WorldWideScience

Sample records for 100-ps time-resolved x-ray

  1. 100ps time-resolved X-ray diffraction study on Nd{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Hirohiko; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Guerin, Laurent; Koshihara, Shin-ya [ERATO ' Non-equilibrium Dynamics Project' , JST (Japan); Sato, Tokushi; Tomita, Ayana; Chollet, Matthieu [Department of Matrials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Oh-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Adachi, Shin-ichi [Photon Factory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Miyano, Kenjiro, E-mail: hirohiko@host.kek.j [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The university of Tokyo, 4-6-1, Komaba Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan)

    2009-02-01

    We report the lattice dynamics in the photoinduced phase of Nd{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} thin film by means of time-resolved x-ray diffraction measurements at the NW14A beamline in the Photon Factory Advanced Ring. We observed the decrease of intensity after the photoirradiation for a superlattice reflection which is associated with Jahn-Teller distortion.

  2. Optimizing a time-resolved X-ray absorption experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bressler, C; Chergui, M; Abela, R; Pattison, P

    2001-01-01

    Calculations are presented of the optimum conditions for performing a laser-pump X-ray probe time-resolved X-ray absorption experiment. The results concerning sensitivity and feasibility for implementing the method are illustrated for the case of the nascent I radical environment following I sup - photolysis in H sub 2 O.

  3. An x-ray detector for time-resolved studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of ultrahigh-brightness x-ray sources makes time-resolved x-ray studies more and more feasible. Improvements in x-ray optics components are also critical for obtaining the appropriate beam for a particular type of experiment. Moreover, fast parallel detectors will be essential in order to exploit the combination of high intensity x-ray sources and novel optics for time-resolved experiments. A CCD detector with a time resolution of microseconds has been developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). This detector is fully programmable using CAMAC electronics and a Micro Vax computer. The techniques of time-resolved x-ray studies, which include scattering, microradiography, microtomography, stroboscopy, etc., can be applied to a range of phenomena (including rapid thermal annealing, surface ordering, crystallization, and the kinetics of phase transition) in order to understand these time-dependent microscopic processes. Some of these applications will be illustrated by recent results performed at synchrotrons. New powerful x-ray sources now under construction offer the opportunity to apply innovative approaches in time-resolved work

  4. Theory of time-resolved inelastic x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Ulf; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2010-01-01

    Starting from a general theory of time-resolved x-ray scattering, we derive a convenient expression for the diffraction signal based on a careful analysis of the relevant inelastic scattering processes. We demonstrate that the resulting inelastic limit applies to a wider variety of experimental...... conditions than similar, previously derived formulas, and it directly allows the application of selection rules when interpreting diffraction signals. Furthermore, we present a simple extension to systems simultaneously illuminated by x rays and a laser beam....

  5. Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth Moya (NSTec); Ian McKennaa (NSTec); Thomas Keenana (NSTec); Michael Cuneob (Sandia)

    2007-03-01

    Wired array studies are being conducted at the SNL Z accelerator to maximize the x-ray generation for inertial confinement fusion targets and high energy density physics experiments. An integral component of these studies is the characterization of the time-resolved spectral content of the x-rays. Due to potential spatial anisotropy in the emitted radiation, it is also critical to diagnose the time-evolved spectral content in a space-resolved manner. To accomplish these two measurement goals, we developed an x-ray spectrometer using a set of high-speed detectors (silicon PIN diodes) with a collimated field-of-view that converged on a 1-cm-diameter spot at the pinch axis. Spectral discrimination is achieved by placing high Z absorbers in front of these detectors. We built two spectrometers to permit simultaneous different angular views of the emitted radiation. Spectral data have been acquired from recent Z shots for the radial and polar views. UNSPEC1 has been adapted to analyze and unfold the measured data to reconstruct the x-ray spectrum. The unfold operator code, UFO2, is being adapted for a more comprehensive spectral unfolding treatment.

  6. Time-resolved hard x-ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Kenneth; Cuneo, Michael; McKenna, Ian; Keenan, Thomas; Sanford, Thomas; Mock, Ray

    2006-08-01

    Wired array studies are being conducted at the SNL Z accelerator to maximize the x-ray generation for inertial confinement fusion targets and high energy density physics experiments. An integral component of these studies is the characterization of the time-resolved spectral content of the x-rays. Due to potential spatial anisotropy in the emitted radiation, it is also critical to diagnose the time-evolved spectral content in a space-resolved manner. To accomplish these two measurement goals, we developed an x-ray spectrometer using a set of high-speed detectors (silicon PIN diodes) with a collimated field-of-view that converged on a 1-cm-diameter spot at the pinch axis. Spectral discrimination is achieved by placing high Z absorbers in front of these detectors. We built two spectrometers to permit simultaneous different angular views of the emitted radiation. Spectral data have been acquired from recent Z shots for the radial and axial (polar) views. UNSPEC 1 has been adapted to analyze and unfold the measured data to reconstruct the x-ray spectrum. The unfold operator code, UFO2, is being adapted for a more comprehensive spectral unfolding treatment.

  7. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  8. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Miaja-Avila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  9. 100-picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure of FeII(1,10-phenanthroline)3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studying photo-induced molecular dynamics in liquid with sub-nanosecond time-resolution and sub-Angstrom spatial resolution gives information for understanding fundamental chemical process in the photo-induced cooperative phenomena of molecular systems and also for developing new materials and devices. Here, we present time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure on the spin-crossover complex FeII tris-(1,10-phenanthroline) dissolved in aqueous solution. We utilized femtosecond laser at 400nm pulse for excitation and 100ps X-ray pulse for probe.

  10. 100-picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure of FeII(1,10-phenanthroline)3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tokushi; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Tomita, Ayana; Ichikawa, Hirohiko; Chollet, Matthieu; Fujii, Hiroshi; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Koshihara, Shin-ya

    2009-02-01

    Studying photo-induced molecular dynamics in liquid with sub-nanosecond time-resolution and sub-Angstrom spatial resolution gives information for understanding fundamental chemical process in the photo-induced cooperative phenomena of molecular systems and also for developing new materials and devices. Here, we present time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure on the spin-crossover complex FeII tris-(1,10-phenanthroline) dissolved in aqueous solution. We utilized femtosecond laser at 400nm pulse for excitation and 100ps X-ray pulse for probe.

  11. BioCARS: a synchrotron resource for time-resolved X-ray science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BioCARS, a NIH-supported national user facility for macromolecular time-resolved X-ray crystallography at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), has recently completed commissioning of an upgraded undulator-based beamline optimized for single-shot laser-pump X-ray-probe measurements with time resolution as short as 100 ps. The source consists of two in-line undulators with periods of 23 and 27 mm that together provide high-flux pink-beam capability at 12 keV as well as first-harmonic coverage from 6.8 to 19 keV. A high-heat-load chopper reduces the average power load on downstream components, thereby preserving the surface figure of a Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror system capable of focusing the X-ray beam to a spot size of 90 (micro)m horizontal by 20 (micro)m vertical. A high-speed chopper isolates single X-ray pulses at 1 kHz in both hybrid and 24-bunch modes of the APS storage ring. In hybrid mode each isolated X-ray pulse delivers up to ∼4 x 1010 photons to the sample, thereby achieving a time-averaged flux approaching that of fourth-generation X-FEL sources. A new high-power picosecond laser system delivers pulses tunable over the wavelength range 450-2000 nm. These pulses are synchronized to the storage-ring RF clock with long-term stability better than 10 ps RMS. Monochromatic experimental capability with Biosafety Level 3 certification has been retained.

  12. Optimization of a Ni-like X-ray laser at 13.9 nm pumped by 100 ps pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ros, D.; Klisnick, A.; Fourcade, P.; Carillon, A.; Jamelot, G.; Jaegle, P.; Zeitoun, Ph. [Paris-Sud Univ., Orsay (France). SAI; Hubert, S. [Paris-Sud Univ., Orsay (France). SAI; CEA/DAM, Ile de France, Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Jacquemot, S.; Bonnet, L. [CEA/DAM, Ile de France, Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Joyeux, D.; Phalippou, D. [Lab. Charles Fabry, Inst. d' Optique, Orsay (France)

    2001-07-01

    Since 1998, we are able to produce a saturated lasing emission in Ni-like silver at 13.9 nm, using short multi pulses (100 ps) combined with a low energy prepulse. This source is now very well characterized and ready to be used for the applications. By contrast with the Ne-like ions, we have found that it is not possible to obtain intense X-ray emission from Ni-like ions when using long pump pulses (600 ps). Simulations performed at the CEA confirm these observations. We will present a summary of the results of the simulations and the experiments on the Ni-like silver laser 13.9 nm, comparing in particular the role of the different pumping parameters. (orig.)

  13. Comparison of implosion core metrics: A 10 ps dilation X-ray imager vs a 100 ps gated microchannel plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, S. R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.

    2016-11-01

    The dilation x-ray imager (DIXI) [T. J. Hilsabeck et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10E317 (2010); S. R. Nagel et al., ibid. 83, 10E116 (2012); S. R. Nagel et al., ibid. 85, 11E504 (2014)] is a high-speed x-ray framing camera that uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps. This is a 10 × improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) (100 ps resolution), and otherwise only achievable with 1D streaked imaging. A side effect of the dramatically reduced gate width is the comparatively lower detected signal level. Therefore we implement a Poisson noise reduction with non-local principal component analysis method [J. Salmon et al., J. Math. Imaging Vision 48, 279294 (2014)] to improve the robustness of the DIXI data analysis. Here we present results on ignition-relevant experiments at the NIF using DIXI. In particular we focus on establishing that/when DIXI gives reliable shape metrics (P0, P2, and P4 Legendre modes, and their temporal evolution/swings).

  14. Time-resolved X-ray transmission microscopy on magnetic microstructures; Zeitaufloesende Roentgentransmissionsmikroskopie an magnetischen Mikrostrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puzic, Aleksandar

    2007-10-23

    Three excitation schemes were designed for stroboscopic imaging of magnetization dynamics with time-resolved magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (TR-MTXM). These techniques were implemented into two types of X-ray microscopes, namely the imaging transmission X-ray microscope (ITXM) and the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM), both installed at the electron storage ring of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, USA. Circular diffraction gratings (Fresnel zone plates) used in both microscopes as focusing and imaging elements presently allow for lateral resolution down to 30 nm. Magnetic imaging is performed by using the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) as element specific contrast mechanism. The developed methods have been successfully applied to the experimental investigation of magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic microstructures. A temporal resolution well below 100 ps was achieved. A conventional pump-probe technique was implemented first. The dynamic response of the magnetization excited by a broadband pulsed magnetic field was imaged spatially resolved using focused X-ray flashes. As a complementary method, the spatially resolved ferromagnetic resonance (SR-FMR) technique was developed for experimental study of magnetization dynamics in the frequency domain. As a third excitation mode, the burst excitation was implemented. The performance and efficiency of the developed methods have been demonstrated by imaging the local magnetization dynamics in laterally patterned ferromagnetic thin-film elements and three-layer stacks. The existence of multiple eigenmodes in the excitation spectra of ferromagnetic microstructures has been verified by using the pump-probe technique. Magnetostatic spin waves were selectively excited and detected with a time resolution of 50 ps using the SR-FMR technique. Thorough analysis of 20 in most cases independently prepared samples has verified that vortices which exhibit a low-amplitude switching of their core

  15. Time Resolved X-Ray Scattering of molecules in Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt van Driel, Tim

    bringing the data from measurement to analysis. Bridging the experimental design and challenges of the experiments from X-ray synchrotrons to the newly available X-ray Free Electron Laser sources (XFEL).LCLS in California is the first XFEL to come online and delivers intense 30fs X-ray pulses, orders of...... purpose built CSPAD detector is presented and applied to the data to highlight the relevance of this work. Thereby showing the ability to capture a molecular movie on the sub-ps time-scale....

  16. Femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid using a hard X-ray free electron laser in a dual-beam dispersive detection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Yuki; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Takayuki; Kurahashi, Naoya; Karashima, Shutaro; Chiba, Yuhei; Isokawa, Yusuke; Togashi, Tadashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Suzuki, Toshinori; Misawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-13

    We present femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of aqueous solution using a hard x-ray free electron laser (SACLA) and a synchronized Ti:sapphire laser. The instrumental response time is 200 fs, and the repetition rate of measurement is 10 Hz. A cylindrical liquid beam 100 μm in diameter of aqueous ammonium iron(III) oxalate solution is photoexcited at 400 nm, and the transient X-ray absorption spectra are measured in the K-edge region of iron, 7.10 - 7.26 keV, using a dual X-ray beam dispersive detection method. Each of the dual beams has the pulse energy of 1.4 μJ, and pump-induced absorbance change on the order of 10(-3) is successfully detected. The photoexcited iron complex exhibits a red shifted iron K-edge with the appearance time constant of 260 fs. The X-ray absorption difference spectra, with and without the pump pulses, are independent of time delay after 1.5 ps up to 100 ps, indicating that the photoexcited species is long-lived.

  17. Time Resolved X-Ray Spot Size Diagnostic

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Roger; Falabella, Steven; Guethlein, Gary; Raymond, Brett; Weir, John

    2005-01-01

    A diagnostic was developed for the determination of temporal history of an X-ray spot. A pair of thin (0.5 mm) slits image the x-ray spot to a fast scintillator which is coupled to a fast detector, thus sampling a slice of the X-Ray spot. Two other scintillator/detectors are used to determine the position of the spot and total forward dose. The slit signal is normalized to the dose and the resulting signal is analyzed to get the spot size. The position information is used to compensate for small changes due to spot motion and misalignment. The time resolution of the diagnostic is about 1 ns and measures spots from 0.5 mm to over 3 mm. The theory and equations used to calculate spot size and position are presented, as well as data. The calculations assume a symmetric, Gaussian spot. The spot data is generated by the ETA II accelerator, a 2kA, 5.5 MeV, 60ns electron beam focused on a Tantalum target. The spot generated is typically about 1 mm FWHM. Comparisons are made to an X-ray pinhole camera which images th...

  18. Microsecond time-resolved 2D X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, A.; Sauer, N.; Strietzel, C.; Besch, H. J.; Orthen, A.; Pavel, N.; Walenta, A. H.; Menk, R. H.

    2001-06-01

    A method is presented which allows to take two-dimensional X-ray images of repetitive processes with recording times in the sub-microsecond range. Various measurements have been performed with a recently introduced novel two-dimensional single photon counter which has been slightly modified in order to determine the exact arrival time of each detected photon. For this purpose a special clock signal is synchronized with the process and is digitized contemporaneously with each event. This technique can be applied even with rate limited detectors and low flux sources, since—unlike in conventional methods, where chopped beams or gated read out electronics are used—all photons are used for the image formation. For the measurements, rapidly moving mechanical systems and conventional X-ray sources have been used, reaching time resolutions of some 10 μs. The technique presented here opens a variety of new biological, medical and industrial applications which will be discussed. As a first application example, three dimensional tomographic reconstructions of rapidly rotating objects (4000 turns/min) are presented.

  19. Microsecond time-resolved 2D X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarvestani, A.; Sauer, N.; Strietzel, C.; Besch, H.J.; Orthen, A.; Pavel, N.; Walenta, A.H.; Menk, R.H. E-mail: ralf.menk@elettra.trieste.it

    2001-06-11

    A method is presented which allows to take two-dimensional X-ray images of repetitive processes with recording times in the sub-microsecond range. Various measurements have been performed with a recently introduced novel two-dimensional single photon counter which has been slightly modified in order to determine the exact arrival time of each detected photon. For this purpose a special clock signal is synchronized with the process and is digitized contemporaneously with each event. This technique can be applied even with rate limited detectors and low flux sources, since--unlike in conventional methods, where chopped beams or gated read out electronics are used--all photons are used for the image formation. For the measurements, rapidly moving mechanical systems and conventional X-ray sources have been used, reaching time resolutions of some 10 {mu}s. The technique presented here opens a variety of new biological, medical and industrial applications which will be discussed. As a first application example, three dimensional tomographic reconstructions of rapidly rotating objects (4000 turns/min) are presented.

  20. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Miaja-Avila, L.; G. C. O'Neil; Uhlig, J.; C. L. Cromer; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary opti...

  1. 100-picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure of Fe{sup II}(1,10-phenanthroline){sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Tokushi; Tomita, Ayana; Koshihara, Shin-ya [Department of Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Nozawa, Shunsuke; Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Ichikawa, Hirohiko; Adachi, Shin-ichi [Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Project, ERATO, JST (Japan); Chollet, Matthieu [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, Chicago (United States); Fujii, Hiroshi, E-mail: skoshi@cms.titech.ac.j [Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences (Japan)

    2009-02-01

    Studying photo-induced molecular dynamics in liquid with sub-nanosecond time-resolution and sub-Angstrom spatial resolution gives information for understanding fundamental chemical process in the photo-induced cooperative phenomena of molecular systems and also for developing new materials and devices. Here, we present time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure on the spin-crossover complex Fe{sup II} tris-(1,10-phenanthroline) dissolved in aqueous solution. We utilized femtosecond laser at 400nm pulse for excitation and 100ps X-ray pulse for probe.

  2. Coherent convergent-beam time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    OpenAIRE

    Spence, John C. H.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Li, Chufeng

    2014-01-01

    The use of coherent X-ray lasers for structural biology allows the use of nanometre diameter X-ray beams with large beam divergence. Their application to the structure analysis of protein nanocrystals and single particles raises new challenges and opportunities. We discuss the form of these coherent convergent-beam (CCB) hard X-ray diffraction patterns and their potential use for time-resolved crystallography, normally achieved by Laue (polychromatic) diffraction, for which the monochromatic ...

  3. A synchrotron radiation camera and data acquisition system for time resolved x-ray scattering studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until recently, time resolved measurements of x-ray scattering patterns have not been feasible because laboratory x-ray sources were too weak and detectors unavailable. Recent developments in both these fields have changed the situation, and it is now possible to follow changes in x-ray scattering patterns with a time resolution of a few ms. The apparatus used to achieve this is described and some examples from recent biological experiments are given. (author)

  4. Time-resolved X-ray studies using third generation synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The third generation, high-brilliance, hard x-ray, synchrotron radiation (SR) sources currently under construction (ESRF at Grenoble, France; APS at Argonne, Illinois; and SPring-8 at Harima, Japan) will usher in a new era of x-ray experimentation for both physical and biological sciences. One of the most exciting areas of experimentation will be the extension of x-ray scattering and diffraction techniques to the study of transient or time-evolving systems. The high repetition rate, short-pulse duration, high brilliance, and variable spectral bandwidth of these sources make them ideal for x-ray time-resolved studies. The temporal properties (bunch length, interpulse period, etc.) of these new sources will be summarized. Finally, the scientific potential and the technological challenges of time-resolved x-ray scattering from these new sources will be described. 13 refs., 4 figs

  5. Time-resolved x-ray transmission grating spectrometer for studying laser-produced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceglio, N M; Kauffman, R L; Hawryluk, A M; Medecki, H

    1983-01-15

    The development of a new time-resolved x-ray spectrometer is reported in which a free-standing x-ray transmission grating is coupled to a soft x-ray streak camera. The instrument measures continuous x-ray spectra with 20-psec temporal resolution and moderate spectral resolution (deltalambda >/= 1 A) over a broad spectral range (0.1-5 keV) with high sensitivity and large information recording capacity. Its capabilities are well suited to investigation of laser-generated plasmas, and they nicely complement the characteristics of other time-resolved spectroscopic techniques presently in use. The transmission grating spectrometer has been used on a variety of laser-plasma experiments. We report the first measurements of the temporal variation of continuous low-energy x-ray spectra from laser-irradiated disk targets. PMID:18195786

  6. On the theory of time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2008-01-01

    We derive the basic theoretical formulation for X-ray diffraction with pulsed fields, using a fully quantized description of light and matter. Relevant time scales are discussed for coherent as well as incoherent X-ray pulses, and we provide expressions to be used for calculation...... of the experimental diffraction signal for both types of X-ray sources. We present a simple analysis of time-resolved X-ray scattering for direct bond breaking in diatomic molecules. This essentially analytical approach highlights the relation between the signal and the time-dependent quantum distribution...

  7. Time-resolved imaging using x-ray free electron lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Barty, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The ultra-intense, ultra-short X-ray pulses provided by X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) sources are ideally suited to time resolved studies of structural dynamics with spatial resolution from nanometre to atomic length scales and temporal resolution of 10 fs or less. Using coherent X-ray diffraction as a diagnostic, XFELs enable the capturing of X-ray snapshots of previously unmeasurable transient phenomena, and the study of ultrafast processes such as sample damage on the timesc...

  8. Ultrafast time-resolved X-ray diffraction using an optimized laser-plasma based X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are invaluable tools to investigate the structural dynamics triggered by a femtosecond laser pulse. These ultrashort X-ray pulses can be provided by lab-sized laser-produced plasma X-ray sources. This thesis is dedicated to optimizing the X-ray emission from the X-ray source at the University of Duisburg-Essen and using this source to investigate ultrafast structural dynamics in laser excited materials. For these purposes, detailed investigations on how the laser intensities, target thicknesses, angles of incidence and different pre-pulse/pre-plasma conditions affecting the emission of Kα-photons from Cu and Ti targets were performed. The outcomes from these studies are applied to optimize the X-ray production of the existing X-ray source for time resolved X-ray diffraction (TRXD) experiments. In the mean time, in order to improve the measurement sensitivity/accuracy, and automatize and speed up the experimental procedures, several other improvements have been implemented in the experimental setup for TRXD experiments. These improvements of the setup are essential to achieve the results of the three TRXD experiments discussed in this thesis. In the first experiment, Debye-Waller effect in a thin laser-excited Au film was observed. The drop of measured diffraction signal with a decay time constant of 4.3±1 ps was measured for high excitation fluences. This result is in good agreement with previous experimental results as well as the Two-Temperature Model (TTM) calculations at high fluences. The second experiment extends the studies of coherent optical phonons in laser-excited Bi to a higher excitation fluence range that has not been investigated previously. Large amplitude coherent atomic motion and a complete softening of the A1g phonon mode were observed. These observations represents conclusive experimental evidence that the Peierls distortion, which defines the equilibrium structure of Bi, vanishes and the material is transformed into

  9. Ultrafast structural dynamics studied by kilohertz time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭鑫; 江舟亚; 陈龙; 陈黎明; 辛建国; 陈洁

    2015-01-01

    Ultrashort multi-keV x-ray pulses are generated by electron plasma produced by the irradiation of femtosecond pulses on metals. These sub-picosecond x-ray pulses have extended the field of x-ray spectroscopy into the femtosecond time domain. However, pulse-to-pulse instability and long data acquisition time restrict the application of ultrashort x-ray systems operating at low repetition rates. Here we report on the performance of a femtosecond laser plasma-induced hard x-ray source that operates at 1-kHz repetition rate, and provides a flux of 2.0 × 1010 photons/s of Cu Kα radiation. Using this system for time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiments, we record in real time, the transient processes and structural changes induced by the interaction of 400-nm femtosecond pulse with the surface of a 200-nm thick Au (111) single crystal.

  10. Time-resolved x-ray imaging of x-ray induced dynamics in Xe clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, M.; Ferguson, K.; Gorkhover, T.; Carron, S.; Cryan, J.; Krzywinski, J.; Lutman, A.; Marinelli, A.; Bacellar, C.; Chatterley, A.; Ziemkiewicz, M.; Bernando, C.; Gomez, L.; Jones, C.; Kwok, J.; Tanyag, R. M. P.; Mueller, M.; Rupp, D.; Möller, T.; Gessner, O.; Vilesov, A.; Bostedt, C.

    2016-05-01

    Nanoparticles irradiated by intense x-ray pulses from the LCLS free-electron laser are immediately transformed into a highly excited nanoplasma. Within the first few femtoseconds of the x-ray pulse the particles are ionized and on longer time scales they disintegrate due to Coulomb forces. We performed an x-ray pump / x-ray probe experiment to investigate how the nanoplasma creation and disintegration changes the particle's diffraction response. As samples we used pristine Xe clusters as well as Xe clusters embedded in He droplets. The data show that for pristine clusters the higher diffraction orders diminish first and vanish completely as the nanoplasma expansion progresses. This effect is less prominent in the embedded clusters. We compare our results to previous studies on optically pumped clusters (T. Gorkhover et al., Nat. Photonics, 2016). This work is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  11. Combined time-resolved SAXS and X-ray Spectroscopy methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bras, W.; Nikitenko, S.; Portale, G.; Beale, A.M.; van der Eerden, A.M.J.; Detollenaere, D.

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed equipment suitable for quasi simultaneous data collection of SAXS/WAXS and X-ray spectroscopy is discussed. The main applications for this technique are foreseen to be time-resolved studies in inorganic materials relevant for catalysis research and ceramics. The equipment is descr

  12. Time-resolved protein nano-crystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the use of an X-ray free electron laser synchronized with an optical pump laser to obtain X-ray diffraction snapshots from the photo-activated states of large membrane protein complexes in the form of nano-crystals flowing in a liquid jet. Light-induced changes of Photosystem I-Ferredoxin co-crystals were observed at time delays of 5 to 10 μs after excitation. The result correlates with the microsecond kinetics of electron transfer from Photosystem I to ferredoxin. The undocking process that follows the electron transfer leads to large rearrangements in the crystals that will terminally lead to the disintegration of the crystals. We describe the experimental setup and obtain the first time resolved femtosecond serial X-ray crystallography results from an irreversible photo-chemical reaction at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This technique opens the door to time-resolved structural studies of reaction dynamics in biological systems. (authors)

  13. Time-resolved protein nanocrystallography using an X-ray free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Doak, R. Bruce; Kirian, Richard A.; Fromme, Petra; White, Thomas A.; Andreasson, Jakob; Arnlund, David; Bajt, Saša; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Barthelmess, Miriam; Bogan, Michael J.; Bostedt, Christoph; Bottin, Hervé; Bozek, John D.; Caleman, Carl; Coppola, Nicola; Davidsson, Jan; DePonte, Daniel P.; Elser, Veit; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Frank, Matthias; Fromme, Raimund; Graafsma, Heinz; Grotjohann, Ingo; Gumprecht, Lars; Hajdu, Janos; Hampton, Christina Y.; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Robert; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Holl, Peter; Holton, James M.; Hömke, André; Johansson, Linda; Kimmel, Nils; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Krasniqi, Faton; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Liang, Mengning; Lomb, Lukas; Malmerberg, Erik; Marchesini, Stefano; Martin, Andrew V.; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Reich, Christian; Neutze, Richard; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schlichting, Ilme; Schmidt, Carlo; Schmidt, Kevin E.; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, M. Marvin; Shoeman, Robert L.; Sierra, Raymond; Soltau, Heike; Starodub, Dmitri; Stellato, Francesco; Stern, Stephan; Strüder, Lothar; Timneanu, Nicusor; Ullrich, Joachim; Wang, Xiaoyu; Williams, Garth J.; Weidenspointner, Georg; Weierstall, Uwe; Wunderer, Cornelia; Barty, Anton; Spence, John C. H.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of an X-ray free electron laser synchronized with an optical pump laser to obtain X-ray diffraction snapshots from the photoactivated states of large membrane protein complexes in the form of nanocrystals flowing in a liquid jet. Light-induced changes of Photosystem I-Ferredoxin co-crystals were observed at time delays of 5 to 10 µs after excitation. The result correlates with the microsecond kinetics of electron transfer from Photosystem I to ferredoxin. The undocking process that follows the electron transfer leads to large rearrangements in the crystals that will terminally lead to the disintegration of the crystals. We describe the experimental setup and obtain the first time-resolved femtosecond serial X-ray crystallography results from an irreversible photo-chemical reaction at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This technique opens the door to time-resolved structural studies of reaction dynamics in biological systems. PMID:22330507

  14. A table-top femtosecond time-resolved soft x-ray transient absorption spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Stephen; Loh, Zhi-Heng; Khalil, Munira; Correa, Raoul E.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-05-21

    A laser-based, table-top instrument is constructed to perform femtosecond soft x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy. Ultrashort soft x-ray pulses produced via high-order harmonic generation of the amplified output of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser system are used to probe atomic core-level transient absorptions in atoms and molecules. The results provide chemically specific, time-resolved dynamics with sub-50-fs time resolution. In this setup, high-order harmonics generated in a Ne-filled capillary waveguide are refocused by a gold-coated toroidal mirror into the sample gas cell, where the soft x-ray light intersects with an optical pump pulse. The transmitted high-order harmonics are spectrally dispersed with a home-built soft x-ray spectrometer, which consists of a gold-coated toroidal mirror, a uniform-line spaced plane grating, and a soft x-ray CCD camera. The optical layout of the instrument, design of the soft x-ray spectrometer, and spatial and temporal characterization of the high-order harmonics are described. Examples of static and time-resolved photoabsorption spectra collected on this apparatus are presented.

  15. Direct observation of ultrafast atomic motion using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shymanovich, U.

    2007-11-13

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the atomic motion in laser irradiated solids on a picosecond to subpicosecond time-scale using the time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique. In the second chapter, the laser system, the laser-plasma based X-ray source and the experimental setup for optical pump / X-ray probe measurements were presented. Chapter 3 is devoted to the characterization and comparison of different types of X-ray optics. Chapter 4 presented the time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments performed for this thesis. The first two sections of this chapter discuss the measurements of initially unexpected strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity of the X-ray probe beam. The elimination of the strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity represented an important prerequisite to perform the study of lattice heating in Germanium after femtosecond optical excitation by measuring the transient Debye-Waller effect. The third section describes the investigations of acoustic waves upon ultrafast optical excitation and discusses the two different pressure contributions driving them: the thermal and the electronic ones. (orig.)

  16. X-ray analog pixel array detector for single synchrotron bunch time-resolved imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Koerner, Lucas J

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic x-ray studies may reach temporal resolutions limited by only the x-ray pulse duration if the detector is fast enough to segregate synchrotron pulses. An analog integrating pixel array detector with in-pixel storage and temporal resolution of around 150 ns, sufficient to isolate pulses, is presented. Analog integration minimizes count-rate limitations and in-pixel storage captures successive pulses. Fundamental tests of noise and linearity as well as high-speed laser measurements are shown. The detector resolved individual bunch trains at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) at levels of up to 3.7x10^3 x-rays/pixel/train. When applied to turn-by-turn x-ray beam characterization single-shot intensity measurements were made with a repeatability of 0.4% and horizontal oscillations of the positron cloud were detected. This device is appropriate for time-resolved Bragg spot single crystal experiments.

  17. Time-resolved x-ray line diagnostics of laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have examined the underdense plasma conditions of laser irradiated disks using K x-rays from highly ionized ions. A 900 ps laser pulse of 0.532 μm light is used to irradiate various Z disks which have been doped with low concentrations of tracer materials. The tracers, whose Z's range from 13 to 22, are chosen so that their K x-ray spectrum is sensitive to typical underdense plasma temperatures and densities. Spectra are measured using a time-resolved crystal spectrograph recording the time history of the x-ray spectrum. A spatially-resolved, time-integrated crystal spectrograph also monitors the x-ray lines. Large differences in Al spectra are observed when the host plasms is changed from SiO2 to PbO or In. Spectra will be presented along with preliminary analysis of the data

  18. Calibrated time-resolved transmission grating spectrometer for the study of ultrafast x-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, J F; Chaker, M; Kieffer, J C

    1996-01-01

    A transmission grating spectrometer has been coupled to a high-temporal-resolution soft x-ray streak camera for the study of picosecond laser-plasma x-ray sources. A procedure to deconvolve the overlapping contributions of diffraction orders and to calibrate the instrument has been established in order to obtain absolute time-resolved x-ray emission spectra in the 0.1-1.2 keV spectral region. The deconvolution and calibration techniques are presented along with measurements establishing the temporal resolution of this diagnostic at ~2 ps. Examples of calibrated spectra of laser-plasma x-ray sources created by 400 fs laser pulses at intensities of 1018 W/cm2 are also shown. PMID:21307534

  19. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Drakopoulos, Michael [Diamond Light Source, I12 Joint Engineering, Environmental, Processing (JEEP) Beamline, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Rack, Alexander [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Eakins, Daniel E., E-mail: d.eakins@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-24

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  20. Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopies of chemical systems: New perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chergui, Majed

    2016-05-01

    The past 3-5 years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of time-resolved X-ray spectroscopic studies, mainly driven by novel technical and methodological developments. The latter include (i) the high repetition rate optical pump/X-ray probe studies, which have greatly boosted the signal-to-noise ratio for picosecond (ps) X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, while enabling ps X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at synchrotrons; (ii) the X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are a game changer and have allowed the first femtosecond (fs) XES and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments to be carried out; (iii) XFELs are also opening the road to the development of non-linear X-ray methods. In this perspective, I will mainly focus on the most recent technical developments and briefly address some examples of scientific questions that have been addressed thanks to them. I will look at the novel opportunities in the horizon. PMID:27376102

  1. Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopies of chemical systems: New perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed Chergui

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The past 3–5 years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of time-resolved X-ray spectroscopic studies, mainly driven by novel technical and methodological developments. The latter include (i the high repetition rate optical pump/X-ray probe studies, which have greatly boosted the signal-to-noise ratio for picosecond (ps X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, while enabling ps X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES at synchrotrons; (ii the X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs are a game changer and have allowed the first femtosecond (fs XES and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments to be carried out; (iii XFELs are also opening the road to the development of non-linear X-ray methods. In this perspective, I will mainly focus on the most recent technical developments and briefly address some examples of scientific questions that have been addressed thanks to them. I will look at the novel opportunities in the horizon.

  2. Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopies of chemical systems: New perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chergui, Majed

    2016-05-01

    The past 3-5 years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of time-resolved X-ray spectroscopic studies, mainly driven by novel technical and methodological developments. The latter include (i) the high repetition rate optical pump/X-ray probe studies, which have greatly boosted the signal-to-noise ratio for picosecond (ps) X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, while enabling ps X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at synchrotrons; (ii) the X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are a game changer and have allowed the first femtosecond (fs) XES and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments to be carried out; (iii) XFELs are also opening the road to the development of non-linear X-ray methods. In this perspective, I will mainly focus on the most recent technical developments and briefly address some examples of scientific questions that have been addressed thanks to them. I will look at the novel opportunities in the horizon.

  3. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy on a Tabletop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, Luis; O'Neil, Galen C.; Joe, Young I.; Alpert, Bradley K.; Damrauer, Niels H.; Doriese, William B.; Fatur, Steven M.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Jimenez, Ralph; Reintsema, Carl D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Silverman, Kevin L.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Tatsuno, Hideyuki; Ullom, Joel N.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental tools capable of monitoring both atomic and electronic structure on ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond) time scales are needed for investigating photophysical processes fundamental to light harvesting, photocatalysis, energy and data storage, and optical display technologies. Time-resolved hard x-ray (>3 keV ) spectroscopies have proven valuable for these measurements due to their elemental specificity and sensitivity to geometric and electronic structures. Here, we present the first tabletop apparatus capable of performing time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy. The time resolution of the apparatus is better than 6 ps. By combining a compact laser-driven plasma source with a highly efficient array of microcalorimeter x-ray detectors, we are able to observe photoinduced spin changes in an archetypal polypyridyl iron complex [Fe (2 ,2'-bipyridine)3]2 + and accurately measure the lifetime of the quintet spin state. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast hard x-ray emission spectroscopy is no longer confined to large facilities and now can be performed in conventional laboratories with 10 times better time resolution than at synchrotrons. Our results are enabled, in part, by a 100- to 1000-fold increase in x-ray collection efficiency compared to current techniques.

  4. Optical and x-ray time resolved study of the structural transition in mixed valence manganites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Q. X.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Time resolved optical reflectivity and x-ray diffraction techniques are employed to study the laser-induced structural response in two charge and orbitally ordered manganites. Optical data indicate a non-thermal nature of the laser-triggered phase transition via the disappearance of an optical phonon related to the charge and orbitally ordered phase. The x-ray diffraction measurements on superlattice reflections confirm the non-thermal time scale of the initial step of this phase transition but also show that the complete change of structural symmetry is not instantaneous.

  5. Time-resolved imaging using x-ray free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, Anton, E-mail: anton.barty@cfel.d [Centre for Free Electron Laser Science, Notkestrasse 85, 22607, Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-10-14

    The ultra-intense, ultra-short x-ray pulses provided by x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) sources are ideally suited to time-resolved studies of structural dynamics with spatial resolution from nanometre to atomic length scales and a temporal resolution of 10 fs or less. With enough photons in a single pulse to enable single-shot measurements and short enough pulses to freeze atomic motion, researchers now have a new window into the time evolution ultrafast phenomena that are intrinsically not cyclic in nature. In this paper we recap some of the key time-resolved imaging experiments performed at FLASH and look ahead to a new generation of experiments at higher resolution using a new generation of new XFEL sources that are only just becoming available.

  6. Time-resolved imaging using x-ray free electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, Anton

    2010-10-01

    The ultra-intense, ultra-short x-ray pulses provided by x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) sources are ideally suited to time-resolved studies of structural dynamics with spatial resolution from nanometre to atomic length scales and a temporal resolution of 10 fs or less. With enough photons in a single pulse to enable single-shot measurements and short enough pulses to freeze atomic motion, researchers now have a new window into the time evolution ultrafast phenomena that are intrinsically not cyclic in nature. In this paper we recap some of the key time-resolved imaging experiments performed at FLASH and look ahead to a new generation of experiments at higher resolution using a new generation of new XFEL sources that are only just becoming available.

  7. Toward picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption studies of interfacial photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Oliver; Mahl, Johannes; Neppl, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    We report on the progress toward developing a novel picosecond time-resolved transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy (TRXAS) capability for time-domain studies of interfacial photochemistry. The technique is based on the combination of a high repetition rate picosecond laser system with a time-resolved X-ray fluorescent yield setup that may be used for the study of radiation sensitive materials and X-ray spectroscopy compatible photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells. The mobile system is currently deployed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and may be used in all operating modes (two-bunch and multi-bunch) of the synchrotron. The use of a time-stamping technique enables the simultaneous recording of TRXAS spectra with delays between the exciting laser pulses and the probing X-ray pulses spanning picosecond to nanosecond temporal scales. First results are discussed that demonstrate the viability of the method to study photoinduced dynamics in transition metal-oxide semiconductor (SC) samples under high vacuum conditions and at SC-liquid electrolyte interfaces during photoelectrochemical water splitting. Opportunities and challenges are outlined to capture crucial short-lived intermediates of photochemical processes with the technique. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Office of Science Early Career Research Program.

  8. Particle tracking during Ostwald ripening using time-resolved laboratory X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory X-ray microtomography is investigated as a method for obtaining time-resolved images of microstructural coarsening of the semisolid state of Al–5 wt.% Cu samples during Ostwald ripening. Owing to the 3D imaging capability of tomography, this technique uniquely provides access to the growth rates of individual particles, thereby not only allowing a statistical characterization of coarsening—as has long been possible by conventional metallography—but also enabling quantification of the influence of local environment on particle boundary migration. The latter information is crucial to understanding growth kinetics during Ostwald ripening at high volume fractions of the coarsening phase. Automated image processing and segmentation routines were developed to close gaps in the network of particle boundaries and to track individual particles from one annealing step to the next. The particle tracking success rate places an upper bound of only a few percent on the likelihood of segmentation errors for any given particle. The accuracy of particle size trajectories extracted from the time-resolved tomographic reconstructions is correspondingly high. Statistically averaged coarsening data and individual particle growth rates are in excellent agreement with the results of prior experimental studies and with computer simulations of Ostwald ripening. - Highlights: • Ostwald ripening in Al–5 wt.% Cu measured by laboratory X-ray microtomography • Time-resolved measurement of individual particle growth • Automated segmentation routines developed to close gaps in particle boundary network • Particle growth/shrinkage rates deviate from LSW model prediction

  9. Particle tracking during Ostwald ripening using time-resolved laboratory X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werz, T., E-mail: thomas.werz@uni-ulm.de [Ulm University, Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, 89081 (Germany); Baumann, M. [Ulm University, Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, 89081 (Germany); Wolfram, U. [Ulm University, Institute of Orthopaedic Research and Biomechanics, Helmholtzstrasse 14, 89081 (Germany); Krill, C.E. [Ulm University, Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, 89081 (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Laboratory X-ray microtomography is investigated as a method for obtaining time-resolved images of microstructural coarsening of the semisolid state of Al–5 wt.% Cu samples during Ostwald ripening. Owing to the 3D imaging capability of tomography, this technique uniquely provides access to the growth rates of individual particles, thereby not only allowing a statistical characterization of coarsening—as has long been possible by conventional metallography—but also enabling quantification of the influence of local environment on particle boundary migration. The latter information is crucial to understanding growth kinetics during Ostwald ripening at high volume fractions of the coarsening phase. Automated image processing and segmentation routines were developed to close gaps in the network of particle boundaries and to track individual particles from one annealing step to the next. The particle tracking success rate places an upper bound of only a few percent on the likelihood of segmentation errors for any given particle. The accuracy of particle size trajectories extracted from the time-resolved tomographic reconstructions is correspondingly high. Statistically averaged coarsening data and individual particle growth rates are in excellent agreement with the results of prior experimental studies and with computer simulations of Ostwald ripening. - Highlights: • Ostwald ripening in Al–5 wt.% Cu measured by laboratory X-ray microtomography • Time-resolved measurement of individual particle growth • Automated segmentation routines developed to close gaps in particle boundary network • Particle growth/shrinkage rates deviate from LSW model prediction.

  10. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E; Chapman, David J; White, Thomas G; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits).

  11. Time resolved energy dispersive X-ray diagnostic for the TCV tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, J.; Amaro, P.; Amorim, P.; Varandas, C.A.F. [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Centro de Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Duval, B. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1996-10-01

    A time resolved energy dispersive X-ray diagnostic is being developed for the TCV tokamak (CRPP - Lausanne) to measure the evolution of the plasma impurities, runaway electrons and electron temperature. A liquid nitrogen cooled Ge diode detects the X-ray photons which are processed by a spectroscopic amplifier and a locally developed interface amplifier and timing generator (IATG) unit. The energy spectrum is obtained using a fast digitiser and a software histogramming algorithm. These electronics components have been optimised to improve the data throughput to match high flux 2 seconds time duration of a TCV plasma pulse. This paper describes the diagnostic hardware with particular emphasis on the IATG unit. (author) 5 figs., 4 refs.

  12. Coherent convergent-beam time-resolved X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, John C H; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Li, Chufeng

    2014-07-17

    The use of coherent X-ray lasers for structural biology allows the use of nanometre diameter X-ray beams with large beam divergence. Their application to the structure analysis of protein nanocrystals and single particles raises new challenges and opportunities. We discuss the form of these coherent convergent-beam (CCB) hard X-ray diffraction patterns and their potential use for time-resolved crystallography, normally achieved by Laue (polychromatic) diffraction, for which the monochromatic laser radiation of a free-electron X-ray laser is unsuitable. We discuss the possibility of obtaining single-shot, angle-integrated rocking curves from CCB patterns, and the dependence of the resulting patterns on the focused beam coordinate when the beam diameter is larger or smaller than a nanocrystal, or smaller than one unit cell. We show how structure factor phase information is provided at overlapping interfering orders and how a common phase origin between different shots may be obtained. Their use in refinement of the phase-sensitive intensity between overlapping orders is suggested. PMID:24914153

  13. Atomic motion of resonantly vibrating quartz crystal visualized by time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyagi, Shinobu, E-mail: aoyagi@nsc.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Information and Basic Science, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 467-8501 (Japan); Osawa, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko [SPring-8/JASRI, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Takeda, Shoichi; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2015-11-16

    Transient atomic displacements during a resonant thickness-shear vibration of AT-cut α-quartz are revealed by time-resolved X-ray diffraction under an alternating electric field. The lattice strain resonantly amplified by the alternating electric field is ∼10{sup 4} times larger than that induced by a static electric field. The resonantly amplified lattice strain is achieved by fast displacements of oxygen anions and collateral resilient deformation of Si−O−Si angles bridging rigid SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra, which efficiently transduce electric energy into elastic energy.

  14. Atomic motion of resonantly vibrating quartz crystal visualized by time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transient atomic displacements during a resonant thickness-shear vibration of AT-cut α-quartz are revealed by time-resolved X-ray diffraction under an alternating electric field. The lattice strain resonantly amplified by the alternating electric field is ∼104 times larger than that induced by a static electric field. The resonantly amplified lattice strain is achieved by fast displacements of oxygen anions and collateral resilient deformation of Si−O−Si angles bridging rigid SiO4 tetrahedra, which efficiently transduce electric energy into elastic energy

  15. Atomic motion of resonantly vibrating quartz crystal visualized by time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Shinobu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Takeda, Shoichi; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Transient atomic displacements during a resonant thickness-shear vibration of AT-cut α-quartz are revealed by time-resolved X-ray diffraction under an alternating electric field. The lattice strain resonantly amplified by the alternating electric field is ˜104 times larger than that induced by a static electric field. The resonantly amplified lattice strain is achieved by fast displacements of oxygen anions and collateral resilient deformation of Si-O-Si angles bridging rigid SiO4 tetrahedra, which efficiently transduce electric energy into elastic energy.

  16. Picosecond time-resolved laser pump/X-ray probe experiments using a gated single-photon-counting area detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejdrup, T.; Lemke, H.T.; Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer;

    2009-01-01

    The recent developments in X-ray detectors have opened new possibilities in the area of time-resolved pump/probe X-ray experiments; this article presents the novel use of a PILATUS detector to achieve X-ray pulse duration limited time-resolution at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), USA. The capab......The recent developments in X-ray detectors have opened new possibilities in the area of time-resolved pump/probe X-ray experiments; this article presents the novel use of a PILATUS detector to achieve X-ray pulse duration limited time-resolution at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), USA...... limited time-resolution of 60 ps using the gated PILATUS detector. This is the first demonstration of X-ray pulse duration limited data recorded using an area detector without the use of a mechanical chopper array at the beamline....

  17. Capturing interfacial photoelectrochemical dynamics with picosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neppl, Stefan; Shavorskiy, Andrey; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew; Slaughter, Daniel S; Troy, Tyler; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Ahmed, Musahid; Gul, Sheraz; Rude, Bruce; Zhang, Jin Z; Tremsin, Anton S; Glans, Per-Anders; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Wu, Cheng Hao; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to trace photoinduced processes has the unique potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics in complex systems. Time-domain studies using transient X-ray absorption and emission techniques have proven extremely valuable to investigate electronic and structural dynamics in isolated and solvated molecules. Here, we describe the implementation of a picosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (TRXPS) technique at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its application to monitor photoinduced electron dynamics at the technologically pertinent interface formed by N3 dye molecules anchored to nanoporous ZnO. Indications for a dynamical chemical shift of the Ru3d photoemission line originating from the N3 metal centre are observed ∼30 ps after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pump pulse. The transient changes in the TRXPS spectra are accompanied by a characteristic surface photovoltage (SPV) response of the ZnO substrate on a pico- to nanosecond time scale. The interplay between the two phenomena is discussed in the context of possible electronic relaxation and recombination pathways that lead to the neutralisation of the transiently oxidised dye after ultrafast electron injection. A detailed account of the experimental technique is given including an analysis of the chemical modification of the nano-structured ZnO substrate during extended periods of solution-based dye sensitisation and its relevance for studies using surface-sensitive spectroscopy techniques.

  18. Advancements in time-resolved x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; Widmann, K; Ao, T; Ping, Y; Hunter, J; Ng, A

    2005-07-28

    Time-resolved soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to probe the non-steady-state evolution of the valence band electronic structure of laser heated ultra-thin (50 nm) metal foils and bulk semiconductors. Single-shot soft x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy with picosecond time resolution was used in combination with optical measurements of the disassembly dynamics that have shown the existence of a metastable liquid phase in fs-laser heated metal foils persisting 4-5 ps. This metastable phase is studied using a 527 nm wavelength 400 fs laser pulse containing 0.3-2.5 mJ laser energy focused in a large 500 x 700 {micro}m{sup 2} spot to create heated conditions of 0.2-1.8 x 10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2} intensity. The unique LLNL COMET compact tabletop soft x-ray laser source provided the necessary high photon flux, highly monoenergetic, picosecond pulse duration, and coherence for observing the evolution of changes in the valence band electronic structure of laser heated metals and semiconductors with picosecond time resolution. This work demonstrates the continuing development of a powerful new technique for probing reaction dynamics and changes of local order on surfaces on their fundamental timescales including phenomena such as non-thermal melting, chemical bond formation, intermediate reaction steps, and the existence of transient reaction products.

