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Sample records for 1-year repeat mri

  1. Are early MRI findings correlated with long-lasting symptoms following whiplash injury? A prospective trial with 1-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Sorensen, Joan; Andersen, Hans

    2008-01-01

    prospectively followed cohorts are needed to identify possible clinically relevant MRI findings. The objective of this trial was to evaluate (1) the predictive value of cervical MRI after whiplash injuries and (2) the value of repeating MRI examinations after 3 months including sequences with flexion...... and extension of the cervical spine. Participants were included after rear-end or frontal car collisions. Patients with fractures or dislocations diagnosed by standard procedures at the emergency unit were not included. MRI scans of the cervical spine were performed at baseline and repeated after 3 months....... Clinical follow-ups were performed after 3 and 12 months. Outcome parameters were neck pain, headache, neck disability and working ability. A total of 178 participants had a cervical MRI scan on average 13 days after the injury. Traumatic findings were observed in seven participants. Signs of disc...

  2. Repeated quantitative perfusion and contrast permeability measurement in the MRI examination of a CNS tumor

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    Vonken, E.P.A.; Osch, M.J.P. van; Willems, P.W.A.; Zwan, A. van der; Bakker, C.J.G.; Viergever, M.A.; Mali, W.P.T.M. [University Hospital Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2000-09-01

    This study reports on the results of quantitative MRI perfusion and contrast permeability measurement on two occasions in one patient. The measurements were separated 81 days in time. The tumor grew considerably in this period, but no change was found with respect to perfusion and contrast permeability. Non-involved white matter values were reproduced to demonstrate repeatability. The presented approach to dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI allows fast and repeatable quantitative assessment of perfusion and is easily integrated in a conventional brain tumor protocol. (orig.)

  3. Repeated dexamphetamine treatment alters the dopaminergic system and increases the phMRI response to methylphenidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrantee, Anouk; Tremoleda, Jordi L.; Wylezinska-Arridge, Marzena; Bouet, Valentine; Hesseling, Peter; Meerhoff, Gideon F.; de Bruin, Kora M.; Koeleman, Jan; Freret, Thomas; Boulouard, Michel; Desfosses, Emilie; Galineau, Laurent; Gozzi, Alessandro; Dauphin, François; Gsell, Willy; Booij, Jan; Lucassen, Paul J.; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2017-01-01

    Dexamphetamine (AMPH) is a psychostimulant drug that is used both recreationally and as medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that repeated exposure to AMPH can induce damage to nerve terminals of dopamine (DA) neurons. We here assessed the underlying neurobiological changes in the DA system following repeated AMPH exposure and pre-treated rats with AMPH or saline (4 times 5 mg/kg s.c., 2 hours apart), followed by a 1-week washout period. We then used pharmacological MRI (phMRI) with a methylphenidate (MPH) challenge, as a sensitive and non-invasive in-vivo measure of DAergic function. We subsequently validated the DA-ergic changes post-mortem, using a.o. high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and autoradiography. In the AMPH pre-treated group, we observed a significantly larger BOLD response to the MPH challenge, particularly in DA-ergic brain areas and their downstream projections. Subsequent autoradiography studies showed that AMPH pre-treatment significantly reduced DA transporter (DAT) density in the caudate-putamen (CPu) and nucleus accumbens, whereas HPLC analysis revealed increases in the DA metabolite homovanillic acid in the CPu. Our results suggest that AMPH pre-treatment alters DAergic responsivity, a change that can be detected with phMRI in rats. These phMRI changes likely reflect increased DA release together with reduced DAT binding. The ability to assess subtle synaptic changes using phMRI is promising for both preclinical studies of drug discovery, and for clinical studies where phMRI can be a useful tool to non-invasively investigate DA abnormalities, e.g. in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:28241065

  4. Repeatability of cardiac-MRI-measured right ventricular size and function in congenital heart disease

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    Walsh, Rowan; Salem, Yishay [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Shah, Amee; Lai, Wyman W. [Morgan Stanley Children' s Hospital of New York Presbyterian, New York, NY (United States); Nielsen, James C. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai Children' s Heart Center, Box 1201, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The measurement error for right ventricular (RV) size and function assessed by cardiac MRI (CMRI) in congenital heart disease has not been fully characterized. As CMRI parameters are being increasingly utilized to make clinical decisions, defining error in the clinical setting is critical. This investigation examines the repeatability of CMRI for RV size and function. Forty consecutive people with congenital heart disease involving the RV were retrospectively identified. Contouring of RV volumes was performed by two expert CMRI clinicians. The coefficient of variability and repeatability coefficients were calculated. Repeatability coefficients were multiplied by the mean value for each group studied to define a threshold beyond which measurement error was unlikely to be responsible. The variability for indexed RV end-diastolic volume = 3.2% and 3.3% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, respectively. The repeatability coefficients were 13.2% and 14.9% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, which yielded threshold values of 15.1 ml/m{sup 2} and 20.2 ml/m{sup 2}, respectively. For RV ejection fraction (EF), the repeatability coefficients for intra- and interobserver comparisons were 5.0% and 6.0%, which resulted in threshold values of 2.6 EF% and 3.0 EF%. The threshold values generated can be used during serial assessment of RV size and function. (orig.)

  5. Medical students who decompress during the M-1 year outperform those who fail and repeat it: A study of M-1 students at the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Urbana-Champaign 1988–2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freund Gregory G

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All medical schools must counsel poor-performing students, address their problems and assist them in developing into competent physicians. The objective of this study was to determine whether students with academic deficiencies in their M-1 year graduate more often, spend less time to complete the curriculum, and need fewer attempts at passing USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 by entering the Decompressed Program prior to failure of the M-1 year than those students who fail the M-1 year and then repeat it. Method The authors reviewed the performance of M-1 students in the Decompressed Program and compared their outcomes to M-1 students who failed and fully repeated the M-1 year. To compare the groups upon admission, t-Tests comparing the Cognitive Index of students and MCAT scores from both groups were performed. Performance of the two groups after matriculation was also analyzed. Results Decompressed students were 2.1 times more likely to graduate. Decompressed students were 2.5 times more likely to pass USMLE Step 1 on the first attempt than the repeat students. In addition, 46% of those in the decompressed group completed the program in five years compared to 18% of the repeat group. Conclusion Medical students who decompress their M-1 year prior to M-1 year failure outperform those who fail their first year and then repeat it. These findings indicate the need for careful monitoring of M-1 student performance and early intervention and counseling of struggling students.

  6. Evaluation of T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in localizing prostate cancer before repeat biopsy

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    Cheikh, Alexandre Ben; Girouin, Nicolas [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France)]|[Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France)]|[Universite de Lyon 1, faculte de medecine Lyon Nord, Lyon (France); Colombel, Marc; Marechal, Jean-Marie [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urology, Lyon (France); Gelet, Albert [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urology, Lyon (France)]|[Inserm, U556, Lyon (France); Bissery, Alvine; Rabilloud, Muriel [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Biostatistics, Lyon (France)]|[Universite de Lyon 1, UMR CNRS 5558, Laboratoire Biostatistiques-Sante, Pierre-Benite (France); Lyonnet, Denis [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France)]|[Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France)]|[Universite de Lyon 1, faculte de medecine Lyon Nord, Lyon (France)]|[Inserm, U556, Lyon (France); Rouviere, Olivier [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France)]|[Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France)]|[Universite de Lyon 1, faculte de medecine Lyon Nord, Lyon (France)]|[Inserm, U556, Lyon (France)]|[Hopital Edouard Herriot, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Pavillon P Radio, Lyon Cedex 03 (France)

    2009-03-15

    We assessed the accuracy of T2-weighted (T2w) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in localizing prostate cancer before transrectal ultrasound-guided repeat biopsy. Ninety-three patients with abnormal PSA level and negative prostate biopsy underwent T2w and DCE prostate MRI using pelvic coil before repeat biopsy. T2w and DCE images were interpreted using visual criteria only. MR results were correlated with repeat biopsy findings in ten prostate sectors. Repeat biopsy found prostate cancer in 23 patients (24.7%) and 44 sectors (6.6%). At per patient analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 47.8%, 44.3%, 20.4% and 79.5% for T2w imaging and 82.6%, 20%, 24.4% and 93.3% for DCE imaging. When all suspicious areas (on T2w or DCE imaging) were taken into account, a sensitivity of 82.6% and a negative predictive value of 100% could be achieved. At per sector analysis, DCE imaging was significantly less specific (83.5% vs. 89.7%, p < 0.002) than T2w imaging; it was more sensitive (52.4% vs. 32.1%), but the difference was hardly significant (p = 0.09). T2w and DCE MRI using pelvic coil and visual diagnostic criteria can guide prostate repeat biopsy, with a good sensitivity and NPV. (orig.)

  7. Accuracy of 3 Tesla pelvic phased-array multiparametric MRI in diagnosing prostate cancer at repeat biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Pepe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Multiparametric pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI accuracy in prostate cancer (PCa diagnosis was evaluated. Materials and Methods. From June 2011 to December 2013, 168 patients (median 65 years with negative digital rectal examination underwent repeat transperineal saturation biopsy (SPBx; median 28 cores for persistently high or increasing PSA values, PSA >10 ng/ml or PSA values between 4.1-10 o r 2.6-4 ng/ml with free/total PSA < 25% and < 20%, respectively. All patients underwent mpMRI using a 3.0 Tesla scanner equipped with surface 16 channels phased-array coil and lesions suspicious for PCa were submitted to additional targeted biopsies. Results. A T1c PCa was found in 66 (39% cases; SPBx and mpMRI-suspicious targeted biopsy diagnosed 60 (91% and 52 (78.8% cancers missing 6 (all of the anterior zone and 14 cancers (12 and 2 of the lateral margins and anterior zone, respectively; in detail, mpMRI missed 12 (18.1% PCa charaterized by microfocal (1 positive core with greatest percentage of cancer and Gleason score equal to 5% and 6, respectively disease at risk for insignificant cancer. The diameter of the suspicious mpMRI lesion was directly correlated to the diagnosis of PCa with poor Gleason score (p < 0.05; detection rate of cancer for each suspicious mpMRI core was 35.3%. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of mpMRI in diagnosing PCa was 75.7%, 82.5%, 71.8%, 78.9%, 87.9%, respectively. Conclusion. Multiparametric pMRI improved SPBx accuracy in diagnosing significant anterior PCa; the diameter of mpMRI suspicious lesion resulted significantly predictive of aggressive cancers.

  8. Repeated diffusion MRI reveals earliest time point for stratification of radiotherapy response in brain metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Faisal; Johannesen, Helle H.; Geertsen, Poul; Hansen, Rasmus H.

    2017-04-01

    An imaging biomarker for early prediction of treatment response potentially provides a non-invasive tool for better prognostics and individualized management of the disease. Radiotherapy (RT) response is generally related to changes in gross tumor volume manifesting months later. In this prospective study we investigated the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), perfusion fraction and pseudo diffusion coefficient derived from diffusion weighted MRI as potential early biomarkers for radiotherapy response of brain metastases. It was a particular aim to assess the optimal time point for acquiring the DW-MRI scan during the course of treatment, since to our knowledge this important question has not been addressed directly in previous studies. Twenty-nine metastases (N  =  29) from twenty-one patients, treated with whole-brain fractionated external beam RT were analyzed. Patients were scanned with a 1 T MRI system to acquire DW-, T2*W-, T2W- and T1W scans, before start of RT, at each fraction and at follow up two to three months after RT. The DW-MRI parameters were derived using regions of interest based on high b-value images (b  =  800 s mm‑2). Both volumetric and RECIST criteria were applied for response evaluation. It was found that in non-responding metastases the mean ADC decreased and in responding metastases it increased. The volume based response proved to be far more consistently predictable by the ADC change found at fraction number 7 and later, compared to the linear response (RECIST). The perfusion fraction and pseudo diffusion coefficient did not show sufficient prognostic value with either response assessment criteria. In conclusion this study shows that the ADC derived using high b-values may be a reliable biomarker for early assessment of radiotherapy response for brain metastases patients. The earliest response stratification can be achieved using two DW-MRI scans, one pre-treatment and one at treatment day 7–9 (equivalent to 21

  9. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI does not use ionizing radiation. No side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves have been reported. The most common type of contrast (dye) used is gadolinium. It is very safe. Allergic reactions rarely ...

  10. Cognitive control mechanisms revealed by ERP and fMRI: evidence from repeated task-switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swainson, R; Cunnington, R; Jackson, G M; Rorden, C; Peters, A M; Morris, P G; Jackson, S R

    2003-08-15

    We investigated the extent to which a common neural mechanism is involved in task set-switching and response withholding, factors that are frequently confounded in task-switching and go/no-go paradigms. Subjects' brain activity was measured using event-related electrical potentials (ERPs) and event-related functional MRI (fMRI) neuroimaging in separate studies using the same cognitive paradigm. Subjects made compatible left/right keypress responses to left/right arrow stimuli of 1000 msec duration; they switched every two trials between responding at stimulus onset (GO task-green arrows) and stimulus offset (WAIT task-red arrows). With-holding an immediate response (WAIT vs. GO) elicited an enhancement of the frontal N2 ERP and lateral PFC activation of the right hemisphere, both previously associated with the "no-go" response, but only on switch trials. Task-switching (switch vs. nonswitch) was associated with frontal N2 amplification and right hemisphere ventrolateral PFC activation, but only for the WAIT task. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) was the only brain region to be activated for both types of task switch, but this activation was located more rostrally for the WAIT than for the GO switch trials. We conclude that the frontal N2 ERP and lateral PFC activation are not markers for withholding an immediate response or switching tasks per se, but are associated with switching into a response-suppression mode. Different regions within the ACC may be involved in two processes integral to task-switching: processing response conflict (rostral ACC) and overcoming prior response suppression (caudal ACC).

  11. Effects of repeatability measures on results of fMRI sICA: a study on simulated and real resting-state effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remes, Jukka J; Starck, Tuomo; Nikkinen, Juha; Ollila, Esa; Beckmann, Christian F; Tervonen, Osmo; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Silven, Olli

    2011-05-15

    Spatial independent components analysis (sICA) has become a widely applied data-driven method for fMRI data, especially for resting-state studies. These sICA approaches are often based on iterative estimation algorithms and there are concerns about accuracy due to noise. Repeatability measures such as ICASSO, RAICAR and ARABICA have been introduced as remedies but information on their effects on estimates is limited. The contribution of this study was to provide more of such information and test if the repeatability analyses are necessary. We compared FastICA-based ordinary and repeatability approaches concerning mixing vector estimates. Comparisons included original FastICA, FSL4 Melodic FastICA and original and modified ICASSO. The effects of bootstrapping and convergence threshold were evaluated. The results show that there is only moderate improvement due to repeatability measures and only in the bootstrapping case. Bootstrapping attenuated power from time courses of resting-state network related ICs at frequencies higher than 0.1 Hz and made subsets of low frequency oscillations more emphasized IC-wise. The convergence threshold did not have a significant role concerning the accuracy of estimates. The performance results suggest that repeatability measures or strict converge criteria might not be needed in sICA analyses of fMRI data. Consequently, the results in existing sICA fMRI literature are probably valid in this sense. A decreased accuracy of original bootstrapping ICASSO was observed and corrected by using centrotype mixing estimates but the results warrant for thorough evaluations of data-driven methods in general. Also, given the fMRI-specific considerations, further development of sICA methods is strongly encouraged.

  12. Radiotherapy for spinal metastases from breast cancer with emphasis on local disease control and pain response using repeated MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta D. Switlyk

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: RT provided excellent local tumor control in patients with SM. Most patients benefit from RT even in cases of progressive vertebral fracture. Pain response was not associated with imaging findings and MRI cannot be used to select patients at risk of not responding to RT.

  13. TU-C-12A-05: Repeatability Study of Reduced Field-Of-View Diffusion-Weighted MRI On Human Thyroid Gland

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    Shukla-Dave, A; Lu, Y; Hatzoglou, V; Stambuk, H; Mazaheri, Y [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Banerjee, S; Shankaranarayanan, A [GE Healthcare, Menlo Park, California (United States); Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the repeatability of reduced field-of-view diffusion-weighted imaging (rFOV DWI) in quantifying apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) for human thyroid glands in a clinical setting. Methods: Nine healthy human volunteers were enrolled and underwent 3T MRI exams. For each volunteer, 3 longitudinal exams (2 weeks apart) with 2 repetitive sessions within each exam, including rFOV and conventional full field-of-view (fFOV) DWI scans, were performed. In the acquired DWI images, a fixed-size region of interest (ROI; diameter=8mm) was placed on thyroid glands to calculate ADC. ADC was calculated using a monoexponential function with a noise correction scheme. The repeatability of ADC was assessed by using coefficient variation (CV) across sessions or exams, which was defined to be: r = 1-CV, 0 < r < 1, where CV=STD/m, STD is the standard deviation of ADC, and m is the average of ADC across sessions or exams. An experienced radiologist assessed and scored rFOV and fFOV DW images based on image characteristics (1, nondiagnostic; 2, poor; 3, satisfactory; 4, good; and 5, excellent).Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to compare ADC values, CV of ADC, repeatability of ADC across sessions and exams, and radiologic scores between rFOV and fFOV DWI techniques. Results: There was no significant difference in ADC values across sessions and exams either in rFOV or fFOV DWI. The average CVs of both rFOV and fFOV DWI were less than 13%. The repeatability of ADC measurement between rFOV and fFOV DWI was not significantly different. The overall image quality was significantly higher with rFOV DWI than with fFOV DWI. Conclusion: This study suggested that ADCs from both rFOV and fFOV DWI were repeatable, but rFOV DWI had superior imaging quality for human thyroid glands in a clinical setting.

  14. Language Development: 1 Year Olds

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    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Language Development: 1 Year Olds Page Content Article Body ... assured, it’s not your imagination. He’s developing his language and comprehension skills right on schedule. This giant ...

  15. Choking - adult or child over 1 year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdominal thrusts - adult or child over 1 year; Heimlich maneuver - adult or child over 1 year: Choking - back ... back blows, or both. To perform abdominal thrusts (Heimlich maneuver): Stand behind the person and wrap your arms ...

  16. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  17. Striatal and extrastriatal atrophy in Huntington's disease and its relationship with length of the CAG repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruocco, H H; Lopes-Cendes, I; Li, L M; Santos-Silva, M; Cendes, F

    2006-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder that affects the striatum most severely. However, except for juvenile forms, relative preservation of the cerebellum has been reported. The objective of the present study was to perform MRI measurements of caudate, putamen, cerebral, and cerebellar volumes and correlate these findings with the length of the CAG repeat and clinical parameters. We evaluated 50 consecutive patients with HD using MRI volumetric measurements and compared them to normal controls. Age at onset of the disease ranged from 4 to 73 years (mean: 43.1 years). The length of the CAG repeat ranged from 40 to 69 (mean: 47.2 CAG). HD patients presented marked atrophy of the caudate and putamen, as well as reduced cerebellar and cerebral volumes. There was a significant correlation between age at onset of HD and length of the CAG repeat, as well as clinical disability and age at onset. The degree of basal ganglia atrophy correlated with the length of the CAG repeat. There was no correlation between cerebellar or cerebral volume and length of the CAG repeat. However, there was a tendency to a positive correlation between duration of disease and cerebellar atrophy. While there was a negative correlation of length of the CAG repeat with age at disease onset and with striatal degeneration, its influence on extrastriatal atrophy, including the cerebellum, was not clear. Extrastriatal atrophy occurs later in HD and may be related to disease duration.

  18. Striatal and extrastriatal atrophy in Huntington's disease and its relationship with length of the CAG repeat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.H. Ruocco

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder that affects the striatum most severely. However, except for juvenile forms, relative preservation of the cerebellum has been reported. The objective of the present study was to perform MRI measurements of caudate, putamen, cerebral, and cerebellar volumes and correlate these findings with the length of the CAG repeat and clinical parameters. We evaluated 50 consecutive patients with HD using MRI volumetric measurements and compared them to normal controls. Age at onset of the disease ranged from 4 to 73 years (mean: 43.1 years. The length of the CAG repeat ranged from 40 to 69 (mean: 47.2 CAG. HD patients presented marked atrophy of the caudate and putamen, as well as reduced cerebellar and cerebral volumes. There was a significant correlation between age at onset of HD and length of the CAG repeat, as well as clinical disability and age at onset. The degree of basal ganglia atrophy correlated with the length of the CAG repeat. There was no correlation between cerebellar or cerebral volume and length of the CAG repeat. However, there was a tendency to a positive correlation between duration of disease and cerebellar atrophy. While there was a negative correlation of length of the CAG repeat with age at disease onset and with striatal degeneration, its influence on extrastriatal atrophy, including the cerebellum, was not clear. Extrastriatal atrophy occurs later in HD and may be related to disease duration.

  19. MRI and low back pain

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    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  20. Your Child's Development: 1 Year (12 Months)

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    ... Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Your Child's Checkup: 1 Year (12 Months) Your Baby's Growth: 12 Months Your Baby's Hearing, Vision, and Other Senses: 12 Months Sleep and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Growth ...

  1. MRI Scans

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    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from ...

  2. Shoulder MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  3. Effects of repeated exposure to high static magnetic fields during NMR imaging on the end point of reproduction and development in the animal model; Auswirkungen wiederholter Exposition mit starken statischen Magnetfeldern des MRI auf die Endpunkte Fortpflanzung und Entwicklung im Tiermodell

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    Winterhager, E.; Gruemmer, R.; Ladd, M.E.

    2011-12-15

    In the present study, the effects of repeated exposure to strong static magnetic fields up to a flux density of 7 Tesla on spermatogenesis in adult male mice as well as on pregnancy and embryogenesis in female mice were studied. In addition, the fertility of male and female mice which were exposed daily to these static magnetic fields throughout their entire embryonic development in utero was investigated. Six experimental groups were examined: (1) cage controls, (2) sham-exposed controls, (3) exposure at the bore entrance and (4) in the isocenter of a 1.5T MRI, (5) exposure at the bore entrance and (6) in the isocenter of a 7T MRI. Overall, 895 adult mice, 944 offspring, and 2007 embryos were analyzed in this study.

  4. Liver transplantation before 1 year of age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, Carlos O.; Koneru, Baburao; Karrer, Frederick; Todo, Satoru; Iwatsuki, Shunzaburo; Gordon, Robert D.; Makowka, Leonard; Marsh, Wallis J.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Since 1981, 20 infants younger than 1 year of age received 26 orthotopic liver transplants. Immunosuppression was with cyclosporine and corticosteroids. Thirteen (65%) of the recipients were discharged from the hospital. To date, 12 (60%) of the 20 recipients are surviving, with follow-up of 1 to 56 months (average 14 months). The 5-year actuarial survival is 53.8%. The allograft liver function in the majority of surviving infants is excellent. The predominant causes of mortality were primary nonfunction of the allograft (three patients) and sepsis (three). Major morbidity was caused by hepatic artery thrombosis (five patients), gastrointestinal complications (six), biliary tract complications (five), and bacterial and viral infections (13). Six patients underwent retransplantation; three of these six survived. Results could be improved by prevention of hepatic artery thrombosis, by decreasing the incidence of sepsis, and by procurement of more and better suited pediatric donors. PMID:3550022

  5. Management of tongue and lip laceration due to dystonia in a 1-year-old infant

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    J P Beena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the management of tongue and lip lacerations due to dystonia in a 1-year-old infant. A splint was given to raise the bite and prevent repeated trauma and aid in healing of the oral tissue. This paper highlights the importance of pediatric dentist's role in improving quality of patient care in an intensive care unit.

  6. MRI-Based Classification Models in Prediction of Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia in Late-Life Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Aleksandra K.; Westman, Eric; Borza, Tom; Beyer, Mona K.; Engedal, Knut; Aarsland, Dag; Selbaek, Geir; Haberg, Asta K.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Late-life depression (LLD) is associated with development of different types of dementia. Identification of LLD patients, who will develop cognitive decline, i.e., the early stage of dementia would help to implement interventions earlier. The purpose of this study was to assess whether structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in LLD patients can predict mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia 1 year prior to the diagnosis. Methods: LLD patients underwent brain MRI at baseline and repeated clinical assessment after 1-year. Structural brain measurements were obtained using Freesurfer software (v. 5.1) from the T1W brain MRI images. MRI-based Random Forest classifier was used to discriminate between LLD who developed MCI or dementia after 1-year follow-up and cognitively stable LLD. Additionally, a previously established Random Forest model trained on 185 patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) vs. 225 cognitively normal elderly from the Alzheimer’s disease Neuroimaging Initiative was tested on the LLD data set (ADNI model). Results: MCI and dementia diagnoses were predicted in LLD patients with 76%/68%/84% accuracy/sensitivity/specificity. Adding the baseline Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores to the models improved accuracy/sensitivity/specificity to 81%/75%/86%. The best model predicted MCI status alone using MRI and baseline MMSE scores with accuracy/sensitivity/specificity of 89%/85%/90%. The most important region for all the models was right ventral diencephalon, including hypothalamus. Its volume correlated negatively with the number of depressive episodes. ADNI model trained on AD vs. Controls using SV could predict MCI-DEM patients with 67% accuracy. Conclusion: LDD patients developing MCI and dementia can be discriminated from LLD patients remaining cognitively stable with good accuracy based on baseline structural MRI alone. Baseline MMSE score improves prediction accuracy. Ventral diencephalon, including the hypothalamus

  7. MRI of the Prostate

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    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Prostate Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate ... limitations of MRI of the Prostate? What is MRI of the Prostate? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  8. MRI zoo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard....... MRI was done using a Philips Achieva 1.5 T system and CT was performed using a Siemens Somatom system. Axial and sagittal slices were acquired using standard T1w and T2w MRI sequences, and visualization was made using the Mistar software (Apollo Imaging Technology, Melbourne, Australia). Images were...

  9. Pediatric MRI

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    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  10. Knee MRI

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    ... air-conditioned and well-lit. Some scanners have music to help you pass the time. When the ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  11. Portable MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  12. MRI Artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abed Al Nasser Assi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available   "nMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI has become more and more frequently used in medical imaging diagnostic in recent years. Radiologists and technicians working at these systems are relatively often confronted with image artifacts related to the radiowave with strong magnetic in the scanner. Many artifacts may be corrected or modulated through an understanding of their cause. This requires familiarity with scanner design; theory of operation; and image acquisition. The purpose of this review article is to present the most relevant artifacts that arise in MRI scanner, to provide some physical background on the formation of artifacts, and to suggest strategies to reduce or avoid these artifacts. The most frequent artifacts that can occur during MRI scanning are Motion related artifacts; Para-magnetic artifacts; Phase Wrap artifacts; Frequency artifacts; Susceptibility artifacts; Clipping artefact; Chemical Shift artifact and "Zebra" artefact .    "n  

  13. Breast MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI - breast; Magnetic resonance imaging - breast; Breast cancer - MRI; Breast cancer screening - MRI ... radiologist) see some areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  14. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z MRI Safety During Pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Illness ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor ...

  15. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  16. Diagnosis of Chiari III malformation by second trimester fetal MRI with postnatal MRI and CT correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Alice B.; Glenn, Orit A. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Gupta, Nalin [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Neurosurgery, San Francisco, CA (United States); Otto, Carl [California Pacific Medical Center, Department of Perinatology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2007-10-15

    We report a case of Chiari III malformation diagnosed by fetal MRI. Ultrasound (US) performed at a gestational age of 18 weeks demonstrated a posterior skull base cyst. Repeat US at 19 weeks demonstrated neural tissue in the cyst, consistent with an encephalocele. MR imaging at 23 weeks confirmed the presence of an occipital encephalocele, demonstrated additional bony defect in the upper cervical spine, and identified abnormal morphology and position of the brainstem consistent with the diagnosis of Chiari III. Postnatal MRI and CT confirmed the fetal MRI findings and demonstrate the utility of fetal MRI in the early evaluation of songraphically detected posterior fossa abnormalities. (orig.)

  17. MRI and pathology in persistent postherniotomy pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Jensen, Karl-Erik; Fiirgaard, Bente

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persistent postherniotomy pain impairs everyday life in 5% to 10% of patients. MRI can potentially be useful in the investigation of pathogenic mechanisms and guide surgeons in mesh removal and neurectomy. No study has investigated interobserver agreement or MRI-specific findings...... in persistent postherniotomy pain. STUDY DESIGN: Thirty-two patients with persistent postherniotomy pain > 1 year after uni- or bilateral groin hernia repair and 6 pain-free postherniotomy controls were MRI scanned, resulting in a total of 32 painful groins, 15 pain-free operated groins, and 29 pain......-free unoperated groins scanned. Two blinded observers separately assessed groins using a predefined list of possible MRI pathology and anatomic landmarks. Primary outcomes included interobserver agreement assessed by calculating kappa-coefficients. Secondary outcomes included frequency of MRI pathology in painful...

  18. Battlefield MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  19. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved.

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the chest ... limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  1. Knee MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI - knee ... radiologist see certain areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ... less anxious. Your provider may suggest an "open" MRI, in which the machine is not as close ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the chest is performed ...

  3. Repeat-until-success quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Barlow, Thomas M.; Razavi, Mohsen; Beige, Almut

    2014-09-01

    We propose a repeat-until-success protocol to improve the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters. Conventionally, these rely on passive static linear-optics elements and photodetectors to perform Bell-state measurements (BSMs) with a maximum success rate of 50%. This is a strong impediment for entanglement swapping between distant quantum memories. Every time a BSM fails, entanglement needs to be redistributed between the corresponding memories in the repeater link. The key ingredients of our scheme are repeatable BSMs. Under ideal conditions, these turn probabilistic quantum repeaters into deterministic ones. Under realistic conditions, our protocol too might fail. However, using additional threshold detectors now allows us to improve the entanglement generation rate by almost orders of magnitude, at a nominal distance of 1000 km, compared to schemes that rely on conventional BSMs. This improvement is sufficient to make the performance of our scheme comparable to the expected performance of some deterministic quantum repeaters.

  4. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does it ... and MRI Breast-feeding and MRI What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, ...

  6. The Safe Dates program: 1-year follow-up results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foshee, V A; Bauman, K E; Greene, W F; Koch, G G; Linder, G F; MacDougall, J E

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: An earlier report described desirable 1-month follow-up effects of the Safe Dates program on psychological, physical, and sexual dating violence. Mediators of the program-behavior relationship also were identified. The present report describes the 1-year follow-up effects of the Safe Dates program. METHODS: Fourteen schools were in the randomized experiment. Data were gathered by questionnaires in schools before program activities and 1 year after the program ended. RESULTS: The short-term behavioral effects had disappeared at 1 year, but effects on mediating variables such as dating violence norms, conflict management skills, and awareness of community services for dating violence were maintained. CONCLUSIONS: The findings are considered in the context of why program effects might have decayed and the possible role of boosters for effect maintenance. PMID:11029999

  7. MRI of car occupants with whiplash injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyvodic, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, SA (Australia); Dolinis, J. [National Injury Surveillance Unit, Bedford Park, SA (Australia)]|[National Health and Medical Research Council Road Accident Research Unit, Univ. of Adelaide, SA (Australia); Moore, V.M. [National Health and Medical Research Council Road Accident Research Unit, Univ. of Adelaide, SA (Australia); Ryan, G.A. [National Health and Medical Research Council Road Accident Research Unit, Univ. of Adelaide, SA (Australia); Slavotinek, J.P. [Dept. of Radiology, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, SA (Australia); Whyte, A.M. [Ashford Hospital Specialist Centre, SA (Australia); Hoile, R.D. [Ashford Hospital Specialist Centre, SA (Australia); Taylor, G.W. [National Health and Medical Research Council Road Accident Research Unit, Univ. of Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose was to document and investigate the prognostic significance of features seen on MRI of patients with whiplash injury following relatively minor road traffic crashes. MRI was obtained shortly and at 6 months after the crash using a 0.5 T imager. The images were assessed independently by two radiologists for evidence of fracture or other injury; loss of lordosis and spondylosis were also recorded. Clinical examinations were used to assess the status of patients initially and at 6 months. The results of the independent MRI and clinical investigations were then examined for association using statistical tests. Initial MRI was performed on 29 patients, of whom 19 had repeat studies at 6 months; 48 examinations were thus examined. Apart from spondylosis and loss of lordosis, only one abnormality was detected: an intramedullary lesion consistent with a small cyst or syrinx. There were no statistically significant associations between the outcome of injury and spondylosis or loss of lordosis. No significant changes were found when comparing the initial and follow-up MRI. It appears that MRI of patients with relatively less severe whiplash symptoms reveals a low frequency of abnormalities, apart from spondylosis and loss of lordosis, which have little short-term prognostic value. Routine investigation of such patients with MRI is not justified in view of the infrequency of abnormalities detected, the lack of prognostic value and the high cost of the procedure. (orig.). With 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Limiting factors of exercise performance 1 year after lung transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinsma, G. D.; ten Hacken, N. H. T.; Grevink, R. G.; van der Bij, W.; Koer, G. H.; van Weert, E.

    2006-01-01

    Background: After lung transplantation (LTx). exercise capacity frequently remains limited, despite significantly improved pulmonary function. The aim of this study was to evaluate maximal exercise capacity and peripheral muscle force before and 1 year after LTx, and to determine whether peripheral

  9. Optic neuritis in Hong Kong: a 1-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Patrick P K; Yau, Gordon S K; Lee, Jacky W Y; Wong, Winnie W Y; Tam, Victor T Y; Chan, Eric Y T; Tse, Doris M W; Yuen, Can Y F

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the etiology and prevalence of optic neuritis in a Chinese population. This was a single centre prospective cohort study. Consecutive patients with either a first or recurrent attack of optic neuritis from November 2010 to December 2011 were recruited from a district hospital in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China. All patients underwent serology testing for NMO (neuromyelitis optica) IgG; oligoclonal bands from lumbar puncture; computer tomography and contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and orbit as well as visual field; and optical coherence tomography testing. Patients were followed up for 1 year after the initial attack. 30 optic neuritis subjects were recruited. 73.3 % (22/30) remain as clinical isolated syndrome (CIS) after 1-year follow-up. 10 % (3/30) patients developed multiple sclerosis. 10 % (3/30) were diagnosed with NMO and 6.7 % (2/30) with NMO-spectrum disorder. The majority of acute unilateral optic neuritis in Chinese was CIS in origin although a fraction does progress to develop MS or NMO-related disorders. Clinicians should be aware of the associations and offer appropriate systemic workups.

  10. Low-cost, low-field dedicated extremity magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis: a 1-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, H.M.; Vallø, J.; Hørslev-Petersen, K.;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the ability of low-cost low-field dedicated extremity magnetic resonance imaging (E-MRI) to assess and predict erosive joint damage in the wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: 24 previously untreated patients with rhe......OBJECTIVE: To study the ability of low-cost low-field dedicated extremity magnetic resonance imaging (E-MRI) to assess and predict erosive joint damage in the wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: 24 previously untreated patients...... with rheumatoid arthritis with joint symptoms for treatment with conventional clinical or biochemical examinations, x rays of both hands and wrists, and E-MRI of the dominant wrist and MCP joints. RESULTS: At baseline, all...... patients showed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) synovitis, and MRI erosions were detected in 21 bones (10 patients). 6 (29%) of these, distributed among two patients, were seen on x ray. One x ray erosion was not detected by MRI. At 1 year, MRI and x ray detected 15 and 8 new erosions, respectively...

  11. Successful liver transplantation in babies under 1 year.

    OpenAIRE

    Beath, S V; Brook, G D; Kelly, D. A.; Cash, A J; McMaster, P; Mayer, A. D.; Buckels, J A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To review the outcome of liver transplantation in babies aged less than 1 year. DESIGN--Prospective evaluation of survival, clinical complications, and nutritional and developmental status before and one year after liver transplantation. SETTING--The Children's Hospital and Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham. SUBJECTS--All 25 babies who received liver transplantation from January 1989 to December 1992 were included. Median age was 9 months and median weight was 7.0 kg. Seven babi...

  12. The MRI appearances of early vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunbar, J.A.T.; Sandoe, J.A.T. [Department of Microbiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Rao, A.S. [Department of Orthopaedics, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Crimmins, D.W. [Department of Neurosurgery, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Baig, W. [Department of Cardiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Rankine, J.J., E-mail: james.rankine@leedsth.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Aim: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances in patients with a clinical history suggestive of vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis who underwent MRI very early in their clinical course. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the database of spinal infections from a spinal microbiological liaison team was performed over a 2 year period to identify cases with clinical features suggestive of spinal infection and an MRI that did not show features typical of vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis. All patients had positive microbiology and a follow up MRI showing typical features of spinal infection. Results: In four cases the features typical of spinal infection were not evident at the initial MRI. In three cases there was very subtle endplate oedema associated with disc degeneration, which was interpreted as Modic type I degenerative endplate change. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was continued prior to repeat MRI examinations. The mean time to the repeat examination was 17 days with a range of 8-22 days. The second examinations clearly demonstrated vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis. Conclusion: Although MRI is the imaging method of choice for vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis in the early stages, it may show subtle, non-specific endplate subchondral changes; a repeat examination may be required to show the typical features.

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ...

  15. Abdominal MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - abdomen; NMR - abdomen; Magnetic resonance imaging - abdomen; MRI of the abdomen ... radiologist see certain areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have this exam in the first trimester of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  19. Quantum repeated games revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Frackiewicz, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2x2 games based on the Marinatto and Weber's approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study twice repeated Prisoner's Dilemma game. We show that results not available in classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games.

  20. fMRI Neuroinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Christensen, Mark Schram; Madsen, Kristoffer M.

    2006-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) generates vast amounts of data. The handling, processing, and analysis of fMRI data would be inconceivable without computer-based methods. fMRI neuroinformatics is concerned with research, development, and operation of these methods. Reconstruction...

  1. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornreich, L. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Dagan, O. [The Intensive Care Unit, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Beilinson Medical Campus, Petah Tiqva (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    1996-05-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  2. Balance 1 year after TKA: correlation with clinical variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascuas, Iria; Tejero, Marta; Monleón, Sandra; Boza, Roser; Muniesa, Josep Maria; Belmonte, Roser

    2013-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis results in changes that affect balance. It has been reported that osteoarthritis worsens proprioception and increases the risk of falling. The objective of this study was to assess changes in balance among patients with knee osteoarthritis at 1 year after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery and its relationship with clinical variables. This prospective, observational study evaluated 44 patients before and 1 year after TKA. Variables analyzed included age, body mass index, pain, range of motion for both knees, bilateral quadriceps and hamstrings muscle strength, gait velocity, and Knee Society score. Balance and posture control were assessed using the following computerized posturography tests: the weight bearing test, modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction on Balance (mCTSIB) test, and sit-to-stand test. Pre- and postoperative differences were analyzed using Wilcoxon and chi-square tests, and effect size was measured using standardized response mean. Correlations were assessed by the Spearman test. One year after TKA, some improvement in balance tests was observed. Significant differences were observed in the mCTSIB test: foam surface with open eyes (P≤.001), foam surface with closed eyes (P≤.001), and composite value (P≤.001). Effect size was moderate to high. Age showed significant correlation with mCTSIB composite value changes (-0.369; P=.037). No significant correlations were found between posturographic tests and other analyzed variables. Balance measured by computerized posturography improved 1 year after TKA. Significant changes were observed between open and closed eyes using a foam surface for the mCTSIB test. A mild negative correlation was found between age and posturographic changes.

  3. A database of age-appropriate average MRI templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, John E; Sanchez, Carmen; Phillips-Meek, Michelle; Xie, Wanze

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes a life-span neurodevelopmental MRI database. The study of neurostructural development or neurofunctional development has been hampered by the lack of age-appropriate MRI reference volumes. This causes misspecification of segmented data, irregular registrations, and the absence of appropriate stereotaxic volumes. We have created the "Neurodevelopmental MRI Database" that provides age-specific reference data from 2 weeks through 89 years of age. The data are presented in fine-grained ages (e.g., 3 months intervals through 1 year; 6 months intervals through 19.5 years; 5 year intervals from 20 through 89 years). The base component of the database at each age is an age-specific average MRI template. The average MRI templates are accompanied by segmented partial volume estimates for segmenting priors, and a common stereotaxic atlas for infant, pediatric, and adult participants. The database is available online (http://jerlab.psych.sc.edu/NeurodevelopmentalMRIDatabase/).

  4. Dietary chocolate colors during their storage up to 1 year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov-Raljić Jovanka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work color quality characteristics of the upper surfaces of commercial dietary chocolates of different manufacturers were investigated. Color was determined instrumentally, using the three stimulus colorimeter "MINOLTA" Chroma meter CR 400. Results were expressed in CIE, CIELab and Hünter systems, immediately after the production (0 - 30 days and after 90, 180, 270 and 360 days of keeping in storage at the temperature of 15°C. Whitening Index (WI was also calculated. On the basis of the obtained results, it could be concluded that all the analyzed samples of dietary chocolates had approximately the same color characteristics qualities (lightness, nuance and color saturation, having only negligible variations, during keeping and storage at 15°C for up to 1 year.

  5. Otitis media with effusion in children younger than 1 year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, Renata Cantisani; Barros, Vivian Boschesi; Ramos, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine the prevalence of otitis media with effusion in children younger than 1 year and its association with the season of the year, artificial feeding, environmental and perinatal factors. Methods: Retrospective study of 184 randomly included medical records from a total of 982 healthy infants evaluated for hearing screening tests. Diagnosis of otitis media with effusion was based on otoscopy (amber-gold color, fluid level, handle of malleus position), type B tympanometric curves and absence of otoacoustic emissions. Incomplete medical records or those describing acute otitis media, upper respiratory tract infections on the assessment day or in the last 3 months, neuropathies and craniofacial anomalies were excluded. Data such as gestational age, birth weight, Apgar score, type of feeding and day care attendance were compared between children with and without otitis media with effusion through likelihood tests and multivariate analysis. Results: 25.3% of 184 infants had otitis media with bilateral effusion; 9.2% had unilateral. In infants with otitis media, the following were observed: chronological age of 9.6±1.7 months; gestational age >38 weeks in 43.4% and birth weight >2500g in 48.4%. Otitis media with effusion was associated with winter/fall, artificial feeding, Apgar score <7 and day care attendance. The multivariate analysis showed that artificial feeding is the factor most often associated to otitis media with effusion. Conclusions: Otitis media with effusion was found in about one third of children younger than 1 year and was mainly associated with artificial feeding. PMID:26559603

  6. Otitis media with effusion in children younger than 1 year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Cantisani Di Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To determine the prevalence of otitis media with effusion in children younger than 1 year and its association with the season of the year, artificial feeding, environmental and perinatal factors. Methods: Retrospective study of 184 randomly included medical records from a total of 982 healthy infants evaluated for hearing screening tests. Diagnosis of otitis media with effusion was based on otoscopy (amber-gold color, fluid level, handle of malleus position, type B tympanometric curves and absence of otoacoustic emissions. Incomplete medical records or those describing acute otitis media, upper respiratory tract infections on the assessment day or in the last 3 months, neuropathies and craniofacial anomalies were excluded. Data such as gestational age, birth weight, Apgar score, type of feeding and day care attendance were compared between children with and without otitis media with effusion through likelihood tests and multivariate analysis. Results: 25.3% of 184 infants had otitis media with bilateral effusion; 9.2% had unilateral. In infants with otitis media, the following were observed: chronological age of 9.6±1.7 months; gestational age >38 weeks in 43.4% and birth weight >2500g in 48.4%. Otitis media with effusion was associated with winter/fall, artificial feeding, Apgar score <7 and day care attendance. The multivariate analysis showed that artificial feeding is the factor most often associated to otitis media with effusion. Conclusions: Otitis media with effusion was found in about one third of children younger than 1 year and was mainly associated with artificial feeding.

  7. MRI follow-up of conservatively treated meniscal knee lesions in general practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oei, Edwin H.G.; Hunink, M.G.M. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Program for the Assessment of Radiological Technology (ART Program), Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Koster, Ingrid M. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Hensen, Jan-Hein J.; Vroegindeweij, Dammis [Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Boks, Simone S. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Diaconessenhuis Meppel, Department of Radiology, Meppel (Netherlands); Wagemakers, Harry P.A.; Koes, Bart W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M.A. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate meniscal status change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, prognostic factors and association with clinical outcome in patients with conservatively treated knee injury. We analysed 403 meniscal horns in 101 conservatively treated patients (59 male; mean age 40 years) in general practice who underwent initial knee MRI within 5 weeks of trauma. We performed ordinal logistic regression analysis to analyse prognostic factors for meniscal change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, and we assessed the association with clinical outcome. On follow-up MRI 49 meniscal horns had deteriorated and 18 had improved. Age (odds ratio [OR] 1.3/decade), body weight (OR 1.2/10 kg), total anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture on initial MRI (OR 2.4), location in the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (OR 3.0) and an initial meniscal lesion (OR 0.3) were statistically significant predictors of meniscal MRI appearance change after 1 year, which was not associated with clinical outcome. In conservatively treated patients, meniscal deterioration on follow-up MRI 1 year after trauma is predicted by higher age and body weight, initial total ACL rupture, and location in the medial posterior horn. Change in MRI appearance is not associated with clinical outcome. (orig.)

  8. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  9. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  10. Recursive quantum repeater networks

    CERN Document Server

    Van Meter, Rodney; Horsman, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Internet-scale quantum repeater networks will be heterogeneous in physical technology, repeater functionality, and management. The classical control necessary to use the network will therefore face similar issues as Internet data transmission. Many scalability and management problems that arose during the development of the Internet might have been solved in a more uniform fashion, improving flexibility and reducing redundant engineering effort. Quantum repeater network development is currently at the stage where we risk similar duplication when separate systems are combined. We propose a unifying framework that can be used with all existing repeater designs. We introduce the notion of a Quantum Recursive Network Architecture, developed from the emerging classical concept of 'recursive networks', extending recursive mechanisms from a focus on data forwarding to a more general distributed computing request framework. Recursion abstracts independent transit networks as single relay nodes, unifies software layer...

  11. MRI in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulert, Christoph [UKE, Hamburg (Germany). Psychiatry Neuroimaging Branch; Shenton, Martha E. (ed.) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology

    2014-07-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  13. MRI brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are expected to be allowed to request MRI scans for adults for selected clinically appropriate indications from November 2013 as part of the expansion of Medicare-funded MRI services announced by the Federal Government in 2011. This article aims to give a brief overview of MRI brain imaging relevant to GPs, which will facilitate explanation of scan findings and management planning with their patients. Basic imaging techniques, common findings and terminology are presented using some illustrative case examples.

  14. A 1-year Study of Eye Trauma at Farabi Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Faraji Oskooie

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The author conducted 1-year study investigating the causation and management of eye trauma at Farabi Eye' center. All patients sustaining eye injuries who were evaluated by ophthalmology service over one year interval were included."n. A formal questionnaire was completed with details of the injuiy being obtained. An ophthalmologic examination was performed on each patient, and examination findings and diagnostic tests obtained, diagnosis and treatment were recorded and analyzed."nNine hundreds and sixty-one injuries (65% occured in males and 503 (35% in females. The average age was 30 years. This study included 1464 eye injuries."nFour handreds and eighty-five (nearly 30% of patients were in pediatric age group. Seventy percent of all patients were admitted within 24 hours of their injury. Fourty percent of all injuries occurred in the street, 30% at home, 15% at the work place , the rest either in school or sport field."nAmong those older than 65 years of age, 70% of injuries were the result of fall. Seventy percent of all eye injuries were caused by blunt trauma. Diagnosis and management were recorded."nConclusions : Tehran and other metropolitans population is more likely to sustain eye trauma as the result of an assault and is less likely to be involved in a work- or sports-related one."nGiven poor compliance without patient management and follow-up, aggressive primary management may be indicated to optimize visual outcome

  15. MRI abnormalities of sacroiliac joints in early spondylarthropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puhakka, K B; Jurik, A G; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe changes in chronic and acute magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities of the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) in early spondylarthropathy (SpA), and to associate these findings with computed tomography (CT), X-ray, and clinical findings during a 1-year follow-up. METHODS...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  18. Proton MRI appearance of cystic fibrosis: Comparison to CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puderbach, Michael; Eichinger, Monika; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Radiology (E010), DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany); Gahr, Julie; Mueller, Frank-Michael [Childrens Hospital, University Heidelberg, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Cystic Fibrosis Center and Infectious Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany); Ley, Sebastian [Department of Radiology (E010), DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany); Childrens Hospital, University Heidelberg, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Tuengerthal, Siegfried; Schmaehl, Astrid [Thoraxklinik am Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Fink, Christian [Department of Radiology (E010), DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany); University of Munich, Medical Center Grosshadern, Institute of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Plathow, Christian [Department of Radiology (E010), DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany); University of Tuebingen, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Wiebel, Matthias [Thoraxklinik am Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Department of Pulmonology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent inherited disorder leading to premature death in the Caucasian population. As life expectancy is limited by pulmonary complications, repeated imaging [chest X-ray, multislice high-resolution computed tomography (MS-HRCT)] is required in the follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung parenchyma is a promising new diagnostic tool. Its value for imaging lung changes caused by CF compared with CT is demonstrated. MRI performs well when compared with CT, which serves as the gold standard. Its lack in spatial resolution is obvious, but advantages in contrast and functional assessment compensate for this limitation. Thus, MRI is a reasonable alternative for imaging the CF lung and should be introduced as a radiation-free modality for follow-up studies in CF patients. For further evaluation of the impact of MRI, systematic studies comparing MRI and conventional imaging modalities are necessary. Furthermore, the value of the additional functional MRI (fMRI) information has to be studied, and a scoring system for the morphological and functional aspect of MRI has to be established. (orig.)

  19. Repeating the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-05-01

    As part of the celebration of the Journal 's 75th year, we are scanning each Journal issue from 25, 50, and 74 years ago. Many of the ideas and practices described are so similar to present-day "innovations" that George Santayana's adage (1) "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" comes to mind. But perhaps "condemned" is too strong - sometimes it may be valuable to repeat something that was done long ago. One example comes from the earliest days of the Division of Chemical Education and of the Journal.

  20. Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate ... MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? What is Ultrasound- and MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate ...

  1. Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Ultrasound- and MRI- ... Ultrasound-and MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? What is Ultrasound- and MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? Ultrasound- and MRI- ...

  2. All-optical repeater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberberg, Y

    1986-06-01

    An all-optical device containing saturable gain, saturable loss, and unsaturable loss is shown to transform weak, distorted optical pulses into uniform standard-shape pulses. The proposed device performs thresholding, amplification, and pulse shaping as required from an optical repeater. It is shown that such a device could be realized by existing semiconductor technology.

  3. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  4. The Effect of fMRI (Noise) on Cognitive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommel, Bernhard; Fischer, Rico; Colzato, Lorenza S.; van den Wildenberg, Wery P. M.; Cellini, Cristiano

    2012-01-01

    Stressful situations, the aversiveness of events, or increases in task difficulty (e.g., conflict) have repeatedly been shown to be capable of triggering attentional control adjustments. In the present study we tested whether the particularity of an fMRI testing environment (i.e., EPI noise) might result in such increases of the cognitive control…

  5. MRI in perianal fistulae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khera Pushpinder

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available MRI has become the method of choice for evaluating perianal fistulae due to its ability to display the anatomy of the sphincter muscles orthogonally, with good contrast resolution. In this article we give an outline of the classification of perianal fistulae and present a pictorial assay of sphincter anatomy and the MRI findings in perianal fistulae. This study is based on a retrospective analysis of 43 patients with a clinical diagnosis of perianal fistula. MRI revealed a total of 44 fistulae in 35 patients; eight patients had only perianal sinuses.

  6. Brain MRI in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Goraj, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review article, conventional brain MRI and advanced MRI techniques in Parkinson`s disease (PD) are discussed, with emphasis on clinical relevance. Conventional brain MRI sequences generally demonstrate limited abnormalities specific for PD and in clinical practice brain MRI is mainly used to

  7. Brain Vulnerability to Repeated Blast Overpressure and Polytrauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    be due to deflection of the shock wave away from the eyes in the face-on animals, owing, in part, to the conical morphology of the rodent skull. We...relevant information in a non-/min- imally invasive and repeatable manner. Various modalities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including diffusion... resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging findings inmild traumatic brain injury. Brain Imaging Behav. 6, 137–192; DOI:10.1007/s11682-012-9156-5

  8. Assessment of muscle function using hybrid PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haddock, Bryan; Holm, Søren; Poulsen, Jákup M;

    2016-01-01

    -FDG while activating the quadriceps of one leg with repeated knee extension exercises followed by hand-grip exercises for one arm. Immediately following the exercises, the subjects were scanned simultaneously with (18)F-FDG PET/MRI and muscle groups were evaluated for increases in (18)F-FDG uptake and MRI T......PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between relative glucose uptake and MRI T 2 changes in skeletal muscles following resistance exercise using simultaneous PET/MRI scans. METHODS: Ten young healthy recreationally active men (age 21 - 28 years) were injected with (18)F...... 2 values. RESULTS: A significant linear correlation between (18)F-FDG uptake and changes in muscle T 2 (R (2) = 0.71) was found. for both small and large muscles and in voxel to voxel comparisons. Despite large intersubject differences in muscle recruitment, the linear correlation between (18)F...

  9. MRI in a case of adult-onset citrullinemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.F.; Huang, Y.C.; Liu, H.M. [Dept. of Radiology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan); Hwu, W.L. [Dept. of Medical Genetics, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2001-10-01

    A 42-year-old man presented with a history of repeated episodes of consciousness disturbance for 5 years. The MRI showed abnormally high signal intensities on T2-weighted images at bilateral cingulate gyri, temporal lobes and insular regions, mimicking the finding of herpes simplex encephalitis. Hyperammonemia was disclosed. Serial work-up led to the diagnosis of adult-onset citrullinemia, deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase. The clinical symptoms improved after diet control and medication. Follow-up MRI showed resolution of the abnormal signal intensities. The MRI findings of citrullinemia and other urea-cycle defects might be attributed to hyperammonemic encephalopathy, but the manifestations were varied. Similar distribution of the abnormalities in the MRI could be found in some reported cases and indicates probably vulnerable sites of hyperammonemic brain injury. (orig.)

  10. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  11. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health and ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other ... that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the patient. ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery pose no risk during MRI. However, a recently placed artificial joint may require the use of ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...

  15. MRI of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery pose no risk during MRI. However, a recently placed artificial joint may require the use of ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...

  16. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.;

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...... February 23 to 27, 2015. Specifically, we summarise the three days of invited presentations from active researchers in this and associated fields augmented by round table discussions and dialogue boards with specific topics. These include the use of PET/MRI in cardiovascular disease, paediatrics, oncology......, neurology and multi-parametric imaging, the latter of which was suggested as a key promoting factor for the wider adoption of integrated PET/MRI. Discussions throughout the workshop and a poll taken on the final day demonstrated that attendees felt more strongly that PET/MRI has further advanced in both...

  17. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and should not enter the MRI scanning area: cochlear (ear) implant some types of clips used for ... follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  19. Extradural spinal meningioma: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, N. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, P. O. Box 20 8042, New Haven, CT 06520-8042 (United States); Sze, G. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, P. O. Box 20 8042, New Haven, CT 06520-8042 (United States)

    1997-06-01

    We report a case of extradural spinal meningioma with pathologically proven features of malignant transformation. The MRI findings of extradural spinal meningioma and differences in the findings from intradural meningiomas are discussed. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ... to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should ... or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an MRI exam contains a ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise in several radiologic ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unless you are told otherwise, take your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear ... your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require you ...

  9. MRI of plantar fasciitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger, B.; Grenier, P. [Service de Radiologie Polyvalente Diagnostique et Interventionelle, Hopital de la Pitie, 83, boulevard de l`Hopital, F-75651 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    1997-12-01

    At present, MRI is the only imaging method that can precisely visualize lesions of the superficial plantar aponeurosis, whether they be musculoaponeurositides, enthesopathies or tears, and whether they be acute or chronic, with or without complications. By its direct visualization of the lesion, MRI enables an accurate assessment of the injury to be made and thereby better orients the therapeutic strategy. (orig.) With 11 figs., 15 refs.

  10. Posttraumatic pseudolipoma: MRI appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theumann, N.; Abdelmoumene, A.; Wintermark, M.; Schnyder, P.; Gailloud, M.C.; Resnick, D. [CHUV, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the MRI characteristics of posttraumatic pseudolipomas. Ten patients with previous history of blunt trauma or local surgery were investigated with MRI at the level of their deformity. The etiology was blunt trauma in eight patients and postoperative trauma in two. For all patients medical documentation, in the form of clinical history and physical examination, confirmed that a visible hematoma was present acutely at the same location following the injury and that the contour deformity subsequently appeared. All patients underwent liposuction. Preoperative bilateral MRI examinations were performed on all patients. The mean clinical follow-up was 17.8 months. MRI examinations were interpreted in consensus by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists with attention to fatty extension (subcutaneous fatty thickness and anatomical extension), asymmetry compared with the asymptomatic side, the presence or absence of fibrous septae or nonfatty components, and patterns of contrast enhancement. Ten posttraumatic pseudolipomas were identified. Clinically, they showed as subcutaneous masses with the consistency of normal adipose tissue. Their locations were the abdomen (n=1), hip (n=1), the upper thigh (n=6), the knee (n=1), and the ankle (n=1). On MRI examinations, using the contralateral side as a control, pseudolipomas appeared as focal fatty masses without a capsule or contrast enhancement. Posttraumatic pseudolipomas may develop at a site of blunt trauma or surgical procedures often antedated by a soft tissue hematoma. Characteristic MRI findings are unencapsulated subcutaneous fatty masses without contrast enhancement. (orig.)

  11. Variability in Muscle Damage after Eccentric Exercise and the Repeated Bout Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Trevor C.

    2006-01-01

    The first purpose of this study was to determine a possible explanation for the variability in the response to eccentric exercise by having participants repeat the same exercise 1 year apart. The second purpose was to examine whether initial injury in response to eccentric exercise was associated with the extent of the repeated bout effect (RBE).…

  12. Validation of SPAMM Tagged MRI Based Measurement of 3D Soft Tissue Deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Moerman, Kevin M; Simms, Ciaran K; Lamerichs, Rolf M; Stoker, Jaap; Nederveen, Aart J

    2016-01-01

    This study presents and validates a novel (non-ECG-triggered) MRI sequence based on SPAtial Modulation of the Magnetization (SPAMM) to non-invasively measure 3D (quasi-static) soft tissue deformations using only six acquisitions (three static and three indentations). In current SPAMM tagged MRI approaches data is typically constructed from many repeated motion cycles. This has so far restricted its application to the measurement of highly repeatable and periodic movements (e.g. cardiac deformation). In biomechanical applications where soft tissue deformation is artificially induced, often by indentation, significant repeatability constraints exist and, for clinical applications, discomfort and health issues generally preclude a large number of repetitions.

  13. MRI of 'brain death'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishino, Shigeki; Itoh, Takahiko; Tuchida, Shohei; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Asari, Shoji; Nishimoto, Akira (Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Sanou, Kazuo

    1990-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was undertaken for two patients who suffered from severe cerebrovascular diseases and were clinically brain dead. The MRI system we used was Resona (Yokogawa Medical Systems, superconductive system 0.5 T) and the CT apparatus was Toshiba TCT-300. Initial CT and MRI were undertaken as soon as possible after admission, and repeated sequentially. After diagnosis of brain death, we performed angiography to determine cerebral circulatory arrest, and MRI obtained at the same time was compared with the angiogram and CT. Case 1 was a 77-year-old man who was admitted in an unconscious state. CT and MRI on the second day after hospitalization revealed cerebellar infarction. He was diagnosed as brain dead on day 4. Case 2 was a 35-year-old man. When he was transferred to our hospital, he was in cardiorespiratory arrested. Cardiac resuscitation was successful but no spontaneous respiration appeared. CT and MRI on admission revealed right intracerebral hemorrhage. Angiography revealed cessation of contrast medium in intracranial vessels in both of the patients. We found no 'flow signal void sign' in the bilateral internal carotid and basilar arteries on MRI images in both cases after brain death. MRI, showing us the anatomical changes of the brain, clearly revealed brain herniations, even though only nuclear findings of 'brain tamponade' were seen on CT. But in Case 1, we could not see the infarct lesions in the cerebellum on MR images obtained after brain death. This phenomenon was caused by the whole brain ischemia masking the initial ischemic lesions. We concluded that MRI was useful not only the anatomical display of lesions and brain herniation with high contrast resolution but for obtaining information on cerebral circulation of brain death. (author).

  14. Multidimensional diffusion MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topgaard, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Principles from multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, and in particular solid-state NMR, have recently been transferred to the field of diffusion MRI, offering non-invasive characterization of heterogeneous anisotropic materials, such as the human brain, at an unprecedented level of detail. Here we revisit the basic physics of solid-state NMR and diffusion MRI to pinpoint the origin of the somewhat unexpected analogy between the two fields, and provide an overview of current diffusion MRI acquisition protocols and data analysis methods to quantify the composition of heterogeneous materials in terms of diffusion tensor distributions with size, shape, and orientation dimensions. While the most advanced methods allow estimation of the complete multidimensional distributions, simpler methods focus on various projections onto lower-dimensional spaces as well as determination of means and variances rather than actual distributions. Even the less advanced methods provide simple and intuitive scalar parameters that are directly related to microstructural features that can be observed in optical microscopy images, e.g. average cell eccentricity, variance of cell density, and orientational order - properties that are inextricably entangled in conventional diffusion MRI. Key to disentangling all these microstructural features is MRI signal acquisition combining isotropic and directional dimensions, just as in the field of multidimensional solid-state NMR from which most of the ideas for the new methods are derived.

  15. MRI of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich (ed.) [University Clinic Heidelberg (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2009-07-01

    For a long time, only chest X-ray and CT were used to image lung structure, while nuclear medicine was employed to assess lung function. During the past decade significant developments have been achieved in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), enabling MRI to enter the clinical arena of chest imaging. Standard protocols can now be implemented on up-to-date scanners, allowing MRI to be used as a first-line imaging modality for various lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and even lung cancer. The diagnostic benefits stem from the ability of MRI to visualize changes in lung structure while simultaneously imaging different aspects of lung function, such as perfusion, respiratory motion, ventilation and gas exchange. On this basis, novel quantitative surrogates for lung function can be obtained. This book provides a comprehensive overview of how to use MRI for imaging of lung disease. Special emphasis is placed on benign diseases requiring regular monitoring, given that it is patients with these diseases who derive the greatest benefit from the avoidance of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  16. Periarthritis of the shoulder-MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Mako; Nomura, Kazutoshi; Hashimoto, Noburo; Fukumoto, Tetsuya; Oshima, Suguru; Katahira, Kazuhiro [Kumamoto National Hospital (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    We examined MRI findings in patients with periarthritis of the shoulder. We excluded cuff tears, calcified tendinitis, instability of the shoulder, fracture and impingement syndrome of young patients. Subjects comprised 36 cases, 38 shoulders (25 men and 11 women), with an average age of 59.1 years (42-75). Scanning was performed on a Gyroscan T5-II 0.5-T (Philips). T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal oblique plane, T2-weighted sequences in the coronal sagittal plane and horizontal plane were taken. Twelve shoulders showed some change in the humeral heads. Degeneration of the rotator cuff was observed in 15 shoulders. Joint fluid collection was observed in the gleno-humeral joints of 15 shoulders, in the subacromial bursa of 11 shoulders and in the acromio-clavicular joints of 7 shoulders. Twenty four shoulders had fluid collection in the sheath of the long head of the biceps long tendon. Localized high signal area was observed around the inferior pouch in 11 shoulders. We studied the relationship between MRI findings and clinical symptoms. There was no significant relationship but the shoulders with night pain and severe contractures had a higher positive rate of joint fluid collection on MRI than the shoulders without night pain and with less contractures. (author)

  17. 3D MRI volume sizing of knee meniscus cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, K R; Stoller, D W; Irving, S G; Elmquist, C; Gildengorin, G

    1994-12-01

    Meniscal replacement by allograft and meniscal regeneration through collagen meniscal scaffolds have been recently reported. To evaluate the effectiveness of a replaced or regrown meniscal cartilage, a method for measuring the size and function of the regenerated tissue in vivo is required. To solve this problem, we developed and evaluated a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique to measure the volume of meniscal tissues. Twenty-one intact fresh cadaver knees were evaluated and scanned with MRI for meniscal volume sizing. The sizing sequence was repeated six times for each of 21 lateral and 12 medial menisci. The menisci were then excised and measured by water volume displacement. Each volume displacement measurement was repeated six times. The MRI technique employed to measure the volume of the menisci was shown to correspond to that of the standard measure of volume and was just as precise. However, the MRI technique consistently underestimated the actual volume. The average of the coefficient of variation for lateral volumes was 0.04 and 0.05 for the water and the MRI measurements, respectively. For medial measurements it was 0.04 and 0.06. The correlation for the lateral menisci was r = 0.45 (p = 0.04) and for the medial menisci it was r = 0.57 (p = 0.05). We conclude that 3D MRI is precise and repeatable but not accurate when used to measure meniscal volume in vivo and therefore may only be useful for evaluating changes in meniscal allografts and meniscal regeneration templates over time.

  18. MRI of oriental cholangiohepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wani, N.A., E-mail: ahmad77chinar@gmail.co [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Srinagar (India); Robbani, I.; Kosar, T. [Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Srinagar (India)

    2011-02-15

    Oriental cholangiohepatitis (OCH) also called recurrent pyogenic cholangitis is characterized by intrahepatic duct calculi, strictures, and recurrent infections. In turn cholangitis can result in multiple hepatic abscesses, further biliary strictures, and in severe cases, progressive hepatic parenchymal destruction, cirrhosis, and portal hypertension. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and conventional T1-weighted (T1 W) and T2-weighted (T2 W) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings have been described in patients with OCH. MRCP findings include duct dilation, strictures, and calculi. MRCP can help to localize the diseased ducts and determine the severity of involvement. T1 and T2 W sequences reveal the parenchymal changes of atrophy, abscess formation, and portal hypertension in addition to calculi. Post-treatment changes are also well depicted using MRI. Comprehensive, non-invasive assessment is achieved by using conventional MRI and MRCP in OCH providing a roadmap for endoscopic or surgical management.

  19. Dependence of DCE-MRI biomarker values on analysis algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaan S Ng

    Full Text Available Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI biomarkers have proven utility in tumors in evaluating microvascular perfusion and permeability, but it is unclear whether measurements made in different centers are comparable due to methodological differences.To evaluate how commonly utilized analytical methods for DCE-MRI biomarkers affect both the absolute parameter values and repeatability.DCE-MRI was performed on three consecutive days in twelve rats bearing C6 xenografts. Endothelial transfer constant (Ktrans, extracellular extravascular space volume fraction (ve, and contrast agent reflux rate constant (kep measures were computed using: 2-parameter ("Tofts" or "standard Kety" vs. 3-parameter ("General Kinetic" or "extended Kety" compartmental models (including blood plasma volume fraction (vp with 3-parameter models; individual- vs. population-based vascular input functions (VIFs; and pixel-by-pixel vs. whole tumor-ROI. Variability was evaluated by within-subject coefficient of variation (wCV and variance components analyses.DCE-MRI absolute parameter values and wCVs varied widely by analytical method. Absolute parameter values ranged, as follows, median Ktrans, 0.09-0.18 min-1; kep, 0.51-0.92 min-1; ve, 0.17-0.23; and vp, 0.02-0.04. wCVs also varied widely by analytical method, as follows: mean Ktrans, 32.9-61.9%; kep, 11.6-41.9%; ve, 16.1-54.9%; and vp, 53.9-77.2%. Ktrans and kep values were lower with 3- than 2-parameter modeling (p<0.0001; kep and vp were lower with pixel- than whole-ROI analyses (p<0.0006. wCVs were significantly smaller for ve, and larger for kep, with individual- than population-based VIFs.DCE-MRI parameter values and repeatability can vary widely by analytical methodology. Absolute values of DCE-MRI biomarkers are unlikely to be comparable between different studies unless analyses are carefully standardized.

  20. Introduction to Interventional MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jarmo Ruohonen; William G.Bradley; Jr.MD

    2002-01-01

    An increasing number of interventional procedures are done under imaging guidance. These include biopsies, drainages and injections. Likewise, imaging guidance and monitoring have enabled the use of sophisticated techniques for minimally invasive therapy of tumors. Since MRI provides the best tissue contrast and lesion sensitivity,the use of MR-guided procedures (MRGP) is quickly gaining momentum. Special hardware and software solutions have been developed that allow more efficient interventional use of the MR scanner.This introduction summarizes the basic concepts of interventional MRI and outlines some of the applications of today and tomorrow.

  1. MRI of osteonecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, A. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com

    2004-12-01

    Osteonecrosis is a relatively common condition, which may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of clinical situations. It may involve the subarticular region of a joint, when it is commonly referred to as ischaemic necrosis, or the metaphyseal regions of long bones, when it is referred to as bone infarction. In both situations, early lesions may be radiographically occult. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is very sensitive in identifying and characterizing osteonecrosis. This review illustrates the varied MRI features of osteonecrosis that enable a confident diagnosis to be made. Complications and differential diagnosis are also considered.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many conditions, including tumors. MRI enables the ...

  4. Quality assurance in functional MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Thomas T; Glover, Gary H; Mueller, Bryon A

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has ben- efited greatly from improvements in MRI hardware and software. At the same time, fMRI researchers have pushed the technical limits of MRI systems and greatly in- fluenced the development of state-of-the-art systems....... Minimizing image noise and maximizing system stability is critical in fMRI because the blood oxygenation level- dependent (BOLD) signal changes that are used for most fMRI studies represent only a small fraction of the total MR signal. In addition, multiple imaging volumes must be acquired over time to track...... cognitive processes. As a result, MRI scanners must have excellent time-series stability to accurately measure BOLD signal changes over the course of a long time series (typically on the order of 10 min per scan). fMRI studies are particularly demanding on the scanner hardware because they utilize fast...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have this exam in the first trimester of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ... Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association top ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  9. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) Print A A A en español Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed pictures of ...

  10. Getting an MRI (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) Print A A A en español Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed pictures of ...

  11. Less Confusion in Diffusion MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tax, C.M.W.

    2016-01-01

    With its unique ability to investigate tissue architecture and microstructure in vivo, diffusion MRI (dMRI) has gained tremendous interest and the society has been continuously triggered to develop novel dMRI image analysis approaches. With the overwhelming amount of strategies currently available i

  12. Vesicouterine fistula: MRI diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J.M.; Lomas, D.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital and University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Lee, G.; Doble, A. [Dept. of Urology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital and University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Sharma, S.D. [Dept. of Urology, Peterborough NHS Trust Hospital (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-01

    A case of vesicouterine fistula in a young woman following caesarean section is presented. The diagnosis was established successfully using heavily T2-weighted MRI which clearly demonstrated fluid within the fistula, obviating the need for conventional radiographic contrast examination. (orig.)

  13. MRI in suspected appendicitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, M.M.N.

    2014-01-01

    Dit proefschrift richt zich op de optimalisatie van beeldvormende diagnostiek bij patiënten met een klinische verdenking op appendicitis, waarbij het gebruik van ‘magnetic resonance imaging’ (MRI) wordt verkend. Het proefschrift omvat de resultaten van de OPTIMAP-studie (OPTimisation of IMaging Appe

  14. Sinus MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A CT scan may be preferred in emergency cases, since it is faster and often available in the emergency room. Note: MRI is not as effective as CT in defining the anatomy of the sinuses, and therefore is not typically used for suspected acute sinusitis.

  15. MRI of intact plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, H. van; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Vergeldt, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive technique that can be used to acquire two- or even three-dimensional images of intact plants. The information within the images can be manipulated and used to study the dynamics of plant water relations and water transpor

  16. MRI of intact plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van H.; Scheenen, T.; Vergeldt, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive technique that can be used to acquire two- or even three-dimensional images of intact plants. The information within the images can be manipulated and used to study the dynamics of plant water relations and water transpor

  17. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood test to determine whether the kidneys are functioning adequately. Women should always inform their physician or technologist if ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ...

  19. Repeated exposure of the developing rat brain to magnetic resonance imaging did not affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Changlian [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Gao, Jianfeng [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Department of Physiology, Henan Traditional Medical University (China); Li, Qian; Huang, Zhiheng; Zhang, Yu; Li, Hongfu [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Kuhn, Hans-Georg [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Blomgren, Klas, E-mail: klas.blomgren@neuro.gu.se [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Queen Silvia Children' s Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} The effect of MRI on the developing brain is a matter of debate. {yields} Repeated exposure to MRI did not affect neurogenesis. {yields} Memory function was not affected by repeated MRI during development. {yields} Neither late gestation nor young postnatal brains were affected by MRI. {yields} Repeated MRI did not cause cell death in the neurogenic region of the hippocampus. -- Abstract: The effect of magnetic fields on the brain is a matter of debate. The objective of this study was to investigate whether repeated exposure to strong magnetic fields, such as during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), could elicit changes in the developing rat brain. Embryonic day 15 (E15) and postnatal day 14 (P14) rats were exposed to MRI using a 7.05 T MR system. The animals were anesthetized and exposed for 35 min per day for 4 successive days. Control animals were anesthetized but no MRI was performed. Body temperature was maintained at 37 {sup o}C. BrdU was injected after each session (50 mg/kg). One month later, cell proliferation, neurogenesis and astrogenesis in the dentate gyrus were evaluated, revealing no effects of MRI, neither in the E15, nor in the P14 group. DNA damage in the dentate gyrus in the P14 group was evaluated on P18, 1 day after the last session, using TUNEL staining. There was no difference in the number of TUNEL-positive cells after MRI compared with controls, neither in mature neurons, nor in newborn progenitors (BrdU/TUNEL double-labeled cells). Novel object recognition was performed to assess memory function 1 month after MRI. There was no difference in the recognition index observed after MRI compared with the control rats, neither for the E15, nor for the P14 group. In conclusion, repeated exposure to MRI did not appear to affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function in rats, neither in late gestation (E15-E18) nor in young postnatal (P14-P17) rats.

  20. MRI of the cardiomyopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Cesare, Ernesto E-mail: ernesto.dicesare@cc.univaq.it

    2001-06-01

    We examined the potentialities of Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of the main cardiomyopathies: hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive and arrhythmogenic right ventricular. The hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is generally adequately investigated by echocardiography, that well defines the myocardial thickening and the obstruction of the left ventricular output. However, by echocardiography we still have difficulties in the evaluation of the apex of the left ventricle and the right ventricle involvement. MRI provides a complete evaluation of the heart with a clear evidence also of the echocardiographic dark zones by means of a clear evidence of the apex of the right ventricle. The dilated form is also well investigated by MRI that provides a clear evaluation of the volumes, mass and ejection fraction by means of the 3D analysis including conditions of the ventricular remodelling. Moreover, this technique helps in the differential diagnosis of acute myocarditis. In the acute phase of myocarditis (first 2 weeks), in fact, the myocardium produces high signal intensity on the T2 weighted sequences due to the presence of oedema. The third form of cardiomyopathy is the restrictive one, characterised by reduced diastolic filling and diastolic volume, normality of the systolic function and parietal thickness, interstitial fibrosis and enlargement of both atria. The mean potentiality of MRI is related to the differential diagnosis with constrictive pericarditis. Only in the former, the pericardium appears irregularly thickened with areas exceeding 4 mm of pericardial thickness. Finally, the right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy represents the main indication to MRI evaluation. With this imaging modality we are can obtain a clear morpho-functional evaluation of the right ventricle and distinguish the intramyocardial adipose substitution characterised by areas of high signal in the myocardium.

  1. 2 years versus 1 year of adjuvant trastuzumab for HER2-positive breast cancer (HERA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldhirsch, Aron; Gelber, Richard D; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J

    2013-01-01

    Trastuzumab has established efficacy against breast cancer with overexpression or amplification of the HER2 oncogene. The standard of care is 1 year of adjuvant trastuzumab, but the optimum duration of treatment is unknown. We compared 2 years of treatment with trastuzumab with 1 year of treatmen......, and updated the comparison of 1 year of trastuzumab versus observation at a median follow-up of 8 years, for patients enrolled in the HERceptin Adjuvant (HERA) trial....

  2. Estimation of intersubject variability of cerebral blood flow measurements using MRI and positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto Mølby; Larsson, Henrik B W; Hansen, Adam E;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the within and between subject variability of quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements in normal subjects using various MRI techniques and positron emission tomography (PET). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Repeated CBF measurements were performed in 17 healthy, young...... subjects using three different MRI techniques: arterial spin labeling (ASL), dynamic contrast enhanced T1 weighted perfusion MRI (DCE) and phase contrast mapping (PCM). All MRI measurements were performed within the same session. In 10 of the subjects repeated CBF measurements by (15) O labeled water PET......L/100 g/min, 16.2% and 4.8%, for DCE 43.0 mL/100 g/min, 20.0%, 15.1% and for PET 41.9 mL/100 g/min, 16.5% and 11.9%, respectively. Only for DCE and PCM a significant positive correlation between measurements was demonstrated. CONCLUSION: These findings confirm large between subject variability in CBF...

  3. Resolution of NASH with weight loss documented by hepatic MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vasvi; Luthra, Saurav; Elajami, Tarec K; Welty, Francine K

    2015-01-06

    A 57-year-old Asian woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, dyslipidaemia and history of breast cancer, was referred to the cardiovascular health and lipid centre for evaluation and management of dyslipidaemia and NASH (Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis) in 2010. She originally had a detailed work up at the liver clinic for elevated liver enzymes, with no associated symptoms. Initial hepatic MRI on 22 January 2007 showed diffuse fatty infiltration quantitated at 15%. We counselled her on lifestyle modifications, including dietary measures and exercise, geared toward weight loss. Over the next 2 years, she lost 24.5 lbs; repeat hepatic MRI on 22 December 2011 showed 6% hepatic fat, which is within the normal range. This case demonstrates the efficacy of significant weight loss in the improvement and resolution of NASH. We believe that this is the first case report documenting this through liver MRI.

  4. DWI Repeaters and Non-Repeaters: A Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeber, Stan

    1981-01-01

    Discussed how driving-while-intoxicated (DWI) repeaters differed signigicantly from nonrepeaters on 4 of 23 variables tested. Repeaters were more likely to have zero or two dependent children, attend church frequently, drink occasionally and have one or more arrests for public intoxication. (Author)

  5. To Repeat or Not to Repeat a Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael J.; Biktimirov, Ernest N.

    2013-01-01

    The difficult transition from high school to university means that many students need to repeat (retake) 1 or more of their university courses. The authors examine the performance of students repeating first-year core courses in an undergraduate business program. They used data from university records for 116 students who took a total of 232…

  6. Novel whole brain segmentation and volume estimation using quantitative MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, J. [Linkoeping University, Radiation Physics, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Imaging Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden); SyntheticMR AB, Linkoeping (Sweden); Warntjes, J.B.M. [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Imaging Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden); SyntheticMR AB, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University and Department of Clinical Physiology UHL, County Council of Oestergoetland, Clinical Physiology, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping (Sweden); Lundberg, P. [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Imaging Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University and Department of Radiation Physics UHL, County Council of Oestergoetland, Radiation Physics, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University and Department of Radiology UHL, County Council of Oestergoetland, Radiology, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2012-05-15

    Brain segmentation and volume estimation of grey matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) are important for many neurological applications. Volumetric changes are observed in multiple sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's disease and dementia, and in normal aging. A novel method is presented to segment brain tissue based on quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) of the longitudinal relaxation rate R{sub 1}, the transverse relaxation rate R{sub 2} and the proton density, PD. Previously reported qMRI values for WM, GM and CSF were used to define tissues and a Bloch simulation performed to investigate R{sub 1}, R{sub 2} and PD for tissue mixtures in the presence of noise. Based on the simulations a lookup grid was constructed to relate tissue partial volume to the R{sub 1}-R{sub 2}-PD space. The method was validated in 10 healthy subjects. MRI data were acquired using six resolutions and three geometries. Repeatability for different resolutions was 3.2% for WM, 3.2% for GM, 1.0% for CSF and 2.2% for total brain volume. Repeatability for different geometries was 8.5% for WM, 9.4% for GM, 2.4% for CSF and 2.4% for total brain volume. We propose a new robust qMRI-based approach which we demonstrate in a patient with MS. (orig.)

  7. Screening in asymptomatic SDHx mutation carriers: added value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT at initial diagnosis and 1-year follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepoutre-Lussey, C.; Deandreis, D.; Berdelou, A.; Nascimento, C.; Lumbroso, J.; Schlumberger, M.; Baudin, E.; Leboulleux, S. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Universite Paris-Sud, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology, Villejuif (France); Caramella, C.; Bidault, F.; Deschamps, F. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Department of Radiology, Villejuif (France); Al Ghuzlan, A. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Department of Medical Biology and Pathology, Villejuif (France); Hartl, D.; Dumont, F. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Department of Surgery, Villejuif (France); Borget, I. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Department of Biostatistic and Epidemiology, Villejuif (France); Paris-Sud University, Villejuif (France); Gimenez-Roqueplo, A.P. [Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Department of Genetics, Paris (France); Paris Descartes University, Faculty of Medicine, Paris (France); Guillaud Bataille, M. [Gustave Roussy Institut, Department of Genetics, Villejuif (France)

    2015-05-01

    Specific recommendations on screening modalities for paraganglioma (PGL) and phaeochromocytoma (PCC) in asymptomatic SDHx mutation carriers (relatives) are still lacking. We evaluated the added value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in comparison with morphological imaging at initial diagnosis and 1 year of follow-up in this population. The study included 30 consecutive relatives with a proven SDHx mutation who were investigated by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the head and neck, thoracic/abdominal/pelvic (TAP) contrast-enhanced CT and/or TAP MRI. {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy was performed in 20 subjects and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in 20 subjects. The gold standard was based on pathology or a composite endpoint as defined by any other positive imaging method and persistent tumour on follow-up. Images were considered as false-positive when the lesions were not detected by another imaging method or not confirmed at 1 year. At initial work-up, an imaging abnormality was found in eight subjects (27 %). The final diagnosis was true-positive in five subjects (two with abdominal PGL, one with PCC and two with neck PGL) and false-positives in the other three subjects (detected with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in two and TAP MRI in one). At 1 year, an imaging abnormality was found in three subjects of which one was an 8-mm carotid body PGL in a patient with SDHD mutation and two were considered false-positive. The tumour detection rate was 100 % for {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and conventional imaging, 80 % for SRS and 60 % for {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy. Overall, disease was detected in 4 % of the subjects at the 1-year follow-up. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated excellent sensitivity but intermediate specificity justifying combined modality imaging in these patients. Given the slow progression of the disease, if {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and MRI are normal at baseline, the second imaging work-up should be delayed and an examination

  8. MRI of cardiovascular malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastler, Bruno [Centre Hospitalier Univ. Jean Minjoz, Besancon (France); Universite de Franche-Comte, Besancon (FR). Lab. I4S (Health, Innovation, Intervention, Imaging, Engineering); Centre Hospitalier Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Dept. of Radiology

    2011-07-01

    MRI is a non-invasive and non-ionizing imaging modality that is perfectly suited for the diagnosis and follow-up of both pediatric and adult congenital heart disease. It provides a large field of view and has the unique ability to depict complex cardiac and vascular anatomy and to measure cardiac function and flow within one examination. MRI is the ideal complement to echocardiography whenever the information provided by the latter is limited. This book has been conceived as a self-teaching manual that will assist qualified radiologists, cardiologists, and pediatricians, as well as those in training. It is richly illustrated with numerous images and drawings that cover all usual and most unusual anomalies. The principal author, Professor Bruno Kastler, is head of radiology at Besancon University Hospital, France and is board certified in both radiology and cardiology. (orig.)

  9. MRI of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-02-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  10. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imager)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoshinori [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1995-05-01

    MRI is a widely used diagnostic imaging modality because it has excellent diagnostic capabilities, is safe to use and generates images not affected by bone artifacts. Images are obtained by utilizing the phenomenon of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) by which protons located in a static magnetic field absorb radio frequency (RF) pulses with a specific frequency and release a part of the energy as a NMR signal. Potentially MRI has the ability to provide functional and metabolic information (such as flow, temperature, diffusion, neuron activity) in addition to morphological information. This paper describes the imaging principles and provides a general outline of some applications: flow imaging, metabolite imaging and temperature imaging. (J.P.N.).

  11. Value of multiparametric MRI in the work-up of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornud, F; Delongchamps, N B; Mozer, P; Beuvon, F; Schull, A; Muradyan, N; Peyromaure, M

    2012-02-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prostate cancer evaluation is controversial and likely underestimated. Technological advances over the past 5 years have demonstrated that multiparametric MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, can evaluate the actual tumor burden of a newly diagnosed prostate cancer more accurately than sextant biopsy protocols. Tumor risk, defined by the D'Amico criteria, hence can be re-evaluated by multiparametric MRI. As a result, there is increasing evidence that MRI before repeat or even initial biopsy can accurately select patients who require immediate biopsies and those in whom biopsy could be deferred. Also, a relationship between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), calculated from DWI, and Gleason score was found. Thus, MRI before biopsy helps to detect high-grade tumors to target biopsies within areas of low ADC values. To achieve good targeting accuracy, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-MRI image registration is necessary. Three-dimensional deformable registration is sufficiently accurate to match TRUS and MRI volumes with a topographic precision of 1 mm. Real-time MRI-guided biopsy is another technique under evaluation. Both approaches will allow for increasing acceptance of focal therapies, should these techniques be validated in the future.

  12. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  13. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  14. Diffuse excessive high signal intensity in low-risk preterm infants at term-equivalent age does not predict outcome at 1 year: a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Yael [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Centre, Child Development Centre, Dana-Dwek Children' s Hospital, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Weinstein, Maya [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Centre, Functional Brain Centre, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Bar Ilan University, Department of Psychology, Gonda Multidisciplinary Brain Research Centre, Ramat-Gan (Israel); Myers, Vicki [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Centre, Functional Brain Centre, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv (Israel); Uliel, Shimrit; Geva, Karen [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Centre, Child Development Centre, Dana-Dwek Children' s Hospital, Tel Aviv (Israel); Berger, Irit; Marom, Ronella [Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Centre, Department of Neonatology, Lis Maternity Hospital, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Bashat, Dafna Ben [Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv (Israel); Ben-Sira, Liat [Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Tel Aviv (Israel); Geva, Ronny [Bar Ilan University, Department of Psychology, Gonda Multidisciplinary Brain Research Centre, Ramat-Gan (Israel); Gross-Tsur, Varda [Shaare-Zedek Medical Centre, Neuropediatric Unit, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2014-08-15

    The outcome of premature infants with only diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI) is not clear. We explored the relationship between DEHSI, white matter (WM) diffusion characteristics, perinatal characteristics, and neurobehavioral outcome at 1 year in a homogenous group of preterm infants without major brain abnormalities. Fifty-eight preterm infants, gestational age 29 ± 2.6 weeks, underwent an MRI at term-equivalent age (TEA). Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales, neurological assessment, and Parental Stress Index (PSI) were performed at 1 year corrected age. These measures were compared between preterm infants according to DEHSI classification (none, mild, moderate). Diffusion tensor imaging was used in major WM volumes of interest to objectively measure the degree of WM maturation. No significant differences were detected in the perinatal risk characteristics, neurobehavioral outcome, and PSI at 1 year between infants with different DEHSI classifications. In infants with DEHSI, increased axial and radial diffusivities were detected in the optic radiations, centrum semiovale, and posterior limb of the internal capsule, indicating less advanced maturation of the WM. Significant correlations were detected between the time interval from birth to MRI and the WM microstructure in infants without DEHSI. DEHSI in premature infants is neither a predictive measure for short-term adverse neurobehavioral outcome nor related to perinatal risk characteristics. Extrauterine exposure time had a differential effect on WM maturational trajectories in infants with DEHSI compared to those without. We suggest DEHSI may represent an alteration in WM maturational characteristics. Further follow-up studies may verify later consequences of DEHSI in premature infants. (orig.)

  15. Segmentation precision of abdominal anatomy for MRI-based radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Camille E; Zhu, Fan; Lee, Andrew Y; Yanle, Hu; Parikh, Parag J

    2014-01-01

    The limited soft tissue visualization provided by computed tomography, the standard imaging modality for radiotherapy treatment planning and daily localization, has motivated studies on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for better characterization of treatment sites, such as the prostate and head and neck. However, no studies have been conducted on MRI-based segmentation for the abdomen, a site that could greatly benefit from enhanced soft tissue targeting. We investigated the interobserver and intraobserver precision in segmentation of abdominal organs on MR images for treatment planning and localization. Manual segmentation of 8 abdominal organs was performed by 3 independent observers on MR images acquired from 14 healthy subjects. Observers repeated segmentation 4 separate times for each image set. Interobserver and intraobserver contouring precision was assessed by computing 3-dimensional overlap (Dice coefficient [DC]) and distance to agreement (Hausdorff distance [HD]) of segmented organs. The mean and standard deviation of intraobserver and interobserver DC and HD values were DC(intraobserver) = 0.89 ± 0.12, HD(intraobserver) = 3.6mm ± 1.5, DC(interobserver) = 0.89 ± 0.15, and HD(interobserver) = 3.2mm ± 1.4. Overall, metrics indicated good interobserver/intraobserver precision (mean DC > 0.7, mean HD segmentation precision for abdominal sites. These findings support the utility of MRI for abdominal planning and localization, as emerging MRI technologies, techniques, and onboard imaging devices are beginning to enable MRI-based radiotherapy.

  16. MRI findings of serous atrophy of bone marrow and associated complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutin, Robert D. [Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); White, Lawrence M. [University of Toronto, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Laor, Tal [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Spitz, Damon J. [New England Baptist Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Lopez-Ben, Robert R. [Carolinas HealthCare System, Charlotte Radiology, Diagnostic Radiology, Charlotte, NC (United States); Stevens, Kathryn J. [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    To report the MRI appearance of serous atrophy of bone marrow (SABM) and analyse clinical findings and complications of SABM. A retrospective search of MRI examinations of SABM was performed. Symptoms, underlying conditions, MRI findings, delay in diagnosis and associated complications were recorded. We identified 30 patients (15 male, 15 female; mean age: 46 ± 21 years) with MRI findings of SABM. Underlying conditions included anorexia nervosa (n = 10), cachexia from malignant (n = 5) and non-malignant (n = 7) causes, massive weight loss after bariatric surgery (n = 1), biliary atresia (n = 1), AIDS (n = 3), endocrine disorders (n = 2) and scurvy (n = 1). MRI showed mildly hypointense signal on T1- weighted and hyperintense signal on fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive images of affected bone marrow in all cases and similar signal abnormalities of the adjacent subcutaneous fat in 29/30 cases. Seven patients underwent repeat MRI due to initial misinterpretation of bone marrow signal as technical error. Superimposed fractures of the hips and lower extremities were common (n = 14). SABM occurs most commonly in anorexia nervosa and cachexia. MRI findings of SABM are often misinterpreted as technical error requiring unnecessary repeat imaging. SABM is frequently associated with fractures of the lower extremities. (orig.)

  17. Pediatric elbow fractures: MRI evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, J. (Dept. of Radiology, Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY (United States)); Rosenberg, Z.S. (Dept. of Radiology, Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY (United States)); Kawelblum, M. (Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY (United States)); Montes, L. (Dept. of Radiology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)); Bergman, A.G. (Dept. of Radiology, Stanford Univ., School of Medicine, CA (United States)); Strongwater, A. (Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in eight patients under the age of 8 years who suffered elbow fractures, to assess possible fracture extension into the distal nonossified epiphysis of the humerus in seven cases and to determine the displacement and location of the radial head in one case. MRI allowed accurate depiction of the fracture line when it extended into the cartilaginous epiphysis. In four cases, MRI findings were confirmed at surgery. In five cases, surgery was obviated because no articular extension of the fracture was seen on MRI (4 cases) or because no displacement was noted (1 case). In one patient, the plain film diagnosis of a Salter type II fracture was changed to Salter type IV on the basis of the MRI findings. It is concluded that MRI might play a role in the preoperative evaluation of pediatric patients presenting with elbow trauma when extension of the fracture cannot be determined with routine radiographic studies. (orig.)

  18. Incidental mastoid opacification in children on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sumit; Kuruva, Manohar [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Pediatric Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States); Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna Rao [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and Arkansas Children' s Hospital Research Institute, Biostatistics Program, Department of Pediatrics, Little Rock, AR (United States); Qin, Curtis [Georgetown University Hospital, Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Hegde, Shilpa V. [University of Pittsburgh Medical Centre, Section of Neuroradiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The opacification the mastoid cavity is frequently reported by radiologists on cross-sectional imaging done for non-otological indications. It is well known that presence of fluid the mastoid does not amount to mastoiditis. This study seeks to provide an evidence-based confirmation of this known finding. The purpose of our study was to determine the prevalence of mastoid opacification in children undergoing outpatient brain MRI examination. Our study included 515 outpatient children who had brain MRI for indications other than mastoiditis or otitis media from January 2014 to March 2014. Children with history of skull base trauma or radiation were excluded. The age range was 15 days to 18 years. The overall prevalence of mastoid opacification was determined using one sample proportion and exact 95% Clopper-Pearson confidence intervals. The prevalence of mastoid opacification was analyzed based on gender, age and presenting symptoms using chi-square test of association. One hundred ten children (21.4%) had mastoid opacification. Younger patients tended to have higher opacification rates with the prevalence in children younger than 1 year of age and between 1 and 2 years of age as high as 41.7% (20/48) and 47.5% (38/80), respectively. The diagnosis of mastoiditis in children should not be based upon a radiologist's report of finding fluid or mucosal thickening in the mastoid air cells as incidental opacification the mastoid is seen frequently. (orig.)

  19. MRI assessment program. Consensus statement on clinical efficacy of MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This consensus statement is largely based on the experience gained at the MRI units at the four hospitals which have operated scanners in the MRI program. It reflects the considered opinion of the radiologists responsible for the MRI services at those hospitals. Account has also been taken of relevant overseas data. This collection of opinion relates particularly to comparison with other imaging modalities. The specific comments will require further consideration as technical developments with MRI become available, additional experience is gained with gadolinium contrast material and additional data are obtained on the influence of MRI on patient management. MRI, at present, is used either to improve diagnostic accuracy when other tests are negative or equivocal, when there is strong clinical suspicion of disease, or to improve surgical or other management planning when the diagnosis known. In some situations (eg syringomyelia, congenital spinal disease, posterior fossa/cerebello-pontine angle tumours) it may entirely replace other tests (eg myelography, air contrast, CT) which are substantially less accurate and/or more invasive. In other situations (eg hemispheric brain tumours, lumbar disc protrusions) when other tests, such as CT, can be as accurate, MRI is not usually or initially indicated because it is currently more expensive and of limited availability. However, balanced against this is the fact that it does not expose the patient to potentially harmful ionising radiation. It is also stressed that MRI images depend on complex, widely variable and, as yet, incompletely understood parameters. There is concern that this may result in false positive diagnoses, especially where MRI is used alone as a screening test, or used as the initial test. For several reasons (availability, cost, medical and diagnostic efficacy), the specific comments on indications for MRI presented are based upon the assumption that MRI is a tertiary and complementary imaging examination

  20. MRI follow-up of conservatively treated meniscal knee lesions in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.G. Oei (Edwin); I.M. Koster (Ingrid); J.H.J. Hensen; S.S. Boks (Simone); H.P.A. Wagemakers (Harry); B.W. Koes (Bart); D. Vroegindeweij (Dammis); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); M.G.M. Hunink (Myriam)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To evaluate meniscal status change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, prognostic factors and association with clinical outcome in patients with conservatively treated knee injury. Methods: We analysed 403 meniscal horns in 101 conservatively treated patients (59 male; mean age 40

  1. Cortical microinfarcts on 3T MRI : Clinical correlates in memory-clinic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Veluw, Susanne J.; Hilal, Saima; Kuijf, Hugo J.; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Xin, Xu; Yeow, Tan Boon; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Biessels, Geert Jan; Chen, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This is the first study to assess cerebral microinfarcts (CMIs) on 3 tesla (3T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a memory clinic population. Methods We included 238 consecutive patients (aged 72.5 ± 9.1 years) from a memory clinic in Singapore. All patients underwent extensive neurol

  2. Dissociated incretin response to oral glucose at 1 year after restrictive vs. malabsorptive bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldstrand, M; Ahrén, B; Näslund, E;

    2009-01-01

    (JIB, n = 5) was performed in 12 women, aged 26-39 years, with severe obesity [body mass index (BMI) 46.6 +/- 2.3 kg/m(2)]. After 1 year, 75 g glucose was administered and plasma levels of glucose, insulin, GIP and GLP-1 were determined regularly during the following 2 h. RESULTS: At 1 year after......AIM: Compare the response to oral glucose of the two incretin hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) at 1 year after restrictive vs. malabsorptive bariatric surgery. METHODS: Vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG, n = 7) or jejunoileal bypass...... = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that at 1 year after bariatric surgery, the two incretins show dissociated responses in that the GIP secretion is higher after VBG whereas GLP-1 secretion is higher after JIB. This dissociated incretin response is independent from reduction in body weight, glucose...

  3. Ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, Ursula [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nemec, Stefan F., E-mail: stefan.nemec@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Bettelheim, Dieter [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Division of Prenatal Diagnosis and Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Horcher, Ernst [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schoepf, Veronika [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Graham, John M.; Rimoin, David L. [Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Weber, Michael; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-08-15

    Objective: Ovarian cysts are the most frequently encountered intra-abdominal masses in females in utero. They may, at times, require perinatal intervention. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to ultrasonography (US) in prenatal diagnosis, we sought to demonstrate the ability to visualize ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 17 fetal MRI scans from 16 female fetuses (23-37 gestational weeks) with an MRI diagnosis of ovarian cysts after suspicious US findings. A multiplanar MRI protocol was applied to image and to characterize the cysts. The US and MRI findings were compared, and the prenatal findings were compared with postnatal imaging findings or histopathology. Results: Simple ovarian cysts were found in 10/16 cases and complex cysts in 7/16 cases, including one case with both. In 11/16 (69%) cases, US and MRI diagnoses were in agreement, and, in 5/16 (31%) cases, MRI specified or expanded the US diagnosis. In 6/16 cases, postnatal US showed that the cysts spontaneously resolved or decreased in size, and in 1/16 cases, postnatal imaging confirmed a hemorrhagic cyst. In 4/16 cases, the prenatal diagnoses were confirmed by surgery/histopathology, and for the rest, postnatal correlation was not available. Conclusion: Our results illustrate the MRI visualization of ovarian cysts in utero. In most cases, MRI will confirm the US diagnosis. In certain cases, MRI may provide further diagnostic information, additional to US, which is the standard technique for diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment planning.

  4. Fetal Electrocardiogram (fECG Gated MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn N.J. Paley

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI-compatible system to enable gating of a scanner to the heartbeat of a foetus for cardiac, umbilical cord flow and other possible imaging applications. We performed radiofrequency safety testing prior to a fetal electrocardiogram (fECG gated imaging study in pregnant volunteers (n = 3. A compact monitoring device with advanced software capable of reliably detecting both the maternal electrocardiogram (mECG and fECG simultaneously was modified by the manufacturer (Monica Healthcare, Nottingham, UK to provide an external TTL trigger signal from the detected fECG which could be used to trigger a standard 1.5 T MR (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA gating system with suitable attenuation. The MR scanner was tested by triggering rapidly during image acquisition at a typical fetal heart rate (123 beats per minute using a simulated fECG waveform fed into the gating system. Gated MR images were also acquired from volunteers who were attending for a repeat fetal Central Nervous System (CNS examination using an additional rapid cardiac imaging sequence triggered from the measured fECG. No adverse safety effects were encountered. This is the first time fECG gating has been used with MRI and opens up a range of new possibilities to study a developing foetus.

  5. Negative predictive value of multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer detection: Outcome of 5-year follow-up in men with negative findings on initial MRI studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itatani, R., E-mail: banguliao@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1, Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, 1-5-1, Tainoshima, Kumamoto 862-0965 (Japan); Namimoto, T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1, Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Atsuji, S.; Katahira, K.; Morishita, S. [Department of Radiology, Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, 1-5-1, Tainoshima, Kumamoto 862-0965 (Japan); Kitani, K.; Hamada, Y. [Department of Urology, Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, 1-5-1, Tainoshima, Kumamoto 862-0965 (Japan); Kitaoka, M. [Department of Pathology, Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, 1-5-1, Tainoshima, Kumamoto 862-0965 (Japan); Nakaura, T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amakusa Medical Center, Kameba 854-1, Amakusa, Kumamoto 863-0046 (Japan); Yamashita, Y. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1, Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We assess the negative predictive value of multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer. • Patients with positive prostate biopsy findings were defined as false-negative. • Patients with negative initial prostate biopsy findings were followed up for 5 years. • The negative predictive value was 89.6% for significant prostate cancer. • MRI is a useful tool to rule out significant prostate cancer before biopsy. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the clinical negative predictive value (NPV) of multiparametric MRI (mp-MRI) for prostate cancer in a 5-year follow-up. Materials and methods: One hundred ninety-three men suspected of harboring prostate cancer with negative MRI findings were included. Patients with positive transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy findings were defined as false-negative. Patients with negative initial TRUS-guided biopsy findings were followed up and only patients with negative findings by digital rectal examination, MRI, and repeat biopsy and no increase in PSA at 5-year follow-up were defined as “clinically negative”. The clinical NPV of mp-MRI was calculated. For quantitative analysis, mean signal intensity on T2-weighted images and the mean apparent diffusion coefficient value on ADC maps of the initial MRI studies were compared between peripheral-zone (PZ) cancer and the normal PZ based on pathologic maps of patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. Results: The clinical NPV of mp-MRI was 89.6% for significant prostate cancer. Small cancers, prostatitis, and benign prostatic hypertrophy masking prostate cancer returned false-negative results. Quantitative analysis showed that there was no significant difference between PZ cancer and the normal PZ. Conclusion: The mp-MRI revealed a high clinical NPV and is a useful tool to rule out clinically significant prostate cancer before biopsy.