  19. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Vecchio, K. S. [Department of NanoEngineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Huskins, E. L. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Casem, D. T. [US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Gruner, S. M. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Woll, A. R. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} s{sup −1} in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  20. Time-resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Electron Transport Study in Warm Dense Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Bae, Leejin; Engelhorn, Kyle; Heimann, Philip; Ping, Yuan; Barbrel, Ben; Fernandez, Amalia; Beckwith, Martha Anne; Cho, Byoung-Ick; GIST Team; IBS Team; LBNL Collaboration; SLAC Collaboration; LLNL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The warm dense Matter represents states of which the temperature is comparable to Fermi energy and ions are strongly coupled. One of the experimental techniques to create such state in the laboratory condition is the isochoric heating of thin metal foil with femtosecond laser pulses. This concept largely relies on the ballistic transport of electrons near the Fermi-level, which were mainly studied for the metals in ambient conditions. However, they were barely investigated in warm dense conditions. We present a time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy measured for the Au/Cu dual layered sample. The front Au layer was isochorically heated with a femtosecond laser pulse, and the x-ray absorption changes around L-edge of Cu, which was attached on the backside of Au, was measured with a picosecond resolution. Time delays between the heating of the `front surface' of Au layer and the alternation of x-ray spectrum of Cu attached on the `rear surface' of Au indicate the energetic electron transport mechanism through Au in the warm dense conditions. IBS (IBS-R012-D1) and the NRF (No. 2013R1A1A1007084) of Korea.

  1. Ultrafast laser-induced melting and ablation studied by time-resolved diffuse X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoul, M.; Quirin, F.; Lindenberg, A. M.; Barty, A.; Fritz, D. M.; Zhu, D.; Lemke, H.; Chollet, M.; Reis, D. A.; Chen, J.; Ghimire, S.; Trigo, M.; Fuchs, M.; Gaffney, K. J.; Larsson, J.; Becker, T.; Meyer, S.; Payer, T.; Heringdorf, F. Meyer zu; Horn von Hoegen, M.; Jerman, M.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.

    2013-03-01

    Time-resolved diffuse X-ray scattering with 50 fs, 9.5 keV X-ray pulses from the Linear Coherent Light Source was used to study the structural dynamics in materials undergoing rapid melting and ablation after fs laser excitation.

  2. Ultrafast laser-induced melting and ablation studied by time-resolved diffuse X-ray scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer zu Heringdorf F.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved diffuse X-ray scattering with 50 fs, 9.5 keV X-ray pulses from the Linear Coherent Light Source was used to study the structural dynamics in materials undergoing rapid melting and ablation after fs laser excitation.

  3. Visualizing a protein quake with time-resolved X-ray scattering at a free-electron laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnlund, David; Johansson, Linda C.; Wickstrand, Cecilia;

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to measure ultrafast protein structural changes using time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering at an X-ray free-electron laser. We demonstrated this approach using multiphoton excitation of the Blastochloris viridis photosynthetic reaction center, observing an ultrafast global...

  4. Structure-activity relationships of heterogeneous catalysts from time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowing the composition and the evolution of the bulk structure of a heterogeneous catalyst under working conditions (in situ) is a pre-requisite for understanding structure-activity relationships. X-ray absorption spectroscopy can be employed to study a catalytically active material in situ. In addition to steady-state investigations, the technique permits experiments with a time-resolution in the sub-second range to elucidate the solid-state kinetics of the reactions involved. Combined with mass spectrometry, the evolution of the short-range order structure of a heterogeneous catalyst, the average valence of the constituent metals, and the phase composition can be obtained. Here we present results obtained from time-resolved studies on the reduction of MoO3 in propene and in propene and oxygen

  5. Time Resolved 2D X-Ray Densitometry of a Ventilated Partial Cavity Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makiharju, Simo; Ceccio, Steven

    2011-11-01

    A time resolved x-ray densitometry system was developed to measure the spatial distribution of void fraction for nominally two-dimensional flows. The system can image a region of (15 cm)2 at a frame rate of up to 4000 fps. The source was a rotating anode type normally used for cineradiography and angiography. Supplied by a 65 kW high frequency generator with a high speed starter, it could be operated at up to 433 mA at 150 kV. The imager subsystem comprised of a high speed camera coupled with a high resolution image intensifier. The range of measured void fraction can be changed to span a desired range yielding an uncertainty on the order of 1% of the measurement range. The system is used to examine the void fraction field in the closure region of a ventilated partial cavity behind a backward facing step. The cavity has Reynolds number of O(105) based on the cavity length, and a non-dimensional gas flux of Q* = 0.0048. The bubbly flow created in the cavity wake is examined using the x-ray densitometry system, duel fiber optical probes, and high speed cinematography. The local void fraction and bubble size distributions in the cavity wake are determined, and the measurements methods are compared. The research was sponsored by ONR under grant N00014-08-1-0215, program manager Dr. L. Patrick Purtell.

  6. Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Diffraction Reveals Transient Structural Distortions of Ternary Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Mann

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Home-based soft X-ray time-resolved scattering experiments with nanosecond time resolution (10 ns and nanometer spatial resolution were carried out at a table top soft X-ray plasma source (2.2–5.2 nm. The investigated system was the lyotropic liquid crystal C16E7/paraffin/glycerol/formamide/IR 5. Usually, major changes in physical, chemical, and/or optical properties of the sample occur as a result of structural changes and shrinking morphology. Here, these effects occur as a consequence of the energy absorption in the sample upon optical laser excitation in the IR regime. The liquid crystal shows changes in the structural response within few hundred nanoseconds showing a time decay of 182 ns. A decrease of the Bragg peak diffracted intensity of 30% and a coherent macroscopic movement of the Bragg reflection are found as a response to the optical pump. The Bragg reflection movement is established to be isotropic and diffusion controlled (1 μs. Structural processes are analyzed in the Patterson analysis framework of the time-varying diffraction peaks revealing that the inter-lamellar distance increases by 2.7 Å resulting in an elongation of the coherently expanding lamella crystallite. The present studies emphasize the possibility of applying TR-SXRD techniques for studying the mechanical dynamics of nanosystems.

  7. Guest–Host Interactions Investigated by Time-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopies and Scattering at MHz Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer; Vanko, G.; Gawelda, W.;

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the photoinduced low spin (LS) to high spin (HS) conversion of [Fe(bipy)3]2+ in aqueous solution. In a laser pump/X-ray probe synchrotron setup permitting simultaneous, time-resolved X-ray diffuse scattering (XDS) and X-ray spectroscopic measurements at a 3.26 MHz repetition rate......, as is the solvent heating due to the initial energy dissipation from the excited HS molecule. Combining information from X-ray emission spectroscopy and scattering, the excitation fraction as well as the temperature and density changes of the solvent can be closely followed on the subnanosecond time scale of the HS...

  8. Cavitation dynamics on a NACA0015 hydrofoil using time resolved X-ray densitometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Harish; Wu, Juliana; Ceccio, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Recent investigations of partial cavitation have shown that the transition from stable to shedding cavities can be related to the presence of both propagating bubbly shocks and re-entrant liquid jets originating in the cavity closure region. In the present study, formation of sheet cavitation and its transition to periodically shedding cavities is studied on a NACA0015 hydrofoil in a recirculating water tunnel at different attack angles. Using high-speed videos and time resolved X-ray densitometry, the instantaneous void fraction flow fields are obtained to identify the principal mechanism responsible for transition from stable to shedding cavities over a range of attack angles and cavitation numbers. The role of attack angle is of particular interest, since is it related to the pressure gradient at cavity enclosure, and can lead to the formation of stronger reentrant flows. The relative importance of reentrant liquid flow and bubbly shock wave propagation will be discussed This work is supported by Office of Naval Research.

  9. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorchies, F; Fedorov, N; Lecherbourg, L

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%-20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ∼1 mn and ∼100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  10. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorchies, F., E-mail: dorchies@celia.u-bordeaux1.fr; Fedorov, N.; Lecherbourg, L. [Université Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, Talence F-33405 (France)

    2015-07-15

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%–20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ∼1 mn and ∼100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  11. Picosecond Photobiology: Watching a Signaling Protein Function in Real Time via Time-Resolved Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun Sun; Schotte, Friedrich; Dashdorj, Naranbaatar; Kyndt, John; Henning, Robert; Anfinrud, Philip A

    2016-07-20

    The capacity to respond to environmental changes is crucial to an organism's survival. Halorhodospira halophila is a photosynthetic bacterium that swims away from blue light, presumably in an effort to evade photons energetic enough to be genetically harmful. The protein responsible for this response is believed to be photoactive yellow protein (PYP), whose chromophore photoisomerizes from trans to cis in the presence of blue light. We investigated the complete PYP photocycle by acquiring time-resolved small and wide-angle X-ray scattering patterns (SAXS/WAXS) over 10 decades of time spanning from 100 ps to 1 s. Using a sequential model, global analysis of the time-dependent scattering differences recovered four intermediates (pR0/pR1, pR2, pB0, pB1), the first three of which can be assigned to prior time-resolved crystal structures. The 1.8 ms pB0 to pB1 transition produces the PYP signaling state, whose radius of gyration (Rg = 16.6 Å) is significantly larger than that for the ground state (Rg = 14.7 Å) and is therefore inaccessible to time-resolved protein crystallography. The shape of the signaling state, reconstructed using GASBOR, is highly anisotropic and entails significant elongation of the long axis of the protein. This structural change is consistent with unfolding of the 25 residue N-terminal domain, which exposes the β-scaffold of this sensory protein to a potential binding partner. This mechanistically detailed description of the complete PYP photocycle, made possible by time-resolved crystal and solution studies, provides a framework for understanding signal transduction in proteins and for assessing and validating theoretical/computational approaches in protein biophysics. PMID:27305463

  12. Direct deconvolution of two-state pump-probe x-ray absorption spectra and the structural changes in a 100 ps transient of Ni(II)-tetramesitylporphyrin.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Della-Longa, S.; Chen, L. X.; Frank, P.; Hayakawa, K.; Hatada, K.; Benfatto, M.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. dell' Aquila; Lab. Nazionali di Frascati; Northwestern Univ.; Stanford Univ.; Museo storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche

    2009-05-04

    Full multiple scattering (FMS) Minuit XANES (MXAN) has been combined with laser pump-probe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine the structure of photoexcited Ni(II)tetramesitylporphyrin, Ni(II)TMP, in dilute toluene solution. It is shown that an excellent simulation of the XANES spectrum is obtained, excluding the lowest-energy bound-state transitions. In ground-state Ni(II)TMP, the first-shell and second-shell distances are, respectively, d(Ni-N) = (1.93 {+-} 0.02) {angstrom} and d(Ni-C) = (2.94 {+-} 0.03) {angstrom}, in agreement with a previous EXAFS result. The time-resolved XANES difference spectrum was obtained from the spectra of Ni(II)TMP in its photoexcited T{sub 1} state and its ground state, S{sub 0}. The XANES difference spectrum has been analyzed to obtain both the structure and the fraction of the T{sub 1} state. If the T{sub 1} fraction is kept fixed at the value (0.37 {+-} 0.10) determined by optical transient spectroscopy, a 0.07 {angstrom} elongation of the Ni-N and Ni-C distances [d(Ni-N) and d(Ni-C)] is found, in agreement with the EXAFS result. However, an evaluation of both the distance elongation and the T{sub 1} fraction can also be obtained using XANES data only. According to experimental evidence, and MXAN simulations, the T{sub 1} fraction is (0.60 {+-} 0.15) with d(Ni-N) = (1.98 {+-} 0.03) {angstrom} (0.05 {angstrom} elongation). The overall uncertainty of these results depends on the statistical correlation between the distances and T{sub 1} fraction, and the chemical shift of the ionization energy because of subtle changes of metal charge between the T{sub 1} and S{sub 0} states. The T{sub 1} excited-state structure results, independently obtained without the excited-state fraction from optical transient spectroscopy, are still in agreement with previous EXAFS investigations. Thus, full multiple scattering theory applied through the MXAN formalism can be used to provide structural information, not only on the ground

  13. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction with accelerator- and laser-plasma-based X-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicoul, Matthieu

    2010-09-01

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are a powerful tool to investigate atomic motions triggered by femtosecond pump pulses. This thesis is dedicated to the production of such pulses and their use in optical pump - X-ray probe measurement. This thesis describes the laser-plasma-based sources available at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Part of it consists of the description of the design, built-up and characterization of a new ''modular'' X-ray source dedicated to optimize the X-ray flux onto the sample under investigation. The acoustic wave generation in femtosecond optically excited semiconductor (gallium arsenide) and metal (gold) was performed using the sources of the University of Duisburg-Essen. The physical answer of the material was modeled by a simple strain model for the semiconductor, pressure model for the metal, in order to gain information on the interplay of the electronic and thermal pressures rising after excitation. Whereas no reliable information could be obtain in gallium arsenide (principally due to the use of a bulk), the model for gold achieved very good agreement, providing useful information. The relaxation time of the electron to lattice energy was found to be (5.0{+-}0.3) ps, and the ratio of the Grueneisen parameters was found to be {gamma}{sub e} / {gamma}{sub i} = (0.5{+-}0.1). This thesis also describes the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) which existed at the (formally) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, an accelerator-based X-ray source, and two measurements performed with it. The first one is the detailed investigation of the phonon softening of the A{sub 1g} mode launch in bismuth upon fluence excitation. Detailed information concerning the new equilibrium position and phonon frequency were obtained over extended laser pump fluences. The second measurement concerned the study of the liquid phase dynamics in a newly formed liquid phase following ultrafast melting in indium antimonide. The formation of the liquid phase

  14. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction with accelerator- and laser-plasma-based X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are a powerful tool to investigate atomic motions triggered by femtosecond pump pulses. This thesis is dedicated to the production of such pulses and their use in optical pump - X-ray probe measurement. This thesis describes the laser-plasma-based sources available at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Part of it consists of the description of the design, built-up and characterization of a new ''modular'' X-ray source dedicated to optimize the X-ray flux onto the sample under investigation. The acoustic wave generation in femtosecond optically excited semiconductor (gallium arsenide) and metal (gold) was performed using the sources of the University of Duisburg-Essen. The physical answer of the material was modeled by a simple strain model for the semiconductor, pressure model for the metal, in order to gain information on the interplay of the electronic and thermal pressures rising after excitation. Whereas no reliable information could be obtain in gallium arsenide (principally due to the use of a bulk), the model for gold achieved very good agreement, providing useful information. The relaxation time of the electron to lattice energy was found to be (5.0±0.3) ps, and the ratio of the Grueneisen parameters was found to be γe / γi = (0.5±0.1). This thesis also describes the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) which existed at the (formally) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, an accelerator-based X-ray source, and two measurements performed with it. The first one is the detailed investigation of the phonon softening of the A1g mode launch in bismuth upon fluence excitation. Detailed information concerning the new equilibrium position and phonon frequency were obtained over extended laser pump fluences. The second measurement concerned the study of the liquid phase dynamics in a newly formed liquid phase following ultrafast melting in indium antimonide. The formation of the liquid phase and its development for excitations close to the

  15. Time-resolved soft X-ray microscopy of magnetic nanostructures at the P04 beamline at PETRA III

    OpenAIRE

    Wessels, Philipp; Ewald, Johannes; Oepen, Hans Peter; Meier, Guido; Wilhein, Thomas; Drescher, Markus; Wieland, Marek; Nisius, Thomas; Abbati, Gennaro; Baumbach, Stefan; Overbuschmann, Johannes; Vogel, Andreas; Neumann, Alexander; Viefhaus, Jens

    2014-01-01

    We present first time-resolved measurements of a new mobile full-field transmission microscope obtained at the soft X-ray beamline P04 at the high brilliance synchrotron radiation source PETRA III.A nanostructured magnetic permalloy (Ni80Fe20) sample can be excited by the magnetic field of a 400 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) long electric current pulse in a coplanar waveguide. The full-field soft X-ray microscope successively probes the time evolution of the sample magnetization via X-...

  16. Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction: The Dynamics of the Chemical Bond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2012-01-01

    We review the basic theoretical formulation for pulsed X-ray scattering on nonstationary molecular states. Relevant time scales are discussed for coherent as well as incpherent X-ray pulses. The general formalism is applied to a nonstationary diatomic molecule in order to highlight the relation b...

  17. Time resolved, 2-D hard X-ray imaging of relativistic electron-beam target interactions on ETA-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced radiographic applications require a constant source size less than 1 mm. To study the time history of a relativistic electron beam as it interacts with a bremsstrahlung converter, one of the diagnostics they use is a multi-frame time-resolved hard x-ray camera. They are performing experiments on the ETA-II accelerator at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to investigate details of the electron beam/converter interactions. The camera they are using contains 6 time-resolved images, each image is a 5 ns frame. By starting each successive frame 10 ns after the previous frame, they create a 6-frame movie from the hard x-rays produced from the interaction of the 50-ns electron beam pulse

  18. Analysis of the X-ray and time-resolved XUV emission of laser produced Xe and Kr plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Kontogiannopoulos, N.; Marquès, J.-R.; Tzortzakis, S.; Lecherbourg, L.; Thais, F.; Matsushima, I.; Peyrusse, O.; Chenais-Popovics, C.

    2007-05-01

    A frequency-doubled laser beam of the Nd:glass kilojoule nanosecond LULI2000 facility (1.5 ns duration, 200-400 J energy, 0.53 μm wavelength) was focused on a Xe or Kr gas jet. The plasma was simultaneously diagnosed with X-ray (in the wavelength range of 6-8 Å for Kr and of 12-15 Å for Xe) and time-resolved XUV (20-200 Å) emission spectroscopy. Electron density and temperature as well as the ionization charge were measured by time-resolved Thomson scattering of the heating laser pulse. The spectra are compared with the calculations performed with the NLTE collisional-radiative code AVERROES/TRANSPEC. Best fits of the X-ray and XUV spectra obtained are presented. The measured charge distribution and dynamics is analyzed using the simultaneous Thomson scattering diagnostic.

  19. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction at monocrystalline indium antimonide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work deals with the experimental study of the structural change of the semiconductor indium antimonide (InSb) after excitation by an ultrashort laser pulse (60 fs). The investigation is carried out by ultra-short X-ray pulses (around 100 fs). As a source for ultrashort X-ray pulses serves a laser plasma X-ray source. With this source, a more intense ultrashort optical laser pulse is focused onto a metal foil (intensity to 8.1016 W/cm2), and by the resulting plasma, there is an emission of X-rays. To characterize the X-ray source a novel Timepix detector was used, which made it possible to detect Bremsstrahlung up to photon energies of 700 keV. The penetration depth of X-rays is usually several micrometers and is thus much greater than the penetration depth of 100 nm of the laser pulse used for excitation. By the use of a highly asymmetric Bragg reflex the penetration depth of X-rays could be adapted to the penetration depth of the excitation pulse. Due to the low penetration depth of 2 ps after excitation an expansion of 4% of a 4 nm thin layer at the surface can already be measured. The excitation of the semiconductor will be described with different models theoretically, the temporal evolution of the deformation obtained therefrom is compared with the performed measurements.

  20. Time-resolved soft-x-ray studies of energy transport in layered and planar laser-driven targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New low-energy x-ray diagnostic techniques are used to explore energy-transport processes in laser heated plasmas. Streak cameras are used to provide 15-psec time-resolution measurements of subkeV x-ray emission. A very thin (50 μg/cm2) carbon substrate provides a low-energy x-ray transparent window to the transmission photocathode of this soft x-ray streak camera. Active differential vacuum pumping of the instrument is required. The use of high-sensitivity, low secondary-electron energy-spread CsI photocathodes in x-ray streak cameras is also described. Significant increases in sensitivity with only a small and intermittant decrease in dynamic range were observed. These coherent, complementary advances in subkeV, time-resolved x-ray diagnostic capability are applied to energy-transport investigations of 1.06-μm laser plasmas. Both solid disk targets of a variety of Z's as well as Be-on-Al layered-disk targets were irradiated with 700-psec laser pulses of selected intensity between 3 x 1014 W/cm2 and 1 x 1015 W/cm2

  1. Investigation on new scintillators for subnanosecond time-resolved x-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruki, R.; Shibuya, K.; Nishikido, F.; Koshimizu, M.; Yoda, Y.; Kishimoto, S.

    2010-03-01

    We investigated new x-ray detectors for nuclear resonant scattering measurements with high energy x rays. The organic-inorganic perovskite scintillator of phenethylamine lead halide ((C6H5C2H4NH3)2PbX4) (X:Br, I) was used. These compounds have fast light emission due to an exciton. They include heavy atoms, which make the detector to have high efficiency to high energy x rays. The merit of these scintillators is that we can make a thick crystal compared to a Si wafer which is used in an avalanche photo-diode detector. We successfully measured 67.41 keV x ray signals, the energy of 61Ni nuclear resonant scattering, with high detection efficiency of 42.5 % by the scintillator.

  2. Time-resolved x-ray scattering measurements of shock propagation in laser-driven CH foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbrel, Benjamin; Koenig, Michel; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Brambrink, Erik; Brown, Colin; Khattak, Fida; Nagler, Bob; Rabec-Le-Gloaec, Marc; Spindloe, Chris; Tolley, Marc; Vinko, Samuel; Riley, David; Wark, Justin; Gregori, Gianluca

    2008-11-01

    We have performed time-resolved x-ray scattering measurements in the warm dense matter regime at the LULI 2000 laser facility (Ecole Polytechnique, France). The laser-driven shocked CH samples were probed with 30ps, 8keV Cu Kalpha radiation, delayed with respect to the shock propagation. The angularly resolved scattered x-ray signal, collected over a wide angle range (25-55 degrees), gives access to the plasma structure factor. For the first time, the use of a short pulse x-ray source allows ourselves to probe the microscopic properties of WDM at different plasma conditions as the shock travels. Spectrum shows evidence of strong coupling behaviour in the CH plasma. Results are compared to simulations taking account strong coupling effect and appropriate multi ionic-species treatment. The data analysis and the models used will be presented and discussed.

  3. PLEIADES: a picosecond Compton scattering x-ray source for advanced backlighting and time-resolved material studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, D J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P; Betts, S M; Booth, R; Brown, W J; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Hartemann, F V; Kuba, J; Le Sage, G P; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T; Rosenzweig, J B

    2003-10-20

    The PLEIADES (Picosecond Laser-Electron Inter-Action for the Dynamical Evaluation of Structures) facility has produced first light at 70 keV. This milestone offers a new opportunity to develop laser-driven, compact, tunable x-ray sources for critical applications such as diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility and time-resolved material studies. The electron beam was focused to 50 {micro}m rms, at 57 MeV, with 260 C of charge, a relative energy spread of 0.2%, and a normalized emittance of 5 mm mrad horizontally and 13 mm mrad vertically. The scattered 820-nm laser pulse had an energy of 180 mJ and a duration of 54 fs. Initial x-rays were captured with a cooled charge-coupled device using a Cesium Iodide scintillator; the peak photon energy was approximately 78 keV, with a total x-ray flux of 1.3 x 10{sup 6} photons/shot, and the observed angular distribution found to agree very well with three-dimensional codes. Simple K-edge radiography of a tantalum foil showed good agreement with the theoretical divergence-angle dependence of the x-ray energy. Optimization of the x-ray dose is currently underway, with the goal of reaching 10{sup 8} photons per shot and a peak brightness approaching 10{sup 20} photons/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/s/0.1%bandwidth.

  4. A split-beam probe-pump-probe scheme for femtosecond time resolved protein X-ray crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper J. van Thor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to exploit the femtosecond pulse duration of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL operating in the hard X-ray regime for ultrafast time-resolved protein crystallography experiments, critical parameters that determine the crystallographic signal-to-noise (I/σI must be addressed. For single-crystal studies under low absorbed dose conditions, it has been shown that the intrinsic pulse intensity stability as well as mode structure and jitter of this structure, significantly affect the crystallographic signal-to-noise. Here, geometrical parameters are theoretically explored for a three-beam scheme: X-ray probe, optical pump, X-ray probe (or “probe-pump-probe” which will allow experimental determination of the photo-induced structure factor amplitude differences, ΔF, in a ratiometric manner, thereby internally referencing the intensity noise of the XFEL source. In addition to a non-collinear split-beam geometry which separates un-pumped and pumped diffraction patterns on an area detector, applying an additional convergence angle to both beams by focusing leads to integration over mosaic blocks in the case of well-ordered stationary protein crystals. Ray-tracing X-ray diffraction simulations are performed for an example using photoactive yellow protein crystals in order to explore the geometrical design parameters which would be needed. The specifications for an X-ray split and delay instrument that implements both an offset angle and focused beams are discussed, for implementation of a probe-pump-probe scheme at the European XFEL. We discuss possible extension of single crystal studies to serial femtosecond crystallography, particularly in view of the expected X-ray damage and ablation due to the first probe pulse.

  5. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction at monocrystalline indium antimonide; Zeitaufgeloeste Roentgenbeugung an einkristallinem Indiumantimonid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefer, Sebastian

    2014-11-07

    The present work deals with the experimental study of the structural change of the semiconductor indium antimonide (InSb) after excitation by an ultrashort laser pulse (60 fs). The investigation is carried out by ultra-short X-ray pulses (around 100 fs). As a source for ultrashort X-ray pulses serves a laser plasma X-ray source. With this source, a more intense ultrashort optical laser pulse is focused onto a metal foil (intensity to 8.10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}), and by the resulting plasma, there is an emission of X-rays. To characterize the X-ray source a novel Timepix detector was used, which made it possible to detect Bremsstrahlung up to photon energies of 700 keV. The penetration depth of X-rays is usually several micrometers and is thus much greater than the penetration depth of 100 nm of the laser pulse used for excitation. By the use of a highly asymmetric Bragg reflex the penetration depth of X-rays could be adapted to the penetration depth of the excitation pulse. Due to the low penetration depth of 2 ps after excitation an expansion of 4% of a 4 nm thin layer at the surface can already be measured. The excitation of the semiconductor will be described with different models theoretically, the temporal evolution of the deformation obtained therefrom is compared with the performed measurements. [German] Die vorliegende Arbeit behandelt die experimentelle Untersuchung der strukturellen Aenderung des Halbleiters Indiumantimonid (InSB) nach der Anregung durch einen ultrakurzen Laserpuls (60 fs). Die Untersuchung erfolgt durch ultrakurze Roentgenpulse (rund 100 fs). Als Quelle der ultrakurzen Roentgenpulse dient eine Laser-Plasma Roentgenquelle. Bei dieser Quelle wird ein ultrakurzer intensiver optischer Laserpuls auf eine Metallfolie fokussiert (Intensitaet bis 8.10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}), durch das entstehende Plasma kommt es zu einer Emission von Roentgenstrahlung. Zur Charakterisierung der Roentgenquelle stand ein neuartiger Timepix- Detektor zu Verfuegung, der

  6. Design of Time-Resolved Shifted Dual Transmission Grating Spectrometer for the X-Ray Spectrum Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baoqing; Yi, Tao; Wang, Chuanke; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Tingshuai; Li, Jin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-07-01

    A new time-resolved shifted dual transmission grating spectrometer (SDTGS) is designed and fabricated in this work. This SDTGS uses a new shifted dual transmission grating (SDTG) as its dispersive component, which has two sub transmission gratings with different line densities, of 2000 lines/mm and 5000 lines/mm. The axes of the two sub transmission gratings in SDTG are horizontally and vertically shifted a certain distance to measure a broad range of 0.1-5 keV time-resolved X-ray spectra. The SDTG has been calibrated with a soft X-ray beam of the synchrotron radiation facility and its diffraction efficiency is also measured. The designed SDTGS can take full use of the space on a record panel and improve the precision for measuring spatial and temporal spectrum simultaneously. It will be a promising application for accurate diagnosis of the soft X-ray spectrum in inertial confinement fusion. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11405158 and 11435011) and Development Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (Nos. 2014B0102011 and 2014B0102012)

  7. Time resolved resonant inelastic X-ray scattering: A supreme tool to understand dynamics in solids and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The high specificity of RIXS ideally suits time-resolved measurements. •Methods relating to the core hole lifetime cover the low femtosecond regime. •Pump-probe methods are used starting at sub-ps time scales. •FELs and synchrotrons are useful for pump-probe studies. •Examples from solid state dynamics and molecules are discussed. -- Abstract: Dynamics in materials typically involve different degrees of freedom, like charge, lattice, orbital and spin in a complex interplay. Time-resolved resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) as a highly selective tool can provide unique insight and follow the details of dynamical processes while resolving symmetries, chemical and charge states, momenta, spin configurations, etc. In this paper, we review examples where the intrinsic scattering duration time is used to study femtosecond phenomena. Free-electron lasers access timescales starting in the sub-ps range through pump-probe methods and synchrotrons study the time scales longer than tens of ps. In these examples, time-resolved resonant inelastic X-ray scattering is applied to solids as well as molecular systems

  8. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging for Time-Resolved Investigation of the Biological Complexes: Computer Modelling towards the XFEL Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaev, A. L.; Guda, A. A.; Yefanov, O. M.; Lorenz, U.; Soldatov, A. V.; Vartanyants, I. A.

    2016-05-01

    The development of the next generation synchrotron radiation sources - free electron lasers - is approaching to become an effective tool for the time-resolved experiments aimed to solve actual problems in various fields such as chemistry’ biology’ medicine’ etc. In order to demonstrate’ how these experiments may be performed for the real systems to obtain information at the atomic and macromolecular levels’ we have performed a molecular dynamics computer simulation combined with quantum chemistry calculations for the human phosphoglycerate kinase enzyme with Mg containing substrate. The simulated structures were used to calculate coherent X-ray diffraction patterns’ reflecting the conformational state of the enzyme, and Mg K-edge X-ray absorption spectra, which depend on the local structure of the substrate. These two techniques give complementary information making such an approach highly effective for time-resolved investigation of various biological complexes, such as metalloproteins or enzymes with metal-containing substrate, to obtain information about both metal-containing active site or substrate and the atomic structure of each conformation.

  9. Picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of ultrafast aluminum plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, P; Renaudin, P; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S; Geindre, J-P; Chenais-Popovics, C; Tzortzakis, S; Nagels-Silvert, V; Shepherd, R; Matsushima, I; Gary, S; Girard, F; Peyrusse, O; Gauthier, J-C

    2005-01-21

    We have used point-projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy to infer the ionization and recombination dynamics of transient aluminum plasmas. Two femtosecond beams of the 100 TW laser at the LULI facility were used to produce an aluminum plasma on a thin aluminum foil (83 or 50 nm), and a picosecond x-ray backlighter source. The short-pulse backlighter probed the aluminum plasma at different times by adjusting the delay between the two femtosecond driving beams. Absorption x-ray spectra at early times are characteristic of a dense and rather homogeneous plasma. Collisional-radiative atomic physics coupled with hydrodynamic simulations reproduce fairly well the measured average ionization as a function of time. PMID:15698184

  10. Scintillating screen CCD camera using fast analog on-chip storage for time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Andreas; Hagelstein, Michael; San Miguel, Alfonso; Fontaine, Alain; Ressler, Thorsten

    1995-03-01

    Serial readout of cooled, linear Si-photodiode arrays or CCDs offer a high dynamic range but only at moderate pixel readout rates. Recording spectroscopic information, i.e. 1D images, requires only a few sensitive lines of a 2D CCD array. A camera is presented where the unexposed part of the CCD is used as a buffer to store successive spectra with high frame rates. In this 'streak mode' the time resolution for data acquisition depends only on the line shift time of the CCD and no longer on the slow pixel readout time. A frame rate of 10 kHz for X-ray absorption spectra has been achieved. The CCD is part of an X-ray camera consisting of a scintillating screen lens-coupled to the CCD. The camera provides a high dynamic range of 17 bit, a spatial resolution of 60 micrometers (FWHM) and a high detective quantum efficiency of > 40% for x- ray energies between 4 keV and 25 keV. The camera is used for time- resolved energy-dispersive XAFS (X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) experiments. This technique permits the study of time-dependent variations of electronic properties and the local environment of atoms under induced external perturbation.

  11. Time-resolved soft X-ray microscopy of magnetic nanostructures at the P04 beamline at PETRA III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, P.; Ewald, J.; Wieland, M.; Nisius, T.; Abbati, G.; Baumbach, S.; Overbuschmann, J.; Vogel, A.; Neumann, A.; Viefhaus, J.; Oepen, H. P.; Meier, G.; Wilhein, T.; Drescher, M.

    2014-04-01

    We present first time-resolved measurements of a new mobile full-field transmission microscope [1] obtained at the soft X-ray beamline P04 at the high brilliance synchrotron radiation source PETRA III. A nanostructured magnetic permalloy (Ni80Fe20) sample can be excited by the magnetic field of a 400 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) long electric current pulse in a coplanar waveguide. The full-field soft X-ray microscope successively probes the time evolution of the sample magnetization via X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) [2] spectromicroscopy in a pump-probe scheme by varying the delay between pump and probe pulses electronically. Static and transient magnetic fields of a permanent magnet and a coil are available in the sample plane to reset the system and to provide external offset fields. The microscope generates a flat-top illumination field of 20 μm diameter by using a grating condenser [3] and the sample plane is directly imaged by a micro zone plate with 60 nm resolution onto a 2D gateable X-ray detector to select the particular bunch in the storage ring that contains the dynamic information. The setup is built into a mobile endstation vacuum system with in-house developed three-axis piezo motorized stages for high accuracy positioning of all microscopy-components inside the chambers.

  12. In situ spatial and time-resolved studies of electrochemical reactions by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Daniel; Stewart-Ornstein, Jacob; Zhang, Xuerong; Hitchcock, Adam P

    2005-06-01

    The first in situ measurements with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) of an active electrochemical cell are reported. An electrochemical wet cell, consisting of an electrodeposited polyaniline thin film on a thin Au film covered by an overlayer of 1 M HCl solution sitting between two X-ray transparent silicon nitride windows, was assembled. X-ray absorption images and spatial and time-resolved spectra of this system under potential control were examined using the beamline 5.3.2 STXM at the Advanced Light Source. The chemical state of the polyaniline film was reversibly converted between reduced (leucoemeraldine) and oxidized (emeraldine chloride) states by changing the applied potential. The electrochemical changes were monitored by spatially resolved C 1s and N 1s X-ray absorption spectroscopy and chemical-state selective imaging. Comparison of differences between images at two energies at different potentials provided electrochemical contrast with a resolution better than 50 nm, thereby monitoring that component of the polyaniline film that was electrochemically active. Kinematic studies in the subsecond regime are demonstrated.

  13. A beamline for time-resolved extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Grilj, Jakob; Sistrunk, Emily; Koch, Markus; Gühr, Markus

    2013-01-01

    High harmonic generation is a convenient way to obtain extreme ultraviolet light from table-top laser systems and the experimental tools to exploit this simple and powerful light source for time-resolved spectroscopy are being developed by several groups. For these applications, brightness and stability of the high harmonic generation is a key feature. This article focuses on practical aspects in the generation of extreme ultraviolet pulses with ultrafast commercial lasers, namely generation ...

  14. Applications of Time-Resolved Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction to Cation Exchange, Crystal Growth and Biomineralization Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in the design of environmental reaction cells and in the collection of X-ray diffraction data are transforming our ability to study mineral-fluid interactions. The resulting increase in time resolution now allows for the determination of rate laws for mineral reactions that are coupled to atomic-scale changes in crystal structure. Here we address the extension of time-resolved synchrotron diffraction techniques to four areas of critical importance to the cycling of metals in soils: (1) cation exchange; (2) biomineralization; (3) stable isotope fractionation during redox reactions; and (4) nucleation and growth of nanoscale oxyhydroxides.

  15. Probing Reaction Dynamics of Transition-Metal Complexes in Solution via Time-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huse, Nils; Khalil, Munira; Kim, Tae Kyu; Smeigh, Amanda L.; Jamula, Lindsey; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2009-05-24

    We report measurements of the photo-induced Fe(II) spin crossover reaction dynamics in solution via time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy. EXAFS measurements reveal that the iron?nitrogen bond lengthens by 0.21+-0.03 Angstrom in the high-spin transient excited state relative to the ground state. XANES measurements at the Fe L-edge show directly the influence of the structural change on the ligand-field splitting of the Fe(II) 3d orbitals associated with the spin transition.

  16. Probing reaction dynamics of transition-metal complexes in solution via time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huse, Nils [Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Khalil, Munira [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Kim, Tae Kyu [Department of Chemistry, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Smeigh, Amanda L; Jamula, Lindsey; McCusker, James K [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Schoenlein, Robert W, E-mail: nhuse@lbl.go, E-mail: rwschoenlein@lbl.go [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-02-01

    We report measurements of the photoinduced Fe{sup II} spin crossover reaction dynamics in solution via time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy. EXAFS measurements reveal that the iron-nitrogen bond lengthens by 0.21+-0.03 A in the high-spin transient excited state relative to the ground state. XANES measurements at the Fe L-edge show directly the influence of the structural change on the ligand-field splitting of the Fe{sup II} 3d orbitals associated with the spin transition.

  17. Introducing a standard method for experimental determination of the solvent response in laser pump, x-ray probe time-resolved wide-angle x-ray scattering experiments on systems in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Kasper Skov; Brandt van Driel, Tim; Kehres, Jan;

    2013-01-01

    In time-resolved laser pump, X-ray probe wide-angle X-ray scattering experiments on systems in solution the structural response of the system is accompanied by a solvent response. The solvent response is caused by reorganization of the bulk solvent following the laser pump event, and in order...... response-the solvent term-experimentally when applying laser pump, X-ray probe time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering. The solvent term describes difference scattering arising from the structural response of the solvent to changes in the hydrodynamic parameters: pressure, temperature and density. We...... is demonstrated to exhibit first order behaviour with respect to the amount of energy deposited in the solution. We introduce a standardized method for recording solvent responses in laser pump, X-ray probe time-resolved X-ray wide-angle scattering experiments by using dye mediated solvent heating. Furthermore...

  18. Space and time resolved emission of hard X-rays from a plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, W. L.; Lee, J. H.; Mcfarland, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The X-ray emission from focused plasmas was observed with an image converter camera in the streak and framing modes. Use of a very high gain image intensifier enabled weak hard X-ray emission (above 25 keV) to be recorded. The use of an admixture of higher atomic number into the deuterium was avoided, and the role of the vapor from the anode surface could be discerned. The recorded bremsstrahlung emission seemed to be from a metallic plasma of copper released from the anode surface by bombardment from an intense electron beam. The intensity of emission was determined by the density of copper and the density and energy of the electron beam. The main emission recorded occurred several 100 nsec after the focus was over, which implies that the electric fields driving the beam existed for this duration. It is suggested that the fields were created by annihilation of magnetic flux for a time much longer than the focus duration.

  19. Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy: Watching atoms dance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milne, Chris J; Pham, Van-Thai; Veen, Renske M van der; El Nahhas, Amal; Lima, Frederico; Vithanage, Dimali A; Chergui, Majed [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Ultrarapide, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Gawelda, Wojciech [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, CSIC (Spain); Johnson, Steven L; Beaud, Paul; Ingold, Gerhard; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia; Kaiser, Maik; Abela, Rafael [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland); Benfatto, Maurizio [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN (Italy); Hauser, Andreas [Departement de Chimie Physique, Universite de Geneve (Switzerland); Bressler, Christian, E-mail: majed.chergui@epfl.c, E-mail: chris.milne@psi.c [European XFEL Project Team, Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    The introduction of pump-probe techniques to the field of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has allowed the monitoring of both structural and electronic dynamics of disordered systems in the condensed phase with unprecedented accuracy, both in time and in space. We present results on the electronically excited high-spin state structure of an Fe(II) molecular species, [Fe{sup II}(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+}, in aqueous solution, resolving the Fe-N bond distance elongation as 0.2 A. In addition an analysis technique using the reduced {chi}{sup 2} goodness of fit between FEFF EXAFS simulations and the experimental transient absorption signal in energy space has been successfully tested as a function of excited state population and chemical shift, demonstrating its applicability in situations where the fractional excited state population cannot be determined through other measurements. Finally by using a novel ultrafast hard x-ray 'slicing' source the question of how the molecule relaxes after optical excitation has been successfully resolved using femtosecond XANES.

  20. Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy: Watching atoms dance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of pump-probe techniques to the field of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has allowed the monitoring of both structural and electronic dynamics of disordered systems in the condensed phase with unprecedented accuracy, both in time and in space. We present results on the electronically excited high-spin state structure of an Fe(II) molecular species, [FeII(bpy)3]2+, in aqueous solution, resolving the Fe-N bond distance elongation as 0.2 A. In addition an analysis technique using the reduced χ2 goodness of fit between FEFF EXAFS simulations and the experimental transient absorption signal in energy space has been successfully tested as a function of excited state population and chemical shift, demonstrating its applicability in situations where the fractional excited state population cannot be determined through other measurements. Finally by using a novel ultrafast hard x-ray 'slicing' source the question of how the molecule relaxes after optical excitation has been successfully resolved using femtosecond XANES.

  1. Diagnosis of laser ablated carbon particles measured by time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time and space resolved properties of laser ablated carbon particles were measured by X-ray absorption spectroscopy using LPX as an X-ray source. The energy density of the irradiation laser on the sample was in the range of 0.5-20J/cm2 and the time delay was varied between 0 and 120ns. The absorption spectra exhibited several peaks originated from level to level transitions and an intense broad absorption in the energy range of C-K edge. At a delay time of 120ns, the absorption peak from 1s→2p transition of neutral carbon atom (C0), C-, C+ and C2+ ions were observed. The absorption peak from C0 was stronger as the probing position was closer to the sample surface and decreased rapidly with distance from the sample surface. The absorption peak C2+ ion was observed only at comparatively distant positions from surface. The maximum speeds of highly charged ions were faster than that of neutral atoms and negative charged ions. The neutral atom and lower charged ions were emitted from the sample even after laser irradiation. The spatial distributions of the laser ablated carbon particles in the localized helium gas environment were measured. In the helium gas environment, the ablation plume was depressed by the helium cloud generated on the top of ablation plume. (author)

  2. A beamline for time-resolved extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Grilj, Jakob; Koch, Markus; Gühr, Markus

    2013-01-01

    High harmonic generation is a convenient way to obtain extreme ultraviolet light from table-top laser systems and the experimental tools to exploit this simple and powerful light source for time-resolved spectroscopy are being developed by several groups. For these applications, brightness and stability of the high harmonic generation is a key feature. This article focuses on practical aspects in the generation of extreme ultraviolet pulses with ultrafast commercial lasers, namely generation parameters and online monitoring as well as analysis of generation yield and stability.

  3. Crystallography using synchrotron radiation X-ray. Application of Weissenberg and time resolved Laue methods to macromolecular structure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three-dimensional structures of macromolecules under static and dynamic conditions are very important for the study of molecular biology. X-ray crystallography is the most powerful tool to obtain the three-dimensional structures of the macromolecules of especially large size, for which synchrotron radiation X-ray is used, The collection of diffraction data is the first, most important step for crystalline structure analysis. Efforts have been exerted to establish the data collection system using monochromatic synchrotron radiation X-ray (SRX). The diffraction intensity data collection system combined with a newly developed Weissenberg camera for macromolecules and an image plate (IP) using SRX has been established at the Photon Factory. Many important biological structures by high resolution have already come out with this data collection system, which is used also for the study on enzymatic reaction mechanism. A time resolved Laue camera has been designed, and the preliminary experiment has been carried out in the Photon Factory. These systems are reported. (K.I.)

  4. Time resolved X-ray Dark-Field Tomography Revealing Water Transport in a Fresh Cement Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prade, Friedrich; Fischer, Kai; Heinz, Detlef; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-06-01

    Grating-based X-ray dark-field tomography is a promising technique for biomedical and materials research. Even if the resolution of conventional X-ray tomography does not suffice to resolve relevant structures, the dark-field signal provides valuable information about the sub-pixel microstructural properties of the sample. Here, we report on the potential of X-ray dark-field imaging to be used for time-resolved three-dimensional studies. By repeating consecutive tomography scans on a fresh cement sample, we were able to study the hardening dynamics of the cement paste in three dimensions over time. The hardening of the cement was accompanied by a strong decrease in the dark-field signal pointing to microstructural changes within the cement paste. Furthermore our results hint at the transport of water from certain limestone grains, which were embedded in the sample, to the cement paste during the process of hardening. This is indicated by an increasing scattering signal which was observed for two of the six tested limestone grains. Electron microscopy images revealed a distinct porous structure only for those two grains which supports the following interpretation of our results. When the water filled pores of the limestone grains empty during the experiment the scattering signal of the grains increases.

  5. Crystallography using synchrotron radiation X-ray. Application of Weissenberg and time resolved Laue methods to macromolecular structure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakabe, Noriyoshi [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    The three-dimensional structures of macromolecules under static and dynamic conditions are very important for the study of molecular biology. X-ray crystallography is the most powerful tool to obtain the three-dimensional structures of the macromolecules of especially large size, for which synchrotron radiation X-ray is used, The collection of diffraction data is the first, most important step for crystalline structure analysis. Efforts have been exerted to establish the data collection system using monochromatic synchrotron radiation X-ray (SRX). The diffraction intensity data collection system combined with a newly developed Weissenberg camera for macromolecules and an image plate (IP) using SRX has been established at the Photon Factory. Many important biological structures by high resolution have already come out with this data collection system, which is used also for the study on enzymatic reaction mechanism. A time resolved Laue camera has been designed, and the preliminary experiment has been carried out in the Photon Factory. These systems are reported. (K.I.).

  6. Resonant soft x-ray scattering endstation for time-resolved pump-probe measurements at LCLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yi-De; Doering, Dionisio; Cruz, Alejandro G.; Tahir, Nadeem; Andresen, Nord C.; Chow, Ken P.; Contarato, Devis; Cummings, Curtis L.; Domning, Edward E.; Joseph, John; Pepper, John S.; Smith, Brian V.; Zizka, G.; Ford, Christopher; Lee, Wei-Sheng; Weaver, Matt; Patthey, Luc; Weizeowick, John; Denes, Peter; Hussain, Zahid

    2012-10-01

    Localized charge, spin and orbital degrees of freedom can compete with electronic itinerancy and such competition lies at the heart of emergent material properties. To study these electronic orderings, resonant soft X-ray scattering (RSXS) spectroscopy has been demonstrated as one of the most powerful direct probes, and its time-resolved capability can be implemented through pump-probe technique. The ultrafast/ultra-intense X-ray pulses from LCLS can be used as the probe in the time-resolved RSXS experiments, but the inherent fluctuations in intensity and timing between pulses can degrade the superior temporal resolution. To overcome such fluctuations, a compact fast CCD (cFCCD) was developed to enable shot-by-shot data acquisitions and a dedicated RSXS endstation, constructed to house this cFCCD and other single-channel photon detectors, has been extensively used at both ALS and LCLS. Time-resolved RSXS experiments on La1.75Sr0.25 NiO4 nickelate have revealed an unexpected transient behavior of charge and spin ordering (CO/SO) states. After 800nm laser excitation, the CO can be fully suppressed at higher pump fluence while SO remains detectable, creating a transient state that is not accessible by tuning thermodynamic variables. Furthermore, two distinct time scales are identified in the recovery of CO and can be attributed to the amplitude (fast) and phase (slow) dynamics of order parameter. A new version of cFCCD, with eight times the detection area and the readout electronics moved into vacuum side to minimize the pickup noise, has been developed and will be incorporated into the RSXS endstation.

  7. Demonstration of a time-resolved x-ray scattering instrument utilizing the full-repetition rate of x-ray pulses at the Pohang Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Wonhyuk; Eom, Intae; Landahl, Eric C.; Lee, Sooheyong; Yu, Chung-Jong

    2016-03-01

    We report on the development of a new experimental instrument for time-resolved x-ray scattering (TRXS) at the Pohang Light Source (PLS-II). It operates with a photon energy ranging from 5 to 18 keV. It is equipped with an amplified Ti:sappahire femtosecond laser, optical diagnostics, and laser beam delivery for pump-probe experiments. A high-speed single-element detector and high trigger-rate oscilloscope are used for rapid data acquisition. While this instrument is capable of measuring sub-nanosecond dynamics using standard laser pump/x-ray probe techniques, it also takes advantage of the dense 500 MHz standard fill pattern in the PLS-II storage ring to efficiently record nano-to-micro-second dynamics simultaneously. We demonstrate this capability by measuring both the (fast) impulsive strain and (slower) thermal recovery dynamics of a crystalline InSb sample following intense ultrafast laser excitation. Exploiting the full repetition rate of the storage ring results in a significant improvement in data collection rates compared to conventional bunch-tagging methods.

  8. Time-resolved and position-resolved X-ray spectrometry with a pixelated detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, Peter

    2012-12-07

    The aim of the work presented here was to measure X-ray spectra with a pixelated detector. Due to effects in the sensor the spectrum cannot be measured directly and has to be calculated by a deconvolution of the measured data. In the scope of this work the deconvolution of the measured spectra could be enhanced considerably by - amongst other things - the introduction of the Bayesian deconvolution method. Those improvements opened the possibilities for further measurements. For the measurements the detectors of the Medipix family have been used. They are nowadays used for a wide range of applications and scientific research. Their main advantage is the very high position resolution gained by a pixel pitch of 55 μm and a high number of 65536 pixels. The Timepix detector has, in particular, two special possibilities of measurement: the ToA mode and the ToT mode. In ToA mode the arrival time of an impinging photon is measured and in ToT mode the amount of deposited charge is measured. The most common method of operation is counting the number of impinging photons that release a charge higher than a preset threshold in each pixel. As this released charge is proportional to the energy deposition of the impinging photon, one can perform energy-sensitive measurements. To perform the deconvolution of the measured energy distribution there is a need of an energy response matrix describing the detector response on radiation. For some detectors it is possible to obtain an analytic model of the response functions. Due to the high discrepancy between the impinging spectrum and the measured spectrum in case of detectors of the Medipix family, there is so far no analytic model. Thus, the detector response has to be simulated. As I could improve the precision of the measurement quite extensively, I also intended to tune the simulation with more accurate and appropriate models to gain the same level of accuracy. The results of measurement and simulation have then been compared and

  9. In situ time-resolved X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy of selenite reduction by siderite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduction oxidation-reaction between aqueous selenite (SeO32-) and siderite (FeCO3(s)) was monitored by in situ, time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the selenium K edge in a controlled electrochemical environment. Spectral evolutions showed that more than 60% of selenite was reduced at the siderite surface after 20 h of experiment, at which time the reaction was still incomplete. Fitting of XANES spectra by linear combination of reference spectra showed that selenite reaction with siderite is essentially a two-step process, selenite ions being immobilized on siderite surface prior to their reduction. A kinetic model of the reduction step is proposed, allowing to identify the specific contribution of surface reduction. These results have strong implications for the retention of selenite by corrosion products in nuclear waste repositories and in a larger extent for the fate of selenium in the environment. (authors)

  10. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Freeland, John W.; Evans, Paul G.; Wen, Haidan

    2016-02-01

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.

  11. ''Live'' Prussian blue fading by time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervais, Claire [Smithsonian Institution Museum Conservation Institute, Suitland, MD (United States); Bern University of the Arts, Bern (Switzerland); Languille, Marie-Angelique [Synchrotron SOLEIL, IPANEMA, USR 3461 CNRS/MCC, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Reguer, Solenn [Synchrotron SOLEIL, DiffAbs beamline, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gillet, Martine [Museum national d' histoire naturelle, Centre de Recherche sur la Conservation des Collections, Paris (France); Vicenzi, Edward P. [Smithsonian Institution Museum Conservation Institute, Suitland, MD (United States); Chagnot, Sebastien; Baudelet, Francois [Synchrotron SOLEIL, ODE beamline, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bertrand, Loic [Synchrotron SOLEIL, IPANEMA, USR 3461 CNRS/MCC, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Synchrotron SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2013-04-15

    Prussian blue (PB) is an artists' pigment that has been frequently used in many artworks but poses several problems of conservation because of its fading under light and anoxia treatment. PB fading is due to the reduction of iron(III) into iron(II) and depends a lot on the object investigated. Due to the complexity of the structure, the precise physico-chemical mechanisms behind the redox process remain obscure. In this paper, we present a procedure to investigate light- and anoxia-induced fading of PB-paper samples by means of time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy performed at the Fe K-edge. A system composed of a visible light source and a flux-controlled environmental cell allowed light, gas and humidity to be modified in situ. The synchrotron X-ray beam was evidenced to induce a reduction of PB and to play a major role in the kinetics. The analysis of the PB fading kinetics of a sample submitted to various gas and light environments showed that both synchrotron beam and anoxia were influencing PB reduction in a correlated way. In comparison, light was found to play a minor role. Finally, we have demonstrated that the type of paper substrate could influence significantly the kinetics of reduction. Several hypotheses to explain the correlation between PB reduction mechanism and substrate are presented. (orig.)

  12. Time-resolved and in-situ X-ray scattering methods beyond photoactivation: Utilizing high-flux X-ray sources for the study of ubiquitous non-photoactive proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rohit; Techert, Simone

    2016-01-01

    X-ray scattering technique, comprising of small-angle/wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques is increasingly used to characterize the structure and interactions of biological macromolecules and their complexes in solution. It is a method of choice to characterize the flexible, partially folded and unfolded protein systems. X-ray scattering is the last resort for proteins that cannot be investigated by crystallography or NMR and acts as a complementary technique with different biophysical techniques to answer challenging scientific questions. The marriage of the X-ray scattering technique with the fourth dimension "time" yields structural dynamics and kinetics information for protein motions in hierarchical timescales from picoseconds to days. The arrival of the high-flux X-ray beam at third generation synchrotron sources, exceptional X-ray optics, state-of-the-art detectors, upgradation of X-ray scattering beamlines with microfluidics devices and advanced X-ray scattering data analysis procedures are the important reasons behind the shining years of X-ray scattering technique. The best days of the X-ray scattering technique are on the horizon with the advent of the nanofocus X-ray scattering beamlines and fourth generation X-ray lightsources, i.e., free electron lasers (XFELs). Complementary to the photon-triggered time-resolved X-ray scattering techniques, we will present an overview of the time-resolved and in-situ X-ray scattering techniques for structural dynamics of ubiquitous non-photoactive proteins.

  13. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy setup for pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Slaughter, Daniel S.; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Rude, Bruce S.; Bluhm, Hendrik [Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neppl, Stefan; Cryan, James P.; Siefermann, Katrin R.; Weise, Fabian; Lin, Ming-Fu; Bacellar, Camila; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P.; Fraund, Matthew W.; Khurmi, Champak; Wright, Travis W.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Gessner, Oliver, E-mail: ogessner@lbl.gov [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Hertlein, Marcus P.; Tyliszczak, Tolek [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Huse, Nils [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physics Department, University of Hamburg and Max-Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2014-09-15

    An apparatus for sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies with pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources is presented. A differentially pumped hemispherical electron analyzer is equipped with a delay-line detector that simultaneously records the position and arrival time of every single electron at the exit aperture of the hemisphere with ∼0.1 mm spatial resolution and ∼150 ps temporal accuracy. The kinetic energies of the photoelectrons are encoded in the hit positions along the dispersive axis of the two-dimensional detector. Pump-probe time-delays are provided by the electron arrival times relative to the pump pulse timing. An average time-resolution of (780 ± 20) ps (FWHM) is demonstrated for a hemisphere pass energy E{sub p} = 150 eV and an electron kinetic energy range KE = 503–508 eV. The time-resolution of the setup is limited by the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spread related to the electron trajectory distribution within the analyzer hemisphere and within the electrostatic lens system that images the interaction volume onto the hemisphere entrance slit. The TOF spread for electrons with KE = 430 eV varies between ∼9 ns at a pass energy of 50 eV and ∼1 ns at pass energies between 200 eV and 400 eV. The correlation between the retarding ratio and the TOF spread is evaluated by means of both analytical descriptions of the electron trajectories within the analyzer hemisphere and computer simulations of the entire trajectories including the electrostatic lens system. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the by far dominant contribution to the TOF spread is acquired within the hemisphere. However, both experiment and computer simulations show that the lens system indirectly affects the time resolution of the setup to a significant extent by inducing a strong dependence of the angular spread of electron trajectories entering the hemisphere on the retarding ratio. The scaling of the angular

  14. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy setup for pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Neppl, Stefan; Slaughter, Daniel S; Cryan, James P; Siefermann, Katrin R; Weise, Fabian; Lin, Ming-Fu; Bacellar, Camila; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew W; Khurmi, Champak; Hertlein, Marcus P; Wright, Travis W; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Coslovich, Giacomo; Robinson, Joseph; Kaindl, Robert A; Rude, Bruce S; Ölsner, Andreas; Mähl, Sven; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    An apparatus for sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies with pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources is presented. A differentially pumped hemispherical electron analyzer is equipped with a delay-line detector that simultaneously records the position and arrival time of every single electron at the exit aperture of the hemisphere with ~0.1 mm spatial resolution and ~150 ps temporal accuracy. The kinetic energies of the photoelectrons are encoded in the hit positions along the dispersive axis of the two-dimensional detector. Pump-probe time-delays are provided by the electron arrival times relative to the pump pulse timing. An average time-resolution of (780 ± 20) ps (FWHM) is demonstrated for a hemisphere pass energy E(p) = 150 eV and an electron kinetic energy range KE = 503-508 eV. The time-resolution of the setup is limited by the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spread related to the electron trajectory distribution within the analyzer hemisphere and within the electrostatic lens system that images the interaction volume onto the hemisphere entrance slit. The TOF spread for electrons with KE = 430 eV varies between ~9 ns at a pass energy of 50 eV and ~1 ns at pass energies between 200 eV and 400 eV. The correlation between the retarding ratio and the TOF spread is evaluated by means of both analytical descriptions of the electron trajectories within the analyzer hemisphere and computer simulations of the entire trajectories including the electrostatic lens system. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the by far dominant contribution to the TOF spread is acquired within the hemisphere. However, both experiment and computer simulations show that the lens system indirectly affects the time resolution of the setup to a significant extent by inducing a strong dependence of the angular spread of electron trajectories entering the hemisphere on the retarding ratio. The scaling of the angular spread with

  15. Sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy setup for pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Neppl, Stefan; Slaughter, Daniel S; Cryan, James P; Siefermann, Katrin R; Weise, Fabian; Lin, Ming-Fu; Bacellar, Camila; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew W; Khurmi, Champak; Hertlein, Marcus P; Wright, Travis W; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Coslovich, Giacomo; Robinson, Joseph; Kaindl, Robert A; Rude, Bruce S; Ölsner, Andreas; Mähl, Sven; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    An apparatus for sub-nanosecond time-resolved ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies with pulsed and constant wave X-ray light sources is presented. A differentially pumped hemispherical electron analyzer is equipped with a delay-line detector that simultaneously records the position and arrival time of every single electron at the exit aperture of the hemisphere with ~0.1 mm spatial resolution and ~150 ps temporal accuracy. The kinetic energies of the photoelectrons are encoded in the hit positions along the dispersive axis of the two-dimensional detector. Pump-probe time-delays are provided by the electron arrival times relative to the pump pulse timing. An average time-resolution of (780 ± 20) ps (FWHM) is demonstrated for a hemisphere pass energy E(p) = 150 eV and an electron kinetic energy range KE = 503-508 eV. The time-resolution of the setup is limited by the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spread related to the electron trajectory distribution within the analyzer hemisphere and within the electrostatic lens system that images the interaction volume onto the hemisphere entrance slit. The TOF spread for electrons with KE = 430 eV varies between ~9 ns at a pass energy of 50 eV and ~1 ns at pass energies between 200 eV and 400 eV. The correlation between the retarding ratio and the TOF spread is evaluated by means of both analytical descriptions of the electron trajectories within the analyzer hemisphere and computer simulations of the entire trajectories including the electrostatic lens system. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the by far dominant contribution to the TOF spread is acquired within the hemisphere. However, both experiment and computer simulations show that the lens system indirectly affects the time resolution of the setup to a significant extent by inducing a strong dependence of the angular spread of electron trajectories entering the hemisphere on the retarding ratio. The scaling of the angular spread with

  16. Development of a novel high-rate gaseous pixel detector for time-resolved x-ray diffraction applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, Amir; Besch, Hans-Juergen; Menk, Ralf-Hendrik; Pavel, Nicolaie A.; Walenta, Albert H.

    1999-10-01

    Modern X-ray diffraction applications demand for imaging detectors with large pixel number, high intensity precision, high rate capability and dead time free operation. Detailed studies with a simulation program, which has been developed to investigate the performance of different detector types, show that a large area gaseous single photon counter is very well suited to meet the aforementioned requirements. The prototype detector, which has been built according to the specification profile from the simulations, belongs to a new generation of gaseous detectors using novel technologies for both gas amplification (using a MicroCAT) and position encoding (using 2D resistive charge division). This local interpolation method combines the advantages of a pure pixel read-out (high local and global rate capability) with those of a projecting read-out (small number of channels). The current prototype system has an active area of 28 X 28 mm2 with effectively 140 X 140 pixels. Various test measurements at synchrotron light sources with biological samples have been performed demonstrating the good spatial resolution (around 300 micrometers FWHM), the high intensity precision (only Poisson limited) and the high rate capability (exceeding 1 MHz spot rate). Moreover, time resolved measurements in the microsecond domain have been performed, and fine angular slicing has been applied to protein crystallography experiments. The detector has a high reliability and robustness, particularly when compared to conventional gaseous detectors, and the extension of the technology used to larger active areas is feasible.

  17. Time structure measurement of the storage ring with the time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence method at SSRF

    CERN Document Server

    Zhaohong, Zhang; Song, Xue; Lifang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the time structure of the storage ring on the sample spot inside the experimental hutch is a foundational step during the time-resolved experiments using the pulsed synchrotron X-rays with the time structure defined by the storage ring. In this work, the method of time-resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence was designed and implemented to do the measurement. This method is based on the principle of time-correlated single photon counting techniques. The measurement system consists of a spectrometer with a detector of photomultiplier tube, a timing system, a set of Nuclear Instrument Modules and a luminescent material of Zinc Oxide. The measurement was performed on the X-ray absorbed fine structure spectrum beamline at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results show that this system can be used to measure the time structure of the storage ring with a precision of less than 1 ns.

  18. Time-resolved Soft X-Ray Imaging (SXRI) diagnostic for use at the NIF and OMEGA lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M; Holder, J; James, D; Bruns, H; Celeste, J; Compton, S; Costa, R; Ellis, A; Emig, J; Hargrove, D; Kalantar, D; MacGowan, B; Power, G; Sorce, C; Rekow, V; Widmann, K; Young, B; Young, P; Garcia, O; McKenney, J; Haugh, M; Goldin, F; MacNeil, L; Cone, K

    2006-05-04

    The soft x-ray imager (SXRI) built for the first experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has four soft x-ray channels and one hard x-ray channel. The SXRI is a snout that mounts to a four strip gated imager. This produces four soft x-ray images per strip, which can be separated in time by {approx}60psec. Each soft x-ray channel consists of a mirror plus a filter. The diagnostic was used to study x-ray burnthrough of hot hohlraum targets at the NIF and OMEGA lasers. The SXRI snout design and issues involved in selecting the desired soft x-ray channels are discussed.

  19. Time-resolved Soft X-Ray Imaging (SXRI) diagnostic for use at the NIF and OMEGA lasers (version 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M B; Holder, J P; James, D L; Bruns, H C; Celeste, J R; Compton, S; Costa, R L; Ellis, A D; Emig, J A; Hargrove, D; Kalantar, D H; MacGowan, B J; Power, G D; Sorce, C; Rekow, V; Widmann, K; Young, B K; Young, P E; Garcia, O F; McKenney, J; Haugh, M; Goldin, F; MacNeil, L P; Cone, K

    2006-07-21

    The soft x-ray imager (SXRI) built for the first experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has four soft x-ray channels and one hard x-ray channel. The SXRI is a snout that mounts to a four strip gated imager. This produces four soft x-ray images per strip, which can be separated in time by {approx}60psec. Each soft x-ray channel consists of a mirror plus a filter. The diagnostic was used to study x-ray burnthrough of hot hohlraum targets at the NIF and OMEGA lasers. The SXRI snout design and issues involved in selecting the desired soft x-ray channels are discussed.

  20. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction study on superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 epitaxially grown on SrTiO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this PhD thesis time-resolved X-ray diffraction in optical pump - X-ray probe scheme was applied for the first time to a High-Temperature Superconductor in the superconducting state. The aim was to study the possible lattice response to optical Cooper pair breaking. As sample a thin YBa2Cu3O7 film with a superconducting transition temperature of Tc=90 K, epitaxially grown on a SrTiO3 single crystal was used. (orig.)

  1. Direct autocorrelation of soft-x-ray free-electron-laser pulses by time-resolved two-photon double ionization of He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitzner, R.; Sorokin, A. A.; Siemer, B.; Roling, S.; Rutkowski, M.; Zacharias, H.; Neeb, M.; Noll, T.; Siewert, F.; Eberhardt, W.; Richter, M.; Juranic, P.; Tiedtke, K.; Feldhaus, J.

    2009-08-01

    The pulse duration of soft x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) radiation is directly measured by time-resolved observation of doubly charged helium ions at 51.8 eV. A wave front splitting autocorrelator produces two correlated FEL pulses with a resolution of better than a femtosecond. In the interesting intensity range from 1013 to 1016W/cm2 direct and sequential double ionization contribute to the ion yield which has significant influence on the correlation width, being a general feature at high photon energies. Here, a duration of τL=(29±5)fs is derived for the soft x-ray pulses at FLASH.

  2. Electron-hole recombination on ZnO(0001) single-crystal surface studied by time-resolved soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, R.; Yamamoto, S.; Ogawa, M.; Yamamoto, Sh.; Fujikawa, K.; Hobara, R.; Matsuda, I., E-mail: imatsuda@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Ozawa, K. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Emori, M.; Sakama, H. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Kitagawa, S.; Daimon, H. [Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2014-10-13

    Time-resolved soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments were performed with time scales from picoseconds to nanoseconds to trace relaxation of surface photovoltage on the ZnO(0001) single crystal surface in real time. The band diagram of the surface has been obtained numerically using PES data, showing a depletion layer which extends to 1 μm. Temporal evolution of the photovoltage effect is well explained by a recombination process of a thermionic model, giving the photoexcited carrier lifetime of about 1 ps at the surface under the flat band condition. This lifetime agrees with a temporal range reported by the previous time-resolved optical experiments.

  3. Structural changes in single membranes in response to an applied transmembrane electric potential revealed by time-resolved neutron/X-ray interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Time-resolved (or transient) neutron/X-ray reflectivity. ► Neutron/X-ray reflectivity enhanced by interferometric techniques. ► Electric potential induced changes in a hybrid lipid bilayer membrane. ► Electric potential induced changes in a voltage-sensor protein membrane. - Abstract: The profile structure of a hybrid lipid bilayer, tethered to the surface of an inorganic substrate and fully hydrated with a bulk aqueous medium in an electrochemical cell, was investigated as a function of the applied transbilayer electric potential via time-resolved neutron reflectivity, enhanced by interferometry. Significant, and fully reversible structural changes were observed in the distal half (with respect to the substrate surface) of the hybrid bilayer comprised of a zwitterionic phospholipid in response to a +100 mV potential with respect to 0 mV. These arise presumably due to reorientation of the electric dipole present in the polar headgroup of the phospholipid and its resulting effect on the thickness of the phospholipid’s hydrocarbon chain layer within the hybrid bilayer’s profile structure. The profile structure of the voltage-sensor domain from a voltage-gated ion channel protein within a phospholipid bilayer membrane, tethered to the surface of an inorganic substrate and fully hydrated with a bulk aqueous medium in an electrochemical cell, was also investigated as a function of the applied transmembrane electric potential via time-resolved X-ray reflectivity, enhanced by interferometry. Significant, fully-reversible, and different structural changes in the protein were detected in response to ±100 mV potentials with respect to 0 mV. The approach employed is that typical of transient spectroscopy, shown here to be applicable to both neutron and X-ray reflectivity of thin films

  4. A full-field transmission x-ray microscope for time-resolved imaging of magnetic nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Ewald, Johannes; Wessels, Philipp; Wilhein, Thomas; Drescher, Markus; Wieland, Marek; Nisius, Thomas; Vogel, Andreas; Abbati, Gennaro; Baumbach, Stefan; Overbuschmann, Johannes; Viefhaus, Jens; Meier, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Sub-nanosecond magnetization dynamics of small permalloy (Ni80Fe20) elements has been investigated with a new full-field transmission microscope at the soft X-ray beamline P04 of the high brilliance synchrotron radiation source PETRA III. The soft X-ray microscope generates a flat-top illumination field of 20 µm diameter using a grating condenser. A tilted nanostructured magnetic sample can be excited by a picosecond electric current pulse via a coplanar waveguide. The transmitted light of th...

  5. Time-Resolved soft X-ray Microscopy of Magnetic Nanostructures at the P04 Beamline of PETRA III

    OpenAIRE

    Wessels, Philipp; Ewald, Johannes; Wilhein, Thomas; Drescher, Markus; Wieland, Marek; Nisius, Thomas; Vogel, Andreas; Abbati, Gennaro; Baumbach, Stefan; Overbuschmann, Johannes; Viefhaus, Jens; Meier, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Picosecond magnetization dynamics of small permalloy (Ni80Fe20) elements has been investigated with a new full-field transmission microscope at the soft X-ray beamline P04 of the high brilliance synchrotron radiation source PETRA III.The soft X-ray microscope generates a flat-top illumination field of 20 µm diameter using a grating condenser. A tilted nanostructured magnetic sample can be excited either by making use of a mobile synchronized femtosecond laser system or by a picosecond electri...

  6. Systematic investigation of lard polymorphism using combined DSC and time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalnin, D.J.E.; Lesieur, P.; Artzner, F.; Keller, G.; Ollivon, M.

    2005-01-01

    The polymorphic behavior of lard was systematically investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) while simultaneously monitoring the formation of the different crystal forms with X-ray diffraction (XRDT). To interpret the complex polymorphic evolution of the sample analyzed by regular DSC

  7. Multichord time-resolved electron temperature measurements by the x-ray absorber-foil method on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorber foils have been installed in the TFTR X-Ray Imaging System to permit measurement of the electron temperature along 10 to 30 chords spaced at 5-12.5 cm with a time resolution of less than 100 μs. The technique uses the ratio of x-ray fluxes transmitted through two different foils. The ratio depends mainly on electron temperature. Simulations show that strong impurity line radiation can distort this ratio. To correct for these effects, special beryllium-scandium filters are employed to select the line-free region between 2 and 4.5 keV. Other filter pairs allow corrections for Fe L and Ni L line radiation as well as Ti K and Ni K emission. Good accuracy is also obtained with simple beryllium filters, provided that impurity corrections are incorporated in the analysis, taking line intensities from the x-ray pulse-height analysis diagnostic. A description of modeling calculations and a comparison of temperature values from this diagnostic with data from the x-ray pulse height analysis, the electron cyclotron emission, and the Thomson scattering diagnostics are presented. Several applications of the absorber foil electron temperature diagnostic on TFTR are discussed

  8. Multichord time-resolved electron temperature measurements by the x-ray absorber-foil method on TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiraly, J.; Bitter, M.; Efthimion, P.; von Goeler, S.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.; McGuire, K.; Sauthoff, N.; Sesnic, S.

    1985-09-01

    Absorber foils have been installed in the TFTR X-Ray Imaging System to permit measurement of the electron temperature along 10 to 30 chords spaced at 5-12.5 cm with a time resolution of less than 100 ..mu..s. The technique uses the ratio of x-ray fluxes transmitted through two different foils. The ratio depends mainly on electron temperature. Simulations show that strong impurity line radiation can distort this ratio. To correct for these effects, special beryllium-scandium filters are employed to select the line-free region between 2 and 4.5 keV. Other filter pairs allow corrections for Fe L and Ni L line radiation as well as Ti K and Ni K emission. Good accuracy is also obtained with simple beryllium filters, provided that impurity corrections are incorporated in the analysis, taking line intensities from the x-ray pulse-height analysis diagnostic. A description of modeling calculations and a comparison of temperature values from this diagnostic with data from the x-ray pulse height analysis, the electron cyclotron emission, and the Thomson scattering diagnostics are presented. Several applications of the absorber foil electron temperature diagnostic on TFTR are discussed.

  9. Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy of photoinduced insulator-metal transition in a colossal magnetoresistive manganite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rini, M.; Tobey, R.; Wall, S.; Zhu, Y.; Tomioka, Y.; Tokura, Y.; Cavalleri, A.; Schoenlein, R.W.

    2008-08-01

    We studied the ultrafast insulator-metal transition in a manganite by means of picosecond X-ray absorption at the O K- and Mn L-edges, probing photoinduced changes in O-2p and Mn-3d electronic states near the Fermi level.

  10. Origins of misorientation defects in single crystal castings: A time resolved in situ synchrotron X-ray radiography study

    OpenAIRE

    Aveson J.W.; Reinhart G.; Nguyen-Thi H.; Mangelinck-Noël N.; D'Souza N; Stone H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of grain boundaries in single crystal castings is intolerable owing to the detrimental impact on creep and fatigue behaviour. Whilst the origins of many defects such as freckles have been understood since the 1970s, other defects such as slivers, or indeed the small mosaicity observed in many castings have eluded comprehensive treatments. In the present work, in situX-ray imaging has been used to examine the origin of misorientation defects that arise during solidification. Dendr...

  11. A full-field transmission x-ray microscope for time-resolved imaging of magnetic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewald, J.; Nisius, T.; Abbati, G.; Baumbach, S.; Overbuschmann, J.; Wilhein, T. [Institute for X-Optics (IXO), Hochschule Koblenz, Joseph-Rovan-Allee 2, 53424 Remagen (Germany); Wessels, P.; Wieland, M.; Drescher, M. [The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging (CUI), University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Experimentalphysik, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Vogel, A. [Institut für Angewandte Physik, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstraße 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Viefhaus, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Meier, G. [The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging (CUI), University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-01-28

    Sub-nanosecond magnetization dynamics of small permalloy (Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) elements has been investigated with a new full-field transmission microscope at the soft X-ray beamline P04 of the high brilliance synchrotron radiation source PETRA III. The soft X-ray microscope generates a flat-top illumination field of 20 μm diameter using a grating condenser. A tilted nanostructured magnetic sample can be excited by a picosecond electric current pulse via a coplanar waveguide. The transmitted light of the sample plane is directly imaged by a micro zone plate with < 65 nm resolution onto a 2D gateable X-ray detector to select one particular bunch in the storage ring that probes the time evolution of the dynamic information successively via XMCD spectromicroscopy in a pump-probe scheme. In the experiments it was possible to generate a homogeneously magnetized state in patterned magnetic layers by a strong magnetic Oersted field pulse of 200 ps duration and directly observe the recovery to the initial flux-closure vortex patterns.

  12. A full-field transmission x-ray microscope for time-resolved imaging of magnetic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, J.; Wessels, P.; Wieland, M.; Nisius, T.; Vogel, A.; Abbati, G.; Baumbach, S.; Overbuschmann, J.; Viefhaus, J.; Meier, G.; Wilhein, T.; Drescher, M.

    2016-01-01

    Sub-nanosecond magnetization dynamics of small permalloy (Ni80Fe20) elements has been investigated with a new full-field transmission microscope at the soft X-ray beamline P04 of the high brilliance synchrotron radiation source PETRA III. The soft X-ray microscope generates a flat-top illumination field of 20 μm diameter using a grating condenser. A tilted nanostructured magnetic sample can be excited by a picosecond electric current pulse via a coplanar waveguide. The transmitted light of the sample plane is directly imaged by a micro zone plate with X-ray detector to select one particular bunch in the storage ring that probes the time evolution of the dynamic information successively via XMCD spectromicroscopy in a pump-probe scheme. In the experiments it was possible to generate a homogeneously magnetized state in patterned magnetic layers by a strong magnetic Oersted field pulse of 200 ps duration and directly observe the recovery to the initial flux-closure vortex patterns.

  13. A new experimental setup for the time resolved x-ray diffraction study of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrel, D.; Girodon-Boulandet, N.; Paris, S.; Mazué, J. F.; Couqueberg, E.; Gailhanou, M.; Thiaudière, D.; Gaffet, E.; Bernard, F.

    2002-02-01

    A new experimental setup for time resolved x-ray diffraction is described. Designed for the LURE H10 beamline and its 4 (+2) circles goniometer, it allows simultaneous recordings of x-ray patterns with a rate of 30 patterns per second, a maximum 2θ range of 120°, infrared thermography at the same rate, and thermocouples readings at a frequency of up to 3×104 Hz. Preliminary results obtained using this setup are presented, showing how it is possible to analyze a solid-solid or solid-liquid reaction. As an example, an in situ study of phase transformation and temperature evolution during the self-sustaining synthesis of an FeAl intermetallic compound starting from a mechanically activated mixture is investigated. The versatility of the setup was proved and could even be enhanced by the design of new sample holders, thus expanding its area of use at low cost.

  14. Topical Review: Molecular reaction and solvation visualized by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering: Structure, dynamics, and their solvent dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Hwan Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved X-ray solution scattering is sensitive to global molecular structure and can track the dynamics of chemical reactions. In this article, we review our recent studies on triiodide ion (I3– and molecular iodine (I2 in solution. For I3–, we elucidated the excitation wavelength-dependent photochemistry and the solvent-dependent ground-state structure. For I2, by combining time-slicing scheme and deconvolution data analysis, we mapped out the progression of geminate recombination and the associated structural change in the solvent cage. With the aid of X-ray free electron lasers, even clearer observation of ultrafast chemical events will be made possible in the near future.

  15. Dehydrogenation kinetics of pure and nickel-doped magnesium hydride investigated by in situ time-resolved powder X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.R.; Andreasen, A.; Vegge, Tejs;

    2006-01-01

    The dehydrogenation kinetics of pure and nickel (Ni)-doped (2w/w%) magnesium hydride (MgH2) have been investigated by in situ time-resolved powder X-ray diffraction (PXD). Deactivated samples, i.e. air exposed, are investigated in order to focus on the effect of magnesium oxide (MgO) surface layers...... by the Johnson-Mehi-Avrami formalism in order to derive rate constants at different temperatures. The apparent activation energies for dehydrogenation of pure and Ni-doped magnesium hydride were E-A approximate to 300 and 250 kJ/mol, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry gave, E-A = 270 k...

  16. Revealing the micromechanisms behind semi-solid metal deformation with time-resolved X-ray tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Kareh, K. M.; Lee, P. D.; Atwood, R. C.; Connolley, T; Gourlay, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    The behaviour of granular solid–liquid mixtures is key when deforming a wide range of materials from cornstarch slurries to soils, rock and magma flows. Here we demonstrate that treating semi-solid alloys as a granular fluid is critical to understanding flow behaviour and defect formation during casting. Using synchrotron X-ray tomography, we directly measure the discrete grain response during uniaxial compression. We show that the stress–strain response at 64–93% solid is due to the shear-in...

  17. Structural and dynamical properties of Mg{sub 65}Cu{sub 25}Y{sub 10} metallic glasses studied by in situ high energy X-ray diffraction and time resolved X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruta, B., E-mail: ruta@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Giordano, V.M. [ILM, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 and CNRS, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Erra, L. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Liu, C.; Pineda, E. [Departament Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, ESAB, UPC-BarcelonaTech, Castelldefels (Spain)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Study of rapidly quenched Mg-based metallic glasses under different thermal paths. • The atomic dynamics was investigated by X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. • The structural changes were followed by in situ high energy X-ray diffraction. • Dynamical and structural properties of Mg-based metallic glasses at the atomic level. • Strengthened idea of a stress-induced atomic motion in metallic glasses. - Abstract: We present a temperature investigation of the structural and dynamical evolution of rapidly quenched metallic glasses of Mg{sub 65}Cu{sub 25}Y{sub 10} at the atomic length scale by means of in situ high energy X-ray diffraction and time resolved X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. We find a flattening of the temperature evolution of the position of the first sharp diffraction peak on approaching the glass transition temperature from the glassy state, which reflects into a surprising slowing down of the relaxation dynamics of even one order of magnitude with increasing temperature. The comparison between structural and dynamical properties strengthens the idea of a stress-induced, rather than pure diffusive, atomic motion in metallic glasses.

  18. Structural and dynamical properties of Mg65Cu25Y10 metallic glasses studied by in situ high energy X-ray diffraction and time resolved X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Study of rapidly quenched Mg-based metallic glasses under different thermal paths. • The atomic dynamics was investigated by X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. • The structural changes were followed by in situ high energy X-ray diffraction. • Dynamical and structural properties of Mg-based metallic glasses at the atomic level. • Strengthened idea of a stress-induced atomic motion in metallic glasses. - Abstract: We present a temperature investigation of the structural and dynamical evolution of rapidly quenched metallic glasses of Mg65Cu25Y10 at the atomic length scale by means of in situ high energy X-ray diffraction and time resolved X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. We find a flattening of the temperature evolution of the position of the first sharp diffraction peak on approaching the glass transition temperature from the glassy state, which reflects into a surprising slowing down of the relaxation dynamics of even one order of magnitude with increasing temperature. The comparison between structural and dynamical properties strengthens the idea of a stress-induced, rather than pure diffusive, atomic motion in metallic glasses

  19. Direct Observation of Phase Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds Using In-situ Spatially Resolved and Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J.; Wong, J.; Ressler, T.

    1999-09-23

    Spatially resolved x-ray diffraction (SRXRD) and time resolved x-ray diffraction (TRXRD) were used to investigate real time solid state phase transformations and solidification in AISI type 304 stainless steel gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds. These experiments were conducted at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) using a high flux beam line. Spatially resolved observations of {gamma} {leftrightarrow} {delta} solid state phase transformations were performed in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of moving welds and time-resolved observations of the solidification sequence were performed in the fusion zone (FZ) of stationary welds after the arc had been terminated. Results of the moving weld experiments showed that the kinetics of the {gamma}{yields}{delta} phase transformation on heating in the HAZ were sufficiently rapid to transform a narrow region surrounding the liquid weld pool to the {delta} ferrite phase. Results of the stationary weld experiments showed, for the first time, that solidification can occur directly to the {delta} ferrite phase, which persisted as a single phase for 0.5s. Upon solidification to {delta}, the {delta} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation followed and completed in 0.2s as the weld cooled further to room temperature.

  20. Laser-induced generation and quenching of magnetization on FeRh investigated with time-resolved X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, Ilie [Regensburg University, Regensburg (Germany); BESSY GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Stamm, Christian; Pontius, Niko; Kachel, Torsten; Duerr, Hermann [BESSY GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Ramm, Paul; Back, Christian [Regensburg University, Regensburg (Germany); Thiele, Jan-Ulrich [Hitachi Global Storage, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Upon heating, the equiatomic FeRh alloy exhibits a first-order magnetic phase transition from the antiferromagnetic (AFM) to the ferromagnetic (FM) state around room temperature. Here, we study the fs laser-induced AFM-FM phase transition as well as the transition from FM towards the paramagnetic state by employing the time-resolved X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Both Fe and Rh elements show a gradual growth of the magnetic moment within 200 ps after laser excitation. Temperature-dependent data, measured at intermediate temperatures between AFM and FM state, provide evidence for the rapid nucleation and subsequent slow expansion of the FM regions within an AFM matrix. Once in the FM state, FeRh can be optically demagnetized on a few ps time scale (limited by the X-ray probing pulse). Further time-resolved magneto-optics measurements done in the visible spectral range reveal a demagnetization time constant of 200 fs. For the photo-induced demagnetization process we consider a mechanism that follows the transient electronic structure of the system.

  1. Revealing the micromechanisms behind semi-solid metal deformation with time-resolved X-ray tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareh, K. M.; Lee, P. D.; Atwood, R. C.; Connolley, T.; Gourlay, C. M.

    2014-07-01

    The behaviour of granular solid-liquid mixtures is key when deforming a wide range of materials from cornstarch slurries to soils, rock and magma flows. Here we demonstrate that treating semi-solid alloys as a granular fluid is critical to understanding flow behaviour and defect formation during casting. Using synchrotron X-ray tomography, we directly measure the discrete grain response during uniaxial compression. We show that the stress-strain response at 64-93% solid is due to the shear-induced dilation of discrete rearranging grains. This leads to the counter-intuitive result that, in unfed samples, compression can open internal pores and draw the free surface into the liquid, resulting in cracking. A soil mechanics approach shows that, irrespective of initial solid fraction, the solid packing density moves towards a constant value during deformation, consistent with the existence of a critical state in mushy alloys analogous to soils.

  2. Origins of misorientation defects in single crystal castings: A time resolved in situ synchrotron X-ray radiography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aveson J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of grain boundaries in single crystal castings is intolerable owing to the detrimental impact on creep and fatigue behaviour. Whilst the origins of many defects such as freckles have been understood since the 1970s, other defects such as slivers, or indeed the small mosaicity observed in many castings have eluded comprehensive treatments. In the present work, in situX-ray imaging has been used to examine the origin of misorientation defects that arise during solidification. Dendrite deformation was observed, which impacted growth characteristics and led to a permanent misoriention. Digital image correlation analysis showed the dendrites becoming increasingly bent as solidification progressed. In order to probe the deformation modes further, a method was devised to convert standard EBSD data into measurements of bending and torsion angle. It was demonstrated that such defects form as the result of bending moments arising from differential thermal contraction and gravity.

  3. Transient grating-induced phase inhomogeneity in FeRh studied by time-resolved hard x-ray nanodiffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Qingteng; Chen, Pice; Walko, D. A.; Dufresne, E. M.; Thiele, J. U.; Fullerton, E. E.; Cai, Zhonghou; Evans, P. G.; Wen, Haidan

    2014-03-01

    The photo-induced antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition of FeRh at room temperature has important technological applications in the magnetic recording industry. This first-order phase transition is accompanied by a large, abrupt lattice expansion. In this study, spatially periodic phase modulation in a FeRh thin film was induced by an optical transient grating; the temporal and spatial evolution of the resulting lattice profile was probed by ultrafast hard x-ray nanodiffraction. We found that the transient grating induced lattice profile deviates from the initial sinusoidal spatial modulation during the recovery process, which allows us to quantitatively measure the in-plane propagation of the phase boundary. Work at Argonne was supported by the Argonne LDRD grant (2013-036-R1).

  4. Time-resolved X-ray microtomographic measurement of water transport in wood-fibre reinforced composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Arttu; Harjupatana, Tero; Kataja, Markku; Fortino, Stefania; Immonen, Kirsi

    2016-07-01

    Natural fibre composites are prone to absorb moisture from the environment which may lead to dimensional changes, mold growth, degradation of mechanical properties or other adverse effects. In this work we develop a method for direct non-intrusive measurement of local moisture content inside a material sample. The method is based on X-ray microtomography, digital image correlation and image analysis. As a first application of the method we study axial transport of water in a cylindrical polylactic acid/birch pulp composite material sample with one end exposed to water. Based on the results, the method seems to give plausible estimates of water content profiles inside the cylindrical sample. The results may be used, e.g., in developing and validating models of moisture transport in biocomposites.

  5. Soft X-ray Laser Microscopy of Lipid Rafts towards GPCR-Based Drug Discovery Using Time-Resolved FRET Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuhiko Kodama

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Many signaling molecules involved in G protein-mediated signal transduction, which are present in the lipid rafts and believed to be controlled spatially and temporally, influence the potency and efficacy of neurotransmitter receptors and transporters. This has focus interest on lipid rafts and the notion that these microdomains acts as a kind of signaling platform and thus have an important role in the expression of membrane receptor-mediated signal transduction, cancer, immune responses, neurotransmission, viral infections and various other phenomena due to specific and efficient signaling according to extracellular stimuli. However, the real structure of lipid rafts has not been observed so far due to its small size and a lack of sufficiently sophisticated observation systems. A soft X-ray microscope using a coherent soft X-ray laser in the water window region (2.3–4.4 nm should prove to be a most powerful tool to observe the dynamic structure of lipid rafts of several tens of nanometers in size in living cells. We have developed for the X-ray microscope a new compact soft X-ray laser using strongly induced plasma high harmonic resonance. We have also developed a time-resolved highly sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET system and confirmed protein-protein interactions coupled with ligands. The simultaneous use of these new tools for observation of localization of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs in rafts has become an important and optimum tool system to analyze the dynamics of signal transduction through rafts as signaling platform. New technology to visualize rafts is expected to lead to the understanding of those dynamics and innovative development of drug discovery that targets GPCRs localized in lipid rafts.

  6. Ultraviolet photochemical reaction of [Fe(III)(C2O4)3](3-) in aqueous solutions studied by femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogi, Y; Obara, Y; Katayama, T; Suzuki, Y-I; Liu, S Y; Bartlett, N C-M; Kurahashi, N; Karashima, S; Togashi, T; Inubushi, Y; Ogawa, K; Owada, S; Rubešová, M; Yabashi, M; Misawa, K; Slavíček, P; Suzuki, T

    2015-05-01

    Time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy was performed for aqueous ammonium iron(III) oxalate trihydrate solutions using an X-ray free electron laser and a synchronized ultraviolet laser. The spectral and time resolutions of the experiment were 1.3 eV and 200 fs, respectively. A femtosecond 268 nm pulse was employed to excite [Fe(III)(C2O4)3](3-) in solution from the high-spin ground electronic state to ligand-to-metal charge transfer state(s), and the subsequent dynamics were studied by observing the time-evolution of the X-ray absorption spectrum near the Fe K-edge. Upon 268 nm photoexcitation, the Fe K-edge underwent a red-shift by more than 4 eV within 140 fs; however, the magnitude of the redshift subsequently diminished within 3 ps. The Fe K-edge of the photoproduct remained lower in energy than that of [Fe(III)(C2O4)3](3-). The observed red-shift of the Fe K-edge and the spectral feature of the product indicate that Fe(III) is upon excitation immediately photoreduced to Fe(II), followed by ligand dissociation from Fe(II). Based on a comparison of the X-ray absorption spectra with density functional theory calculations, we propose that the dissociation proceeds in two steps, forming first [(CO2 (•))Fe(II)(C2O4)2](3-) and subsequently [Fe(II)(C2O4)2](2-).

  7. Ultraviolet photochemical reaction of [Fe(III(C2O43]3− in aqueous solutions studied by femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ogi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy was performed for aqueous ammonium iron(III oxalate trihydrate solutions using an X-ray free electron laser and a synchronized ultraviolet laser. The spectral and time resolutions of the experiment were 1.3 eV and 200 fs, respectively. A femtosecond 268 nm pulse was employed to excite [Fe(III(C2O43]3− in solution from the high-spin ground electronic state to ligand-to-metal charge transfer state(s, and the subsequent dynamics were studied by observing the time-evolution of the X-ray absorption spectrum near the Fe K-edge. Upon 268 nm photoexcitation, the Fe K-edge underwent a red-shift by more than 4 eV within 140 fs; however, the magnitude of the redshift subsequently diminished within 3 ps. The Fe K-edge of the photoproduct remained lower in energy than that of [Fe(III(C2O43]3−. The observed red-shift of the Fe K-edge and the spectral feature of the product indicate that Fe(III is upon excitation immediately photoreduced to Fe(II, followed by ligand dissociation from Fe(II. Based on a comparison of the X-ray absorption spectra with density functional theory calculations, we propose that the dissociation proceeds in two steps, forming first [(CO2•Fe(II(C2O42]3− and subsequently [Fe(II(C2O42]2−.

  8. Time-resolved soft-x-ray spectroscopy of a magnetic octupole transition in nickel-like xenon, cesium, and barium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabert, E; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Boyce, K; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Szymkowiak, A

    2005-11-11

    A microcalorimeter with event mode capability for time-resolved soft-x-ray spectroscopy, and a high-resolution flat-field EUV spectrometer have been employed at the Livermore EBIT-I electron beam ion trap for observations and wavelength measurements of M1, E2, and M3 decays of long-lived levels in the Ni-like ions Xe{sup 26+}, Cs{sup 27+}, and Ba{sup 28+}. Of particular interest is the lowest excited level, 3d{sup 9}4s {sup 3}D{sub 3}, which can only decay via a magnetic octupole (M3) transition. For this level in Xe an excitation energy of (590.40 {+-} 0.03eV) and a level lifetime of (11.5 {+-} 0.5 ms) have been determined.

  9. Element-specific characterization of transient electronic structure of solvated Fe(II) complexes with time-resolved soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kiryong; Cho, Hana; Schoenlein, Robert W; Kim, Tae Kyu; Huse, Nils

    2015-11-17

    Polypyridyl transition-metal complexes are an intriguing class of compounds due to the relatively facile chemical designs and variations in ligand-field strengths that allow for spin-state changes and hence electronic configurations in response to external perturbations such as pressure and light. Light-activated spin-conversion complexes have possible applications in a variety of molecular-based devices, and ultrafast excited-state evolution in these complexes is of fundamental interest for understanding of the origins of spin-state conversion in metal complexes. Knowledge of the interplay of structure and valence charge distributions is important to understand which degrees of freedom drive spin-conversion and which respond in a favorable (or unfavorable) manner. To track the response of the constituent components, various types of time-resolved X-ray probe methods have been utilized for a broad range of chemical and biological systems relevant to catalysis, solar energy conversions, and functional molecular devices. In particular, transient soft X-ray spectroscopy of solvated molecules can offer complementary information on the detailed electronic structures and valence charge distributions of photoinduced intermediate species: First-row transition-metal L-edges consist of 2p-3d transitions, which directly probe the unoccupied valence density of states and feature lifetime broadening in the range of 100 meV, making them sensitive spectral probes of metal-ligand interactions. In this Account, we present some of our recent progress in employing picosecond and femtosecond soft X-ray pulses from synchrotron sources to investigate element specific valence charge distributions and spin-state evolutions in Fe(II) polypyridyl complexes via core-level transitions. Our results on transient L-edge spectroscopy of Fe(II) complexes clearly show that the reduction in σ-donation is compensated by significant attenuation of π-backbonding upon spin-crossover. This underscores

  10. Photo-induced magnetization dynamics of FeRh thin films investigated by time-resolved X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, Ilie [Institut fuer Experimentelle Physik, Universitaet Regensburg (Germany); BESSY GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Stamm, Christian; Kachel, Torsten; Pontius, Niko; Duerr, Hermann [BESSY GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Ramm, Paul; Back, Christian [Institut fuer Experimentelle Physik, Universitaet Regensburg (Germany); Thiele, Jan [Hitachi GST, San Jose Research Center (United States)

    2008-07-01

    For close to equiatomic composition the FeRh alloy undergoes a first-order phase transition from the antiferromagnetic (AFM) to ferromagnetic (FM) state upon heating above room temperature. We trigger the magnetic phase transition by femtosecond laser excitation and study the subsequent dynamics of the Fe and Rh magnetic moments in an element specific manner using X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) as a probing tool. For both elements we observe a gradual growth of ferromagnetic ordering that takes place on a 200 ps time scale after optical excitation. On the other hand, once in the FM state, FeRh can be demagnetized on a few picoseconds time interval, the observed dynamics being limited by the width of the X-ray probing pulse (here 10 ps). By comparison to the demagnetization dynamics measured on Ni under similar conditions, we retrieve the lower limit of the demagnetization process that evolves on a sub-picosecond time scale. Hence, the AFM-FM phase transition in conjunction with time-resolved XMCD allow us to study at a microscopic level the elementary processes involved in the magnetization growth, demagnetization and re-magnetization phenomena.