  6. Repeat endocarditis: analysis of risk factors based on the International Collaboration on Endocarditis - Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagna, L; Park, L P; Nicholson, B P; Keiger, A J; Strahilevitz, J; Morris, A; Wray, D; Gordon, D; Delahaye, F; Edathodu, J; Miró, J M; Fernández-Hidalgo, N; Nacinovich, F M; Shahid, R; Woods, C W; Joyce, M J; Sexton, D J; Chu, V H

    2014-06-01

    Repeat episodes of infective endocarditis (IE) can occur in patients who survive an initial episode. We analysed risk factors and 1-year mortality of patients with repeat IE. We considered 1874 patients enrolled in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis - Prospective Cohort Study between January 2000 and December 2006 (ICE-PCS) who had definite native or prosthetic valve IE and 1-year follow-up. Multivariable analysis was used to determine risk factors for repeat IE and 1-year mortality. Of 1874 patients, 1783 (95.2%) had single-episode IE and 91 (4.8%) had repeat IE: 74/91 (81%) with new infection and 17/91 (19%) with presumed relapse. On bivariate analysis, repeat IE was associated with haemodialysis (p 0.002), HIV (p 0.009), injection drug use (IDU) (p < 0.001), Staphylococcus aureus IE (p 0.003), healthcare acquisition (p 0.006) and previous IE before ICE enrolment (p 0.001). On adjusted analysis, independent risk factors were haemodialysis (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.2-5.3), IDU (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.6-5.4), previous IE (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.5-5.1) and living in the North American region (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1-3.4). Patients with repeat IE had higher 1-year mortality than those with single-episode IE (p 0.003). Repeat IE is associated with IDU, previous IE and haemodialysis. Clinicians should be aware of these risk factors in order to recognize patients who are at risk of repeat IE.

  7. MRI of the cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, H.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.-M.; Krestan, C.; Gahleitner, A.; Marlovits, S.; Trattnig, S. [Department of Osteology, Universitaetklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, AKH-Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sulzbacher, I. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Pathologie Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2002-11-01

    With the introduction of fat-suppressed gradient-echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences in clinical routine MR visualization of the hyaline articular cartilage is routinely possible in the larger joints. While 3D gradient-echo with fat suppression allows exact depiction of the thickness and surface of cartilage, FSE outlines the normal and abnormal internal structures of the hyaline cartilage; therefore, both sequences seem to be necessary in a standard MRI protocol for cartilage visualization. In diagnostically ambiguous cases, in which important therapeutic decisions are required, direct MR arthrography is the established imaging standard as an add-on procedure. Despite the social impact and prevalence, until recent years there was a paucity of knowledge about the pathogenesis of cartilage damage. With the introduction of high-resolution MRI with powerful surface coils and fat-suppression techniques, visualization of the articular cartilage is now routinely possible in many joints. After a short summary of the anatomy and physiology of the hyaline cartilage, the different MR imaging methods are discussed and recommended standards are suggested. (orig.)

  8. MRI in intraspinal tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K. (Dept. of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)); Gupta, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)); Kumar, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)); Kohli, A. (Dept. of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)); Misra, U.K. (Dept. of Neurology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India)); Gujral, R.B. (Dept. of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India))

    1994-01-01

    We studied 20 patients with intraspinal tuberculosis (TB), to characterise the MRI features of tuberculous meningitis and myelitis. MRI leptomeningitis and intramedullary involvement in 11 patients, intramedullary lesions alone in 5, leptomeningitis alone in 2, and isolated extradural disease in 2. TB leptomeningitis was characterised by loculation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), nerve root thickening and clumping (seen only in the lumbar region) or complete obliteration of the subarachnoid space on unenhanced images. Gd-DTPA-enhanced images proved useful in 6 cases, revealing linear enhancement of the surface of the spinal cord and nerve roots or plaque-like enhancement of the dura-arachnoid mater complex. Intramedullary lesions included tuberculomas (8), cord oedema (5) and cavitation (3). In seven cases of intramedullary tuberculoma multiple lesions with skip areas were seen, without significant cord swelling. One patient had an isolated lesion in the conus medullaris. The lesions were iso- or hypointense on T1-weighted images, iso-, hypo- or hyperintense on T2-weighted images and showed rim or nodular enhancement with contrast medium. (orig.)

  9. MRI of ranulas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurabayashi, T.; Ida, M.; Ohbayashi, N.; Yoshino, N.; Tetsumura, A.; Sasaki, T. [Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan); Yasumoto, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan)

    2000-12-01

    We reviewed the MRI of 20 patients with a ranula (8 simple and 12 plunging) and ten with other cystic masses in the floor of the mouth and/ or suprahyoid portion of the neck (three haemangiomas, two neuromas, one monomorphic adenoma, one lipoma, two lateral cervical cysts and one dermoid cyst). Histological diagnoses were obtained in all cases with the exception of one presumed haemangioma. Ranulas were all well-defined, homogeneous masses giving low signal on T1-and markedly high signal on T2-weighted images. While simple ranulas were all confined to the sublingual space, plunging ranulas were centered on the submandibular space and tended to spill into one or more adjacent spaces. They extended into the sublingual space anteriorly (producung a so-called tail sign) in eight of 12 cases and into the parapharyngeal space superiorly in five. Although they sometimes filled a considerable part of the parapharyngeal space, displacement of surrounding muscles or vessels was usually slight, which was thought to reflect the nature of extravasation pseudocysts. All other cystic masses in our study had one or more MRI finding different from those of ranulas and could be easily differentiated from them. (orig.)

  10. MRI Findings In Dengue Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf V.V

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological manifestations are rare in dengue fever. Two cases with encephalopathy and systemic features of dengue fever with abnormal CSF and MR imaging are reported. Striking MRI finding was bilateral symmetrical thalamic lesions similar to those reported in Japanese encephalitis. This report highlights that MRI findings can be similar in dengue and Japanese encephalitis.

  11. MRI atlas of ectopic endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallaudière, B; Salut, C; Hummel, V; Pouquet, M; Piver, P; Rouanet, J-P; Maubon, A

    2013-03-01

    Ectopic endometriosis is a common condition which is often underdiagnosed, where MRI can help make a diagnosis simply, non-invasively and without irradiation. However, imagery signs of it are enormously polymorphic with a wide range of possible locations. In this paper, we have tried to illustrate comprehensively all its MRI appearances depending on the different locations where it occurs.

  12. Molecular MRI of Atherosclerotic lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adel, Brigit den

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of MRI contrast agents and vessel wall parameters to image different stages of atherosclerosis. Chapter 2 summerizes different MRI contrast agents targeted towards vulnerable plaques that have been presented in literature. Chapter 3 illustrates accumulation of paramagn

  13. Postmortem MRI of bladder agenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Brendan R. [St George' s Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Weber, Martin A. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Bockenhauer, Detlef [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Nephrology, London (United Kingdom); Hiorns, Melanie P.; McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    We report a 35-week preterm neonate with bladder agenesis and bilateral dysplastic kidneys. A suprapubic catheter was inadvertently inserted into one of the larger inferior cysts of the left dysplastic kidney. A postmortem MRI scan was performed with the findings being confirmed on autopsy. We are unaware of another postmortem MRI study demonstrating bladder agenesis. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  15. Fast Reference-Based MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Weizman, Lior; Ben-Basaht, Dafna

    2015-01-01

    In many clinical MRI scenarios, existing imaging information can be used to significantly shorten acquisition time or to improve Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). In some cases, a previously acquired image can serve as a reference image, that may exhibit similarity to the image being acquired. Examples include similarity between adjacent slices in high resolution MRI, similarity between various contrasts in the same scan and similarity between different scans of the same patient. In this paper we present a general framework for utilizing reference images for fast MRI. We take into account that the reference image may exhibit low similarity with the acquired image and develop an iterative weighted approach for reconstruction, which tunes the weights according to the degree of similarity. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the method in three different clinical MRI scenarios: SNR improvement in high resolution brain MRI, utilizing similarity between T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR)...

  16. Visualizing electromagnetic vacuum by MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrashekar, Chandrika S; Chandrashekar, S; Taylor, Erika A; Taylor, Deanne M

    2016-01-01

    Based upon Maxwell's equations, it has long been established that oscillating electromagnetic (EM) fields incident upon a metal surface decay exponentially inside the conductor, leading to a virtual EM vacuum at sufficient depths. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizes radiofrequency (r.f.) EM fields to produce images. Here we present the first visualization of an EM vacuum inside a bulk metal strip by MRI, amongst several novel findings. We uncover unexpected MRI intensity patterns arising from two orthogonal pairs of faces of a metal strip, and derive formulae for their intensity ratios. Further, we furnish chemical shift imaging (CSI) results that discriminate different faces (surfaces) of a metal block according to their distinct nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts, which holds much promise for monitoring surface chemical reactions noninvasively. Bulk metals are ubiquitous, and MRI is a premier noninvasive diagnostic tool. Combining the two, the emerging field of bulk metal MRI can be expe...

  17. Arthroscopy vs. MRI for a detailed assessment of cartilage disease in osteoarthritis: diagnostic value of MRI in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haage Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with osteoarthritis, a detailed assessment of degenerative cartilage disease is important to recommend adequate treatment. Using a representative sample of patients, this study investigated whether MRI is reliable for a detailed cartilage assessment in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods In a cross sectional-study as a part of a retrospective case-control study, 36 patients (mean age 53.1 years with clinically relevant osteoarthritis received standardized MRI (sag. T1-TSE, cor. STIR-TSE, trans. fat-suppressed PD-TSE, sag. fat-suppressed PD-TSE, Siemens Magnetom Avanto syngo MR B 15 on a 1.5 Tesla unit. Within a maximum of three months later, arthroscopic grading of the articular surfaces was performed. MRI grading by two blinded observers was compared to arthroscopic findings. Diagnostic values as well as intra- and inter-observer values were assessed. Results Inter-observer agreement between readers 1 and 2 was good (kappa = 0.65 within all compartments. Intra-observer agreement comparing MRI grading to arthroscopic grading showed moderate to good values for readers 1 and 2 (kappa = 0.50 and 0.62, respectively, the poorest being within the patellofemoral joint (kappa = 0.32 and 0.52. Sensitivities were relatively low at all grades, particularly for grade 3 cartilage lesions. A tendency to underestimate cartilage disorders on MR images was not noticed. Conclusions According to our results, the use of MRI for precise grading of the cartilage in osteoarthritis is limited. Even if the practical benefit of MRI in pretreatment diagnostics is unequivocal, a diagnostic arthroscopy is of outstanding value when a grading of the cartilage is crucial for a definitive decision regarding therapeutic options in patients with osteoarthritis.

  18. MRI findings with periventricular leukomalacia. Correlation with neurological development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, Hisakazu; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Koh; Doi, Yasuo; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Murata, Miyuki; Sawada, Tadashi [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan); Kotani, Hiromi; Goma, Hideyo

    1998-08-01

    In 22 infants with PVL, who were born at 35 weeks gestational age or less, correlation between severity of white matter lesions on MRI and developmental quotient (DQ) of infants was studied. MRI was obtained later than 7 months of age and the severity of white matter lesions was classified as follows: Group I: periventricular white matter is focally affected (n=7), Group II: periventricular white matter is diffusely affected (n=10), and Group III: subcortical white matter is also affected (n=5). Perinatal characteristics including gestational weeks, birth weight, Apgar score, procedure of delivery, and duration of mechanical ventilation revealed no significant differences between the groups. Seventeen infants developed cerebral palsy, while the other 5 infants (4 in Group I, 1 in Group II) showed normal development at 1 year of age, MRI of 4 among these 5 infants only revealed unilateral cysts around the anterior horn of lateral ventricles. Enjoji developmental test showed significant differences in gross motor DQ between Group I and III at both 1 and 2 corrected ages. Although more quantitative criteria will be required for precise classification, it is suggested that the severity of the white matter lesions on MRI is well correlated with gross motor development in PVL. (author)

  19. MRI findings in Hirayama disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raval Monali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to study the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI features of Hirayama disease on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Nine patients with clinically suspected Hirayama disease were evaluated with neutral position, flexion, contrast-enhanced MRI and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA sequences. The spectrum of MRI features was evaluated and correlated with the clinical and electromyography findings. MRI findings of localized lower cervical cord atrophy (C5-C7, abnormal curvature, asymmetric cord flattening, loss of attachment of the dorsal dural sac and subjacent laminae in the neutral position, anterior displacement of the dorsal dura on flexion and a prominent epidural space were revealed in all patients on conventional MRI as well as with the dynamic 3D-FIESTA sequence. Intramedullary hyperintensity was seen in four patients on conventional MRI and on the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Flow voids were seen in four patients on conventional MRI sequences and in all patients with the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Contrast enhancement of the epidural component was noted in all the five patients with thoracic extensions. The time taken for conventional and contrast-enhanced MRI was about 30-40 min, while that for the 3D-FIESTA sequence was 6 min. Neutral and flexion position MRI and the 3D-FIESTA sequence compliment each other in displaying the spectrum of findings in Hirayama disease. A flexion study should form an essential part of the screening protocol in patients with suspected Hirayama disease. Newer sequences such as the 3D-FIESTA may help in reducing imaging time and obviating the need for contrast.

  20. Changes in flow experience among occupational therapy students: a 1-year longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Hirao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this 1-year longitudinal study is to investigate the change in flow experience among occupational therapy students (OTS. Methods: In December 2012, we prospectively recruited 97 OTS from the Department of Occupational Therapy, Kibi International University. To assess flow experience in daily life, we used the Flow Experience Checklist. Results: The dataset included 87 OTS, of which 75 participated in the assessment at 1 year (follow-up rate, 86.2%. The mean age at baseline of 45 male and 30 female OTS was 19.59±1.1 years (range, 18 to 24 years. A comparison of the ‘frequency of flow experience’ showed significant differences between baseline values and those after 1 year (December 2013 among male OTS (P<0.05. Conclusion: The present results indicate that, for male OTS, the frequency of flow was significantly reduced after 1 year compared with baseline values. This finding suggests the need for further education to increase the frequency of flow among male OTS.

  1. Segmentation precision of abdominal anatomy for MRI-based radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, Camille E.; Zhu, Fan; Lee, Andrew Y.; Yanle, Hu; Parikh, Parag J., E-mail: pparikh@radonc.wustl.edu

    2014-10-01

    The limited soft tissue visualization provided by computed tomography, the standard imaging modality for radiotherapy treatment planning and daily localization, has motivated studies on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for better characterization of treatment sites, such as the prostate and head and neck. However, no studies have been conducted on MRI-based segmentation for the abdomen, a site that could greatly benefit from enhanced soft tissue targeting. We investigated the interobserver and intraobserver precision in segmentation of abdominal organs on MR images for treatment planning and localization. Manual segmentation of 8 abdominal organs was performed by 3 independent observers on MR images acquired from 14 healthy subjects. Observers repeated segmentation 4 separate times for each image set. Interobserver and intraobserver contouring precision was assessed by computing 3-dimensional overlap (Dice coefficient [DC]) and distance to agreement (Hausdorff distance [HD]) of segmented organs. The mean and standard deviation of intraobserver and interobserver DC and HD values were DC{sub intraobserver} = 0.89 ± 0.12, HD{sub intraobserver} = 3.6 mm ± 1.5, DC{sub interobserver} = 0.89 ± 0.15, and HD{sub interobserver} = 3.2 mm ± 1.4. Overall, metrics indicated good interobserver/intraobserver precision (mean DC > 0.7, mean HD < 4 mm). Results suggest that MRI offers good segmentation precision for abdominal sites. These findings support the utility of MRI for abdominal planning and localization, as emerging MRI technologies, techniques, and onboard imaging devices are beginning to enable MRI-based radiotherapy.

  2. Anatomical evaluation of CT-MRI combined femoral model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Gyu-Ha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both CT and MRI are complementary to each other in that CT can produce a distinct contour of bones, and MRI can show the shape of both ligaments and bones. It will be ideal to build a CT-MRI combined model to take advantage of complementary information of each modality. This study evaluated the accuracy of the combined femoral model in terms of anatomical inspection. Methods Six normal porcine femora (180 ± 10 days, 3 lefts and 3 rights with ball markers were scanned by CT and MRI. The 3D/3D registration was performed by two methods, i.e. the landmark-based 3 points-to-3 points and the surface matching using the iterative closest point (ICP algorithm. The matching accuracy of the combined model was evaluated with statistical global deviation and locally measure anatomical contour-based deviation. Statistical analysis to assess any significant difference between accuracies of those two methods was performed using univariate repeated measures ANOVA with the Turkey post hoc test. Results This study revealed that the local 2D contour-based measurement of matching deviation was 0.5 ± 0.3 mm in the femoral condyle, and in the middle femoral shaft. The global 3D contour matching deviation of the landmark-based matching was 1.1 ± 0.3 mm, but local 2D contour deviation through anatomical inspection was much larger as much as 3.0 ± 1.8 mm. Conclusion Even with human-factor derived errors accumulated from segmentation of MRI images, and limited image quality, the matching accuracy of CT-&-MRI combined 3D models was 0.5 ± 0.3 mm in terms of local anatomical inspection.

  3. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-23

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  4. Outpatient treated burns in infants younger than 1 year in Helsinki during 2005-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitakari, Elina; Koljonen, Virve; Pyörälä, Sari; Rintala, Risto

    2014-05-01

    In general, voluminous data exists concerning burns in children, but the data focusing specially on children less than 1 year of age is sporadic. We therefore focused on examining the special features of burns in children less than 1 year of age. A retrospective study of all outpatient treated burn patients burns, representing 15% of all pediatric burns during the study period. The majority was male and aged 9-12 months. Most of the burns occurred at home, and in most cases a caregiver was present in the injury room. Scalds were the most common type of injury followed by contact burns. The most common source of scald was from cups containing hot drink, and the most common source of contact burn was hot stoves or oven doors. Special attention needs to be targeted toward the prevention of burns in children less than 1 year of age. The majority of the injuries could have been prevented with more vigilance.

  5. Modelling DW-MRI data from primary and metastatic ovarian tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winfield, Jessica M. [Institute of Cancer Research, CRUK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, Surrey (United Kingdom); Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital, MRI Unit, Surrey (United Kingdom); DeSouza, Nandita M.; Collins, David J. [Institute of Cancer Research, CRUK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, Surrey (United Kingdom); Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey (United Kingdom); Priest, Andrew N.; Hodgkin, Charlotte; Freeman, Susan [University of Cambridge, Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Wakefield, Jennifer C.; Orton, Matthew R. [Institute of Cancer Research, CRUK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Division of Radiotherapy and Imaging, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    To assess goodness-of-fit and repeatability of mono-exponential, stretched exponential and bi-exponential models of diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) data in primary and metastatic ovarian cancer. Thirty-nine primary and metastatic lesions from thirty-one patients with stage III or IV ovarian cancer were examined before and after chemotherapy using DW-MRI with ten diffusion-weightings. The data were fitted with (a) a mono-exponential model to give the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), (b) a stretched exponential model to give the distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC) and stretching parameter (α), and (c) a bi-exponential model to give the diffusion coefficient (D), perfusion fraction (f) and pseudodiffusion coefficient (D*). Coefficients of variation, established from repeated baseline measurements, were: ADC 3.1 %, DDC 4.3 %, α 7.0 %, D 13.2 %, f 44.0 %, D* 165.1 %. The bi-exponential model was unsuitable in these data owing to poor repeatability. After excluding the bi-exponential model, analysis using Akaike Information Criteria showed that the stretched exponential model provided the better fit to the majority of pixels in 64 % of lesions. The stretched exponential model provides the optimal fit to DW-MRI data from ovarian, omental and peritoneal lesions and lymph nodes in pre-treatment and post-treatment measurements with good repeatability. (orig.)

  6. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, Virgil [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); ElBidweihy, Hatem, E-mail: Hatem@gwmail.gwu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  7. "I was born full deaf." Written language outcomes after 1 year of strategic and interactive writing instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbers, Kimberly A; Dostal, Hannah M; Bowers, Lisa M

    2012-01-01

    Nonstandard grammatical forms are often present in the writing of deaf students that are rarely, if ever, seen in the writing of hearing students. With the implementation of Strategic and Interactive Writing Instruction (SIWI) in previous studies, students have demonstrated significant gains in high-level writing skills (e.g., text structure) but have also made gains with English grammar skills. This 1-year study expands on prior research by longitudinally examining the written language growth (i.e., writing length, sentence complexity, sentence awareness, and function words) of 29 deaf middle-school students. A repeated-measures analysis of variance with a between-subjects variable for literacy achievement level was used to examine gains over time and the intervention's efficacy when used with students of various literacy levels. Students, whether high or low achieving, demonstrated statistically significant gains with writing length, sentence complexity, and sentence awareness. Subordinate clauses were found to be an area of difficulty, and follow up strategies are suggested. An analysis of function word data, specifically prepositions and articles, revealed different patterns of written language growth by language group (e.g., American Sign Language users, oral students, users of English-based sign).

  8. PTSD among a treatment sample of repeat DUI offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peller, Allyson J; Najavits, Lisa M; Nelson, Sarah E; LaBrie, Richard A; Shaffer, Howard J

    2010-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the most common psychiatric comorbidities among driving-under-the-influence (DUI) offenders in treatment. Investigation of DUI offenders' PTSD and clinical characteristics could have important implications for prevention and treatment. This prospective study examined the demographic and clinical characteristics of repeat DUI offenders with PTSD symptoms at baseline and 1-year follow-up. Seven hundred twenty-nine DUI offenders admitted to a 2-week inpatient program participated in the study. Participants with PTSD evidenced more severe psychiatric comorbidity and reported a higher DUI recidivism rate at 1-year than those without PTSD. This study suggests a need to address PTSD among DUI offenders, as well as to further develop methodologies for accurately reporting DUI recidivism.

  9. fMRI adaptation revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Jonas; Solomon, Samuel G; Kohn, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Adaptation has been widely used in functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) studies to infer neuronal response properties in human cortex. fMRI adaptation has been criticized because of the complex relationship between fMRI adaptation effects and the multiple neuronal effects that could underlie them. Many of the longstanding concerns about fMRI adaptation have received empirical support from neurophysiological studies over the last decade. We review these studies here, and also consider neuroimaging studies that have investigated how fMRI adaptation effects are influenced by high-level perceptual processes. The results of these studies further emphasize the need to interpret fMRI adaptation results with caution, but they also provide helpful guidance for more accurate interpretation and better experimental design. In addition, we argue that rather than being used as a proxy for measurements of neuronal stimulus selectivity, fMRI adaptation may be most useful for studying population-level adaptation effects across cortical processing hierarchies.

  10. MRI of plants and foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van As, Henk; van Duynhoven, John

    2013-04-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by complex multiple length scale architectures. Intact plants have an additional level of complexity since they are living systems which critically depend on transport and signalling processes between and within tissues and organs. The combination of recent cutting-edge technical advances and integration of MRI accessible parameters has the perspective to contribute to breakthroughs in understanding complex regulatory plant performance mechanisms. In food science and technology MRI allows for quantitative multi-length scale structural assessment of food systems, non-invasive monitoring of heat and mass transport during shelf-life and processing, and for a unique view on food properties under shear. These MRI applications are powerful enablers of rationally (re)designed food formulations and processes. Limitations and bottlenecks of the present plant and food MRI methods are mainly related to short T2 values and susceptibility artefacts originating from small air spaces in tissues/materials. We envisage cross-fertilisation of solutions to overcome these hurdles in MRI applications in plants and foods. For both application areas we witness a development where MRI is moving from highly specialised equipment to mobile and downscaled versions to be used by a broad user base in the field, greenhouse, food laboratory or factory.

  11. Neuroanatomical Classification in a Population-Based Sample of Psychotic Major Depression and Bipolar I Disorder with 1 Year of Diagnostic Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio H. Serpa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of psychotic features in the course of a depressive disorder is known to increase the risk for bipolarity, but the early identification of such cases remains challenging in clinical practice. In the present study, we evaluated the diagnostic performance of a neuroanatomical pattern classification method in the discrimination between psychotic major depressive disorder (MDD, bipolar I disorder (BD-I, and healthy controls (HC using a homogenous sample of patients at an early course of their illness. Twenty-three cases of first-episode psychotic mania (BD-I and 19 individuals with a first episode of psychotic MDD whose diagnosis remained stable during 1 year of followup underwent 1.5 T MRI at baseline. A previously validated multivariate classifier based on support vector machine (SVM was employed and measures of diagnostic performance were obtained for the discrimination between each diagnostic group and subsamples of age- and gender-matched controls recruited in the same neighborhood of the patients. Based on T1-weighted images only, the SVM-classifier afforded poor discrimination in all 3 pairwise comparisons: BD-I versus HC; MDD versus HC; and BD-I versus MDD. Thus, at the population level and using structural MRI only, we failed to achieve good discrimination between BD-I, psychotic MDD, and HC in this proof of concept study.

  12. Interobserver agreement on MRI evaluation of patients with cervical radiculopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, B., E-mail: kuijperb@maasstadziekenhuis.n [Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Neurology, Maasstad Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Beelen, A. [Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kallen, B.F. van der [Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Nollet, F. [Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lycklama a Nijeholt, G.J. [Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands); Visser, M. de [Department of Neurology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tans, J. Th.J. [Department of Neurology, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Aim: To evaluate the interobserver agreement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of herniated discs, spondylotic neuroforaminal stenosis, and root compression in patients with recent onset cervical radiculopathy and in addition, to assess the added value of disclosure of clinical information to interobserver agreement. Materials and methods: The MRI images of 82 patients with less than 1 month of symptoms and signs of cervical radiculopathy were evaluated independently by two neuroradiologists who were unaware of clinical findings. MRI analysis was repeated after disclosure of clinical information. Interobserver agreement was calculated using kappa statistics. Results: The kappa score for evaluation of herniated discs and of spondylotic foramen stenosis was 0.59 and 0.63, respectively. A kappa score of 0.67 was found for the presence of root compression. After disclosure of clinical information kappa scores increased slightly: from 0.59 to 0.62 for the detection of herniated discs, from 0.63 to 0.66 for spondylotic foramen stenosis, and from 0.67 to 0.76 for root compression. Conclusion: Interobserver reliability of MRI evaluation in patients with cervical radiculopathy was substantial for root compression, with or without clinical information. Agreement on the cause of the compression, i.e., herniated disc or spondylotic foraminal stenosis, was lower.

  13. MRI probes for sensing biologically relevant metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Célia S; Tóth, Eva

    2010-03-01

    Given the important role of metal ions in fundamental biological processes, the visualization of their concentration in living animals by repeatable, noninvasive imaging techniques, such as MRI, would be highly desirable. A large number of metal-responsive MRI contrast agents, the majority based on Gd(3+) complexes, have been reported in recent years. The contrast-enhancing properties (relaxivity) of a Gd(3+) complex can be most conveniently modulated by interaction with the sensed metal cation via changes in the number of water molecules bound directly to Gd(3+) or changes in the size of the complex, which represent the two major strategies to develop metal sensitive MRI probes. Here, we survey paramagnetic lanthanide complexes involving Gd(3+) agents and paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer probes designed to detect the most important endogenous metal ions: calcium, zinc, iron and copper. Future work will likely focus on extending applications of these agents to living animals, as well as on exploring new ways of creating molecular MRI probes in order to meet requirements such as higher specificity or lower detection limits.

  14. Feasibility of dynamic MRI for evaluating velopharyngeal insufficiency in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drissi, C. [St Vincent de Paul Hospital, Pediatric Radiology, 82 av Denfert Rochereau, 75674, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Institut National de Neurologie, Radiology Department, Tunis (Tunisia); Mitrofanoff, M.; Talandier, C. [St Vincent de Paul Hospital, Plastic Surgery, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Falip, C. [St Vincent de Paul Hospital, Pediatric Radiology, 82 av Denfert Rochereau, 75674, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Paris Descartes University, Paris Cedex (France); Couls, V. le [Siemens, St Denis (France); Adamsbaum, C. [St Vincent de Paul Hospital, Pediatric Radiology, 82 av Denfert Rochereau, 75674, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Paris Descartes University, Paris Cedex (France); St Vincent de Paul Hospital, AP-HP - Pediatric Imaging, Paris (France)

    2011-07-15

    To demonstrate the feasibility of dynamic MRI with near-real-time temporal resolution for analysing velopharyngeal closure. Eleven children and young adults (seven girls, four boys, mean age: 8.4 years) with suspected velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI), and one healthy volunteer underwent MRI (1.5 Tesla) using T2 fast imaging sequences. Imaging was done without any sedation at rest and during various phonations in the axial and sagittal planes. Images were analysed by two radiologists, a plastic surgeon and a speech therapist. The MRI examinations were well tolerated by even the youngest patient. A qualitative analysis found that the sagittal dynamic sequences during phonation were in relation to the clinical data in all patients. A quantitative analysis enabled calculation of the elevation angle of the soft palate in relation to the hard palate, the velar eminence angle and the percentage of reduction of the antero-posterior diameter of the pharyngeal lumen. Dynamic MRI is a non-invasive, rapid and repeatable method. It can be considered a complementary tool to endoscopy and fluoroscopy, particularly in children, for assessing VPI without any sedation or radiation exposure. (orig.)

  15. MRI of congenital urethroperineal fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadimi-Mahani, Maryam; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Pai, Deepa; DiPietro, Michael [C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Park, John [C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Urology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We present the MRI features of a congenital urethroperineal fistula diagnosed in a 12-year-old boy being evaluated after a single urinary tract infection. This diagnosis was initially suggested by voiding cystourethrogram and confirmed by MRI. Imaging revealed an abnormal fluid-filled tract arising from the posterior urethra and tracking to the perineal skin surface that increased in size during micturition. Surgical resection and histopathological evaluation of the abnormal tract confirmed the diagnosis of congenital urethroperineal fistula. MRI played important roles in confirming the diagnosis and assisting surgical planning. (orig.)

  16. Dose estimation for repeated phosphorus-32 ingestion in human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, J.H.; Tseng, C.L.; Hsieh, W.A.; Hung, D.Z.; Chang, W.P. E-mail: wpc94@mailsrv.ym.edu.tw

    2001-01-15

    Dose estimation was conducted for internal phosphorus-32 exposure in one young male subject from repeated oral mis-ingestion for >1 year. Since disclosure for previous continuous contamination, a series of urine samples were collected from this individual weekly for a period of >2 months. P-32 radioactivity in urine samples were measured by the acid precipitation method. Estimation for retrospective total effective dose equivalent received by this subject was conducted for cumulative internal dose estimation. A minimum of 9.4 mSv was estimated for an assumed single ingestion. As this was a rare case in radiation protection and internal radiation dosimetry, its implications were of considerable significance.

  17. BNP and NT-proBNP, Predictors of 1-Year Mortality in Nursing Home Residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barents, Maaike; Hillege, Hans H. L.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; de Boer, Rudolph A.; Koster, J.; Muskiet, Frits A. J.; de Jongste, Mike J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate 1-year mortality prediction of B type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N terminal-proBNP (NT-proBNP) in institutionalized elderly with multiple morbidities. Design: Prospective cross-sectional study. Setting: One nursing home. Participants: Ninety-three residents (mean age 81

  18. An Analysis of 1-Year Impacts of Youth Transition Demonstration Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraker, Thomas M.; Luecking, Richard G.; Mamun, Arif A.; Martinez, John M.; Reed, Deborah S.; Wittenburg, David C.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the impacts of the Youth Transition Demonstration, an initiative of the Social Security Administration (SSA) to improve employment outcomes for youth with disabilities. Based on a random assignment design, the analysis uses data from a 1-year follow-up survey and SSA administrative records for 5,203 youth in six research…

  19. High 1-Year Complication Rate after Anterior Resection for Rectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, H. S.; Bakker, I. S.; Dekker, J. W. T.; Vermeer, T. A.; Consten, E. C. J.; Hoff, C.; Klaase, J. M.; Havenga, K.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; Wiggers, T.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical options after anterior resection for rectal cancer include a primary anastomosis, anastomosis with a defunctioning stoma, and an end colostomy. This study describes short-term and 1-year outcomes of these different surgical strategies. Patients undergoing surgical resection for primary mid

  20. Relationship between tongue strength and 1-year life expectancy in elderly people needing nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Yuri; Kikutani, Takeshi; Tamura, Fumiyo; Yoshida, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-01-05

    Tongue strength is a useful indicator of oral function and has been found to decrease with aging and reduced physical functioning. The present study aimed to assess the relationships of tongue strength with physical function, mental function, and nutritional status, and also between these factors and 1-year outcomes, to determine whether tongue strength is related to life expectancy in elderly people needing nursing care. The subjects were 140 elderly individuals requiring needing nursing care (49 men and 91 women; ≥65 years). The investigated items included sex, age, activities of daily living (ADL), comorbidity, cognitive function, nutritional status, eating function, occlusal support, and tongue strength. Furthermore, a follow-up study was conducted 1 year later, and factors related to death were identified. The mean tongue strength of the total 140 subjects was 20.3 ± 8.6 kPa. Tongue strength was assessed relative to each of the investigated items, using the t test and one-way analysis of variance. Tongue strength was significantly related to ADL, comorbidity, cognitive function, calf circumference, food intake, and occlusal support. Fifteen subjects were found to have died at the 1-year follow-up study. We assessed the relationships of 1-year outcomes with each of the factors examined, and 1-year outcomes were found to be significantly related to ADL and tongue strength.

  1. Blood pressure 1 year after stroke: the need to optimize secondary prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete; Larsen, Klaus; Boysen, Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    stroke or transient ischemic attack were randomly assigned to either usual care or to 4 home visits by a nurse. During the visits, the nurse measured and recorded BP and provided individually tailored counseling on a healthy lifestyle. A total of 303 patients completed the 1-year follow up. No change...

  2. Mandibular Overdentures Supported by 6-mm Dental Implants : A 1-Year Prospective Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulje, Felix; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Ter Meulen, Jan-Willem P.; Vissink, Arjan; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Guljé, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Background: The extremely resorbed edentulous mandible, with a bone height of 8 mm or less, is still a challenge in implant dentistry. Recently, dental implants of 6 mm in length have been developed. Purpose: The purpose of this 1-year prospective cohort study was to evaluate treatment outcome of ma

  3. [Standartization of MRI studies in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryukhov, V V; Krotenkova, I A; Morozova, S N; Krotenkova, M V

    2016-01-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with multiple sclerosis has markedly increased in recent years. The main task of the MRI studies after the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is to assess the dynamics of MRI for determining disease progression and monitoring the efficacy of therapy. In this regard, it is very important to obtain the most identical baseline and follow-up MRI that is possible when a single standard protocol is used. This article presents the protocol of brain MRI and spinal cord MRI and interpretation of MRI studies in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  4. Repeat urine cultures in children with urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risky Vitria Prasetyo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Urinary tract infections (UTIs are the second leading cause of infection in children, following respiratory tract infections. Repeat urine cultures after antibiotic treatment are routinely obtained in clinical practice to verify proof of bacteriologic cure. The American Academy of Pediatrics does not recommended repeat cultures, due to increased cost and discomfort to patients. Objective To determine the frequency of positive repeat urine cultures after 3 days of antibiotics in children with UTIs. Methods We conducted a retrospective study on children with UTIs who visited the Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Department of Child Health at Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya from January 2006 to December 2011. Results of repeat urine cultures were obtained after 3 days of antibiotic treatment. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Results Of the 779 pediatric UTI cases, repeat urine cultures were performed in 264 (33.9% cases. Of the 264 patients who comprised our study, there were similar numbers of girls and boys (50.4% vs. 49.6%, respectively. The mean age of patients was 43.9 (SD 1.59 months and 35.5% of subjects were aged under 1 year. In the initial urine cultures of our subjects, Escherichia coli was the most common organism found, with 92 cases (34.8%, compared to 58 cases (21.9% of Klebsiella pneumoniae and 29 cases (10.9% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Rrepeat urine cultures showed no bacterial growth in 168 cases (63.6%. Conclusion Mostly negative repeat urine cultures will probably obviate the need of this test in daily routine practice. [Paediatr Indones. 2012;52:170-4].

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other ... that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the patient. ...

  7. Metalloprotein-based MRI probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yuri; Jasanoff, Alan

    2013-04-17

    Metalloproteins have long been recognized as key determinants of endogenous contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of biological subjects. More recently, both natural and engineered metalloproteins have been harnessed as biotechnological tools to probe gene expression, enzyme activity, and analyte concentrations by MRI. Metalloprotein MRI probes are paramagnetic and function by analogous mechanisms to conventional gadolinium or iron oxide-based MRI contrast agents. Compared with synthetic agents, metalloproteins typically offer worse sensitivity, but the possibilities of using protein engineering and targeted gene expression approaches in conjunction with metalloprotein contrast agents are powerful and sometimes definitive strengths. This review summarizes theoretical and practical aspects of metalloprotein-based contrast agents, and discusses progress in the exploitation of these proteins for molecular imaging applications.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery pose no risk during MRI. However, a recently placed artificial joint may require the use of ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and should not enter the MRI scanning area: cochlear (ear) implant some types of clips used for ... follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stroke infections developmental anomalies hydrocephalus — dilatation of fluid spaces within the brain (ventricles) causes of epilepsy (seizure) ... MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  13. MRI of orbital hydroxyapatite implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanders, A.E. [Dept. of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); De Potter, P. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Wills Eye Inst., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rao, V.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tom, B.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shields, C.L. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Wills Eye Inst., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shields, J.A. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Wills Eye Inst., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Our aim was to use MRI for the postsurgical assessment of a new form of integrated orbital implant composed of a porous calcium phosphate hydroxyapatite substrate. We studied ten patients 24-74 years of age who underwent enucleation and implantation of a hydroxyapatite ball; 5-13 months after surgery, each patient was examined by spin-echo MRI, with fat suppression and gadolinium enhancement. Fibrovascular ingrowth was demonstrated in all ten patients as areas of enhancement at the periphery of the hydroxyapatite sphere that extended to the center to a variable degree. The radiologist should aware of the MRI appearances of the coralline hydroxyapatite orbital implant since it is now widely used following enucleation. MRI is a useful means to determine successful incorporation of the substrate into the orbital tissues. The normal pattern of contrast enhancement should not be mistaken for recurrent tumor or infection. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  18. MRI appearance of muscle denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, S. [University Hospital of Wales, Department of Radiology, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Venkatanarasimha, N.; Walsh, M.A.; Hughes, P.M. [Derriford Hospital, Department of Radiology, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    Muscle denervation results from a variety of causes including trauma, neoplasia, neuropathies, infections, autoimmune processes and vasculitis. Traditionally, the diagnosis of muscle denervation was based on clinical examination and electromyography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a distinct advantage over electromyography, not only in diagnosing muscle denervation, but also in determining its aetiology. MRI demonstrates characteristic signal intensity patterns depending on the stage of muscle denervation. The acute and subacutely denervated muscle shows a high signal intensity pattern on fluid sensitive sequences and normal signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI images. In chronic denervation, muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration demonstrate high signal changes on T1-weighted sequences in association with volume loss. The purpose of this review is to summarise the MRI appearance of denervated muscle, with special emphasis on the signal intensity patterns in acute and subacute muscle denervation. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ... to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should ... copied to a CD. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise in several radiologic ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors stroke infections developmental anomalies hydrocephalus — dilatation of fluid spaces ... MRA page for more information. MRI can detect stroke at a very early stage by mapping the ...

  4. MRI of the Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... receive injections of gadolinium contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the Safety page ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... receive injections of gadolinium contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the Safety page ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unless you are told otherwise, take your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear ... your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require you ...

  7. Spiritual absence and 1-year mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Deidre B; Christian, Lisa M; Patidar, Seema; Bishop, Michelle M; Dodd, Stacy M; Athanason, Rebecca; Wingard, John R; Reddy, Vijay S

    2010-08-01

    Religiosity and spirituality have been associated with better survival in large epidemiologic studies. This study examined the relationship between spiritual absence and 1-year all-cause mortality in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Depression and problematic compliance were examined as possible mediators of a significant spiritual absence-mortality relationship. Eighty-five adults (mean = 46.85 years old, SD = 11.90 years) undergoing evaluation for allogeneic HSCT had routine psychologie evaluation prior to HSCT admission. The Millon Behavioral Medicine Diagnostic was used to assess spiritual absence, depression, and problematic compliance, the psychosocial predictors of interest. Patient status at 1 year and survival time in days were abstracted from medical records. Cox regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between the psychosocial factors of interest and mortality after adjusting for relevant biobehavioral factors. Twenty-nine percent (n = 25) of participants died within 1 year of HSCT. After covarying for disease type, individuals with the highest spiritual absence and problematic compliance scores were significantly more likely to die 1-year post-HSCT (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.49, P = .043 and HR = 3.74, P = .029, respectively), particularly secondary to infection, sepsis, or graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (HR = 4.56, P = .01 and HR = 5.61, P = .014), relative to those without elevations on these scales. Depression was not associated with 1-year mortality, and problematic compliance did not mediate the relationship between spiritual absence and mortality. These preliminary results suggest that both spiritual absence and problematic compliance may be associated with poorer survival following HSCT. Future research should examine these relations in a larger sample using a more comprehensive assessment of spirituality.

  8. STUDY OF POSTERIOR FOSSA TUMORS BY HIGH RESOLUTION MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sree Hari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is the imaging modality used for the assessment of infratentorial neoplasms. Although Computed Tomography (CT provides better demonstration of small or subtle calcifications within tumors. OBJECTIVES Study is done to assess the potential of MRI in characterisation of different tumors in posterior fossa by evaluating various unenhanced and gadolinium enhanced sequences and to compare high resolution FSE MRI sequences with routine FSE MRI sequences in diagnosing posterior fossa brain tumors. Also correlate findings on Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Pathological diagnosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 52 patients were diagnosed by CT brain as having posterior fossa brain for a year of 2 years were included in the study. In all studies MR imaging was performed with a clinical 1.5 T system (General electrical medical systems. A dedicated phased-array coil was used. RESULTS The age group ranged from 1 year to 60 years, majority were between 1 to 20 years (39%. Slight male preponderance was seen (males 29, females 23. Commonest tumor encountered in our study was vestibular schwannoma. DWI alone can differentiate different pediatric posterior fossa brain tumors. One case of pilocytic astrocytoma showed solid lesion instead of typical cystic lesion with mural nodule. One case AT-RT showed 2 lesions one in cerebrum, one in CP angle. Common feature being intra-axial lesion involving cerebellum. MRI was able to predict diagnosis in 50 of the 52 tumors. CONCLUSION Magnetic Resonance Imaging was found to be a highly sensitive imaging procedure and method of choice for posterior fossa brain tumors.

  9. MRI in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldemeyer, K.S. (Div. of Neuroradiology, Dept. of Radiology, Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Smith, R.R. (Div. of Neuroradiology, Dept. of Radiology, Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Harris, T.M. (Div. of Neuroradiology, Dept. of Radiology, Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Edwards, M.K. (Div. of Neuroradiology, Dept. of Radiology, Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States))

    1994-04-01

    A retrospective analysis of CT and MRI studies in 12 patients with a clinical diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) was performed. MRI was the definitive modality for the assessment of the lesions of ADEM: all patients had abnormalities consistent with the clinical diagnosis. Ten had abnormalities in the brain, three spinal cord lesions, and three showed evidence of optic neuritis. CT was normal in 6 of the 7 patients in which it was performed. (orig.)

  10. MRI and intraocular tamponade media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manfre, I. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Inst. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Catania (Italy)); Fabbri, G. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Inst. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Catania (Italy)); Avitabile, T. (Inst. of Ophthalmology, Univ. of Catania (Italy)); Biondi, P. (Inst. of Ophthalmology, Univ. of Catania (Italy)); Reibaldi, A. (Inst. of Ophthalmology, Univ. of Catania (Italy)); Pero, G. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Inst. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Catania (Italy))

    1993-05-01

    Thirteen patients who underwent surgery for retinal detachment and injection of intraocular tamponade media (silicone oil, flurosilicone oil, or perfluoro-carbon liquid) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), using spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted images. The ophthalmic tamponade media showed different signal intensity, according to their chemical structure. Unlike ophthalmoscopy or ultrasonography, MRI showed no oil-related artefact, making possible recognition of recurrent retinal detachment. (orig.)

  11. MRI evaluation of vascular dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yicheng Liu; Hongxing Zhang; Wei Huang; Wenjun Wan; Hongfen Peng

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTTVE: To explain the association between vascular dementia and the cranial MRI manifestations, and recognize the value of cranial MRI in the early diagnosis of vascular dementia and the assessment of disease conditions.DATA SOURCES: Pubmed database was searched to identify articles about the cranial MRI manifestations of patients with vascular dementia published in English from January 1992 to June 2006 by using the key words of "MRI, vascular dementia". Others were collected by searching the name of journals and title of articles in the Chinese full-text journal database.STUDY SELECTTON: The collected articles were primarily checked, those correlated with the cranial MRI manifestations of patients with vascular dementia were selected, while the obviously irrelative ones were excluded, and the rest were retrieved manually, the full-texts were searched.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 255 articles were collected, 41 of them were involved, and the other 214 were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS: MRI can be taken as one of the effective methods for the early diagnosis and disease evaluation of vascular dementia. White matter lesions are the important risk factors of vascular dementia.Vascular dementia is accompanied by the atrophy of related brain sites, but further confirmation is needed to investigate whether there is significant difference. MRI can be used to quantitatively investigate the infarcted sites and sizes of patients with vascular dementia after infarction, but there is still lack of systematic investigation on the association of the infarcted sites and sizes with the cognitive function of patients with vascular dementia.CONCLUSTON: Cranial MRI can detect the symptoms of vascular dementia at early period, so that corresponding measures can be adopted to prevent and treat vascular dementia in time.

  12. Congenital dacryocystocele: prenatal MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazici, Zeynep [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Uludag University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Bursa (Turkey); Kline-Fath, Beth M.; Rubio, Eva I.; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A.; Linam, Leann E. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Yazici, Bulent [Uludag University, Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Bursa (Turkey)

    2010-12-15

    Congenital dacryocystocele can be diagnosed prenatally by imaging. Prenatal MRI is increasingly utilized for fetal diagnosis. To present the radiological and clinical features of seven fetuses with congenital dacryocystocele diagnosed with prenatal MRI. The institutional database of 1,028 consecutive prenatal MR examinations performed during a period of 4 years was reviewed retrospectively. The cases of congenital dacryocystocele were identified by reading the report of each MRI study. The incidence of dacryocystocele diagnosed with prenatal MRI was 0.7% (n=7/1,028). The dacryocystocele was bilateral in three fetuses. Mean gestational age at the time of diagnosis was 31 weeks. The indication for prenatal MRI was the presence or the suspicion of central nervous system abnormality in six fetuses and diaphragmatic hernia in one. Dacryocystocele was associated with an intranasal cyst in six of ten eyes. Prenatal sonography revealed dacryocystocele in only two of seven fetuses. Of eight eyes with postnatal follow-up, four did not have any lacrimal symptoms. Prenatal MRI can delineate congenital dacryocystocele more clearly and in a more detailed fashion than ultrasonography. Presence of dacryocystocele was symptomatic in only 50% of our patients, supporting that prenatal diagnosis of dacryocystocele might follow a benign course. (orig.)

  13. Inexperienced clinicians can extract pathoanatomic information from MRI narrative reports with high reproducability for use in research/quality assurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Briggs, Andrew M; Albert, Hanne Birgit;

    2011-01-01

    Background Although reproducibility in reading MRI images amongst radiologists and clinicians has been studied previously, no studies have examined the reproducibility of inexperienced clinicians in extracting pathoanatomic information from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) narrative reports...... pathoanatomic information from radiologist-generated MRI narrative reports. Methods Twenty MRI narrative reports were randomly extracted from an institutional database. A group of three physiotherapy students independently reviewed the reports and coded the presence of 14 common pathoanatomic findings using...... a categorical electronic coding matrix. Decision rules were developed after initial coding in an effort to resolve ambiguities in narrative reports. This process was repeated a further three times using separate samples of 20 MRI reports until no further ambiguities were identified (total n=80). Reproducibility...

  14. Directionality switchable gain stabilized linear repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Takayuki; Ohmachi, Tadashi; Aida, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    We propose a new approach to realize a bidirectional linear repeater suitable for future optical internet networks and fault location in repeater chain with OTDR. The proposed approach is the linear repeater of simple configuration whose directionality is rearranged dynamically by electrical control signal. The repeater is composed of a magneto-optical switch, a circulator, a dynamically gain stabilized unidirectional EDFA, and control circuits. The repeater directionality is rearranged as fast as 0.1ms by an electrical control pulse. It is experimentally confirmed that OTDR with the directionality switchable repeater is feasible for repeater chain. The detailed design and performance of the repeater are also discussed, including the multi-pass interference (MPI) which may arise in the proposed repeater, the effect of the MPI on SNR degradation of the repeater chain and the feed-forward EDFA gain control circuit.

  15. Three-dimensional assessment of mandibular advancement 1 year after surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis Ribeiro Carvalho, Felipe; Cevidanes, Lucia Helena Soares; Motta, Alexandre Trindade Simões da; de Oliveira Almeida, Marco Antonio; Phillips, Ceib

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This prospective observational study evaluated changes in the 3-dimensional position and remodeling of the mandibular rami, condyles, and chin at splint removal and 1 year after mandibular advancement surgery. Methods Presurgery, splint removal (4–6 weeks postsurgery), and 1-year postsurgery cone-beam computed tomography scans of 27 subjects were used. Superimposition on the cranial base was used to assess positional or remodeling changes in the anatomic regions of interest. Surface distance displacements were visually displayed and quantified by 3-dimensional color maps. A 1-sample t test was used to assess the average postsurgical changes of each region of interest. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results After antero-inferior chin displacement with surgery (mean, 6.81 ± 3.2 mm at splint removal), the average 1-year post-surgery displacement was not statistically significant (P = 0.44). Postsurgical adaptations greater than 2 mm were observed in 48% of the patients: 16% with an additional anterior-inferior displacement of the chin of 2 to 4 mm, and 4% with ≥4 mm; 20% had postero-superior movement of 2 to 4 mm, and 8% had postero-superior movement of ≥4 mm. The condyles tended to move, on average, ≤2 mm supero-posteriorly with surgery, and this small positional displacement was maintained 1 year postsurgery (right condyle, P = 0.58; left, P = 0.88). The rami exhibited outward (lateral) movements with surgery, with greater displacement of the inferior part of the rami (≥2 mm in 65% of the subjects). This torque of the ramus with surgery was stable 1 year postsurgery. Conclusions Three-dimensional assessment of skeletal changes with mandibular advancement surgery shows that nearly half of the patients have >2 mm change in chin position from splint removal to the 1-year follow-up, with approximately equal chances of anterior and posterior movement. Torque of the rami usually occurs with mandibular advancement surgery. PMID:20381760

  16. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of the fast radio bursts has led several authors to hypothesise that they originate in cataclysmic astrophysical events. Here we report the detection of ten additional bursts from the direction of FRB121102, using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and wh...

  17. Measurement-based quantum repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Zwerger, M; Briegel, H J

    2012-01-01

    We introduce measurement-based quantum repeaters, where small-scale measurement-based quantum processors are used to perform entanglement purification and entanglement swapping in a long-range quantum communication protocol. In the scheme, pre-prepared entangled states stored at intermediate repeater stations are coupled with incoming photons by simple Bell-measurements, without the need of performing additional quantum gates or measurements. We show how to construct the required resource states, and how to minimize their size. We analyze the performance of the scheme under noise and imperfections, with focus on small-scale implementations involving entangled states of few qubits. We find measurement-based purification protocols with significantly improved noise thresholds. Furthermore we show that already resource states of small size suffice to significantly increase the maximal communication distance. We also discuss possible advantages of our scheme for different set-ups.