  11. Development of a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system for time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at an X-ray free-electron laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system for time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using an X-ray free-electron laser has been developed. The basic performance of the system is demonstrated using XFEL-induced and synchrotron-radiation-induced Ti 1s core-level spectroscopy. In order to utilize high-brilliance photon sources, such as X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), for advanced time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TR-PES), a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system combined with a high-resolution hemispherical electron energy analyzer has been developed. The system’s design enables it to be controlled by an external trigger signal for single-shot pump–probe-type TR-PES. The basic performance of the system is demonstrated with an offline test, followed by online core-level photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy in ‘single-shot image’, ‘shot-to-shot image (image-to-image storage or block storage)’ and ‘shot-to-shot sweep’ modes at soft X-ray undulator beamline BL17SU of SPring-8. In the offline test the typical repetition rate for image-to-image storage mode has been confirmed to be about 15 Hz using a conventional pulse-generator. The function for correcting the shot-to-shot intensity fluctuations of the exciting photon beam, an important requirement for the TR-PES experiments at FEL sources, has been successfully tested at BL17SU by measuring Au 4f photoelectrons with intentionally controlled photon flux. The system has also been applied to hard X-ray PES (HAXPES) in ‘ordinary sweep’ mode as well as shot-to-shot image mode at the 27 m-long undulator beamline BL19LXU of SPring-8 and also at the SACLA XFEL facility. The XFEL-induced Ti 1s core-level spectrum of La-doped SrTiO3 is reported as a function of incident power density. The Ti 1s core-level spectrum obtained at low power density is consistent with the spectrum obtained using the synchrotron source. At high power densities the Ti 1s core-level spectra show

  12. Direct Observations of Phase Transitions in Ti-6Al-4V Alloy Transient Welds using Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J W; Palmer, T A; Babu, S S; Zhang, W; Debroy, T

    2003-11-11

    Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) experiments were used to directly observe phase transformations occurring during gas tungsten arc spot welding of Ti-6Al-4V. These in-situ x-ray diffraction experiments tracked the evolution of the {alpha} {yields} {beta} {yields} L {yields} {beta} {yields} {alpha}/{alpha}{prime} phase transformation sequence in real time during rapid weld heating and cooling. Three different weld locations were examined, providing kinetic information about phase transformations in the fusion zone (FZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) under different heating and cooling rates and at different temperatures. The TRXRD data were further coupled with the results of thermodynamic calculations of phase equilibria and numerical modeling to compute the weld temperatures. The results suggest that significant superheat is required above the {beta} transus temperature to complete the {alpha} {yields} {beta} transformation at all locations during weld heating, and that the amount of superheat decreases with distance from the center of the weld where the heating rates are lower. Johnson-Mehl-Avrami modeling of the weld heating kinetics produced a set of parameters that allowed the prediction of the {alpha} {yields} {beta} phase transformation rate at each location, but were not successful in determining a definitive mechanism for the transformation. The {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation during weld cooling in the HAZ was shown to initiate at the {beta} transus temperature and reach completion below the Ms temperature, producing substantial {alpha}{prime}martensite. In the FZ, the {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation during weld cooling was shown to initiate below the Ms temperature, and to completely transform the microstructure to {alpha}{prime} martensite.

  13. Direct Observations of Austenite, Bainite and Martensite Formation During Arc Welding of 1045 Steel using Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J; Palmer, T; Babu, S; Zhang, W; DebRoy, T

    2004-02-17

    In-situ Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) experiments were performed during stationary gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of AISI 1045 C-Mn steel. These synchrotron-based experiments tracked, in real time, phase transformations in the heat-affected zone of the weld under rapid heating and cooling conditions. The diffraction patterns were recorded at 100 ms intervals, and were later analyzed using diffraction peak profile analysis to determine the relative fraction of ferrite ({alpha}) and austenite ({gamma}) phases in each diffraction pattern. Lattice parameters and diffraction peak widths were also measured throughout the heating and cooling cycle of the weld, providing additional information about the phases that were formed. The experimental results were coupled with a thermofluid weld model to calculate the weld temperatures, allowing time-temperature transformation kinetics of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation to be evaluated. During heating, complete austenitization was observed in the heat affected zone of the weld and the kinetics of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation were modeled using a Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach. The results from the 1045 steel weld were compared to those of a 1005 low carbon steel from a previous study. Differences in austenitization rates of the two steels were attributed to differences in the base metal microstructures, particularly the relative amounts of pearlite and the extent of the allotriomorphic ferrite phase. During weld cooling, the austenite transformed to a mixture of bainite and martensite. In situ diffraction was able to distinguish between these two non-equilibrium phases based on differences in their lattice parameters and their transformation rates, resulting in the first real time x-ray diffraction observations of bainite and martensite formation made during welding.

  14. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction from frog skeletal muscle during shortening against an inertial load and a quick release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A group of Japanese researchers conducted, for the first time in this field, experiments on time-resolved x-ray diffraction of frog (bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana) skeletal muscle in conditions where both the force and the muscle length change with time. During an isotonic twitch under a load of about 0.3 P0, the intensity ratio started falling on stimulation and reached a minimum value of 0.5 - 0.6 at the early shortening phase, which was maintained until the beginning of relaxation. Except that the minimum value was not retained until the start of relaxation, the same was observed during a twitch against an inertial load whereby the peak force exerted by the muscle was about 0.4 P0. The results may be taken to indicate that the change in the intensity ratio reflects not the time course of shortening but that of force generation. When a quick release (3 - 4% of muscle length) was applied during the rising phase of an isometric twitch, the intensity ratio showed no distinct change. Judging from tentative calculation results, however, the foregoing result is subject to further experiments with a much improved time resolution of the measurements. (Kitajima, A.)

  15. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction studies of frog skeletal muscle isometrically twitched by two successive stimuli using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to clarify the delay between muscular structural changes and mechanical responses, the intensity changes of the equatorial and myosin layer-line reflections were studied by a time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique using synchrotron radiation. The muscle was stimulated at 12-130C by two successive stimuli at an interval during which the second twitch started while tension was still being exerted by the muscle. At the first twitch, the intensity changes of the 1,0 and 1,1 equatorial reflections reached 65 and 200% of the resting values, and further changes to 55 and 220% were seen at the second twitch, respectively. Although the second twitch decreased not only the time to peak tension but also that to the maximum intensity changes of the equatorial reflections, the delay between the intensity changes and the development of tension at the first twitch were still observed at the second twitch. On the other hand, the intensities of the 42.9 nm off-meridional and the 21.5 nm meridional myosin reflections decreased at the first twitch to the levels found when a muscle was isometrically tetanized, and no further decrease in their intensities was observed at the second twitch. These results indicate that a certain period of time is necessary for myosin heads to contr0116e to tension development after their arrival in the vicinity of the thin filaments during contraction. (Auth.)

  16. Development of a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system for time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at an X-ray free-electron laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oura, Masaki; Wagai, Tatsuya; Chainani, Ashish; Miyawaki, Jun; Sato, Hiromi; Matsunami, Masaharu; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Kiss, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Nakatani, Yasuhiro; Togashi, Tadashi; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Kanade; Yabashi, Makina; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Tamasaku, Kenji; Shin, Shik; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    In order to utilize high-brilliance photon sources, such as X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), for advanced time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TR-PES), a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system combined with a high-resolution hemispherical electron energy analyzer has been developed. The system's design enables it to be controlled by an external trigger signal for single-shot pump-probe-type TR-PES. The basic performance of the system is demonstrated with an offline test, followed by online core-level photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy in 'single-shot image', 'shot-to-shot image (image-to-image storage or block storage)' and `shot-to-shot sweep' modes at soft X-ray undulator beamline BL17SU of SPring-8. In the offline test the typical repetition rate for image-to-image storage mode has been confirmed to be about 15 Hz using a conventional pulse-generator. The function for correcting the shot-to-shot intensity fluctuations of the exciting photon beam, an important requirement for the TR-PES experiments at FEL sources, has been successfully tested at BL17SU by measuring Au 4f photoelectrons with intentionally controlled photon flux. The system has also been applied to hard X-ray PES (HAXPES) in `ordinary sweep' mode as well as shot-to-shot image mode at the 27 m-long undulator beamline BL19LXU of SPring-8 and also at the SACLA XFEL facility. The XFEL-induced Ti 1s core-level spectrum of La-doped SrTiO3 is reported as a function of incident power density. The Ti 1s core-level spectrum obtained at low power density is consistent with the spectrum obtained using the synchrotron source. At high power densities the Ti 1s core-level spectra show space-charge effects which are analysed using a known mean-field model for ultrafast electron packet propagation. The results successfully confirm the capability of the present data acquisition system for carrying out the core-level HAXPES studies of condensed matter induced by the XFEL. PMID:24365935

  17. Development of a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system for time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at an X-ray free-electron laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oura, Masaki; Wagai, Tatsuya; Chainani, Ashish; Miyawaki, Jun; Sato, Hiromi; Matsunami, Masaharu; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Kiss, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Nakatani, Yasuhiro; Togashi, Tadashi; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Kanade; Yabashi, Makina; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Tamasaku, Kenji; Shin, Shik; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    In order to utilize high-brilliance photon sources, such as X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), for advanced time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TR-PES), a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system combined with a high-resolution hemispherical electron energy analyzer has been developed. The system's design enables it to be controlled by an external trigger signal for single-shot pump-probe-type TR-PES. The basic performance of the system is demonstrated with an offline test, followed by online core-level photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy in 'single-shot image', 'shot-to-shot image (image-to-image storage or block storage)' and `shot-to-shot sweep' modes at soft X-ray undulator beamline BL17SU of SPring-8. In the offline test the typical repetition rate for image-to-image storage mode has been confirmed to be about 15 Hz using a conventional pulse-generator. The function for correcting the shot-to-shot intensity fluctuations of the exciting photon beam, an important requirement for the TR-PES experiments at FEL sources, has been successfully tested at BL17SU by measuring Au 4f photoelectrons with intentionally controlled photon flux. The system has also been applied to hard X-ray PES (HAXPES) in `ordinary sweep' mode as well as shot-to-shot image mode at the 27 m-long undulator beamline BL19LXU of SPring-8 and also at the SACLA XFEL facility. The XFEL-induced Ti 1s core-level spectrum of La-doped SrTiO3 is reported as a function of incident power density. The Ti 1s core-level spectrum obtained at low power density is consistent with the spectrum obtained using the synchrotron source. At high power densities the Ti 1s core-level spectra show space-charge effects which are analysed using a known mean-field model for ultrafast electron packet propagation. The results successfully confirm the capability of the present data acquisition system for carrying out the core-level HAXPES studies of condensed matter induced by the XFEL.

  18. Bond Shortening (1.4 Å) in the Singlet and Triplet Excited States of [Ir2(dimen)4]2+ in Solution Determined by Time-Resolved X-ray Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer; Harlang, Tobias; Christensen, Morten;

    2011-01-01

    Ground- and excited-state structures of the bimetallic, ligand-bridged compound Ir2(dimen)42+ are investigated in acetonitrile by means of time-resolved X-ray scattering. Following excitation by 2 ps laser pulses at 390 nm, analysis of difference scattering patterns obtained at eight different ti...

  19. Intercalation chemistry in a LDH system: anion exchange process and staging phenomenon investigated by means of time-resolved, in situ X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taviot-Guého, Christine; Feng, Yongjun; Faour, Azzam; Leroux, Fabrice

    2010-07-14

    Using time-resolved, in situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD), the formation of interstratified LDH structures, with alternate interlayer spaces occupied by different anions, have been demonstrated during anion exchange reactions. Novel hybrid LDH nanostructures can thus be prepared, combining the physicochemical properties of two intercalated anions plus those of the LDH host. A general trend is that inorganic-inorganic anion exchange reactions occur in a one-step process while inorganic-organic exchanges may proceed via a second-stage intermediate, suggesting that staging occurs partly as a result of organic-inorganic separation. Yet, other influencing parameters must be considered such as LDH host composition, LDH affinity for different anions and LDH particle size as well as extrinsic parameters like the reaction temperature. Hence, a correlation between the occurrence of staging phenomenon and the difficulty of the exchange of the initial anion is observed, suggesting that staging is needed to overcome the energy barrier in the case of the exchange by organic anions. Notwithstanding the LiAl(2) system, staging has mainly been observed with Zn(2)Cr LDH host so far, a peculiar LDH composition with a unique Zn/Cr ratio of two and a local order of the cations within the hydroxide layers. The formation of a higher order-staged intermediate than stage two, observed during the exchange reaction of CO(3)(2-) or SO(4)(2-) anions with Zn(2)Cr-tartrate, is in favour of a Daumas-Herold model although this model implies a bending of LDH layers. The analysis of the X-ray powder diffraction pattern of Zn(2)Cr-Cl/tartrate second-stage intermediate, isolated almost as a pure phase during the exchange of Cl(-) with tartrate anions in Zn(2)Cr LDH, indicates a disorder in the stacking sequence and a relative proportion of the two kinds of interlayers slightly different from 50/50. Besides, the microstructural analysis of the XRD pattern reveals a great reduction of the

  20. Small-angle X-ray scattering and rheological characterization of alginate gels. 2. Time-resolved studies on ionotropic gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuguchi, Y.; Urakawa, H.; Kajiwara, K.; Draget, K. I.; Stokke, B. T.

    2000-10-01

    Gelation was observed by time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering and rheology on 10 mg/ml Ca-alginate gels prepared by in situ release of Ca 2+ from CaEGTA or CaCO 3 with total Ca 2+ concentration in the range 10-20 mM. This was carried out for alginates having a fraction of α- L-GulA (G) of FG=0.39 and 0.68, respectively, obtained by the selection of alginates isolated from two different brown algae, Ascophyllum nodosum and Laminaria hyperborea stipe. Correlation between the rheological data and SAXS data shows that a large fraction of the lateral association precedes the formation of a continuous network through the sample cell. Following the initial association of chain segments in junction zones, the analysis using two-component broken rod model indicates the formation of larger bundles, and that the relative weight of these bundles increases with increasing time. The molecular model for the bundles is proposed by associating 2-16 units (G-blocks) composed of 14 (1→4) linked residues of α- L-GulA in parallel according to the available crystallographic data. The storage modulus increases as the bundles composed of associated alginate chains grow during the gel formation. The gel elasticity is mainly sustained by single chains in the alginate sample with a low fraction of α- L-GulA. The alginates with a high fraction of α- L-GulA associate into thicker bundles which join to form a network. Here the gel elasticity seems to be due to the flexible joints between bundles, since the fraction of single chains is extremely low.

  1. Uptake of liquid alcohols by the flexible Fe(III) metal-organic framework MIL-53 observed by time-resolved in situ X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Richard I; Munn, Alexis S; Guillou, Nathalie; Millange, Franck

    2011-06-14

    A comprehensive, time-resolved, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction study of the uptake of liquid alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol and propan-2-ol) by the flexible metal-organic framework solid MIL-53(Fe)[H(2)O] is reported. In the case of the primary alcohols, a fluorinated version of the MIL-53(Fe) host (C2/c symmetry V ca. 1000 Å(3)), in which a fraction of framework hydroxides are replaced by fluoride, shows uptake of alcohols to give initially a partially expanded phase (C2/c symmetry, V ca. 1200 Å(3)) followed by an expanded form of the material (either Imcm or Pnam symmetry, V ca. 1600 Å(3)). In the case of methanol-water mixtures, the EDXRD data show that the partially open intermediate phase undergoes volume expansion during its existence, before switching to a fully open structure if concentrated methanol is used; analogous behaviour is seen if the initial guest is propan-2-ol, which then is replaced by pyridine, where a continuous shift of Bragg peaks within C2/c symmetry is observed. In contrast to the partially fluorinated materials, the purely hydroxylated host materials show little tendency to stabilise partially open forms of MIL-53(Fe) with primary alcohols and the kinetics of guest introduction are markedly slower without the framework fluorination: this is exemplified by the exchange of water by propan-2-ol, where a partially open C2/c phase is formed in a step-wise manner. Our study defines the various possible pathways of liquid-phase uptake of molecular guests by flexible solid MIL-53(Fe).

  2. Anhydrate to hydrate solid-state transformations of carbamazepine and nitrofurantoin in biorelevant media studied in situ using time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boetker, Johan P; Rantanen, Jukka; Arnfast, Lærke; Doreth, Maria; Raijada, Dhara; Loebmann, Korbinian; Madsen, Cecilie; Khan, Jamal; Rades, Thomas; Müllertz, Anette; Hawley, Adrian; Thomas, Diana; Boyd, Ben J

    2016-03-01

    Transformation of the solid-state form of a drug compound in the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract may alter the drug bioavailability and in extreme cases result in patient fatalities. The solution-mediated anhydrate-to-hydrate phase transformation was examined using an in vitro model with different biorelevant media, simulated fasted and fed state intestinal fluids containing bile salt and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) micelles, DOPC/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) mixture, bile salt solution and water. Two anhydrate compounds (carbamazepine, CBZ and nitrofurantoin, NF) with different overall transformation time into hydrate form were used as model compounds. The transformations were monitored using direct structural information from time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The kinetics of these transformations were estimated using multivariate data analysis (principal component analysis, PCA) and compared to those for nitrofurantoin (NF). The study showed that the solution-mediated phase transformation of CBZ anhydrate was remarkably faster in the DOPC/SDS medium compared to transformation in all the other aqueous dispersion media. The conversion time for CBZ anhydrate in water was shorter than for DOPC/SDS but still faster than the conversion seen in fed and fasted state micellar media. The conversion of CBZ anhydrate to hydrate was the slowest in the solution containing bile salt alone. In contrast, the solution-mediated phase transformations of NF did only show limited kinetic dependence on the dispersion media used, indicating the complexity of the nucleation process. Furthermore, when the CBZ and NF material was compacted into tablets the transformation times were remarkably slower. Results suggest that variations in the composition of the contents of the stomach/gut may affect the recrystallization kinetics, especially when investigating compounds with relatively fast overall transformation time, such as CBZ.

  3. Time-resolved crystallography and protein design: signalling photoreceptors and optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Keith

    2014-07-17

    Time-resolved X-ray crystallography and solution scattering have been successfully conducted on proteins on time-scales down to around 100 ps, set by the duration of the hard X-ray pulses emitted by synchrotron sources. The advent of hard X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs), which emit extremely intense, very brief, coherent X-ray pulses, opens the exciting possibility of time-resolved experiments with femtosecond time resolution on macromolecular structure, in both single crystals and solution. The X-ray pulses emitted by an FEL differ greatly in many properties from those emitted by a synchrotron, in ways that at first glance make time-resolved measurements of X-ray scattering with the required accuracy extremely challenging. This opens up several questions which I consider in this brief overview. Are there likely to be chemically and biologically interesting structural changes to be revealed on the femtosecond time-scale? How shall time-resolved experiments best be designed and conducted to exploit the properties of FELs and overcome challenges that they pose? To date, fast time-resolved reactions have been initiated by a brief laser pulse, which obviously requires that the system under study be light-sensitive. Although this is true for proteins of the visual system and for signalling photoreceptors, it is not naturally the case for most interesting biological systems. To generate more biological targets for time-resolved study, can this limitation be overcome by optogenetic, chemical or other means?

  4. Cooperative protein structural dynamics of homodimeric hemoglobin linked to water cluster at subunit interface revealed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Goo Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Homodimeric hemoglobin (HbI consisting of two subunits is a good model system for investigating the allosteric structural transition as it exhibits cooperativity in ligand binding. In this work, as an effort to extend our previous study on wild-type and F97Y mutant HbI, we investigate structural dynamics of a mutant HbI in solution to examine the role of well-organized interfacial water cluster, which has been known to mediate intersubunit communication in HbI. In the T72V mutant of HbI, the interfacial water cluster in the T state is perturbed due to the lack of Thr72, resulting in two less interfacial water molecules than in wild-type HbI. By performing picosecond time-resolved X-ray solution scattering experiment and kinetic analysis on the T72V mutant, we identify three structurally distinct intermediates (I1, I2, and I3 and show that the kinetics of the T72V mutant are well described by the same kinetic model used for wild-type and F97Y HbI, which involves biphasic kinetics, geminate recombination, and bimolecular CO recombination. The optimized kinetic model shows that the R-T transition and bimolecular CO recombination are faster in the T72V mutant than in the wild type. From structural analysis using species-associated difference scattering curves for the intermediates, we find that the T-like deoxy I3 intermediate in solution has a different structure from deoxy HbI in crystal. In addition, we extract detailed structural parameters of the intermediates such as E-F distance, intersubunit rotation angle, and heme-heme distance. By comparing the structures of protein intermediates in wild-type HbI and the T72V mutant, we reveal how the perturbation in the interfacial water cluster affects the kinetics and structures of reaction intermediates of HbI.

  5. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction study on superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} epitaxially grown on SrTiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebcke, A.

    2007-07-01

    In this PhD thesis time-resolved X-ray diffraction in optical pump - X-ray probe scheme was applied for the first time to a High-Temperature Superconductor in the superconducting state. The aim was to study the possible lattice response to optical Cooper pair breaking. As sample a thin YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} film with a superconducting transition temperature of T{sub c}=90 K, epitaxially grown on a SrTiO{sub 3} single crystal was used. (orig.)

  6. A high count rate one-dimensional position sensitive detector and a data acquisition system for time resolved X-ray scattering studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A curved multiwire proportional drift chamber has been built as a general purpose instrument for X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction experiments with synchrotron radiation. This parallaxe-free one-dimensional linear position sensitive detector has a parallel readout with a double hit logic. The data acquisition system, installed as a part of the D11 camera at LURE-DCI, is designed to perform time slicing and cyclic experiments; it has been used with either the fast multiwire chamber or a standard position sensitive detector with delay line readout

  7. Time-resolved hard X-Ray hardness variation of solar flares observed by Suzaku Wide-band All-sky monitor

    OpenAIRE

    遠藤, 輝; Endo, Akira; 守上, 浩市; Morigami, Kouichi; 田代, 信; Tashiro, Makoto; 寺田, 幸功; Terada, Yukikatsu; 山岡, 和貴; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; 園田 絵里; Sonoda, Eri; 簑島, 敬; Minoshima, Takashi; Krucker, Sam

    2010-01-01

    Results of solar flare observations in the hard X-ray band with the Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM) are reported. On June 2009, 108 solar flares (GOES class X:16, M:29, C:46, B:17) have been detected with the WAM since the launch. One of the brightest flares WAM detected was the event occurring on 2006 December 13. It lasted for more than 700 seconds even in above 500 keV. This event was simultaneously observed by the solar missions Hinode and RHESSI in soft and hard X-ray region respe...

  8. Photo-Induced Spin-State Conversion in Solvated Transition Metal Complexes Probed via Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huse, Nils; Kim, Tae Kyu; Jamula, Lindsey; McCusker, James K.; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Solution-phase photoinduced low-spin to high-spin conversion in the Fe-II polypyridyl complex [Fe(tren(py)(3))](2+) (where tren(py)3 is tris(2-pyridylmethyliminoethyl)amine) has been studied via picosecond soft X-ray spectroscopy. Following (1)A(1) -> (MLCT)-M-1 (metal-to-ligand charge transfer) exc

  9. In-Situ Chemical Dynamics and Phase Mapping Under Steep Thermal Gradients Using Time-Resolved and Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, J.; Larson, E.M.; Holt, J.B.; Ressler, T.; Elmer, J.W.

    1999-09-17

    Time-resolved and spatially-resolved diffraction techniques have been developed recently to perform materials dynamics study in-situ extending into the time and spatial domain in high temperature processes. The applications of these methods to investigate the chemical dynamics of solid combustion reactions and to map phases and their transformation in fusion welds are exemplified in this paper.

  10. Effects of sulfation level on the desulfation behavior of pre-sulfated Pt BaO/Al2O3 lean NOx trap catalysts: a combined H2 Temperature-Programmed Reaction, in-situ sulfur K-edge X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desulfation by hydrogen of pre-sulfated Pt(2wt%) BaO(20wt%)/Al2O3 with various sulfur loading (S/Ba = 0.12, 0.31 and 0.62) were investigated by combining H2 temperature programmed reaction (TPRX), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), in-situ sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), and synchrotron time-resolved x-ray diffraction (TR-XRD) techniques. We find that the amount of H2S desorbed during the desulfation in the H2 TPRX experiments is not proportional to the amount of initial sulfur loading. The results of both in-situ sulfur K-edge XANES and TR-XRD show that at low sulfur loadings, sulfates were transformed to a BaS phase and remained in the catalyst, rather than being removed as H2S. On the other hand, when the deposited sulfur level exceeded a certain threshold (at least S/Ba = 0.31) sulfates were reduced to form H2S, and the relative amount of the residual sulfide species in the catalyst was much less than at low sulfur loading. Unlike samples with high sulfur loading (e.g., S/Ba = 0.62), H2O did not promote the desulfation for the sample with S/Ba of 0.12, implying that the formed BaS species originating from the reduction of sulfates at low sulfur loading are more stable to hydrolysis. The results of this combined spectroscopy investigation provide clear evidence to show that sulfates at low sulfur loadings are less likely to be removed as H2S and have a greater tendency to be transformed to BaS on the material, leading to the conclusion that desulfation behavior of Pt BaO/Al2O3 lean NOx trap catalysts is markedly dependent on the sulfation levels.

  11. Two mirror X-ray pulse split and delay instrument for femtosecond time resolved investigations at the LCLS free electron laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrah, Nora; Fang, Li; Murphy, Brendan F; Kukk, Edwin; Osipov, Timur Y; Coffee, Ryan; Ferguson, Ken R; Xiong, Hui; Castagna, Jean-Charles; Petrovic, Vlad S; Montero, Sebastian Carron; Bozek, John D

    2016-05-30

    We built a two-mirror based X-ray split and delay (XRSD) device for soft X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source free electron laser facility. The instrument is based on an edge-polished mirror design covering an energy range of 250 eV-1800 eV and producing a delay between the two split pulses variable up to 400 femtoseconds with a sub-100 attosecond resolution. We present experimental and simulation results regarding molecular dissociation dynamics in CH3I and CO probed by the XRSD device. We observed ion kinetic energy and branching ratio dependence on the delay times which were reliably produced by the XRSD instrument. PMID:27410102

  12. Two mirror X-ray pulse split and delay instrument for femtosecond time resolved investigations at the LCLS free electron laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrah, Nora; Fang, Li; Murphy, Brendan F; Kukk, Edwin; Osipov, Timur Y; Coffee, Ryan; Ferguson, Ken R; Xiong, Hui; Castagna, Jean-Charles; Petrovic, Vlad S; Montero, Sebastian Carron; Bozek, John D

    2016-05-30

    We built a two-mirror based X-ray split and delay (XRSD) device for soft X-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source free electron laser facility. The instrument is based on an edge-polished mirror design covering an energy range of 250 eV-1800 eV and producing a delay between the two split pulses variable up to 400 femtoseconds with a sub-100 attosecond resolution. We present experimental and simulation results regarding molecular dissociation dynamics in CH3I and CO probed by the XRSD device. We observed ion kinetic energy and branching ratio dependence on the delay times which were reliably produced by the XRSD instrument.

  13. In Situ X-ray Diffraction of Forsterite Under Shock Compression to 52 GPa: Time Resolved Observation of Changes in Crystal Structure and Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, M. C.; Maddox, B.; Teruya, A.; Asimow, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's mantle is composed primarily of ferromagnesian silicates, of which Forsterite (Fo) is the magnesium-rich end member of the dominant upper mantle phase, olivine. Fo is thought to undergo a chemical decomposition associated with a structural phase transition when dynamically loaded to 40-71 GPa, but previous inferences about such decomposition have been based only on pressure-density data with no direct phase identification. To obtain direct data on the phase evolution of shocked Fo, synthetic single crystal samples of Mg2SiO4 Fo were loaded to pressures of 52 GPa using a two stage light gas gun. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were collected on the static and the loaded samples in situ using a single pulse Mo Kα anode to provide a 17 keV X-ray source. X-ray polycapillary optics were used to couple the source to the sample. Clear Laue spots were observed in the static images, while the dynamic images show the appearance of new spots at early times and powder-like rings at late times. The angles of the dynamically driven spots and rings overlap with each other and indicate the change in phase of forsterite under pressure through a process that begins with the formation of single crystals and ends with polycrystalline material. Efforts are underway to identify the high-pressure phases from among the library of dense magnesium silicates, and further experiments covering a larger pressure range will be completed shortly. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Standing surface acoustic waves in LiNbO3 studied by time resolved X-ray diffraction at Petra III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Reusch

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out time resolved stroboscopic diffraction experiments on standing surface acoustic waves (SAWs of Rayleigh type on a LiNbO3 substrate. A novel timing system has been developed and commissioned at the storage ring Petra III of Desy, allowing for phase locked stroboscopic diffraction experiments applicable to a broad range of timescales and experimental conditions. The combination of atomic structural resolution with temporal resolution on the picosecond time scale allows for the observation of the atomistic displacements for each time (or phase point within the SAW period. A seamless transition between dynamical and kinematic scattering regimes as a function of the instantaneous surface amplitude induced by the standing SAW is observed. The interpretation and control of the experiment, in particular disentangling the diffraction effects (kinematic to dynamical diffraction regime from possible non-linear surface effects is unambiguously enabled by the precise control of phase between the standing SAW and the synchrotron bunches. The example illustrates the great flexibility and universality of the presented timing system, opening up new opportunities for a broad range of time resolved experiments.

  15. Table-top instrumentation for time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy of solids excited by nanosecond pulse of soft X-ray source and/or UV laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The practical applicability of the rare-earth doped scintillators in high-speed detectors is limited by the slow decay components in the temporal response of a scintillator. The study of origin and properties of material defects that induce the slow decay components is of major importance for the development of new scintillation materials. We present a table-top, time-domain UV-VIS luminescence spectrometer, featuring extended time and input sensitivity ranges and two excitation sources. The combination of both soft X-ray/XUV and UV excitation source allows the comparative measurements of luminescence spectra and decay kinetics of scintillators to be performed under the same experimental conditions. The luminescence of emission centers of a doped scintillator can be induced by conventional N2 laser pulse, while the complete scintillation process can be initiated by a soft X-ray/XUV pulse excitation from the laser-produced plasma in gas puff target of 4 ns duration. In order to demonstrate the spectrometer, the UV-VIS luminescence spectra and decay kinetics of cerium doped Lu3Al5O12 single crystal (LuAG:Ce) scintillator excited by XUV and UV radiation were acquired. Luminescence of the doped Ce3+ ions was studied under 2.88 nm (430 eV) XUV excitation from the laser-produced nitrogen plasma, and compared with the luminescence under 337 nm (3.68 eV) UV excitation from nitrogen laser. In the former case the excitation energy is deposited in the LuAG host, while in the latter the 4f-5d2 transition of Ce3+ is directly excited. Furthermore, YAG:Ce and LuAG:Ce single crystals luminescence decay profiles are compared and discussed.

  16. Table-top instrumentation for time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy of solids excited by nanosecond pulse of soft X-ray source and/or UV laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruza, Petr; Fidler, Vlastimil [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Czech Technical University, Nam. Sitna 3105, Kladno (Czech Republic); Nikl, Martin, E-mail: petr.bruza@fbmi.cvut.cz [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of The Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2011-09-15

    The practical applicability of the rare-earth doped scintillators in high-speed detectors is limited by the slow decay components in the temporal response of a scintillator. The study of origin and properties of material defects that induce the slow decay components is of major importance for the development of new scintillation materials. We present a table-top, time-domain UV-VIS luminescence spectrometer, featuring extended time and input sensitivity ranges and two excitation sources. The combination of both soft X-ray/XUV and UV excitation source allows the comparative measurements of luminescence spectra and decay kinetics of scintillators to be performed under the same experimental conditions. The luminescence of emission centers of a doped scintillator can be induced by conventional N{sub 2} laser pulse, while the complete scintillation process can be initiated by a soft X-ray/XUV pulse excitation from the laser-produced plasma in gas puff target of 4 ns duration. In order to demonstrate the spectrometer, the UV-VIS luminescence spectra and decay kinetics of cerium doped Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} single crystal (LuAG:Ce) scintillator excited by XUV and UV radiation were acquired. Luminescence of the doped Ce{sup 3+} ions was studied under 2.88 nm (430 eV) XUV excitation from the laser-produced nitrogen plasma, and compared with the luminescence under 337 nm (3.68 eV) UV excitation from nitrogen laser. In the former case the excitation energy is deposited in the LuAG host, while in the latter the 4f-5d{sub 2} transition of Ce{sup 3+} is directly excited. Furthermore, YAG:Ce and LuAG:Ce single crystals luminescence decay profiles are compared and discussed.

  17. Table-top instrumentation for time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy of solids excited by nanosecond pulse of soft X-ray source and/or UV laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brůža, Petr; Fidler, Vlastimil; Nikl, Martin

    2011-09-01

    The practical applicability of the rare-earth doped scintillators in high-speed detectors is limited by the slow decay components in the temporal response of a scintillator. The study of origin and properties of material defects that induce the slow decay components is of major importance for the development of new scintillation materials. We present a table-top, time-domain UV-VIS luminescence spectrometer, featuring extended time and input sensitivity ranges and two excitation sources. The combination of both soft X-ray/XUV and UV excitation source allows the comparative measurements of luminescence spectra and decay kinetics of scintillators to be performed under the same experimental conditions. The luminescence of emission centers of a doped scintillator can be induced by conventional N2 laser pulse, while the complete scintillation process can be initiated by a soft X-ray/XUV pulse excitation from the laser-produced plasma in gas puff target of 4 ns duration. In order to demonstrate the spectrometer, the UV-VIS luminescence spectra and decay kinetics of cerium doped Lu3Al5O12 single crystal (LuAG:Ce) scintillator excited by XUV and UV radiation were acquired. Luminescence of the doped Ce3+ ions was studied under 2.88 nm (430 eV) XUV excitation from the laser-produced nitrogen plasma, and compared with the luminescence under 337 nm (3.68 eV) UV excitation from nitrogen laser. In the former case the excitation energy is deposited in the LuAG host, while in the latter the 4f-5d2 transition of Ce3+ is directly excited. Furthermore, YAG:Ce and LuAG:Ce single crystals luminescence decay profiles are compared and discussed.

  18. Time-resolved analysis of the X-ray emission of femtosecond-laser-produced plasmas in the 1.5-keV range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Audebert, P.; Nagels-Silvert, V.; Geindre, J. P.; Gauthier, J. C.; Adam, J. C.; Héron, A.; Chenais-Popovics, C.

    Recent experimental results on ion beams produced in high-intensity laser-solid interactions indicate the presence of very intense electric fields in the target. This suggests the possibility of efficiently heating a solid material by means of the fast electrons created during the laser-solid interactions and trapped in the target, rather than by the laser photons themselves. We tested this mechanism by irradiating very small cubic aluminum targets with the LULI 100-TW, 300-fs laser at 1.06-μm wavelength. X-ray spectra were measured with an ultra-fast streak camera, coupled to a conical Bragg crystal, providing spectra in the 1.5-keV range with high temporal and spectral resolution. The results indicate the creation of a hot plasma, but a very low coupling between the rapid electrons and the solid. A tentative explanation, in agreement with other experimental results and with preliminary particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, points out the fatal role of the laser prepulse.

  19. Automatic generation of time resolved motion vector fields of coronary arteries and 4D surface extraction using rotational x-ray angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandt, Uwe; Schäfer, Dirk; Grass, Michael; Rasche, Volker

    2009-01-01

    Rotational coronary angiography provides a multitude of x-ray projections of the contrast agent enhanced coronary arteries along a given trajectory with parallel ECG recording. These data can be used to derive motion information of the coronary arteries including vessel displacement and pulsation. In this paper, a fully automated algorithm to generate 4D motion vector fields for coronary arteries from multi-phase 3D centerline data is presented. The algorithm computes similarity measures of centerline segments at different cardiac phases and defines corresponding centerline segments as those with highest similarity. In order to achieve an excellent matching accuracy, an increasing number of bifurcations is included as reference points in an iterative manner. Based on the motion data, time-dependent vessel surface extraction is performed on the projections without the need of prior reconstruction. The algorithm accuracy is evaluated quantitatively on phantom data. The magnitude of longitudinal errors (parallel to the centerline) reaches approx. 0.50 mm and is thus more than twice as large as the transversal 3D extraction errors of the underlying multi-phase 3D centerline data. It is shown that the algorithm can extract asymmetric stenoses accurately. The feasibility on clinical data is demonstrated on five different cases. The ability of the algorithm to extract time-dependent surface data, e.g. for quantification of pulsating stenosis is demonstrated.

  20. Automatic generation of time resolved motion vector fields of coronary arteries and 4D surface extraction using rotational x-ray angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandt, Uwe; Schaefer, Dirk; Grass, Michael [Philips Research Europe-Hamburg, Roentgenstr. 24, 22335 Hamburg (Germany); Rasche, Volker [University of Ulm, Department of Internal Medicine II, Robert-Koch-Strasse 8, 89081 Ulm (Germany)], E-mail: ujandt@gmx.de

    2009-01-07

    Rotational coronary angiography provides a multitude of x-ray projections of the contrast agent enhanced coronary arteries along a given trajectory with parallel ECG recording. These data can be used to derive motion information of the coronary arteries including vessel displacement and pulsation. In this paper, a fully automated algorithm to generate 4D motion vector fields for coronary arteries from multi-phase 3D centerline data is presented. The algorithm computes similarity measures of centerline segments at different cardiac phases and defines corresponding centerline segments as those with highest similarity. In order to achieve an excellent matching accuracy, an increasing number of bifurcations is included as reference points in an iterative manner. Based on the motion data, time-dependent vessel surface extraction is performed on the projections without the need of prior reconstruction. The algorithm accuracy is evaluated quantitatively on phantom data. The magnitude of longitudinal errors (parallel to the centerline) reaches approx. 0.50 mm and is thus more than twice as large as the transversal 3D extraction errors of the underlying multi-phase 3D centerline data. It is shown that the algorithm can extract asymmetric stenoses accurately. The feasibility on clinical data is demonstrated on five different cases. The ability of the algorithm to extract time-dependent surface data, e.g. for quantification of pulsating stenosis is demonstrated.

  1. Time-resolved synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of the crystallization of amorphous Co(80-x)FexB₂₀

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, L. M., E-mail: l.simmons@mmu.ac.uk [Division of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Engineering, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom); Greig, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Lucas, C. A. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Kilcoyne, S. H. [School of Applied Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-28

    This paper addresses the time-dependent crystallization process occurring in “bulk” amorphous Co(80-x)FexB₂₀ (x = 20, 40) metallic ribbons by means of synchrotron x-ray diffraction (SXRD) and transmission electron microscopy. Metallic ribbons, produced via melt-spinning technique, were annealed in-situ, with SXRD patterns collected every 60 s. SXRD reveals that Co₄₀Fe₄₀B₂₀ alloys crystallize from an amorphous structure to a primary bcc α-(Co,Fe) phase, whereas Co₆₀Fe₂₀B₂₀ initially crystallizes into the same bcc α-(Co,Fe) but exhibits cooperative growth of both stable and metastable boride phases later into the hold. Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov statistics was used on post annealed samples to determine the mechanisms of growth and the activation energy (Ea) of the α-(Co,Fe) phase. Results indicate that the growth mechanisms are similar for both alloy compositions for all annealing temperatures, with the Avrami exponent of n = 1.51(1) and 2.02(6) for x = 20 and 40, respectively, suggesting one-dimensional growth, with a decreasing nucleation rate. Activation energy for α-(Co,Fe) was determined to be 2.7(1) eV and 2.4(3) eV in x = 20 and 40, respectively, suggesting that those alloys with a lower Co content have a stronger resistance to crystallization. Based on these results, fabrication of CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions via depositing amorphous layers and subsequently annealing to induce lattice matching presents itself as a viable and efficient method, for increasing the giant magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junctions.

  2. FeCoSiBNbCu bulk metallic glass with large compressive deformability studied by time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoica, Mihai, E-mail: m.stoica@ifw-dresden.de; Scudino, Sergio [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Bednarčik, Jozef [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), FS-PE Group, Notkestr. 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Kaban, Ivan; Eckert, Jürgen [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institute of Materials Science, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-07

    By adding 0.5 at. % Cu to the strong but brittle [(Fe{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}){sub 0.75}Si{sub 0.05}B{sub 0.20}]{sub 96}Nb{sub 4} bulk metallic glass, fully amorphous rods with diameters up to 2 mm were obtained. The monolithic samples with 1 mm diameter revealed a fracture strain of 3.80% and a maximum stress of 4143 MPa upon compression, together with a slight work-hardening behavior. SEM micrographs of fractured samples did neither reveal any shear bands on the lateral surface nor the typical vein patterns which characterize ductile fracture. However, some layers appear to have flowed and this phenomenon took place before the brittle final fracture. An estimate of the temperature rise ΔT in the shear plane gives 1039 K, which is large enough to melt a layer of 120 nm. The overall performance and the macroscopic plastic strain depend on the interaction between cleavage-like and viscous flow-like features. Mechanical tests performed in-situ under synchrotron radiation allowed the calculation of the strain tensor components, using the reciprocal-space data and analyzing the shift of the first (the main) and the second broad peak positions in the X-ray diffraction patterns. The results revealed that each atomic shell may have a different stiffness, which may explain the macroscopic compressive plastic deformation. Also, there were no signs of (nano) crystallization induced by the applied stress, but the samples preserve a monolithic amorphous structure until catastrophic failure occurs.

  3. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies on the intensity changes of the 5.9 and 5.1 nm actin layer lines from frog skeletal muscle during an isometric tetanus using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies have been made on the 5.9- and 5.1-nm actin layer lines from frog skeletal muscles during an isometric tetanus at 6 degrees C, using synchrotron radiation. The integrated intensities of these actin layer lines were found to increase during a tetanus by 30-50% for the 5.9-nm reflection and approximately 70% for the 5.1-nm reflection of the resting values. The intensity increase of both reflections was greater than that taking place in the transition from rest to rigor state. The intensity change of the 5.9-nm reflection preceded those of the myosin 42.9-nm off-meridional reflection and of the equatorial reflections, as well as the isometric tension development. The intensity profile of the 5.9-nm layer line during contraction was found to be different from that observed in the rigor state

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of the barotropic lamellar gel/lamellar liquid crystal phase transition in fully hydrated dihexadecylphosphatidylethanolamine: a time-resolved x-ray diffraction study using pressure jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, A; Hummel, B; Mencke, A; Caffrey, M

    1994-07-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the barotropic lamellar gel (L beta')/lamellar liquid crystal (L alpha) phase transition in fully hydrated 1,2-dihexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DHPE) has been studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction (TRXRD). The phase transition was induced by pressure jumps of varying amplitudes in both the pressurization and depressurization directions at controlled temperature (78 degrees C). Both low- and wide-angle diffracted x rays were recorded simultaneously in live time using an x-ray-sensitive image intensifier coupled to a CCD camera and Super-VHS videotape recorder. Such an arrangement allowed for the direct and quantitative characterization of the long- (lamellar repeat spacing) and short-range order (chain packing) during a kinetic experiment. The image-processed live-time x-ray diffraction data were fitted using a nonlinear least-squares model, and the parameters of the fits were monitored continuously throughout the transition. The pressure-induced transitions from the L alpha to the L beta' phase and from the L beta' to the L alpha phase was two-state (no formation of intermediates apparent during the transition) to within the sensitivity limits of the method. The corresponding transit time (the time during which both phases coexist) associated with the long- and short-range order of the pressurization-induced L alpha-to-L beta' phase transition decreased to a limiting value of approximately 50 ms with increasing pressure jump amplitude. This limiting value was close to the response time of the detector/recording system. Thus, the intrinsic transit time of this transition in fully hydrated DHPE at 78 degrees C was less than or equal to 50 ms. In contrast, the depressurization-induced L beta'-to-L alpha phase transition was slower, taking approximately 1 s to complete, and occurred with no obvious dependence of the transit time on pressure jump amplitude. In the depressurization jump experiment, the lipid responded

  5. The Time-resolved and Extreme-conditions XAS (TEXAS) facility at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: the energy-dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline ID24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascarelli, S; Mathon, O; Mairs, T; Kantor, I; Agostini, G; Strohm, C; Pasternak, S; Perrin, F; Berruyer, G; Chappelet, P; Clavel, C; Dominguez, M C

    2016-01-01

    The European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has recently made available to the user community a facility totally dedicated to Time-resolved and Extreme-conditions X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy--TEXAS. Based on an upgrade of the former energy-dispersive XAS beamline ID24, it provides a unique experimental tool combining unprecedented brilliance (up to 10(14) photons s(-1) on a 4 µm × 4 µm FWHM spot) and detection speed for a full EXAFS spectrum (100 ps per spectrum). The science mission includes studies of processes down to the nanosecond timescale, and investigations of matter at extreme pressure (500 GPa), temperature (10000 K) and magnetic field (30 T). The core activities of the beamline are centered on new experiments dedicated to the investigation of extreme states of matter that can be maintained only for very short periods of time. Here the infrastructure, optical scheme, detection systems and sample environments used to enable the mission-critical performance are described, and examples of first results on the investigation of the electronic and local structure in melts at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the Earth's interior and in laser-shocked matter are given.

  6. Time-resolved studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When new or more powerful probes become available that offer both shorter data-collection times and the opportunity to apply innovative approaches to established techniques, it is natural that investigators consider the feasibility of exploring the kinetics of time-evolving systems. This stimulating area of research not only can lead to insights into the metastable or excited states that a system may populate on its way to a ground state, but can also lead to a better understanding of that final state. Synchrotron radiation, with its unique properties, offers just such a tool to extend X-ray measurements from the static to the time-resolved regime. The most straight-forward application of synchrotron radiation to the study of transient phenomena is directly through the possibility of decreased data-collection times via the enormous increase in flux over that of a laboratory X-ray system. Even further increases in intensity can be obtained through the use of novel X-ray optical devices. Widebandpass monochromators, e.g., that utilize the continuous spectral distribution of synchrotron radiation, can increase flux on the sample several orders of magnitude over conventional X-ray optical systems thereby allowing a further shortening of the data-collection time. Another approach that uses the continuous spectral nature of synchrotron radiation to decrease data-collection times is the open-quote parallel data collectionclose quotes method. Using this technique, intensities as a function of X-ray energy are recorded simultaneously for all energies rather than sequentially recording data at each energy, allowing for a dramatic decrease in the data-collection time

  7. Anomalous lattice expansion in yttria stabilized zirconia under simultaneous applied electric and thermal fields: A time-resolved in situ energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry study with an ultrahigh energy synchrotron probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akdogan, E. K.; Savkl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I y Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I ld Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I z, I.; Bicer, H.; Paxton, W.; Toksoy, F.; Tsakalakos, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8065 (United States); Zhong, Z. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2013-06-21

    Nonisothermal densification in 8% yttria doped zirconia (8YSZ) particulate matter of 250 nm median particle size was studied under 215 V/cm dc electric field and 9 Degree-Sign C/min heating rate, using time-resolved in-situ high temperature energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry with a polychromatic 200 keV synchrotron probe. Densification occurred in the 876-905 Degree-Sign C range, which resulted in 97% of the theoretical density. No local melting at particle-particle contacts was observed in scanning electron micrographs, implying densification was due to solid state mass transport processes. The maximum current draw at 905 Degree-Sign C was 3 A, corresponding to instantaneous absorbed power density of 570 W/cm{sup 3}. Densification of 8YSZ was accompanied by anomalous elastic volume expansions of the unit cell by 0.45% and 2.80% at 847 Degree-Sign C and 905 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The anomalous expansion at 905 Degree-Sign C at which maximum densification was observed is characterized by three stages: (I) linear stage, (II) anomalous stage, and (III) anelastic recovery stage. The densification in stage I (184 s) and II (15 s) was completed in 199 s, while anelastic relaxation in stage III lasted 130 s. The residual strains ({epsilon}) at room temperature, as computed from tetragonal (112) and (211) reflections, are {epsilon}{sub (112)} = 0.05% and {epsilon}{sub (211)} = 0.13%, respectively. Time dependence of (211) and (112) peak widths ({beta}) show a decrease with both exhibiting a singularity at 905 Degree-Sign C. An anisotropy in (112) and (211) peak widths of {l_brace} {beta}{sub (112)}/{beta}{sub (211)}{r_brace} = (3:1) magnitude was observed. No phase transformation occurred at 905 Degree-Sign C as verified from diffraction spectra on both sides of the singularity, i.e., the unit cell symmetry remains tetragonal. We attribute the reduction in densification temperature and time to ultrafast ambipolar diffusion of species arising from the

  8. Combined time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy study on the complexation of trivalent actinides with chloride at T = 25-200 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerencak-Frech, Andrej; Fröhlich, Daniel R; Rothe, Jörg; Dardenne, Kathy; Panak, Petra J

    2014-01-21

    The complexation of trivalent actinides (An(III)) with chloride is studied in the temperature range from 25 to 200 °C by spectroscopic methods. Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) is applied to determine the thermodynamic data of Cm(III)-Cl(-) complexes, while extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) is used to determine the structural data of the respective Am(III) complexes. The experiments are performed in a custom-built high-temperature cell which is modified for the respective spectroscopic technique. The TRLFS results show that at 25 °C the speciation is dominated mainly by the Cm(3+) aquo ion. Only a minor fraction of the CmCl(2+) complex is present in solution. As the temperature increases, the fraction of this species decreases further. Simultaneously, the fraction of the CmCl2(+) complex increases strongly with the temperature. Also, the CmCl3 complex is formed to a minor extent at T > 160 °C. The conditional stability constant log β'2 is determined as a function of the temperature and extrapolated to zero ionic strength with the specific ion interaction theory approach. The log β°2(T) values increase by more than 3 orders of magnitude in the studied temperature range. The temperature dependency of log β°2 is fitted by the extended van't Hoff equation to determine ΔrH°m, ΔrS°m, and ΔrC°p,m. The EXAFS results support these findings. The results confirm the absence of americium(III) chloride complexes at T = 25 and 90 °C ([Am(III)] = 10(-3) m, [Cl(-)] = 3.0 m), and the spectra are described by 9-10 oxygen atoms at a distance of 2.44-2.48 Å. At T = 200 °C two chloride ligands are present in the inner coordination sphere of Am(III) at a distance of 2.78 Å.