  18. Breast MRI used as a problem-solving tool reliably excludes malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spick, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.spick@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna (AKH), Waehringer-Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Szolar, Dieter H.M.; Preidler, Klaus W.; Tillich, Manfred; Reittner, Pia [Diagnostikum Graz-Südwest, Weblinger Guertel 25, 8054 Graz (Austria); Baltzer, Pascal A., E-mail: pascal.baltzer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna (AKH), Waehringer-Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Breast MRI reliably excludes malignancy in conventional BI-RADS 0 cases (NPV: 100%). • Malignancy rate in the BI-RADS 0 population is substantial with 13.5%. • Breast MRI used as a problem-solving tool reliably excludes malignancy. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of breast MRI if used as a problem-solving tool in BI-RADS 0 cases. Material and methods: In this IRB-approved, single-center study, 687 women underwent high-resolution-3D, dynamic contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between January 2012 and December 2012. Of these, we analyzed 111 consecutive patients (mean age, 51 ± 12 years; range, 20–83 years) categorized as BI-RADS 0. Breast MRI findings were stratified by clinical presentations, conventional imaging findings, and breast density. MRI results were compared to the reference standard, defined as histopathology or an imaging follow-up of at least 1 year. Results: One hundred eleven patients with BI-RADS 0 conventional imaging findings revealed 30 (27%) mammographic masses, 57 (51.4%) mammographic architectural distortions, five (4.5%) mammographic microcalcifications, 17 (15.3%) ultrasound-only findings, and two palpable findings without imaging correlates. There were 15 true-positive, 85 true-negative, 11 false-positive, and zero false-negative breast MRI findings, resulting in a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of 100% (15/15), 88.5% (85/96), 57.7% (15/26), and 100% (85/85), respectively. Breast density and reasons for referral had no significant influence on the diagnostic performance of breast MRI (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Breast MRI reliably excludes malignancy in conventional BI-RADS 0 cases resulting in a NPV of 100% (85/85) and a PPV of 57.7% (15/26)

  19. Repeatability of Harris Corner Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Lili

    2003-01-01

    Interest point detectors are commonly employed to reduce the amount of data to be processed. The ideal interest point detector would robustly select those features which are most appropriate or salient for the application and data at hand. This paper shows that interest points are geometrically stable under different transformations.This property makes interest points very successful in the context of image matching. To measure this property quantatively, we introduce a evaluation criterion: repeatability rate.

  20. Serial MRI in a case of familial hemiplegic migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butteriss, D.J.A.; Birchall, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Regional Neurosciences Centre Newcastle General Hospital, Westgate Road, NE4 6BE, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Ramesh, V. [Department of Paediatric Neurology, Regional Neurosciences Centre Newcastle General Hospital, Westgate Road, NE4 6BE, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2003-05-01

    We report MRI findings in a patient with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) with repeated episodes of hemiparesis. FHM is caused by a penetrant autosomal dominant genetic mutation; several mutations have been genotyped, involving brain-expressed ion channels. We found cerebral oedema, dilatation of intracerebral vessels and decreased water diffusion contralateral to the hemiparesis, not respecting vascular territories, with subsequent complete resolution of both clinical and imaging abnormalities. These results are thought to be consistent with an underlying primary neuronal pathology with secondary vascular effects, as opposed to the traditional, primarily vascular, model of migraine aetiology. (orig.)

  1. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6: MRI of three Japanese patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, J.I.; Tokumoto, H.; Yukitake, M.; Matsui, M.; Kuroda, Y. [Division of Neurology, Department of Internal Medicine, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849 (Japan); Matsuyama, Z.; Kawakami, H.; Nakamura, S. [Third Department of Internal Medicine, Hiroshima University School of Medicine Hiroshima (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    We describe the MRI findings in three Japanese patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) in which a polymorphic CAG repeat was identified in the gene encoding the {alpha}{sub 1A} voltage-dependent P/Q-type Ca{sup 2+} channel subunit (CACNL1A4). All showed slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia and mild pyramidal signs. Neuroradiologically, they had moderate cerebellar atrophy, most prominently in the superior vermis, whereas the brain stem appeared to be spared. No abnormal signal intensity was identified. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 23 refs.

  2. Sexual function in male patients with obstructive sleep apnoea after 1 year of CPAP treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marian Christin; Kristensen, Ellids; Berg, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    year of CPAP treatment, a total of 207 CPAP-compliant male patients (age 26-77) received a survey with questions drawn from two self-administered questionnaires on sexuality - Life Satisfaction 11 (LiSat-11) and brief sexual function inventory (BSFI). For assessment of daytime sleepiness, we used...... the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS). RESULTS: Response rate was 76%. We found no significant changes in satisfaction with relation to partner or life as a whole, but satisfaction with sexual life (LiSat-11) and both general and functional aspects of sexuality (BSFI) were significantly improved after 1 year......OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to investigate what impact 1 year of effective nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment had on general and functional aspects of sexuality in male patients with a confirmed diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). METHODS: Before and after 1...

  3. A 1-year time course study of the relaxation times and histology for irradiated rat lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shioya, S.; Haida, M.; Fukuzaki, M.; Ono, Y.; Tsuda, M.; Ohta, Y.; Yamabayashi, H. (Tokai Univ. School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1990-05-01

    To investigate the NMR relaxation times for irradiated rat lung tissue, we measured T1 and T2 at 11 different times during the injury's 1-year time course. A biexponential analysis of T2 was used to determine T2 fast (T2f) and T2 slow (T2s). In addition, we measured water content and correlated changes in the relaxation times with pathological changes. The correlation indicates the following: (1) Shortly after irradiation, the biexponential T2 decay for 1/3 of the samples became monoexponential and there were no noticeable pathological changes observed using light microscopy. (2) During radiation pneumonitis, T2f and T2s were prolonged. This accompanied acute edematous changes and inflammatory cell infiltration. (3) Finally, during radiation fibrosis T1 shortened and collagen increased. We observed no significant correlation between relaxation time changes and water content changes throughout the 1-year time course.

  4. Safety and efficacy of polymer-free paclitaxel-eluting microporous stent in real-world practice: 1-year follow-up of the SERY-I registry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Rui-yan; QIU Jian; WANG Wei; CHEN Xi-ming; YANG Zhi-iian; YAN Jin-chuan; CHEN Shao-liang; HOU Yu-qing; WU Yan-qing; LUO Hai-ming; QIU Jian-ping; ZHANG Oi; ZHU Li; WANG Yan; FU Guo-sheng; WANG Jian-an; MA Kang-hua; YIN Yue-hui; ZHANG Dai-fu; HU Xue-song; ZHU Guo-ying; SHEN Wei-feng; ZHU Jin-zhou; CHEN Liang-long; ZHANG Chen-yun; ZHOU Xu-chen; YUAN Yong; ZHONG Zhi-xiong; LI Lang

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundPolymer coating on coronary stents induces vascular inflammatory response,reduces re-endothelialization,and affects long-term outcome after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).The SERY-1 registry aimed to determine whether a novel polymer-free paclitaxel-eluting microporous Yinyi stent could improve 1-year outcome after index procedure in real-world clinical practice.Methods Clinical and angiographic data and follow-up outcome were collected in 1045 patients who underwent PCI with implantation of ≥1 Yinyi stents between June 2008 and August 2009 at 27 medical centers.The primary endpoint was the cumulative rate of composite major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and the secondary endpoint was the incidence of stent thrombosis at 1 year.Results Overall,1376 lesions were treated successfully with 1713 Yinyi stents,and 1019 (98.7%) patients received dual antiplatelet therapy for at least 12 months.During 1-year follow-up,8 patients (0.78%) had cardiac death,6 (0.58%)suffered non-fatal myocardial infarction,and 46 (4.46%) underwent repeat PCI due to recurrence of angina,resulting in 1-year MACE-free survival of 94.09%.Stent thrombosis occurred in 10 (0.97%) patients,and the rate of Academic Research Consortium (ARC) definite or probable stent thrombosis was 0.78%.Conclusions Polymer-free paclitaxel-eluting microporous Yinyi stent is effective and safe for interventional treatment of coronary artery disease in real-world clinical practice,without recourse to carrier polymer.Potential long-term clinical advantages of this stent deserve further investigation.

  5. Outcome of knee injuries in general practice: 1-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Background Knee injuries may lead to pain and to functional limitations in the activities of daily living. Patients with knee injuries are frequently seen in general practice; however, the outcome and management in these patients is not known. Aim To assess the outcome and management of knee injuries at 12 months' follow-up in general practice. Design of study A prospective observational cohort study with a 1-year follow-up. Setting. Primary health care. Method Adult patients consulting their...

  6. How hot is too hot? Live-trapped gray wolf rectal temperatures and 1-year survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber-Meyer, Shannon M.; Mech, L. David

    2014-01-01

    The ability of physically restrained and anesthetized wolves to thermoregulate is lessened and could lead to reduced survival, yet no information is available about this subject. Therefore, we analyzed rectal temperatures related to survival 1 year post-capture from 173 adult (non-pup) gray wolves (Canis lupus) captured in modified foot-hold traps for radiocollaring during June–August, 1988–2011, in the Superior National Forest of northeastern Minnesota, USA. The maximum observed rectal temperature (“maxtemp,” ° F, ° C) in each wolf during capture (x = 104.0, 40.0; SD = 2.0, 1.1; min. = 95.9, 35.5; max. = 108, 42.2) was not a significant predictor of survival to 1 year post-capture. Although no weather or morphometric variable was a significant predictor of maxtemps, wolves initially anesthetized with ketamine–xylazine rather than telazol®–xylazine averaged higher maxtemps. This information does not fully address possible effects of high body temperatures related to live-capture and handling of wolves, but it does provide a useful waypoint for future assessments of this relationship and a reassurance to wildlife practitioners that the maxtemps observed in our study did not appear to affect 1-year survival.

  7. Origin and fate of repeats in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achaz, G; Rocha, E P C; Netter, P; Coissac, E

    2002-07-01

    We investigated 53 complete bacterial chromosomes for intrachromosomal repeats. In previous studies on eukaryote chromosomes, we proposed a model for the dynamics of repeats based on the continuous genesis of tandem repeats, followed by an active process of high deletion rate, counteracted by rearrangement events that may prevent the repeats from being deleted. The present study of long repeats in the genomes of Bacteria and Archaea suggests that our model of interspersed repeats dynamics may apply to them. Thus the duplication process might be a consequence of very ancient mechanisms shared by all three domains. Moreover, we show that there is a strong negative correlation between nucleotide composition bias and the repeat density of genomes. We hypothesise that in highly biased genomes, non-duplicated small repeats arise more frequently by random effects and are used as primers for duplication mechanisms, leading to a higher density of large repeats.

  8. Longitudinal changes in prospective memory and their clinical correlates at 1-year follow-up in first-episode schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungvari, Gabor S.; Ng, Chee H.; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Jingjing; Shum, David H. K.; Man, David; Liu, Deng-Tang; Li, Jun; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate prospective memory (PM) and the association with clinical factors at 1-year follow-up in first-episode schizophrenia (FES). Thirty-two FES patients recruited from a university-affiliated psychiatric hospital in Beijing and 17 healthy community controls (HCs) were included. Time- and event-based PM (TBPM and EBPM) performances were measured with the Chinese version of the Cambridge Prospective Memory Test (C-CAMPROMPT) at baseline and at one-year follow-up. A number of other neurocognitive tests were also administered. Remission was determined at the endpoint according to the PANSS score ≤ 3 for selected items. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a significant interaction between time (baseline vs. endpoint) and group (FES vs. HCs) for EBPM (F(1, 44) = 8.8, p = 0.005) and for all neurocognitive components. Paired samples t-tests showed significant improvement in EBPM in FES (13.1±3.7 vs. 10.3±4.8; t = 3.065, p = 0.004), compared to HCs (15.7±3.6 vs. 16.5±2.3; t = -1.248, p = 0.230). A remission rate of 59.4% was found in the FES group. Analysis of covariance revealed that remitters performed significantly better on EBPM (14.9±2.6 vs. 10.4±3.6; F(1, 25) = 12.2, p = 0.002) than non-remitters at study endpoint. The association between EBPM and 12-month clinical improvement in FES suggests that EBPM may be a potential neurocognitive marker for the effectiveness of standard pharmacotherapy. Furthermore, the findings also imply that PM may not be strictly a trait-related endophenotype as indicated in previous studies. PMID:28245266

  9. MRI Abnormalities Are Common In Little League Player’s Elbows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennock, Andrew T.; Roocroft, Joanna Helena; Bastrom, Tracey P.; Kruk, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Youth baseball is extremely popular, but it has been associated with elbow pain and pathology. The purpose of this study was to examine pre- and post-season Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) changes in Little League baseball players and correlate these findings with the players’ throwing history and physical exams. Methods: A prospective study of Little League players age 10 -13 years was performed. Players were recruited prior to the start of the season and underwent bilateral elbow MRI. All players underwent a physical exam and responded to a questionnaire addressing their playing history and arm pain. At the end of the season, the players underwent repeat physical exam and MRI of their throwing arm. MRIs were read by two blinded radiologists. During the season, player statistics including innings played and pitch counts were recorded. Physical exam findings and players statistics were compared between subjects with and without MRI changes utilizing chi-square and ANOVA techniques. Results: Twenty-six players were enrolled. On pre-season MRI, nine players (35%) had 12 positive MRI findings; edema of the medial epicondyle (ME) apophysis (7), fragmentation of ME (2), and edema of the sublime tubercle (3). The two factors associated with a positive MRI were year round play (47% vs 11%, phistory of pain was also associated with year round play and a private coach (p0.10). Descriptively, 60% of self-reported pitchers/catchers had post season MRI findings versus 40% of other field positions (p=0.3). Conclusion: Pre-season and post-season MRI abnormalities of the medial elbow are common in Little League baseball players. While Little League pitching guidelines are intended to decrease overuse injuries, our data indicate that further refinement of these guidelines addressing year round play, pain and private coaching should be considered.

  10. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid flow assessed using intraoperative MRI during posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Aaron E; Jane, John A; Liu, Kenneth C; Oldfield, Edward H

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT The authors completed a prospective, institutional review board-approved study using intraoperative MRI (iMRI) in patients undergoing posterior fossa decompression (PFD) for Chiari I malformation. The purpose of the study was to examine the utility of iMRI in determining when an adequate decompression had been performed. METHODS Patients with symptomatic Chiari I malformations with imaging findings of obstruction of the CSF space at the foramen magnum, with or without syringomyelia, were considered candidates for surgery. All patients underwent complete T1, T2, and cine MRI studies in the supine position preoperatively as a baseline. After the patient was placed prone with the neck flexed in position for surgery, iMRI was performed. The patient then underwent a bone decompression of the foramen magnum and arch of C-1, and the MRI was repeated. If obstruction was still present, then in a stepwise fashion the patient underwent dural splitting, duraplasty, and coagulation of the tonsils, with an iMRI study performed after each step guiding the decision to proceed further. RESULTS Eighteen patients underwent PFD for Chiari I malformations between November 2011 and February 2013; 15 prone preincision iMRIs were performed. Fourteen of these patients (93%) demonstrated significant improvement of CSF flow through the foramen magnum dorsal to the tonsils with positioning only. This improvement was so notable that changes in CSF flow as a result of the bone decompression were difficult to discern. CONCLUSIONS The authors observed significant CSF flow changes when simply positioning the patient for surgery. These results put into question intraoperative flow assessments that suggest adequate decompression by PFD, whether by iMRI or intraoperative ultrasound. The use of intraoperative imaging during PFD for Chiari I malformation, whether by ultrasound or iMRI, is limited by CSF flow dynamics across the foramen magnum that change significantly when the patient is

  11. A neurotological study of patients with pontine hyperintense lesions on T2 weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Toru; Tominaga, Satoru; Yukimasa, Akiko; Oku, Masaya; Sakagami, Masafumi [Hyogo Coll. of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    Pontine hyperintense lesions seen on T2-weighted MRI were thought to be related to disequilibrium. Some of these lesions have a low signal on T1-weighted imaging, while others have an iso-signal. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between neurological findings and pontine lesions detected by MRI. The subjects were 11 patients (6 males, 5 females; age range: 30 to 83 years [mean: 64.1 years]) with pontine hyperintense lesions identified on T2-weighted MRI. We compared the clinical signs and the MRI findings. Six of the patients had low-intensity areas on T1-weighted images, and the other 5 had iso-intensity areas. Six patients complained of vertigo, and 5 complained of dizziness. Eight complained of positionaly evoked disequilibrium. Positional nystagmus was seen in 4 patients. In 9 patients, abnormalities were found on the ENG test, including the saccadic eye movement test, ETT, and OKP. Numbness on the lips occurred in 2 patients, and cerebellar signs were present in 4. None of the patients had facial paralysis. Disequilibrium originating in the central nervous system was suggested in 10 patients. Clinical examinations revealed similar findings in patients with a low signal on T1-weighted MRI and those with an iso-signal. Our results indicate that pontine lesions identified by T2-weighted MRI cause vertigo or dizziness, and, in most cases, these lesions cause abnormal neurological or neurological abnormalities. (author)

  12. Bayesian Concordance Correlation Coefficient with Application to Repeatedly Measured Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanu BHATTACHARJEE

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In medical research, Lin's classical concordance correlation coefficient (CCC is frequently applied to evaluate the similarity of the measurements produced by different raters or methods on the same subjects. It is particularly useful for continuous data. The objective of this paper is to propose the Bayesian counterpart to compute CCC for continuous data. Material and Methods: A total of 33 patients of astrocytoma brain treated in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Malabar Cancer Centre is enrolled in this work. It is a continuous data of tumor volume and tumor size repeatedly measured during baseline pretreatment workup and post surgery follow-ups for all patients. The tumor volume and tumor size are measured separately by MRI and CT scan. The agreement of measurement between MRI and CT scan is calculated through CCC. The statistical inference is performed through Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC technique. Results: Bayesian CCC is found suitable to get prominent evidence for test statistics to explore the relation between concordance measurements. The posterior mean estimates and 95% credible interval of CCC on tumor size and tumor volume are observed with 0.96(0.87,0.99 and 0.98(0.95,0.99 respectively. Conclusion: The Bayesian inference is adopted for development of the computational algorithm. The approach illustrated in this work provides the researchers an opportunity to find out the most appropriate model for specific data and apply CCC to fulfill the desired hypothesis.

  13. Improving repeatability by improving quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronen, Shuki; Ackers, Mark; Schlumberger, Geco-Prakla; Brink, Mundy

    1998-12-31

    Time lapse (4-D) seismic is a promising tool for reservoir characterization and monitoring. The method is apparently simple: to acquire data repeatedly over the same reservoir, process and interpret the data sets, then changes between the data sets indicate changes in the reservoir. A problem with time lapse seismic data is that reservoirs are a relatively small part of the earth and important reservoir changes may cause very small differences to the time lapse data. The challenge is to acquire and process economical time lapse data such that reservoir changes can be detected above the noise of varying acquisition and environment. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  14. Coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2014-11-01

    We develop a coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) approach. With the proposed scheme, if a user message is correctly decoded in the first HARQ rounds, its spectrum is allocated to other users, to improve the network outage probability and the users\\' fairness. The results, which are obtained for single- and multiple-antenna setups, demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach in different conditions. For instance, with a maximum of M retransmissions and single transmit/receive antennas, the diversity gain of a user increases from M to (J+1)(M-1)+1 where J is the number of users helping that user.

  15. Efficacy of risedronate in men with primary and secondary osteoporosis: results of a 1-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, J D; Faber, H; Farahmand, P; Dorst, A

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is prevalent in men with an estimated one in eight men older than 50 years suffering from osteoporotic fracture, and a higher mortality rate after fracture among men compared with women. There are few approved therapies for osteoporosis in men. This observational study assesses the efficacy and safety of risedronate in the treatment of men with primary and secondary osteoporosis. A single-center, open label, randomized, prospective 1-year study was conducted in men with primary or secondary osteoporosis. Patients were randomized to risedronate (risedronate 5 mg/day plus calcium 1,000 mg/day and vitamin D 800 IU/day) or control groups (alfacalcidol 1 mug/day plus calcium 500 mg/day or vitamin D 1,000 IU/day plus calcium 800 mg/day). Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements, X-rays of the spine, a medical history and physical exam, and patient self-assessments of back pain were performed at baseline and 12 months. Blinded semi-quantitative fracture assessment was conducted by a radiologist. A total of 316 men with osteoporosis were enrolled in the trial (risedronate, n=158; control, n=158). At 1 year lumbar spine BMD increased by 4.7% in the risedronate group versus an increase of 1.0% in the control group (P<0.001). Significant increases in BMD at the total hip and femoral neck were also observed with risedronate compared with the control group. The incidence of new vertebral fracture in the risedronate group was reduced by 60% versus the control group (P=0.028). Daily treatment with risedronate for 12 months significantly increased BMD at the lumbar spine, femoral neck and total hip and significantly reduced the incidence of new vertebral fractures. This is the first prospective, randomized, controlled trial to demonstrate a significant reduction in vertebral fractures in 1 year in men with primary or secondary osteoporosis.

  16. A comparison of emission calculations using different modeled indicators with 1-year online measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengers, Bernd; Schiefler, Inga; Büscher, Wolfgang

    2013-12-01

    The overall measurement of farm level greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in dairy production is not feasible, from either an engineering or administrative point of view. Instead, computational model systems are used to generate emission inventories, demanding a validation by measurement data. This paper tests the GHG calculation of the dairy farm-level optimization model DAIRYDYN, including methane (CH₄) from enteric fermentation and managed manure. The model involves four emission calculation procedures (indicators), differing in the aggregation level of relevant input variables. The corresponding emission factors used by the indicators range from default per cow (activity level) emissions up to emission factors based on feed intake, manure amount, and milk production intensity. For validation of the CH₄ accounting of the model, 1-year CH₄ measurements of an experimental free-stall dairy farm in Germany are compared to model simulation results. An advantage of this interdisciplinary study is given by the correspondence of the model parameterization and simulation horizon with the experimental farm's characteristics and measurement period. The results clarify that modeled emission inventories (2,898, 4,637, 4,247, and 3,600 kg CO₂-eq. cow(-1) year(-1)) lead to more or less good approximations of online measurements (average 3,845 kg CO₂-eq. cow(-1) year(-1) (±275 owing to manure management)) depending on the indicator utilized. The more farm-specific characteristics are used by the GHG indicator; the lower is the bias of the modeled emissions. Results underline that an accurate emission calculation procedure should capture differences in energy intake, owing to milk production intensity as well as manure storage time. Despite the differences between indicator estimates, the deviation of modeled GHGs using detailed indicators in DAIRYDYN from on-farm measurements is relatively low (between -6.4% and 10.5%), compared with findings from the literature.

  17. Necessity and Opportunity: the 1-Year Master's ABA Program at Auburn University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James M

    2016-05-01

    The Auburn University Master of Science program in Applied Behavior Analysis was designed to accommodate not only the requirements of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board for approved course sequences and practicum training, but unavoidable limitations in faculty and other resources. These limitations were incompatible with the more traditional 2-year curriculum model, so a 1-year program was designed that met the necessary conditions. This article describes the resulting academic and practicum curriculum, the key funding mechanisms that allowed the program to develop, and the opportunities and benefits that this model afforded.

  18. Cognitive and affective assessment in day care versus institutionalized elderly patients: a 1-year longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maseda A

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ana Maseda, Aránzazu Balo, Laura Lorenzo–López, Leire Lodeiro–Fernández, José Luis Rodríguez–Villamil, José Carlos Millán–CalentiGerontology Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of A Coruña, A Coruña, SpainPurpose: Cognitive decline and depression are two common mental health problems that may create a need for long-term care among the elderly. In the last decade, the percentage of older adults who receive health care in nursing homes, day care centers, or home support services has increased in Europe. The objectives of this descriptive and nonrandomized longitudinal study were to evaluate and to compare the cognitive and affective evolution of day care versus institutionalized older patients through a 1-year period, and to assess the presence of cognitive and affective impairment as a function of the care setting.Patients and methods: Ninety-four patients were assessed at baseline, and 63 (67.0% were reassessed 1 year later. Neuropsychological assessment included measures of cognitive performance (general cognitive status, visuospatial, and language abilities and affective status (depressive symptoms.Results: Our findings indicated that the majority of the participants (day care and institutionalized patients had mild–moderate cognitive impairment at baseline, which significantly increased in both groups after 1-year follow-up. However, the rate of change in global cognitive function did not significantly differ between groups over time. Regarding language abilities, naming function maintained among day care patients in comparison with institutionalized patients, who showed worse performance at follow-up. As regards to affective status, results revealed that institutionalized patients had a significant reduction in depressive symptoms at follow-up, when compared to day care patients. Results also highlight the high frequency of cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms regardless of the care setting

  19. A prospective study of the 1-year incidence of fibromyalgia after acute whiplash injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective To measure the 1-year incidence of fibromyalgia in a cohort of acute whiplash-injured participants. Methods Consecutive acute patients with whiplash were assessed via the 2010 Modified American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for fibromyalgia at 3 months, 6 months and 1 year postinjury. At each of these follow-up points, participants were also examined for recovery from whiplash injury. Results Of an initial 268 participants, data on recovery was available for 264 participant...

  20. Interstitial pregnancy: role of MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filhastre, M.; Lesnik, A. [Lapeyronie Hospital, Department of Radiology, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Dechaud, H.; Taourel, P. [Arnaud de Villeneuve Hospital, Department of Gynecology, Montpellier (France)

    2005-01-01

    We report the MRI features of two cases of interstitial pregnancy. In both cases, MRI was able to localize the ectopic pregnancy by showing a gestational structure surrounded by a thick wall in the upper part of the uterine wall separated from the endometrium by an uninterrupted junctional zone. Because US may confuse angular and interstitial pregnancies and because interstitial pregnancy has a particular evolutive course, MR imaging may play a key role in the diagnosis and management of women with interstitial pregnancy. (orig.)

  1. Recording event-related activity under hostile magnetic resonance environment: Is multimodal EEG/ERP-MRI recording possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaş, H M; Karakaş, S; Ozkan Ceylan, A; Tali, E T

    2009-08-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) have high temporal resolution, but insufficient spatial resolution; the converse is true for the functional imaging techniques. The purpose of the study was to test the utility of a multimodal EEG/ERP-MRI technique which combines electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for a simultaneously high temporal and spatial resolution. The sample consisted of 32 healthy young adults of both sexes. Auditory stimuli were delivered according to the active and passive oddball paradigms in the MRI environment (MRI-e) and in the standard conditions of the electrophysiology laboratory environment (Lab-e). Tasks were presented in a fixed order. Participants were exposed to the recording environments in a counterbalanced order. EEG data were preprocessed for MRI-related artifacts. Source localization was made using a current density reconstruction technique. The ERP waveforms for the MRI-e were morphologically similar to those for the Lab-e. The effect of the recording environment, experimental paradigm and electrode location were analyzed using a 2x2x3 analysis of variance for repeated measures. The ERP components in the two environments showed parametric variations and characteristic topographical distributions. The calculated sources were in line with the related literature. The findings indicated effortful cognitive processing in MRI-e. The study provided preliminary data on the feasibility of the multimodal EEG/ERP-MRI technique. It also indicated lines of research that are to be pursued for a decisive testing of this technique and its implementation to clinical practice.

  2. Crowding by a repeating pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Sarah; Pelli, Denis G

    2015-01-01

    Theinability to recognize a peripheral target among flankers is called crowding. For a foveal target, crowding can be distinguished from overlap masking by its sparing of detection, linear scaling with eccentricity, and invariance with target size.Crowding depends on the proximity and similarity of the flankers to the target. Flankers that are far from or dissimilar to the target do not crowd it. On a gray page, text whose neighboring letters have different colors, alternately black and white, has enough dissimilarity that it might escape crowding. Since reading speed is normally limited by crowding, escape from crowding should allow faster reading. Yet reading speed is unchanged (Chung & Mansfield, 2009). Why? A recent vernier study found that using alternating-color flankers produces strong crowding (Manassi, Sayim, & Herzog, 2012). Might that effect occur with letters and reading? Critical spacing is the minimum center-to-center target-flanker spacing needed to correctly identify the target. We measure it for a target letter surrounded by several equidistant flanker letters of the same polarity, opposite polarity, or mixed polarity: alternately white and black. We find strong crowding in the alternating condition, even though each flanker letter is beyond its own critical spacing (as measured in a separate condition). Thus a periodic repeating pattern can produce crowding even when the individual elements do not. Further, in all conditions we find that, once a periodic pattern repeats (two cycles), further repetition does not affect critical spacing of the innermost flanker.

  3. Automatization and familiarity in repeated checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dek, Eliane C P; van den Hout, Marcel A.; Giele, Catharina L.; Engelhard, Iris M.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated checking paradoxically increases memory uncertainty. This study investigated the underlying mechanism of this effect. We hypothesized that as a result of repeated checking, familiarity with stimuli increases, and automatization of the checking procedure occurs, which should result in decrea

  4. MRI in Optic Neuritis: Structure, Function, Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglø, Dan

    2011-01-01

    resonance imaging (MRI), and the visual evoked potential (VEP) continues to show a delayed P100 indicating persistent demyelination. The explanation for this apparent discrepancy between structure and function could be due to either a redundancy in the visual pathways so that some degree of signal loss...... are low. Functional MRI (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique that can measure brain activity with a high spatial resolution. Recently, technical and methodological advancements have made it feasible to record VEPs and fMRI simultaneously and the relationship between averaged VEPs and averaged fMRI signals...... have been described. Still, to take full advantage of simultaneously recorded VEP-fMRI one would ideally want to track single-trial changes in the VEP and use this information in the fMRI analysis. In order to do this we examined 10 healthy volunteers with simultaneous VEP-fMRI. Different measures...

  5. Expanded complexity of unstable repeat diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Polak, Urszula; McIvor, Elizabeth; Dent, Sharon Y.R.; Wells, Robert D.; Napierala, Marek.

    2012-01-01

    Unstable Repeat Diseases (URDs) share a common mutational phenomenon of changes in the copy number of short, tandemly repeated DNA sequences. More than 20 human neurological diseases are caused by instability, predominantly expansion, of microsatellite sequences. Changes in the repeat size initiate a cascade of pathological processes, frequently characteristic of a unique disease or a small subgroup of the URDs. Understanding of both the mechanism of repeat instability and molecular consequen...

  6. The clinical and genetic correlates of MRI findings in myotonic dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, G. [Neuromuscular and Genetic Research Group, Department of Radiology, Justus Liebig University, Giessen (Germany); Damian, M.S. [Department of Neurology, University of Giessen (Germany); Koch, M. [Department of Human Genetics, University of Marburg (Germany); Schilling, G. [Department of Psychiatry, University of Giessen (Germany); Fach, B. [Department of Neurology, University of Giessen (Germany); Stoeppler, S. [Department of Neurology, University of Giessen (Germany)

    1996-10-01

    Amplification of an unstable CTG trinucleotide repeat sequence in a protein kinase gene on chromosome 19 has recently been recognised as the molecular basis of myotonic dystrophy (DM), a multisystem disorder with a wide spectrum of muscular and extramuscular manifestations. The CTG expansion of 40 patients was assessed by direct genotype analysis of the white blood cell DNA and correlated with MRI of the brain and muscles, and with functional clinical data. Cerebral pathology on MRI consisted of diffuse atrophy (68 %), subcortical white matter lesions (65 %), wide Virchow-Robin spaces (38 %) and thickening of the skull (35 %). Cerebral atrophy and extent of white matter disease correlated significantly with mental retardation, duration of disease and CTG fragment amplification. MRI of the muscular system showed fatty degeneration of different degrees in neighbouring muscles causing a mosaic pattern of the thigh in 38 % and the calf in 44 %. Muscular changes on MRI were strongly correlated with muscular impairment but less strongly with CTG expansion. Changes on MRI reflect the stage of development of tissue pathology in DM, modified by defect of the DM gene. Pathology on MRI is strongly correlated with functional deficits. (orig.). With 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Focal cortical dysplasia of the temporal lobe with late-onset partial epilepsy: serial quantitative MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rademacher, J.; Seitz, R.J. [Department of Neurology, Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf (Germany); Aulich, A. [Department of Radiology, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Reifenberger, G. [Department of Neuropathology, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Kiwit, J.C.W. [Department of Neurosurgery, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Langen, K.J.; Schmidt, D. [Institute of Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2000-06-01

    We describe serial studies of focal cortical dysplasia causing temporal lobe seizures and progressive aphasia in a 54-year-old woman. Initially, MRI volumetry of the temporal lobes showed significant left cortical thickening corresponding to an elevated aminoacid uptake in the left temporoparietal and inferior frontal cortex on SPECT using 3-[{sup 123}I]iodo-{alpha}-methyl-l-tyrosine (IMT). After 1 year there was severe shrinkage of the left temporal lobe, possibly the result of recurrent complex partial seizures. (orig.)

  8. Moyamoya disease: diagnostic accuracy of MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, I. [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan); Suzuki, [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan); Matsushima, Y. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    MRI may be employed to investigate moyamoya disease, since it provides vascular information without use of contrast medium. We reported the usefulness and limitations of MR angiography (MRA) in moyamoya disease. To our knowledge, no report has appeared dealing with the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in a large number of cases of moyamoya disease, although MRI is used more commonly than MRA. We therefore undertook to evaluate the accuracy of MRI in moyamoya disease. (orig.)

  9. ProtRepeatsDB: a database of amino acid repeats in genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauhan Virander S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide and cross species comparisons of amino acid repeats is an intriguing problem in biology mainly due to the highly polymorphic nature and diverse functions of amino acid repeats. Innate protein repeats constitute vital functional and structural regions in proteins. Repeats are of great consequence in evolution of proteins, as evident from analysis of repeats in different organisms. In the post genomic era, availability of protein sequences encoded in different genomes provides a unique opportunity to perform large scale comparative studies of amino acid repeats. ProtRepeatsDB http://bioinfo.icgeb.res.in/repeats/ is a relational database of perfect and mismatch repeats, access to which is designed as a resource and collection of tools for detection and cross species comparisons of different types of amino acid repeats. Description ProtRepeatsDB (v1.2 consists of perfect as well as mismatch amino acid repeats in the protein sequences of 141 organisms, the genomes of which are now available. The web interface of ProtRepeatsDB consists of different tools to perform repeat s; based on protein IDs, organism name, repeat sequences, and keywords as in FASTA headers, size, frequency, gene ontology (GO annotation IDs and regular expressions (REGEXP describing repeats. These tools also allow formulation of a variety of simple, complex and logical queries to facilitate mining and large-scale cross-species comparisons of amino acid repeats. In addition to this, the database also contains sequence analysis tools to determine repeats in user input sequences. Conclusion ProtRepeatsDB is a multi-organism database of different types of amino acid repeats present in proteins. It integrates useful tools to perform genome wide queries for rapid screening and identification of amino acid repeats and facilitates comparative and evolutionary studies of the repeats. The database is useful for identification of species or organism specific

  10. 47 CFR 97.205 - Repeater station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repeater station. 97.205 Section 97.205... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.205 Repeater station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a repeater. A holder of...

  11. 47 CFR 22.1015 - Repeater operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repeater operation. 22.1015 Section 22.1015... Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1015 Repeater operation. Offshore central stations may be used as repeater stations provided that the licensee is able to maintain control of the station, and in...

  12. Topological characteristics of helical repeat proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groves, M R; Barford, D

    1999-01-01

    The recent elucidation of protein structures based upon repeating amino acid motifs, including the armadillo motif, the HEAT motif and tetratricopeptide repeats, reveals that they belong to the class of helical repeat proteins. These proteins share the common property of being assembled from tandem

  13. Incidence of Acute Diarrhea Among Children Aged 0 - 1 Year in Southern Brazil, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nascimento

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The incidence rate of acute diarrheal disease in children is a health indicator, and the estimation of these data can help guide public health policies. Objectives The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence and risk factors for acute diarrheal disease in children aged 0 - 1 year. Patients and Methods An observational prospective cohort study was conducted on 210 children recruited at Hospital Nossa Senhora da Conceicao, in Tubarao, state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. Children born between July and September 2012 were followed up for 12 months. The presence of three or more liquid or loose stools during a 24-hour period was considered acute diarrhea. The categories of variables evaluated were comprised of sociodemographic characteristics (per capita income, maternal education, maternal age, access to medical care [public or private], and housing and living conditions [sanitation and hygiene, water supply, daycare attendance, and domestic animal] and characteristics of the child (gender, birth weight, and breastfeeding. Results The incidence of acute diarrhea among the 0 - 1-year-old children was 26.7 cases per 1,000 children per month. Independent risk factors for the occurrence of diarrhea were maternal age under 20 years and health care services provided by the Brazilian National Health System (SUS. Conclusions The high incidence density of diarrhea among the children recruited in this study indicates the need for educational programs directed at people who are involved in this issue.

  14. BDNF mediates improvements in executive function following a 1-year exercise intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Lynn Leckie

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Executive function declines with age, but engaging in aerobic exercise may attenuate decline. One mechanism by which aerobic exercise may preserve executive function is through the up-regulation of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF, which also declines with age. The present study examined BDNF as a mediator of the effects of a 1-year walking intervention on executive function in 90 older adults (mean age = 66.82. Participants were randomized to a stretching and toning control group or a moderate intensity walking intervention group. BDNF serum levels and performance on a task-switching paradigm were collected at baseline and follow-up. We found that age moderated the effect of intervention group on changes in BDNF levels, with those in the highest age quartile showing the greatest increase in BDNF after 1-year of moderate intensity walking exercise (p = .036. The mediation analyses revealed that BDNF mediated the effect of the intervention on task-switch accuracy, but did so as a function of age, such that exercise-induced changes in BDNF mediated the effect of exercise on task-switch performance only for individuals over the age of 71. These results demonstrate that both age and BDNF serum levels are important factors to consider when investigating the mechanisms by which exercise interventions influence cognitive outcomes, particularly in elderly populations.

  15. Induction of Maturogenesis by Partial Pulpotomy: 1 Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bacaksiz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In cariously exposed immature permanent teeth, the treatment choice is controversial in pediatric dentistry. Radical root canal treatment usually appears to be the solution for these teeth. Even partial pulpotomy is a vital treatment for traumatically exposed immature permanent teeth; extending the borders of indication towards cariously exposed immature permanent teeth with reversible pulpitis may abolish the necessity of pulpectomy. This article describes the partial pulpotomy of a cariously affected immature permanent teeth and the follow-up for 1 year. A healthy 11-year-old male patient was referred to Gazi University Faculty of Dentistry Department of Pediatric Dentistry. The patient had reversible pulpitis symptoms on teeth numbered 45. At radiographic examination, immature apex and deep caries lesion were observed and partial pulpotomy was performed by using calcium hydroxide to maintain vitality of the pulp and allow continued development of root dentin expecting the root will attain full maturity. Clinical and radiographic follow-up demonstrated a vital pulp besides not only closure of the apex (apexogenesis, but also physiologic root development (maturogenesis after 1 year. Partial pulpotomy is an optional treatment for cariously exposed immature permanent teeth for preserving vitality and physiological root development.

  16. Determinants of telomere attrition over 1 year in healthy older women: stress and health behaviors matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puterman, E; Lin, J; Krauss, J; Blackburn, E H; Epel, E S

    2015-04-01

    Telomere length, a reliable predictor of disease pathogenesis, can be affected by genetics, chronic stress and health behaviors. Cross-sectionally, highly stressed postmenopausal women have shorter telomeres, but only if they are inactive. However, no studies have prospectively examined telomere length change over a short period, and if rate of attrition is affected by naturalistic factors such as stress and engagement in healthy behaviors, including diet, exercise, and sleep. Here we followed healthy women over 1 year to test if major stressors that occurred over the year predicted telomere shortening, and whether engaging in healthy behaviors during this period mitigates this effect. In 239 postmenopausal, non-smoking, disease-free women, accumulation of major life stressors across a 1-year period predicted telomere attrition over the same period-for every major life stressor that occurred during the year, there was a significantly greater decline in telomere length over the year of 35 bp (P<0.05). Yet, these effects were moderated by health behaviors (interaction B=0.19, P=0.04). Women who maintained relatively higher levels of health behaviors (1 s.d. above the mean) appeared to be protected when exposed to stress. This finding has implications for understanding malleability of telomere length, as well as expectations for possible intervention effects. This is the first study to identify predictors of telomere length change over the short period of a year.

  17. Repeatability of Detecting Visual Cortex Activity in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboubeh Ma'soumbeigi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction As functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is too expensive and time consuming, its frequent implementation is difficult. The aim of this study is to evaluate repeatability of detecting visual cortex activity in fMRI. Materials and Methods In this study, 15 normal volunteers (10 female, 5 male; Mean age±SD: 24.7±3.8 years attended. Functional magnetic resonance images were obtained during a visual task of sine-wave with spatial frequency of 1.84 cpd and temporal frequency of 8 Hz in three scan runs. Two runs of functional images were provided consecutively in a session, and the third run was provided 1-6 weeks later. The activation map was created using the data obtained from the block-designed fMRI study. Voxels whose Z value was above a threshold of 2.3, at a significance level p=0.05, were considered activated. After image processing, the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal changes and the number of activated voxels in response to visual stimuli were compared in different runs. Results The results of this study demonstrate no significant difference between the number of activated voxels and BOLD signal in first and second runs in one session (Paired t-test, p>0.05. Moreover, there is a considerable correlation between first and second scan runs (rsignal=0.74, p=0.006 and rvoxel=0.62, p=0.03, while the correlation between the runs in separate sessions is weak (rsignal=0.28, p=0.38 and rvoxel=0.32, p=0.31. Conclusion Since the repeatability of BOLD signal and number of activated voxels in one session is considerably better than that in the separate sessions, it is suggested that in fMRI visual studies that need repeated scanning, scans should be acquired during a single session.

  18. Breast MRI in high risk patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.I.M. Obdeijn (Inge-Marie)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract In this thesis we address various indications of breast MRI, with the emphasis on the value of MRI in screening of women with high genetic risk for breast cancer, and especially in BRCA1 mutation carriers. We showed that in the era of up-to-date MRI expertise and digital

  19. Comparison of ASL and DCE MRI for the non-invasive measurement of renal blood flow: quantification and reproducibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutajar, Marica; Hales, Patrick W.; Clark, Christopher A.; Gordon, Isky [UCL Institute of Child Health, Imaging and Biophysics Unit, London (United Kingdom); Thomas, David L. [UCL Institute of Neurology, Department of Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, London (United Kingdom); Banks, T. [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    To investigate the reproducibility of arterial spin labelling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitatively compare these techniques for the measurement of renal blood flow (RBF). Sixteen healthy volunteers were examined on two different occasions. ASL was performed using a multi-TI FAIR labelling scheme with a segmented 3D-GRASE imaging module. DCE MRI was performed using a 3D-FLASH pulse sequence. A Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess repeatability of each technique, and determine the degree of correspondence between the two methods. The overall mean cortical renal blood flow (RBF) of the ASL group was 263 ± 41 ml min{sup -1} [100 ml tissue]{sup -1}, and using DCE MRI was 287 ± 70 ml min{sup -1} [100 ml tissue]{sup -1}. The group coefficient of variation (CV{sub g}) was 18 % for ASL and 28 % for DCE-MRI. Repeatability studies showed that ASL was more reproducible than DCE with CV{sub g}s of 16 % and 25 % for ASL and DCE respectively. Bland-Altman analysis comparing the two techniques showed a good agreement. The repeated measures analysis shows that the ASL technique has better reproducibility than DCE-MRI. Difference analysis shows no significant difference between the RBF values of the two techniques. (orig.)

  20. MRI of medulloblastoma in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malheiros, S.M.F.; Santos, A.J.; Borges, L.R.R.; Guimaraes, I.F.; Franco, C.M.R.; Gabbai, A.A. [Department of Neurology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo Rua Botucatu 740, SP 04023-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Carrete, H. [Department of Radiology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo Rua Botucatu 740, SP 04023-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Stavale, J.N.; Pelaez, M.P. [Department of Pathology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo Rua Botucatu 740, SP 04023-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Medulloblastoma has variable appearances on MRI in both children and adults. Adults are more likely to have heterogeneous cerebellar hemisphere tumours, and this is thought to be related to the greater prevalence of desmoplastic tumours in adulthood. Few studies have addressed the MRI features of adult medulloblastoma and the specific characteristics of desmoplastic and classic tumours have not been analysed. Our aim was to analyse the imaging characteristics of desmoplastic (DM) and classic (CM) medulloblastomas in adult. We retrospectively studied preoperative MRI of six men and three women, median age 33 years, range 23-53 years, with pathologically proved medulloblastomas. There were six (67%) with DM. The tumour was in the cerebellar hemisphere in eight patients (89%), including the three with CM, one of which was bilateral. All tumours were heterogeneous, giving predominantly low or isointense signal on T1- and isointense signal on T2-weighted images. Cystic or necrotic areas in all patients were particularly visible on T2-weighted images. Contrast enhancement was absent in one DM and varied from slight to intense in eight (three CM), homogeneous in one DM and patchy in seven. All tumours extended to the surface of the cerebellum and two had well-defined margins. MRI does not allow a clear distinction between DM and CM in adults. (orig.)

  1. MRI of rectal stromal tumour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Claus; Lindebjerg, Jan; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2012-01-01

    to be aware of for the rectal multidisciplinary team. On suspicion of GIST, patients should be referred to a sarcoma centre. The diagnosis of rectal GIST can be suggested on MRI by the presence of a well-defined heterogeneously large mass with a necrotic center associated with a prominent extra...

  2. MRI of plants and foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van H.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known as diffusion, is impaired by most ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full ... address): From (your name): Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to perform a blood test to determine whether the kidneys are functioning adequately. Women should always inform their physician or technologist if ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ...

  7. Pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Alice; Small, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins constitute one of the largest protein families in land plants, with more than 400 members in most species. Over the past decade, much has been learned about the molecular functions of these proteins, where they act in the cell, and what physiological roles they play during plant growth and development. A typical PPR protein is targeted to mitochondria or chloroplasts, binds one or several organellar transcripts, and influences their expression by altering RNA sequence, turnover, processing, or translation. Their combined action has profound effects on organelle biogenesis and function and, consequently, on photosynthesis, respiration, plant development, and environmental responses. Recent breakthroughs in understanding how PPR proteins recognize RNA sequences through modular base-specific contacts will help match proteins to potential binding sites and provide a pathway toward designing synthetic RNA-binding proteins aimed at desired targets.

  8. General benchmarks for quantum repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Using a technique based on quantum teleportation, we simplify the most general adaptive protocols for key distribution, entanglement distillation and quantum communication over a wide class of quantum channels in arbitrary dimension. Thanks to this method, we bound the ultimate rates for secret key generation and quantum communication through single-mode Gaussian channels and several discrete-variable channels. In particular, we derive exact formulas for the two-way assisted capacities of the bosonic quantum-limited amplifier and the dephasing channel in arbitrary dimension, as well as the secret key capacity of the qubit erasure channel. Our results establish the limits of quantum communication with arbitrary systems and set the most general and precise benchmarks for testing quantum repeaters in both discrete- and continuous-variable settings.

  9. Two-dimensional quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallnöfer, J.; Zwerger, M.; Muschik, C.; Sangouard, N.; Dür, W.

    2016-11-01

    The endeavor to develop quantum networks gave rise to a rapidly developing field with far-reaching applications such as secure communication and the realization of distributed computing tasks. This ultimately calls for the creation of flexible multiuser structures that allow for quantum communication between arbitrary pairs of parties in the network and facilitate also multiuser applications. To address this challenge, we propose a two-dimensional quantum repeater architecture to establish long-distance entanglement shared between multiple communication partners in the presence of channel noise and imperfect local control operations. The scheme is based on the creation of self-similar multiqubit entanglement structures at growing scale, where variants of entanglement swapping and multiparty entanglement purification are combined to create high-fidelity entangled states. We show how such networks can be implemented using trapped ions in cavities.

  10. Quality control during repeated fryings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuesta, C.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the debate ¡s about how the slow or frequent turnover of fresh fat affects the deterioration, of fat used in frying. Then, the modification of different oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without or with turnover of fresh oil, under similar frying conditions, was evaluated by two criteria: by measuring the total polar component isolated by column chromatography and by the evaluation of the specific compounds related to thermoxidative and hydrolytic alteration by High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC. The results indicate that with frequent turnover of fresh oil, the critical level of 25% of polar material is rarely reached, and there are fewer problems with fat deterioration because the frying tended to increase the level of polar material and thermoxidative compounds (polymers and dimers of triglycerides and oxidized triglycerides in the fryer oil during the first fryings, followed by minor changes and a tendency to reach a near-steady state in successive fryings. However, in repeated frying of potatoes using a null turnover the alteration rate was higher being linear the relationship found between polar material or the different thermoxidative compounds and the number of fryings. On the other hand chemical reactions produced during deep-fat frying can be minimized by using proper oils. In addition the increased level of consumers awareness toward fat composition and its impact on human health could had an impact on the selection of fats for snacks and for industry. In this way monoenic fats are the most adequate from a nutritional point of view and for its oxidative stability during frying.

  11. Demonstration of the reproducibility of free-breathing diffusion-weighted MRI and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in children with solid tumours: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Keiko; Jerome, Neil P.; Collins, David J.; Orton, Matthew R.; D' Arcy, James A.; Leach, Martin O. [Cancer Research UK Cancer Imaging Centre at The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Wallace, Toni; Koh, Dow-Mu [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Radiology, London, England (United Kingdom); Moreno, Lucas [The Institute of Cancer Research, Paediatric Drug Development Team, Divisions of Cancer Therapeutics and Clinical Studies, London (United Kingdom); Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Clinical Research Programme, Madrid (Spain); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Paediatric Drug Development Unit, Children and Young People' s Unit, Sutton (United Kingdom); Pearson, Andrew D.J.; Marshall, Lynley V.; Carceller, Fernando; Zacharoulis, Stergios [The Institute of Cancer Research, Paediatric Drug Development Team, Divisions of Cancer Therapeutics and Clinical Studies, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Paediatric Drug Development Unit, Children and Young People' s Unit, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    The objectives are to examine the reproducibility of functional MR imaging in children with solid tumours using quantitative parameters derived from diffusion-weighted (DW-) and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE-) MRI. Patients under 16-years-of age with confirmed diagnosis of solid tumours (n = 17) underwent free-breathing DW-MRI and DCE-MRI on a 1.5 T system, repeated 24 hours later. DW-MRI (6 b-values, 0-1000 sec/mm{sup 2}) enabled monoexponential apparent diffusion coefficient estimation using all (ADC{sub 0-1000}) and only ≥100 sec/mm{sup 2} (ADC{sub 100-1000}) b-values. DCE-MRI was used to derive the transfer constant (K{sup trans}), the efflux constant (k{sub ep}), the extracellular extravascular volume (v{sub e}), and the plasma fraction (v{sub p}), using a study cohort arterial input function (AIF) and the extended Tofts model. Initial area under the gadolinium enhancement curve and pre-contrast T{sub 1} were also calculated. Percentage coefficients of variation (CV) of all parameters were calculated. The most reproducible cohort parameters were ADC{sub 100-1000} (CV = 3.26 %), pre-contrast T{sub 1} (CV = 6.21 %), and K{sup trans} (CV = 15.23 %). The ADC{sub 100-1000} was more reproducible than ADC{sub 0-1000}, especially extracranially (CV = 2.40 % vs. 2.78 %). The AIF (n = 9) derived from this paediatric population exhibited sharper and earlier first-pass and recirculation peaks compared with the literature's adult population average. Free-breathing functional imaging protocols including DW-MRI and DCE-MRI are well-tolerated in children aged 6 - 15 with good to moderate measurement reproducibility. (orig.)

  12. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo JE; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Baan, Caroline A; Rutten, Guy EHM

    2016-01-01

    Background More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined by the quality of interactions between patients and clinicians at the practice level, it should be facilitated at organizational level too. This nationwide study aimed to assess the state of diabetes quality management on patient-centeredness at organizational level and its possibilities to improve after a tailored intervention. Methods This before–after study compares the quality management on patient-centeredness within Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics before and after a 1-year stepwise intervention. At baseline, managers of 51 diabetes primary care groups and 28 outpatient diabetes clinics completed a questionnaire about the organization’s quality management program. Patient-centeredness (0%–100%) was operationalized in six subdomains: facilitating self-management support, individualized care plan support, patients’ access to medical files, patient education policy, safeguarding patients’ interests, and formal patient involvement. The intervention consisted of feedback and benchmark and if requested a telephone call and/or a consultancy visit. After 1 year, the managers completed the questionnaire again. The 1-year changes were examined by dependent (non) parametric tests. Results Care groups improved significantly on patient-centeredness (from 47.1% to 53.3%; P=0.002), and on its subdomains “access to medical files” (from 42.0% to 49.4%), and “safeguarding patients’ interests” (from 58.1% to 66.2%). Outpatient clinics, which scored higher at baseline (66.7%) than care groups, did not improve on patient-centeredness (65.6%: P=0.54) or its subdomains. “Formal patient involvement” remained low in both care groups (23.2%) and

  13. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campmans-Kuijpers MJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marjo JE Campmans-Kuijpers,1 Lidwien C Lemmens,2 Caroline A Baan,2 Guy EHM Rutten1 1Julius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, 2Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Utrecht, the Netherlands Background: More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined by the quality of interactions between patients and clinicians at the practice level, it should be facilitated at organizational level too. This nationwide study aimed to assess the state of diabetes quality management on patient-centeredness at organizational level and its possibilities to improve after a tailored intervention.Methods: This before–after study compares the quality management on patient-centeredness within Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics before and after a 1-year stepwise intervention. At baseline, managers of 51 diabetes primary care groups and 28 outpatient diabetes clinics completed a questionnaire about the organization’s quality management program. Patient-centeredness (0%–100% was operationalized in six subdomains: facilitating self-management support, individualized care plan support, patients’ access to medical files, patient education policy, safeguarding patients’ interests, and formal patient involvement. The intervention consisted of feedback and benchmark and if requested a telephone call and/or a consultancy visit. After 1 year, the managers completed the questionnaire again. The 1-year changes were examined by dependent (non parametric tests.Results: Care groups improved significantly on patient-centeredness (from 47.1% to 53.3%; P=0.002, and on its subdomains “access to

  14. Syntactic Priming and the Lexical Boost Effect during Sentence Production and Sentence Comprehension: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segaert, Katrien; Kempen, Gerard; Petersson, Karl Magnus; Hagoort, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral syntactic priming effects during sentence comprehension are typically observed only if both the syntactic structure and lexical head are repeated. In contrast, during production syntactic priming occurs with structure repetition alone, but the effect is boosted by repetition of the lexical head. We used fMRI to investigate the neuronal…

  15. Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty in osteoporotic fractures of vertebral bodies - a prospective 1-year follow-up analysis; Vertebroplastie und Kyphoplastie bei osteoporotischen Wirbelkoerperfrakturen - Eine prospektive Analyse der Einjahresergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflugmacher, R.; Kandziora, F.; Schroeder, R.; Schleicher, P.; Scholz, M.; Schnake, K.; Haas, N.; Khodadadyan-Klostermann, C. [Charite - Centrum fuer Muskuloskeletale Chirurgie, Berlin (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Purpose: Kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty offer two minimally invasive operative stabilization procedures for vertebral compression fractures. The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate whether both procedures are able to reduce pain and to preserve postoperative vertebral height during a 1-year follow up. Materials and methods: Osteoporotic vertebral fractures were treated in 42 cases, 20 patients (15 female, 5 male) underwent vertebroplasty, 22 patients (14 female, 8 male) underwent kyphoplasty. 32 vertebral fractures were treated with vertebroplasty and 35 vertebral fractures were treated with kyphoplasty. Symptomatic levels were identified by correlating the clinical presentation with conventional radiographs, CT or/and MRI. During the follow up reduction of pain was determined. Radiographic scans were performed pre- and postoperatively and after 3, 6 and 12 months. The vertebral height and endplate angles were measured to assess the restoration of the sagittal alignment. The effects on pain symptoms were measured on a self-reported Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the Oswestry score was documented. Results: The median pain scores (VAS) decreased significantly for kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty from pre- to post-treatment, as did the Oswestry score (p<0.05). No significant differences could be found between both groups for the median pain score (VAS) and the Oswestry score. Kyphoplasty led to a significant restoration of the vertebral height and reduction of kyphosis (p<0.05). During the 1-year follow up operation techniques were able to stabilize the height of the vertebral body. Conclusion: Kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty are effective minimally invasive procedures for the stabilization of osteoporotic vertebral fractures leading to a statistically significant reduction in pain. Kyphoplasty restores significantly vertebral body height in fresh fractures. The restoration of vertebral height and reduction of kyphosis may have an influence on the long

  16. Parenchymal neurocysticercosis: follow-up and staging by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, J.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France)]|[Inst. of Tropical Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Limoges (France); Visy, J.M. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Belin, C. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France); Gaston, A. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Henri-Mondor, Creteil (France); Goldlust, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Hopital Avicenne, Bobigny (France); Dumas, M. [Inst. of Tropical Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Limoges (France)

    1997-01-01

    We describe the evolution of parenchymal cerebral cysticerci on MRI, to assess signs of early cyst degeneration. We studied 15 lesions in four treated and one untreated patient. MRI was performed before therapy and repeated in the 1st month after each course of anticysticercus drugs, every 4 months during the 1st year and then annually; the follow-up period was 8-48 months. Lesions were classified according to changes in four features: cyst content and capsule signal, gadolinium enhancement and oedema signal. We were able to recognise each of the pathological phases; five MRI stages were identified. Stage 1 showed oedema and/or nodular gadolinium enhancement in the tissue invasion phase; stage 2 was cerebrospinal fluid-like signal within a cyst in the vesicular phase; stage 3 showed a thick capsule with an impure liquid content signal and surrounding oedema, in the cystic phase; stage 4 showed the disappearance of the cyst fluid content signal in the degenerative phase; stage 5 showed a calcified lesion in the residual phase. Stage 1 lesions disappeared after therapy; the other progressed from one stage to another. Stage 4 indicated the end of viability of the parasite and determined the point after which treatment was useless. On T2-weighted images changes in the cyst content differed according to the history of the lesion; nodular low intensity followed the natural degeneration of the parasite and a mixed fluid signal with punctate low signal seemed to represent the specific result of therapy. MRI staging can help in the evaluation of indications for treatment and facilitate clinical therapeutic trials. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Shock-wave therapy for tennis and golfer's elbow--1 year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischek, O; Hopf, C; Nafe, B; Rompe, J D

    1999-01-01

    Thirty patients with chronic medial epicondylitis were treated with low-energy shock waves. They received 500 impulses of 0.08 mJ/mm2 three times at weekly intervals. At 1 year follow-up examinations were performed. According to the Verhaar criteria, only seven patients reached excellent or good results. In eight cases a fair outcome was recorded, and in 14 patients the outcome was poor. Only six patients were satisfied with the treatment. The average relief of pain was 32%. These data were significantly worse than for identically treated patients with chronic tennis elbow. Thus, the question arises as to whether extracorporal shock-wave therapy is indicated in medial epicondylitis.

  18. Evidence of Bordetella pertussis infection in vaccinated 1-year-old Danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Pontoppidan, Peter Lotko; von König, Carl-Heinz Wirsing

    2010-01-01

    We measured IgA and IgG antibodies to pertussis toxin (PT) and filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) in sera from 203 1-year-old children who had received one to three doses of a monocomponent PT toxoid vaccine. Ten children (5%) had IgA antibody to PT indicating recent infection; seven of these children...... had received three doses of vaccine. PT IgA responders did not have significantly longer coughing episodes than PT IgA non-responders. Since an IgA antibody response occurs in only approximately 50% of infected children, the actual infection rate in our cohort is estimated to approximately 10......%. The apparent high Bordetella pertussis infection rate in Danish infants suggests that the monocomponent PT toxoid vaccine used in Denmark has limited efficacy against B. pertussis infection. A prospective immunization study comparing a multi-component vaccine with the present monocomponent PT toxoid vaccine...

  19. 1-Year Outcomes of FFRCT-Guided Care in Patients With Suspected Coronary Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglas, Pamela S; De Bruyne, Bernard; Pontone, Gianluca;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) plus estimation of fractional flow reserve using CTA (FFRCT) safely and effectively guides initial care over 90 days in patients with stable chest pain. Longer-term outcomes are unknown. OBJECTIVES: The study sought to determine the 1-year...... clinical, economic, and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes of using FFRCT instead of usual care. METHODS: Consecutive patients with stable, new onset chest pain were managed by either usual testing (n = 287) or CTA (n = 297) with selective FFRCT (submitted in 201, analyzed in 177); 581 of 584 (99.5%) completed...... events were infrequent, with 2 in each arm of the planned invasive group and 1 in the planned noninvasive cohort (usual care strategy). In the planned invasive stratum, mean costs were 33% lower with CTA and selective FFRCT ($8,127 vs. $12,145 usual care; p

  20. Efficacy and safety of tiotropium Respimat SMI in COPD in two 1-year randomized studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Eric; Singh, Dave; Smith, David; Disse, Bernd; Towse, Lesley; Massey, Dan; Blatchford, Jon; Pavia, Demetri; Hodder, Rick

    2010-08-09

    Two 1-year studies evaluated the long-term efficacy and safety of tiotropium 5 or 10 microg versus placebo, inhaled via the Respimat Soft Mist Inhaler (SMI). The two studies were combined and had 4 co-primary endpoints (trough FEV(1) response, Mahler Transition Dyspnea Index [TDI] and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire scores all at week 48, and COPD exacerbations per patient-year). A total of 1990 patients with COPD participated (mean FEV(1): 1.09 L). The mean trough FEV(1) response of tiotropium 5 or 10 microg relative to placebo was 127 or 150 mL, respectively (both P SMI 5 microg demonstrated sustained improvements in patients with COPD relative to placebo and similar to the 10 microg dose but with a lower frequency of anticholinergic adverse events.

  1. Substance use disorder counselors' job performance and turnover after 1 year: linear or curvilinear relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschober, Tanja C; de Tormes Eby, Lillian Turner

    2013-07-01

    The main goals of the current study were to investigate whether there are linear or curvilinear relationships between substance use disorder counselors' job performance and actual turnover after 1 year utilizing four indicators of job performance and three turnover statuses (voluntary, involuntary, and no turnover as the reference group). Using longitudinal data from 440 matched counselor-clinical supervisor dyads, results indicate that overall, counselors with lower job performance are more likely to turn over voluntarily and involuntarily than not to turn over. Further, one of the job performance measures shows a significant curvilinear effect. We conclude that the negative consequences often assumed to be "caused" by counselor turnover may be overstated because those who leave both voluntarily and involuntarily demonstrate generally lower performance than those who remain employed at their treatment program.

  2. Whooping cough in South-East Romania: a 1-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinu, Sorin; Guillot, Sophie; Dragomirescu, Cristiana Cerasella; Brun, Delphine; Lazăr, Stefan; Vancea, Geta; Ionescu, Biatrice Mariana; Gherman, Mariana Felicia; Bjerkestrand, Andreea-Florina-Dana; Ungureanu, Vasilica; Guiso, Nicole; Damian, Maria

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of whooping cough in Romania is substantially underestimated, and, as noted by the health authorities, this is mostly due to the lack of both awareness and biological diagnosis. We conducted a 1-year study in Bucharest in order to assess the circulation of Bordetella pertussis, the main etiological agent of whooping cough. Fifty-one subjects suspected of whooping cough were enrolled. Culture, real-time PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for laboratory diagnosis. Whooping cough patients (63%) were distributed among all age groups, and most were unvaccinated, incompletely vaccinated, or had been vaccinated more than 5 years previously. Bordetella holmesii DNA was detected in 22% of the bordetellosis cases; these patients included adults; teenagers; and, surprisingly, young children. B. pertussis isolates were similar to the clinical isolates currently circulating elsewhere in Europe. One isolate does not express pertactin, an antigen included in some acellular pertussis vaccines.

  3. A histopathological score on baseline biopsies from elderly donors predicts outcome 1 year after renal transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Birgitte G; Federspiel, Birgitte H; Sørensen, Søren S

    2012-01-01

    Kidneys from elderly deceased patients and otherwise marginal donors may be considered for transplantation and a pretransplantation histopathological score for prediction of postoperative outcome is warranted. In a retrospective design, 29 baseline renal needle biopsies from elderly deceased donors...... wall thickness of arteries and/or arterioles. Nineteen renal baseline biopsies from 15 donors (age: 64 ± 10 years) were included and following consensus the histopathological score was 4.3 ± 2.1 (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.81; confidence interval: 0.66-0.92). The donor organs were used...... for single renal transplantation (recipient age: 47 ± 3 years). Two grafts were lost after the transplantation. In the remaining 17 recipients the 1-year creatinine clearance (54 ± 6 mL/min) correlated to the baseline histopathological score (r(2) = 0.59; p

  4. fMRI-BCI: a Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-Huan Li; Qin Gao; Wei-Shuai Lü; Hua-Fu Chen

    2009-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a new tool for brain-computer interface (BCI).This paper presents an overview to fMRI-BCI.Our attention is mainly put on the methods of signal acquisition,signal preprocessing,and signal analysis of basic fMRI-BCI structure.The available softwares and the applications of fMRI-BCI are briefly introduced.At last,we suggest focusing on some technologies to make fMRI-BCI more perfect.

  5. Bone mineral density in rheumatoid arthritis patients 1 year after adalimumab therapy: arrest of bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijbrandts, C A; Klaasen, R; Dijkgraaf, M G W; Gerlag, D M; van Eck-Smit, B L F; Tak, P P

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α antibody therapy on bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine and femur neck in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: A total of 50 patients with active RA (DAS28⩾3.2) who started adalimumab (40 mg subcutaneously/2 weeks) were included in an open label prospective study. All patients used stable methotrexate and were allowed to use prednisone (⩽10 mg/day). The BMD of the lumbar spine and femur neck was measured before and 1 year after start of treatment. Results: Disease activity at baseline (28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28)) and disease duration were inversely correlated with femoral neck BMD and lumbar spine BMD (p<0.05). Mean BMD of lumbar spine and femur neck remained unchanged after 1 year of adalimumab therapy (+0.3% and +0.3%, respectively). Of interest, a beneficial effect of prednisone on change in femur neck BMD was observed with a relative increase with prednisone use (+2.5%) compared to no concomitant prednisone use (−0.7%), (p = 0.015). Conclusion: In contrast to the progressive bone loss observed after conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy, TNF blockade may result in an arrest of general bone loss. Consistent with previous observations, the data also suggest that the net effect of low-dose corticosteroids on BMD in RA may be beneficial, possibly resulting from their anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:18408246

  6. Safety and efficacy of nurse-controlled analgesia in patients less than 1 year of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walia H

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hina Walia,1 Dmitry Tumin,1 Sharon Wrona,1 David Martin,1,2 Tarun Bhalla,1,2 Joseph D Tobias,1-3 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, 3Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA Background: The management of acute pain presents unique challenges in the younger pediatric population. Although patient-controlled devices are frequently used in patients ≥6 years of age, alternative modes of analgesic delivery are needed in infants.Objective: To examine the safety and efficacy of nurse-controlled analgesia (NCA in neonates less than 1 year of age.Methods: Data from patients <1 year of age receiving NCA as ordered by the Acute Pain Service at our institution were collected over a 5-year period and reviewed retrospectively. The primary outcomes were activation of the institution’s Rapid Response Team (RRT or Code Blue, signifying severe adverse events. Pain score after NCA initiation was a secondary outcome.Results: Among 338 girls and 431 boys, the most common opioid used for NCA was fentanyl, followed by morphine and hydromorphone. There were 39 (5% cases involving RRT or Code Blue activation, of which only one (Code Blue was activated due to a complication of NCA (apnea. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated morphine NCA to be associated with greater odds of RRT activation (OR=3.29, 95% CI=1.35, 8.03, P=0.009 compared to fentanyl NCA. There were no statistically significant differences in pain scores after NCA initiation across NCA agents.Conclusion: NCA is safe in neonates and infants, with comparable efficacy demonstrated for the three agents used. The elevated incidence of RRT activation in patients receiving morphine suggests caution in its use and consideration of alternative agents in this population. Keywords: nurse-controlled analgesia, pain medicine, Rapid Response Team

  7. Identifying groups at risk for 1-year membership termination from a fitness center at enrollment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Stephanie A; Ross, Kaile M; Ranby, Krista W; Masters, Kevin S; Peters, John C; Hill, James O

    2016-12-01

    The vast majority of Americans do not engage in adequate regular physical activity despite its well-known health benefits. Even when individuals attempt to become more active by joining a fitness center, estimates suggest that nearly half terminate their membership within the first 6 months. A better understanding of who is at risk for early membership termination upon joining may help researchers develop targeted interventions to improve the likelihood that individuals will successfully maintain memberships and physical activity. This study's purpose was to identify, based on a wellness assessment (WA) used in fitness centers, individuals at risk for fitness membership termination prior to 1-year. Center members (N = 441; Mage = 41.9, SD = 13.1; 74.4% female) completed a comprehensive WA of stress, life satisfaction, physical fitness, metabolic health, and sleep quality at the beginning of their memberships and were followed for one year. Latent class analyses utilized the WA to identify four groups: (a) healthy, (b) unhealthy, (c) poor psychological wellness, and (d) poor physical wellness. Participants in the poor psychological wellness group (OR = 2.24, p = 0.007) and the unhealthy group (OR = 2.40, p = 0.037) were significantly more likely to terminate their memberships at 1-year as compared to the healthy group. Participants with poor physical wellness visited the fitness center less frequently than healthy participants (p psychological wellness is a risk factor for terminating memberships, whereas poor physical wellness is not. Future studies should replicate these latent classes and develop targeted interventions to address psychological wellness as a method to improve fitness membership retention.

  8. Qualitative Examination of Adolescent Health-Related Quality of Life at 1 Year Postconcussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iadevaia, Cheree; Roiger, Trevor; Zwart, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Context Moderate to severe traumatic brain injuries can negatively influence health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adolescent patients. The effect of sport-related concussion on adolescent HRQOL remains unclear. Objective To investigate the perceptions of adolescent student-athletes and their parents regarding the adolescents' HRQOL 1 year after sport-related concussion. Design Qualitative study. Setting Secondary school. Patients or Other Participants Seven adolescent student-athletes (age range, 12–16 years) who sustained a sport-related concussion at least 1 year (15.3 ± 2.8 months) before the study participated along with their primary care-giving parents (n = 7). Data Collection and Analysis Fourteen semistructured face-to-face interviews (7 adolescents, 7 parents) were completed. Interviews were transcribed and inductively analyzed by a team of 3 athletic trainers with 32 combined years of professional experience. Themes were negotiated through a consensual review process. Participant checks were completed to ensure trustworthiness of the results. Results Four major themes emerged from the interviews: (1) significant effect of symptoms, (2) feelings of frustration, (3) influence on school attendance and activities, and (4) nature of interpersonal and team relationships. Participants indicated that the physical symptoms of the concussion substantially affected their emotional and academic function. The influence of the concussion on social interactions seemed to depend on the nature of interpersonal relationships. Conclusions Sport-related concussion can negatively influence physical and emotional function, academics, and interpersonal interactions as perceived by adolescent student-athletes and their parents. Education of parents and their children, school professionals, coaches, and teammates remains critical to effectively recognize and manage sport-related concussion. Secondary school districts also play a critical role in the concussion

  9. Perinatal dioxin exposure and the neurodevelopment of Vietnamese toddlers at 1 year of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tai The; Nishijo, Muneko; Nguyen, Anh Thi Nguyet; Tran, Nghi Ngoc; Van Hoang, Luong; Tran, Anh Hai; Nguyen, Trung Viet; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-12-01

    Dioxin concentrations remain elevated in both the environment and in humans residing near former US Air Force bases in South Vietnam. This may potentially have adverse health effects, particularly on infant neurodevelopment. We followed 214 infants whose mothers resided in a dioxin-contaminated area in Da Nang, Vietnam, from birth until 1 year of age. Perinatal exposure to dioxins was estimated from toxic equivalent (TEQ) levels of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/Fs-TEQ), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TetraCDD) concentrations in breast milk. In infants, daily dioxin intake (DDI) was used as an index of postnatal exposure through breastfeeding. Neurodevelopment of toddlers was assessed using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (Bayley-III). No significant differences in neurodevelopmental scores were exhibited for cognitive, language or motor functions between four exposure groups of PCDDs/Fs-TEQ or 2,3,7,8-TetraCDD. However, social-emotional scores were decreased in the high PCDDs/Fs-TEQ group and the high 2,3,7,8-TetraCDD group compared with those with mild exposure, after adjusting for confounding factors. Cognitive scores in the mild, moderate, and high DDI groups were significantly higher than those in low DDI group, but there were no differences in cognitive scores among the three higher DDI groups. These results suggest that perinatal exposure to dioxins may affect social-emotional development of 1-year-old toddlers, without diminishing global neurodevelopmental function.

  10. Identifying groups at risk for 1-year membership termination from a fitness center at enrollment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Hooker

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of Americans do not engage in adequate regular physical activity despite its well-known health benefits. Even when individuals attempt to become more active by joining a fitness center, estimates suggest that nearly half terminate their membership within the first 6 months. A better understanding of who is at risk for early membership termination upon joining may help researchers develop targeted interventions to improve the likelihood that individuals will successfully maintain memberships and physical activity. This study's purpose was to identify, based on a wellness assessment (WA used in fitness centers, individuals at risk for fitness membership termination prior to 1-year. Center members (N = 441; Mage = 41.9, SD = 13.1; 74.4% female completed a comprehensive WA of stress, life satisfaction, physical fitness, metabolic health, and sleep quality at the beginning of their memberships and were followed for one year. Latent class analyses utilized the WA to identify four groups: (a healthy, (b unhealthy, (c poor psychological wellness, and (d poor physical wellness. Participants in the poor psychological wellness group (OR = 2.24, p = 0.007 and the unhealthy group (OR = 2.40, p = 0.037 were significantly more likely to terminate their memberships at 1-year as compared to the healthy group. Participants with poor physical wellness visited the fitness center less frequently than healthy participants (p < 0.01. Results suggest that poor psychological wellness is a risk factor for terminating memberships, whereas poor physical wellness is not. Future studies should replicate these latent classes and develop targeted interventions to address psychological wellness as a method to improve fitness membership retention.

  11. Comparison of scar thickness measurements using trans-vaginal sonography and MRI in cases of pregnancy with previous caesarean section. Do they correlate with actual scar thickness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N; Tripathi, R; Mala, Y M; Dixit, R; Tyagi, S; Batra, A

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate scar thickness in cases of pregnancy with previous caesarean section, by trans-vaginal sonography (TVS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to correlate precision of radiologically-measured scar thickness with actual measurement of scar thickness. A total of 35 pregnant patients with previous caesarean section planned for elective caesarean section, were evaluated prospectively. Their scar thickness was measured by TVS and MRI on the day of elective repeat caesarean section. These measurements were correlated with each other and with scar thickness measured during elective repeat caesarean section by using a caliper. The correlation coefficients between scar thickness measured by TVS and MRI with peroperative evaluation with a caliper, were +0.72 and +0.59, respectively. The study concluded that as MRI is a costlier modality and TVS has better correlation coefficient with actual scar thickness, TVS can be considered to be the better modality for antenatal scar thickness measurement.

  12. Advances in Clinical PET/MRI Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Hans; Lerche, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    In 2010, the first whole-body PET/MRI scanners installed for clinical use were the sequential Philips PET/MRI with PMT-based, TOF-capable technology and the integrated simultaneous Siemens PET/MRI. Avalanche photodiodes as non-magneto-sensitive readout electronics allowed PET integrated within the MRI. The experiences with these scanners showed that improvements of software aspects, such as attenuation correction, were necessary and that efficient protocols combining optimally PET and MRI must be still developed. In 2014, General Electric issued an integrated PET/MRI with SiPM-based PET detectors, allowing TOF-PET. Looking at the MRI components of current PET/MR imaging systems, primary improvements come from sequences and new coils.

  13. Management of Apical Periodontitis : Healing of Post-treatment Periapical Lesions Present 1 Year after Endodontic Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Ming-Ming; Liang, Yu-Hong; Gao, Xue-Jun; Jiang, Lan; van der Sluis, Luc; Wu, Min-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Post-treatment periapical lesions present 1 year after treatment may heal during the second year or later. The aim of this study was to assess second-year volumetric changes in post-treatment periapical radiolucencies detected 1 year after treatment. Methods: Post-treatment periapical

  14. Integration of DCE-MRI and DW-MRI Quantitative Parameters for Breast Lesion Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Fusco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of an imaging protocol combining dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI in patients with suspicious breast lesions. Materials and Methods. A total of 31 breast lesions (15 malignant and 16 benign proved by histological examination in 26 female patients were included in this study. For both DCE-MRI and DW-MRI model free and model based parameters were computed pixel by pixel on manually segmented ROIs. Statistical procedures included conventional linear analysis and more advanced techniques for classification of lesions in benign and malignant. Results. Our findings indicated no strong correlation between DCE-MRI and DW-MRI parameters. Results of classification analysis show that combining of DCE parameters or DW-MRI parameter, in comparison of single feature, does not yield a dramatic improvement of sensitivity and specificity of the two techniques alone. The best performance was obtained considering a full combination of all features. Moreover, the classification results combining all features are dominated by DCE-MRI features alone. Conclusion. The combination of DWI and DCE-MRI does not show a potential to dramatically increase the sensitivity and specificity of breast MRI. DCE-MRI alone gave the same performance as in combination with DW-MRI.

  15. Quasar Variability Measurements With SDSS Repeated Imaging and POSS Data

    CERN Document Server

    Ivezic, Z; Juric, M; Anderson, S; Hall, P B; Richards, G T; Rockosi, C M; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Turner, E L; Knapp, G R; Gunn, J E; Schlegel, D J; Strauss, M A; Schneider, D P

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the properties of quasar variability using repeated SDSS imaging data in five UV-to-far red photometric bands, accurate to 0.02 mag, for 13,000 spectroscopically confirmed quasars. The observed time lags span the range from 3 hours to over 3 years, and constrain the quasar variability for rest-frame time lags of up to two years, and at rest-frame wavelengths from 1000 Ang. to 6000 Ang. We demonstrate that 66,000 SDSS measurements of magnitude differences can be described within the measurement noise by a simple function of only three free parameters. The addition of POSS data constrains the long-term behavior of quasar variability and provides evidence for a turn-over in the structure function. This turn-over indicates that the characteristic time scale for optical variability of quasars is of the order 1 year.

  16. MRI in temporal lobe epilepsy. Correlation between EEG, SPECT and clinical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uesugi, Hideji; Onuma, Teiichi; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Ishida, Shiro [National Center Hospital for Mental, Nervous and Muscular Disorders, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-02-01

    The relationship between MRI, SPECT, EEG and clinical features in temporal lobe epilepsy was investigated. Subjects were 162 patients (84 males, 78 females) whose average age was 38.1{+-}12.1 years. SPECT was carried out in 45 patients. The results were as follows: abnormal MR images were obtained in 36% of the group without epileptic discharge, and in 42% of the group with temporal spikes. There was no correlation between epileptic discharge in EEG and MRI abnormality. The lateralities of epileptic discharge and MRI were in disagreement in 9 of 39 patients (23%), indicating that determining the epileptic focus from scalp EEG was difficult. There was no correlation between the basic activity in EEG and abnormality in MRI. The rate of abnormal SPECT (89%) was higher than that of abnormal MRI (40%). The rate of the group with ictal automatism (52%) was higher than that of the group without ictal automatism (35%). The rate of abnormal MR images was high in the group with encephalitis (73%). The rate was higher in the group with febrile convulsion (62%) than in the group without it (28%). The rate of the abnormal MR images was higher in the group with a seizure frequency of at least several mal/month (48%) than in the group with a seizure frequency of less than several mal/year (29%). (author).

  17. The relationship between MRI and PET changes and cognitive disturbances in MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Jønsson, Agnete; Kahr Mathiesen, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    of the brain including abnormalities in normal appearing white matter (NAWM) and cortical grey matter, which is undetected with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Hence, imaging techniques that embrace such abnormalities are needed to achieve better correlation with cognitive dysfunction. MR...... grey matter. Measurements of global NAA using multi-slice EPSI is a new promising method for measurement of the global neuron capacity and can be repeated with only little discomfort and without any risk for the patient....

  18. MRI in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuncay, R. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Akman-Demir, G. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Goekyigit, A. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Eraksoy, M. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Barlas, M. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Tolun, R. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey); Guersoy, G. [Department of Neurology, Istanbul Medical Faculty, University of Istanbul (Turkey)

    1996-10-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a progressive, slow virus infection of the brain, caused by the measles virus, attacking children and young adults. We investigated 15 patients with SSPE by MRI, with 5 normal and 10 pathological results. In the early period, lesions were in the grey matter and subcortical white matter. They were asymmetrical and had a predilection for the posterior parts of the hemispheres. Later, high-signal changes in deep white matter and severe cerebral atrophy were observed. Parenchymal lesions significantly correlated with the duration of disease. A significant relationship between MRI findings and clinical stage was observed in the 1st year of the disease. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. MRI of Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galluzzi, P.; Filosomi, G.; Vallone, I.M.; Venturi, C. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Policlinico ' ' Le Scotte' ' , Siena (Italy); Bardelli, A.M. [Dept. of Ophthalmological Sciences, Unit of Paediatric Ophthalmology, University of Siena (Italy)

    1999-10-01

    Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD) is a rare diffuse neurodegenerative disorder characterised by diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness, and a wide variety of abnormalities of the central nervous system, urinary tract and endocrine glands. It may be familial or sporadic. Reported features on MRI of the brain are absence of the physiological high signal of the posterior lobe of the pituitary, shrinkage of optic nerves, chiasm and tracts, atrophy of the hypothalamic region, brain stem, cerebellum, and cerebral cortex. We report a 12-year-old girl with a 5-year history without brain stem, cerebellar or cerebral atrophy. MRI showed an unusual feature: a focus of high signal on PD- and T2-weighted images in the right substantia nigra. This is consistent with previously reported neuropathological post-mortem studies, but has never been reported in vivo. (orig.)

  20. MRI morphometry in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    MRI based evaluation of brain atrophy is regarded as a valid method to stage the disease and to assess progression in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Volumetric software programs have made it possible to quantify gray matter in the human brain in an automated fashion. At present, voxel based morphometry (VBM) is easily applicable to the routine clinical procedure with a short execution time. The importance of the VBM approach is that it is not biased to one particular structure and is able to assess anatomical differences throughout the brain. Stand-alone VBM software running on Windows, Voxel-based Specific Regional analysis system for AD (VSRAD), has been widely used in the clinical diagnosis of AD in Japan. On the other hand, recent application of graph theory to MRI has made it possible to analyze changes in structural connectivity in AD.

  1. Vertebral Augmentation with Nitinol Endoprosthesis: Clinical Experience in 40 Patients with 1-Year Follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo, E-mail: gc.anselmetti@fastwebnet.it [Villa Maria Hospital, Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Manca, Antonio, E-mail: anto.manca@gmail.com [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Marcia, Stefano, E-mail: stemarcia@gmail.com [Institute of Radiology, University of Cagliari (Italy); Chiara, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele.chiara@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Marini, Stefano, E-mail: stemarini@gmail.com [Institute of Radiology, University of Cagliari (Italy); Baroud, Gamal, E-mail: gamalbaroud@gmail.com [University of Sherbrooke, Departement de Genie Mecanique (Canada); Regge, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.regge@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Radiology Unit (Italy); Montemurro, Filippo, E-mail: filippo.montemurro@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Internal Medicine Unit (Italy)

    2013-05-08

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess the clinical outcomes of patients treated by vertebral augmentation with nitinol endoprosthesis (VNE) to treat painful vertebral compression fractures.MethodsForty patients with one or more painful osteoporotic VCF, confirmed by MRI and accompanied by back-pain unresponsive to a minimum 2 months of conservative medical treatment, underwent VNE at 42 levels. Preoperative and postoperative pain measured with Visual Analog Scale (VAS), disability measured by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and vertebral height restoration (measured with 2-dimensional reconstruction CT) were compared at last follow-up (average follow-up 15 months). Cement extravasation, subsequent fractures, and implant migration were recorded.ResultsLong-term follow-up was obtained in 38 of 40 patients. Both VAS and ODI significantly improved from a median of 8.0 (range 5–10) and 66 % (range 44–88 %) to 0.5 (range 0–8) and 6 % (range 6–66 %), respectively, at 1 year (p < 0.0001). Vertebral height measurements comparing time points increased in a statistically significant manner (ANOVA, p < 0.001). Overall cement extravasation rate was 9.5 %. Discal and venous leakage rates were 7.1 and 0 % respectively. No symptomatic extravasations occurred. Five of 38 (13.1 %) patients experienced new spontaneous, osteoporotic fractures. No device change or migration was observed.ConclusionsVNE is a safe and effective procedure that is able to provide long-lasting pain relief and durable vertebral height gain with a low rate of new fractures and cement leakages.

  2. Experience with cinacalcet in primary hyperparathyroidism: results after 1 year of treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martín, Antonia; Luque-Pazos, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the characteristics of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) treated with cinacalcet and to evaluate its efficacy in reducing serum calcium and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations after 1 year of treatment. Methods: The study included 20 patients with PHPT who had completed at least 12 months of treatment with cinacalcet (eight patients for refusal of parathyroidectomy, three for surgery not possible due to comorbidities and nine for progressive hypercalcemia prior to surgery). We recorded clinical and biochemical data at baseline, and after 3, 6 and 12 months of treatment. We also monitored adverse events. Cinacalcet was administered in increasing doses until normal serum calcium was reached or side effects preventing a further increase occurred. Results: After 3 months of treatment, serum calcium significantly decreased (11.73 ± 0.85 versus 10.71 ± 1.63 mg/dl, p < 0.001) and serum phosphorus significantly increased (2.41 ± 0.48 versus 2.63 ± 0.70 mg/dl, p = 0.004) while no significant change occurred in PTH (181.91 ± 102.37 versus 195.47 ± 111.71 pg/ml, p = 0.695). No further variation was observed after 6 months compared with 3 months of follow up. However, after 12 months of treatment, there was a significant decrease in PTH concentrations compared with baseline (181.91 ± 102.37 versus 152.47± 70.16 pg/ml, p = 0.028) as well as serum calcium (11.73 ± 0.85 versus 10.20± 0.95 mg/dl, p < 0.001); serum phosphorus significantly increased (2.41 ± 0.48 versus 2.71 ± 0.43 mg/dl, p = 0.01). Normocalcemia (S-Ca < 10.2 mg/dl) was achieved in 55% of patients. The medication was usually well tolerated (83.4%). Most common adverse events were nausea and vomiting, especially at the beginning of therapy. Conclusion: Cinacalcet rapidly reduced serum calcium in patients with PHPT and this reduction remained stable after 1 year of treatment. We also observed a decrease in PTH. Cinacalcet is an effective alternative in nonsurgical

  3. Wilson's disease: cranial MRI observations and clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, S.; Taly, A.B.; Prashanth, L.K.; Venugopal, K.S.; Arunodaya, G.R.; Swamy, H.S. [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Department of Neurology, Bangalore (India); Ravishankar, S.; Vasudev, M.K. [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Department of Neuroimaging and Interventional Radiology, Bangalore (India)

    2006-09-15

    Study of MRI changes may be useful in diagnosis, prognosis and better understanding of the pathophysiology of Wilson's disease (WD). We aimed to describe and correlate the MRI abnormalities of the brain with clinical features in WD. MRI evaluation was carried out in 100 patients (57 males, 43 females; mean age 19.3{+-}8.9 years) using standard protocols. All but 18 patients were on de-coppering agents. Their history, clinical manifestations and scores for severity of disease were noted. The mean duration of illness and treatment were 8.3{+-}10.8 years and 7.5{+-}7.1 years respectively. MRI of the brain was abnormal in all the 93 symptomatic patients. The most conspicuous observations were atrophy of the cerebrum (70%), brainstem (66%) and cerebellum (52%). Signal abnormalities were also noted: putamen (72%), caudate (61%), thalami (58%), midbrain (49%), pons (20%), cerebral white matter (25%), cortex (9%), medulla (12%) and cerebellum (10%). The characteristic T2-W globus pallidal hypointensity (34%), ''Face of giant panda'' sign (12%), T1-W striatal hyperintensity (6%), central pontine myelinosis (7%), and bright claustral sign (4%) were also detected. MRI changes correlated with disease severity scores (P<0.001) but did not correlate with the duration of illness. MRI changes were universal but diverse and involved almost all the structures of the brain in symptomatic patients. A fair correlation between MRI observations and various clinical features provides an explanation for the protean manifestations of the disease. (orig.)

  4. Cortical and Subcortical Changes in Alzheimer's Disease: A Longitudinal and Quantitative MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li; Blamire, Andrew M; Watson, Rosie; He, Jiabao; Aribisala, Benjamin; O'Brien, John T

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative MRI provides important information about tissue properties in brain both in normal ageing and in degenerative disorders. Although it is well known that those with Alzheimer's disease (AD) show a specific pattern and faster rate of atrophy than controls, the precise spatial and temporal patterns of quantitative MRI in AD are unknown. We aimed to investigate neuroimaging correlates of AD using serial quantitative MRI. In our study, twenty-one subjects with AD and thirty-two similar-aged healthy controls underwent two serial MRI scans at baseline and 12 months. Tissue characteristics were captured using two quantitative MRI parameters: longitudinal relaxation time (qT1) and transverse relaxation time (qT2). The two groups (AD and controls) were statistically compared using a voxel based quantification (VBQ) method based on Matlab and SPM8. At baseline, subjects with AD showed a significant reduction of qT1 and qT2 compared to controls in bilateral temporal and parietal lobes, hippocampus, and basal ganglia. This pattern was also observed at follow-up. Longitudinally, in AD we found a significant increase rather than further reduction of qT1 and qT2 from the baseline in bilateral hippocampus, thalamus and right caudate nucleus. In addition, the longitudinal change of qT1 in left hippocampus was negatively correlated with cognitive decline in AD over the 1-year period, and the general disease severity significantly predicted the amount of increase of qT1 in bilateral hippocampus over 12 months. The longitudinal change of qT2 in left parahippocampus correlated with change in neuropsychiatric features over time. In summary, quantitative MRI parameters were reduced in AD cross-sectionally, but increased over time, showing distinct spatiotemporal patterns from the atrophy in AD. We also showed the clinical relevance of quantitative MRI parameters, indicating their potential promise as new imaging markers in AD.

  5. Strengthening concept learning by repeated testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklund-Hörnqvist, Carola; Jonsson, Bert; Nyberg, Lars

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether repeated testing with feedback benefits learning compared to rereading of introductory psychology key-concepts in an educational context. The testing effect was examined immediately after practice, after 18 days, and at a five-week delay in a sample of undergraduate students (n = 83). The results revealed that repeated testing with feedback significantly enhanced learning compared to rereading at all delays, demonstrating that repeated retrieval enhances retention compared to repeated encoding in the short- and the long-term. In addition, the effect of repeated testing was beneficial for students irrespectively of working memory capacity. It is argued that teaching methods involving repeated retrieval are important to consider by the educational system.

  6. Neurosarcoidosis with unusual MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handler, M.S. (Dept. of Pathology and Oncology, Kansas Univ. Medical Center, KS (United States)); Johnson, L.M. (Dept. of Neurology, Kansas Univ. Medical Center, KS (United States)); Dick, A.R. (Dept. of Neurology, Kansas Univ. Medical Center, KS (United States)); Batnitzky, S. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Kansas Univ. Medical Center, KS (United States))

    1993-02-01

    This 53-year-old white male presented with a 4-month-history of weakness and pain. Despite an initial partial response to steroid therapy, his neurologic deterioration progressed culminating in paraparesis, paresthesias, urinary incontinence, altered mentation and a 20 Ib weight loss. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI study showed a pattern suggestive of perivascular involvement. A subsequent cerebral biopsy was diagnostic for neurosarcoidosis. (orig.)

  7. MRI of vulvar Crohn disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, Deepa; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Mahani, Maryam Ghadimi; Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, F3503, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Adler, Jeremy [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Crohn disease is a chronic granulomatous inflammatory disorder that most commonly affects the gastrointestinal tract, particularly the distal small bowel and colon. While certain extraintestinal manifestations of Crohn disease are relatively common and well-known, others, such as metastatic cutaneous involvement, are quite rare and may be difficult to recognize, particularly in the pediatric population. This case report illustrates the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of vulvar region cutaneous Crohn disease in an 11-year-old girl. (orig.)

  8. MRI-induced retrocalcaneal bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tol, J.L.; Dijk, C.N. van [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, M. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1999-10-01

    This case report describes a patient with acute retrocalcaneal bursitis, which developed after MRI examination of the ankle. The sagittal T2*-weighted gradient echo sequence revealed an extensive susceptibility artifact in the area surrounding the Achilles tendon near its insertion at the os calcis. This artifact was caused by postsurgical metallic particles. We postulate that these particles were mechanically stimulated by the magnetic field and induced the inflammatory response. (orig.)

  9. Cine-MRI versus two-dimensional echocardiography to measure in vivo left ventricular function in rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Daniel J; Carr, Carolyn A; Tyler, Damian J; Clarke, Kieran

    2008-08-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography is the most commonly used non-invasive method for measuring in vivo cardiac function in experimental animals. In humans, measurements of cardiac function made using cine-MRI compare favourably with those made using echocardiography. However, no rigorous comparison has been made in small animals. Here, standard short-axis two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography (2D-echo) and cine-MRI measurements were made in the same rats, both control and after chronic myocardial infarction. Correlations between the two techniques were found for end diastolic area, stroke area and ejection fraction, but cine-MRI measurements of ejection fraction were 12+/-6% higher than those made using 2D-echo, because of the 1.8-fold higher temporal resolution of the MRI technique (4.6 ms vs 8.3 ms). Repeated measurements on the same group of rats over several days showed that the cine-MRI technique was more reproducible than 2D-echo, in that 2D-echo would require five times more animals to find a statistically significant difference. In summary, caution should be exercised when comparing functional results acquired using short-axis 2D-echo vs cine-MRI. The accuracy of cine-MRI allows identification of alterations in heart function that may be missed when using 2D-echo.

  10. Bowel magnetic resonance imaging of pediatric patients with oral mannitol. MRI compared to endoscopy and intestinal ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borthne, Arne S.; Reiseter, Tor [Ullevaal University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Abdelnoor, Michael [Ullevaal University Hospital, Section of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centre of Clinical Research, Oslo (Norway); Rugtveit, Jarle [Ullevaal University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Oslo (Norway); Perminow, Goeri [Akershus County University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Nordbyhagen (Norway); Kloew, Nils-Einar [Ullevaal University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, Oslo (Norway)

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pediatric patients with clinical suspicion of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by comparing MRI and ultrasound (US) to endoscopy, the gold standard. A median volume of 300 ml of mannitol in a 4.5% watery solution were ingested by 43 children prior to examination. The 53 MRI examinations were compared with 20 endoscopies and 41 US of the terminal ileum. The outcomes were MRI quality; pathologic findings; level of adverse events; and concordance between endoscopy, MRI, and US estimated by kappa statistics. The ileum and terminal ileum were very good or excellently imaged in approximately 80% of cases. Wall thickening and enhancement were most frequent in the terminal ileum. MRI compared with endoscopy had a sensitivity of 81.8% [95% confidence interval (CI)], specificity of 100%, diagnostic accuracy of 90%, and kappa value of 0.80 (95% CI), indicating a good degree of concordance. A similar degree of concordance was achieved between US and endoscopy. In spite of the frequent adverse reactions, such as diarrhea and nausea, half of the patients were prepared to repeat the examination. The results of MRI are concordant with endoscopy and US of the terminal ileum. (orig.)

  11. MRI characteristics of midbrain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, B. [Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing (China). Neurosurgical Inst.]|[Department of Neuroradiology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital (China); Wang, C.C.; Wang, J. [Chinese Academy of Medical Science, Beijing (China). Neurosurgical Inst.

    1999-03-01

    We diagnosed 60 cases of midbrain tumours by MRI between 1993 to 1997. There were 39 males and 21 females, aged 2-64 years, mean 25.6 years. We found 38 patients with true intramedullary midbrain tumours, 11 predominantly in the tectum, 20 in the tegmentum and 7 with a downward extension to the pons; there were 7 within the cerebral aqueduct. There were 22 patients with infiltrating midbrain tumours extending from adjacent structures, 11 cases each from the thalamus and pineal region. All patients received surgical treatment. Gross total resection was achieved in 42 cases, subtotal (> 75 %) resection in 18. Pathological diagnoses included 16 low-grade and 15 high-grade astrocytomas; 5 oligodendroastrocytomas; 2 ependymomas; 11 glioblastomas; and 11 pineal parenchymal or germ-cell tumours. Midbrain tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, with wide variation in clinical and MRI features, related to the site and type of tumour. MRI not only allows precise analysis of their growth pattern, but also can lead to a correct preoperative diagnosis in the majority of cases. (orig.) (orig.) With 3 figs., 3 tabs., 19 refs.

  12. MRI findings of extramedullary haemopoiesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chourmouzi, D.; Pistevou-Gompaki, K.; Plataniotis, G.; Skaragas, G.; Papadopoulos, L.; Drevelegas, A. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiation Oncology, AHEPA University Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2001-09-01

    Extramedullary haemopoiesis (EH) is a compensatory process associated with chronic haemolytic anaemia. It is rare, however, for such an abnormality to cause spinal cord compression. We present two patients with known beta-thalassaemia intermedia who developed spinal cord compression due to masses of extramedullary haematopoietic tissue in the epidural space of the thoracic spine. The EH masses were diagnosed by MRI as an isointense epidural lesion on both T1- and T2-weighted images, compressing severely the spinal cord. After administration of a paramagnetic agent, an intermediate enhancement of the masses was evident. All the vertebral bodies had low to intermediate signal intensity as a result of displacement of fatty marrow by haematopoietic marrow. Expansion of thoracic ribs with bilateral paravertebral masses were characteristic. A small dose of radiotherapy was given and marked improvement in neurological symptoms was evident. An MRI examination established shrinkage of the mass and decompression of spinal cord. The role of MRI in diagnosis of EH masses is essential and radiation therapy is a very effective treatment for this rare complication. (orig.)

  13. MRI in insulinomas; Preliminary findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liessi, Guido (Ospedale Civile, Castelfranco Veneto (Italy). Servizio di Radiologia); Pasquali, Claudio; Alfano D' Andrea, Alfonso; Pedrazzoli, Sergio (Padova Universita, I Cattedra di: Patologia Speciale Chirurgica (Italy). Istituto di Clinica Chirurgica); Scandellari, Cesare (Padova Universita, Cattedra di Medicina Interna V (Italy). Istituto di Semeiotica Medica)

    After establishing the diagnosis of an insulinoma, most surgeons prefer preoperative localization. Selective arteriography is usually considered the gold standard for this purpose. Recently, computed tomography (CT) and preoperative US have contended the role to angiography. MRI has been used in few cases of endocrine pancreatic tumors, and its role in this particular field has to be defined. Between November 1988-September 1990 7 adult patients who had undergone surgery were evaluated. Eight tumors were resected in 6 patients who were cured; in an 18-year-old woman surgical treatment was unsuccessful. Arterio-graphy, CT, preoperative US, MRI and intraoperative US detected 2, 6, 6, 5 and 6 tumors respectively. Two insulinomas (0.2 and 0.7 cm) were found at histologic examination in resected specimen. The ability of intra-operative US and careful surgical exploration to resolve more than 90 percent of cases makes the preoperative use of arteriography and CT questionable value. If further experience confirms these findings, US and MRI may suffice. (author). 13 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab.

  14. MRI after successful lumbar discectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van [Department of Radiology, University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, B-2650 Edegem (Belgium); Kelft, E. van de [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Antwerp, Edegem (Belgium); Biltjes, I.G.G.M. [Department of Radiology, University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, B-2650 Edegem (Belgium); Hasselt, B.A.A.M. van [Department of Radiology, University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, B-2650 Edegem (Belgium); Hauwe, L. van den [Department of Radiology, University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, B-2650 Edegem (Belgium); Parizel, P.M. [Department of Radiology, University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, B-2650 Edegem (Belgium); Schepper, A.M.A. de [Department of Radiology, University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, B-2650 Edegem (Belgium)

    1996-05-01

    Our aim was to establish the normal range of MRI findings after successful lumbar discectomy. We prospectively examined 34 consecutive patients with an excellent clinical outcome by MRI 6 weeks and 6 months after surgery. All examinations included sagittal and axial spin-echo (SE) T1-weighted images before and after intravenous gadolinium-DTPA and fast SE T2-weighted images. Contrast enhancement along the surgical tract was seen in all patients 6 weeks and 6 months after surgery. After 6 months minimal or no mass effect on the dural sac by epidural scar was seen. In 20 % of patients there was recurrent disc herniation, with mass effect. Enhancing nerve roots were seen in 20 % of patients 6 weeks postoperatively, and half of these were associated with recurrent disc herniation at the same side. None of these patients still showed nerve root enhancement 6 months after surgery. Postoperative MRI studies must be interpreted with great care since the features described in the failed back surgery syndrome are also found, to some extent, in asymptomatic postoperative patients. (orig.). With 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Automated quality checks on repeat prescribing.

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Jeremy E; Wroe, Christopher J; Roberts, Angus; Swallow, Angela; Stables, David; Cantrill, Judith A; Rector, Alan L.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Good clinical practice in primary care includes periodic review of repeat prescriptions. Markers of prescriptions that may need review have been described, but manually checking all repeat prescriptions against the markers would be impractical. AIM: To investigate the feasibility of computerising the application of repeat prescribing quality checks to electronic patient records in United Kingdom (UK) primary care. DESIGN OF STUDY: Software performance test against benchmark manual...

  16. Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 130 Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database (Web, free access)   Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database is intended to benefit research and application of short tandem repeat DNA markers for human identity testing. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included.

  17. A 1-year clinical evaluation of fissure sealants on permanent first molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nupur Ninawe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To evaluate and compare the retention, marginal discoloration, surface texture and anatomical form of pit and fissure sealants. Materials and Methods : Thirty children between the ages of 6 and 10 years, who were attending the school health program regularly, had participated in the study. A split-mouth design was used in which the two fissure sealants (Helioseal-F and Glass ionomer Fuji VII were randomly placed in 60 matched contralateral pairs of permanent molar teeth. Sealants were rated by a single trained and calibrated examiner using mouth mirrors and probes following the US Public Health Service criteria. The sealants were evaluated at 3 months, 6 months and 1 year intervals. Results : The data obtained for retention, marginal discoloration, surface texture and anatomical form of pit and fissure sealants were tabulated and compared statistically using the Chi-square test of significance. Conclusion : The Helioseal-F sealant was better than the Glass ionomer Fuji VII sealant with respect to retention, anatomical form and surface texture. Both the materials showed similar results with respect to marginal discoloration.