  9. Time-Resolved Research at the Advanced Photon Source Beamline 7-ID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufresne, Eric M.; Adams, Bernhard; Arms, Dohn A.; Chollet, Matthieu; Landahl, Eric C.; Li, Yuelin; Walko, Donald A.; Wang, Jin

    2010-08-02

    The Sector 7 undulator beamline (7-ID) of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is dedicated to time-resolved x-ray research and is capable of ultrafast measurements on the order of 100 ps. Beamline 7-ID has a laser laboratory featuring a Ti:Sapphire system (average power of 2.5W, pulse duration <50 fs, repetition rate 1-5 kHz) that can be synchronized to the bunch pattern of the storage ring. The laser is deliverable to x-ray enclosures, which contain diffractometers, as well as motorized optical tables for table-top experiments. Beamline 7-ID has a single APS Undulator A and uses a diamond (111) double-crystal monochromator, providing good energy resolution over a range of 6-24 keV. Available optics include Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors to microfocus the x-ray beam. A variety of time-resolved diffraction and spectroscopy research is available at 7-ID, with experiments being done in the atomic, molecular, optical, chemistry, and solid state (bulk and surface) fields.

  10. Time-resolved molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junliang; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Agostini, Pierre; DiMauro, Louis F.

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved molecular imaging is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. In this article, we review present and future key spectroscopic and microscopic techniques for ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics and show their differences and connections. The advent of femtosecond lasers and free electron x-ray lasers bring us closer to this goal, which eventually will extend our knowledge about molecular dynamics to the attosecond time domain.

  11. Space and time resolved spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas: A study of density-sensitive x-ray transitions in helium-like and neon-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of level populations and detailed population mechanisms in dense plasmas has become an increasingly important problem in atomic physics. In this work, the density variation of line intensities and level populations in aluminum K-shell and molybdenum and silver L-shell emission spectra have been measured from high-powered, laser-produced plasmas. For each case, the density dependence of the observed line emission is due to the effect of high frequency electron-ion collisions on metastable levels. The density dependent line intensities vary greatly in laser-produced plasmas and can be used to extract detailed information concerning the population kinetics and level populations of the ions. The laser-plasmas had to be fully characterized in order to clearly compare the observed density dependence with atomic theory predictions. This has been achieved through the combined use of new diagnostic instruments and microdot targets which provided simultaneously space, time, and spectrally resolved data. The plasma temperatures were determined from the slope of the hydrogen-like recombination continuum. The time resolved electron density profiles were measured using multiple frame holographic interferometry. Thus, the density dependence of K-shell spectral lines could be clearly examined, independent of assumptions concerning the dynamics of the plasma. In aluminum, the electron density dependence of various helium-like line intensity ratios were measured. Standard collisional radiative equilibrium models fail to account for the observed density dependence measured for the ''He/sub α//IC'' ratio. Instead, a quasi-steady state atomic model based on a purely recombining plasma is shown to accurately predict the measured density dependence. This same recombining plasma calculation successfully models the density dependence of the high-n ''He/sub γ//He/sub β/'' and ''He/sub δ//He/sub β/'' helium-like resonance line intensity ratios

  12. Space and time resolved spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas: A study of density-sensitive x-ray transitions in helium-like and neon-like ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Bruce Kai Fong

    1988-09-01

    The determination of level populations and detailed population mechanisms in dense plasmas has become an increasingly important problem in atomic physics. In this work, the density variation of line intensities and level populations in aluminum K-shell and molybdenum and silver L-shell emission spectra have been measured from high-powered, laser-produced plasmas. For each case, the density dependence of the observed line emission is due to the effect of high frequency electron-ion collisions on metastable levels. The density dependent line intensities vary greatly in laser-produced plasmas and can be used to extract detailed information concerning the population kinetics and level populations of the ions. The laser-plasmas had to be fully characterized in order to clearly compare the observed density dependence with atomic theory predictions. This has been achieved through the combined use of new diagnostic instruments and microdot targets which provided simultaneously space, time, and spectrally resolved data. The plasma temperatures were determined from the slope of the hydrogen-like recombination continuum. The time resolved electron density profiles were measured using multiple frame holographic interferometry. Thus, the density dependence of K-shell spectral lines could be clearly examined, independent of assumptions concerning the dynamics of the plasma. In aluminum, the electron density dependence of various helium-like line intensity ratios were measured. Standard collisional radiative equilibrium models fail to account for the observed density dependence measured for the ''He/sub ..cap alpha..//IC'' ratio. Instead, a quasi-steady state atomic model based on a purely recombining plasma is shown to accurately predict the measured density dependence. This same recombining plasma calculation successfully models the density dependence of the high-n ''He/sub ..gamma..//He/sub ..beta../'' and ''He/sub delta

  13. Linking Jet Emission, X-Ray States, and Hard X-Ray Tails in the Neutron Star X-Ray Binary GX 17+2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Migliari; J.C.A. Miller-Jones; R.P. Fender; J. Homan; T. di Salvo; R.E. Rothschild; M.P. Rupen; J.A. Tomsick; R. Wijnands; M. van der Klis

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of simultaneous radio (VLA) and X-ray (RXTE) observations of the Z-type neutron star X-ray binary GX 17+2. The aim is to assess the coupling between X-ray and radio properties throughout its three rapidly variable X-ray states and during the time-resolved transitions. These ob

  14. Framing-camera tube developed for sub-100-ps range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new framing-camera tube, developed by Electronics Engineering, is capable of recording two-dimensional image frames with high spatial resolution in the sub-100-ps range. Framing is performed by streaking a two-dimensional electron image across narrow slits; the resulting electron-line images from the slits are restored into a framed image by a restorer deflector operating synchronously with the dissector deflector. We have demonstrated its performance in a prototype tube by recording 125-ps-duration framed images of 2.5-mm patterns. The limitation in the framing speed is in the external electronic drivers for the deflectors and not in the tube design characteristics. Shorter frame durations (below 100 ps) can be obtained by use of faster deflection drivers

  15. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Hugh T., E-mail: htp2@cornell.edu; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Gruner, Sol M. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    A high-speed pixel array detector for time-resolved X-ray imaging at synchrotrons has been developed. The ability to isolate single synchrotron bunches makes it ideal for time-resolved dynamical studies. A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8–12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10–100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed.

  16. XPS for time resolved X-ray spectroscopy of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is based on the simple energy conservation relation between a photon and an electron, hν = E /sub b/ + E /sub k/ , where hν is the photon energy, E /sub k/ is the electron kinetic energy and E /sub b/ is the binding energy of the electron ejected by the photon. In photoelectron spectroscopy, monochromatic photons are used to extract information about the various E /sub b/ 's in an atomic system by measuring E /sub k/ . By using atomic systems having a single electronic level with significant photoionization cross-section at the photon energies of interest it is also possible to find the energy of photons in a polychromatic source, again by measuring E /sub k/

  17. Linking Jet Emission, X-ray States and Hard X-ray Tails in the Neutron Star X-ray Binary GX 17+2

    OpenAIRE

    Migliari, S.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Fender, R. P.; Homan, J.; T. Di Salvo; Rothschild, R. E.; Rupen, M P; Tomsick, J. A.; Wijnands, R.; van der Klis, M.

    2007-01-01

    We present the results from simultaneous radio (Very Large Array) and X-ray (Rossi-X-ray Timing Explorer) observations of the Z-type neutron star X-ray binary GX~17+2. The aim is to assess the coupling between X-ray and radio properties throughout its three rapidly variable X-ray states and during the time-resolved transitions. These observations allow us, for the first time, to investigate quantitatively the possible relations between the radio emission and the presence of the hard X-ray tai...

  18. Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Bressler, Christian; Chen, Lin X.;

    2013-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) deliver short (time-resolved studies. Here we show that, despite the inherent instabilities of current (SASE based) XFELs, they can be used for measuring high......-quality X-ray absorption data and we report femtosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements of a spin-crossover system, iron(II) tris(2,2'-bipyridine) in water. The data indicate that the low-spin to high-spin transition can be modeled by single-exponential kinetics...

  19. X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat ...

  20. Ultrasensitive Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Pushing the Limits of Time Resolution and Magnetic Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohldag, Hendrik

    Understanding magnetic properties at ultrafast timescales is crucial for the development of new magnetic devices. Samples of interest are often thin film magnetic multilayers with thicknesses in the range of a few atomic layers. This fact alone presents a sensitivity challenge in STXM microscopy, which is more suited toward studying thicker samples. In addition the relevant time scale is of the order of 10 ps, which is well below the typical x-ray pulse length of 50 - 100 ps. The SSRL STXM is equipped with a single photon counting electronics that effectively allows using a double lock-in detection at 476MHz (the x-ray pulse frequency) and 1.28MHz (the synchrotron revelation frequency) to provide the required sensitivity. In the first year of operation the excellent spatial resolution, temporal stability and sensitivity of the detection electronics of this microscope has enabled researchers to acquire time resolved images of standing as well as traveling spin waves in a spin torque oscillator in real space as well as detect the real time spin accumulation in non magnetic Copper once a spin polarized current is injected into this material. The total magnetic moment is comparable to that of a single nanocube of magnetic Fe buried under a micron of non-magnetic material.

  1. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90o Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated ∼ 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 (angstrom)) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has been

  2. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Alan Hap [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90{sup o} Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated {approx} 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 {angstrom}) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has

  3. Chest x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  4. X-ray spectroscopy: Enlightened state

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, James K.

    2014-07-01

    Determining the sequence of events following photon absorption by a molecule can be a surprisingly challenging task. An innovative use of time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy has revealed an important insight into the ultrafast excited-state dynamics of a well-known inorganic chromophore.

  5. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  6. Impact of microfabrication technology on x-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray optics stands on the threshold of realizing its early promise: precision analysis of microstructure on the scale of the x-ray wavelength. The achievement of this exciting goal will depend in large part on advances in microfabrication technology making possible the precision fabrication of periodic microstructures. A review of recent advances in, as well as future prospects for: x-ray microscopy, coded imaging, and space-time resolved spectroscopy, resulting from improved microstructure fabrication capabilities is presented

  7. X-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  8. Dental x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some are: Bitewing Periapical Palatal (also called occlusal) ...

  9. X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diagnostic x-ray device, readily convertible between conventional radiographic and tomographic operating modes, is described. An improved drive system interconnects and drives the x-ray source and the imaging device through coordinated movements for tomography

  10. Dental x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film; Digital image ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some of them are: Bitewing. Shows the crown ...

  11. X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and ...

  12. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  13. X-Ray Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  14. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of semiconductor nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porte, Henrik

    This thesis describes time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy measurements on various semiconductor nanostructures. The aim is to study the carrier dynamics in these nanostructures on a picosecond timescale. In a typical experiment carriers are excited with a visible or near-infrared pulse...... be signicantly reduced. Besides time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy measurement, optical transmission, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray, and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy experiments on black silicon are presented....... produced by laser annealing of amorphous silicon lms. The amplitude and the decay time of the photoconductivity depends strongly on the method and annealing uence used in the production process. Furthermore, it is shown that by adding copper to the black silicon, the decay time of the photoconductivity can...

  15. Time-resolved diffraction experiments on piezoelectric actuators

    OpenAIRE

    Rödl, Florian

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important features of many common functional ceramics is piezoelectricity, a phenomenon which is not fully under-stood so far. Especially the time-dependent response and its role in the deterioration of properties due to fatigue has not been much investigated. The present work focuses especially on time-resolved X-ray-diffraction, but also uses static methods to improve the understanding of dynamic processes that occur during switching in piezoelectric actuators and how they c...

  16. Dilation x-ray imager a new∕faster gated x-ray imager for the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, S R; Hilsabeck, T J; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Ayers, M J; Barrios, M A; Felker, B; Smith, R F; Collins, G W; Jones, O S; Kilkenny, J D; Chung, T; Piston, K; Raman, K S; Sammuli, B; Hares, J D; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A K L

    2012-10-01

    As the yield on implosion shots increases it is expected that the peak x-ray emission reduces to a duration with a FWHM as short as 20 ps for ∼7 × 10(18) neutron yield. However, the temporal resolution of currently used gated x-ray imagers on the NIF is 40-100 ps. We discuss the benefits of the higher temporal resolution for the NIF and present performance measurements for dilation x-ray imager, which utilizes pulse-dilation technology [T. J. Hilsabeck et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10E317 (2010)] to achieve x-ray imaging with temporal gate times below 10 ps. The measurements were conducted using the COMET laser, which is part of the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  17. Time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy for the study of solid state reactions: synthesis of nanocrystalline barium titanate and thermal decomposition of ammonium hexachlorometallate compounds; Zeitaufgeloeste Roentgenabsorptionspektroskopie zur Untersuchung von Festkoerperreaktionen: Synthese von nanokristallinem Bariumtitanat und thermische Zersetzung von Ammoniumhexachlorometallat-Verbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumpf, H.

    2001-07-01

    This report presents investigations on the mechanism of two different types of solid-state reactions: At first, barium titanate nanopowders were prepared through a combined polymerization and pyrolysis of a metallo-organic precursor. The mean particle size d{sub m} could be adjusted by choosing appropriate reaction temperatures and tempering atmospheres. In the present in situ study of this particular solid-phase reaction, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the Ti K and Ba L{sub 3}-edges was applied in the preparation route of BaTiO{sub 3} nanopowders. A pronounced distortion of the lattice symmetry was found to occur in very fine BaTiO{sub 3} nanopowders (d{sub m} < 20 nm). Secondly, in situ XANES investigations were carried out at the Cl K, Pd L{sub 3}, Rh L{sub 3}, and Pt L{sub 3}-edges to study the mechanism of the thermal decomposition of ammonium hexachlorometallates. The results exceed structural information obtained by in situ X-ray diffraction methods and thermal analysis. Feff8 multiple scattering simulations have been carried out to disclose new intermediate phases of unknown reference compounds. (orig.)

  18. EPICS oscilloscope for time-resolved data acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sector 7 undulator beamline (7 ID) of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is dedicated to time-resolved X-ray research . Silicon avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are used as the primary point detector for time-resolved Bragg diffraction experiments for their fast recovery time (5 photons/s) at the detector, however, deadtime corrections to the counting statistics become appreciable . Common practice has been to attenuate the monochromatic beam entering the experimental hutch to an appropriately low flux . For these high-flux experiments, an APD operated in proportional mode is a better detector choice due to a large dynamic range and linearity. With the ZT4212 ZTEC, EPICS based oscilloscope, the operating procedure to use an APD in proportional mode has been improved. This article shows the setup and operating procedure for this oscilloscope and demonstrates its application to measuring time-resolved rocking curves of laser excited semiconductors.

  19. X-Ray Polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kaaret, Philip

    2014-01-01

    We review the basic principles of X-ray polarimetry and current detector technologies based on the photoelectric effect, Bragg reflection, and Compton scattering. Recent technological advances in high-spatial-resolution gas-filled X-ray detectors have enabled efficient polarimeters exploiting the photoelectric effect that hold great scientific promise for X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV band. Advances in the fabrication of multilayer optics have made feasible the construction of broad-band soft X-ray polarimeters based on Bragg reflection. Developments in scintillator and solid-state hard X-ray detectors facilitate construction of both modular, large area Compton scattering polarimeters and compact devices suitable for use with focusing X-ray telescopes.

  20. X-Ray Polarimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Kaaret, Philip

    2014-01-01

    We review the basic principles of X-ray polarimetry and current detector technologies based on the photoelectric effect, Bragg reflection, and Compton scattering. Recent technological advances in high-spatial-resolution gas-filled X-ray detectors have enabled efficient polarimeters exploiting the photoelectric effect that hold great scientific promise for X-ray polarimetry in the 2-10 keV band. Advances in the fabrication of multilayer optics have made feasible the construction of broad-band ...

  1. The 7BM beamline at the APS: a facility for time-resolved fluid dynamics measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Kastengren, Alan; Powell, Christopher F.; Arms, Dohn; Dufresne, Eric M.; Gibson, Harold; Wang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, X-ray radiography has been used to probe the internal structure of dense sprays with microsecond time resolution and a spatial resolution of 15 µm even in high-pressure environments. Recently, the 7BM beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been commissioned to focus on the needs of X-ray spray radiography measurements. The spatial resolution and X-ray intensity at this beamline represent a significant improvement over previous time-resolved X-ray radiography measure...

  2. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT (Conference Chair); Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  3. Time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verano-Braga, Thiago; Schwämmle, Veit; Sylvester, Marc;

    2012-01-01

    proteins involved in the Ang-(1-7) signaling, we performed a mass spectrometry-based time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteome study of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) treated with Ang-(1-7). We identified 1288 unique phosphosites on 699 different proteins with 99% certainty of correct peptide...

  4. Time-resolved pump-probe experiments at the LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glownia, James; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Cryan, J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Andreasson, J.; /Uppsala U.; Belkacem, A.; /LBNL, Berkeley; Berrah, N.; /Western Michigan U.; Blaga, C.L.; /Ohio State U.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J.; /SLAC; DiMauro, L.F.; /Ohio State U.; Fang, L.; /Western Michigan U.; Frisch, J.; /SLAC; Gessner, O.; /LBNL; Guhr, M.; /SLAC; Hajdu, J.; /Uppsala U.; Hertlein, M.P.; /LBNL; Hoener, M.; /Western Michigan U. /LBNL; Huang, G.; Kornilov, O.; /LBNL; Marangos, J.P.; /Imperial Coll., London; March, A.M.; /Argonne; McFarland, B.K.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /IRAMIS, Saclay /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Georgia Tech /Argonne /Kansas State U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC /LBNL /Argonne /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-12

    The first time-resolved x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) used a combination of feedback methods and post-analysis binning techniques to synchronize an ultrafast optical laser to the linac-based x-ray laser. Transient molecular nitrogen alignment revival features were resolved in time-dependent x-ray-induced fragmentation spectra. These alignment features were used to find the temporal overlap of the pump and probe pulses. The strong-field dissociation of x-ray generated quasi-bound molecular dications was used to establish the residual timing jitter. This analysis shows that the relative arrival time of the Ti:Sapphire laser and the x-ray pulses had a distribution with a standard deviation of approximately 120 fs. The largest contribution to the jitter noise spectrum was the locking of the laser oscillator to the reference RF of the accelerator, which suggests that simple technical improvements could reduce the jitter to better than 50 fs.

  5. Detectors and Concepts for sub-100 ps timing with gaseous detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Diaz, D; Gonzalez, J; Chen, H

    2016-01-01

    We give a short compendium of the main ongoing detectors and concepts capable of performing accurate sub-100 ps timing at high particle fluxes and on large areas, through technologies based on gaseous media. We briefly discuss the state-of-the-art, technological limitations and prospects, and a new bizarre idea.

  6. Demonstration of a 2-ps transient x-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A time-resolved measurement of the output from the Ni-like Ag transient-collisional-excitation x-ray laser is described. An ultrafast x-ray streak camera was used to diagnose the output of the J=0→1 4d-4p lasing line at 13.9 nm. The full width at half maximum duration of the x-ray pulse is measured to be of 1.9±0.7 ps at optimum conditions of pump laser irradiation. This is the shortest x-ray laser duration directly demonstrated to date and illustrates the great potential of transient x-ray lasers as a high brightness, picosecond x-ray source for applications

  7. X-ray - skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    A skeletal x-ray is an imaging test used to look at the bones. It is used to detect fractures , tumors, or ... in the health care provider's office by an x-ray technologist. You will lie on a table or ...

  8. Extremity x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    An extremity x-ray is an image of the hands, wrist, feet, ankle, leg, thigh, forearm humerus or upper arm, hip, shoulder ... term "extremity" often refers to a human limb. X-rays are a form of radiation that passes through ...

  9. X-ray interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved type of amplitude-division x-ray interferometer is described. The wavelength at which the interferometer can operate is variable, allowing the instrument to be used to measure x-ray wavelength, and the angle of inclination is variable for sample investigation. (U.K.)

  10. X-ray sensitivity measurements on CVD diamond film detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microwave chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond films have been used to fabricate radiation detectors. The polycrystalline diamond films have a resistivity of 1012 ohm.cm and carrier mobility and lifetime of about 280 cm2/V.s and 530 ps. The detector response to laser pulses (355, 532 and 1064 nm), X-ray flux (15-50 keV) and alpha particles (241Am, 5.49 MeV) has been investigated. The response speed of the detector is in the 100 ps range. A sensitivity of about 3 x 10-10 A/V.Gy.s was measured under 50 keV X-ray flux. The detector current response to X-ray flux is almost linear. It is also shown that CVD diamond detectors can be used for alpha particle counting. (authors). 9 figs., 25 refs

  11. X-ray crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose ... limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is ...

  14. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  16. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very ... of an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  17. X-ray lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Elton, Raymond C

    2012-01-01

    The first in its field, this book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to guide for specialists. It provides new entrants and others interested in the field with a comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. In one succinct volume, X-Ray Lasers collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development and conveys the exciting challenges and possibilities still to come._Add on for longer version of blurb_M>The reader is first introduced

  18. A MEMS-based high frequency x-ray chopper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siria, A; Schwartz, W; Chevrier, J [Institut Neel, CNRS-Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Dhez, O; Comin, F [ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Torricelli, G [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-29

    Time-resolved x-ray experiments require intensity modulation at high frequencies (advanced rotating choppers have nowadays reached the kHz range). We here demonstrate that a silicon microlever oscillating at 13 kHz with nanometric amplitude can be used as a high frequency x-ray chopper. We claim that using micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), it will be possible to achieve higher frequencies in excess of hundreds of megahertz. Working at such a frequency can open a wealth of possibilities in chemistry, biology and physics time-resolved experiments.

  19. A MEMS-based high frequency x-ray chopper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siria, A; Dhez, O; Schwartz, W; Torricelli, G; Comin, F; Chevrier, J

    2009-04-29

    Time-resolved x-ray experiments require intensity modulation at high frequencies (advanced rotating choppers have nowadays reached the kHz range). We here demonstrate that a silicon microlever oscillating at 13 kHz with nanometric amplitude can be used as a high frequency x-ray chopper. We claim that using micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), it will be possible to achieve higher frequencies in excess of hundreds of megahertz. Working at such a frequency can open a wealth of possibilities in chemistry, biology and physics time-resolved experiments.

  20. X-Ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  1. Medical X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) publishes Suggested State Regulations for the Control of Radiation , ... eSubmitter Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff - Assembler's Guide to Diagnostic X-Ray Equipment ...

  2. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a tiny dose of ionizing radiation, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs any risk. ...

  3. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and chest wall and may be used ... diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A ...

  4. Studying Nanoscale Magnetism and its Dynamics with Soft X-ray Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mccall, Monnikue M; Fischer, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy allows for imaging magnetic structures at a spatial resolution down to 15nm and a time resolution in the sub-100ps regime. Inherent elemental specificity can be used to image the magnetic response of individual components such as layers in multilayered systems. This review highlights current achievements and discusses the future potential of magnetic soft X-ray microscopy at fsec X-ray sources where snapshot images of ultrafast spin dynamics with a spatial resolution below 10nm will become feasible.

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  6. A Time Resolved XANES Study of an Organo-Clay Redox System

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, W.; Hunter, D.; Nuessle, P.; Bertsch, P.

    1997-01-01

    In situ, time-resolved X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopic measurements of tetraphenylboron (TPB)-treated Fe-bearing clay minerals were conducted to investigate whether smectite structural Fe was reduced during surface-enhanced oxidative degradation of TPB. Reference samples were prepared by reducing varying amounts of structural Fe with Na-dithionite in an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Kα X-ray fluorescence near edge structure of reference and TPB-treated samples w...

  7. FXR LIA Optimization - Time-resolved OTR Emittance Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P; LeSage, G

    2005-07-21

    The Flash X-Ray Radiography (FXR) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory utilizes a high current, long pulse linear induction accelerator to produce high doses of x-ray radiation. Accurate characterization of the transverse beam emittance is required in order to facilitate accelerator modeling and tuning efforts and, ultimately, to optimize the final focus spot size, yielding higher resolution radiographs. In addition to conventional magnet scan, pepper-pot, and multiple screen techniques, optical transition radiation (OTR) has been proven as a useful emittance measurement diagnostic and is particularly well suited to the FXR accelerator. We shall discuss the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam using OTR, and we will present our experimental apparatus and analysis software. We shall also develop the theoretical background of beam emittance and transition radiation.

  8. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  9. Ultrafast x-ray-induced nuclear dynamics in diatomic molecules using femtosecond x-ray-pump-x-ray-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, C. S.; Picón, A.; Bostedt, C.; Rudenko, A.; Marinelli, A.; Moonshiram, D.; Osipov, T.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Bomme, C.; Bucher, M.; Doumy, G.; Erk, B.; Ferguson, K. R.; Gorkhover, T.; Ho, P. J.; Kanter, E. P.; Krässig, B.; Krzywinski, J.; Lutman, A. A.; March, A. M.; Ray, D.; Young, L.; Pratt, S. T.; Southworth, S. H.

    2016-07-01

    The capability of generating two intense, femtosecond x-ray pulses with a controlled time delay opens the possibility of performing time-resolved experiments for x-ray-induced phenomena. We have applied this capability to study the photoinduced dynamics in diatomic molecules. In molecules composed of low-Z elements, K -shell ionization creates a core-hole state in which the main decay mode is an Auger process involving two electrons in the valence shell. After Auger decay, the nuclear wave packets of the transient two-valence-hole states continue evolving on the femtosecond time scale, leading either to separated atomic ions or long-lived quasibound states. By using an x-ray pump and an x-ray probe pulse tuned above the K -shell ionization threshold of the nitrogen molecule, we are able to observe ion dissociation in progress by measuring the time-dependent kinetic energy releases of different breakup channels. We simulated the measurements on N2 with a molecular dynamics model that accounts for K -shell ionization, Auger decay, and the time evolution of the nuclear wave packets. In addition to explaining the time-dependent feature in the measured kinetic energy release distributions from the dissociative states, the simulation also reveals the contributions of quasibound states.

  10. X-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Roland

    2016-01-01

    X-ray pulsars shine thanks to the conversion of the gravitational energy of accreted material to X-ray radiation. The accretion rate is modulated by geometrical and hydrodynamical effects in the stellar wind of the pulsar companions and/or by instabilities in accretion discs. Wind driven flows are highly unstable close to neutron stars and responsible for X-ray variability by factors $10^3$ on time scale of hours. Disk driven flows feature slower state transitions and quasi periodic oscillations related to orbital motion and precession or resonance. On shorter time scales, and closer to the surface of the neutron star, X-ray variability is dominated by the interactions of the accreting flow with the spinning magnetosphere. When the pulsar magnetic field is large, the flow is confined in a relatively narrow accretion column, whose geometrical properties drive the observed X-ray emission. In low magnetized systems, an increasing accretion rate allows the ignition of powerful explosive thermonuclear burning at t...

  11. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains the lectures, and the most important seminars held at the NATO meeting on X-Ray astronomy in Erice, July 1979. The meeting was an opportune forum to discuss the results of the first 8-months of operation of the X-ray satellite, HEAO-2 (Einstein Observatory) which was launched at the end of 1978. Besides surveying these results, the meeting covered extragalactic astronomy, including the relevant observations obtained in other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum (ultra-violet, optical, infrared and radio). The discussion on galactic X-ray sources essentially covered classical binaries, globular clusters and bursters and its significance to extragalactic sources and to high energy astrophysics was borne in mind. (orig.)

  12. Monochromatic x-ray radiography for areal-density measurement of inertial fusion energy fuel in fast ignition experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrafast, two-dimensional x-ray imaging is an important diagnostics for the inertial fusion energy research, especially in investigating implosion dynamics at the final stage of the fuel compression. Although x-ray radiography was applied to observing the implosion dynamics, intense x-rays emitted from the high temperature and dense fuel core itself are often superimposed on the radiograph. This problem can be solved by coupling the x-ray radiography with monochromatic x-ray imaging technique. In the experiment, 2.8 or 5.2 keV backlight x-rays emitted from laser-irradiated polyvinyl chloride or vanadium foils were selectively imaged by spherically bent quartz crystals with discriminating the out-of-band emission from the fuel core. This x-ray radiography system achieved 24 μm and 100 ps of spatial and temporal resolutions, respectively.

  13. Analysis of the transient collisional x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Akira; Utsumi, Takayuki; Moribayashi, Kengo; Zhidkov, Alexei; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Kado, Masataka; Tanaka, Momoko; Hasegawa, Noboru; Daido, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kizu, Kyoto (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    2001-10-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of the gain of a transient collisional x-ray lasers had been investigated using a plasma hydrodynamics code coupled with a detailed atomic kinetics code. The calculated gain of a Ni-like Ag laser pumped by two 100ps laser pulses agrees qualitatively with the experiment. Calculations for a thin foil target irradiated by two 2ps laser pulses shows that a high gain (>50/cm) can be obtained by adjusting the temporal interval between the two pump pulses. (author)

  14. CRL X-RAY TUBE

    OpenAIRE

    Kolchevsky, N. N.; Petrov, P. V.

    2015-01-01

    A novel types of X-ray tubes with refractive lenses are proposed. CRL-R X-ray tube consists of Compound Refractive Lens- CRL and Reflection X-ray tube. CRL acts as X-ray window. CRL-T X-ray consists of CRL and Transmission X-ray tube. CRL acts as target for electron beam. CRL refractive lens acts as filter, collimator, waveguide and focusing lens. Properties and construction of the CRL X-ray tube are discussed.

  15. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chen-Ting; Sergienko, Eduard A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence-based detection techniques are popular in high throughput screening due to sensitivity and cost-effectiveness. Four commonly used techniques exist, each with distinct characteristics. Fluorescence intensity assays are the simplest to run, but suffer the most from signal interference. Fluorescence polarization assays show less interference from the compounds or the instrument, but require a design that results in change of fluorophore-containing moiety size and usually have narrow assay signal window. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is commonly used for detecting protein-protein interactions and is constrained not by the sizes of binding partners, but rather by the distance between fluorophores. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), an advanced modification of FRET approach utilizes special fluorophores with long-lived fluorescence and earns its place near the top of fluorescent techniques list by its performance and robustness, characterized by larger assay window and minimized compound spectral interference. TR-FRET technology can be applied in biochemical or cell-based in vitro assays with ease. It is commonly used to detect modulation of protein-protein interactions and in detection of products of biochemical reactions and cellular activities. PMID:27316992

  16. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript ... time! Spotlight Recently posted: Pediatric MRI Intravascular Ultrasound Video: Chest CT Video:Thyroid Ultrasound Video: Head CT ...

  17. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ultrasound Video: Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is ... radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  18. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript ... Recently posted: Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids Dementia Video: General Ultrasound Video: Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Radiology and ...

  19. Medical x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book describes the fundamental subject about medical radiography. It is a multidisciplinary field that requires cross professional input from scientists, engineers and medical doctors. However, it is presented in simple language to suit different levels of readers from x-ray operators and radiographers to physists, general practitioners and radiology specialists.The book is written in accordance to the requirements of the standard syllabus approved by the Ministry of Health Malaysia for the training of medical x-ray operator and general practitioners. In general, the content is not only designed to provide relevant and essential subject for related professionals in medical radiological services such as x-ray operator, radiographer and radiologists, but also to address those in associated radiological services including nurses, medical technologists and physicists.The book is organized and arranged sequentially into 3 parts for easy reference: Radiation safety; X-ray equipment and associated facilities; Radiography practices. With proper grasping of all these parts, the radiological services could be provided with confident and the highest professional standard. Thus, medical imaging with highest quality that can provide useful diagnostic information at minimum doses and at cost effective could be assured

  20. Pyroelectric x-ray detectors and x-ray pyrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses pyroelectric detectors which are very promising x-ray detectors for intense pulsed x-ray/γ-ray measurements and can be used as x-ray pyrometers. They are fast, passive, and inherently flat in spectral response for low energy x-rays. The authors report tests of LiTaO3, Sr.5Ba.5Nb2O6 and LiNbO3 detectors at Nova laser with 1 ns low energy x-rays and at Zapp Z-pinch machine with 100 ns x-rays. The temporal and spectral responses are discussed

  1. Pyroelectric x-ray detectors and x-ray pyrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyroelectric detectors are very promising x-ray detectors for intense pulsed x-ray/γ-ray measurements and can be used as x-ray pyrometers. They are fast, passive, and inherently flat in spectral response for low-energy x rays. We report our tests of LiTaO3 detectors at Nova laser with 1-ns low-energy x rays and at Zapp Z-pinch machine with 100-ns x rays. The temporal and spectral responses are discussed

  2. Resource Letter on Stimulated Inelastic X-ray Scattering at an XFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Bruce D.; /SLAC

    2010-09-02

    At sufficient X-ray intensity, stimulated effects in inelastic scattering will become important. These coherent, non-linear optical phenomena may be used to impulsively produce a high degree of collective excitation in, for example, correlated electron materials, suitable for performing ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy. This Resource Letter collects information on fundamental aspects of stimulated X-ray scattering and evaluates the prospect for successful experiments at a present or future X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facility.

  3. Quantum effets in nonresonant X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowik, Jan Malte

    2015-11-15

    Due to their versatile properties, X rays are a unique tool to investigate the structure and dynamics of matter. X-ray scattering is the fundamental principle of many imaging techniques. Examples are X-ray crystallography, which recently celebrated one hundred years and is currently the leading method in structure determination of proteins, as well as X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI), which is an imaging technique with countless applications in biology, medicine, etc. The technological development of X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL) has brought X-ray imaging at the edge of a new scientific revolution. XFELs offer ultrashort X-ray pulses with unprecedented high X-ray fluence and excellent spatial coherence properties. These properties make them an outstanding radiation source for X-ray scattering experiments, providing ultrafast temporal resolution as well as atomic spatial resolution. However, the radiation-matter interaction in XFEL experiments also advances into a novel regime. This demands a sound theoretical fundament to describe and explore the new experimental possibilities. This dissertation is dedicated to the theoretical study of nonresonant X-ray scattering. As the first topic, I consider the near-field imaging by propagation based X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI). I devise a novel theory of PCI, in which radiation and matter are quantized. Remarkably, the crucial interference term automatically excludes contributions from inelastic scattering. This explains the success of the classical description thus far. The second topic of the thesis is the X-ray imaging of coherent electronic motion, where quantum effects become particularly apparent. The electron density of coherent electronic wave packets - important in charge transfer and bond breaking - varies in time, typically on femto- or attosecond time scales. In the near future, XFELs are envisaged to provide attosecond X-ray pulses, opening the possibility for time-resolved ultrafast X-ray scattering

  4. Quantum effets in nonresonant X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their versatile properties, X rays are a unique tool to investigate the structure and dynamics of matter. X-ray scattering is the fundamental principle of many imaging techniques. Examples are X-ray crystallography, which recently celebrated one hundred years and is currently the leading method in structure determination of proteins, as well as X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI), which is an imaging technique with countless applications in biology, medicine, etc. The technological development of X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL) has brought X-ray imaging at the edge of a new scientific revolution. XFELs offer ultrashort X-ray pulses with unprecedented high X-ray fluence and excellent spatial coherence properties. These properties make them an outstanding radiation source for X-ray scattering experiments, providing ultrafast temporal resolution as well as atomic spatial resolution. However, the radiation-matter interaction in XFEL experiments also advances into a novel regime. This demands a sound theoretical fundament to describe and explore the new experimental possibilities. This dissertation is dedicated to the theoretical study of nonresonant X-ray scattering. As the first topic, I consider the near-field imaging by propagation based X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI). I devise a novel theory of PCI, in which radiation and matter are quantized. Remarkably, the crucial interference term automatically excludes contributions from inelastic scattering. This explains the success of the classical description thus far. The second topic of the thesis is the X-ray imaging of coherent electronic motion, where quantum effects become particularly apparent. The electron density of coherent electronic wave packets - important in charge transfer and bond breaking - varies in time, typically on femto- or attosecond time scales. In the near future, XFELs are envisaged to provide attosecond X-ray pulses, opening the possibility for time-resolved ultrafast X-ray scattering

  5. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been interested in structural elucidation by x-ray diffraction of compounds of biological interest. Understanding exactly how atoms are arranged in three-dimensional arrays as molecules can help explain the relationship between structure and functions. The species investigated may vary in size and shape; our recent studies included such diverse substances as antischistosomal drugs, a complex of cadmium with nucleic acid base, nitrate salts of adenine, and proteins

  6. A high temperature furnace for in situ and time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitán, M. J.; Thouin, N.; Rostaing, G.

    1999-05-01

    A high temperature furnace has been built and mounted on a six-circle goniometer for in situ diffraction studies of polycrystalline and powder samples. Temperatures up to 1400 K are controlled with a stability better than ±0.05 K in a vacuum better than 10-7 atm. The furnace is also able to work in oxidizing or reducing atmosphere and is mounted on a χ circle table using the φ circle as a driver for precise translation of the sample in the z direction. The sample can be rotated continuously via a mechanical feedthrough. The temperature is measured by means of a thermocouple placed at the sample holder (0.5 mm from the sample position). The temperature has been calibrated up to 1073 K by following the known thermal expansion of an AlCuFe quasicrystal.

  7. Time-Resolved Pump-Probe X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy of Gaq3

    OpenAIRE

    Dicke, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Gallium(tris-8-hydroxyquinoline) (Gaq3) belongs to a class of metal organic compounds, usedas electron transport layer and emissive layer in organic light emitting diodes. Many researchactivities have concentrated on the optical and electronic properties, especially of the homologuemolecule aluminum(tris-8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq3). Knowledge of the first excited state S1structure of these molecules could provide deeper insight into the processes involved into the operationof electronic device...

  8. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, C.P.J. [University of California, Department of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Science, Urey Hall, Mali Code 0339, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  9. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... wrist, arm, elbow, shoulder, spine, pelvis, hip, thigh, knee, leg (shin), ankle or foot. top of page ... the patient standing upright, as in cases of knee x-rays. A portable x-ray machine is ...

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fracture. guide orthopedic surgery, such as spine repair/fusion, joint replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, ... and Media Arthritis X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to X-ray ( ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and ...

  13. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-oral dental X-ray apparatus for panoramic radiography is described in detail. It comprises a tubular target carrier supporting at its distal end a target with an inclined forward face. Image definition is improved by positioning in the path of the X-rays a window of X-ray transmitting ceramic material, e.g. 90% oxide of Be, or Al, 7% Si02. The target carrier forms a probe which can be positioned in the patient's mouth. X-rays are directed forwardly and laterally of the target to an X-ray film positioned externally. The probe is provided with a detachable sleeve having V-form arms of X-ray opaque material which serve to depress the tongue out of the radiation path and also shield the roof of the mouth and other regions of the head from the X-ray pattern. A cylindrical lead shield defines the X-ray beam angle. (author)

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. top of page How is the procedure performed? ... position possible that still ensures x-ray image quality. top of page Who interprets the results and ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As a result, bones appear white on the x-ray, soft tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were maintained on large film sheets (much ...

  16. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a ... a large photographic negative). Today, most images are digital files that are stored electronically. These stored images ...

  17. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Edward Snell, a National Research Council research fellow at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), prepares a protein crystal for analysis by x-ray crystallography as part of NASA's structural biology program. The small, individual crystals are bombarded with x-rays to produce diffraction patterns, a map of the intensity of the x-rays as they reflect through the crystal.

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-rays. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for bone x-rays consists of ... and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available in emergency ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The x-ray tube is connected to a flexible arm that is extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath the patient. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ...

  20. Tunable X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, James R.

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  1. X-ray selected BALQSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Page, M J; Ceballos, M; Corral, A; Ebrero, J; Esquej, P; Krumpe, M; Mateos, S; Rosen, S; Schwope, A; Streblyanska, A; Symeonidis, M; Tedds, J A; Watson, M G

    2016-01-01

    We study a sample of six X-ray selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) from the XMM-Newton Wide Angle Survey. All six objects are classified as BALQSOs using the classic balnicity index, and together they form the largest sample of X-ray selected BALQSOs. We find evidence for absorption in the X-ray spectra of all six objects. An ionized absorption model applied to an X-ray spectral shape that would be typical for non-BAL QSOs (a power law with energy index alpha=0.98) provides acceptable fits to the X-ray spectra of all six objects. The optical to X-ray spectral indices, alpha_OX, of the X-ray selected BALQSOs, have a mean value of 1.69 +- 0.05, which is similar to that found for X-ray selected and optically selected non-BAL QSOs of similar ultraviolet luminosity. In contrast, optically-selected BALQSOs typically have much larger alpha_OX and so are characterised as being X-ray weak. The results imply that X-ray selection yields intrinsically X-ray bright BALQSOs, but their X-ray sp...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lies. A drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... that is extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  3. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  4. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: dedo What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  5. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Wrist Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: muñeca What It Is A wrist X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  6. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Hip KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Hip Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: cadera What It Is A hip X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  7. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Forearm KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Forearm Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: brazo What It Is A forearm X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  8. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Pelvis KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Pelvis Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: pelvis What It Is A pelvis X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  9. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Foot KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Foot Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: pie What It Is A foot X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  10. Neutron and X-ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carini, Gabriella [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Denes, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gruener, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Lessner, Elianne [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science Office of Basic Energy Sciences

    2012-08-01

    (and two computing hurdles that result from the corresponding increase in data volume) for the detector community to overcome in order to realize the full potential of BES neutron and X-ray facilities. Resolving these detector impediments will improve scientific productivity both by enabling new types of experiments, which will expand the scientific breadth at the X-ray and neutron facilities, and by potentially reducing the beam time required for a given experiment. These research priorities are summarized in the table below. Note that multiple, simultaneous detector improvements are often required to take full advantage of brighter sources. High-efficiency hard X-ray sensors: The fraction of incident particles that are actually detected defines detector efficiency. Silicon, the most common direct-detection X-ray sensor material, is (for typical sensor thicknesses) 100% efficient at 8 keV, 25%efficient at 20 keV, and only 3% efficient at 50 keV. Other materials are needed for hard X-rays. Replacement for 3He for neutron detectors: 3He has long been the neutron detection medium of choice because of its high cross section over a wide neutron energy range for the reaction 3He + n —> 3H + 1H + 0.764 MeV. 3He stockpiles are rapidly dwindling, and what is available can be had only at prohibitively high prices. Doped scintillators hold promise as ways to capture neutrons and convert them into light, although work is needed on brighter, more efficient scintillator solutions. Neutron detectors also require advances in speed and resolution. Fast-framing X-ray detectors: Today’s brighter X-ray sources make time-resolved studies possible. For example, hybrid X-ray pixel detectors, initially developed for particle physics, are becoming fairly mature X-ray detectors, with considerable development in Europe. To truly enable time-resolved studies, higher frame rates and dynamic range are required, and smaller pixel sizes are desirable. High-speed spectroscopic X-ray detectors

  11. Scintillator characterization using the LBL Pulsed X-ray Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have developed a bench-top pulsed x-ray system for measuring scintillation properties of compounds in crystal or powdered form. The source is a light-excited x-ray tube that produces 40 x-ray photons (mean energy 18.5 keV) per steradian in each 100 ps fwhm pulse. The repetition rate is adjustable from 0 to 107 pulses per second. The fluorescent emanations from the x-ray excited samples are detected with either a sapphire-windowed microchannel plate photomultiplier tube (spectral range 150--650 nm, transit time jitter 40 ps fwhm) or a quartz windowed GaAs(Cs) photomultiplier tube (spectral range 160--930 nm, transit time jitter 4 ns fwhm). Decay time spectra are acquired using a TDC Havina 40 ps fwhm resolution over a 84 ms dynamic range. A computer controlled monochromator can be inserted into the optical path to measure the emission spectrum or wavelength resolved decay time spectrum. A computer controlled sample changer allows up to 64 samples to be measured without intervention

  12. Soft X-ray Images of Krypton Gas-Puff Z-Pinches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱孟通; 蒯斌; 曾正中; 吕敏; 王奎禄; 邱爱慈; 张美; 罗建辉

    2002-01-01

    A series of experiments has been carried out on Qiang-guang Ⅰ generator to study the dynamics of krypton gas-puff Z-pinches. The generator was operated at a peak current of 1.5 MA with a rise-time of 80 ns. The specific linear mass of gas liner was about 20 μg/cm in these experiments. In the diagnostic system, a four-frame x-ray framing camera and a pinhole camera were employed. A novel feature of this camera is that it can give time-resolved x-ray images with four frames and energy-resolved x-ray images with two different filters and an array of 8 pinholes integrated into one compact assemble. As a typical experimental result, an averaged radial imploding velocity of 157 km/s over 14 ns near the late phase of implosion was measured from the time-resolved x-ray images. From the time-integrated x-ray image an averaged radial convergence of 0.072 times of the original size was measured. An averaged radial expansion velocity was 130 km/s and the maximum radial convergence of 0.04 times of the original size were measured from the time-resolved x-ray images. The dominant axial wavelengths of instabilities in the plasma were between 1 and 2 mm. The change in average photons energy was observed from energy spectrum- and time-resolved x-ray images.

  13. The application of photoconductive detectors to the measurement of x-ray production in laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoconductive detectors (PCDs) offer an attractive alternative for the measurement of pulsed x-rays from laser produced plasmas. These devices are fast (FWHM ∼100 ps), sensitive and simple to use. We have used InP, GaAs, and Type IIa diamond as PCDs to measure x-rays emission from 100 eV to 100 keV. Specifically, we have used these detectors to measure total radiation yields, corona temperatures, and hot electron generated x-rays from laser produced plasmas. 5 refs., 4 figs

  14. Analyses of the short pulse laser pumped transient collisional excited X-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, A.; Utsumi, T.; Moribayashi, K.; Zhidkov, A.; Kado, M.; Tanaka, M.; Hasegawa, N.; Kawachi, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Osaka (Japan). Advanced Photon Research Center

    2001-07-01

    The soft X-ray gain of the transient collisional excited (TCE) Ni-like Ag laser is investigated using the plasma hydrodynamics and atomic kinetics codes. The gain is calculated for a plasma produced from two 100ps laser irradiated solid target to show qualitative agreement with the experiment. The calculation shows significant improvement of the gain using a thin foil target pumped by two short laser pulses, because of a better coupling of the pump laser energy into the gain region of the plasma. The codes will provide performance prediction as well as optimization of the experimental studies of the TCE X-ray lasers. (orig.)