  18. [The combined DAK therapy of obesity for children and adolescents. Evaluation after 1 year].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, S; Westenhöfer, J; Rudolphi, B; Kraaibeek, H K

    2008-04-10

    In 2003, the program "The combined DAK therapy of obesity for children and adolescents", funded and conducted by the Deutsche Angestellten Krankenkasse (DAK) (A German Health Insurance Company), has started. The whole treatment lasts for 1 year including an initial inpatient therapy for 6 weeks followed by an outpatient treatment at home that adresses the overweight patients and their families. The therapy contents are developed according to the recommendations of the "Arbeitsgemeinschaft Adipositas im Kindes- und Jugendalter (AGA)". In a prospective cohort study a sample of 604 subjects was studied in order to examine the achievement of the treatment goals weight reduction, behaviour modification and improvement of quality of life. The development of weight was evaluated using BMI-SDS. 44,1% of children and adolescents had a successful weight reduction, they reduced their weight at least by 0,3 BMI-SDS. Furthermore, significant changes of health behaviour, physical fitness and quality of life were observed. However, during the outpatient treatment an impairment of some behaviour changes were observed. Nevertheless, the study has identified significant, positive effects in weight loss, behaviour modifications, changes in physical fitness and in the development of quality of life as a result of the therapy. It is demonstrated that a relapse in "old behaviour" followed by an increase of weight after the inpatient treatment can be avoided bythe subsequent outpatient therapy.

  19. Congenital abnormality of the vagina complicated by haemato-pyocolpos in a 1-year labrador retriever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonge, S; Romussi, S; Grieco, V; Luvoni, G C

    2015-06-01

    A 1-year-old female Labrador retriever was referred with a few days history of haematic-like vulvar discharge. Physical examination, vaginal inspection and palpation did not reveal any remarkable finding. Transabdominal ultrasound showed echogenic fluid accumulation in the vagina suggesting haemato-pyocolpos. An exploratory laparotomy was performed: a well-delimited ectasic vagina was identified. Ovariohysterectomy and partial vaginectomy and vaginoplasty were performed to spay the bitch and to remove the ectasic vagina. Post-operative recovery and 12-month follow-up were uneventful. Clinical, morphological and histological findings were consistent with a congenital abnormality of the muscular layer of the vagina complicated by haemato-pyocolpos. The disorganization of the vaginal tunica muscularis may have acted as locus minoris resistentiae in the vaginal wall. The organ was dilated and atonic due to the gradual accumulation of physiological fluids complicated by an overgrowth of genital bacteria. This congenital disorder has to be taken into account as differential diagnosis of haemato-pyocolpos with vaginal discharge in young bitches.

  20. Mandibular incisor alignment and dental arch changes 1 year after extraction of deciduous canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Anders; Arnrup, Kristina; Lennartsson, Bertil; Huggare, Jan

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the early effects on mandibular incisor irregularity and rotation together with dental arch dimensions of the extraction of four deciduous canines. Children, during early mixed dentition, were randomized into one extraction (n = 32) and one control (n = 41) group. Dental casts from baseline (T0) and 1 year follow-up (T1) were used to evaluate changes in the irregularity index and in mandibular incisor rotation, dental arch dimensions, overjet, and overbite. Median mandibular incisor irregularity decreased over time, significantly more in the extraction than the control group (1.2 versus 0.7 mm; P extraction group (42 versus 20 per cent; P extraction group versus 34 per cent in the control group (P extraction group (1.3, 1.1 mm and 2.4, 2.0 mm, respectively; P extraction of the deciduous canines, small improvements in mandibular incisor alignment were seen, together with reduced arch dimensions. Little's index underestimated malalignment related to tooth rotation.

  1. Depression and posttraumatic stress disorder in temporary settlement residents 1 year after the Sichuan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhang; Ma, Ning; Yang, Lei; Agho, Kingsley; Stevens, Garry; Raphael, Beverley; Cui, Lijun; Liu, Yongqiao; Yan, Baoping; Ma, Hong; Yu, Xin

    2015-03-01

    The authors sought to determine the prevalence and risk factors for major depressive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among survivors living in temporary accommodation in the Yongxing settlement in Mianyang city 1 year after the Sichuan earthquake for further interventions. They interviewed 182 residents, using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders and a self-report questionnaire. The 12-month prevalence of depressive disorder and PTSD were 48.9% and 39.6%, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that bereaved survivors were 5.51 times (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 5.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] =2.14-14.22) more likely to report PTSD and 2.42 times (AOR = 2.42; 95%CI =1.00-5.48) more likely to report depressive disorder than nonbereaved survivors. Older age and receipt of government financial support were significantly associated with 12-month PTSD. Depressive disorder 12 months after the earthquake was associated with receipt of government financial support, pre-earthquake physical illness, single marital status, being currently employed, and Han ethnicity.

  2. Effectiveness of sealing active proximal caries lesions with an adhesive system: 1-year clinical evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarisse Abuchaim

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a therapeutic sealant to arrest non-cavitated proximal carious lesion progression. The study population comprised 44 adolescents who had bitewing radiographs taken for caries diagnosis. Non-cavitated lesions extending up to half of dentin thickness were included in the sample. In the experimental group (n = 33, the proximal caries-lesion surfaces were sealed with an adhesive (OptiBond Solo, Kerr after tooth separation. The control group (n = 11 received no treatment, except for oral hygiene instructions including use of dental floss. Follow-up radiographs were taken after one year and were analyzed in comparison with baseline radiographs. In a blind study setting, visual readings were performed by two examiners, blinded to whether the examined radiograph was baseline or follow-up, and whether it concerned a test or control lesion. The efficacy of sealing treatment was evaluated by the McNemar test (0.05. About 22% of the sealed lesions showed reduction, 61% showed no change and 16% showed progression. For the control lesions, the corresponding values were 27%, 36% and 36% respectively. The number of lesions that showed reduction and no changes were merged and therefore 83.3% of the sealed lesions and 63.6% of the control lesions were considered clinically successful. No statistical significance was detected (p > 0.05. In the course of 1 year, sealing proximal caries lesions was not shown to be superior to lesion monitoring.

  3. Sustained sympathetic and blood pressure reduction 1 year after renal denervation in patients with resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Dagmara; Marusic, Petra; Walton, Antony S; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Krum, Henry; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Lambert, Gavin W; Esler, Murray D; Schlaich, Markus P

    2014-07-01

    Renal denervation (RDN) reduces muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure (BP) in resistant hypertension. Although a persistent BP-lowering effect has been demonstrated, the long-term effect on MSNA remains elusive. We investigated whether RDN influences MSNA over time. Office BP and MSNA were obtained at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months after RDN in 35 patients with resistant hypertension. Office BP averaged 166±22/88±19 mm Hg, despite the use of an average of 4.8±2.1 antihypertensive drugs. Baseline MSNA was 51±11 bursts/min ≈2- to 3-fold higher than the level observed in healthy controls. Mean office systolic and diastolic BP significantly decreased by -12.6±18.3/-6.5±9.2, -16.1±25.6/-8.6±12.9, and -21.2±29.1/-11.1±12.9 mm Hg (Phypertension and high baseline MSNA. These observations are compatible with the hypothesis of a substantial contribution of afferent renal nerve signaling to increased BP in resistant hypertension and argue against a relevant reinnervation at 1 year after procedure.

  4. Beyond Earth: Weaving Science and Indigenous Culture - A 1-year NSF Planning Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Timothy; Guy, M.; Baker Big-Back, C.; Froelich, K.

    2011-01-01

    We present results of a 1-year NSF planning grant called Beyond Earth. The project is designed to engage Native American, urban, and rural families in science learning while piloting curriculum development and implementation that incorporates both Native and Western epistemologies. Physical, earth, and space science content is juxtaposed with indigenous culture, stories, language and epistemology in after-school programs and teacher training. Project partners include the Dakota Science Center, Fort Berthold Community College, and Sitting Bull College. The Native American tribes represented in this initiative illustrate partnerships between the Dakota, Lakota, Nakota, Hidatsa, Mandan, and Arikara. Over the past year the primary project deliverables include a culturally responsive curriculum Beyond Earth Moon Module, teacher training workshops, a project website. The curriculum module introduces students to the moon's appearance, phases, and positions in the sky using the Night Sky Planetarium Experience Station to explore core concepts underlying moon phases and eclipses using the interactive Nature Experience Station before engaging in the culminating Mission Challenge in which they apply their knowledge to problem solving situations and projects. The Native Science and Western Science activities developed, planetarium explorations created, and website toolkit utilizations are presented.

  5. The First Cause of Traumatic Death in Children < 1 Year: A Review on Abusive Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Ferrara

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Pediatric abusive head trauma (AHT can be defined as an injury to the skull or intracranial contents of a child under the age of 5 due to inflicted blunt impact or violent shaking. Evidence Acquisition AHT is the most common cause of traumatic death in children younger than 1 year, and it is the leading cause of death due to child abuse. Clinical presentation observed in children with AHT depends on the type of AHT and accompanying injuries. History and physical examination are important for diagnosing AHT and for distinguishing it from other conditions that can mimic shaken baby syndrome, such as accidental trauma, cancer, metabolic diseases, and others. Results Progress in research on the medical diagnosis of AHT has been remarkable, while the development of treatment strategies has been limited. For these reasons, there is an urgent need to develop effective treatment strategies for AHT able to improve the outcomes. Conclusions The construction of a nationwide database that supports clinical studies is required in the future.

  6. Ablation for atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery: 1-year results through continuous subcutaneous monitoring†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachev-Prokophiev, Alexandr; Zheleznev, Sergey; Romanov, Alexander; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Pivkin, Alexey; Corbucci, Giorgio; Karaskov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of cardiac rhythm may play an important role in measuring the true symptomatic/asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) burden and improve the management of anti-arrhythmic and anti-thrombotic therapies. Forty-seven patients with mitral valve disease and longstanding persistent AF (LSPAF) underwent a left atrial maze procedure with bipolar radiofrequency and valve surgery. The follow-up data recorded by an implanted loop recorder were analysed after 3, 6 and 12 months. On discharge, 40 (85.1%) patients were in stable sinus rhythm, as documented by in-office electrocardiography (ECG), 4 (8.5%) were in pacemaker rhythm and 3 (6.4%) were in AF. One (2.1%) patient died after 7 months. On 12-month follow-up examination, 30 (65.2%) patients had an AF burden 0.5%. Two (4.3%) patients with AF recurrences were completely asymptomatic. Among the symptomatic events stored by the patients, only 27.6% was confirmed as genuine AF recurrences according to the concomitant ECG recorded by the implanted loop recorder. A concomitant bipolar maze procedure during mitral valve surgery is effective in treating AF, as proved by detailed 1-year continuous monitoring. PMID:22514258

  7. Ablation for atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery: 1-year results through continuous subcutaneous monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachev-Prokophiev, Alexandr; Zheleznev, Sergey; Romanov, Alexander; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Pivkin, Alexey; Corbucci, Giorgio; Karaskov, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Continuous monitoring of cardiac rhythm may play an important role in measuring the true symptomatic/asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) burden and improve the management of anti-arrhythmic and anti-thrombotic therapies. Forty-seven patients with mitral valve disease and longstanding persistent AF (LSPAF) underwent a left atrial maze procedure with bipolar radiofrequency and valve surgery. The follow-up data recorded by an implanted loop recorder were analysed after 3, 6 and 12 months. On discharge, 40 (85.1%) patients were in stable sinus rhythm, as documented by in-office electrocardiography (ECG), 4 (8.5%) were in pacemaker rhythm and 3 (6.4%) were in AF. One (2.1%) patient died after 7 months. On 12-month follow-up examination, 30 (65.2%) patients had an AF burden 0.5%. Two (4.3%) patients with AF recurrences were completely asymptomatic. Among the symptomatic events stored by the patients, only 27.6% was confirmed as genuine AF recurrences according to the concomitant ECG recorded by the implanted loop recorder. A concomitant bipolar maze procedure during mitral valve surgery is effective in treating AF, as proved by detailed 1-year continuous monitoring.

  8. Predictors of mortality within 1 year after primary ovarian cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørskov, Mette; Iachina, Maria; Guldberg, Rikke;

    2016-01-01

    important predictors of mortality from the multivariable model were residual tumour tissue >2 cm versus no residual tumour (HR=4.58 (95% CI 3.20 to 6.59)), residual tumour tissue ≤2 cm versus no residual tumour (HR=2.50 (95% CI 1.63 to 3.82)) and age >64 years versus age ≤64 years (HR=2.33 (95% CI 1.69 to 3......OBJECTIVES: To identify predictors of mortality within 1 year after primary surgery for ovarian cancer. DESIGN: Prospective nationwide cohort study from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2012. SETTING: Evaluation of data from the Danish Gynaecology Cancer Database and the Danish Civil Registration...... (ASA) score, body mass index (BMI), International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, residual tumour tissue after surgery, perioperative blood transfusion and calendar year of surgery. RESULTS: The overall 1-year survival was 84%. Within 0-180 days after surgery, the 3 most...

  9. Results of 1 year of clinical experience with independent dose calculation software for VMAT fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Fernando Mata Colodro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that a redundant independent dose calculation (RIDC must be included in any treatment planning verification procedure. Specifically, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT technique implies a comprehensive quality assurance (QA program in which RIDC should be included. In this paper, the results obtained in 1 year of clinical experience are presented. Eclipse from Varian is the treatment planning system (TPS, here in use. RIDC were performed with the commercial software; Diamond ® (PTW which is capable of calculating VMAT fields. Once the plan is clinically accepted, it is exported via Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM to RIDC, together with the body contour, and then a point dose calculation is performed, usually at the isocenter. A total of 459 plans were evaluated. The total average deviation was -0.3 ± 1.8% (one standard deviation (1SD. For higher clearance the plans were grouped by location in: Prostate, pelvis, abdomen, chest, head and neck, brain, stereotactic radiosurgery, lung stereotactic body radiation therapy, and miscellaneous. The highest absolute deviation was -0.8 ± 1.5% corresponding to the prostate. A linear fit between doses calculated by RIDC and by TPS produced a correlation coefficient of 0.9991 and a slope of 1.0023. These results are very close to those obtained in the validation process. This agreement led us to consider this RIDC software as a valuable tool for QA in VMAT plans.

  10. Results of 1 year of clinical experience with independent dose calculation software for VMAT fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colodro, Juan Fernando Mata; Berna, Alfredo Serna; Puchades, Vicente Puchades; Amores, David Ramos; Baños, Miguel Alcaraz

    2014-10-01

    It is widely accepted that a redundant independent dose calculation (RIDC) must be included in any treatment planning verification procedure. Specifically, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique implies a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program in which RIDC should be included. In this paper, the results obtained in 1 year of clinical experience are presented. Eclipse from Varian is the treatment planning system (TPS), here in use. RIDC were performed with the commercial software; Diamond(®) (PTW) which is capable of calculating VMAT fields. Once the plan is clinically accepted, it is exported via Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) to RIDC, together with the body contour, and then a point dose calculation is performed, usually at the isocenter. A total of 459 plans were evaluated. The total average deviation was -0.3 ± 1.8% (one standard deviation (1SD)). For higher clearance the plans were grouped by location in: Prostate, pelvis, abdomen, chest, head and neck, brain, stereotactic radiosurgery, lung stereotactic body radiation therapy, and miscellaneous. The highest absolute deviation was -0.8 ± 1.5% corresponding to the prostate. A linear fit between doses calculated by RIDC and by TPS produced a correlation coefficient of 0.9991 and a slope of 1.0023. These results are very close to those obtained in the validation process. This agreement led us to consider this RIDC software as a valuable tool for QA in VMAT plans.

  11. Latent transition models to study women's changing of dietary patterns from pregnancy to 1 year postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Herring, Amy H; Siega-Riz, Anna-Maria

    2013-04-15

    Latent class models are useful for classifying subjects by dietary patterns. Our goals were to use latent transition models to identify dietary patterns during pregnancy and postpartum, to estimate the prevalence of these dietary patterns, and to model transition probabilities between dietary patterns as a function of covariates. Women who were enrolled in the Pregnancy, Infection, and Nutrition Study (University of North Carolina, 2000-2005) were followed for 1 year postpartum, and their diets were assessed in the second trimester and at 3 and 12 months postpartum (n = 519, 484, and 374, respectively) by using a food frequency questionnaire. After adjusting for energy intake, parity, smoking status, race, and education, we identified 3 dietary patterns and named them "prudent," "health conscious Western," and "Western." Nulliparas were 2.9 and 2.1 times more likely to be in the "prudent" class than the "health conscious Western" or the "Western" class, respectively. The 3 dietary patterns were very stable, with the "health conscious Western" class being the least stable; the probability for staying in the same class was 0.74 and 0.87 at 3 and 12 months postpartum, respectively. Breastfeeding mothers were more likely than nonbreastfeeding mothers to switch dietary pattern class (P = 0.0286). Except for breastfeeding mothers, most women did not switch dietary patterns from pregnancy to postpartum.

  12. A 1-year-old boy with persistent, generalized eruption. Urticaria pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Adnan; Chamlin, Sarah L

    2014-01-01

    A healthy 1-year-old boy born at full term after an uncomplicated pregnancy presented to the dermatology clinic for a widespread eruption with gradual onset since 3 months of age. He was otherwise well, afebrile, feeding well, and gaining weight appropriately. The child was overall asymptomatic, though some of his lesions occasionally became red and pruritic. His mother noticed that after mild illnesses, he was more prone to these flares. She denied flushing, vomiting, diarrhea, respiratory distress, and irritability. He was meeting all developmental milestones and started walking at 11 months of age. The remainder of his review of systems was unremarkable, and family history was noncontributory. Physical exam revealed a well-appearing, well-nourished, playful, and interactive toddler. There were innumerable discrete and coalescing pink-brown macules and papules concentrated on the trunk and extending onto the proximal upper and lower extremities bilaterally, as well as the neck and lower face. Stroking the lesions quickly led to development of erythematous edematous wheals. There was no hepatosplenomegaly, and the lymph node exam was unremarkable.

  13. MRI findings of juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward Y.; Kleinman, Paul K. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States); Sundel, Robert P.; Kim, Susan [Harvard Medical School, Rheumatology Program, Division of Immunology and the Department of Pediatrics, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, David [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JpsA) in children in order to facilitate early diagnosis and proper management. Two pediatric radiologists retrospectively reviewed in consensus a total of 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients (nine boys, 22 girls; age range 1-17 years; mean age 9.4 years) who had a definite diagnosis of JpsA and underwent MRI. Each MRI was evaluated for synovium abnormality (thickening and enhancement), joint effusion (small, moderate, and large), bone marrow abnormality (edema, enhancement, and location of abnormality), soft tissue abnormality (edema, enhancement, atrophy, and fatty infiltration), tendon abnormality (thickening, edema, tendon sheath fluid, and enhancement), and articular abnormality (joint space narrowing and erosion). The distribution of abnormal MRI findings among the six categories for the 37 MRI examinations was evaluated. The number of abnormal MRI findings for each MRI examination was assessed. Age at MRI examination and all six categories of abnormal MRI findings according to gender were evaluated. There were a total 96 abnormal MRI findings noted on 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients. The 37 abnormal MRI examinations included MRI of the hand (n=8), knee (n = 8), ankle (n = 5), pelvis (n = 5), temporomandibular joint (n = 4), wrist (n = 3), foot (n = 2), elbow (n = 1), and shoulder (n = 1). Twenty-eight diffuse synovial thickening and/or enhancement were the most common MRI abnormality (29.2%). Joint effusion comprised 22 abnormal MRI findings (22.9%). There were 16 abnormal MRI bone marrow edema and/or enhancement findings (16.7%), and in seven (7.3%) the edema involved non-articular sites. Soft tissue abnormality manifested as edema and/or enhancement constituted 14 abnormal MRI findings (14.5%). There were ten MRI abnormalities (10.4%) involving tendons. Articular abnormality seen as joint space

  14. MRI evaluation of a new scaffold-based allogenic chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhollander, A.A.M., E-mail: Aad.Dhollander@Ugent.b [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 1P5, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Huysse, W.C.J., E-mail: Wouter.Huysse@Ugent.b [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, -1K12 IB, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Verdonk, P.C.M., E-mail: pverdonk@yahoo.co [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 1P5, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Verstraete, K.L., E-mail: Koenraad.Verstraete@Ugent.b [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, -1K12 IB, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Verdonk, R., E-mail: Rene.Verdonk@Ugent.b [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 1P5, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Verbruggen, G., E-mail: Gust.Verbruggen@Ugent.b [Laboratory of Connective Tissue Biology, Department of Rheumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, Ghent (Belgium); Almqvist, K.F., E-mail: Fredrik.Almqvist@Ugent.b [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 1P5, B9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2010-07-15

    Aim: The present study was designed to evaluate the implantation of alginate beads containing human mature allogenic chondrocytes for the treatment of symptomatic cartilage defects of the knee. MRI was used for the morphological analysis of cartilage repair. The correlation between MRI findings and clinical outcome was also studied. Methods: A biodegradable, alginate-based biocompatible scaffold containing human mature allogenic chondrocytes was used for the treatment of symptomatic chondral and osteochondral lesions in the knee. Twenty-one patients were prospectively evaluated with use of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain preoperatively and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of follow-up. Of the 21 patients, 12 had consented to follow the postoperative MRI evaluation protocol. MRI data were analyzed based on the original MOCART (Magnetic Resonance Observation of Cartilage Repair Tissue) and modified MOCART scoring system. The correlation between the clinical outcome and MRI findings was evaluated. Results: A statistically significant clinical improvement became apparent after 6 months and patients continued to improve during the 12 months of follow-up. One of the two MRI scoring systems that were used, showed a statistically significant deterioration of the repair tissue at 1 year of follow-up. Twelve months after the operation complete filling or hypertrophy was found in 41.6%. Bone-marrow edema and effusion were seen in 41.7% and 25% of the study patients, respectively. We did not find a consistent correlation between the MRI criteria and the clinical results. Discussion: The present study confirmed the primary role of MRI in the evaluation of cartilage repair. Two MOCART-based scoring systems were used in a longitudinal fashion and allowed a practical and morphological evaluation of the repair tissue. However, the correlation between clinical outcome and MRI findings was poor. Further

  15. Effects on Metabolic Health after a 1-Year-Lifestyle Intervention in Overweight and Obese Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Waling

    2012-01-01

    Results. BMI z-scores decreased in both groups, 0.22 (P = 0.002 and 0.23 (P = 0.003 in intervention and control group, respectively, during the 1-year study, but there was no difference in BMI between the groups at 1-year measurement (P = 0.338. After 1 year, there was a significant difference in waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, and apolipoprotein B/A1 ratio between intervention and control group. Conclusions. The intervention had limited effects on anthropometrics and metabolic markers, which emphasizes the need of preventing childhood overweight and obesity.

  16. Response to immunotherapy in CLIPPERS: clinical, MRI, and MRS follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempere, Angel P; Mola, Santiago; Martin-Medina, Patricia; Bernabeu, Angela; Khabbaz, Elias; Lopez-Celada, Susana

    2013-04-01

    Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) is a recently defined inflammatory central nervous system disorder responsive to steroids with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features. We report a 69-year-old man presenting with gait ataxia with the characteristic MRI features of CLIPPERS and describe the clinical, MRI, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) follow-up after treatment with glucocorticosteroids. Brain and spine MRI showed punctate enhancement peppering the brainstem, cerebellar peduncles, and upper cervical cord. In MRS, the ratio of N-acetyl aspartate to creatine (NAA/Cr) was significantly decreased in the pons and both thalami. An extensive evaluation found no alternative diagnoses. Treatment with steroids led to rapid clinical improvement. Repeat MRI and MRS showed complete resolution of gadolinium-enhancing lesions and recovery of NAA/Cr levels in the pons and thalami. After 1 month of tapering oral steroids, weekly oral methotrexate was started and the patient has remained stable for the past 6 months.

  17. Characteristic MRI Findings of upper Limb Muscle Involvement in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Sugie

    Full Text Available The objective of our study was to evaluate the relation between muscle MRI findings and upper limb weakness with grip myotonia in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1. Seventeen patients with DM1 were evaluated by manual muscle strength testing and muscle MRI of the upper limbs. Many DM1 patients presenting with decreased grasping power frequently showed high intensity signals in the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP muscles on T1-weighted imaging. Patients presenting with upper limb weakness frequently also showed high intensity signals in the flexor pollicis longus, abductor pollicis longus, and extensor pollicis muscles. Disturbances of the distal muscles of the upper limbs were predominant in all DM1 patients. Some DM1 patients with a prolonged disease duration showed involvement of not only distal muscles but also proximal muscles in the upper limbs. Muscle involvement of the upper limbs on MRI strongly correlated positively with the disease duration or the numbers of CTG repeats. To our knowledge, this is the first study to provide a detailed description of the distribution and severity of affected muscles of the upper limbs on MRI in patients with DM1. We conclude that muscle MRI findings are very useful for identifying affected muscles and predicting the risk of muscle weakness in the upper limbs of DM1 patients.

  18. Repeated adjacent-segment degeneration after posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Shinya; Oda, Takenori; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Maeno, Takafumi; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important sequelae affecting long-term results is adjacent-segment degeneration (ASD) after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Although several reports have described the incidence rate, there have been no reports of repeated ASD. The purpose of this report was to describe 1 case of repeated ASD after PLIF. A 62-year-old woman with L-4 degenerative spondylolisthesis underwent PLIF at L4-5. At the second operation, L3-4 PLIF was performed for L-3 degenerative spondylolisthesis 6 years after the primary operation. At the third operation, L2-3 PLIF was performed for L-2 degenerative spondylolisthesis 1.5 years after the primary operation. Vertebral collapse of L-1 was detected 1 year after the third operation, and the collapse had progressed. At the fourth operation, 3 years after the third operation, vertebral column resection of L-1 and replacement of titanium mesh cages with pedicle screw fixation between T-4 and L-5 was performed. Although the patient's symptoms resolved after each operation, the time between surgeries shortened. The sacral slope decreased gradually although each PLIF achieved local lordosis at the fused segment.

  19. Variability in heart rate recovery measurements over 1 year in healthy, middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellis, M G; Ingle, L; Carroll, S

    2014-02-01

    This study assessed the longer-term (12-month) variability in post-exercise heart rate recovery following a submaximal exercise test. Longitudinal data was analysed for 97 healthy middle-aged adults (74 male, 23 female) from 2 occasions, 12 months apart. Participants were retrospectively selected if they had stable physical activity habits, submaximal treadmill fitness and anthropometric measurements between the 2 assessment visits. A submaximal Bruce treadmill test was performed to at least 85% age-predicted maximum heart rate. Absolute heart rate and Δ heart rate recovery (change from peak exercise heart rate) were recorded for 1 and 2 min post-exercise in an immediate supine position. Heart rate recovery at both time-points was shown to be reliable with intra-class correlation coefficient values ≥ 0.714. Absolute heart rate 1-min post-exercise showed the strongest agreement between repeat tests (r = 0.867, P rate values rather than Δ heart rate recovery, and for 1-min rather than 2-min post-exercise recovery time points. Log-transformed values generated better variability with acceptable coefficient of variation for all measures (2.2-10%). Overall, 1 min post-exercise heart rate recovery data had least variability over the 12-month period in apparently healthy middle-aged adults.

  20. The diagnostic utility of MRI in spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne J; Weber, Ulrich; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    The recently developed Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) classification criteria for axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA) are the first criteria ever to include findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the sacroiliac joints. Features indicating sacroiliac...... joint inflammation on MRI are weighted equally to structural changes on conventional radiography, and thus MRI has become an important tool for use in daily practice to evaluate patients with clinically suspected early spondyloarthritis. However, MRI can also detect structural changes such as erosions...... and fat infiltrations, and recent studies suggest that assessment of both inflammatory and structural changes of the sacroiliac joints may improve the diagnostic utility of MRI. The present article reviews the evidence for the use of sacroiliac joint and spinal MRI to assess patients with axial...

  1. MRI in patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Krüger; Manniche, Claus; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    MRI in LBP patients: good or bad? Background: The routine use of radiology is presently discouraged in patients with low back pain (LBP). MRI provides clinicians and patients with detailed knowledge of the spinal structures and has no known physical side effects. It is possible that detailed...... insight into the pathological changes in LBP patients may affect the management of patients. However, this has never been tested. Until June 2006, all patients at our specialized public out-patient clinic, were referred to MRI on the basis of clinical indications, economic constraints, and availability...... of MRI (the "old" group). As a new approach, all patients with certain criteria are now referred to MRI before the clinical examination (the "new" group).   Objectives: The aims of this study were to investigate if the two different MRI approaches, the "old" and "new", resulted in differences in relation...

  2. Moyamoya disease: diagnostic accuracy of MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, I; Suzuki, S; Matsushima, Y

    1995-07-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in moyamoya disease. We studied 30 patients with this disease, comparing MRI and angiographic findings. The diagnostic value of MRI was evaluated for occlusive lesions, collateral vessels, and parenchymal lesions. In all patients bilateral occlusion or stenosis of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery and proximal anterior and middle cerebral arteries was clearly shown by MRI, and staging of the extent of occlusion agreed with angiographic staging in 44 (73%) of 60 arteries. MRI, particularly coronal images, clearly showed basal cerebral moyamoya vessels in 54 hemispheres, and 45 of a total of 71 large leptomeningeal and transdural collateral vessels were identified. MRI also showed parenchymal lesions in 48 (80%) hemispheres, and the extent of occlusion in the anterior and posterior circulations respectively correlated with white matter and cortical and/or subcortical infarcts.

  3. A novel anthropomorphic flow phantom for the quantitative evaluation of prostate DCE-MRI acquisition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Silvin P.; Browne, Jacinta E.; Meaney, James F.; Smith, David S.; Fagan, Andrew J.

    2016-10-01

    A novel anthropomorphic flow phantom device has been developed, which can be used for quantitatively assessing the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners to accurately measure signal/concentration time-intensity curves (CTCs) associated with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. Modelling of the complex pharmacokinetics of contrast agents as they perfuse through the tumour capillary network has shown great promise for cancer diagnosis and therapy monitoring. However, clinical adoption has been hindered by methodological problems, resulting in a lack of consensus regarding the most appropriate acquisition and modelling methodology to use and a consequent wide discrepancy in published data. A heretofore overlooked source of such discrepancy may arise from measurement errors of tumour CTCs deriving from the imaging pulse sequence itself, while the effects on the fidelity of CTC measurement of using rapidly-accelerated sequences such as parallel imaging and compressed sensing remain unknown. The present work aimed to investigate these features by developing a test device in which ‘ground truth’ CTCs were generated and presented to the MRI scanner for measurement, thereby allowing for an assessment of the DCE-MRI protocol to accurately measure this curve shape. The device comprised a four-pump flow system wherein CTCs derived from prior patient prostate data were produced in measurement chambers placed within the imaged volume. The ground truth was determined as the mean of repeat measurements using an MRI-independent, custom-built optical imaging system. In DCE-MRI experiments, significant discrepancies between the ground truth and measured CTCs were found for both tumorous and healthy tissue-mimicking curve shapes. Pharmacokinetic modelling revealed errors in measured K trans, v e and k ep values of up to 42%, 31%, and 50% respectively, following a simple variation of the parallel imaging factor and number of signal averages in the acquisition

  4. Test-retest reliability of white matter structural brain networks: A multiband diffusion MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengda eZhao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The multiband EPI sequence has been developed for the human connectome project to accelerate MRI data acquisition. However, no study has yet investigated the test-retest (TRT reliability of the graph metrics of white matter (WM structural brain networks constructed from this new sequence. Here, we employed a multiband diffusion MRI (dMRI dataset with repeated scanning sessions and constructed both low- and high-resolution WM networks by volume- and surface-based parcellation methods. The reproducibility of network metrics and its dependence on type of construction procedures was assessed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC. We observed conserved topological architecture of WM structural networks constructed from the multiband dMRI data as previous findings from conventional dMRI. For the global network properties, the first order metrics were more reliable than second order metrics. Between two parcellation methods, networks with volume-based parcellation showed better reliability than surface-based parcellation, especially for the global metrics. Between different resolutions, the high-resolution network exhibited higher TRT performance than the low-resolution in terms of the global metrics with a large effect size, whereas the low-resolution performs better in terms of local (region and connection properties with a relatively low effect size. Moreover, we identified that the association and primary cortices showed higher reproducibility than the paralimbic/limbic regions. The important hub regions and rich-club connections are more reliable than the non-hub regions and connections. Finally, we found WM networks from the multiband dMRI showed higher reproducibility compared with those from the conventional dMRI. Together, our results demonstrated the fair to good reliability of the WM structural brain networks from the multiband EPI sequence, suggesting its potential utility for exploring individual differences and for clinical

  5. Test-retest reliability of white matter structural brain networks: a multiband diffusion MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tengda; Duan, Fei; Liao, Xuhong; Dai, Zhengjia; Cao, Miao; He, Yong; Shu, Ni

    2015-01-01

    The multiband EPI sequence has been developed for the human connectome project to accelerate MRI data acquisition. However, no study has yet investigated the test-retest (TRT) reliability of the graph metrics of white matter (WM) structural brain networks constructed from this new sequence. Here, we employed a multiband diffusion MRI (dMRI) dataset with repeated scanning sessions and constructed both low- and high-resolution WM networks by volume- and surface-based parcellation methods. The reproducibility of network metrics and its dependence on type of construction procedures was assessed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). We observed conserved topological architecture of WM structural networks constructed from the multiband dMRI data as previous findings from conventional dMRI. For the global network properties, the first order metrics were more reliable than second order metrics. Between two parcellation methods, networks with volume-based parcellation showed better reliability than surface-based parcellation, especially for the global metrics. Between different resolutions, the high-resolution network exhibited higher TRT performance than the low-resolution in terms of the global metrics with a large effect size, whereas the low-resolution performs better in terms of local (region and connection) properties with a relatively low effect size. Moreover, we identified that the association and primary cortices showed higher reproducibility than the paralimbic/limbic regions. The important hub regions and rich-club connections are more reliable than the non-hub regions and connections. Finally, we found WM networks from the multiband dMRI showed higher reproducibility compared with those from the conventional dMRI. Together, our results demonstrated the fair to good reliability of the WM structural brain networks from the multiband EPI sequence, suggesting its potential utility for exploring individual differences and for clinical applications.

  6. MRI findings in thoracic outlet syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aralasmak, Ayse; Sharifov, Rasul; Kilicarslan, Rukiye; Alkan, Alpay [Bezmialem Vakif University, Department of Radiology, Fatih/Istanbul (Turkey); Cevikol, Can; Karaali, Kamil; Senol, Utku [Akdeniz University, Department of Radiology, Antalya (Turkey)

    2012-11-15

    We discuss MRI findings in patients with thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). A total of 100 neurovascular bundles were evaluated in the interscalene triangle (IS), costoclavicular (CC), and retropectoralis minor (RPM) spaces. To exclude neurogenic abnormality, MRIs of the cervical spine and brachial plexus (BPL) were obtained in neutral. To exclude compression on neurovascular bundles, sagittal T1W images were obtained vertical to the longitudinal axis of BPL from spinal cord to the medial part of the humerus, in abduction and neutral. To exclude vascular TOS, MR angiography (MRA) and venography (MRV) of the subclavian artery (SA) and vein (SV) in abduction were obtained. If there is compression on the vessels, MRA and MRV of the subclavian vessels were repeated in neutral. Seventy-one neurovascular bundles were found to be abnormal: 16 arterial-venous-neurogenic, 20 neurogenic, 1 arterial, 15 venous, 8 arterial-venous, 3 arterial-neurogenic, and 8 venous-neurogenic TOS. Overall, neurogenic TOS was noted in 69%, venous TOS in 66%, and arterial TOS in 39%. The neurovascular bundle was most commonly compressed in the CC, mostly secondary to position, and very rarely compressed in the RPM. The cause of TOS was congenital bone variations in 36%, congenital fibromuscular anomalies in 11%, and position in 53%. In 5%, there was unilateral brachial plexitis in addition to compression of the neurovascular bundle. Severe cervical spondylosis was noted in 14%, contributing to TOS symptoms. For evaluation of patients with TOS, visualization of the brachial plexus and cervical spine and dynamic evaluation of neurovascular bundles in the cervicothoracobrachial region are mandatory. (orig.)

  7. Cow's milk protein intolerance in infants under 1 year of age: a prospective epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrander, J J; van den Bogart, J P; Forget, P P; Schrander-Stumpel, C T; Kuijten, R H; Kester, A D

    1993-08-01

    Incidence and clinical manifestation of cow's milk protein intolerance (CMPI) were studied in 1158 unselected newborn infants followed prospectively from birth to 1 year of age. No food changes were required in 914 infants who were used as healthy controls. When CMPI was suspected (211 infants), diagnostic dietary interventions according to a standard protocol were performed. After exclusion of lactose intolerance, two positive cow's milk elimination/challenge tests were considered diagnostic of CMPI. Two hundred and eleven symptomatic infants were examined for possible CMPI. A large group of 80 infants improved on a lactose reduced formula. In 87/211 infants CMPI was excluded (sick controls). Finally CMPI was proven in 26 infants. The calculated incidence rate for CMPI was 2.8%. The principal symptoms in infants with CMPI were gastrointestinal, dermatological and respiratory in 50%, 31% and 19% respectively. A positive family history for atopy (first or second degree relatives) was more frequent in either CMPI infants (65%), or sick controls (63%) when compared to either healthy controls (35%) or infants improving on a low lactose formula (51%). Differences between patients with CMPI and sick controls were only found for the presence of atopy in at least 2 first degree relatives [(5/26 in CMPI infants and 4/87 in sick controls (P < 0.05)] and for multiorgan involvement [10/26 infants with CMPI as opposed to 12/87 in the sick control group (P < 0.02)]. These statistical differences are too weak to be of clinical value.

  8. Robot-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty: minimum 1-year follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vipul; Thaly, Rahul; Shah, Ketul

    2007-02-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of robotic-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty. Laparoscopic pyeloplasty has been shown to have a success rate comparable to that of the open surgical approach. However, the steep learning curve has hindered its acceptance into mainstream urologic practice. The introduction of robotic assistance provides advantages that have the potential to facilitate precise dissection and intracorporeal suturing. Methods: A total of 50 patients underwent robotic-assisted laparoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty. A four-trocar technique was used. Most patients were discharged home on day 1, with stent removal at 3 weeks. Patency of the ureteropelvic junction was assessed in all patients with mercaptotriglycylglycine Lasix renograms at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, then every 6 months for 1 year, and then yearly. Results: Each patient underwent a successful procedure without open conversion or transfusion. The average estimated blood loss was 40 ml. The operative time averaged 122 minutes (range 60 to 330) overall. Crossing vessels were present in 30% of the patients and were preserved in all cases. The time for the anastomosis averaged 20 minutes (range 10 to 100). Intraoperatively, no complications occurred. Postoperatively, the average hospital stay was 1.1 days. The stents were removed at an average of 20 days (range 14 to 28) postoperatively. The average follow-up was 11.7 months; at the last follow-up visit, each patient was doing well. Of the 50 patients, 48 underwent one or more renograms, demonstrating stable renal function, improved drainage, and no evidence of recurrent obstruction. Conclusions: Robotic-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty is a feasible technique for ureteropelvic junction reconstruction. The procedure provides a minimally invasive alternative with good short-term results.

  9. Effectiveness of a multidisciplinary heart failure disease management programme on 1-year mortality: Prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborde-Castérot, Hervé; Agrinier, Nelly; Zannad, Faiez; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Rossignol, Patrick; Girerd, Nicolas; Alla, François; Thilly, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    We performed a multicenter prospective observational cohort study (Epidémiologie et Pronostic de l'Insuffisance Cardiaque Aiguë en Lorraine, Epidemiology and Prognosis of Acute Heart Failure in Lorraine [EPICAL2]) to evaluate the effectiveness on mortality of a community-based multidisciplinary disease management programme (DMP) for heart failure (HF) patients.Between October 2011 and October 2012, 1816 patients, who were hospitalized for acute HF or who developed acute HF during a hospitalization, were included from 21 hospitals in a northeast region of France. At hospital admission, their mean age was 77.3 (standard deviation [SD] 11.6) years and mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 45.0 (SD 16.0)%. A subset of patients were enrolled in a multidimensional DMP for HF (n = 312, 17.2%), based on structured patient education, home monitoring visits by HF-trained nurses, and automatic alerts triggered by significant clinical and biological changes to the patient. The DMP involved general practitioners, nurses, and cardiologists collaborating via an individual web-based medical electronic record. The outcome was all-cause mortality from the 3rd to the 12th month after discharge. During the follow-up, a total of 377 (20.8%) patients died: 321 (21.3%) in the control group and 56 (17.9%) in the DMP group. In a propensity score analysis, DMP was associated with lower 1-year all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.65, 95% CI 0.46-0.92). Instrumental variable analysis gave similar results (hazard ratio 0.56, 0.27-1.16).In a real world setting, a multidimensional DMP for HF with structured patient education, home nurse monitoring, and appropriate physician alerts may improve survival when implemented after discharge from hospitalization due to worsening HF.

  10. Aerosol source apportionment from 1-year measurements at the CESAR tower in Cabauw, the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlag, Patrick; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Blom, Marcus Johannes; Canonaco, Francesco; Sebastiaan Henzing, Jeroen; Moerman, Marcel; Prévôt, André Stephan Henry; Holzinger, Rupert

    2016-07-01

    Intensive measurements of submicron aerosol particles and their chemical composition were performed with an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research (CESAR) in Cabauw, the Netherlands, sampling at 5 m height above ground. The campaign lasted nearly 1 year from July 2012 to June 2013 as part of the EU-FP7-ACTRIS project (Q-ACSM Network). Including equivalent black carbon an average particulate mass concentration of 9.50 µg m-3 was obtained during the whole campaign with dominant contributions from ammonium nitrate (45 %), organic aerosol (OA, 29 %), and ammonium sulfate (19 %). There were 12 exceedances of the World Health Organization (WHO) PM2.5 daily mean limit (25 µg m-3) observed at this rural site using PM1 instrumentation only. Ammonium nitrate and OA represented the largest contributors to total particulate matter during periods of exceedance. Source apportionment of OA was performed season-wise by positive matrix factorization (PMF) using the multilinear engine 2 (ME-2) controlled via the source finder (SoFi). Primary organic aerosols were attributed mainly to traffic (8-16 % contribution to total OA, averaged season-wise) and biomass burning (0-23 %). Secondary organic aerosols (SOAs, 61-84 %) dominated the organic fraction during the whole campaign, particularly on days with high mass loadings. A SOA factor which is attributed to humic-like substances (HULIS) was identified as a highly oxidized background aerosol in Cabauw. This shows the importance of atmospheric aging processes for aerosol concentration at this rural site. Due to the large secondary fraction, the reduction of particulate mass at this rural site is challenging on a local scale.

  11. Effect of ethnicity on weight loss among adolescents 1 year after bariatric surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah; E; Messiah; Gabriela; Lopez-Mitnik; Deborah; Winegar; Bintu; Sherif; Kristopher; L; Arheart; Kirk; W; Reichard; Marc; P; Michalsky; Steven; E; Lipshultz; Tracie; L; Miller; Alan; S; Livingstone; Nestor; de; la; Cruz-Muoz

    2013-01-01

    AIM:To investigate whether or not bariatric surgeryweight outcomes vary by ethnicity in a large,nationally representative sample of adolescents.METHODS:The Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database was used for analysis and contains data on surgeries performed on adolescents from 2004 to 2010from 423 surgeons at 360 facilities across the United States Adolescents(n=827)between 11 and 19 years old who underwent either gastric bypass or adjustable gastric banding surgery were included in the analysis.Outcome measures included changes in anthropometric measurements[weight(kg)and body mass index]from baseline to 3(n=739),6(n=512),and 12(n=247)mo after surgery.RESULTS:A year after patients underwent either gastric bypass(51%)or adjustable gastric banding(49%)surgery,mean estimated weight loss for all ethnic groups differed by a maximum of only 1.5 kg,being34.3 kg(95%CI:30.0-38.5 kg)for Hispanics,33.8 kg(95%CI:27.3-40.3 kg)for non-Hispanic blacks,and32.8 kg(95%CI:30.9-34.7 kg)for non-Hispanic whites.No overall pairwise group comparisons were significant,indicating that no ethnic group had better weight loss outcomes than did another.CONCLUSION:Bariatric surgery substantially reduces the weight of severely obese adolescents at 1 year post-procedure with little variation by ethnicity and/or gender.These results suggest that bariatric surgery is a safe and reasonable treatment for all severely obese adolescents with the appropriate indications.

  12. Hyperuricemia beyond 1 year after kidney transplantation in pediatric patients: Prevalence and risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einollahi, B.; Einollahi, H.; Rostami, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is frequent among adult renal transplant recipients; however, data among pediatric kidney recipients are scarce. This study is designed to estimate the prevalence and risk factors of late post-transplant hyperuricemia in pediatric recipients. A retrospective observational multicenter study on 179 pediatric renal recipients (5–18 years) was conducted between April 2008 and January 2011 from five kidney transplant centers of Tehran, Iran. All recipients were followed up for more than 1 year (5.9 ±3.3 years) after transplantation. A total of 17686 blood samples were obtained for serum uric acid (SUA). The normal range of SUA was defined as SUA 1.86–5.93 mg/dl for children between 2 and 15 years in both genders; 2.40–5.70 mg/dl for girls aged >15 years; 3.40–7.0 mg/dl for boys aged >15 and more than 6 and 7 mg/dl in boys and girls older than 15 years old. The median age of the children was 13 years. Male recipients were more popular than female (male/female 59/41%). Hyperuricemia was detected in 50.2% of patients. Mean SUA concentration was 5.9±1.7 mg/dl and mean SUA concentration in hyperuricemic patients was 7.7±1.2 mg/dl. While at multivariate logistic regression elevated serum creatinine concentration (P<0.001) and the time span after renal transplantation (P=0.02) had impact on late post-transplant hyperuricemia. High cyclosporine level (C0 and C2) was not risk factor for huperuricemia. Late post-transplant hyperuricemia was found in about half of pediatric renal recipients, and was associated with impaired renal allograft function. PMID:23162272

  13. Change in Metabolic Profile after 1-Year Nutritional-Behavioral Intervention in Obese Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Verduci

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Research findings are inconsistent about improvement of specific cardio-metabolic variables after lifestyle intervention in obese children. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the effect of a 1-year intervention, based on normocaloric diet and physical activity, on body mass index (BMI, blood lipid profile, glucose metabolism and metabolic syndrome. Eighty-five obese children aged ≥6 years were analyzed. The BMI z-score was calculated. Fasting blood samples were analyzed for lipids, insulin and glucose. The homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR was calculated and insulin resistance was defined as HOMA-IR >3.16. HOMA-β%, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index and triglyceride glucose index were calculated. The metabolic syndrome was defined in accordance with the International Diabetes Federation criteria. At the end of intervention children showed a reduction (mean (95% CI in BMI z-score (−0.58 (−0.66; −0.50, triglycerides (−0.35 (−0.45; −0.25 mmol/L and triglyceride glucose index (−0.29 (−0.37; −0.21, and an increase in HDL cholesterol (0.06 (0.01; 0.11 mmol/L. Prevalence of insulin resistance declined from 51.8% to 36.5% and prevalence of metabolic syndrome from 17.1% to 4.9%. Nutritional-behavioral interventions can improve the blood lipid profile and insulin sensitivity in obese children, and possibly provide benefits in terms of metabolic syndrome.

  14. Encouraging responses in sexual and relationship violence prevention: what program effects remain 1 year later?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Mary M; Banyard, Victoria L; Cares, Alison C; Potter, Sharyn J; Williams, Linda M; Stapleton, Jane G

    2015-01-01

    Colleges and universities are high-risk settings for sexual and relationship violence. To address these problems, institutions of higher education have implemented prevention programs, many of which train students as potential bystanders who can step in to help diffuse risky situations, identify and challenge perpetrators, and assist victims. The impact of bystander sexual and relationship violence prevention programs on long-term behavior of bystanders has remained a key unanswered question for those who seek to offer the most effective programs as well as for policy makers. In this study, the researchers experimentally evaluated the effectiveness of the Bringing in the Bystander® in-person program. Participants were 948 1st-year college students of whom 47.8% were women and 85.2% identified as White (15% also identified as Hispanic in a separate question) between the ages of 18 and 24 at two universities (one a rural, primarily residential campus and the other an urban, highly commuter campus) in the northeastern United States. To date, this is the first study to have found positive behavior changes as long-lasting as 1 year following an educational workshop focusing on engaging bystanders in preventing sexual and relationship violence. Even so, many questions remain to be answered about prevention and intervention of this type. More prospective research is needed on bystander-focused prevention of these forms of violence to help understand and better predict the complicated relationships both between and among the attitudes and behaviors related to preventing sexual and relationship violence. In this regard, we make specific recommendations for designing and evaluating programs based on our findings relating to the importance of moderators, especially two key understudied ones, readiness to help and opportunity to intervene.

  15. Percutaneous fixation of fractures of the spine: 1-year clinical and radiological follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Fernando Pereira da Silva Herrero

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the preliminary results of the surgical treatment through minimally invasive fixation technique in patients with thoracolumbar spinal fractures. Methods: Retrospective study of 17 patients with fractures of thoracolumbar vertebrae who underwent surgery with percutaneous fixation in the period of 2009 to 2011. The clinical evaluation of the results was performed using the SF-36 and Oswestry questionnaires. The radiographic parameters evaluated were: fracture classification according to Magerl's criteria, wedge angle of the fractured vertebrae and bisegmental Cobb angle. These measurements were made in the preoperative, immediate postoperative and 1 year after surgery. Other data such as associated injuries, neurological deficit, post-surgical infection, loosening and breakage of implants were also considered. Results: The data revealed average scores above 80% in all domains of the SF-36 questionnaire while in Oswestry Questionnaire, 79% of patients had minimal or absent physical limitations with a mean score of 12.4±11.89%. The average Cobb angle for preoperative kyphosis was 5.53º±13.80o, 2.18º±13.38o in the early postoperative period and 5.26º±13.95o one year after surgery. The average correction obtained after surgery was 3.35º and the average correction loss was 3.19º. No complications such as post-surgical infection, permanent neurological deficits and implant loosening and breakage were observed. Conclusion: The surgical treatment of fractures of thoracolumbar vertebrae using a minimally invasive technique provides satisfactory clinical and radiographic results with low complication rates.