  15. High-sensitivity CCD-based x-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detector is designed for imaging measurements requiring relatively high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. The detector can discriminate single X-ray photons, yet has the wide dynamic range (∼10000:1) associated with integrating detectors. A GdO2S2 phosphor screen converts the incoming X-ray image into an optical image. The optical image is coupled (without demagnification) to the CCD image sensor using a fiber optic faceplate. The CCD (Philips Semiconductors) has an area of 4.9 x 8.6 cm with 4000 x 7000 12 μm pixels. A single 12 keV X-ray photon produces a signal of 100 e-. With 2 x 2 pixel binning, the total noise per 24 μm pixel in a 100 s image is ∼30 e-, the detective quantum efficiency is >0.6 at 1 X-ray photon per pixel, and the full image can be read out in <4 s. The spatial resolution is 50 μm. The CCD readout system is fully computer-controlled, allowing flexible operation in time-resolved experiments. The detector has been characterized using visible-light images, X-ray images and time-resolved muscle diffraction measurements.

  16. X-ray today

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, U. [Philips Medical Systems, Hamburg (Germany)

    2001-09-01

    The interest attracted by the new imaging modalities tends to overshadow the continuing importance of projection radiography and fluoroscopy. Nevertheless, projection techniques still represent by far the greatest proportion of diagnostic imaging examinations, and play an essential role in the growing number of advanced interventional procedures. This article describes some of the latest developments in X-ray imaging technology, using two products from the Philips range as examples: the Integris Allura cardiovascular system with 3D image reconstruction, and the BV Pulsera: a high-end, multi-functional mobile C-arm system with cardiac capabilities. (orig.)

  17. Optoelectronic measurement of x-ray synchrotron pulses: A proof of concept demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Caffee, Marc; Savikhin, Sergei [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Mahmood, Aamer [Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Dufresne, Eric M.; Wen, Haidan; Li, Yuelin [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2013-02-04

    Optoelectronic detection using photoconductive coplanar stripline devices has been applied to measuring the time profile of x-ray synchrotron pulses, a proof of concept demonstration that may lead to improved time-resolved x-ray studies. Laser sampling of current vs time delay between 12 keV x-ray and 800 nm laser pulses reveal the {approx}50 ps x-ray pulse width convoluted with the {approx}200 ps lifetime of the conduction band carriers. For GaAs implanted with 8 MeV protons, a time profile closer to the x-ray pulse width is observed. The protons create defects over the entire depth sampled by the x-rays, trapping the x-ray excited conduction electrons and minimizing lifetime broadening of the electrical excitation.

  18. Fast time-resolved aerosol collector: proof of concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-Y. Yu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric particles can be collected in the field on substrates for subsequent laboratory analysis via chemically sensitive single particle methods such as scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. With moving substrates time resolution of seconds to minutes can be achieved. In this paper, we demonstrate how to increase the time resolution when collecting particles on a substrate to a few milliseconds to provide real-time information. Our fast time-resolved aerosol collector ("Fast-TRAC" microscopically observes the particle collection on a substrate and records an on-line video. Particle arrivals are resolved to within a single frame (4–17 ms in this setup, and the spatial locations are matched to the subsequent single particle analysis. This approach also provides in-situ information on particle size and number concentration. Applications are expected in airborne studies of cloud microstructure, pollution plumes, and surface long-term monitoring.

  19. Fast time-resolved aerosol collector: proof of concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-Y. Yu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric particles can be collected in the field on substrates for subsequent laboratory analysis via chemically sensitive single particle methods such as scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. With moving substrates time resolution of seconds to minutes can be achieved. In this paper, we demonstrate how to increase the time resolution when collecting particles on a substrate to a few milliseconds to provide real-time information. Our fast time-resolved aerosol collector ("Fast-TRAC" microscopically observes the particle collection on a substrate and records an on-line video. Particle arrivals are resolved to within a single frame (4–17 ms in this setup, and the spatial locations are matched to the subsequent single particle analysis. This approach also provides in-situ information on particle size and number concentration. Applications are expected in airborne studies of cloud microstructure, pollution plumes, and surface long-term monitoring.

  20. Time-resolved neutron imaging at ANTARES cold neutron beamline

    CERN Document Server

    Tremsin, A S; Tittelmeier, K; Schillinger, B; Schulz, M; Lerche, M; Feller, W B

    2015-01-01

    In non-destructive evaluation with X-rays light elements embedded in dense, heavy (or high-Z) matrices show little contrast and their structural details can hardly be revealed. Neutron radiography, on the other hand, provides a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross section on the atomic number. The majority of neutron imaging experiments at the present time is conducted with static objects mainly due to the limited flux intensity of neutron beamline facilities and sometimes due to the limitations of the detectors. However, some applications require the studies of dynamic phenomena and can now be conducted at several high intensity beamlines such as the recently rebuilt ANTARES beam line at the FRM-II reactor. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of time resolved imaging for repetitive processes, where different phases of the process can be imaged simultaneously and...

  1. Picosecond soft-x-ray pulses from a high-intensity laser-plasma source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, J F; Chaker, M; Kieffer, J C

    1996-07-15

    We report time-resolved spectroscopic analysis of laser-produced plasma x-ray sources. Plasmas produced by a 400-fs 1-TW tabletop laser are characterized with a transmission grating spectrometer coupled to a soft-x-ray streak camera. Soft-x-ray radiation in the 1-6-nm range with durations of 2-7 ps is observed for copper and tantalum plasmas. The effect of incident laser energy on the x-ray pulse duration is also investigated. PMID:19876245

  2. Neutron and X-ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carini, Gabriella [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Denes, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gruener, Sol [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Lessner, Elianne [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science Office of Basic Energy Sciences

    2012-08-01

    (and two computing hurdles that result from the corresponding increase in data volume) for the detector community to overcome in order to realize the full potential of BES neutron and X-ray facilities. Resolving these detector impediments will improve scientific productivity both by enabling new types of experiments, which will expand the scientific breadth at the X-ray and neutron facilities, and by potentially reducing the beam time required for a given experiment. These research priorities are summarized in the table below. Note that multiple, simultaneous detector improvements are often required to take full advantage of brighter sources. High-efficiency hard X-ray sensors: The fraction of incident particles that are actually detected defines detector efficiency. Silicon, the most common direct-detection X-ray sensor material, is (for typical sensor thicknesses) 100% efficient at 8 keV, 25%efficient at 20 keV, and only 3% efficient at 50 keV. Other materials are needed for hard X-rays. Replacement for 3He for neutron detectors: 3He has long been the neutron detection medium of choice because of its high cross section over a wide neutron energy range for the reaction 3He + n —> 3H + 1H + 0.764 MeV. 3He stockpiles are rapidly dwindling, and what is available can be had only at prohibitively high prices. Doped scintillators hold promise as ways to capture neutrons and convert them into light, although work is needed on brighter, more efficient scintillator solutions. Neutron detectors also require advances in speed and resolution. Fast-framing X-ray detectors: Today’s brighter X-ray sources make time-resolved studies possible. For example, hybrid X-ray pixel detectors, initially developed for particle physics, are becoming fairly mature X-ray detectors, with considerable development in Europe. To truly enable time-resolved studies, higher frame rates and dynamic range are required, and smaller pixel sizes are desirable. High-speed spectroscopic X-ray detectors

  3. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of enveloped virus microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX using X-ray free-electron lasers has produced high-resolution, room temperature, time-resolved protein structures. We report preliminary SFX of Sindbis virus, an enveloped icosahedral RNA virus with ∼700 Å diameter. Microcrystals delivered in viscous agarose medium diffracted to ∼40 Å resolution. Small-angle diffuse X-ray scattering overlaid Bragg peaks and analysis suggests this results from molecular transforms of individual particles. Viral proteins undergo structural changes during entry and infection, which could, in principle, be studied with SFX. This is an important step toward determining room temperature structures from virus microcrystals that may enable time-resolved studies of enveloped viruses.

  4. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  5. X-ray instrumentation for SR beamlines

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalchuk, M V; Zheludeva, S I; Aleshko-Ozhevsky, O P; Arutynyan, E H; Kheiker, D M; Kreines, A Y; Lider, V V; Pashaev, E M; Shilina, N Y; Shishkov, V A

    2000-01-01

    The main possibilities and parameters of experimental X-ray stations are presented: 'Protein crystallography', 'X-ray structure analysis', 'High-precision X-ray optics', 'X-ray crystallography and material science', 'X-ray topography', 'Photoelectron X-ray standing wave' that are being installed at Kurchatov SR source by A.V. Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography.

  6. Small-angle X-ray scattering of solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of synchrotron radiation in small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques in biological structural studies is described. The main features of the monochromatic radiation systems and the white radiation systems are considered. The detectors, data acquisition and experimental procedures are briefly described. Experimental results are presented for 1) measurements on dilute solutions and weak scatterers, 2) measurement of conformational transitions, 3) contrast variation experiments, 4) time-resolved measurements and 5) complex contrast variation. (U.K.)

  7. X-ray lithography sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron from dipole magnets in electron storage rings has emerged as a useful source of x-rays for lithography. To meet the need for these sources numerous groups around the world have embarked on projects to design and construct storage rings for x-ray lithography. Both conventional electromagnets as well as superconducting (SC) dipoles have been incorporated into the various designs. An overview of the worldwide effort to produce commercial x-ray sources will be presented. To better illustrate the elements involved in these sources a closer examination of the Superconducting X-ray Lithography Source Project (SXLS) at BNL will be presented. 11 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  8. Soft X-ray optics

    CERN Document Server

    Spiller, Eberhard A

    1993-01-01

    This text describes optics mainly in the 10 to 500 angstrom wavelength region. These wavelengths are 50 to 100 times shorter than those for visible light and 50 to 100 times longer than the wavelengths of medical x rays or x-ray diffraction from natural crystals. There have been substantial advances during the last 20 years, which one can see as an extension of optical technology to shorter wavelengths or as an extension of x-ray diffraction to longer wavelengths. Artificial diffracting structures like zone plates and multilayer mirrors are replacing the natural crystals of x-ray diffraction.

  9. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  10. X-ray Fluorescence Sectioning

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an x-ray fluorescence imaging system for elemental analysis. The key idea is what we call "x-ray fluorescence sectioning". Specifically, a slit collimator in front of an x-ray tube is used to shape x-rays into a fan-beam to illuminate a planar section of an object. Then, relevant elements such as gold nanoparticles on the fan-beam plane are excited to generate x-ray fluorescence signals. One or more 2D spectral detectors are placed to face the fan-beam plane and directly measure x-ray fluorescence data. Detector elements are so collimated that each element only sees a unique area element on the fan-beam plane and records the x-ray fluorescence signal accordingly. The measured 2D x-ray fluorescence data can be refined in reference to the attenuation characteristics of the object and the divergence of the beam for accurate elemental mapping. This x-ray fluorescence sectioning system promises fast fluorescence tomographic imaging without a complex inverse procedure. The design can be ad...

  11. Lensless x-ray imaging in reflection geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, S.; Parks, D.H.; Seu, K.A.; Turner, J.J.; Chao, W.; Anderson, E.H.; Cabrini, S.; Kevan, S.D.; Su, R.

    2011-02-03

    Lensless X-ray imaging techniques such as coherent diffraction imaging and ptychography, and Fourier transform holography can provide time-resolved, diffraction-limited images. Nearly all examples of these techniques have focused on transmission geometry, restricting the samples and reciprocal spaces that can be investigated. We report a lensless X-ray technique developed for imaging in Bragg and small-angle scattering geometries, which may also find application in transmission geometries. We demonstrate this by imaging a nanofabricated pseudorandom binary structure in small-angle reflection geometry. The technique can be used with extended objects, places no restriction on sample size, and requires no additional sample masking. The realization of X-ray lensless imaging in reflection geometry opens up the possibility of single-shot imaging of surfaces in thin films, buried interfaces in magnetic multilayers, organic photovoltaic and field-effect transistor devices, or Bragg planes in a single crystal.

  12. Molecular Imaging Using X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, Anton; Küpper, Jochen; Chapman, Henry N.

    2013-04-01

    The opening of hard X-ray free-electron laser facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in the United States, has ushered in a new era in structural determination. With X-ray pulse durations down to 10 fs or shorter, and up to 1013 transversely coherent photons per pulse in a narrow spectral bandwidth, focused irradiances of 1018 to 1021 W cm-2 or higher can be produced at X-ray energies ranging from 500 eV to 10 keV. New techniques for determining the structure of systems that cannot be crystallized and for studying the time-resolved behavior of irreversible reactions at femtosecond timescales are now available.

  13. Radioisotope x-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope x-ray fluorescence and x-ray preferential absorption (XRA) techniques are used extensively for the analysis of materials, covering such diverse applications as analysis of alloys, coal, environmental samples, paper, waste materials, and metalliferous mineral ores and products. Many of these analyses are undertaken in the harsh environment of industrial plants and in the field. Some are continuous on-line analyses of material being processed in industry, where instantaneous analysis information is required for the control of rapidly changing processes. Radioisotope x-ray analysis systems are often tailored to a specific but limited range of applications. They are simpler and often considerably less expensive than analysis systems based on x-ray tubes. These systems are preferred to x-ray tube techniques when simplicity, ruggedness, reliability, and cost of equipment are important; when minimum size, weight, and power consumption are necessary; when a very constant and predictable x-ray output is required; when the use of high-energy x-rays is advantageous; and when short x-ray path lengths are required to minimize the absorption of low-energy x-rays in air. This chapter reviews radioisotope XRF, preferential absorption, and scattering techniques. Some of the basic analysis equations are given. The characteristics of radioisotope sources and x-ray detectors are described, and then the x-ray analytical techniques are presented. The choice of radioisotope technique for a specific application is discussed. This is followed by a summary of applications of these techniques, with a more detailed account given of some of the applications, particularly those of considerable industrial importance. 79 refs., 28 figs., 7 tabs

  14. Imaging experiments of Ne-like x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, J.C., Nilsen, J.; Barbee, T.W.; Da Silva, L.B.; Fill, E.; Li, Y,; Lu, P.

    1997-06-01

    We discuss high resolution two-dimensional near-field images of the neon-like nickel and germanium x-ray laser obtained using the Asterix laser at the Max-Planck-Institute and the Nova laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Our imaging diagnostic consisted of a concave multilayer mirror that imaged the output end of the x-ray laser line onto a backside illuminated x-ray CCD detector. A 25 microm thick wire positioned at the end of the target provided a spatial fiducial. With the Asterix iodine laser, a prepulse 5.23 ns before the main pulse, was used to irradiate slab targets. A great deal of structure was observed in the near field images, particularly in the J=0-1 emission. We observed a large difference in the spatial dependence of the J=0-1 and J=2-1 lines of germanium, with the J=2-1 emission peaking farther away from the original target surface. A larger prepulse moved the peak emission farther away from the target surface. For the Nova experiments we used a series of 100 ps pulses spaced 400 ps apart to illuminate a germanium target. We obtained high resolution images of both the J=0-1 and J=2-1 lines of Ge. These measurements are compared to hydrodynamic simulations coupled with atomic kinetics and including refraction effects.

  15. Hard disk drive based microsecond x-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, O.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.

    2015-03-01

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few μs was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of μs to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper.

  16. Hard disk drive based microsecond x-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, O., E-mail: o.mueller@uni-wuppertal.de; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R. [Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Gaußstraße 20, Wuppertal 42119 (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few μs was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of μs to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper.

  17. Femtosecond electron and x-ray source based on laser wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Oulianov, D A; Gosztola, D J; Korovyanko, O J; Li, Y; Rey de Castro, R C; Shkrob, I A; Crowell, Robert A.; Gosztola, David J.; Korovyanko, Oleg J.; Li, Yuelin; Oulianov, Dmitri A.; Rey-de-Castro, Roberto C.; Shkrob, Ilya A.

    2006-01-01

    A terawatt tabletop laser wakefield acceleration source of relativistic electrons has been developed in our Terawatt Ultrafast High Field Facility (TUHFF). The preliminary results for ultrafast radiolysis of liquid water using this femtosecond electron source are presented. A TUHFF based femtosecond x-ray source is proposed. Thomson scattering of the accelerated electrons off a counterpropagating terawatt laser beam will be used to generate keV x-ray photons. The expected parameters of this x-ray source have been estimated. The short pulse duration, high flux, and good collimation of the resulting x-ray beam would be conducive for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption studies of short-lived transient species in gases, liquids, and solids. It is argued that the solvation dynamics of Br atoms generated in photoinduced electron detachment from aqueous bromide would make a convenient choice for the first pump-probe experiment using this x-ray source.

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different ...

  19. X-ray diagnostic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An X-ray tube is connected to several different image processing devices in X-ray diagnostic equipment. Only a single organ selector is allocated to it, for which the picture parameters for each image processing device are selected. The choice of the correct combination of picture parameters is made by means of a selector switch. (DG)

  20. X-ray tube arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An x-ray tube is described incorporating an elongated target/ anode over which the electron beam is deflected and from which x-rays are emitted. Improved methods of monitoring and controlling the amplitude of the beam deflection are presented. (U.K.)

  1. Time-resolved HAXPES at SACLA: probe and pump pulse-induced space-charge effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (trHAXPES) is established using the x-ray free-electron laser SACLA. The technique extends time-resolved photoemission into the hard x-ray regime and, as a core-level spectroscopy, combines element and atomic-site specificity and sensitivity to the chemical environment with femtosecond time resolution and bulk (sub-surface) sensitivity. The viability of trHAXPES using 8 keV x-ray free-electron-laser radiation is demonstrated by a systematic investigation of probe and pump pulse-induced vacuum space-charge effects on the V 1s emission of VO2 and the Ti 1s emission of SrTiO3. The time and excitation energy dependencies of the measured spectral shifts and broadenings are compared to the results of N-body numerical simulations and simple analytic (mean-field) models. Good agreement between the experimental and calculated results is obtained. In particular, the characteristic temporal evolution of the pump pulse-induced spectral shift is shown to provide an effective means to determine the temporal overlap of pump and probe pulses. trHAXPES opens a new avenue in the study of ultrafast atomic-site specific electron and chemical dynamics in materials and at buried interfaces. (paper)

  2. Ultrafast Excited State Relaxation of a Metalloporphyrin Revealed by Femtosecond X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Megan L; Lestrange, Patrick J; Jackson, Nicholas E; Haldrup, Kristoffer; Mara, Michael W; Stickrath, Andrew B; Zhu, Diling; Lemke, Henrik T; Chollet, Matthieu; Hoffman, Brian M; Li, Xiaosong; Chen, Lin X

    2016-07-20

    Photoexcited Nickel(II) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP), like many open-shell metalloporphyrins, relaxes rapidly through multiple electronic states following an initial porphyrin-based excitation, some involving metal centered electronic configuration changes that could be harnessed catalytically before excited state relaxation. While a NiTMP excited state present at 100 ps was previously identified by X-ray transient absorption (XTA) spectroscopy at a synchrotron source as a relaxed (d,d) state, the lowest energy excited state (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2007, 129, 9616 and Chem. Sci., 2010, 1, 642), structural dynamics before thermalization were not resolved due to the ∼100 ps duration of the available X-ray probe pulse. Using the femtosecond (fs) X-ray pulses of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the Ni center electronic configuration from the initial excited state to the relaxed (d,d) state has been obtained via ultrafast Ni K-edge XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) on a time scale from hundreds of femtoseconds to 100 ps. This enabled the identification of a short-lived Ni(I) species aided by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) methods. Computed electronic and nuclear structure for critical excited electronic states in the relaxation pathway characterize the dependence of the complex's geometry on the electron occupation of the 3d orbitals. Calculated XANES transitions for these excited states assign a short-lived transient signal to the spectroscopic signature of the Ni(I) species, resulting from intramolecular charge transfer on a time scale that has eluded previous synchrotron studies. These combined results enable us to examine the excited state structural dynamics of NiTMP prior to thermal relaxation and to capture intermediates of potential photocatalytic significance. PMID:27286410

  3. Time resolved thermal lens in edible oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, T. A. S.; Pedreira, P. R. B.; Medina, A. N.; Pereira, J. R. D.; Bento, A. C.; Baesso, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    In this work time resolved thermal lens spectrometry is applied to investigate the optical properties of the following edible oils: soya, sunflower, canola, and corn oils. The experiments were performed at room temperature using the mode mismatched thermal lens configuration. The results showed that when the time resolved procedure is adopted the technique can be applied to investigate the photosensitivity of edible oils. Soya oil presented a stronger photochemical reaction as compared to the other investigated samples. This observation may be relevant for future studies evaluating edible oils storage conditions and also may contribute to a better understanding of the physical and chemical properties of this important foodstuff.

  4. Semiconductor X-ray detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, Barrie Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and measuring the elemental x-rays released when materials are examined with particles (electrons, protons, alpha particles, etc.) or photons (x-rays and gamma rays) is still considered to be the primary analytical technique for routine and non-destructive materials analysis. The Lithium Drifted Silicon (Si(Li)) X-Ray Detector, with its good resolution and peak to background, pioneered this type of analysis on electron microscopes, x-ray fluorescence instruments, and radioactive source- and accelerator-based excitation systems. Although rapid progress in Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs), Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs), and Compound Semiconductor Detectors, including renewed interest in alternative materials such as CdZnTe and diamond, has made the Si(Li) X-Ray Detector nearly obsolete, the device serves as a useful benchmark and still is used in special instances where its large, sensitive depth is essential. Semiconductor X-Ray Detectors focuses on the history and development of Si(Li) X-Ray Detect...

  5. Novel applications of the x-ray tracing software package McXtrace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Haldrup, Kristoffer;

    2014-01-01

    We will present examples of applying the X-ray tracing software package McXtrace to different kinds of X-ray scattering experiments. In particular we will be focusing on time-resolved type experiments. Simulations of full scale experiments are particularly useful for this kind, especially when...... of this kind along with the newest developments of the McXtrace software package....

  6. X-ray diffraction apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention provides an x-ray diffraction apparatus permitting the rotation of the divergence sit in conjunction with the rotation of the x-ray irradiated specimen, whereby the dimensions of the x-ray irradiated portion of the specimen remain substantially constant during the rotation of the specimen. In a preferred embodiment, the divergence slit is connected to a structural element linked with a second structural element connected to the specimen such that the divergence slit rotates at a lower angular speed than the specimen

  7. POLARIX: a pathfinder mission of X-ray polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Enrico; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Matt, Giorgio; Argan, Andrea; Attina', Primo; Baldini, Luca; Basso, Stefano; Brez, Alessandro; Citterio, Oberto; Di Cosimo, Sergio; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Fabiani, Sergio; Feroci, Marco; Ferri, Antonella; Latronico, Luca; Lazzarotto, Francesco; Minuti, Massimo; Morelli, Ennio; Muleri, Fabio; Nicolini, Lucio; Pareschi, Giovanni; Di Persio, Giuseppe; Pinchera, Michele; Razzano, Massimiliano; Reboa, Luigia; Rubini, Alda; Salonico, Antonio Maria; Sgro', Carmelo; Soffitta, Paolo; Spandre, Gloria; Spiga, Daniele; Trois, Alessio

    2011-01-01

    Since the birth of X-ray astronomy, spectral, spatial and timing observation improved dramatically, procuring a wealth of information on the majority of the classes of the celestial sources. Polarimetry, instead, remained basically unprobed. X-ray polarimetry promises to provide additional information procuring two new observable quantities, the degree and the angle of polarization. POLARIX is a mission dedicated to X-ray polarimetry. It exploits the polarimetric response of a Gas Pixel Detector, combined with position sensitivity, that, at the focus of a telescope, results in a huge increase of sensitivity. Three Gas Pixel Detectors are coupled with three X-ray optics which are the heritage of JET-X mission. POLARIX will measure time resolved X-ray polarization with an angular resolution of about 20 arcsec in a field of view of 15 arcmin $\\times$ 15 arcmin and with an energy resolution of 20 % at 6 keV. The Minimum Detectable Polarization is 12 % for a source having a flux of 1 mCrab and 10^5 s of observing ...

  8. Decomposition of time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmid, P.J.; Violato, D.; Scarano, F.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted on a transitional water jet at a Reynolds number of Re = 5,000. Flow fields have been obtained by means of time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry capturing all relevant spatial and temporal scales. The measured threedimensional flow fields have

  9. Duodenal X-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication provides an overview of duodenal X-ray diagnostics with the aid of barium meals in 1362 patients. The introducing paragraphs deal with the topographic anatomy of the region and the methodics of X-ray investigation. The chapter entitled ''processes at the duodenum itself'' describes mainly ulcers, diverticula, congenital anomalies, tumors and inflammations. The neighbourhood processes comprise in the first place diseases having their origin at the pancreas and bile ducts. As a conclusion, endoscopic rectograde cholangio-pancreaticography and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography are pointed out as advanced X-ray investigation methods. In the annex of X-ray images some of the described phenomena are shown in exemplary manner. (orig./MG)

  10. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... like a photographic negative). Today, most images are digital files that are stored electronically. These stored images ... and places the x-ray film holder or digital recording plate under the table in the area ...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not to expose the fetus to ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does ...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the baby. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page ... procedure varies. See the Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their ...

  13. X-ray microtomographic scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syryamkin, V. I., E-mail: klestov-simon@mail.ru; Klestov, S. A., E-mail: klestov-simon@mail.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and ... in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can be taken to the patient in a hospital bed or the emergency room. The x-ray ... and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern ...

  16. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the patient in a hospital bed or the emergency room. The x-ray tube is connected to ... equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available in emergency rooms, physician offices, ambulatory care centers, nursing homes ...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or in bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no special ... to 10 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? A bone ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. Dense bone absorbs much of the radiation while ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  19. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-oral dental X-ray apparatus for panoramic dental radiography is described in detail. It comprises an electron gun having an elongated tubular target carrier extending into the patient's mouth. The carrier supports an inclined target for direction of an X-ray pattern towards a film positioned externally of the patient's mouth. Image definition is improved by a focusing anode which focuses the electron beam into a sharp spot (0.05 to 0.10 mm diameter) on the target. The potential on the focusing anode is adjustable to vary the size of the spot. An X-ray transmitting ceramic (oxides of Be, Al and Si) window is positioned adjacent to the front face of the target. The electron beam can be magnetically deflected to change the X-ray beam direction. (author)

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... during x-ray examinations to use the lowest radiation dose possible while producing the best images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... technologist, an individual specially trained to perform radiology examinations, positions the patient on the x-ray table ... bone is forming), for comparison purposes. When the examination is complete, you may be asked to wait ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, infection, arthritis , abnormal bone growths and bony changes seen in ... injuries, including fractures, and joint abnormalities, such as arthritis. X-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely ...

  3. X-Ray Assembler Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Federal regulations require that an assembler who installs one or more certified components of a diagnostic x-ray system submit a report of assembly. This database...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a large photographic negative). Today, most images are digital files that are stored electronically. These stored images ... and places the x-ray film holder or digital recording plate under the table in the area ...

  5. Accelerator x-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Talman, Richard

    2007-01-01

    This first book to cover in-depth the generation of x-rays in particle accelerators focuses on electron beams produced by means of the novel Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) technology. The resulting highly brilliant x-rays are at the centre of this monograph, which continues where other books on the market stop. Written primarily for general, high energy and radiation physicists, the systematic treatment adopted by the work makes it equally suitable as an advanced textbook for young researchers.

  6. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  7. Electromechanical x-ray generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Scott A; Platts, David; Sorensen, Eric B

    2016-05-03

    An electro-mechanical x-ray generator configured to obtain high-energy operation with favorable energy-weight scaling. The electro-mechanical x-ray generator may include a pair of capacitor plates. The capacitor plates may be charged to a predefined voltage and may be separated to generate higher voltages on the order of hundreds of kV in the AK gap. The high voltage may be generated in a vacuum tube.

  8. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, S. R., E-mail: nagel7@llnl.gov; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Piston, K.; Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ≈2–17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ≈10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (≈100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ≈64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10{sup 17}. We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  9. Development of a short pulse Ne-like x-ray laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, J.C.; Cauble, R.C.; Celliers, P.; Da Silva, L.B.; Nilsen, J.; Wan, A.S.

    1995-06-01

    We are developing techniques to shorten the time duration of neon-like x-ray Iners while maintaining their high brightness in order to optimize, their usefulness as a plasma diagnostic. Adjusting the duration of the pump laser pulse is shown to directly influence the duration of neon-like x-ray laser transitions. Using slab targets, multiple 100 ps pulses and traveling wave geometry we have shortened the duration of lasing transitions down to 45 ps for both the neon-like germanium and yttrium x-ray lasers. However for the neon-like yttrium laser the intensity of short duration pulses are down two orders of magnitude from the long duration pulses because of limitations of the driving laser. We are presently looking at curved targets and pulse shaping in order to more efficiently pump the Ne-like x-ray laser system and increase the output intensity of the lasing lines. The relative merits of using the germanium x-ray laser at 196 {Angstrom} compared to the yttrium x-ray laser at 155 {Angstrom} are discussed.

  10. X-ray diagnostic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A falling load type X-ray diagnostic apparatus comprises a low voltage power source, AC-DC converting means connected to the low voltage power source so as to apply a rectified low DC voltage, chopping means connected to the AC-DC converting means and chopping said DC voltage into a low AC voltage, high voltage applying means for transforming said low AC voltage into a high AC voltage, said high AC voltage being applied as a tube voltage to an X-ray tube from which X-rays are irradiated toward an object to be examined, means for controlling a filament heating power of the X-ray tube, programming means for supplying a control signal to said filament heating control means so as to reduce the emission current of said X-ray tube during the irradiation, and chopper control means for controlling the chopping ratio of said chopping means by evaluating said rectified DC voltage with a preset tube voltage generated in said programming means, said programming means compensating said tube voltage by receiving said control signal in such a manner that said tube voltage is maintained substantially constant during the irradiation by varying said preset tube voltage so as to control the chopping ratio based upon the reduction of the filament heating power for the X-ray tube

  11. Low energy (soft) x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetry of low-energy (soft) X rays produced by the SOFTEX Model CMBW-2 was performed using Nuclear Associates Type 30 - 330 PTW, Exradin Type A2, and Shonka-Wyckoff ionization chambers with a Keithley Model 602 electrometer. Thermoluminescent (BeO chip) dosimeters were used with a Harshaw Detector 2000-A and Picoammeter-B readout system. Beam quality measurements were made using aluminum absorbers; exposure rates were assessed by the current of the X-ray tube and by exposure times. Dose distributions were established, and the average factors for non-uniformity were calculated. The means of obtaining accurate absorbed and exposed doses using these methods are discussed. Survival of V79 cells was assessed by irradiating them with soft X rays, 200 kVp X rays, and 60Co gamma rays. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for soft X rays with 0, 0.2, 0.7 mm added thicknesses of aluminum were 1.6, which were compared to 60Co. The RBE of 200 kVp X rays relative to 60Co was 1.3. Results of this study are available for reference in future RERF studies of cell survival. (author)

  12. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors

  13. Use of a C.C.D. array in an X-ray pinhole camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray imaging adapted to the laser-matter interaction experiments consits in recording plasma images from its X-ray emission; those phenomena have between 100 ps and some nanoseconds duration. When we only need spatial information on 1-10 keV X-ray emission, the most simple imaging device is the pinhole camera; the two dimension image of the plasma is temporally integrated by an X-ray sensitive detector. Until now, X-ray film was used. Its operation and processing were long and tedious, so we replaced it by a television camera built around a Charge Coupled device (C.C.D.). This camera is directly integrated in the pinhole camera. The X-ray detection is made by the silicon substrat of a C.C.D. without input window working in the vacuum of the experiment chamber; a compact camera head (40 mm diameter, 120 mm length) located near the C.C.D. (1 to 2 cm) makes the charge voltage conversion and the signal amplification. The immediate operation of images is done by an image acquisition and processing unit after digitizing the video signal on 8 bits. From measurements made on a continuous X-ray source (5,4 keV) we could point out the fact that a THOMSON-CSF THX 31135 CCD is 10 times more sensitive than the X-ray SB2 KODAK film that we use in pinhole cameras. The dynamic range measured in these conditions was about 300. The first experimental results obtained on a pulsed X-ray source are presented

  14. Low coercive field of polymer ferroelectric via x-ray induced phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyeon Jun; Kim, Jihong; Lee, Hye Jeong; Kwak, Jeong Hun; Kim, Jae Myung; Lee, Sung Su; Kim, Dong-Yu; Jo, Ji Young, E-mail: jyjo@gist.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Oryong-Dong, Buk-Gu, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Owoong; Kim, Yunseok [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 400-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-28

    We present an experimental strategy via X-ray irradiation combined with time-resolved X-ray diffraction to reduce a coercive field of ferroelectric thin films. We found in real-time that X-ray irradiation enables the irreversible phase transition from a polar to non-polar phase in ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) thin films. The non-polar regions act as initial nucleation sites for opposite domains thus reducing the coercive field, directly related to the switching of domains, by 48%.

  15. X-ray phase-contrast imaging: the quantum perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved phase-contrast imaging using ultrafast x-ray sources is an emerging method to investigate ultrafast dynamical processes in matter. Schemes to generate attosecond x-ray pulses have been proposed, bringing electronic timescales into reach and emphasizing the demand for a quantum description. In this paper, we present a method to describe propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging in nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics. We explain why the standard scattering treatment via Fermi’s golden rule cannot be applied. Instead, the quantum electrodynamical treatment of phase-contrast imaging must be based on a different approach. It turns out that it is essential to select a suitable observable. Here, we choose the quantum-mechanical Poynting operator. We determine the expectation value of our observable and demonstrate that the leading order term describes phase-contrast imaging. It recovers the classical expression of phase-contrast imaging. Thus, it makes the instantaneous electron density of non-stationary electronic states accessible to time-resolved imaging. Interestingly, inelastic (Compton) scattering does automatically not contribute in leading order, explaining the success of the semiclassical description. (paper)

  16. Time-resolved photoemission using attosecond streaking

    CERN Document Server

    Nagele, Stefan; Wais, Michael; Wachter, Georg; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically study time-resolved photoemission in atoms as probed by attosecond streaking. We review recent advances in the study of the photoelectric effect in the time domain and show that the experimentally accessible time shifts can be decomposed into distinct contributions that stem from the field-free photoionization process itself and from probe-field induced corrections. We perform accurate quantum-mechanical as well as classical simulations of attosecond streaking for effective one-electron systems and determine all relevant contributions to the time delay with attosecond precision. In particular, we investigate the properties and limitations of attosecond streaking for the transition from short-ranged potentials (photodetachment) to long-ranged Coulomb potentials (photoionization). As an example for a more complex system, we study time-resolved photoionization for endohedral fullerenes $A$@$\\text{C}_{60}$ and discuss how streaking time shifts are modified due to the interaction of the $\\text{C}_...

  17. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy with SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    Bickerton, Steven; Hettinger, Thomas; Beers, Timothy; Huang, Sonya

    2011-01-01

    We present a brief technical outline of the newly-formed 'Detection of Spectroscopic Differences over Time' (DS/DT) project. Our collaboration is using the individual exposures from the SDSS spectroscopic archive to produce a uniformly-processed set of time-resolved spectra. Here we provide an overview of the properties and processing of the available data, and highlight the wide range of time baselines present in the archive.

  18. LIGHT SOURCE: Spot size diagnostics for flash radiographic X-ray sources at LAPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Gang; Li, Qin; Shi, Jin-Shui; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2009-06-01

    Spot size is one of the parameters to characterize the performance of a radiographic X-ray source. It determines the degree of blurring due to magnification directly. In recent years, a variety of measurement methods have been used to diagnose X-ray spot size at Laboratory of Accelerator Physics and Application (LAPA). Computer simulations and experiments showed that using a rolled-edge to measure the spot size are more accurate, and the intensity distribution of X-ray source was obtained by a device with a square aperture. Experimental and simulation results on a flash X-ray source at our laboratory are presented and discussed in this paper. In addition, a new method for time resolved diagnostics of X-ray spot size is introduced too.

  19. Ultra-high vacuum compatible optical chopper system for synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hao, E-mail: hc000211@ohio.edu [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Physics & Astronomy Department, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Cummings, Marvin; Shirato, Nozomi; Stripe, Benjamin; Preissner, Curt; Freeland, John W. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Rosenmann, Daniel [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kersell, Heath; Hla, Saw-Wai [Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Physics & Astronomy Department, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Rose, Volker, E-mail: vrose@anl.gov [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    High-speed beam choppers are a crucial part of time-resolved x-ray studies as well as a necessary component to enable elemental contrast in synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy (SX-STM). However, many chopper systems are not capable of operation in vacuum, which restricts their application to x-ray studies with high photon energies, where air absorption does not present a significant problem. To overcome this limitation, we present a fully ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible chopper system capable of operating at variable chopping frequencies up to 4 kHz. The lightweight aluminum chopper disk is coated with Ti and Au films to provide the required beam attenuation for soft and hard x-rays with photon energies up to about 12 keV. The chopper is used for lock-in detection of x-ray enhanced signals in SX-STM.

  20. Spot size diagnostics for flash radiographic X-ray sources at LAPA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cheng-Gang; LI Qin; SHI Jin-Shui; DENG Jian-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Spot size is one of the parameters to characterize the performance of a radiographic X-ray source.It determines the degree of blurring due to magnification directly.In recent years,a variety of measurement methods have been used to diagnose X-ray spot size at Laboratory of Accelerator Physics and Application (LAPA).Computer simulations and experiments showed that using a rolled-edge to measure the spot size are more accurate,and the intensity distribution of X-ray source was obtained by a device with a square aperture.Experimental and simulation results on a flash X-ray source at our laboratory are presented and discussed in this paper.In addition,a new method for time resolved diagnostics of X-ray spot size is introduced too.

  1. Temporal and Spectral Resolved Measurement of Soft X-ray From Ultrashort Pulse Laser Produced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.Theobald; L.Veisz; H.Schwoerer; R.Sauerbrey; X.Z.Tang

    2001-01-01

    Ultrashort laser pulse produced plasmas are powerful sources of incoherent XUV/soft X-ray radiation and have important applications range from microscopy to lithography. Adding a prepulse is one possible way to enhance soft X-ray emission. The experiment is performed on the Jena 10 TW laser system in IOQ, Germany. The main purpose is to measure the time-resolved soft X-ray spectrum, and study how a prepulse play an important role and enhance the X-ray emission as well as and pulse duration. We clarified the temporal behavior of X-ray emission from quartz plasma produced by intensive femtosecond 800 nm laser pulse, and obtained a quantitative pictures of the

  2. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >108 ) with broadband ≃5 - 13 meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 103 signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  3. X-ray echo spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin-echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a point-like x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x-rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1--0.02-meV ultra-high-resolution IXS applications (resolving power $> 10^8$) with broadband $\\simeq$~5--13~meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than $10^3$ signal e...

  4. X-ray Echo Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-02-26

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a counterpart of neutron spin echo, is being introduced here to overcome limitations in spectral resolution and weak signals of the traditional inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) probes. An image of a pointlike x-ray source is defocused by a dispersing system comprised of asymmetrically cut specially arranged Bragg diffracting crystals. The defocused image is refocused into a point (echo) in a time-reversal dispersing system. If the defocused beam is inelastically scattered from a sample, the echo signal acquires a spatial distribution, which is a map of the inelastic scattering spectrum. The spectral resolution of the echo spectroscopy does not rely on the monochromaticity of the x rays, ensuring strong signals along with a very high spectral resolution. Particular schemes of x-ray echo spectrometers for 0.1-0.02 meV ultrahigh-resolution IXS applications (resolving power >10^{8}) with broadband ≃5-13  meV dispersing systems are introduced featuring more than 10^{3} signal enhancement. The technique is general, applicable in different photon frequency domains.

  5. Soft x-ray studies of plasma-focus pinch structures in PF-1000U experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, M. J.; Paduch, M.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Surala, W.; Zaloga, D.; Miklaszewski, R.; Zielinska, E.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2015-10-01

    This work reports on recent experiments performed at the modernized PF-1000U plasma-focus facility. In contrast to earlier studies the main attention was focussed on measurements of the soft x-ray emission. Detailed time-integrated x-ray measurements, carried out using filtered pinhole cameras with sensitive x-ray films, are presented and analysed. The fine structure of the collapsing current sheath and dense pinch column is investigated. Observations of ‘plasma filaments’ are discussed and compared with those from the old POSEIDON facility. New results are time-integrated x-ray images of PF-1000U discharges with additional gas puffing, which in many cases show distinct plasma filaments and/or ‘hot spots’ formed inside the dense pinch column. The formation of such ‘hot-spots’ is explained by necking and breaking of the plasma filaments. Results of time-resolved x-ray measurements, performed outside the experimental chamber by means of scintillation probes, and inside with PIN-diodes placed behind pinholes and absorption filters, are also presented Time-resolved measurements, carried out using an old XUV framing-camera and a new soft x-ray four-frame camera (SXRFFC), are also presented and discussed. Correlations of the time-integrated x-ray images (of plasma filaments and hot spots) with time-resolved x-ray signals are discussed. The hypothesis that plasma-current filaments appear in almost all PF-type discharges is supported by pictures of radial erosion tracks on the anode front-plate after many discharges.

  6. Dental X-ray apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intra-oral X-ray apparatus which reduces the number of exposures necessary to obtain panoramic dental radiographs is described in detail. It comprises an electron gun, a tubular target carrier projecting from the gun along the beam axis and carrying at its distal end a target surrounded by a shield of X-ray opaque material. This shield extends forward and laterally of the target and has surfaces which define a wedge or cone-shaped radiation pattern delimited vertically by the root tips of the patient's teeth. A film holder is located externally of the patient's mouth. A disposable member can fit on the target carrier to depress the patient's tongue out of the radiation pattern and to further shield the roof of the mouth. The electron beam can be magnetically deflected to change the X-ray beam direction. (author)

  7. Advanced Photon Counting Imaging Detectors with 100ps Timing for Astronomical and Space Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Welsh, B.; Rabin, M.; Bloch, J.

    In recent years EAG has implemented a variety of high-resolution, large format, photon-counting MCP detectors in space instrumentation for satellite FUSE, GALEX, IMAGE, SOHO, HST-COS, rocket, and shuttle payloads. Our scheme of choice has been delay line readouts encoding photon event position centroids, by determination of the difference in arrival time of the event charge at the two ends of a distributed resistive-capacitive (RC) delay line. Our most commonly used delay line configuration is the cross delay line (XDL). In its simplest form the delay-line encoding electronics consists of a fast amplifier for each end of the delay line, followed by time-to-digital converters (TDC's). We have achieved resolutions of advantages over "frame driven" recording devices for some important applications. For example we have built open face and sealed tube cross delay line detectors used for biological fluorescence lifetime imaging, observation of flare stars, orbital satellites and space debris with the GALEX satellite, and time resolved imaging of the Crab Pulsar with a telescope as small as 1m. Although microchannel plate delay line detectors meet many of the imaging and timing demands of various applications, they have limitations. The relatively high gain (107) reduces lifetime and local counting rate, and the fixed delay (10's of ns) makes multiple simultaneous event recording problematic. To overcome these limitations we have begun development of cross strip readout anodes for microchannel plate detectors. The cross strip (XS) anode is a coarse (~0.5 mm) multi-layer metal and ceramic pattern of crossed fingers on an alumina substrate. The charge cloud is matched to the anode period so that it is collected on several neighboring fingers to ensure an accurate event charge centroid can be determined. Each finger of the anode is connected to a low noise charge sensitive amplifier and followed by subsequent A/D conversion of individual strip charge values and a hardware

  8. X-ray imaging: Perovskites target X-ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Wolfgang; Brabec, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Single crystals of perovskites are currently of interest to help fathom fundamental physical parameters limiting the performance of perovskite-based polycrystalline solar cells. Now, such perovskites offer a technology platform for optoelectronic devices, such as cheap and sensitive X-ray detectors.

  9. Diagnostics for an XUV/soft x-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have begun investigating the production of an XUV/soft x-ray laser, using our high-powered glass lasers as drivers. A major diagnostic for lasing is the measure of the absolute power produced in the lasing line. I have developed a spectrograph to time-resolved lasing lines in the energy range from 50 eV to greater than 200 eV. the spectrograph combines a transmission grating and x-ray streak camera to produce a flat field instrument. A cylindrical mirror is used in front of the grating to image the source and act as a collecting optic. The efficiency of the components is calibrated so that absolute intensities can be measured. I will compare the performance of this instrument with reflection grating systems. I will also discuss planned improvements to the system which should increase total throughput, image quality, and resolving power

  10. On the calculation of x-ray scattering signals from pairwise radial distribution functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Asmus Ougaard; Biasin, Elisa; Haldrup, Kristoffer;

    2015-01-01

    We derive a formulation for evaluating (time-resolved) x-ray scattering signals of solvated chemical systems, based on pairwise radial distribution functions, with the aim of this formulation to accompany molecular dynamics simulations. The derivation is described in detail to eliminate any possi...

  11. Transient lattice dynamics in fs-laser-excited semiconductors probed by ultrafast X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Hoegen, M.H. von; Linde, D. von der [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik; Cavelleri, A.; Brown, F.L.H.; Leitner, D.M.; Wilson, K.R. [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik; California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Siders, C.W. [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik; California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; School of Optics/CREOL, Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Toth, Cs. [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik; California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Inst. for Nonlinear Science; Squier, J.A. [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik; Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Univ. of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Barty, C.P.J. [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik; Dept. of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Sciences, Univ. of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Kammler, M. [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik; Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik

    2001-07-01

    Using time-resolved X-ray diffraction ultrafast lattice dynamics in fs-laser-excited crystalline bulk Ge and Ge/Si-heterostructures has been studied. This experimental technique uniquely allows us to observe fast energy transport deep into the bulk of the material, coherent acoustic phonon dynamics, lattice anharmonicity, and vibrational transport across a buried interface. (orig.)

  12. Time resolution below 100 ps for the SciTil detector of PANDA employing SiPM

    CERN Document Server

    Brunner, S E; Marton, J; Orth, H; Suzuki, K

    2013-01-01

    The barrel time-of-flight (TOF) detector for the PANDA experiment at FAIR in Darmstadt is planned as a scintillator tile hodoscope (SciTil) using 8000 small scintillator tiles. It will provide fast event timing for a software trigger in the otherwise trigger-less data acquisition scheme of PANDA, relative timing in a multiple track event topology as well as additional particle identification in the low momentum region. The goal is to achieve a time resolution of sigma ~ 100 ps. We have conducted measurements using organic scintillators coupled to Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM). The results are encouraging such that we are confident to reach the required time resolution.

  13. Time resolved spectroscopic studies on some nanophosphors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harish Chander; Santa Chawla

    2008-06-01

    Time resolved spectroscopy is an important tool for studying photophysical processes in phosphors. Present work investigates the steady state and time resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopic characteristics of ZnS, ZnO and (Zn, Mg)O nanophosphors both in powder as well as thin film form. Photoluminescence (PL) of ZnS nanophosphors typically exhibit a purple/blue emission peak termed as self activated (SA) luminescence and emission at different wavelengths arising due to dopant impurities e.g. green emission for ZnS : Cu, orange emission for ZnS : Mn and red emission for ZnS : Eu. The lifetimes obtained from decay curves range from ns to ms level and suggest the radiative recombination path involving donor–acceptor pair recombination or internal electronic transitions of the impurity atom. A series of ZnMgO nanophosphor thin films with varied Zn : Mg ratios were prepared by chemical bath deposition. Photoluminescence (PL) excitation and emission spectra exhibit variations with changing Mg ratio. Luminescence lifetime as short as 10-10 s was observed for ZnO and ZnMgO (100 : 10) nanophosphors. With increasing Mg ratio, PL decay shifts into microsecond range. ZnO and ZnMgO alloys up to 50% Mg were prepared as powder by solid state mixing and sintering at high temperature in reducing atmosphere. Time resolved decay of PL indicated lifetime in the microsecond time scale. The novelty of the work lies in clear experimental evidence of dopants (Cu, Mn, Eu and Mg) in the decay process and luminescence life times in II–VI semiconductor nanocrystals of ZnS and ZnO. For ZnS, blue self activated luminescence decays faster than Cu and Mn related emission. For undoped ZnO nanocrystals, PL decay is in the nanosecond range whereas with Mg doping the decay becomes much slower in the microsecond range.