  16. Increased Cardiovascular Events and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: 1 Year Prospective Single Centre Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscitti, Piero; Cipriani, Paola; Masedu, Francesco; Romano, Silvio; Berardicurti, Onorina; Liakouli, Vasiliki; Carubbi, Francesco; Di Benedetto, Paola; Alvaro, Saverio; Penco, Maria; Valenti, Marco; Giacomelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Several studies showed the close relationship between Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and cerebro-cardiovascular events (CVEs) and subclinical atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis during the course of RA and we evaluated the possible role of both traditional cardiovascular (CV) and disease related risk factors to predict the occurrence of new CVEs and the onset of subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods We designed a single centre, bias-adjusted, prospective, observational study to investigate, in a homogeneous subset of RA patients, the occurrence of new onset of CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the role of traditional CV and disease-related risk factors to predict the occurrence of new CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis. Results We enrolled 347 RA patients prospectively followed for 12 months. An increased percentage of patients experienced CVEs, developed subclinical atherosclerosis and was affected by systemic arterial hypertension (SAH), type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (MS), at the end of follow up. Our analysis showed that the insurgence of both SAH and MS, during the follow up, the older age, the CVE familiarity and the lack of clinical response, were associated with a significantly increased risk to experience CVEs and to develop subclinical atherosclerosis. Conclusions Our study quantifies the increased expected risk for CVEs in a cohort of RA patients prospectively followed for 1 year. The occurrence of both new CVEs and subclinical atherosclerosis in RA patients may be explained by inflammatory burden as well as traditional CV risk factors. PMID:28103312

  17. MRI of sequela of transverse myelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.C.; Lee, S.K.; Ho, Y.J. (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan). Dept. of Radiology); Lee, K.R. (National Tsing-Hua Univ., Hsin-Chu (Taiwan). Inst. of Life Science); Mak, S.C.; Chi, C.S. (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan). Dept. of Pediatrics)

    1992-09-01

    A 4-year-old boy developed acute paraplegia, associated with sensory impairement and bowel and urinary dysfunction after an URI. MRI showed diffuse hyperintensity in T2WI in the spinal cord below the T6 level. Acute transverse myelitis was diagnosed based on the clinical presentations and MRI findings. The patient had poor recovery and two months later, a follow-up MRI disclosed a severer diffuse atrophic change of the spinal cord in the affected segment. (orig.).

  18. fMRI-compatible rehabilitation hand device

    OpenAIRE

    Tzika Aria; Astrakas Loukas; Weinberg Brian; Triantafyllou Christina; Muto Andrew; Khanicheh Azadeh; Mavroidis Constantinos

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used in studying human brain functions and neurorehabilitation. In order to develop complex and well-controlled fMRI paradigms, interfaces that can precisely control and measure output force and kinematics of the movements in human subjects are needed. Optimized state-of-the-art fMRI methods, combined with magnetic resonance (MR) compatible robotic devices for rehabilitation, can assist therapists to quantify, mo...

  19. Repeatability & Workability Evaluation of SIGMOD 2009

    KAUST Repository

    Manegold, Stefan

    2010-12-15

    SIGMOD 2008 was the first database conference that offered to test submitters\\' programs against their data to verify the repeatability of the experiments published [1]. Given the positive feedback concerning the SIGMOD 2008 repeatability initiative, SIGMOD 2009 modified and expanded the initiative with a workability assessment.

  20. Navicular bone position determined by positional MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Philip; Johannsen, Finn E; Hangaard, Stine

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine intraobserver, interobserver and between-day reproducibility of positional MRI for evaluation of navicular bone height (NVH) and medial navicular position (MNP). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Positional MRI (pMRI) of the foot was performed on ten healthy participants (0.25 T G......: Navicular height and medial navicular position can be measured by pMRI in a very reproducible manner within and between observers. Increased measurement variation is observed between-days in supine position, which may be due to small positional differences or other unknown biomechanical factors....

  1. Breast MRI in high risk patients

    OpenAIRE

    Obdeijn, Inge-Marie

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract In this thesis we address various indications of breast MRI, with the emphasis on the value of MRI in screening of women with high genetic risk for breast cancer, and especially in BRCA1 mutation carriers. We showed that in the era of up-to-date MRI expertise and digital mammography the screening efficacy is improved. However, the additional value of mammography over MRI is little while at the same time BRCA carriers are more sensitive the risks of low dose radiation ...

  2. MRI of the lungs in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, Wolfgang [Paediatric Radiology in the Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Leipzig (Germany)], E-mail: wolfgang.hirsch@medizin.uni-leipzig.de; Sorge, Ina; Krohmer, Svetlana; Weber, Dana [Paediatric Radiology in the Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Leipzig (Germany); Meier, Konstanze [Department of Paediatrics, University Hospital Leipzig (Germany); Till, Holger [Department of Paediatric Surgery, University Hospital Leipzig (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    Lung diseases of children often need diagnostic imaging beyond X-ray. Although CT is considered the gold standard of lung imaging, MRI is sufficient to answer most of the questions raised. After all, the exposure to radiation caused by one CT examination corresponds to approximately the effective dose of 200 chest radiographs. What is MRI's potential in the lung today? In diseases with alveolar pathology, cardiac- and respiratory-triggered MRI examinations are roughly equivalent to CT examinations. Distinct interstitial processes are easily diagnosable using MRI. Early interstitial processes may be missed by MRI, but conventional plain films fail to recognize them just as often. For identification of lung metastases, CT is still used as the initial diagnostic measure. Subsequent therapy monitoring may then be carried out with the help of MRI. Small bullae and pulmonary emphysema at present pose a problem to MRI. On the other hand, MRI is reliable for follow-up examinations in inflammatory diseases or for imaging of complications, and the increased use of lung MRI as an alternative to chest CT may contribute immensely to reducing radiation exposure in children.

  3. MRI of central nervous system anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izawa, M.; Oikawa, A.; Matoba, A.

    1987-05-01

    MRI was very useful in the evaluation of congenital anomalies of central nervous system as well as other nervous system disease with three-dimensional spatial resolution. We had experienced MRI of central nervous system anomalies, demonstrated characterisitic findings in each anomaly. MRI is useful to observe the coronal, horizontal and sagittal images of the brain and spinal cord in order to discuss the etiological mechanisms of spinal dysraphysm and its associated anomalies. In case of spina bifida cystica MRI was available to decide operative indication for radical operation and tetherd cord developed from postoperative scar or accompanied intraspinal lesions.

  4. Preoperative diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inouye, Takahiro; Tomita, Toshiki; Nitta, Seiichi [Tochigi Prefecture Saiseikai Utsunomiya Hospital (Japan); Kanou, Shigeru; Sato, Toshihiko

    1996-06-01

    We evaluated 12 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism by MRI. Nine patients presented parathyroid adenomas and the others hypertrophy of the parathyroid. Abnormal parathyroid was detected in 10 patients (83%) by T2-weighed image. And abnormal parathyroid was detected in one of the other two cases by MRI combined with {sup 99m}Tc{center_dot}MIBI-{sup 99m}Tc subtraction scintigraphy. Although we usually employ the axial view of MRI, it is incompatible with the operative field. We therefore hope that three-dimensional MRI will become compatible with the operative field in the future. (author)

  5. Unexpected dominance of 1 year old parr among migrating salmon and sea trout individuals in the River Siesartis, Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kęstutis Skrupskelis

    2015-12-01

    However, 1 year age parr unexpectedly dominated among salmon juveniles descending towards the Sea in the restocked Siesartis River, which is situated 400 km to the Baltic Sea. The same phenomenon has been observed among migrating sea trout individuals, too. Mass migration of 1 year age salmon and sea trout parr with mean body length ranging from 69 to 150 mm can hardly be explained by density-dependant regulatory mechanisms alone. Possible impact of particularly long distance migration route is also discussed.

  6. UK 2009-2010 repeat station report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J.G. Shanahan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The British Geological Survey is responsible for conducting the UK geomagnetic repeat station programme. Measurements made at the UK repeat station sites are used in conjunction with the three UK magnetic observatories: Hartland, Eskdalemuir and Lerwick, to produce a regional model of the local field each year. The UK network of repeat stations comprises 41 stations which are occupied at approximately 3-4 year intervals. Practices for conducting repeat station measurements continue to evolve as advances are made in survey instrumentation and as the usage of the data continues to change. Here, a summary of the 2009 and 2010 UK repeat station surveys is presented, highlighting the measurement process and techniques, density of network, reduction process and recent results.

  7. Comparison of neurite density measured by MRI and histology after TBI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyang Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Functional recovery after brain injury in animals is improved by marrow stromal cells (MSC which stimulate neurite reorganization. However, MRI measurement of neurite density changes after injury has not been performed. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of MRI measurement of neurite density in an animal model of traumatic brain injury (TBI with and without MSC treatment. METHODS: Fifteen male Wistar rats, were treated with saline (n = 6 or MSCs (n = 9 and were sacrificed at 6 weeks after controlled cortical impact (CCI. Healthy non-CCI rats (n = 5, were also employed. Ex-vivo MRI scans were performed two days after the rats were sacrificed. Multiple-shell hybrid diffusion imaging encoding scheme and spherical harmonic expansion of a two-compartment water diffusion displacement model were used to extract neurite related parameters. Bielshowski and Luxol Fast blue was used for staining axons and myelin, respectively. Modified Morris water maze and neurological severity score (mNSS test were performed for functional evaluation. The treatment effects, the correlations between neurite densities measured by MRI and histology, and the correlations between MRI and functional variables were calculated by repeated measures analysis of variance, the regression correlation analysis tests, and spearman correlation coefficients. RESULTS: Neurite densities exhibited a significant correlation (R(2>0.80, p<1E-20 between MRI and immuno-histochemistry measurements with 95% lower bound of the intra-correlation coefficient (ICC as 0.86. The conventional fractional anisotropy (FA correlated moderately with histological neurite density (R(2 = 0.59, P<1E-5 with 95% lower bound of ICC as 0.76. MRI data revealed increased neurite reorganization with MSC treatment compared with saline treatment, confirmed by histological data from the same animals. mNSS were significantly correlated with MRI neurite density in the hippocampus region

  8. Long term outcomes from CT-guided indirect cervical nerve root blocks and their relationship to the MRI findings. A prospective study

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    Bensler, Susanne; Sutter, Reto; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Peterson, Cynthia K. [Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    To investigate long-term pain reduction and 'improvement' in patients with indirect cervical nerve-root-blocks in comparison to MRI findings. One hundred and twelve patients with MRI confirmed cervical radiculopathy and an indirect cervical nerve-root-block were included. Two radiologists independently evaluated the MRI examinations. 12 different MRI abnormalities at the level and side of infiltration were compared to pain relief and 'improvement' at 1-month, 3-months and 1-year post injection. The proportion of patients reporting clinically relevant 'improvement' was 36.7 % at 1-month, 53.9 % at 3-months and 68.1 % at 1-year. At 1-month post injection, a statistically significantly lower percentage of patients eventually requiring surgery reported improvement and lower NRS change scores compared to those who did not undergo surgery (p = 0.001). Patients with extrusion of the disc were around 4-times more likely to have surgery. At 1-year post-injection the presence of nerve-root compromise was significantly linked to treatment outcome (p = 0.011). Patients with nerve root compression were more likely to report improvement at 1 year. Patients with disc extrusions have less pain relief and are 4 times more likely to go to surgery than patients with disc protrusions. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of MRI and PET-CT in detecting the loco-regional recurrence of soft tissue sarcomas during surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun-Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Department of Radiology, Anyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hye Won [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Sun Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-Seok [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of MRI and PET-CT for the detection of loco-regional recurrences after soft tissue sarcoma (STS) excision. From Dec 2003 to Aug 2014, 394 patients with STSs, who were included in the electronic patient registry for initial or repeated surgery at our hospital, were retrospectively reviewed. We identified 152 patients who underwent regular postoperative follow-ups with both MRI and PET-CT, obtained within a 3 month period of each other. We analyzed differences in the performance of MRI and PET-CT for the diagnosis of loco-regional recurrences using McNemar's test. The receiver-operating characteristic curves and calculations of the area under the curve were used. Twenty patients were found to have a loco-regional recurrence after tumor excision. For MRI and PET-CT, the sensitivities were 90.0 and 95.0 %, and the specificities 97.7 and 95.5 %, respectively, with positive predictive values of 85.7 and 76.0 % and negative predictive values of 98.5 and 99.2 %, respectively. No significant difference was detected between the sensitivities of MRI and PET-CT (p = 0.125). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for PET-CT (0.952) was not significantly greater than that for MRI (0.939; p = 0.6). MRI of the area of interest is recommended for evaluation of tumor recurrence after surgical excision of STS. PET-CT was shown to be effective for detection of STS recurrence, and comparable to MRI. However, if PET-CT or MRI findings are inconclusive, the other modality may be helpful in differentiating tumor recurrence from post-therapeutic tissue change. (orig.)

  10. MRI of nasopharyngeal adenoid hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surov, Alexey; Ryl, Ina; Bartel-Friedrich, Sylvia; Wienke, Andreas; Kösling, Sabrina

    2016-10-01

    Nasopharyngeal adenoid hypertrophy (NAH) is a typical benign lesion. Due to involution, nasopharyngeal lymphatic tissue usually is not found in adults beyond the 30th to 40th year of life. However, occasionally NAH has been recognized after the 50th or 60th year. The aim of this study is to identify the frequency of NAH and to analyze its MRI findings in different age groups. From 2007 to 2011, 6693 MR investigations of the head were performed at our institution. MRI was obtained with a 1.5 T MRI device. NAH was identified in 18.0% of the patients. The frequency of NAH varied from 60.3% to 1.0% in the different age groups. The mean size of NAH was 23.2 ± 4.5 mm in cranio-caudal, 31.1 ± 5.2 mm in left-right, and 14.2 ± 4.1 mm in the anterior-posterior direction. The left-right and cranio-caudal sizes of NAH were largest in the 0-9 age group and decreased with age. On T1-w images most lesions (95.4%) were hypointense in comparison to the adjacent musculature. On T2-w fat-saturated images 82.4% of the lesions were hyperintense. After intravenous administration of contrast medium most lesions showed a slight enhancement (58.6%). Moderate enhancement was seen in 32.4% and a marked enhancement was identified in 9.0%. In the 0-9 age group most lesions showed a slight enhancement. Cysts within NAH were identified in 433 cases (35.9%). The frequency of cysts increased continuously with age, namely from 10.9% to 65.2%.

  11. Changes in corneal topography and biomechanical properties after collagen cross linking for keratoconus: 1-year results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Sedaghat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate changes in corneal topography and biomechanical properties after collagen cross-linking (CXL for progressive keratoconus. Patients and Methods: Collagen cross-linking was performed on 97 eyes. We assessed uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA. Corneal topography indices were evaluated using placido disc topography, scanning slit anterior topography (Orbscan II, and rotating Scheimpflug topography (Pentacam. Specular microscopy and corneal biomechanics were evaluated. Results: A 1-year-follow-up results revealed that UCVA improved from 0.31 to 0.45 and BCVA changed from 0.78 to 0.84 (P < 0.001. The mean of average keratometry value decreased from 49.62 to 47.95 D (P < 0.001. Astigmatism decreased from 4.84 to 4.24 D (P < 0.001. Apex corneal thickness decreased from 458.11 to 444.46 mm. Corneal volume decreased from 56.66 to 55.97 mm 3 (P < 0.001. Posterior best fit sphere increased from 55.50 to 46.03 mm (P = 0.025. Posterior elevation increased from 99.2 to 112.22 mm (P < 0.001. Average progressive index increased from 2.26 to 2.56 (P < 0.001. A nonsignificant decrease was observed in mean endothelial count from 2996 to 2928 cell/mm 2 (P = 0.190. Endothelial coefficient of variation (CV increased nonsignificantly from 18.26 to 20.29 (P = 0.112. Corneal hysteresis changed from 8.18 to 8.36 (P = 0.552 and corneal resistance factor increased from 6.98 to 7.21(P = 0.202, so these changes were not significant. Conclusion: Visual acuity and K values improved after CXL. In spite of the nonsignificant increase in endothelial cell count and increase in the CV, CLX seems to be a safe treatment for keratoconus. Further studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up periods are recommended.

  12. Compressive myelopathy in fluorosis: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K. [MR Section, Department of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow-226014 (India); Agarwal, P. [MR Section, Department of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow-226014 (India); Kumar, S. [MR Section, Department of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow-226014 (India); Surana, P.K. [Department of Neurology, SGPGIMS, Lucknow-226014 (India); Lal, J.H. [MR Section, Department of Radiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow-226014 (India); Misra, U.K. [Department of Neurology, SGPGIMS, Lucknow-226014 (India)

    1996-05-01

    We examined four patients with fluorosis, presenting with compressive myelopathy, by MRI, using spin-echo and fast low-angle shot sequences. Cord compression due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) and ligamentum flavum (LF) was demonstrated in one and ossification of only the LF in one. Marrow signal was observed in the PLL and LF in all the patients on all pulse sequences. In patients with compressive myelopathy secondary to ossification of PLL and/or LF, fluorosis should be considered as a possible cause, especially in endemic regions. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. An isolated fourth ventricle in neurosarcoidosis: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Terstegge, Klaus; Schulte, Oliver; Krug, Barbara; Lackner, Klaus [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Joseph Stelzmann Strasse 9, 50924 Cologne (Germany); Wedekind, Christoph [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Joseph Stelzmann Strasse 9, 50924 Cologne (Germany); Voges, Juergen [Department of Stereotaxy und Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Joseph Stelzmann Strasse 9, 50924 Cologne (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    We report on an isolated enlargement of the fourth ventricle in a patient with neurosarcoidosis which developed 3 years after the insertion of a ventriculo-atrial shunt. Repeated MRI images were obtained in a patient with known neurosarcoidosis between 1995 and 2000. Imaging findings were correlated to the medical course of the patient, who developed a hydrocephalus and a trapped fourth ventricle consecutively. The isolation was presumably due to granulomatous inflammation of the ependyma surrounding the fourth ventricular outlets. The isolated fourth ventricle was responsible for a deterioration of neurological status. Neurosarcoidosis is a severe complication in sarcoidosis patients. An isolated enlargement of the fourth ventricle is a rare complication in clinically deteriorated patients with neurosarcoidosis and ventricular drainage, which may require neurosurgical treatment. (orig.)

  14. In vivo MRI volumetric measurement of prostate regression and growth in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalcioglu Orhan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mouse models for treatment of late-stage prostate cancer are valuable tools, but assessing the extent of growth of the prostate and particularly its regression due to therapeutic intervention or castration is difficult due to the location, small size and interdigitated anatomy of the prostate gland in situ. Temporal monitoring of mouse prostate regression requires multiple animals and examination of histological sections. Methods Initially, T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was performed on normal year-old C57/BL6 mice. Individual mice were repeatedly imaged using inhalation anesthesia to establish the reproducibility of the method and to follow hormone manipulation of the prostate volume. Subsequently, MRI fat signal was suppressed using a chemical shift-selective (CHESS pulse to avoid signal contamination and enhance discrimination of the prostate. Results High field (7T MRI provides high resolution (117 × 117 μm in plane, highly reproducible images of the normal mouse prostate. Despite long imaging times, animals can be imaged repeatedly to establish reliability of volume measurements. Prostate volume declines following castration and subsequently returns to normal with androgen administration in the same animal. CHESS imaging allowed discrimination of both the margins of the prostate and the dorsal-lateral lobes of the prostate (DLP from the ventral lobes (VP. Castration results in a 40% reduction in the volume of the DLP and a 75% reduction in the volume of the VP. Conclusion MRI assessment of the volume of the mouse prostate is precise and reproducible. MRI improves volumetric determination of the extent of regression and monitoring of the same mouse over time during the course of treatment is possible. Since assessing groups of animals at each time point is avoided, this improves the accuracy of the measurement of any manipulation effect and reduces the number of animals required.

  15. Visual perception changes and optical stability after intracorneal ring segment implantation: comparison between 3 months and 1 year after surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paranhos JFS

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Juliane de Freitas Santos Paranhos, Marcos Pereira Ávila, Augusto Paranhos Jr, Paulo SchorFederal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilPurpose: To prospectively evaluate intracorneal ring segment (ICRS implantation on quality of life (QoL of patients with keratoconus changes and identify factors responsible.Methods: Sixty-nine eyes of 42 keratoconus patients were implanted with the Keraring (Mediphacos, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA, refraction, and steep keratometry were analyzed 3 months and 1 year after surgery. All patients self-administered the National Eye Institute Refractive Error Quality of life instrument at 2 time points: after having worn best correction for at least 30 days since evaluation (mean 4 months after surgery and 1 year after surgery. To analyze if the use of the appropriate correction at 1 year follow up had any impact on visual acuity and V-QoL, patients were divided into 2 groups: group A (appropriate correction and B (not appropriate correction.Results: After 1 year, QoL changes related to scales ‘clarity of vision’, ‘near vision’, and ‘far vision’. Keratometric values, sphere, and spherical equivalent did not differ significantly between 3 months and 1 year postoperative. Cylinder increase was statistically but not clinically significant. Binocular BCVA did not change 1 year after surgery in group A and showed a clinically significant impairment in group B. A year after surgery, 18 patients did not use correction suggested by a physician 3 months after surgery. QoL was not statistically different 1 year after surgery between group A and group B.Conclusion: Our findings show that the way keratoconic patients see is difficult to analyze using only quantitative and 1-visit metrics. They highlight the importance of patients’ self perception and performing longitudinal analysis to consider neural compensation to optical changes from surgery.Keywords: keratoconus, cornea

  16. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Gao, Linfeng; Ge, Chaoyong; Zheng, Junzheng; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli

    2014-09-21

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations.

  17. Central nervous system tuberculosis: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kioumehr, F.; Dadsetan, M.R.; Rooholamini, S.A.; Au, A.

    1994-02-01

    The MRI findings of 18 proven cases of central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis were reviewed; 10 patients were seropositive for HIV. All had medical, laboratory, or surgical proof of CNS tuberculosis. Eleven patients had meningitis, of whom two also had arachnoiditis. Five patients had focal intra-axial tuberculomas: four brain masses and one an intramedullary spinal lesion. Two patients had focal extra-axial tuberculomas: one in the pontine cistern, and one in the spine. In all 11 patients with meningitis MRI showed diffuse, thick, meningeal enhancement. All intraparenchymal tuberculomas showed low signal intensity on T2-weighted images and ring or nodular enhancement. The extra-axial tuberculomas had areas isointense or hypointense relative to normal brain and spinal cord on T2-weighted images. Although tuberculous meningitis cannot be differentiated from other meningitides on the basis of MR findings, intraparenchymal tuberculomas show characteristic T2 shortening, not found in most other space-occupying lesions. In the appropriate clinical setting, tuberculoma should be considered. (orig.)

  18. Physics of MRI: a primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewes, Donald B; Kucharczyk, Walter

    2012-05-01

    This article is based on an introductory lecture given for the past many years during the "MR Physics and Techniques for Clinicians" course at the Annual Meeting of the ISMRM. This introduction is not intended to be a comprehensive overview of the field, as the subject of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) physics is large and complex. Rather, it is intended to lay a conceptual foundation by which magnetic resonance image formation can be understood from an intuitive perspective. The presentation is nonmathematical, relying on simple models that take the reader progressively from the basic spin physics of nuclei, through descriptions of how the magnetic resonance signal is generated and detected in an MRI scanner, the foundations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation, and a discussion of the Fourier transform and its relation to MR image formation. The article continues with a discussion of how magnetic field gradients are used to facilitate spatial encoding and concludes with a development of basic pulse sequences and the factors defining image contrast.

  19. Childhood moyamoya disease: hemodynamic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzika, A.A. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Robertson, R.L. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Barnes, P.D. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Vajapeyam, S. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Burrows, P.E. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Treves, S.T. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Scott, R.M. l [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Background. Childhood moyamoya disease is a rare progressive cerebrovascular disease. Objective. To evaluate cerebral hemodynamics using dynamic Gd-DTPA-enhanced imaging in children with moyamoya disease. Materials and methods. Eight children (2-11 years of age) with the clinical and angiographic findings typical of moyamoya disease, before and/or after surgical intervention (pial synangiosis), underwent conventional MR imaging (MRI) and hemodynamic MR imaging (HMRI). HMRI used a spoiled gradient-echo with low flip angle (10 deg) and long TE (TR/TE = 24/15 ms) to minimize T 1 effects and emphasize T 2{sup *} weighting. Raw and calculated hemodynamic images were reviewed. Three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography (MRA) and perfusion brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were also performed. Results. Abnormal hemodynamic maps resulting from vascular stenosis or occlusion and basal collaterals were observed in six patient studies. HMRI depicted perfusion dynamics of affected cerebrovascular territories, detected cortical perfusion deficits, and complemented conventional MRI and MRA. HMRI findings were consistent with those of catheter angiography and perfusion SPECT. Conclusion. Our preliminary experience suggests that HMRI may be of value in the preoperative and postoperative evaluation of surgical interventions in moyamoya disease. (orig.). With 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. The child accident repeater: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J G

    1980-04-01

    The child accident repeater is defined as one who has at least three accidents that come to medical attention within a year. The accident situation has features in common with those of the child who has a single accident through simple "bad luck", but other factors predispose him to repeated injury. In the child who has a susceptible personality, a tendency for accident repetition may be due to a breakdown in adjustment to a stressful environment. Prevention of repeat accidents should involve the usual measures considered appropriate for all children as well as an attempt to provide treatment of significant maladjustment and modification of a stressful environment.

  1. Characterization of outcomes 1 year after endoscopic thermal vapor ablation for patients with heterogeneous emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herth FJ

    2012-07-01

    deviation age of 63 (5.6 years, FEV1 0.86 mL (0.25 mL (n = 22 men and 22 women. Mean (standard deviation changes from baseline at 12 months were: FEV1 86.2 mL (173.8 mL, St George's Respiratory Questionnaire -11.0 (14.0 units, treated lobar volume from high-resolution computed tomography -751.8 mL (653.9 mL, residual volume -302.8 mL (775.6 mL, 6MWD 18.5 m (63.7 m, and modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale score -0.83 (0.97 (P < 0.05 for all except 6MWD. Improvements were numerically larger at 6 versus 12 months. GOLD stage III and IV patients had similar outcomes at 6 months; however, improvements relative to baseline were numerically higher in GOLD stage IV patients. Larger improvements were observed in patients with higher heterogeneity. In total, 39 serious adverse events were reported in 23 patients with 10 events in 8 patients between 6 and 12 months.Conclusion: Unilateral lobar InterVapor treatment of heterogeneous emphysema improved lung function and health outcomes 1 year following treatment. The magnitude of improvement was larger at 6 months compared to 12 months. Improvements relative to baseline continue to be exhibited at 12 months despite the expected disease related decline over time.Clinical trials: NCT 01041586 and NCT 01102712Keywords: emphysema, bronchoscopy, lung volume reduction, thermal energy

  2. Anencephaly: MRI findings and pathogenetic theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzolari, Ferdinando; Gambi, Beatrice; Garani, Giampaolo; Tamisari, Lalla

    2004-12-01

    We describe the MRI appearances of an anencephalic newborn who survived for 13 h; particularities of this case are male gender and the absence of other associated malformations. Moreover, we discuss the pathogenetic theories of anencephaly, correlating MRI findings with embryological data. An exencephaly-anencephaly sequence due to amnion rupture is hypothesized.

  3. Anencephaly: MRI findings and pathogenetic theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calzolari, Ferdinando [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria, Department of Neuroradiology, Ferrara (Italy); Gambi, Beatrice [Ospedale S. Donato, Neonatal Unit, Arezzo (Italy); Garani, Giampaolo; Tamisari, Lalla [Universita degli Studi, Neonatal Unit, Ferrara (Italy)

    2004-12-01

    We describe the MRI appearances of an anencephalic newborn who survived for 13 h; particularities of this case are male gender and the absence of other associated malformations. Moreover, we discuss the pathogenetic theories of anencephaly, correlating MRI findings with embryological data. An exencephaly-anencephaly sequence due to amnion rupture is hypothesized. (orig.)

  4. MRI for clinically suspected appendicitis during pregnancy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobben, L.P.; Groot, I.; Haans, L.; Blickman, J.G.; Puylaert, J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether MRI can be used to accurately diagnose or exclude appendicitis in pregnant patients with clinically suspected appendicitis. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that MRI is helpful in the examination and diagnosis of acute appendicitis in pregn

  5. [Anatomic variants of Meckel's cave on MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoudiba, F; Hadj-Rabia, M; Iffenecker, C; Fuerxer, F; Bekkali, F; Francke, J P; Doyon, D

    1998-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gives an accurate analysis of Meckel's cave variability. Images were acquired in 50 patients with several sections for anatomical comparison. Using several sections, MRI is a suitable method for better analysis of the trigeminal cistern. The most frequent findings are symmetrical trigeminal cisterns. Expansion of Meckel's cave or its disappearance has pathological significance.

  6. MRI in acute phase of whiplash injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagerlund, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Bjoernebrink, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Pettersson, K. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Hildingsson, C. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden)

    1995-11-01

    A prospective MRI study of 39 whiplash patients was performed and the results were compared with the clinical findings within 15 days after trauma. The MRI parameters included disc bulging either with impingement on the anterior epidural space or with medullary compression, foraminal stenosis, dorsal ligament thickening, osteophyte extension and intramedullary or paravertebral soft tissue injury. All changes were graded visually on a four-point scale (no, some, moderate or extensive changes). After the MRI evaluation was made the clinical findings were analysed by two orthopaedic surgeons using a specially designed protocol. With MRI 29 patients (74 %) showed no or only slight changes, and were thus regarded as normal variations. Of these, 10 of 29 patients (34 %) had as the only symptom pain in the head or in the neck, 19 of 29 patients (66 %) showed neurological changes, either paresthesias, sensory deficits or weakness of upper extremities. In 10 (26 %) patients with moderate or extensive MRI changes, 3 of 10 (33 %) had only head or neck pain, or both, and 7 of 10 (66 %) had neurological changes. Use of MRI in whiplash injury is helpful, but it is not the first-choice radiological examination method. Despite neurological changes, the frequency of true traumatic lesions is low. There is no clear correlation between the patients` subjective symptoms or clinical signs and the findings with MRI. However, MRI can be used to find patients with disk herniation that can be treated surgically. (orig.)

  7. Cardiac MRI of the athlete's heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakken, N.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    The increase in pre-participation cardiovascular screening using the Lausanne protocol will ultimately lead to an increased use of cardiac MRI and MDCT in the cardiovascular work-up of athletes. The role of cardiac MRI is well established in the evaluation of cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, aortic st

  8. MRI study of lumbosacral lipoma in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taviere, V.; Brunelle, F.; Baraton, J.; Teman, M.; Pierre-Kahn, A.; Lallemand, D.

    1989-06-01

    We report our experience with 16 cases of lumbosacral lipoma and MRI in children. From these observations, MRI appears to be a suitable examination. The exact situation of the cord and the lipoma is clearly seen. Associated anomalies such as syringomyelia is also clearly demonstrated.

  9. Paradigm shift in MRI for sciatica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barzouhi, Abdelilah el

    2013-01-01

    In contrast with the intuitive feeling of physicians many worrisome MRI findings do not correlate with patient outcome in patients with sciatica. Physicians should for example not automatically ascribe persistent or recurrent symptoms of sciatica to the presence of abnormalities visible on MRI. This

  10. Comparison of static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI in temporomandibular joint disorder patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Ho; Yun, Kyoung In [Eulji Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, In Woo; Choi, Hang Moon; Park, Moon Soo [Kangnung National Univ. College of Dentistry, Kangnung (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to elevate comparison of static MRI and pseudo-dynamic (cine) MRI in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder patients. In this investigation, 33 patients with TMJ disorders were examined using both conventional static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI. Multiple spoiled gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state (SPGR) images were obtained when mouth opened and closed. Proton density weighted images were obtained at the closed and open mouth position in static MRI. Two oral and maxillofacial radiologists evaluated location of the articular disk, movement of condyle and bony change respectively and the posterior boundary of articular disk was obtained. No statistically significant difference was found in the observation of articular disk position, mandibular condylar movement and posterior boundary of articular disk using static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI (P>0.05). Statistically significant difference was noted in bony changes of condyle using static MRI and pseudo-dynamic MRI (P<0.05). This study showed that pseudo-dynamic MRI didn't make a difference in diagnosing internal derangement of TMJ in comparison with static MRI. But it was considered as an additional method to be supplemented in observing bony change.

  11. Long-term vascular access ports as a means of sedative administration in a rodent fMRI survival model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettinger, Patrick C; Li, Rupeng; Yan, Ji-Geng; Matloub, Hani S; Cho, Younghoon R; Pawela, Christopher P; Rowe, Daniel B; Hyde, James S

    2011-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop a rodent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) survival model with the use of heparin-coated vascular access devices. Such a model would ease the administration of sedative agents, reduce the number of animals required in survival experiments and eliminate animal-to-animal variability seen in previous designs. Seven male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent surgical placement of an MRI-compatible vascular access port, followed by implantable electrode placement on the right median nerve. Functional MRI during nerve stimulation and resting-state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) were performed at times 0, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks postoperatively using a 9.4T scanner. Anesthesia was maintained using intravenous dexmedetomidine and reversed using atipamezole. There were no fatalities or infectious complications during this study. All vascular access ports remained patent. Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation by electrical stimulation of the median nerve using implanted electrodes was seen within the forelimb sensory region (S1FL) for all animals at all time points. The number of activated voxels decreased at time points 4 and 8 weeks, returning to a normal level at 12 weeks, which is attributed to scar tissue formation and resolution around the embedded electrode. The applications of this experiment extend far beyond the scope of peripheral nerve experimentation. These vascular access ports can be applied to any survival MRI study requiring repeated medication administration, intravenous contrast, or blood sampling.

  12. In vivo evaluation of the effect of stimulus distribution on FIR statistical efficiency in event-related fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansma, J Martijn; de Zwart, Jacco A; van Gelderen, Peter; Duyn, Jeff H; Drevets, Wayne C; Furey, Maura L

    2013-05-15

    Technical developments in MRI have improved signal to noise, allowing use of analysis methods such as Finite impulse response (FIR) of rapid event related functional MRI (er-fMRI). FIR is one of the most informative analysis methods as it determines onset and full shape of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) without any a priori assumptions. FIR is however vulnerable to multicollinearity, which is directly related to the distribution of stimuli over time. Efficiency can be optimized by simplifying a design, and restricting stimuli distribution to specific sequences, while more design flexibility necessarily reduces efficiency. However, the actual effect of efficiency on fMRI results has never been tested in vivo. Thus, it is currently difficult to make an informed choice between protocol flexibility and statistical efficiency. The main goal of this study was to assign concrete fMRI signal to noise values to the abstract scale of FIR statistical efficiency. Ten subjects repeated a perception task with five random and m-sequence based protocol, with varying but, according to literature, acceptable levels of multicollinearity. Results indicated substantial differences in signal standard deviation, while the level was a function of multicollinearity. Experiment protocols varied up to 55.4% in standard deviation. Results confirm that quality of fMRI in an FIR analysis can significantly and substantially vary with statistical efficiency. Our in vivo measurements can be used to aid in making an informed decision between freedom in protocol design and statistical efficiency.

  13. MRI findings in 100 epileptic children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzukawa, Junko; Sugimoto, Tateo; Araki, Atsushi (Kansai Medical School, Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan)) (and others)

    1993-02-01

    Findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain were retrospectively reviewed in 100 consecutive pediatric patients with epilepsy in relation to the type of epilepsy and prognosis. There were 65 boys and 35 girls, ranging in age from 3 months to 25 years. Among 100 patients, 67 (a total of 102 lesions) showed abnormal findings on MRI. Morphological abnormalities, including ventricular enlargement, atrophy and malformation, were seen in 54 patients. Periventricular (n=14), frontal (n=3), temporal (n=8) and occipital (n=7) areas were of high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. According to the type of epilepsy, MRI abnormality was seen in 34 (61%) of 56 patients with partial seizures and 33 (76%) of 44 patients with generalized seizures. When associated with cerebral palsy and mental retardation, the incidence of MRI abnormality was high. There was no sigificant correlation between MRI findings and prognosis. (N.K.).

  14. MRI and CT patterns of neurocysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodiek, S.O.; Rupp, N.; Einsiedel, H. von

    1987-05-01

    MRI and CT manifestations were studied in five cases of neurocysticercosis. As demonstrated by long-term follow-ups the disease usually causes multiple lesions the morphology of which depends on the life cycle of the parasite. Tissue lesions consist of three main types: 1) vital cysticerci, 2) inflammatory parenchymatous reactions following degenerating cysts and 3) calcified granulomas. MRI provides all information that is given by CT except for small calcifications which are usually missed. Morphological details of vital cysticerci like cysts wall and scolex are better outlined by MRI. When i.v. contrast medium is applied, it leads to nodular or annular enhancement of inflamed tissue. The sensitivity of MRI towards edema caused by parasite exceeds that of CT by several weeks. CT and MRI are complementary methods providing at the present time the highest degree of specificity in diagnosing neurocysticercosis.

  15. fMRI. Basics and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, Stephan; Jansen, Olav (eds.) [University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Inst. of Neuroradiology, Neurocenter

    2010-07-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) and the basic method of BOLD imaging were introduced in 1993 by Seiji Ogawa. From very basic experiments, fMRI has evolved into a clinical application for daily routine brain imaging. There have been various improvements in both the imaging technique as such as well as in the statistical analysis. In this volume, experts in the field share their knowledge and point out possible technical barriers and problems explaining how to solve them. Starting from the very basics on the origin of the BOLD signal, the book covers technical issues, anatomical landmarks, presurgical applications, and special issues in various clinical fields. Other modalities for brain mapping such as PET, TMS, and MEG are also compared with fMRI. This book is intended to give a state-of-the-art overview and to serve as a reference and guide for clinical applications of fMRI. (orig.)

  16. Clinical functional MRI. Presurgical functional neuroimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stippich, C. (ed.) [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Div. of Neuroradiology

    2007-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) permits noninvasive imaging of the ''human brain at work'' under physiological conditions. This is the first textbook on clinical fMRI. It is devoted to preoperative fMRI in patients with brain tumors and epilepsies, which are the most well-established clinical applications. By localizing and lateralizing specific brain functions, as well as epileptogenic zones, fMRI facilitates the selection of a safe treatment and the planning and performance of function-preserving neurosurgery. State of the art fMRI procedures are presented, with detailed consideration of the physiological and methodological background, imaging and data processing, normal and pathological findings, diagnostic possibilities and limitations, and other related techniques. All chapters are written by recognized experts in their fields, and the book is designed to be of value to beginners, trained clinicians and experts alike. (orig.)

  17. NMR, MRI, and spectroscopic MRI in inhomogeneous fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demas, Vasiliki; Pines, Alexander; Martin, Rachel W; Franck, John; Reimer, Jeffrey A

    2013-12-24

    A method for locally creating effectively homogeneous or "clean" magnetic field gradients (of high uniformity) for imaging (with NMR, MRI, or spectroscopic MRI) both in in-situ and ex-situ systems with high degrees of inhomogeneous field strength. THe method of imaging comprises: a) providing a functional approximation of an inhomogeneous static magnetic field strength B.sub.0({right arrow over (r)}) at a spatial position {right arrow over (r)}; b) providing a temporal functional approximation of {right arrow over (G)}.sub.shim(t) with i basis functions and j variables for each basis function, resulting in v.sub.ij variables; c) providing a measured value .OMEGA., which is an temporally accumulated dephasing due to the inhomogeneities of B.sub.0({right arrow over(r)}); and d) minimizing a difference in the local dephasing angle .phi.({right arrow over (r)},t)=.gamma..intg..sub.0.sup.t{square root over (|{right arrow over (B)}.sub.1({right arrow over (r)},t')|.sup.2+({right arrow over (r)}{right arrow over (G)}.sub.shimG.sub.shim(t')+.parallel.{right arrow over (B)}.sub.0({right arrow over (r)}).parallel..DELTA..omega.({right arrow over (r)},t'/.gamma/).sup.2)}dt'-.OMEGA. by varying the v.sub.ij variables to form a set of minimized v.sub.ij variables. The method requires calibration of the static fields prior to minimization, but may thereafter be implemented without such calibration, may be used in open or closed systems, and potentially portable systems.

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... text version SOURCE: Adapted from Trussell J in Contraceptive Technology, 2011, and FDA Office of Women’s Health ... about how to avoid repeat births with both male and female teens. http://www.cdc.gov/teenpregnancy/ ...

  19. The Moral Maturity of Repeater Delinquents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronio, Richard J.

    1980-01-01

    Differences in moral development (as conceived by Kohlberg) were examined in a sample of delinquent teenagers. The repeater group was not found, as had been hypothesized, to be lower on moral maturity than those who engaged in less delinquency. (GC)

  20. MRI-conditional pacemakers: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira AM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available António M Ferreira,1,2 Francisco Costa,2 António Tralhão,2 Hugo Marques,3 Nuno Cardim,1 Pedro Adragão1,2 1Cardiology Department, Hospital da Luz, 2Cardiology Department, Hospital Santa Cruz- CHLO, 3Radiology Department, Hospital da Luz, Lisbon, Portugal Abstract: Use of both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and pacing devices has undergone remarkable growth in recent years, and it is estimated that the majority of patients with pacemakers will need an MRI during their lifetime. These investigations will generally be denied due to the potentially dangerous interactions between cardiac devices and the magnetic fields and radiofrequency energy used in MRI. Despite the increasing reports of uneventful scanning in selected patients with conventional pacemakers under close surveillance, MRI is still contraindicated in those circumstances and cannot be considered a routine procedure. These limitations prompted a series of modifications in generator and lead engineering, designed to minimize interactions that could compromise device function and patient safety. The resulting MRI-conditional pacemakers were first introduced in 2008 and the clinical experience gathered so far supports their safety in the MRI environment if certain conditions are fulfilled. With this technology, new questions and controversies arise regarding patient selection, clinical impact, and cost-effectiveness. In this review, we discuss the potential risks of MRI in patients with electronic cardiac devices and present updated information regarding the features of MRI-conditional pacemakers and the clinical experience with currently available models. Finally, we provide some guidance on how to scan patients who have these devices and discuss future directions in the field. Keywords: pacemakers, magnetic resonance imaging, MRI, MRI-conditional devices, safety

  1. Star repeaters for fiber optic links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, D H; Gravel, R L

    1977-02-01

    A star repeater combines the functions of a passive star coupler and a signal regenerating amplifier. By more effectively utilizing the light power radiated by a light emitting diode, the star repeater can, when used with small diameter channels, couple as much power to all receivers of a multiterminal link as would be coupled to the single receiver of a simple point-to-point link.

  2. Quantum Key Distribution over Probabilistic Quantum Repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Amirloo, Jeyran; Majedi, A Hamed

    2010-01-01

    A feasible route towards implementing long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) systems relies on probabilistic schemes for entanglement distribution and swapping as proposed in the work of Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) [Nature 414, 413 (2001)]. Here, we calculate the conditional throughput and fidelity of entanglement for DLCZ quantum repeaters, by accounting for the DLCZ self-purification property, in the presence of multiple excitations in the ensemble memories as well as loss and other sources of inefficiency in the channel and measurement modules. We then use our results to find the generation rate of secure key bits for QKD systems that rely on DLCZ quantum repeaters. We compare the key generation rate per logical memory employed in the two cases of with and without a repeater node. We find the cross-over distance beyond which the repeater system outperforms the non-repeater one. That provides us with the optimum inter-node distancing in quantum repeater systems. We also find the optimal exci...

  3. Digital repeat analysis; setup and operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nol, J; Isouard, G; Mirecki, J

    2006-06-01

    Since the emergence of digital imaging, there have been questions about the necessity of continuing reject analysis programs in imaging departments to evaluate performance and quality. As a marketing strategy, most suppliers of digital technology focus on the supremacy of the technology and its ability to reduce the number of repeats, resulting in less radiation doses given to patients and increased productivity in the department. On the other hand, quality assurance radiographers and radiologists believe that repeats are mainly related to positioning skills, and repeat analysis is the main tool to plan training needs to up-skill radiographers. A comparative study between conventional and digital imaging was undertaken to compare outcomes and evaluate the need for reject analysis. However, digital technology still being at its early development stages, setting a credible reject analysis program became the major task of the study. It took the department, with the help of the suppliers of the computed radiography reader and the picture archiving and communication system, over 2 years of software enhancement to build a reliable digital repeat analysis system. The results were supportive of both philosophies; the number of repeats as a result of exposure factors was reduced dramatically; however, the percentage of repeats as a result of positioning skills was slightly on the increase for the simple reason that some rejects in the conventional system qualifying for both exposure and positioning errors were classified as exposure error. The ability of digitally adjusting dark or light images reclassified some of those images as positioning errors.

  4. Dynamic combinatorial libraries of artificial repeat proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Margarita; Shumacher, Inbal; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2013-06-15

    Repeat proteins are found in almost all cellular systems, where they are involved in diverse molecular recognition processes. Recent studies have suggested that de novo designed repeat proteins may serve as universal binders, and might potentially be used as practical alternative to antibodies. We describe here a novel chemical methodology for producing small libraries of repeat proteins, and screening in parallel the ligand binding of library members. The first stage of this research involved the total synthesis of a consensus-based three-repeat tetratricopeptide (TPR) protein (~14 kDa), via sequential attachment of the respective peptides. Despite the effectiveness of the synthesis and ligation steps, this method was found to be too demanding for the production of proteins containing variable number of repeats. Additionally, the analysis of binding of the individual proteins was time consuming. Therefore, we designed and prepared novel dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs), and show that their equilibration can facilitate the formation of TPR proteins containing up to eight repeating units. Interestingly, equilibration of the library building blocks in the presence of the biologically relevant ligands, Hsp90 and Hsp70, induced their oligomerization into forming more of the proteins with large recognition surfaces. We suggest that this work presents a novel simple and rapid tool for the simultaneous screening of protein mixtures with variable binding surfaces, and for identifying new binders for ligands of interest.

  5. Mental fatigue negatively influences manual dexterity and anticipation timing but not repeated high-intensity exercise performance in trained adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael J; Fowler, Nicholas; George, Oliver; Joyce, Samuel; Hankey, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a period of mental fatigue on manual dexterity, anticipation timing and repeated high intensity exercise performance. Using a randomised, repeated measures experimental design, eight physically trained adults (mean age = 24.8 ± 4.1 years) undertook a 40 minute vigilance task to elicit mental fatigue or a control condition followed by four repeated Wingate anaerobic performance tests. Pre, post fatigue/control and post each Wingate test, manual dexterity (Seconds), coincidence anticipation (absolute error) were assessed. A series of two (condition) by six (time) ways repeated measures ANOVAs indicated a significant condition by time interactions for manual dexterity time (p = 0.021) and absolute error (p = 0.028). Manual dexterity and coincidence anticipation were significantly poorer post mental fatigue compared with control. There were no significant differences in mean power between conditions or across trials (all p > 0.05).

  6. Correlation between MRI findings and long-term outcome in patients with severe brain trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierallini, A.; Pantano, P.; Fantozzi, L.M.; Bonamini, M. [Dept. of Neurological Sciences, Univ. di Roma (Italy); Vichi, R.; Zylberman, R.; Pisarri, F. [Hospital San Giovanni Battista, SMOM, Roma (Italy); Colonnese, C. [IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy); Bozzao, L. [Dept. of Neurological Sciences, Univ. di Roma (Italy); IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy)

    2000-12-01

    Our aim was to relate MRI findings in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) to clinical severity and long-term outcome. We studied 37 patients with severe TBI, who were submitted to clinical assessment for disability and cognition and to MRI 60-90 days after trauma. Clinical assessment was also performed 3, 6 and 12 months later. The number and volume of lesions in various cerebral structures were calculated semiautomatically from FLAIR and fast field-echo images. Possible correlations between total and regional lesion volume and clinical deficits were then investigated. The frontal and temporal lobes were most frequently involved. Total lesion volume on FLAIR images correlated significantly with clinical outcome, whereas that on FFE images did not. Regional analysis showed that FLAIR lesion volume in the corpus callosum correlated significantly with scores on disability and cognition scales at the first clinical assessment. FLAIR lesion volume in the frontal lobes correlated significantly with clinical scores 1 year later. (orig.)

  7. Peri-ictal signal changes in seven patients with status epilepticus: interesting MRI observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Manoj K.; Sinha, Sanjib [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Department of Neurology, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Ravishankar, Shivshankar; Shivshankar, Jai Jai [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Department of Neuroimaging and Interventional Radiology, Bangalore (India)

    2009-03-15

    Transient peri-ictal changes on imaging had been described following status epilepticus (SE), but its cause is not very well understood. We analyzed the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in SE patients in order to elucidate such changes including peri-ictal signal. This prospective study involved 34 patients (M/F 23:11, mean age 25.8 {+-} 17.2 years) who experienced SE. MRI was performed during or within 96 h of cessation of seizures. Twenty-five patients had generalized convulsive status epilectus (GCSE; ten secondary GCSE and 15 primary GCSE). Seven patients had epilepsia partialis continua and two patients non-convulsive SE. Eight patients had a history of seizures and three patients previous SE. The mean duration of SE prior to MRI was 89.2 {+-} 105.3 h (range 2-360 h). MRI provided diagnosis in 17 patients, and in 13 patients, no structural cause was identified. Peri-ictal focal signal changes with restricted diffusion on apparent diffusion coefficient maps were present in seven (20.6%) patients with SE (generalized convulsive, three; partial, three; non-convulsive, one). The changes were observed when MRI was performed during SE in 3/10 (30%) patients, or within 24 h in 1/7 (14.3%), 48 h in 1/5 (20%), 72 h in 1/6 (16.7%), or 96 h in 1/6 (16.7%) patients after cessation of seizures. Repeat MRI revealed disappearance of signal changes in two patients. Peri-ictal MR changes with restricted diffusion appear to be an effect rather than the cause of SE. (orig.)

  8. MRI predictors of treatment response for perianal fistulizing Crohn disease in children and young adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenoy-Bhangle, Anuradha; Nimkin, Katherine; Gee, Michael S. [Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Goldner, Dana; Israel, Esther J. [Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Harvard Medical School, Department of Pediatrics, Boston, MA (United States); Bradley, William F. [Analog Devices, Lyric Labs, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the imaging standard for diagnosis and characterization of perianal complications associated with Crohn disease in children and adults. To define MRI criteria that could act as potential predictors of treatment response in fistulizing Crohn disease in children, in order to guide more informed study interpretation. We performed a retrospective database query to identify all children and young adults with Crohn disease who underwent serial MRI studies for assessment of perianal symptoms between 2003 and 2010. We examined imaging features of perianal disease including fistula number, type and length, presence and size of associated abscess, and disease response/progression on follow-up MRI. We reviewed imaging studies and electronic medical records. Statistical analysis, including logistic regression, was performed to associate MR imaging features with treatment response and disease progression. We included 36 patients (22 male, 14 female; age range 8-21 years). Of these, 32 had a second MRI exam and 4 had clinical evidence of complete response, obviating the need for repeat imaging. Of the parameters analyzed, presence of abscess, type of fistula according to the Parks classification, and multiplicity were not predictors of treatment outcome. Maximum length of the dominant fistula and aggregate fistula length in the case of multiple fistulae were the best predictors of treatment outcome. Maximum fistula length <2.5 cm was a predictor of treatment response, while aggregate fistula length ≥2.5 cm was a predictor of disease progression. Perianal fistula length is an important imaging feature to assess on MRI of fistulizing Crohn disease. (orig.)

  9. Prognostic factors for weight loss over 1-year period in patients recently diagnosed with mild Alzheimer Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.L.; Waldorff, F.B.; Waldemar, G.;

    2011-01-01

    % in 1 year for defining weight loss. The mean age at inclusion was 76.1 years. Sixty-six patients (24.6%) lost more than 4% of their body weight during the study period. A logistic regression showed that an increase of 1 baseline body mass index point significantly increased the odds of weight loss by 9......%. Furthermore, the results suggested a trend that for men, living alone was a risk factor for losing weight, whereas for women living with somebody was associated with a higher risk. However, further studies are pertinent within this area. As weight loss is a predictor of mortality in patients with AD...