  14. Membrane protein structural biology using X-ray free electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutze, Richard; Brändén, Gisela; Schertler, Gebhard F X

    2015-08-01

    Membrane protein structural biology has benefitted tremendously from access to micro-focus crystallography at synchrotron radiation sources. X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are linear accelerator driven X-ray sources that deliver a jump in peak X-ray brilliance of nine orders of magnitude and represent a disruptive technology with potential to dramatically change the field. Membrane proteins were amongst the first macromolecules to be studied with XFEL radiation and include proof-of-principle demonstrations of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX), the observation that XFEL data can deliver damage free crystallographic structures, initial experiments towards recording structural information from 2D arrays of membrane proteins, and time-resolved SFX, time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering and time-resolved X-ray emission spectroscopy studies. Conversely, serial crystallography methods are now being applied using synchrotron radiation. We believe that a context dependent choice of synchrotron or XFEL radiation will accelerate progress towards novel insights in understanding membrane protein structure and dynamics.

  15. An experimental measurement of metal multilayer x-ray reflectivity degradation due to intense x-ray flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of the x-ray reflection characteristics of metal multilayer Bragg diffractors due to intense x-ray flux was investigated. The Z-pinch plasma produced by PROTO II of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, was used as the source. The plasma generated total x-ray yields of as much as 40 kJ with up to 15 kJ in the neon hydrogen- and helium-like resonance lines in nominal 20-ns pulses. Molybdenum-carbon, palladium-carbon, and tungsten-carbon metal multilayers were placed at 15 and 150 cm from the plasma center. The multilayers were at nominal angles of 50 and 100 to diffract the neon resonance lines. The time-integrated x-ray reflection of the metal multilayers was monitored by x-ray film. A fluorescer-fiber optic-visible streak camera detector system was then used to monitor the time-resolved x-ray reflection characteristics of 135 A- 2d tungsten-carbon multilayers. A large specular component in the reflectivity prevented determination of the rocking curve of the multilayer. For a neon implosion onto a vanadium-doped polyacrylic acid foam target shot, detailed modeling was attempted. The spectral flux was determined with data from 5 XRD channels and deconvolved using the code SHAZAM. The observed decay in reflectivity was assumed to correspond to the melting of the first tungsten layer. A ''conduction factor'' of 82 was required to manipulate the heat loading of the first tungsten layer such that the time of melting corresponded to the observed decay. The power at destruction was 141 MW/cm2 and the integrated energy at destruction was 2.0 J/cm2. 82 refs., 66 figs., 10 tabs

  16. An experimental measurement of metal multilayer x-ray reflectivity degradation due to intense x-ray flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hockaday, M.Y.P.

    1987-06-01

    The degradation of the x-ray reflection characteristics of metal multilayer Bragg diffractors due to intense x-ray flux was investigated. The Z-pinch plasma produced by PROTO II of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, was used as the source. The plasma generated total x-ray yields of as much as 40 kJ with up to 15 kJ in the neon hydrogen- and helium-like resonance lines in nominal 20-ns pulses. Molybdenum-carbon, palladium-carbon, and tungsten-carbon metal multilayers were placed at 15 and 150 cm from the plasma center. The multilayers were at nominal angles of 5/sup 0/ and 10/sup 0/ to diffract the neon resonance lines. The time-integrated x-ray reflection of the metal multilayers was monitored by x-ray film. A fluorescer-fiber optic-visible streak camera detector system was then used to monitor the time-resolved x-ray reflection characteristics of 135 A- 2d tungsten-carbon multilayers. A large specular component in the reflectivity prevented determination of the rocking curve of the multilayer. For a neon implosion onto a vanadium-doped polyacrylic acid foam target shot, detailed modeling was attempted. The spectral flux was determined with data from 5 XRD channels and deconvolved using the code SHAZAM. The observed decay in reflectivity was assumed to correspond to the melting of the first tungsten layer. A ''conduction factor'' of 82 was required to manipulate the heat loading of the first tungsten layer such that the time of melting corresponded to the observed decay. The power at destruction was 141 MW/cm/sup 2/ and the integrated energy at destruction was 2.0 J/cm/sup 2/. 82 refs., 66 figs., 10 tabs.

  17. X-ray crystal spectroscopy of JET - a design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the design and specification of a diagnostic system to measure the space- and time-resolved x-ray spectrum from JET discharges with high-resolution crystal spectrometers operating in the wavelength region 1 - 15A. The specification is given in terms of sensitivity, resolving power, detector, and data handling requirements, special attention being given to the problems encountered in interfacing the spectrometer arrays to the torus vacuum system and in their disposition to the machine. Shielding requirements during the active mode are evaluated and a staged diagnostic is proposed to accommodate D - T operation. (U.K.)

  18. X-ray hot plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray plasma emission study is powerful diagnostic tool of hot plasmas. In this review article the main techniques of X-ray plasma emission measurement are shortly presented: X-ray spectrometry using absorbent filters, crystal and grating spectrometers, imaging techniques using pinhole cameras, X-ray microscopes and Fresnel zone plate cameras, X-ray plasma emission calorimetry. Advances in these techniques with examples for different hot plasma devices are also presentes. (author)

  19. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of Literature on x-ray fluorescence spectrometry starts with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. It is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is subdivided according to spectra, equipment, applications and absorption analysis

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Images related to X-ray (Radiography) - Bone About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Please note ... you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs ...

  1. X-ray backscatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone ...

  3. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.

  4. X-ray film processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray films have to be highly sensitive, for radiation protection reasons. The films used in radiology are coated on both sides with a photosensitive emulsion. This applies to all dental films. Their properties and the development of the different exposed films are explained. (DG)

  5. X-rays and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    Magnetism is among the most active and attractive areas in modern solid state physics because of intriguing phenomena interesting to fundamental research and a manifold of technological applications. State-of-the-art synthesis of advanced magnetic materials, e.g. in hybrid structures paves the way to new functionalities. To characterize modern magnetic materials and the associated magnetic phenomena, polarized x-rays have emerged as unique probes due to their specific interaction with magnetic materials. A large variety of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed to quantify in an element, valence and site-sensitive way properties of ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic systems, such as spin and orbital moments, and to image nanoscale spin textures and their dynamics with sub-ns time and almost 10 nm spatial resolution. The enormous intensity of x-rays and their degree of coherence at next generation x-ray facilities will open the fsec time window to magnetic studies addressing fundamental time scales in magnetism with nanometer spatial resolution. This review will give an introduction into contemporary topics of nanoscale magnetic materials and provide an overview of analytical spectroscopy and microscopy tools based on x-ray dichroism effects. Selected examples of current research will demonstrate the potential and future directions of these techniques.

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and easiest ... cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs the risk. ...

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Bone x-rays are the fastest and easiest ... evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is ... encourage linking to this site. × Recommend RadiologyInfo to a friend Send to (friend's e-mail address): From ( ...

  9. The stopped-drop method: a novel setup for containment-free and time-resolved measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiener, Andreas; Seifert, Soenke; Magerl, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    A novel setup for containment-free time-resolved experiments at a free-hanging drop is reported. Within a dead-time of 100 ms a drop of mixed reactant solutions is formed and the time evolution of a reaction can be followed from thereon by various techniques. As an example, a small-angle X-ray scattering study on the formation mechanism of EDTA-stabilized CdS both at a synchrotron and a laboratory X-ray source is presented here. While the evolution can be followed with one drop only at a synchrotron source, a stroboscopic mode with many drops is preferable for the laboratory source.

  10. Observation of Ultrafast Bond-length Expansion at the Initial Stage of Laser Ablation by Picosecond Time-resolved EXAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Katsuya; Okano, Yasuaki; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi

    We have demonstrated a time-resolved extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique by using a femtosecond laser produced plasma soft X-ray source. By applying this technique to the measurement of the initial stage of the laser ablation in Si foil, we were able to observe a slight shortening of the EXAFS oscillation period. This result suggests that the Si-Si atomic bond length expands as a result of the solid-liquid phase transition in Si. The realization of this technique is the first step toward understanding atomic structural dynamics during a chemical reaction.

  11. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, F. M. F.

    2001-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption process. Section II discusses 1s X-ray absorption, i.e., the K edges, and section III deals with 2p X-ray absorption, the L edges. X-ray emission is discussed in, respectively, the L edges. X-ray emis...

  12. Time-Resolved Emittance Characterization of an Induction Linac Beam using Optical Transition Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Le Sage, G P

    2002-01-01

    An induction linac is used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform radiographic testing at the Flash X-ray Radiography facility. Emittance characterization is important since x-ray spot size impacts the resolution of shadow-graphs. Due to the long pulse length, high current, and beam energy, emittance measurement using Optical Transition Radiation is an attractive alternative for reasons that will be described in the text. The utility of OTR-based emittance measurement has been well demonstrated for both RF and induction linacs. We describe the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam. We have refined the optical collection system for the induction linac application, and have demonstrated a new technique for probing the divergence of a subset of the beam profile. The experimental apparatus, data reduction, and conclusions will be presented. Additionally, a new scheme for characterizing the correlation between beam divergence and spatial coordinates within the b...

  13. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2001-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption pro

  14. Measurements of X-ray spectra from irradiated gold foils at the OMEGA Laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Joshua; Keiter, Paul; Drake, Paul; Klein, Sallee; Fein, Jeff

    2014-10-01

    In many HED systems high intensity x-rays can be used to measure plasma properties such as density and temperature. At the OMEGA laser facility, these X-rays are produced by irradiating a metal foil with high-intensity lasers, which heats the foil and causes it to act as a quasi-continuum x-ray source for radiography or absorption spectroscopy. As this emission is quasi-continuous and the transmission of x-rays through a material varies with photon energy a well-characterized x-ray source is vital. Therefore, in order to optimize diagnostics reliant upon x-rays it is necessary to gain a better understanding of how the x-ray emission from these targets varies over time and varying beam energy. We will present experimental results studying the effect that beam energy and pulse length have on M-band and sub-keV x-ray emission generated from a 5 μm thick gold disk using time-resolved spectroscopy and a Henway crystal spectrometer. This work is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0001840, and the National Laser User Facility Program, Grant Number DE-NA0000850, and through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  15. Eight-channel time-resolved tissue oximeter for functional muscle studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Biscotti, Giovanni; Pifferi, Antonio; Taroni, Paola; Torricelli, Alessandro; Ferrari, Marco; Quaresima, Valentina

    2003-07-01

    A portable instrument for tissue oximetry based on time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy was developed. The output pulses of 2 laser diodes (683 and 785 nm, 80 MHz pulse repetition rate, 1 mW average power, 100 ps FWHM) are delayed and coupled into a multimode graded-index fiber (50/125 μm and injected into the tissue. The reflectance photons are collected by 8 independent 1 mm fibers and detected by a 16-anode photomultiplier. A time-correlated single photon counting PC board is used for the parallel acquisition of the curves. Simultaneous estimate of the transport scattering and absorption coefficients is achieved by best fitting of time-resolved reflectance curves with a standard model of Diffusion Theory. The performances of the system were tested on phantoms in terms of stability, reproducibility among channels, and accuracy in the determination of the optical properties. Preliminary in vivo measurements were performed on healthy volunteers to monitor spatial changes in calf (medical and lateral gastrocnemius) oxygen hemoglobin saturation and blood volume during dynamic plantar flexion exercise.

  16. Time-resolved magnetization dynamics of cross-tie domain walls in permalloy microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel, J; Kurde, J; Piantek, M; Kuch, W [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Sanchez-Barriga, J; Heitkamp, B; Kronast, F; Duerr, H A [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Elektronenspeicherring BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Bayer, D; Aeschlimann, M, E-mail: jorge.miguel@fu-berlin.d [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger Strasse 46, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2009-12-02

    We report on a picosecond time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroic-photoelectron emission microscopy study of the evolution of the magnetization components of a microstructured permalloy platelet comprising three cross-tie domain walls. A laser-excited photoswitch has been used to apply a triangular 80 Oe, 160 ps magnetic pulse. Micromagnetic calculations agree well with the experimental results, both in time and frequency, illustrating the large angle precession in the magnetic domains with magnetization perpendicular to the applied pulse, and showing how the magnetic vortices revert their core magnetization while the antivortices remain unaffected.

  17. Lasers and laser applications. Imaging implosion dynamics: The x-ray pinhole/streak camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Livermore-developed x-ray-sensitive streak camera was combined with a unique x-ray pinhole camera to make dynamic photographs of laser-irradiated fusion target implosions. These photographs show x radiation emitted from the imploding shell during its 100-ps implosion; they are the first continuous observations of an imploding laser-driven fusion capsule. The diagnostic system has a time resolution of 15 ps and a spatial resolution of about 6 μm. Results agree very well with those predicted by our LASNEX calculations, confirming that the essential physics are correctly described in the code and providing further confidence in the soundness of this approach to inertial confinement fusion

  18. A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, A. S.; Guymer, T. M.; Morton, J.; Bentley, C.; Stevenson, M. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kline, J. L.; Taccetti, M.; Lanier, N. E.; Workman, J.; Peterson, B.; Mussack, K.; Cowan, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Prasad, R.; Richardson, M.; Burns, S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors it records 16 time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000 eV with 100 ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300 eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and vacuum ultraviolet beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, evidence a <100 {mu}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10 eV at photon energies of 300 eV.

  19. A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A. S.; Guymer, T. M.; Kline, J. L.; Morton, J.; Taccetti, M.; Lanier, N. E.; Bentley, C.; Workman, J.; Peterson, B.; Mussack, K.; Cowan, J.; Prasad, R.; Richardson, M.; Burns, S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Hsing, W.; Stevenson, M.

    2012-10-01

    A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors it records 16 time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000 eV with 100 ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300 eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and vacuum ultraviolet beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, evidence a <100 μm spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10 eV at photon energies of 300 eV.

  20. Time-resolved neutron imaging at ANTARES cold neutron beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In non-destructive evaluation with X-rays light elements embedded in dense, heavy (or high-Z) matrices show little contrast and their structural details can hardly be revealed. Neutron radiography, on the other hand, provides a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross section on the atomic number. The majority of neutron imaging experiments at the present time is conducted with static objects mainly due to the limited flux intensity of neutron beamline facilities and sometimes due to the limitations of the detectors. However, some applications require the studies of dynamic phenomena and can now be conducted at several high intensity beamlines such as the recently rebuilt ANTARES beam line at the FRM-II reactor. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of time resolved imaging for repetitive processes, where different phases of the process can be imaged simultaneously and integrated over multiple cycles. A fast MCP/Timepix neutron counting detector was used to image the water distribution within a model steam engine operating at 10 Hz frequency. Within <10 minutes integration the amount of water was measured as a function of cycle time with a sub-mm spatial resolution, thereby demonstrating the capabilities of time-resolved neutron radiography for the future applications. The neutron spectrum of the ANTARES beamline as well as transmission spectra of a Fe sample were also measured with the Time Of Flight (TOF) technique in combination with a high resolution beam chopper. The energy resolution of our setup was found to be ∼ 0.8% at 5 meV and ∼ 1.7% at 25 meV. The background level (most likely gammas and epithermal/fast neutrons) of the ANTARES beamline was also measured in our experiments and found to be on the scale of 3% when no filters are installed in the beam. Online supplementary data available from stacks

  1. CCD sensors in synchrotron X-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, M. G.; Naday, I.; Sherman, I. S.; Kraimer, M. R.; Westbrook, E. M.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1988-04-01

    The intense photon flux from advanced synchrotron light sources, such as the 7-GeV synchrotron being designed at Argonne, require integrating-type detectors. Charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are well suited as synchrotron X-ray detectors. When irradiated indirectly via a phosphor followed by reducing optics, diffraction patterns of 100 cm 2 can be imaged on a 2 cm 2 CCD. With a conversion efficiency of ˜ 1 CCD electron/X-ray photon, a peak saturation capacity of > 10 6 X-rays can be obtained. A programmable CCD controller operating at a clock frequency of 20 MHz has been developed. The readout rate is 5 × 10 6 pixels/s and the shift rate in the parallel registers is 10 6 lines/s. The test detector was evaluated in two experiments. In protein crystallography diffraction patterns have been obtained from a lysozyme crystal using a conventional rotating anode X-ray generator. Based on these results we expect to obtain at a synchrotron diffraction images at a rate of ˜ 1 frame/s or a complete 3-dimensional data set from a single crystal in ˜ 2 min. In electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), the CCD was used in a parallel detection mode which is similar to the mode array detectors are used in dispersive EXAFS. With a beam current corresponding to 3 × 10 9 electron/s on the detector, a series of 64 spectra were recorded on the CCD in a continuous sequence without interruption due to readout. The frame-to-frame pixel signal fluctuations had σ = 0.4% from which DQE = 0.4 was obtained, where the detector conversion efficiency was 2.6 CCD electrons/X-ray photon. These multiple frame series also showed the time-resolved modulation of the electron microscope optics by stray magnetic fields.

  2. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for X-Ray Optics has made substantial progress during the past year on the development of very high resolution x-ray technologies, the generation of coherent radiation at x-ray wavelengths, and, based on these new developments, had embarked on several scientific investigations that would not otherwise have been possible. The investigations covered in this report are topics on x-ray sources, x-ray imaging and applications, soft x-ray spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation, advanced light source and magnet structures for undulators and wigglers

  3. Soft x-ray tomoholography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate an x-ray imaging method that combines Fourier transform holography with tomography (‘tomoholography’) for three-dimensional (3D) microscopic imaging. A 3D image of a diatom shell with a spatial resolution of 140 nm is presented. The experiment is realized by using a small gold sphere as the reference wave source for holographic imaging. This setup allows us to rotate the sample and to collect a number of 2D projections for tomography. (paper)

  4. Soft x-ray tomoholography

    OpenAIRE

    Guehrs, E.; Stadler, A.M.; Flewett, S.; Frömmel, S.; Geilhufe, J.; Pfau, B; Rander, T.; Schaffert, S.; Büldt, G; Eisebitt, S.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate an x-ray imaging method that combines Fourier transform holography with tomography ('tomoholography') for three-dimensional (3D) microscopic imaging. A 3D image of a diatom shell with a spatial resolution of 140 nm is presented. The experiment is realized by using a small gold sphere as the reference wave source for holographic imaging. This setup allows us to rotate the sample and to collect a number of 2D projections for tomography.

  5. X-ray tube arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for ensuring the rapid correction of both amplitude and offset errors in the deflectional movement of an electron beam along an X-ray emissive target is described. The movement is monitored at at least two positions during a sweep and differences, between the two movements and a desired movement, at these positions are combined in different proportions to produce a corrective servo signal. Such arrangements find application, for example, in computerised tomographic scanners. (author)

  6. X-Ray Crystallography Reagent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Microcapsules prepared by encapsulating an aqueous solution of a protein, drug or other bioactive substance inside a semi-permeable membrane by are disclosed. The microcapsules are formed by interfacial coacervation under conditions where the shear forces are limited to 0-100 dynes per square centimeter at the interface. By placing the microcapsules in a high osmotic dewatering solution. the protein solution is gradually made saturated and then supersaturated. and the controlled nucleation and crystallization of the protein is achieved. The crystal-filled microcapsules prepared by this method can be conveniently harvested and stored while keeping the encapsulated crystals in essentially pristine condition due to the rugged. protective membrane. Because the membrane components themselves are x-ray transparent, large crystal-containing microcapsules can be individually selected, mounted in x-ray capillary tubes and subjected to high energy x-ray diffraction studies to determine the 3-D smucture of the protein molecules. Certain embodiments of the microcapsules of the invention have composite polymeric outer membranes which are somewhat elastic, water insoluble, permeable only to water, salts, and low molecular weight molecules and are structurally stable in fluid shear forces typically encountered in the human vascular system.

  7. X-ray-powered macronovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kisaka, Shota; Nakar, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    A macronova (or kilonova) was observed as an infrared excess several days after short gamma-ray burst, GRB 130603B. Although the $r$-process radioactivity is widely discussed as an energy source, it requires huge mass of ejecta from a neutron star (NS) binary merger. We propose that the X-ray excess simultaneously observed with the infrared excess can naturally heat the ejecta, leading to the thermal re-emission as observed in infrared. This X-ray-powered model explains both the X-ray and infrared excesses with a single energy source by the central engine like a black hole, and allows for broader parameter region, in particular smaller ejecta mass $\\sim10^{-3}-10^{-2}M_{\\odot}$ with iron mixed as suggested by general relativistic simulations for typical NS-NS mergers, than the previous models. We also discuss the other macronova candidates in GRB 060614 and GRB 080503, and implications for the search of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves.

  8. X-Ray-powered Macronovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisaka, Shota; Ioka, Kunihito; Nakar, Ehud

    2016-02-01

    A macronova (or kilonova) was observed as an infrared excess several days after the short gamma-ray burst GRB 130603B. Although the r-process radioactivity is widely discussed as an energy source, it requires a huge mass of ejecta from a neutron star (NS) binary merger. We propose a new model in which the X-ray excess gives rise to the simultaneously observed infrared excess via thermal re-emission, and explore what constraints this would place on the mass and velocity of the ejecta. This X-ray-powered model explains both the X-ray and infrared excesses with a single energy source such as the central engine like a black hole, and allows for a broader parameter region than the previous models, in particular a smaller ejecta mass ˜ {10}-3{--}{10}-2{M}⊙ and higher iron abundance mixed as suggested by general relativistic simulations for typical NS-NS mergers. We also discuss the other macronova candidates in GRB 060614 and GRB 080503, and the implications for the search of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves.

  9. Study of X-ray emission from plasma focus device using vacuum photodiode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, N.; Borthakur, T. K.; Neog, N. K.

    2013-10-01

    A newly fabricated vacuum photodiode (VPD) is used to measure time resolved X-ray emission and electron temperature from plasma focus device operated in hydrogen medium. The VPD signals are compared with the PIN diode signal and observed to be of similar in nature. The acquired signals from VPD are deduced to measure electron temperature and X-ray radiated power for four different anode tips (cylindrical, diverging, oval and converging). The electron temperatures are found to be 0.64, 1.5, 0.60 and 0.55 keV for cylindrical, diverging, oval and converging anode tips respectively in hydrogen plasma. The X-ray radiated powers are observed to be varying with respect to the shape of the anode tips and it is found highest in case of converging tip and lowest for the diverging one. Results indicate that VPD could efficiently be employed as an X-ray diagnostics in plasma focus device.

  10. Moving the Frontier of Quantum Control into the Soft X-Ray Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aquila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The femtosecond nature of X-ray free electron laser (FEL pulses opens up exciting research possibilities in time-resolved studies including femtosecond photoemission and diffraction. The recent developments of seeding X-ray FELs extend their capabilities by creating stable, temporally coherent, and repeatable pulses. This in turn opens the possibility of spectral engineering soft X-ray pulses to use as a probe for the control of quantum dynamics. We propose a method for extending coherent control pulse-shaping techniques to the soft X-ray spectral range by using a reflective geometry 4f pulse shaper. This method is based on recent developments in asymmetrically cut multilayer optic technology and piezoelectric substrates.

  11. Imaging instantaneous electron flow with ultrafast resonant x-ray scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Popova-Gorelova, Daria

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel way to image dynamical properties of nonstationary electron systems using ultrafast resonant x-ray scattering. Employing a rigorous theoretical analysis within the framework of quantum electrodynamics, we demonstrate that a single scattering pattern from a nonstationary electron system encodes the instantaneous interatomic electron current in addition to the structural information usually obtained by resonant x-ray scattering from stationary systems. Thus, inelastic contributions that are indistinguishable from elastic processes induced by a broadband probe pulse, instead of being a concern, serve as an advantage for time-resolved resonant x-ray scattering. Thereby, we propose an approach combining elastic and inelastic resonant x-ray scattering for imaging dynamics of nonstationary electron systems in both real space and real time. In order to illustrate its power, we show how it can be applied to image the electron hole current in an ionized diatomic molecule.

  12. X-ray absorption for the study of warm dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, A; Dorchies, F; Harmand, M; Fourment, C; Hulin, S; Peyrusse, O; Santos, J J [Universite de Bordeaux - CNRS - CEA, CELIA, Talence, F-33405 France (France); Antici, P; Audebert, P; Fuchs, J; Lancia, L; Mancic, A; Nakatsutsumi, M [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Mazevet, S; Recoules, V; Renaudin, P [CEA-DIF, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Fourmaux, S [INRS-Energie et Materiaux, 1650 bd. L Boulet, J3X1S2 Varennes, Quebec (Canada)

    2009-12-15

    A time-resolved ultrafast x-ray spectrometer is developed in order to extract the x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) structure of an Al sample in the warm dense matter regime. In this context, an intense, broadband, short (ps) x-ray source based on the M-band emission from high-Z plasmas is optimized to maximize the photon flux around the Al K-edge. An experiment is reported, devoted to probe a solid Al foil isochorically heated by laser-produced protons up to 3 eV. The experimental x-ray spectra lead to an estimation of the electron temperature with an accuracy of 15%. In good agreement with two different theoretical approaches, the observed progressive smoothing of the XANES structures is clearly related to a significant loss of ion-ion correlation.

  13. X-ray/UV variability and the origin of soft X-ray excess emission from II Zw 177

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Main; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Misra, Ranjeev; Pawar, Pramod K.

    2016-03-01

    We study X-ray and UV emission from the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy II Zw 177 using a 137 ks long and another 13 ks short XMM-Newton observation performed in 2012 and 2001, respectively. Both observations show soft X-ray excess emission contributing 76.9 ± 4.9 per cent in 2012 and 58.8 ± 10.2 per cent in 2001 in the 0.3-2 keV band. We find that both blurred reflection from an ionized disc and Comptonized disc emission describe the observed soft excess well. Time-resolved spectroscopy on scales of ˜20 ks reveals strong correlation between the soft excess and the power-law components. The fractional variability amplitude Fvar derived from EPIC-pn light curves at different energy bands is nearly constant (Fvar ˜ 20 per cent). This is in contrast to other active galactic nuclei where the lack of short term variation in soft X-ray excess emission has been attributed to intense light bending in the framework of the `lamppost' model. Thus, the variations in power-law emission are most likely intrinsic to corona rather than just due to the changes of height of compact corona. The variable UV emission (Fvar ˜ 1 per cent) is uncorrelated to any of the X-ray components on short time-scales suggesting that the UV emission is not dominated by the reprocessed emission. The gradual observed decline in the UV emission in 2012 may be related to the secular decline due to the changes in the accretion rate. In this case, the short term X-ray variability is not due to the changes in the seed photons but intrinsic to the hot corona.

  14. High resolution time- and 2-dimensional space-resolved x-ray imaging of plasmas at NOVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A streaked multiple pinhole camera technique, first used by P. Choi et al. to record time- and 2-D space-resolved soft X-ray images of plasma pinches, has been implemented on laser plasmas at NOVA. The instrument is particularly useful for time-resolved imaging of small sources ( 2.5 key imaging, complementing the existing 1--3 key streaked X-ray microscope capabilities at NOVA

  15. Nanosecond laser pulse heating of a platinum surface studied by pump-probe X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayduk, Roman; Vonk, Vedran; Arndt, Björn; Franz, Dirk; Strempfer, Jörg; Francoual, Sonia; Keller, Thomas F.; Spitzbart, Tobias; Stierle, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    We report on the quantitative determination of the transient surface temperature of Pt(110) upon nanosecond laser pulse heating. We find excellent agreement between heat transport theory and the experimentally determined transient surface temperature as obtained from time-resolved X-ray diffraction on timescales from hundred nanoseconds to milliseconds. Exact knowledge of the surface temperature's temporal evolution after laser excitation is crucial for future pump-probe experiments at synchrotron storage rings and X-ray free electron lasers.

  16. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  17. Stabilized x-ray generator power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence analysis are very much adopted in laboratories to determine the type and structure of the constituent compounds in solid materials, chemical composition of materials, stress developed on metals etc. These experiments need X-ray beam of fixed intensity and wave length. This can only be achieved by X-ray generator having highly stabilized tube voltage and tube current. This paper describes how X-ray tube high voltage and electron beam current are stabilized. This paper also highlights generation of X-rays, diffractometry and X-ray fluorescence analysis and their wide applications. Principle of operation for stabilizing the X-ray tube voltage and current, different protection circuits adopted, special features of the mains H.V. transformer and H.T. tank are described in this report. (author)

  18. X-ray diffraction indicates that active cross-bridges bind to actin target zones in insect flight muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Tregear, R T; Edwards, R J; Irving, T C; Poole, K J; Reedy, M C; Schmitz, H.; Towns-Andrews, E; Reedy, M K

    1998-01-01

    We report the first time-resolved study of the two-dimensional x-ray diffraction pattern during active contraction in insect flight muscle (IFM). Activation of demembranated Lethocerus IFM was triggered by 1.5-2.5% step stretches (risetime 10 ms; held for 1.5 s) giving delayed active tension that peaked at 100-200 ms. Bundles of 8-12 fibers were stretch-activated on SRS synchrotron x-ray beamline 16.1, and time-resolved changes in diffraction were monitored with a SRS 2-D multiwire detector. ...

  19. X-ray scattering studies of non-equilibrium ordering processes: Progress report, November 1, 1988--October 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the progress of our project entitled ''X-ray Scattering Studies of Non-Equilibrium Ordering Processes.'' In-house time-resolved x-ray scattering has been used to investigate ordering kinetics in single crystal thin films of Cu3Au. Scaling analysis of the results shows that two dimensional kinetic behavior is observed in 260 /angstrom/ thick films. Significant improvements have been made in the local capabilities for fast time resolved measurements and data analysis. Measurements of microphase separation and ordering kinetics have been made in block-co-polymers, and experiments on Au-Cd martensitic material are continuing. 15 refs., 7 figs

  20. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  1. Optical element for X-ray microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chadzitaskos, G.

    2008-01-01

    We present a proposal for a X-ray optical element suitable for X-ray microscopy and other X-ray-based display systems. Its principle is based on the Fresnel lenses condition and the Bragg condition for X-ray scattering on a slice of monocrystal. These conditions are fulfilled simultaneously due to a properly machined shape of the monocrystal with a stress at its ends.

  2. Enzyme reactions and their time resolved measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses experimental strategies in data collection with the Laue method and summarises recent results using synchrotron radiation. Then, an assessment is made of the progress towards time resolved studies with protein crystals and the problems that remain. The paper consists of three parts which respectively describe some aspects of Laue diffraction, recent examples of structural results from Laue diffraction, and kinetic Laue crystallography. In the first part, characteristics of Laue diffraction is discussed first, focusing on the harmonics problems, spatials problem, wavelength normalization, low resolution hole, data completeness, and uneven coverage of reciprocal space. Then, capture of the symmetry unique reflection set is discussed focusing on the effect of wavelength range on the number of reciprocal lattice points occupying diffracting positions, effect of crystal to film distance and the film area and shape on the number of reflections captured, and effect of crystal symmetry on the number of unique reflections within the number of reflections captured. The second part addresses the determination of the structure of turkey egg white lysozyme, and calcium binding in tomato bushy stunt virus. The third part describes the initiation of reactions in enzyme crystals, picosecond Laue diffraction at high energy storage rings, and detectors. (N.K.)

  3. Pulsed synchrotron x-ray as a tool for providing molecular movies at 100-picosecond temporal and sub-nanometer spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, S; Kawata, H [Photon Factory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) (Japan); Nozawa, S; Ichiyanagi, K; Ichikawa, H; Guerin, L; Tazaki, R; Sato, T; Tomita, A; Koshihara, S [Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Project, ERATO, JST (Japan); Chollet, M [Frontier Collaborative Research Center and Department of Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Sawa, H [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya University (Japan); Arima, T, E-mail: shinichi.adachi@kek.j [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University (Japan)

    2009-02-01

    Time-resolved X-ray techniques utilizing pulsed nature of synchrotron radiation are becoming general and powerful tools to explore structural dynamics in materials and biological systems. The time-resolved technique enables to produce structural movies at 100-picosecond temporal and sub-nanometer spatial resolution. It will be fascinating to apply such capabilities to capture ultrafast cooperative phenomena in strongly-correlated electron systems, photochemical catalytic reaction dynamics in liquid or on solid surface, light-induced response of photosensitive protein molecules, etc. The time-resolved X-ray studies conducted at NW14, PF-AR, KEK will be presented.

  4. Pulsed synchrotron x-ray as a tool for providing molecular movies at 100-picosecond temporal and sub-nanometer spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved X-ray techniques utilizing pulsed nature of synchrotron radiation are becoming general and powerful tools to explore structural dynamics in materials and biological systems. The time-resolved technique enables to produce structural movies at 100-picosecond temporal and sub-nanometer spatial resolution. It will be fascinating to apply such capabilities to capture ultrafast cooperative phenomena in strongly-correlated electron systems, photochemical catalytic reaction dynamics in liquid or on solid surface, light-induced response of photosensitive protein molecules, etc. The time-resolved X-ray studies conducted at NW14, PF-AR, KEK will be presented.

  5. Mode-Locked Multichromatic X-Rays in a Seeded Free-Electron Laser for Single-Shot X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Dao; Ding, Yuantao; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-05-10

    We present the promise of generating gigawatt mode-locked multichromatic x rays in a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). We show that, by using a laser to imprint periodic modulation in electron beam phase space, a single-frequency coherent seed can be amplified and further translated to a mode-locked multichromatic output in an FEL. With this configuration the FEL output consists of a train of mode-locked ultrashort pulses which span a wide frequency gap with a series of equally spaced sharp lines. These gigawatt multichromatic x rays may potentially allow one to explore the structure and dynamics of a large number of atomic states simultaneously. The feasibility of generating mode-locked x rays ranging from carbon K edge ({approx}284 eV) to copper L{sub 3} edge ({approx}931 eV) is confirmed with numerical simulation using the realistic parameters of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) and LCLS-II. We anticipate that the mode-locked multichromatic x rays in FELs may open up new opportunities in x-ray spectroscopy (i.e. resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, time-resolved scattering and spectroscopy, etc.).

  6. Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-10-26

    An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

  7. Center for X-ray Optics, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report briefly reviews the following topics: soft-x-ray imaging; reflective optics for hard x-rays; coherent XUV sources; spectroscopy with x-rays; detectors for coronary artery imaging; synchrotron-radiation optics; and support for the advanced light source

  8. Electron beam parallel X-ray generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, P.

    1967-01-01

    Broad X ray source produces a highly collimated beam of low energy X rays - a beam with 2 to 5 arc minutes of divergence at energies between 1 and 6 keV in less than 5 feet. The X ray beam is generated by electron bombardment of a target from a large area electron gun.

  9. X-Ray Exam: Neck (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Delight: Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth X-Ray Exam: Neck KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Neck Print A A A Text Size ... español Radiografía: cuello What It Is A neck X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  10. X-ray tracing using Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an extension to the Geant4 software package that allows it to be used as a general purpose X-ray tracing package. We demonstrate the use of our extension by building a model of the X-ray optics of the X-ray observatory XMM-Newton, calculating its effective area, and comparing the results with the published calibration curves.

  11. Stochastic stimulated electronic x-ray Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kimberg, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) is a well-established tool for studying electronic, nuclear and collective dynamics of excited atoms, molecules and solids. An extension of this powerful method to a time-resolved probe technique at x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) to ultimately unravel ultrafast chemical and structural changes on a femtosecond time scale is often challenging, due to the small signal rate in conventional implementations at XFELs that rely on the usage of a monochromator set up to select a small frequency band of the broadband, spectrally incoherent XFEL radiation. Here, we suggest an alternative approach, based on stochastic spectroscopy, that uses the full bandwidth of the incoming XFEL pulses. Our proposed method is relying on stimulated resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, where in addition to a pump pulse that resonantly excites the system a probe pulse on a specific electronic inelastic transition is provided, that serves as seed in the stimulated scattering process. The limit...

  12. Combining SAXS and DLS for simultaneous measurements and time-resolved monitoring of nanoparticle synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwamberger, A., E-mail: alexander.schwamberger@bruker-axs.de [TU Dortmund, Experimentelle Physik 1, Otto-Hahn-Str. 4, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Bruker AXS GmbH, Östliche Rheinbrückenstr. 49, 76187 Karlsruhe (Germany); De Roo, B. [KU Leuven, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Jacob, D. [Cordouan Technologies, Cité de la Photonique, 11 Avenue Canteranne, 33600 Pessac (France); Dillemans, L. [KU Leuven, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Bruegemann, L. [Bruker AXS GmbH, Östliche Rheinbrückenstr. 49, 76187 Karlsruhe (Germany); Seo, J.W. [KU Leuven, Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Locquet, J.P. [KU Leuven, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2015-01-15

    Time-resolved characterization of nano-particle (NP) synthesis is a promising mean to produce NPs under controlled conditions. Here, an innovative experimental demonstration of a NP characterization tool which combines a laboratory Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) instrument, a new Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) device and a microflow reactor is shown. The complementary SAXS and DLS techniques were designed and optimized to meet the ambitious requirements of time-resolved monitoring of NP suspensions while ongoing synthesis. For this purpose, SAXS instrument performance was enhanced by the implementation and optimization of a unique X-ray metal jet source. In parallel, an innovative DLS fiber remote probe head was developed specifically for in situ measurements. DLS measurements were performed directly inside a 2.0 mm diameter glass capillary located inside the SAXS vacuum sample chamber. The combined SAXS and DLS devices were tested separately on commercially available gold NP suspensions of known size. Furthermore, simultaneous SAXS and DLS measurements were performed during the synthesis of silica NPs.

  13. New Worlds / New Horizons Science with an X-ray Astrophysics Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Randall K.; Bookbinder, Jay A.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Bandler, Simon; Brandt, W. N.; Hughes, John P.; McCammon, Dan; Matsumoto, Hironori; Mushotzky, Richard; Osten, Rachel A.; Petre, Robert; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Ptak, Andrew; Ramsey, Brian; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Schattenburg, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In 2013 NASA commenced a design study for an X-ray Astrophysics Probe to address the X-ray science goals and program prioritizations of the Decadal Survey New World New Horizons (NWNH) with a cost cap of approximately $1B. Both the NWNH report and 2011 NASA X-ray mission concept study found that high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy performed with an X-ray microcalorimeter would enable the most highly rated NWNH X-ray science. Here we highlight some potential science topics, namely: 1) a direct, strong-field test of General Relativity via the study of accretion onto black holes through relativistic broadened Fe lines and their reverberation in response to changing hard X-ray continuum, 2) understanding the evolution of galaxies and clusters by mapping temperatures, abundances and dynamics in hot gas, 3) revealing the physics of accretion onto stellar-mass black holes from companion stars and the equation of state of neutron stars through timing studies and time-resolved spectroscopy of X-ray binaries and 4) feedback from AGN and star formation shown in galaxy-scale winds and jets. In addition to these high-priority goals, an X-ray astrophysics probe would be a general-purpose observatory that will result in invaluable data for other NWNH topics such as stellar astrophysics, protostars and their impact on protoplanetary systems, X-ray spectroscopy of transient phenomena such as high-z gamma-ray bursts and tidal capture of stars by massive black holes, and searches for dark matter decay.

  14. Simultaneous X-ray/optical observations of GX 9+9 (4U 1728-16)

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, A K H; Homer, L; Kuulkers, E; O'Donoghue, D

    2006-01-01

    We report on the results of the first simultaneous X-ray (RXTE) and optical (SAAO) observations of the luminous low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) GX 9+9 in 1999 August. The high-speed optical photometry revealed an orbital period of 4.1958 hr and confirmed previous observations, but with greater precision. No X-ray modulation was found at the orbital period. On shorter timescales, a possible 1.4-hr variability was found in the optical light curves which might be related to the mHz quasi-periodic oscillations seen in other LMXBs. We do not find any significant X-ray/optical correlation in the light curves. In X-rays, the colour-colour diagram and hardness-intensity diagram indicate that the source shows characteristics of an atoll source in the upper banana state, with a correlation between intensity and spectral hardness. Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy suggests that two-component spectral models give a reasonable fit to the X-ray emission. Such models consist of a blackbody component which can be interpreted as ...

  15. The Short-Pulse X-ray Facility at the Advanced Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Linda; Evans, Paul

    2013-05-01

    The Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) Facility will extend time-resolved x-ray scattering and spectroscopy to the picosecond time scale while retaining the powerful characteristics of synchrotron radiation, i.e., user-controlled continuous tunability of energy, polarization, and bandwidth combined with exquisite x-ray energy and pulse-length stability over a wide energy range. Experiments at the SPX facility will produce 1-ps stroboscopic snapshots of molecular rotations, molecular excited-state transient structures, stress/strain wave propagation, magnetic domain wall dynamics, phase transitions, and the coupling between electronic, vibrational, and magnetic degrees of freedom in condensed matter systems. Time-resolved studies of transient dynamics will be possible with simultaneous picosecond time resolution and picometer structural precision for a variety of atomic, molecular, supramolecular, nanoscale, and bulk material systems. Pump-probe experiments using high-average-power, sub-picosecond, high-repetition-rate laser systems will make efficient use of the MHz x-ray rates of the SPX. Five end stations for x-ray scattering, diffraction, spectroscopy, imaging, and microscopy can be developed as part of the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project. The Advanced Photon Source is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Dept of Energy Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  16. Orbital-specific mapping of chemical dynamics with ultrafast x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Philippe

    Charge and spin density changes at the metal sites of transition-metal complexes and in metalloproteins determine reactivity and selectivity. To understand their function and to optimize complexes for photocatalytic applications the changes of charge and spin densities need to be mapped and ultimately controlled. I will discuss how time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy enables a fundamental understanding of local atomic and intermolecular interactions and their dynamics on atomic length and time scales of Ångströms and femtoseconds. The approach consists in using time-resolved, atom- and orbital-specific x-ray spectroscopy and quantum chemical theory to map the frontier-orbital interactions and their evolution in real time of ultrafast chemical transformations. We recently used femtosecond resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS, the x-ray analog of resonant Raman scattering) at the x-ray free-electron laser LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Stanford, USA) to probe the reaction dynamics of a transition-metal complex in solution on the femtosecond time scale. Spin crossover and ligation are found to define the excited-state dynamics. It is demonstrated how correlating orbital symmetry and orbital interactions with spin multiplicity allows for determining the reactivity of short-lived reaction intermediates. I will discuss how this complements approaches that probe structural dynamics and how it can be extended to map the local chemical interactions and their dynamical evolution in metalloproteins.

  17. Protonium X-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gotta, D

    1999-01-01

    The Lyman and Balmer transitions from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium were studied extensively at the low-energy-antiproton ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. A first series of experiments $9 was performed with semiconductor and gaseous X-ray detectors. In the last years of LEAR operation using a Bragg crystal spectrometer, strong interaction parameters in the 2p states of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium were measured $9 directly. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction. (39 refs).

  18. X-ray tomographic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An x-ray tomographic system consists of a radiation source such as gamma or x radiation which produces a fan-shaped beam. The fan is wide enough to encompass the patient circle. The system further includes means for rotating the radiation source about the patient for less than a full rotation, and detectors for detecting the radiation at positions that surround the patient by 1800 plus the angle of the fan beam plus the angle between adjacent fan detectors. Attenuation data from the detectors is sorted into detector fans of attenuation data, then processed. The convolved data is back-projected into an image memory and displayed on a video monitor

  19. X-ray/UV variability and the origin of soft X-ray excess emission from II Zw 177

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Main; Misra, Ranjeev; Pawar, Pramod K

    2016-01-01

    We study X-ray and UV emission from the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy II~Zw~177 using a $137\\ks$ long and another $13\\ks$ short \\xmm{} observation performed in 2012 and 2001, respectively. Both observations show soft X-ray excess emission contributing $76.9\\pm4.9\\%$ in 2012 and $58.8\\pm10.2\\%$ in 2001 in the $0.3-2\\kev$ band. We find that both blurred reflection from an ionized disc and Comptonized disc emission describe the observed soft excess well. Time-resolved spectroscopy on scales of $\\sim20\\ks$ reveals strong correlation between the soft excess and the powerlaw components. The fractional variability amplitude $F_{var}$ derived from EPIC-pn lightcurves at different energy bands is nearly constant ($F_{var} \\sim20\\%$). This is in contrast to other AGNs where the lack of short term variation in soft X-ray excess emission has been attributed to intense light bending in the framework of the "lamppost" model. Thus, the variations in powerlaw emission are most likely intrinsic to corona rather than just due t...

  20. Time-Resolved X-Ray and Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer for Use on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Lepson, J K; Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Roquemore, L

    2008-05-05

    We describe upgrades to a compact grazing-incidence spectrometer utilized on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) for monitoring light and heavy impurities . A fast-readout charge couple device (CCD) camera has been implemented that allows the recording of spectra with up to 25 ms time integration. This capability is used to study the time evolution of the K-shell emission of hydrogenlike and heliumlike boron, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen between 10 and 65 {angstrom}. Different camera positioning pieces have been employed to extend the possible spectral range to as high as 140. Several lines that cannot be ascribed to the usual elements found in the plasma have been observed in this spectral range, though often only in a few isolated discharges.

  1. Crystallization of Photosystem II for Time-Resolved Structural Studies Using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Jesse; Kupitz, Christopher; Basu, Shibom; Conrad, Chelsie E; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Fromme, Raimund; Fromme, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a membrane protein supercomplex that executes the initial reaction of photosynthesis in higher plants, algae, and cyanobacteria. It captures the light from the sun to catalyze a transmembrane charge separation. In a series of four charge separation events, utilizing the energy from four photons, PSII oxidizes two water molecules to obtain dioxygen, four protons, and four electrons. The light reactions of photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) result in the formation of an electrochemical transmembrane proton gradient that is used for the production of ATP. Electrons that are subsequently transferred from PSI via the soluble protein ferredoxin to ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase that reduces NADP(+) to NADPH. The products of photosynthesis and the elemental oxygen evolved sustain all higher life on Earth. All oxygen in the atmosphere is produced by the oxygen-evolving complex in PSII, a process that changed our planet from an anoxygenic to an oxygenic atmosphere 2.5 billion years ago. In this chapter, we provide recent insight into the mechanisms of this process and methods used in probing this question. PMID:25950978

  2. X-ray Pulsations in the Supersoft X-ray Binary CAL 83

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidtke, P. C.; Cowley, A. P.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray data reveal that the supersoft X-ray binary CAL 83 exhibits 38.4 minute pulsations at some epochs. These X-ray variations are similar to those found in some novae and are likely to be caused by nonradial pulsations the white dwarf. This is the first detection of pulsations in a classical supersoft X-ray binary.

  3. Ionospheric effects of solar x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danskin, Donald

    2016-07-01

    The ionospheric absorption of radio waves caused by solar x-ray bursts is measured directly by Riometers from the Canada Riometer Array. The absorption is found to be proportional to the square root of the flux intensity of the X-ray burst with time delays of 18-20 seconds between the peak X-ray emission and absorption in the ionosphere. A detailed analysis showed that some X-ray flares during 2011-2014 are more effective at producing absorption than others. Solar longitude of X-ray burst for several X-class flares shows no consistent pattern of enhancement in the absorption.

  4. Comets: mechanisms of x-ray activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Basic mechanisms of X-ray activity of comets are considered, including D-D mechanism corresponding to generation of X-rays due to production of hot short-living plasma clumps at high-velocity collisions between cometary and interplanetary dust particles as well as M-M one corresponding to production of X-rays due to recombination of multicharge ions of solar wind plasma via charge exchange process at their collisions with molecules/atoms of the cometary atmospheres. Peculiarities of the variation of the comet X-ray spectrum and X-ray luminosity with variation of its heliocentric distance are revealed.

  5. Swift Observations of X-ray supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Li, K. L.; Pun, Chun. S. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a result of X-ray supernovae (SNe) survey using the Swift satellite public archive. An automatic searching program was designed to search X-ray SNe among all of the Swift archival observations between November 2004 and February 2011. Using the C++ program, 24 X-ray detectable supernovae have been found in the archive and 3 of them were newly-discovered in X-rays which are SN 1986L, SN 2003lx, and SN 2007od. In addition, SN 2003lx is a Type Ia supernova which may be the second X-ray...

  6. Symbiotic stars in X-rays

    OpenAIRE

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K; Nelson, T.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of nine white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that had previously been detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The nine new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbi...

  7. X-ray powder diffraction applied to cement related phases: in-situ and high resolution applications

    OpenAIRE

    Cuesta, Ana; Álvarez-Pinazo, Gema; De la Torre, Ángeles G.; Santacruz, Isabel; Peral, Inma; Aranda, Miguel A. G.

    2014-01-01

    XRPD is a powerful tool for material characterization in general, and for in-situ studies of chemical processes in particular. The use of an intense X-ray source, .i.e. synchrotron X-rays, coupled with fast X-ray detection permits time-resolved diffraction experiments allowing in-situ quantitative phase analysis during the early ages of cement hydration. CSA cements may have variable compositions, but all of them contain ye’elimite (Ca4Al6O12SO4). This phase is also included, ~25 wt%, in s...

  8. Optical laser-induced CO desorption from Ru(0001) monitored with a free-electron X-ray laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öberg, H.; Gladh, J.; Dell'Angela, M.;

    2015-01-01

    We present density functional theory modeling of time-resolved optical pump/X-ray spectroscopic probe data of CO desorption from Ru(0001). The BEEF van der Waals functional predicts a weakly bound state as a precursor to desorption. The optical pump leads to a near-instantaneous (b100 fs) increase...... (~1.4 eV at 2000 K). Experimental pump-probe X-ray absorption/X-ray emission spectroscopy indicates population of a precursor state to desorption upon laser-excitation of the system (Dell'Angela et al., 2013). Computing spectra along the desorption path confirms the picture of a weakly bound transient...

  9. Ultra Fast X-ray Streak Camera for TIM Based Platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marley, E; Shepherd, R; Fulkerson, E S; James, L; Emig, J; Norman, D

    2012-05-02

    Ultra fast x-ray streak cameras are a staple for time resolved x-ray measurements. There is a need for a ten inch manipulator (TIM) based streak camera that can be fielded in a newer large scale laser facility. The LLNL ultra fast streak camera's drive electronics have been upgraded and redesigned to fit inside a TIM tube. The camera also has a new user interface that allows for remote control and data acquisition. The system has been outfitted with a new sensor package that gives the user more operational awareness and control.

  10. Tracking the density evolution in counter-propagating shock waves using imaging X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrau, U.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kraus, D.; Benage, J. F.; Drake, R. P.; Efthimion, P.; Falk, K.; Falcone, R. W.; Fletcher, L. B.; Galtier, E.; Gauthier, M.; Granados, E.; Hastings, J. B.; Heimann, P.; Hill, K.; Keiter, P. A.; Lu, J.; MacDonald, M. J.; Montgomery, D. S.; Nagler, B.; Pablant, N.; Schropp, A.; Tobias, B.; Gericke, D. O.; Glenzer, S. H.; Lee, H. J.

    2016-07-01

    We present results from time-resolved X-ray imaging and inelastic scattering on collective excitations. These data are then employed to infer the mass density evolution within laser-driven shock waves. In our experiments, thin carbon foils are first strongly compressed and then driven into a dense state by counter-propagating shock waves. The different measurements agree that the graphite sample is about twofold compressed when the shock waves collide, and a sharp increase in forward scattering indicates disassembly of the sample 1 ns thereafter. We can benchmark hydrodynamics simulations of colliding shock waves by the X-ray scattering methods employed.

  11. Time-resolved lattice measurements of shock-induced phase transitions in polycrystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milathianaki, Despina

    The response of materials under extreme temperature and pressure conditions is a topic of great significance because of its relevance in astrophysics, geophysics, and inertial confinement fusion. In recent years, environments exceeding several hundred gigapascals in pressure have been produced in the laboratory via laser-based dynamic loading techniques. Shock-loading is of particular interest as the shock provides a fiducial for measuring time-dependent processes in the lattice such as phase transitions. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction is the only technique that offers an insight into these shock-induced processes at the relevant spatial (atomic) and temporal scales. In this study, nanosecond resolution x-ray diffraction techniques were developed and implemented towards the study of shock-induced phase transitions in polycrystalline materials. More specifically, the capability of a focusing x-ray diffraction geometry in high-resolution in situ lattice measurements was demonstrated by probing shock-compressed Cu and amorphous metallic glass samples. In addition, simultaneous lattice and free surface velocity measurements of shock-compressed Mg in the ambient hexagonal close packed (hcp) and shock-induced body centered cubic (bcc) phases between 12 and 45 GPa were performed. These measurements revealed x-ray diffraction signals consistent with a compressed bcc lattice above a shock pressure of 26.2+/-1.3 GPa, thus capturing for the first time direct lattice evidence of a shock-induced hcp to bcc phase transition in Mg. Our measurement of the hcp-bcc phase boundary in Mg was found to be consistent with the calculated boundary from generalized pseudopotential theory in the pressure and temperature region intersected by the principal shock Hugoniot. Furthermore, the subnanosecond timescale of the phase transition implied by the shock-loading conditions was in agreement with the kinetics of a martensitic transformation. In conclusion, we report on the progress and

  12. Time-resolved XAS (Bonn-SUT-SLRI) beamline at SLRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poo-arporn, Yingyot; Chirawatkul, Prae; Saengsui, Worasarit; Chotiwan, Siwarak; Kityakarn, Sutasinee; Klinkhieo, Supat; Hormes, Josef; Songsiriritthigul, Prayoon

    2012-11-01

    An energy-dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline has been constructed at the Synchrotron Light Research Institute, Thailand. The beamline was designed to utilize the synchrotron radiation with photon energies between 2400 and 8000 eV. The horizontal focusing of the bent crystal in the energy-dispersive monochromator offers a small polychromatic focal spot of 1 mm at the sample position. By employing an energy-dispersive scheme, the whole X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) can be obtained simultaneously using a position-sensitive detector with a fastest readout speed of 25 ms. The short data collection time opens a new opportunity for time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments such as studies of changes of the electronic structures or the local coordination environments of an atom during a change in thermodynamic conditions. For this purpose, an in situ cell was designed and fabricated for the beamline. Thermal oxidation of TiO(2) was chosen as an in situ experiment example. The structural change of TiO(2) as a function of temperatures was monitored from the change in the measured XAS spectra. The obtained Ti K-edge XANES spectra clearly show the formation of an anatase phase when the temperature was raised to 673 K. PMID:23093752

  13. Time-resolved structural studies with serial crystallography: A new light on retinal proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Panneels

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Structural information of the different conformational states of the two prototypical light-sensitive membrane proteins, bacteriorhodopsin and rhodopsin, has been obtained in the past by X-ray cryo-crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. However, these methods do not allow for the structure determination of most intermediate conformations. Recently, the potential of X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (X-FELs for tracking the dynamics of light-triggered processes by pump-probe serial femtosecond crystallography has been demonstrated using 3D-micron-sized crystals. In addition, X-FELs provide new opportunities for protein 2D-crystal diffraction, which would allow to observe the course of conformational changes of membrane proteins in a close-to-physiological lipid bilayer environment. Here, we describe the strategies towards structural dynamic studies of retinal proteins at room temperature, using injector or fixed-target based serial femtosecond crystallography at X-FELs. Thanks to recent progress especially in sample delivery methods, serial crystallography is now also feasible at synchrotron X-ray sources, thus expanding the possibilities for time-resolved structure determination.

  14. XNAP: a hybrid pixel detector with nanosecond resolution for time resolved synchrotron radiation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, P.; Baron, A. Q. R.; Dautet, H.; Davies, M.; Fischer, P.; Göttlicher, P.; Graafsma, H.; Hervé, C.; Rüffer, R.; Thil, C.

    2013-03-01

    The XNAP collaboration is constructing a hybrid pixel X-ray detector based on a monolithic silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) sensor array aiming at applications in synchrotron radiation facilities. The 2D detector is capable of identifying which individual electron bunch produces each detected X-ray photon, even when the storage ring operates in multibunch filling modes. This instrument is intended to be used in X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy and Nuclear Resonance experiments and serve as a demonstrator for various kind of time resolved diffraction and scattering applications as well as a very high count rate device. The detector is a 1 kilopixel device with 280 μm pitch that implements both counting mode up to MHz frame rates and event-by-event readout with sub-nanosecond time resolution. The paper describes the detector design and some results obtained with small 4×4 pixel prototypes that have been built and measured to make and validate the most critical choices for the final detector.

  15. Full-field transmission x-ray imaging with confocal polycapillary x-ray optics

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Tianxi; MacDonald, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    A transmission x-ray imaging setup based on a confocal combination of a polycapillary focusing x-ray optic followed by a polycapillary collimating x-ray optic was designed and demonstrated to have good resolution, better than the unmagnified pixel size and unlimited by the x-ray tube spot size. This imaging setup has potential application in x-ray imaging for small samples, for example, for histology specimens.

  16. Lipidic cubic phase injector is a viable crystal delivery system for time-resolved serial crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogly, Przemyslaw; Panneels, Valerie; Nelson, Garrett; Gati, Cornelius; Kimura, Tetsunari; Milne, Christopher; Milathianaki, Despina; Kubo, Minoru; Wu, Wenting; Conrad, Chelsie; Coe, Jesse; Bean, Richard; Zhao, Yun; Båth, Petra; Dods, Robert; Harimoorthy, Rajiv; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Rheinberger, Jan; James, Daniel; DePonte, Daniel; Li, Chufeng; Sala, Leonardo; Williams, Garth J; Hunter, Mark S; Koglin, Jason E; Berntsen, Peter; Nango, Eriko; Iwata, So; Chapman, Henry N; Fromme, Petra; Frank, Matthias; Abela, Rafael; Boutet, Sébastien; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John; Neutze, Richard; Schertler, Gebhard; Standfuss, Jörg

    2016-08-22

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray free-electron laser sources is an emerging method with considerable potential for time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Here we present a lipidic cubic phase SFX structure of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (bR) to 2.3 Å resolution and a method to investigate protein dynamics with modest sample requirement. Time-resolved SFX (TR-SFX) with a pump-probe delay of 1 ms yields difference Fourier maps compatible with the dark to M state transition of bR. Importantly, the method is very sample efficient and reduces sample consumption to about 1 mg per collected time point. Accumulation of M intermediate within the crystal lattice is confirmed by time-resolved visible absorption spectroscopy. This study provides an important step towards characterizing the complete photocycle dynamics of retinal proteins and demonstrates the feasibility of a sample efficient viscous medium jet for TR-SFX.

  17. Sub-100 ps coincidence time resolution for positron emission tomography with LSO:Ce codoped with Ca

    CERN Document Server

    Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Lecoq, Paul; Auffray, Etiennette; Ferri, Alessandro; Gola, Alberto; Piemonte, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The coincidence time resolution (CTR) becomes a key parameter of 511keV gamma detection in time of flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET). This is because additional information obtained through timing leads to a better noise suppression and therefore a better signal to noise ratio in the reconstructed image. In this paper we present the results of CTR measurements on two different SiPM technologies from FBK coupled to LSO:Ce codoped 0.4%Ca crystals. We compare the measurements performed at two separate test setups, i.e. at CERN and at FBK, showing that the obtained results agree within a few percent. We achieve a best CTR value of 85  ±  4 ps FWHM for 2  ×  2  ×  3 mm3 LSO:Ce codoped 0.4%Ca crystals, thus breaking the 100 ps barrier with scintillators similar to LSO:Ce or LYSO:Ce. We also demonstrate that a CTR of 140  ±  5 ps can be achieved for longer 2  ×  2  ×  20 mm3 crystals, which can readily be implemented in the current generation PET syst...

  18. X-Ray Attenuation Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D.; Toor, A.

    2000-03-03

    To minimize the pulse-to-pulse variation, the LCLS FEL must operate at saturation, i.e. 10 orders of magnitude brighter spectral brilliance than 3rd-generation light sources. At this intensity, ultra-high vacuums and windowless transport are required. Many of the experiments, however, will need to be conducted at a much lower intensity thereby requiring a reliable means to reduce the x-ray intensity by many orders of magnitude without increasing the pulse-to-pulse variation. In this report we consider a possible solution for controlled attenuation of the LCLS x-ray radiation. We suggest using for this purpose a windowless gas-filled cell with the differential pumping. Although this scheme is easily realizable in principle, it has to be demonstrated that the attenuator can be made short enough to be practical and that the gas loads delivered to the vacuum line of sight (LOS) are acceptable. We are not going to present a final, optimized design. Instead, we will provide a preliminary analysis showing that the whole concept is robust and is worth further study. The spatial structure of the LCLS x-ray pulse at the location of the attenuator is shown in Fig. 1. The central high-intensity component, due to the FEL, has a FWHM of {approx}100 {micro}m. A second component, due to the undulator's broad band spontaneous radiation is seen as a much lower intensity ''halo'' with a FWHM of 1 mm. We discuss two versions of the attenuation cell. The first is directed towards a controlled attenuation of the FEL up to the 4 orders of magnitude in the intensity, with the spontaneous radiation halo being eliminated by collimators. In the second version, the spontaneous radiation is not sacrificed but the FEL component (as well as the first harmonic of the spontaneous radiation) gets attenuated by a more modest factor up to 100. We will make all the estimates assuming that the gas used in the attenuator is Xenon and that the energy of the FEL is 8.25 keV. At

  19. Sub-Picosecond Tunable Hard X-Ray Undulator Source for Laser/X-Ray Pump-Probe Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingold, G.; Beaud, P.; Johnson, S.; Streun, A.; Schmidt, T.; Abela, R.; Al-Adwan, A.; Abramsohn, D.; Böge, M.; Grolimund, D.; Keller, A.; Krasniqi, F.; Rivkin, L.; Rohrer, M.; Schilcher, T.; Schmidt, T.; Schlott, V.; Schulz, L.; van der Veen, F.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-01

    The FEMTO source under construction at the μXAS beamline is designed to enable tunable time-resolved laser/x-ray absorption and diffraction experiments in photochemistry and condensed matter with ps- and sub-ps resolution. The design takes advantage of (1) the highly stable operation of the SLS storage ring, (2) the reliable high harmonic operation of small gap, short period undulators to generate hard x-rays with energy 3-18 keV at 2.4 GeV beam energy, and (3) the progress in high power, high repetition rate fs solid-state laser technology to employ laser/e-beam `slicing' to reach a time resolution of ultimately 100 fs. The source will profit from the inherently synchronized pump (laser I: 100 fs, 2 mJ, 1 kHz) and probe (sliced X-rays, laser II: 50 fs, 5 mJ, 1 kHz) pulses, and from the excellent stability of the SLS storage ring which is operated in top-up mode and controlled by a fast orbit feedback (FOFB). Coherent radiation emitted at THz frequencies by the sliced 100 fs electron bunches will be monitored as on-line cross-correlation signal to keep the laser-electron beam interaction at optimum. The source is designed to provide at 8 keV (100 fs) a monochromized flux of 104 ph/s/0.01% bw (Si crystal monochromator) and 106 ph/s/1.5% bw (multilayer monochromator) at the sample. It is operated in parasitic mode using a hybrid bunch filling pattern. Because of the low intensity measurements are carried out repetitively over many shots using refreshing samples and gated detectors. `Diffraction gating' experiments will be used to characterize the sub-ps X-ray pulses.

  20. X-ray intensifying screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An x-ray intensifying screen comprises a support which has a luminescent composition comprising an isotropic phosphor and a polymer having an index of refraction within 0.02 of that of the phosphor over at least 80 percent of its emission spectrum. The support has an index of refraction up to or equal to 0.05 units higher than that of the phosphor and has a reflection optical density of at least 1.7 to light emitted by the phosphor. A preferred luminescent composition comprises Kl:Tl, Rbl:Tl at BaSrFCl:Eu mixed with two monomers such as 1-naphthylmethylmethacrylate, S(1-naphthylmethyl) thioacrylate, 1-bromo-2-naphthylacrylate, and benzyl methacrylate, coated on black anodised Al and polymerised in situ. The ratio of monomers is adjusted to give the desired refractive index. Other phosphors, polymers and supports are specified together with the preparation of the monomers and polymers. (author)

  1. X-ray flat panel detectors and X-ray tubes contributing to development of X-ray diagnostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray flat panel detectors (FPDs) and X-ray tubes are key devices allowing X-ray diagnostic systems to support more sophisticated medical care. FPDs provide valuable information for the diagnosis of various diseases through the conversion of X-ray images of the human body into electronic signals, while X-ray tubes are used in a wide range of applications such as computed tomography (CT), angiography, fluoroscopy, mammography, and dental systems. Toshiba Electron Tubes and Devices Co., Ltd. has developed and commercialized FPDs providing high-quality diagnostic X-ray images with low dose exposure through the development of cutting-edge technologies including a fine crystal formation technology for cesium iodide (CsI) scintillators, thin-film transistor (TFT) arrays with photodiodes, and so on. In the field of X-ray tubes that can generate a high output of X-rays, we have developed a liquid metal hydrodynamic bearing (LM bearing) technology for various diagnostic systems including medical CT systems with a long lifetime and high rotation speed, and cardiovascular imaging systems with quiet operation. Furthermore, LM bearing technology reduces the burden on the environment by replacing insulating oil with water coolant for the cooling system and making the X-ray tubes more compact. (author)

  2. Soft x-ray interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the soft x-ray interferometry workshop held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was to discuss with the scientific community the proposed technical design of the soft x-ray Fourier-transform spectrometer being developed at the ALS. Different design strategies for the instrument's components were discussed, as well as detection methods, signal processing issues, and how to meet the manufacturing tolerances that are necessary for the instrument to achieve the desired levels of performance. Workshop participants were encouraged to report on their experiences in the field of Fourier transform spectroscopy. The ALS is developing a Fourier transform spectrometer that is intended to operate up to 100 eV. The motivation is solely improved resolution and not the throughput (Jaquinot) or multiplex (Fellgett) advantage, neither of which apply for the sources and detectors used in this spectral range. The proposed implementation of this is via a Mach-Zehnder geometry that has been (1) distorted from a square to a rhombus to get grazing incidence of a suitable angle for 100 eV and (2) provided with a mirror-motion system to make the path difference between the interfering beams tunable. The experiment consists of measuring the emergent light intensity (I(x)) as a function of the path difference (x). The resolving power of the system is limited by the amount of path difference obtainable that is 1 cm (one million half-waves at 200 angstrom wavelength) in the design thus allowing a resolving power of one million. The free spectral range of the system is limited by the closeness with which the function I(x) is sampled. It is proposed to illuminate a helium absorption cell with roughly 1%-band-width light from a monochromator thus allowing one hundred aliases without spectral overlap even for sampling of I(x) at one hundredth of the Nyquist frequency

  3. Soft x-ray polarimeter laboratory tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kendrah D.; Marshall, Herman L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Jenks, Kevin; Sommer, Sophie J. B.; Marshall, Eric A.

    2010-07-01

    Multilayer-coated optics can strongly polarize X-rays and are central to a new design of a broad-band, soft X-ray polarimeter. We have begun laboratory work to verify the performance of components that could be used in future soft X-ray polarimetric instrumentation. We have reconfigured a 17 meter beamline facility, originally developed for testing transmission gratings for Chandra, to include a polarized X-ray source, an X-ray-dispersing transmission grating, and a multilayer-coated optic that illuminates a CCD detector. The X-rays produced from a Manson Model 5, multi-anode source are polarized by a multilayer-coated flat mirror. The current configuration allows for a 180 degree rotation of the source in order to rotate the direction of polarization. We will present progress in source characterization and system modulation measurements as well as null and robustness tests.

  4. X-rays for medical use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessenbruch, A.

    1995-11-01

    1995 is the centenary of the discovery of X-rays by the German physicist Wilhelm C Rontgen. In the past hundred years, the new rays have developed from being unknown to finding application in many walks of life, not least in medicine. This is so much so that in common speech the word `x-ray` refers not to a form of radiation but to an X-ray photograph taken for the purposes of diagnosis (as in: `I had an X-ray done to see if my leg was broken`). X-rays are now used routinely, and they are used both for diagnosis and for therapy. This paper will give an outline of the use of X-rays in medicine throughout our present century.

  5. Handbook of X-Ray Data

    CERN Document Server

    Zschornack, Günter

    2007-01-01

    This sourcebook is intended as an X-ray data reference for scientists and engineers working in the field of energy or wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry and related fields of basic and applied research, technology, or process and quality controlling. In a concise and informative manner, the most important data connected with the emission of characteristic X-ray lines are tabulated for all elements up to Z = 95 (Americium). This includes X-ray energies, emission rates and widths as well as level characteristics such as binding energies, fluorescence yields, level widths and absorption edges. The tabulated data are characterized and, in most cases, evaluated. Furthermore, all important processes and phenomena connected with the production, emission and detection of characteristic X-rays are discussed. This reference book addresses all researchers and practitioners working with X-ray radiation and fills a gap in the available literature.

  6. X-ray microlaminography with polycapillary optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabrowski, K. M.; Dul, D. T.; Wrobel, A.; Korecki, P. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2013-06-03

    We demonstrate layer-by-layer x-ray microimaging using polycapillary optics. The depth resolution is achieved without sample or source rotation and in a way similar to classical tomography or laminography. The method takes advantage from large angular apertures of polycapillary optics and from their specific microstructure, which is treated as a coded aperture. The imaging geometry is compatible with polychromatic x-ray sources and with scanning and confocal x-ray fluorescence setups.

  7. X-ray data booklet. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, D. (ed.)

    1986-04-01

    A compilation of data is presented. Included are properties of the elements, electron binding energies, characteristic x-ray energies, fluorescence yields for K and L shells, Auger energies, energy levels for hydrogen-, helium-, and neonlike ions, scattering factors and mass absorption coefficients, and transmission bands of selected filters. Also included are selected reprints on scattering processes, x-ray sources, optics, x-ray detectors, and synchrotron radiation facilities. (WRF)

  8. Applications of soft x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, C.H.

    1993-08-01

    The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. Imaging of biological specimens using x-ray lasers has been demonstrated by several groups. Other applications to fields such as chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography are beginning to emerge. We review the current status of soft x-ray lasers from the perspective of applications, and present an overview of the applications currently being developed.

  9. X-ray spot film device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvements are described in an X-ray spot film device which is used in conjunction with an X-ray table to make a selected number of radiographic exposures on a single film and to perform fluoroscopic examinations. To date, the spot film devices consist of two X-ray field defining masks, one of which is moved manually. The present device is more convenient to use and speeds up the procedure. (U.K.)

  10. X-ray data booklet. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compilation of data is presented. Included are properties of the elements, electron binding energies, characteristic x-ray energies, fluorescence yields for K and L shells, Auger energies, energy levels for hydrogen-, helium-, and neonlike ions, scattering factors and mass absorption coefficients, and transmission bands of selected filters. Also included are selected reprints on scattering processes, x-ray sources, optics, x-ray detectors, and synchrotron radiation facilities

  11. Topological X-Rays and MRIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Let K be a compact subset of the interior of the unit disk D in the plane and suppose one can't see through the boundary of D and identify K. However, assume that one can take "topological X-rays" of D which measure the "density" of K along the lines of the X-rays. By taking these X-rays from all directions, a "topological MRI" is generated for…

  12. X-Ray Kinematography of Temperature-Jump Relaxation Probes the Elastic Properties of Fluid Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Pabst, Georg; Rappolt, Michael; Amenitsch, Heinz; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Laggner, Peter

    2000-01-01

    The response kinetics of liquid crystalline phosphatidylcholine bilayer stacks to rapid, IR-laser induced temperature jumps has been studied by millisecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The system reacts on the fast temperature change by a discrete bilayer compression normal to its surface and a lateral bilayer expansion. Since water cannot diffuse from the excess phase into the interbilayer water region within the 2 ms duration of the laser pulse, the water layer has to follow the bilayer...

  13. Bright x-ray stainless steel K-shell source development at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, M. J.; Fournier, K. B.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Moody, J.; Patterson, J. R.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808 L170, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Hohenberger, M.; Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    High x-ray conversion efficiency (XRCE) K-shell sources are being developed for high energy density experiments for use as backlighters and for the testing of materials exposed to high x-ray fluxes and fluences. Recently, sources with high XRCE in the K-shell x-ray energy range of iron and nickel were investigated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The x-ray conversion efficiency in the 5–9 keV spectral range was determined to be 6.8% ± 0.3%. These targets were 4.1 mm diameter, 4 mm tall hollow epoxy tubes having a 50 μm thick wall supporting a tube of 3 to 3.5 μm thick stainless steel. The NIF laser deposited ∼460 kJ of 3ω light into the target in a 140 TW, 3.3 ns square pulse. The absolute x-ray emission of the source was measured by two calibrated Dante x-ray spectrometers. Time resolved images filtered for the Fe K-shell were recorded to follow the heating of the target. Time integrated high-resolution spectra were recorded in the K-shell range.

  14. Observation of femtosecond X-ray interactions with matter using an X-ray-X-ray pump-probe scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Ichiro; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Kameshima, Takashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Owada, Shigeki; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Takashi; Hara, Toru; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-02-01

    Resolution in the X-ray structure determination of noncrystalline samples has been limited to several tens of nanometers, because deep X-ray irradiation required for enhanced resolution causes radiation damage to samples. However, theoretical studies predict that the femtosecond (fs) durations of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses make it possible to record scattering signals before the initiation of X-ray damage processes; thus, an ultraintense X-ray beam can be used beyond the conventional limit of radiation dose. Here, we verify this scenario by directly observing femtosecond X-ray damage processes in diamond irradiated with extraordinarily intense (∼10(19) W/cm(2)) XFEL pulses. An X-ray pump-probe diffraction scheme was developed in this study; tightly focused double-5-fs XFEL pulses with time separations ranging from sub-fs to 80 fs were used to excite (i.e., pump) the diamond and characterize (i.e., probe) the temporal changes of the crystalline structures through Bragg reflection. It was found that the pump and probe diffraction intensities remain almost constant for shorter time separations of the double pulse, whereas the probe diffraction intensities decreased after 20 fs following pump pulse irradiation due to the X-ray-induced atomic displacement. This result indicates that sub-10-fs XFEL pulses enable conductions of damageless structural determinations and supports the validity of the theoretical predictions of ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions. The X-ray pump-probe scheme demonstrated here would be effective for understanding ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions, which will greatly stimulate advanced XFEL applications, such as atomic structure determination of a single molecule and generation of exotic matters with high energy densities.

  15. Advanced X-ray diffractive optics

    OpenAIRE

    Vila-Comamala, J.; Jefimovs, K.; Pilvi, T.; Ritala, M; Sarkar, S S; Solak, H H; Guzenko, V.A.; Stampanoni, M.; Marone, F.; J. Raabe; G. Tzvetkov; Fink, R H; Grolimund, D.; Borca, C.N.; Kaulich, B

    2009-01-01

    X-ray microscopy greatly bene�ts from the advances in x-ray optics. At the Paul Scherrer Institut, developments in x-ray di�ractive optics include the manufacture and optimization of Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) and di�ractive optical elements for both soft and hard x-ray regimes. In particular, we demonstrate here a novel method for the production of ultra-high resolution FZPs. This technique is based on the deposition of a zone plate material (iridium) onto the sidewalls of a p...

  16. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  17. The Lunar X-ray Observatory (LXO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2008-01-01

    X-ray emission from charge exchange recombination between the highly ionized solar wind and neutral material i n Earth's magnetosheath has complicated x-ray observations of celestial objects with x-ray observatories including ROSAT, Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku. However, the charge-exchange emission can also be used as an important diagnostic of the solar-wind interacting with the magnetosheath. Soft x-ray observations from low-earth orbit or even the highly eccentric orbits of Chandra and XMM-Newton are likely superpositions of the celestial object of interest, the true extra-solar soft x-ray background, geospheric charge exchange, and heliospheric charge exchange. We show that with a small x-ray telescope placed either on the moon, in a similar vein as the Apollo ALSOP instruments, or at a stable orbit near L1, we can begin t o disentangle the complicated emission structure in the soft x-ray band. Here we present initial results of a feasibility study recently funded by NASA t o place a small x-ray telescope on the lunar surface. The telescope operates during lunar night to observe charge exchange interactions between the solar wind and magnetospheric neutrals, between the solar wind and the lunar atmosphere, and an unobstructed view of the soft x-ray background without the geospheric component.

  18. X-ray pulsar rush in 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, K.; Tsujimoto, K.; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Yokogawa, J.; Koyama, K. [Kyoto Univ., Faculty of Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We present recent remarkable topics about discoveries of X-ray pulsars. 1. Pulsations from two Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters: These pulsars have enormously strong magnetic field (B {approx} 10{sup 15} G), thus these are called as 'magnetar', new type of X-ray pulsars. 2. New Crab-like pulsars: These discoveries lead to suggesting universality of Crab-like pulsars. 3. An X-ray bursting millisecond pulsar: This is strong evidence for the recycle theory of generating radio millisecond pulsars. 4. X-ray pulsar rush in the SMC: This indicates the younger star formation history in the SMC. (author)

  19. Imaging with x-ray lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, L.B.; Cauble, B.; Frieders, G.; Koch, J.A.; MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Mrowka, S.; Ress, D.; Trebes, J.E.; Weiland, T.L.

    1993-11-01

    Collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35--300 {Angstrom}. These sources have high peak brightness and are now being utilized for x-ray imaging and plasma interferometry. In this paper we will describe our efforts to probe long scalelength plasmas using Moire deflectrometry and soft x-ray imaging. The progress in the development of short pulse x-ray lasers using a double pulse irradiation technique which incorporates a travelling wave pump will also be presented.

  20. X-ray Emission from Elliptical Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Sarazin, Craig L.

    1996-01-01

    Elliptical galaxies are generally luminous sources of X-ray radiation, and contain large amounts of hot, interstellar gas. In the brighter X-ray galaxies, the inferred masses of hot gas are consistent with those expected given the present rates of stellar mass loss. The required rates of heating of the gas are also roughly consistent with those expected from the motions of gas losing stars. X-ray observations, particularly X-ray spectra, require a low rate of Type Ia supernova heating and che...

  1. X-ray Observations of Planetary Nebulae

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero, M. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R A

    2003-01-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) are an exciting addition to the zoo of X-ray sources. Recent Chandra and XMM-Newton observations have detected diffuse X-ray emission from shocked fast winds in PN interiors as well as bow-shocks of fast collimated outflows impinging on the nebular envelope. Point X-ray sources associated with PN central stars are also detected, with the soft X-ray (>0.5 keV) emission from instability shocks in the fast stellar wind itself or from a low-mass companion's coronal activit...

  2. X-ray pulsars: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero, I

    2012-01-01

    Accreting X-ray pulsars are among the most luminous objects in the X-ray sky. In highly magnetized neutron stars (B~10^12 G), the flow of matter is dominated by the strong magnetic field. The general properties of accreting X-ray binaries are presented, focusing on the spectral characteristics of the systems. The use of cyclotron lines as a tool to directly measure a neutron star's magnetic field and to test the theory of accretion are discussed. We conclude with the current and future prospects for accreting X-ray binary studies.

  3. Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Fangjun

    2011-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) will be China's first astronomical satellite. On board HXMT there are three kinds of slat-collimated telescopes, the High Energy X-ray Telescope (HE, 20-250 keV, 5000 cm^2), the Medium Energy X-ray Telescope (ME, 5-30 keV, 952 cm^2), and the Low Energy X-ray Telescope (LE, 1-15 keV, 384 cm^2).

  4. X-rays from the youngest stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    1994-01-01

    The X-ray properties of classical and weak-lined T Tauri stars are briefly reviewed, emphasizing recent results from the ROSAT satellite and prospects for ASCA. The interpretation of the high level of T Tauri X-rays as enhanced solar-type magnetic activity is discussed and criticized. The census of X-ray emitters is significantly increasing estimates of galactic star formation efficiency, and X-ray emission may be important for self-regulation of star formation. ASCA images will detect star formation regions out to several kiloparsecs and will study the magnetically heated plasma around T Tauri stars. However, images will often suffer from crowding effects.

  5. Time-resolved studies at PETRA III with a highly repetitive synchronized laser system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlie, Mortiz

    2013-09-15

    Atomic and molecular processes can nowadays be directly followed in the time domain. This is a core technique for a better understanding of the involved fundamental physics, thus auguring new applications in the future as well. Usually the so-called pump-probe technique making use of two synchronized ultrashort light pulses is utilized to obtain this time-resolved data. In this work, the development and characterization of a synchronization system enabling such pump-probe studies at the storage ring PETRA III in combination with an external, then synchronized fs-laser system is described. The synchronization is based on an extended PLL approach with three interconnected feedback loops allowing to monitor short-time losses of the lock and thus prevent them. This way, the jitter between the laser PHAROS and the PETRA III reference signal is reduced to {sigma} <5 ps. Thus the system allows to conduct experiments at a repetition rate of 130 kHz with a temporal resolution limited only by the X-ray pulse length. A major emphasis in the fundamental introductory chapters is an intuitive explanation of the basic principles of phase locked loops and the different aspects of phase noise to allow a deeper understanding of the synchronization. Furthermore, first pump-probe experiments conducted at different beamlines at PETRA III are presented, demonstrating the usability of the laser system in a scientific environment as well. In first characterizing experiments the pulse duration of PETRA III X-ray pulses has been measured to be 90 ps FWHM. In particular, there have been time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments on Gaq3 and Znq2 conducted at beamline P11. First results show dynamics of the electronic excitation on the timescale of a few hundred pico seconds up to a few nano seconds and provide a basic understanding for further research on those molecules. For Gaq3 this data is analyzed in detail and compared with visible fluorescence measurements suggesting at

  6. Time-resolved studies at PETRA III with a highly repetitive synchronized laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic and molecular processes can nowadays be directly followed in the time domain. This is a core technique for a better understanding of the involved fundamental physics, thus auguring new applications in the future as well. Usually the so-called pump-probe technique making use of two synchronized ultrashort light pulses is utilized to obtain this time-resolved data. In this work, the development and characterization of a synchronization system enabling such pump-probe studies at the storage ring PETRA III in combination with an external, then synchronized fs-laser system is described. The synchronization is based on an extended PLL approach with three interconnected feedback loops allowing to monitor short-time losses of the lock and thus prevent them. This way, the jitter between the laser PHAROS and the PETRA III reference signal is reduced to σ <5 ps. Thus the system allows to conduct experiments at a repetition rate of 130 kHz with a temporal resolution limited only by the X-ray pulse length. A major emphasis in the fundamental introductory chapters is an intuitive explanation of the basic principles of phase locked loops and the different aspects of phase noise to allow a deeper understanding of the synchronization. Furthermore, first pump-probe experiments conducted at different beamlines at PETRA III are presented, demonstrating the usability of the laser system in a scientific environment as well. In first characterizing experiments the pulse duration of PETRA III X-ray pulses has been measured to be 90 ps FWHM. In particular, there have been time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments on Gaq3 and Znq2 conducted at beamline P11. First results show dynamics of the electronic excitation on the timescale of a few hundred pico seconds up to a few nano seconds and provide a basic understanding for further research on those molecules. For Gaq3 this data is analyzed in detail and compared with visible fluorescence measurements suggesting at least

  7. High temperature x-ray micro-tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowell, Alastair A.; Barnard, Harold; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.; Haboub, Abdel; Larson, Natalie; Zok, Frank; Panerai, Francesco; Mansour, Nagi N.; Bale, Hrishikesh; Gludovatz, Bernd; Acevedo, Claire; Liu, Dong; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2016-07-01

    There is increasing demand for 3D micro-scale time-resolved imaging of samples in realistic - and in many cases extreme environments. The data is used to understand material response, validate and refine computational models which, in turn, can be used to reduce development time for new materials and processes. Here we present the results of high temperature experiments carried out at the x-ray micro-tomography beamline 8.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source. The themes involve material failure and processing at temperatures up to 1750°C. The experimental configurations required to achieve the requisite conditions for imaging are described, with examples of ceramic matrix composites, spacecraft ablative heat shields and nuclear reactor core Gilsocarbon graphite.

  8. The x-ray laser coherence experiments in neon-like yttrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present recent results from neon-like x-ray laser experiments conducted at the Nova laser's Two-Beam Facility. This begins a series of experiments aimed at the characterization and control of the degree of spatial coherece in our soft x-ray laser beams, important to planned applications areas susch as microscopy and holography. New instrumentation developed for this effort include a fully time-resolved coherence diagnostic (which records a multiple-slit diffraction pattern) and wide-angle extreme ultraviolet spectrographs and beam divergence cameras. We present new measurements of beam profiles and gain, as well as spatial coherence data such as time-resolved multi-slit diffraction patterns. This new time-resolved coherence data exhibit aperture functions which increase in size during the time of the lasing. Also, some preliminary data is given from the first ''double-foil'' experiments, involving two x-ray amplifiers spatially separated by 29 cm and shot sequentially, in an ''oscillator-amplifier'' configuration

  9. Observation of iron spin-states using tabletop x-ray emission spectroscopy and microcalorimeter sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Y. I.; O'Neil, G. C.; Miaja-Avila, L.; Fowler, J. W.; Jimenez, R.; Silverman, K. L.; Swetz, D. S.; Ullom, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a powerful probe of the electronic and chemical state of elemental species embedded within complex compounds. X-ray sensors that combine high resolving power and high collecting efficiency are desirable for photon-starved XES experiments such as measurements of dilute, gaseous, and radiation-sensitive samples, time-resolved measurements, and in-laboratory XES. To assess whether arrays of cryogenic microcalorimeters will be useful in photon-starved XES scenarios, we demonstrate that these emerging energy-dispersive sensors can detect the spin-state of 3d electrons of iron in two different compounds, Fe2O3 and FeS2. The measurements were conducted with a picosecond pulsed laser-driven plasma as the exciting x-ray source. The use of this tabletop source suggests that time-resolved in-laboratory XES will be possible in the future. We also present simulations of {{K}}α and {{K}}β spectra that reveal the spin-state sensitivity of different combinations of sensor resolution and accumulated counts. These simulations predict that our current experimental apparatus can perform time-resolved XES measurements on some samples with a measurement time of a few 10 s of hours per time delay.

  10. X-ray imaging using a tunable coherent X-ray source based on parametric X-ray radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel X-ray source based on parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) has been employed for X-ray imaging at the Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application (LEBRA), Nihon University. Notable features of PXR are tunable energy, monochromaticity with spatial chirp, narrow local bandwidth and spatial coherence. Since the X-ray beam from the PXR system has a large irradiation area with uniform flux density, the PXR-based source is suited for X-ray imaging, especially for application to phase-contrast imaging. Despite the cone-like X-ray beam, diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) can be employed as a phase contrast imaging technique. DEI experiments were performed using 14- to 34-keV X-rays and the phase-gradient images were obtained. The results demonstrated the capability of PXR as an X-ray source for phase-contrast imaging with a large irradiation field attributed to the cone-beam effect. Given the significant properties of the LEBRA-PXR source, the result suggests the possible construction of a compact linac-driven PXR-Imaging instrument and its application to medical diagnoses

  11. Chemistry of Metal-organic Frameworks Monitored by Advanced X-ray Diffraction and Scattering Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaj, Matjaž; Kaučič, Venčeslav; Zabukovec Logar, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    The research on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) experienced rapid progress in recent years due to their structure diversity and wide range of application opportunities. Continuous progress of X-ray and neutron diffraction methods enables more and more detailed insight into MOF's structural features and significantly contributes to the understanding of their chemistry. Improved instrumentation and data processing in high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods enables the determination of new complex MOF crystal structures in powdered form. By the use of neutron diffraction techniques, a lot of knowledge about the interaction of guest molecules with crystalline framework has been gained in the past few years. Moreover, in-situ time-resolved studies by various diffraction and scattering techniques provided comprehensive information about crystallization kinetics, crystal growth mechanism and structural dynamics triggered by external physical or chemical stimuli. The review emphasizes most relevant advanced structural studies of MOFs based on powder X-ray and neutron scattering. PMID:27640372

  12. Chemistry of Metal-organic Frameworks Monitored by Advanced X-ray Diffraction and Scattering Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaj, Matjaž; Kaučič, Venčeslav; Zabukovec Logar, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    The research on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) experienced rapid progress in recent years due to their structure diversity and wide range of application opportunities. Continuous progress of X-ray and neutron diffraction methods enables more and more detailed insight into MOF's structural features and significantly contributes to the understanding of their chemistry. Improved instrumentation and data processing in high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods enables the determination of new complex MOF crystal structures in powdered form. By the use of neutron diffraction techniques, a lot of knowledge about the interaction of guest molecules with crystalline framework has been gained in the past few years. Moreover, in-situ time-resolved studies by various diffraction and scattering techniques provided comprehensive information about crystallization kinetics, crystal growth mechanism and structural dynamics triggered by external physical or chemical stimuli. The review emphasizes most relevant advanced structural studies of MOFs based on powder X-ray and neutron scattering.

  13. Time-resolved pulsed EPR: microwave and optical detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifunac, A.D.; Smith, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Time-resolved pulsed EPR spectrometers are described. EPR spectra, kinetic profiles, and relaxation studies are used to illustrate some capabilities of the pulsed EPR experiment. Optical detection of time-resolved EPR spectra of radical ion pairs is used to study radical-ion recombination kinetics, recombination pathways, and the structure of radical anions and cations. 17 figures.

  14. Time-resolved pulsed EPR: microwave and optical detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved pulsed EPR spectrometers are described. EPR spectra, kinetic profiles, and relaxation studies are used to illustrate some capabilities of the pulsed EPR experiment. Optical detection of time-resolved EPR spectra of radical ion pairs is used to study radical-ion recombination kinetics, recombination pathways, and the structure of radical anions and cations. 17 figures

  15. Probing photoinduced phase transition in a charge-transfer molecular crystal by 100 picosecond X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin, Laurent; Collet, Eric; Lemée-Cailleau, Marie-Hélène; Buron-Le Cointe, Marylise; Cailleau, Hervé; Plech, Anton; Wulff, Michael; Koshihara, Shin-Ya; Luty, Tadeusz

    2004-04-01

    Watching with an atomic resolution at structural changes as fast or ultra-fast photoinduced physical processes take place benefits from recent progresses in time-resolved X-ray diffraction. Molecular materials where electronic and structural changes are strongly coupled are model systems to perform such time-resolved crystallography studies. We report the structural investigation of photoinduced phase transformations between ionic and neutral states in an organic charge-transfer molecular material, using 100 picosecond (ps) synchrotron pulses. This light-induced phenomenon, triggered by an ultra-short optical pulse from a femtosecond laser, occurs by virtue of intrinsic cooperativity. Since electronic and structural changes are strongly coupled, it is of fundamental interest to perform time-resolved X-ray diffraction to obtain information at the atomic scale. We also discuss the problem of coexistence of phases and the interest of future investigations in faster timescale.

  16. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M.; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jörg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.panneels@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, OFLC/103, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-06-27

    A new batch preparation method is presented for high-density micrometre-sized crystals of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin for use in time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser using a liquid jet. Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  17. On the universal X-ray luminosity function of binary X-ray sources in galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Postnov, K. A.

    2002-01-01

    The empirically determined universal power-law shape of X-ray luminosity function of high mass X-ray binaries in galaxies is explained by fundamental mass-luminosity and mass-radius relations for massive stars.

  18. Structure and function of proteins investigated by crystallographic and spectroscopic time-resolved methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwar, Namrta

    Biomolecules play an essential role in performing the necessary functions for life. The goal of this thesis is to contribute to an understanding of how biological systems work on the molecular level. We used two biological systems, beef liver catalase (BLC) and photoactive yellow protein (PYP). BLC is a metalloprotein that protects living cells from the harmful effects of reactive oxygen species by converting H2O2 into water and oxygen. By binding nitric oxide (NO) to the catalase, a complex was generated that mimics the Cat-H2O2 adduct, a crucial intermediate in the reaction promoted by the catalase. The Cat-NO complex is obtained by using a convenient NO generator (1-(N,N-diethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate). Concentrations up to 100˜200 mM are reached by using a specially designed glass cavity. With this glass apparatus and DEANO, sufficient NO occupation is achieved and structure determination of the catalase with NO bound to the heme iron becomes possible. Structural changes upon NO binding are minute. NO has a slightly bent geometry with respect to the heme normal, which results in a substantial overlap of the NO orbitals with the iron-porphyrin molecular orbitals. From the structure of the iron-NO complex, conclusions on the electronic properties of the heme iron can be drawn that ultimately lead to an insight into the catalytic properties of this enzyme. Enzyme kinetics is affected by additional parameters such as temperature and pH. Additionally, in crystallography, the absorbed X-ray dose may impair protein function. To address the effect of these parameters, we performed time-resolved crystallographic experiments on a model system, PYP. By collecting multiple time-series on PYP at increasing X-ray dose levels, we determined a kinetic dose limit up to which kinetically meaningful X-ray data sets can be collected. From this, we conclude that comprehensive time-series spanning up to 12 orders of magnitude in time can be collected from a single PYP

  19. Enzyme transient state kinetics in crystal and solution from the perspective of a time-resolved crystallographer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Schmidt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available With recent technological advances at synchrotrons [Graber et al., J. Synchrotron Radiat. 18, 658–670 (2011], it is feasible to rapidly collect time-resolved crystallographic data at multiple temperature settings [Schmidt et al., Acta Crystallogr. D 69, 2534–2542 (2013], from which barriers of activation can be extracted. With the advent of fourth generation X-ray sources, new opportunities emerge to investigate structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules in real time [M. Schmidt, Adv. Condens. Matter Phys. 2013, 1–10] in crystals and potentially from single molecules in random orientation in solution [Poon et al., Adv. Condens. Matter Phys. 2013, 750371]. Kinetic data from time-resolved experiments on short time-scales must be interpreted in terms of chemical kinetics [Steinfeld et al., Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics, 2nd ed. (Prentience Hall, 1985] and tied to existing time-resolved experiments on longer time-scales [Schmidt et al., Acta Crystallogr. D 69, 2534–2542 (2013; Jung et al., Nat. Chem. 5, 212–220 (2013]. With this article, we will review and outline steps that are required to routinely determine the energetics of reactions in biomolecules in crystal and solution with newest X-ray sources. In eight sections, we aim to describe concepts and experimental details that may help to inspire new approaches to collect and interpret these data.

  20. SN X-ray Progenitor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Identifying stars that explode, right before they explode, is a tricky proposition since the end of starlife comes swiftly: in thermonuclear deflagrations, in nuclear exhaustion, or maybe in a rapid swirling merger of two dead stellar cores. On the right in the image above is an image of the galaxy NGC 1404 taken by the UV/optical Telescope (UVOT) on the Swift observatory. The circle surrounds SN 2007on, a supernova of Type Ia produced by the explosion of a white dwarf star in a binary system. These types of supernovae are important since they are believed to be 'standard candles', events which have the same intrinsic brightness which can serve as an important yardstick to measure cosmic distances. On the left is an image of the same galaxy taken by the Chandra X-ray observatory four years before the supernova. Conspicuous in the SN source circle is a bright source in the Chandra image, believed to be emission from a compact object+normal star companion: a similar system to the supposed precursor of SN 2007on. If true this would be the first time a Type Ia supernova precursor has ever been seen. But astronomers are still debating whether the Chandra source really is the precursor or not; it seems there's a slight but significant difference in the location of the Chandra source and the supernova. Stay tuned for more developments.