  10. Is It Worth Continuing Sexual Rehabilitation after Radical Prostatectomy with Intracavernous Injection of Alprostadil for More than 1 Year?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Yiou, MD, PhD, PUPH

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: The response to IAI remained stable after 2 years of treatment, and no significant improvement of spontaneous erections during intercourse attempts was found between M12 and M24. Patients should be informed of the limited effect of IAI on natural erections after 1 year. Yiou R, Bütow Z, Parisot J, Binhas M, Lingombet O, Augustin D, de la Taille A, and Audureau E. Is it worth continuing sexual rehabilitation after radical prostatectomy with intracavernous injection of alprostadil for more than 1 year? Sex Med 2015;3:42–48.

  11. Algorithm for quantifying advanced carotid artery atherosclerosis in humans using MRI and active contours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Gareth; Vick, G. W., III; Bordelon, Cassius; Insull, William; Morrisett, Joel

    2002-05-01

    A new algorithm for measuring carotid artery volumes and estimating atherosclerotic plaque volumes from MRI images has been developed and validated using pressure-perfusion-fixed cadaveric carotid arteries. Our method uses an active contour algorithm with the generalized gradient vector field force as the external force to localize the boundaries of the artery on each MRI cross-section. Plaque volume is estimated by an automated algorithm based on estimating the normal wall thickness for each branch of the carotid. Triplicate volume measurements were performed by a single observer on thirty-eight pairs of cadaveric carotid arteries. The coefficient of variance (COV) was used to quantify measurement reproducibility. Aggregate volumes were computed for nine contiguous slices bounding the carotid bifurcation. The median (mean +/- SD) COV for the 76 aggregate arterial volumes was 0.93% (1.47% +/- 1.52%) for the lumen volume, 0.95% (1.06% +/- 0.67%) for the total artery volume, and 4.69% (5.39% +/- 3.97%) for the plaque volume. These results indicate that our algorithm provides repeatable measures of arterial volumes and a repeatable estimate of plaque volume of cadaveric carotid specimens through analysis of MRI images. The algorithm also significantly decreases the amount of time necessary to generate these measurements.

  12. Combined PET/MRI scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlyer, David; Woody, Craig L.; Rooney, William; Vaska, Paul; Stoll, Sean; Pratte, Jean-Francois; O'Connor, Paul

    2007-10-23

    A combined PET/MRI scanner generally includes a magnet for producing a magnetic field suitable for magnetic resonance imaging, a radiofrequency (RF) coil disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet and a ring tomograph disposed within the magnetic field produced by the magnet. The ring tomograph includes a scintillator layer for outputting at least one photon in response to an annihilation event, a detection array coupled to the scintillator layer for detecting the at least one photon outputted by the scintillator layer and for outputting a detection signal in response to the detected photon and a front-end electronic array coupled to the detection array for receiving the detection signal, wherein the front-end array has a preamplifier and a shaper network for conditioning the detection signal.

  13. Fetal MRI of clubfoot associated with myelomeningocele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servaes, Sabah; Hernandez, Andrea; Gonzalez, Leonardo; Victoria, Teresa; Jaramillo, Diego; Christopher Edgar, J.; Johnson, Ann [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Johnson, Mark [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Fetal Surgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The sensitivity and specificity of evaluating clubfoot deformity by MR in high-risk fetuses is currently unknown. To correlate fetal MRI with US in the assessment of clubfoot and to identify the MRI features most characteristic of clubfoot. With IRB approval and informed consent, the presence of fetal clubfoot was prospectively evaluated in mothers referred for MRI for a fetus with myelomeningocele. Two radiologists blind to the US results independently reviewed the MRI for the presence of clubfoot. MRI results were compared with US results obtained the same day and birth outcomes. Of 20 patients enrolled, there were 13 clubfeet. Interobserver agreement for the presence of clubfoot was 100%. The sensitivity of the MRI exam was 100% and the specificity 85.2%. A dedicated sagittal imaging plane through the ankle region allowed the most confident diagnosis; medial deviation of the foot relative to the leg was seen in all 13 fetuses with clubfoot. The correlation of fetal MRI with US in the evaluation of clubfoot yields a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 85.2%. The sagittal plane provided the most useful information. (orig.)

  14. Lung MRI for experimental drug research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, Nicolau [Discovery Technologies, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Lichtstr. 35, WSJ-386.2.09, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland)], E-mail: nicolau.beckmann@novartis.com; Cannet, Catherine [Discovery Technologies, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Lichtstr. 35, WSJ-386.2.09, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); Karmouty-Quintana, Harry [Discovery Technologies, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Lichtstr. 35, WSJ-386.2.09, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); Meakins-Christie Laboratories, McGill University, Montreal, Canada H2X 2P2 (Canada); Tigani, Bruno; Zurbruegg, Stefan [Discovery Technologies, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Lichtstr. 35, WSJ-386.2.09, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); Ble, Francois-Xavier [Discovery Technologies, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Lichtstr. 35, WSJ-386.2.09, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); Respiratory Diseases Department, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Faculty of Pharmacy, University Louis Pasteur-Strasbourg-I, F-67401 Illkirch (France); Cremillieux, Yannick [University of Lyon-1, Laboratory of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Trifilieff, Alexandre [Respiratory Diseases Department, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2007-12-15

    Current techniques to evaluate the efficacy of potential treatments for airways diseases in preclinical models are generally invasive and terminal. In the past few years, the flexibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to obtain anatomical and functional information of the lung has been explored with the scope of developing a non-invasive approach for the routine testing of drugs in models of airways diseases in small rodents. With MRI, the disease progression can be followed in the same animal. Thus, a significant reduction in the number of animals used for experimentation is achieved, as well as minimal interference with their well-being and physiological status. In addition, under certain circumstances the duration of the observation period after disease onset can be shortened since the technique is able to detect changes before these are reflected in parameters of inflammation determined using invasive procedures. The objective of this article is to briefly address MRI techniques that are being used in experimental lung research, with special emphasis on applications. Following an introduction on proton techniques and MRI of hyperpolarized gases, the attention is shifted to the MRI analysis of several aspects of lung disease models, including inflammation, ventilation, emphysema, fibrosis and sensory nerve activation. The next subject concerns the use of MRI in pharmacological studies within the context of experimental lung research. A final discussion points towards advantages and limitations of MRI in this area.

  15. MRI of anterior cruciate ligament autografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogi, Shigeyuki; Ariizumi, Mitsuko; Yamagishi, Tsuneo [The Aoyama Tokyo Metropolitan office' s Hospital (Japan); Agata, Toshihiko; Tada, Shinpei; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of autografts after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects were 110 patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patellar tendon autografts who underwent clinical examination, MRI, and arthroscopy of the knee. T1- and T2-weighted MR images were obtained in sagittal plane. Clinical findings were categorized into three groups: normal, borderline, and abnormal. The MRI appearances of the autografts were categorized into three types: straight continuous band (type I), interrupted band (type II) and generalized increased intensity band (type III). The clinical findings and MRI findings were compared with arthroscopic findings. Ninety-six percent of the type I showed no autograft tear on arthroscopy. In comparison with the clinical findings, MRI was found to be well correlated with arthroscopic findings. In conclusion, if the clinical findings are normal, patients are to be followed-up without MRI and arthroscopy. However, if clinical findings are either borderline or abnormal, MRI should be performed prior to arthroscopy. (author)

  16. Application of functional MRI in epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ai-hong; LI Kun-cheng; PIAO Chang-fu; LI Hong-li

    2005-01-01

    Objective To review the recent development of functional MRI application in epilepsy. Data sources Both Chinese and English language literatures were researched using MEDLINE/ CD ROM (1996-2005) and the Chinese Biomedical Literature Disk (1996-2005). Study selection Published articles about functional MRI application and epilepsy were selected.Data extraction Data were mainly extracted from 38 articles which are listed in the reference section of this review.Results fMRI can be used to localize seizure foci through detecting these cerebral hemodynamic changes produced by epileptiform discharges. EEG-triggered fMRI, which has higher spatial and temporal resolution, helps to detect the spatiotemporal pattern of spike origin and propagation, and define localization of the epileptogenic focus. fMRI is also useful in language and memory cognitive function assessment and presurgical assessment of refractory epilepsy. Atypically distributed cognitive function areas can be detected by fMRI, because of cortical language and memory areas reorganization during long-term epileptic activity in patients with epilepsy. Conclusions fMRI technique plays a very important role in cognitive function and presurgical assessment of patients with epilepsy. It is meaningful for understanding pathogenesis of epilepsy.

  17. Recommendations for Real-Time Speech MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingala, Sajan Goud; Sutton, Brad P.; Miquel, Marc E.; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2016-01-01

    Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (RT-MRI) is being increasingly used for speech and vocal production research studies. Several imaging protocols have emerged based on advances in RT-MRI acquisition, reconstruction, and audio-processing methods. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art, discusses technical considerations, and provides specific guidance for new groups entering this field. We provide recommendations for performing RT-MRI of the upper airway. This is a consensus statement stemming from the ISMRM-endorsed Speech MRI summit held in Los Angeles, February 2014. A major unmet need identified at the summit was the need for consensus on protocols that can be easily adapted by researchers equipped with conventional MRI systems. To this end, we provide a discussion of tradeoffs in RT-MRI in terms of acquisition requirements, a priori assumptions, artifacts, computational load, and performance for different speech tasks. We provide four recommended protocols and identify appropriate acquisition and reconstruction tools. We list pointers to open-source software that facilitate implementation. We conclude by discussing current open challenges in the methodological aspects of RT-MRI of speech. PMID:26174802

  18. MRI findings in acute Hendra virus meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakka, P.; Amos, G.J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102 (Australia); Saad, N., E-mail: nivena100@hotmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102 (Australia); Jeavons, S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102 (Australia)

    2012-05-15

    Aim: To describe serial changes in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute human infection from two outbreaks of Hendra virus (HeV), relate these changes to disease prognosis, and compare HeV encephalitis to reported cases of Nipah virus encephalitis. Materials and methods: The MRI images of three human cases (two of which were fatal) of acute HeV meningoencephalitis were reviewed. Results: Cortical selectivity early in the disease is evident in all three patients, while deep white matter involvement appears to be a late and possibly premorbid finding. This apparent early grey matter selectivity may be related to viral biology or ribavirin pharmacokinetics. Neuronal loss is evident at MRI, and the rate of progression of MRI abnormalities can predict the outcome of the infection. In both fatal cases, the serial changes in the MRI picture mirrored the clinical course. Conclusion: This is the first comprehensive report of serial MRI findings in acute human cerebral HeV infection from two outbreaks. The cortical selectivity appears to be an early finding while deep white matter involvement a late, and possibly premorbid, finding. In both fatal cases, the serial changes in MRI mirrored the clinical course.

  19. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  20. The effect of an official match on repeated sprint ability in junior basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprino, Davide; Clarke, Neil David; Delextrat, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an official basketball match on repeated sprint ability indices in male junior players. Ten (16 ± 1 years old; 183.6 ± 7.0 cm; 76.6 ± 8.0 kg) starting players for their teams performed three repeated sprint ability tests, before, at half-time and immediately after an official match. Each repeated sprint ability test consisted of 10 shuttle-run sprints of 30 m (15 + 15 m) separated by 30 seconds of passive recovery. The matches were video-taped to determine the frequency of eight types of movement patterns, and blood lactate concentration was measured before and immediately after each repeated sprint ability test. Differences in total time, ideal time and percentage decrement between tests was assessed by a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures, while a two-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used to identify differences in blood lactate concentration. The main results indicated a significant decrease in total movement frequency (-9.9%), high-intensity activity frequency (-13.3%), run frequency (-13.0%) and sprint frequency (-23.3%) in the second compared to the first half, and significantly worse total time and ideal time at the end of the match, compared to the start and half-time (differences ranging from -2.1% to -2.9%, P < 0.05). The practical implications of these findings suggest that regional basketball players should participate in conditioning sessions that focus on the improvement of repeated sprint ability.

  1. A newly developed removable dental device for fused 3-D MRI/Meg imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuboki, Takuo [Okayama Univ. (Japan). Dental School; Clark, G.T.; Akhtari, M.; Sutherling, W.W.

    1999-06-01

    Recently 3-D imaging techniques have been used to shed light on the role of abnormal brain functions in such conditions as nocturnal bruxism and orofacial pain. In order to achieve precise 3-D image fusion between magnetic resonance images (MRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, we developed a removable dental device which attaches rigidly to the teeth. Using this device, correlation of MEG and MRI data points was achieved by the co-registration of 3 or more fiducial points. Using a Polhemus 3-space digitizer the locations of the points were registered on MEG and then a small amount of high-water-content material was placed at each point for registering these same points on MRI. The mean reproducibility of interpoint distances, determined for 2 subjects, was between 0.59 and 0.82 mm. Using a Monte Carlo statistical analysis we determined that the accuracy of a posterior projection from the fiducial points to any point within the strata of the brain is {+-}3.3 mm. The value of this device is that it permits reasonably precise and repeatable co-registration of these points and yet it is easily removed and replaced by the patient. Obviously such a device could also be adapted for use in diagnosis and analysis of brain functions related with other various sensory and motor functions (e.g., taste, pain, clenching) in maxillofacial region using MRI and MEG. (author)

  2. Single element ultrasonic imaging of limb geometry: an in-vivo study with comparison to MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang; Fincke, Jonathan R.; Anthony, Brian W.

    2016-04-01

    Despite advancements in medical imaging, current prosthetic fitting methods remain subjective, operator dependent, and non-repeatable. The standard plaster casting method relies on prosthetist experience and tactile feel of the limb to design the prosthetic socket. Often times, many fitting iterations are required to achieve an acceptable fit. Use of improper socket fittings can lead to painful pathologies including neuromas, inflammation, soft tissue calcification, and pressure sores, often forcing the wearer to into a wheelchair and reducing mobility and quality of life. Computer software along with MRI/CT imaging has already been explored to aid the socket design process. In this paper, we explore the use of ultrasound instead of MRI/CT to accurately obtain the underlying limb geometry to assist the prosthetic socket design process. Using a single element ultrasound system, multiple subjects' proximal limbs were imaged using 1, 2.25, and 5 MHz single element transducers. Each ultrasound transducer was calibrated to ensure acoustic exposure within the limits defined by the FDA. To validate image quality, each patient was also imaged in an MRI. Fiducial markers visible in both MRI and ultrasound were used to compare the same limb cross-sectional image for each patient. After applying a migration algorithm, B-mode ultrasound cross-sections showed sufficiently high image resolution to characterize the skin and bone boundaries along with the underlying tissue structures.

  3. A systematic review of implant-supported maxillary overdentures after a mean observation period of at least 1 year

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, Wim; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Vissink, Arjan; Slater, James J. Huddleston; Meijer, Henny J. A.

    2010-01-01

    P>Aim The aim of the present systematic review of implant-supported maxillary overdentures was to assess the survival of implants, survival of maxillary overdentures and the condition of surrounding hard and soft tissues after a mean observation period of at least 1 year. Material and methods MEDLIN

  4. Risk factors for urinary incontinence 1 year after the first vaginal delivery in a cohort of primiparous Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svare, Jens A; Hansen, Bent B; Lose, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The objective was to examine the relationship between maternal and perinatal factors and the occurrence of stress (SUI) or mixed (MUI) urinary incontinence (UI) 1 year after the first vaginal delivery in primiparous women. METHODS: Participants in this prospective coh...

  5. Genetic evaluation of weaning weight and probability of lambing at 1 year of age in Targhee lambs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to investigate genetic control of 120-day weaning weight and the probability of lambing at 1 year of age in Targhee ewe lambs. Records of 5,967 ewe lambs born from 1989 to 2012 and first exposed to rams for breeding at approximately 7 months of age were analyzed. Reco...

  6. Risk factors for 1-year mortality in patients with intermediate-stage hepatocellular carcinoma treated solely with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Lin Lin

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: One-year mortality in patients with intermediate-stage HCC treated solely with TACE is not uncommon. High serum AFP level (> 400 ng/mL, CTP class B cirrhosis, and tumor size are independent risk factors for 1-year mortality in those patients.

  7. Endovascular treatment of a bleeding secondary aorto-enteric fistula. A case report with 1-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brountzos, Elias N; Vasdekis, Spyros; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Danias, Nikolaos; Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Petropoulou, Konstantina; Gouliamos, Athanasios; Perros, Georgios

    2007-01-01

    We report a patient with life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding caused by a secondary aorto-enteric fistula. Because the patient had several comorbid conditions, we succesfully stopped the bleeding by endovascular placement of a bifurcated aortic stent-graft. The patient developed periaortic infection 4 months later, but he was managed with antibiotics. The patient is well 1 year after the procedure.

  8. Decrease in Television Viewing Predicts Lower Body Mass Index at 1-Year Follow-Up in Adolescents, but Not Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Simone A.; Mitchell, Nathan R.; Hannan, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine associations between television viewing, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, eating out, physical activity, and body weight change over 1 year. Design: Secondary data analysis from randomized intervention trial. Setting: Households in the community. Participants: Adults (n = 153) and adolescents (n = 72) from the same…

  9. The additional value of patient-reported health status in predicting 1-year mortality after invasive coronary procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenzen, Mattie J; Scholte op Reimer, Wilma J M; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2007-01-01

    Self-perceived health status may be helpful in identifying patients at high risk for adverse outcomes. The Euro Heart Survey on Coronary Revascularization (EHS-CR) provided an opportunity to explore whether impaired health status was a predictor of 1-year mortality in patients with coronary arter...

  10. Immediate Single-Tooth Implant Placement in Bony Defects in the Esthetic Zone : A 1-Year Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagter, Kirsten W.; Meijer, Henny J. A.; Bakker, Nicolaas A.; Vissink, Arjan; Raghoebar, Gerry M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to assess, with regard to marginal bone level (MBL), whether the outcome of immediate implant placement in bony defects in the esthetic zone was non-inferior to delayed implant placement after 1 year. Methods: Forty patients with a failing tooth in the esthetic zone and a

  11. Synchronized Babinski and Chaddock signs preceded the MRI findings in a case of repetitive transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzono, Kosuke; Yoshiki, Takao; Wakutani, Yosuke; Manabe, Yasuhiro; Yamashita, Toru; Deguchi, Kentaro; Ikeda, Yoshio; Abe, Koji

    2013-01-01

    We herein report a 53-year-old female with repeated transient ischemic attack (TIA) symptoms including 13 instances of right hemiparesis that decreased in duration over 4 days. Two separate examinations using diffusion weighted image (DWI) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed normal findings, but we observed that both Babinski and Chaddock signs were completely synchronized with her right hemiparesis. We were only able to diagnose this case of early stage TIA using clinical signs. This diagnosis was confirmed 4 days after the onset by the presence of abnormalities on the MRI. DWI-MRI is generally useful when diagnosing TIA, but a neurological examination may be more sensitive, especially in the early stages.

  12. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  13. 6{sup th} interventional MRI symposium. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The ongoing progress in the field of interventional MRI and the great success of our last symposium 2004 in Boston have stimulated us to organize the 6th Interventional MRI Symposium to be held September 15-16, 2006 in Leipzig. This meeting will highlight ground-breaking research as well as cutting-edge reports from many groups. The symposium also provides a forum to network with leaders and innovators in the field. Session topics are: intraoperative MRI, vascular applications, targeted drug delivery, cryotherapy, thermometry, pulse sequences, LITT, percutaneous procedures, navigation, robotics, focused ultrasound. (uke)

  14. MRI of cerebral rheumatoid pachymeningitis: report of two cases with follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cellerini, M.; Gabbrielli, S. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Clinical Pathophysiology; Maddali Bongi, S.; Cammelli, D. [Section of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Univ. of Florence (Italy)

    2001-02-01

    We report the clinical and neuroradiological features of cerebral rheumatoid pachymeningitis with 1 year follow-up in two patients. MRI of the head enabled noninvasive diagnosis of both the meningeal abnormality and its complications, consisting of hypertensive hydrocephalus and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis, respectively. Dural sinus thrombosis, very uncommon in rheumatoid arthritis, was confirmed by phase-contrast MRA. Worsening of the pachymeningitis at follow-up was observed in both patients despite regression or stability of the clinical picture and long-term therapy. (orig.)

  15. Disseminated tuberculomas in spinal cord and brain demonstrated by MRI with gadolinium-DTPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, W.C. (Dept. of Radiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Cheng, T.Y. (Section of Neurology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Lee, S.K. (Dept. of Radiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Ho, Y.J. (Dept. of Radiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Lee, K.R. (Inst. of Life Science, National Tsing-Hua Univ. (Taiwan, Province of China))

    1993-03-01

    Intramedullary tuberculoma is rare, and there has been no report of concurrent intramedullary and intracerebral tuberculomas. We report a 30-year-old man with miliary tuberculosis of the lung. He suffered sudden paraplegia due to tuberculomas in the thoracic spinal cord and MRI showed more tuberculomas in the cervical spinal cord, brain stem, and cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. The tuberculomas were isointense on the T1-weighted images, and hyperintense on the T2-weighted images; there was marked enhancement with intravenous gadolinium-DTPA. All the tuberculomas were very small 1 year after antituberculous chemotherapy. (orig.)

  16. The usefulness of repeated ictal SPET for the localization of epileptogenic zones in intractable epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center (Korea); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea); Lee, Sang Kun [Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea); Kim, Yu Kyeong [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea); Kang, Eunjoo; Lee, Jae Sung [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center (Korea)

    2002-05-01

    This study investigated whether repeated ictal single-photon emission tomography (SPET) is helpful in the localization of epileptogenic zones and whether it can provide information confirming that an area of increased perfusion is really the culprit epileptogenic lesion. Fifty-four repeated ictal SPET studies were performed in 24 patients with ambiguous or unexpected findings on the first ictal SPET study. These patients were enrolled from among 502 patients with intractable epilepsy in whom pre-operative localization of epileptogenic zones was attempted with a view to possible surgical resection. Video monitoring of ictal behaviour and EEGs was performed in all patients. Repeated ictal SPET was performed using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) when there was no prominently hyperperfused area or when unexpected findings were obtained during the first study. Two ictal SPET studies were performed in 19 patients, three studies in four patients and four studies in one patient. The average delay between ictal onset and injection was 28 s for the first study and 22 s for the second, third and fourth studies. Using interictal SPET, ictal-interictal subtraction images were acquired and co-registered with the population magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) template. Invasive study and surgery were performed in 18 patients, and in these cases the surgical outcome was known. In the other six patients, epileptogenic foci were determined using MRI, positron emission tomography (PET) and ictal EEG findings. Two patients were found to have mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, two lateral temporal lobe epilepsy, eight frontal lobe epilepsy, three parietal lobe epilepsy and one occipital lobe epilepsy. The other eight had multifocal epilepsy. The first study was normal in 12 patients (group I) and indicated certain zones to be epileptogenic in the other 12 (group II). Among group I, the correct epileptogenic zone or lateralization was revealed at the repeated study in

  17. CAG repeat length does not associate with the rate of cerebellar degeneration in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Ran Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study investigated the correlation between the CAG repeat length and the degeneration of cerebellum in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 patients based on neuroimaging approaches. Forty SCA3 patients were recruited and classified into two subgroups according to their CAG repeat lengths (≥74 and <74. We measured each patient's Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA score, N-acetylaspartate (NAA/creatine (Cr ratios based on magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS, and 3-dimensional fractal dimension (3D-FD values derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI results. Furthermore, the 3D-FD values were used to construct structural covariance networks based on graph theoretical analysis. The results revealed that SCA3 patients with a longer CAG repeat length demonstrated earlier disease onset. However, the CAG repeat length did not significantly correlate with their SARA scores, cerebellar NAA/Cr ratios or cerebellar 3D-FD values. Network dissociation between cerebellar regions and parietal-occipital regions was found in SCA3 patients with CAG ≥ 74, but not in those with CAG < 74. In conclusion, the CAG repeat length is uncorrelated with the change of SARA score, cerebellar function and cerebellar structure in SCA3. Nevertheless, a longer CAG repeat length may indicate early structural covariance network dissociation.

  18. A simple risk stratification model that predicts 1-year postoperative mortality rate in patients with solid-organ cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wen-Chi; Wang, Frank; Cheng, Yu-Fan; Chen, Miao-Fen; Lu, Chang-Hsien; Wang, Cheng-Hsu; Lin, Yung-Chang; Yeh, Ta-Sen

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to construct a scoring system developed exclusively from the preoperative data that predicts 1-year postoperative mortality in patients with solid cancers. A total of 20,632 patients who had a curative resection for solid-organ cancers between 2007 and 2012 at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital Linkou Medical Center were included in the derivation cohort. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to develop a risk model that predicts 1-year postoperative mortality. Patients were then stratified into four risk groups (low-, intermediate-, high-, and very high-risk) according to the total score (0-43) form mortality risk analysis. An independent cohort of 16,656 patients who underwent curative cancer surgeries at three other hospitals during the same study period (validation cohort) was enrolled to verify the risk model. Age, gender, cancer site, history of previous cancer, tumor stage, Charlson comorbidity index, American Society of Anesthesiologist score, admission type, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status were independently predictive of 1-year postoperative mortality. The 1-year postoperative mortality rates were 0.5%, 3.8%, 14.6%, and 33.8%, respectively, among the four risk groups in the derivation cohort (c-statistic, 0.80), compared with 0.9%, 4.2%, 14.6%, and 32.6%, respectively, in the validation cohort (c-statistic, 0.78). The risk stratification model also demonstrated good discrimination of long-term survival outcome of the four-tier risk groups (P model not only predicts 1-year postoperative mortality but also differentiates long-term survival outcome between the risk groups.

  19. Late Adverse Events after Enhanced and Unenhanced MRI and CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzouz, Manal; Rømsing, Janne; Thomsen, Henrik S.

    2014-01-01

    of LAEs was significantly higher in the enhanced MRI (38%) and CT (27%) groups than unenhanced MRI (20%) and CT (16%) groups. The frequency of nausea, dizziness, abdominal pain and diarrhoea was significantly higher in the enhanced MRI group than in the MRI control group, while taste sensation...

  20. Mining of simple sequence repeats in the Genome of Gentianaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sathishkumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple sequence repeats (SSRs or short tandem repeats are short repeat motifs that show high level of length polymorphism due to insertion or deletion mutations of one or more repeat types. Here, we present the detection and abundance of microsatellites or SSRs in nucleotide sequences of Gentianaceae family. A total of 545 SSRs were mined in 4698 nucleotide sequences downloaded from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI. Among the SSR sequences, the frequency of repeat type was about 429 -mono repeats, 99 -di repeats, 15 -tri repeats, and 2 --hexa repeats. Mononucleotide repeats were found to be abundant repeat types, about 78%, followed by dinucleotide repeats (18.16% among the SSR sequences. An attempt was made to design primer pairs for 545 identified SSRs but these were found only for 169 sequences.

  1. Functional imaging of olfaction by CBV fMRI in monkeys: insight into the role of olfactory bulb in habituation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fuqiang; Holahan, Marie A; Houghton, Andrea K; Hargreaves, Richard; Evelhoch, Jeffrey L; Winkelmann, Christopher T; Williams, Donald S

    2015-02-01

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) fMRI with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO) as contrast agent was used to investigate the odorant-induced olfaction in anesthetized rhesus monkeys. fMRI data were acquired in 24 axial slices covering the entire brain, with isoamyl-acetate as the odor stimulant. For each experiment, multiple fMRI measurements were made during a 1- or 2-h period, with each measurement consisting of a baseline period, a stimulation period, and a recovery period. Three different stimulation paradigms with a stimulation period of 1 min, 2 min, or 8 min, respectively, were used to study the olfactory responses in the olfactory bulb (OB). Odorant-induced CBV increases were observed in the OB of each individual monkey. The spatial and temporal activation patterns were reproducible within and between animals. The sensitivity of CBV fMRI in OB was comparable with the sensitivities reported in previous animal fMRI studies. The CBV responses during the 1-min, 2-min, or 8-min odor stimulation period were relatively stable, and did not show attenuation. The amplitudes of CBV response to the repeated stimuli during the 1- or 2-h period were also stable. The stable CBV response in the OB to both continuous and repeated odor stimuli suggests that the OB may not play a major role in olfactory habituation. The technical approach described in this report can enable more extensive fMRI studies of olfactory processing in OB of both humans and non-human primates.

  2. PolyQ repeat expansions in ATXN2 associated with ALS are CAA interrupted repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenming Yu

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a devastating, rapidly progressive disease leading to paralysis and death. Recently, intermediate length polyglutamine (polyQ repeats of 27-33 in ATAXIN-2 (ATXN2, encoding the ATXN2 protein, were found to increase risk for ALS. In ATXN2, polyQ expansions of ≥ 34, which are pure CAG repeat expansions, cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. However, similar length expansions that are interrupted with other codons, can present atypically with parkinsonism, suggesting that configuration of the repeat sequence plays an important role in disease manifestation in ATXN2 polyQ expansion diseases. Here we determined whether the expansions in ATXN2 associated with ALS were pure or interrupted CAG repeats, and defined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs rs695871 and rs695872 in exon 1 of the gene, to assess haplotype association. We found that the expanded repeat alleles of 40 ALS patients and 9 long-repeat length controls were all interrupted, bearing 1-3 CAA codons within the CAG repeat. 21/21 expanded ALS chromosomes with 3CAA interruptions arose from one haplotype (GT, while 18/19 expanded ALS chromosomes with <3CAA interruptions arose from a different haplotype (CC. Moreover, age of disease onset was significantly earlier in patients bearing 3 interruptions vs fewer, and was distinct between haplotypes. These results indicate that CAG repeat expansions in ATXN2 associated with ALS are uniformly interrupted repeats and that the nature of the repeat sequence and haplotype, as well as length of polyQ repeat, may play a role in the neurological effect conferred by expansions in ATXN2.

  3. Brain regional homogeneity changes following transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in cirrhotic patients support cerebral adaptability theory—A resting-state functional MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Ling; Qi, Rongfeng [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Zhang, Long Jiang, E-mail: kevinzhlj@163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Zhong, Jianhui [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Zheng, Gang [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Wu, Xingjiang; Fan, Xinxin [Department of General Surgery, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Lu, Guang Ming, E-mail: cjr.luguangming@vip.163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The exact neuro-pathophysiological effect of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) on brain function remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the longitudinal brain activity changes in cirrhotic patients with TIPS insertion using resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) with regional homogeneity (ReHo) method. Methods: Fifteen cirrhotic patients without overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) planned for TIPS procedure and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Eleven of the 15 patients underwent repeated fMRI examinations at median 7-day following TIPS, 8 patients in median 3-month, and 7 patients in median 1-year follow-up duration, respectively. Regional homogeneity was calculated by the Kendall's coefficient of concordance (KCC) and compared between patients before TIPS and healthy controls with two-sample t test as well as pre-and post-TIPS patients with paired t test. Correlations between the pre- and post-TIPS changes of ReHo and the changes of venous blood ammonia level and number connection test type A (NCT-A)/digit symbol test (DST) scores were calculated by crossing subjects. Results: Compared with healthy controls, 15 cirrhotic patients before TIPS procedure showed decreased ReHo in the bilateral frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes and increased ReHo in the bilateral caudate. Compared with the pre-TIPS patients, 11 post-TIPS patients in the median 7-day follow-up examinations demonstrated decreased ReHo in the medial frontal gyrus (MFG), superior parietal gyrus (SPG), middle/superior temporal gyrus (M/STG), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), caudate, and increased ReHo in the insula. Eight post-TIPS patients in the median 3-month follow-up examinations showed widespread decreased ReHo in the bilateral frontal and parietal lobes, ACC, caudate, and increased ReHo in the insula and precuneus/cuneus. In the median 1-year follow-up studies, seven post-TIPS patients displayed

  4. Late onset temporal lobe epilepsy with MRI evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis following acute neurocysticercosis. Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Eliane; Guerreiro, Carlos A.M.; Cendes, Fernando [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Neurologia]. E-mail: fcendes@unicamp.br

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this case report is to describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) in a patient with new onset temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and acute neurocysticercosis with multiple cysts. A 56 years old man with new onset headache, Simple Partial Seizures and Complex Partial Seizures underwent CT scan and lumbar puncture as diagnose proceeding. Multiple cysts and meningitis were identified, with a positive immunology for cysticercosis. Seizures were recorded over the left temporal region in a routine EEG. Treatment with al bendazole was performed for 21 days, with clinical improvement and seizure remission after 4 months. An MRI scan 11 months after treatment, showed complete resolution of those cystic lesions and a left hippocampal atrophy (HA) with hyperintense T2 signal. The presence of HA and hyperintense T 2 signal in this patient has not, to date, been associated with a poor seizure control. Conclusions: This patient presented with MRI evidence of left MTS after new onset partial seizures of left temporal lobe origin. Although we did not have a previous MRI scan, it is likely that this hippocampal abnormality was due to the acute inflammatory response to cysticercosis associated to repeated partial seizures. This suggests that acute neurocysticercosis associated with repeated seizures may cause MTS and late onset TLE. (author)

  5. Gadolinium deposition within the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus after repeated administrations of gadolinium-based contrast agents - current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanov, Dragan [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia); Center for Radiology, Nis (Serbia); Aracki-Trenkic, Aleksandra [Center for Radiology, Nis (Serbia); Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia)

    2016-05-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) have been used clinically since 1988 for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI). Generally, GBCAs are considered to have an excellent safety profile. However, GBCA administration has been associated with increased occurrence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in patients with severely compromised renal function, and several studies have shown evidence of gadolinium deposition in specific brain structures, the globus pallidus and dentate nucleus, in patients with normal renal function. Gadolinium deposition in the brain following repeated CE-MRI scans has been demonstrated in patients using T1-weighted unenhanced MRI and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Additionally, rodent studies with controlled GBCA administration also resulted in neural gadolinium deposits. Repeated GBCA use is associated with gadolinium deposition in the brain. This is especially true with the use of less-stable, linear GBCAs. In spite of increasing evidence of gadolinium deposits in the brains of patients after multiple GBCA administrations, the clinical significance of these deposits continues to be unclear. Here, we discuss the current state of scientific evidence surrounding gadolinium deposition in the brain following GBCA use, and the potential clinical significance of gadolinium deposition. There is considerable need for further research, both to understand the mechanism by which gadolinium deposition in the brain occurs and how it affects the patients in which it occurs. (orig.)

  6. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubuchon, Adam C., E-mail: acaubuchon@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Chan, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lovato, James F. [Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Balamucki, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  7. Safety of Repeated Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Louie, John D. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Iagaru, Andrei H.; Goris, Michael L. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine (United States); Sze, Daniel Y., E-mail: dansze@stanford.edu [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Repeated radioembolization (RE) treatments carry theoretically higher risk of radiation-induced hepatic injury because of the liver's cumulative memory of previous exposure. We performed a retrospective safety analysis on patients who underwent repeated RE. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 247 patients were treated by RE. Eight patients (5 men, 3 women, age range 51-71 years) underwent repeated treatment of a targeted territory, all with resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres; Sirtex, Lane Cove, Australia). Adverse events were graded during a standardized follow-up. In addition, the correlation between the occurrence of RE-induced liver disease (REILD) and multiple variables was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses in all 247 patients who received RE. Results: Two patients died shortly after the second treatment (at 84 and 107 days) with signs and symptoms of REILD. Both patients underwent whole liver treatment twice (cumulative doses 3.08 and 2.66 GBq). The other 6 patients demonstrated only minor toxicities after receiving cumulative doses ranging from 2.41 to 3.88 GBq. All patients experienced objective tumor responses. In the whole population, multifactorial analysis identified three risk factors associated with REILD: repeated RE (p = 0.036), baseline serum total bilirubin (p = 0.048), and baseline serum aspartate aminotransferase (p = 0.043). Repeated RE proved to be the only independent risk factor for REILD in multivariate analysis (odds ratio 9.6; p = 0.002). Additionally, the administered activity per target volume (in GBq/L) was found to be an independent risk factor for REILD, but only in whole liver treatments (p = 0.033). Conclusion: The risk of REILD appears to be elevated for repeated RE. Objective tumor responses were observed, but establishment of safety limits will require improvement in dosimetric measurement and prediction.

  8. Development and validation of an MRI reference criterion for defining a positive SIJ MRI in spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Ulrich; Zubler, Veronika; Pedersen, Susanne J

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate an MRI reference criterion for a positive SIJ MRI based on the level of confidence in classification of spondyloarthritis (SpA) by expert MRI readers. METHODS: Four readers assessed SIJ MRI in two inception cohorts (A/B) of 157 consecutive back pain patients ≤50 years...... (0=definitely not; 10=definite). The MRI reference criterion was pre-specified as the majority of readers recording a confidence of 8-10; absence of SpA required all readers to record Non-SpA (confidence 0-4). We calculated inter-reader reliability and agreement between MRI-based and clinical...... classification using kappa statistics. We estimated cut-off values for MRI lesions attaining specificity `0.90 for SpA. RESULTS: 76.4%/71.6% of subjects in cohorts A/B met the MRI criterion. Kappa values for inter-reader agreement were 0.76/0.80, and between MRI-based and clinical assessment 0.93/0.57. Using...

  9. Utility of functional MRI in pediatric neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freilich, Emily R; Gaillard, William D

    2010-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI), a tool increasingly used to study cognitive function, is also an important tool for understanding not only normal development in healthy children, but also abnormal development, as seen in children with epilepsy, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and autism. Since its inception almost 15 years ago, fMRI has seen an explosion in its use and applications in the adult literature. However, only recently has it found a home in pediatric neurology. New adaptations in study design and technologic advances, especially the study of resting state functional connectivity as well as the use of passive task design in sedated children, have increased the utility of functional imaging in pediatrics to help us gain understanding into the developing brain at work. This article reviews the background of fMRI in pediatrics and highlights the most recent literature and clinical applications.

  10. PET/MRI in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Andreas; Loft, Annika; Law, Ian;

    2013-01-01

    Combined PET/MRI systems are now commercially available and are expected to change the medical imaging field by providing combined anato-metabolic image information. We believe this will be of particular relevance in imaging of cancer patients. At the Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear...... Medicine & PET at Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen we installed an integrated PET/MRI in December 2011. Here, we describe our first clinical PET/MR cases and discuss some of the areas within oncology where we envision promising future application of integrated PET/MR imaging in clinical routine. Cases...... described include brain tumors, pediatric oncology as well as lung, abdominal and pelvic cancer. In general the cases show that PET/MRI performs well in all these types of cancer when compared to PET/CT. However, future large-scale clinical studies are needed to establish when to use PET/MRI. We envision...

  11. MRI findings of Guillain-Barre syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Kyu; Lee, Hwa Jin; Byun, Woo Mok [Yeungnam Univ. College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-04-01

    To evaluate MRI findings of Guillain-Barre syndrome. In six patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome diagnosed by clinical, cerebrospinal fluid and electrophysiologic findings, a retrospective review of MR findings was conducted. Follow-up MRI scans were carried out in two patients showing minimal clinical improvement. Marked or moderate enhancement of thickened nerve roots was seen in all cases on gadopentetate dimeglumine enhanced axial T1-weighted images. Two patterns were seen; one was even enhancement of both anterior and posterior nerve roots (n=1) and the other was enhancement of anterior nerve roots only (n=5). Enhancement and thickness of nerve roots was seen to have slightly decreased on MRI follow-up at 32 and 50 days; clinical and electrophysiologic examination showed minimal improvement. Although MRI findings of nerve root enhancement are nonspecific and can be seen in neoplastic and other inflammatory diseases, the enhancement of thickened anterior nerve roots within the cal sac suggests Guillain-Barre syndrome.

  12. Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) -- Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  13. MRI Helps Assess Fetal Brain Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... authors. The study was published Dec. 14 in The Lancet . "Adding an MRI scan when a problem is ... practice as soon as possible, he said. SOURCE: The Lancet , news release, Dec. 14, 2016 HealthDay Copyright (c) ...

  14. Organizing Knowing in Interdisciplinary MRI Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoshinaka, Yutaka

    This paper addresses organizational knowledge practices pertaining to the interdisciplinary work of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) at a hospital radiology department. The setting occasions an interesting venue for exploring domestication of MRI as it unfolds in distributed settings of collective...... envisaged to deal with the department’s appropriation of a new MRI scanner, occasioned by the replacement of an existing model. Work was reorganised to reflect this aspect in the practice protocols from early on, where personnel previously assigned only to other imaging modalities such as the department......'s CT-scan and X-ray machines, were to take on MRI scanning, on an albeit rotational basis. Opening up to a broader group of operators to the scanning practice was to allow for organizational flexibility and a broader basis for competence building among radiology staff, where different occupational...

  15. Accuracy of MRI in Growth Plate Measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Rahbek, Ole; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    was measured and compared to histology. Results. Histology measurements showed a mean growth plate thickness of 467 μm (SD = 82.2). The mean growth plate thickness measured in the 7T MR images was 465 μm (SD = 62.2) and 1325 μm (SD=183.5) on 1.5 MRI measurements. We found a better correlation between...... the growth plate thickness measured on the 7T MRI and histology samples compared to 1.5T, where the accuracy was poor. Conclusion. The growth plate can be identified and measured with high accuracy using 7T MRI. 1.5T MRI can only describe some morphological characteristics; its poor resolution impedes to do...

  16. Superresolution improves MRI cortical segmentation with FACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Manjón, José V.; Coupé, Pierrick

    Brain cortical surface extraction from MRI has applications for measurement of gray matter (GM) atrophy, functional mapping, source localization and preoperative neurosurgical planning. Accurate cortex segmentation requires high resolution morphological images and several methods for extracting...

  17. 2015 MICCAI Workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Aurobrata; Kaden, Enrico; Rathi, Yogesh; Reisert, Marco

    2016-01-01

    These Proceedings of the 2015 MICCAI Workshop “Computational Diffusion MRI” offer a snapshot of the current state of the art on a broad range of topics within the highly active and growing field of diffusion MRI. The topics vary from fundamental theoretical work on mathematical modeling, to the development and evaluation of robust algorithms, new computational methods applied to diffusion magnetic resonance imaging data, and applications in neuroscientific studies and clinical practice. Over the last decade interest in diffusion MRI has exploded. The technique provides unique insights into the microstructure of living tissue and enables in-vivo connectivity mapping of the brain. Computational techniques are key to the continued success and development of diffusion MRI and to its widespread transfer into clinical practice. New processing methods are essential for addressing issues at each stage of the diffusion MRI pipeline: acquisition, reconstruction, modeling and model fitting, image processing, fiber t...

  18. Multichannel Compressive Sensing MRI Using Noiselet Encoding

    CERN Document Server

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Zhang, Jingxin

    2014-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI, and presents a method to design the pulse sequence for the noiselet encoding. This novel encoding scheme is combined with the multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. An empirical RIP a...

  19. MRI Reporter Genes for Noninvasive Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is one of the most important imaging technologies used in clinical diagnosis. Reporter genes for MRI can be applied to accurately track the delivery of cell in cell therapy, evaluate the therapy effect of gene delivery, and monitor tissue/cell-specific microenvironments. Commonly used reporter genes for MRI usually include genes encoding the enzyme (e.g., tyrosinase and β-galactosidase, the receptor on the cells (e.g., transferrin receptor, and endogenous reporter genes (e.g., ferritin reporter gene. However, low sensitivity limits the application of MRI and reporter gene-based multimodal imaging strategies are common including optical imaging and radionuclide imaging. These can significantly improve diagnostic efficiency and accelerate the development of new therapies.

  20. MRI manifestations of enlarged superior ophthalmic vein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Rui-li; MA Xiao-ye; CAI Ji-ping; ZHU Huang

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To assess MRI in the evaluation of enlarged superior ophthalmic vein (SOV). Methods: MRI manifestations and etiology of forty-six patients with enlarged SOV were analyzed. Results: SOV enlargement was noted to occur in carotid-cavernous fistula, ophthalmic Graves'disease, Tolosa-Hunt syndrome, inflammation at the apex of the orbit, orbital pseudotumor and thrombosis of cavernous sinus. The dilated vein appeared as signal void tubular shadows on both T1 and T2 weighted images. The diameter of the enlarged vein was 3.5-6.0 mm. Extraocular muscle enlargement, orbital pathologies, enlarged carotid cavernous sinus etc were also revealed by MRI. Conclusion: The dilated SOV may be well demonstrated by MRI. The etiological diagnosis of enlarged SOV can be made in combination with the associated findings.

  1. MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Shi Kyung; Han, Chun Hwan; Rho, Eun Jin [Kangnam General Hospital Public Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is a rare syndrom characterized by developmental delay, acrocyanosis, petechiae, chronic diarrhea, and ethylmalonic, lactic, and methylsuccinic aciduria. We report the MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy including previously unreported intracranial hematoma.

  2. PET/MRI in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Andreas; Loft, Annika; Law, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Combined PET/MRI systems are now commercially available and are expected to change the medical imaging field by providing combined anato-metabolic image information. We believe this will be of particular relevance in imaging of cancer patients. At the Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear...... described include brain tumors, pediatric oncology as well as lung, abdominal and pelvic cancer. In general the cases show that PET/MRI performs well in all these types of cancer when compared to PET/CT. However, future large-scale clinical studies are needed to establish when to use PET/MRI. We envision...... that PET/MRI in oncology will prove to become a valuable addition to PET/CT in diagnosing, tailoring and monitoring cancer therapy in selected patient populations....

  3. On clustering fMRI time series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, C; Toft, P; Rostrup, E

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of fMRI time series is often performed by extracting one or more parameters for the individual voxels. Methods based, e.g., on various statistical tests are then used to yield parameters corresponding to probability of activation or activation strength. However, these methods do not indi......Analysis of fMRI time series is often performed by extracting one or more parameters for the individual voxels. Methods based, e.g., on various statistical tests are then used to yield parameters corresponding to probability of activation or activation strength. However, these methods do...... between the activation stimulus and the fMRI signal. We present two different clustering algorithms and use them to identify regions of similar activations in an fMRI experiment involving a visual stimulus....

  4. MRI of the Body (Chest, Abdomen, Pelvis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... receive injections of gadolinium contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the Safety page ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ...

  5. Relationships among androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length in Han adult men from China: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Yan-Min Ma; Kai-Jie Wu; Liang Ning; Jin Zeng; Bo Kou; Hong-Jun Xie; Zhen-Kun Ma; Xin-Yang Wang; Yong-Guang Gong; Da-Lin He

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlations among androgen receptor (AR) CAG repeat polymorphism, sex hormones and penile length in healthy Chinese young adult men. Two hundred and fifty-three healthy men (aged 22.8 ± 3.1 years) were enrolled. The individuals were grouped as CAG short (CAG S ) if they harbored repeat length of ≤20 or as CAG long (CAG L ) if their CAG repeat length was >20. Body height/weight, penile length and other parameters were examined and recorded by the specified ...

  6. Can unenhanced multiparametric MRI substitute gadolinium-enhanced MRI in the characterization of vertebral marrow infiltrative lesions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Z. Zidan

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Unenhanced-multiparametric MRI is compatible with gadolinium-enhanced MRI in reliable characterization of marrow infiltrative lesions. The routine MRI protocol of cancer patients should be altered to accommodate the evolving MRI technology and cost effectively substitute the need for a gadolinium enhanced scan.

  7. Intersession reliability of fMRI activation for heat pain and motor tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimi L. Quiton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the practice of conducting longitudinal fMRI studies to assess mechanisms of pain-reducing interventions becomes more common, there is a great need to assess the test–retest reliability of the pain-related BOLD fMRI signal across repeated sessions. This study quantitatively evaluated the reliability of heat pain-related BOLD fMRI brain responses in healthy volunteers across 3 sessions conducted on separate days using two measures: (1 intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC calculated based on signal amplitude and (2 spatial overlap. The ICC analysis of pain-related BOLD fMRI responses showed fair-to-moderate intersession reliability in brain areas regarded as part of the cortical pain network. Areas with the highest intersession reliability based on the ICC analysis included the anterior midcingulate cortex, anterior insula, and second somatosensory cortex. Areas with the lowest intersession reliability based on the ICC analysis also showed low spatial reliability; these regions included pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and posterior insula. Thus, this study found regional differences in pain-related BOLD fMRI response reliability, which may provide useful information to guide longitudinal pain studies. A simple motor task (finger-thumb opposition was performed by the same subjects in the same sessions as the painful heat stimuli were delivered. Intersession reliability of fMRI activation in cortical motor areas was comparable to previously published findings for both spatial overlap and ICC measures, providing support for the validity of the analytical approach used to assess intersession reliability of pain-related fMRI activation. A secondary finding of this study is that the use of standard ICC alone as a measure of reliability may not be sufficient, as the underlying variance structure of an fMRI dataset can result in inappropriately high ICC values; a method to eliminate these false positive results

  8. Incidental pineal cysts in children who undergo 3-T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, Matthew T. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Oh, Christopher C. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Choudhri, Asim F. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Pineal cysts, both simple and complex, are commonly encountered in children. More cysts are being detected with MR technology; however, nearly all pineal cysts are benign and require no follow-up. To discover the prevalence of pineal cysts in children at our institution who have undergone high-resolution 3-T MRI. We retrospectively reviewed 100 consecutive 3-T brain MRIs in children ages 1 month to 17 years (mean 6.8 {+-} 5.1 years). We evaluated 3-D volumetric T1-W imaging, axial T2-W imaging, axial T2-W FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery) and coronal STIR (short tau inversion recovery) sequences. Pineal parenchymal and cyst volumes were measured in three planes. Cysts were analyzed for the presence and degree of complexity. Pineal cysts were present in 57% of children, with a mean maximum linear dimension of 4.2 mm (range 1.5-16 mm). Of these cysts, 24.6% showed thin septations or fluid levels reflecting complexity. None of the cysts demonstrated complete T2/FLAIR signal suppression. No cyst wall thickening or nodularity was present. There was no significant difference between the ages of children with and without cysts. Cysts were more commonly encountered in girls than boys (67% vs. 52%; P = 0.043). There was a slight trend toward increasing pineal gland volume with age. Pineal cysts are often present in children and can be incidentally detected by 3-T MRI. Characteristic-appearing pineal cysts in children are benign, incidental findings, for which follow-up is not required if there are no referable symptoms or excessive size. (orig.)

  9. Risk of multiple sclerosis after optic neuritis in patients with normal baseline brain MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Inês Brás; Matias, Fernando; Silva, Eduardo Duarte; Cunha, Luis; Sousa, Lívia

    2014-04-01

    When assessing and managing a patient with optic neuritis (ON), the risk of future development of multiple sclerosis (MS) is an important issue, as this can be the first presentation of the disease. Although the presence of lesions on baseline brain MRI is the strongest predictor of MS conversion, some patients with normal imaging also develop MS. We aimed to estimate MS risk in patients with ON and a normal baseline MRI and identify individuals with higher risk of conversion. We performed a retrospective study including patients with idiopathic ON and normal baseline brain MRI who presented to our hospital over an 8 year period. Of a total of 42 patients, 10 converted to MS: five during the first follow-up year, seven during the first 2 years and all of the patients within the first 5 years, with a 5 year MS conversion rate of 23.8%. MS conversion rates were significantly higher in patients with history of previous symptoms suggestive of demyelination (p=0.002), cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands unmatched in serum (p=0.004) and incomplete visual acuity recovery (≤6/12) after 1 year (p=0.002). Lower conversion rates were found in patients with optic disc edema (p=0.022). According to these results, a significant proportion of patients with idiopathic ON and a normal baseline brain MRI will develop MS, with a higher risk during the first 5 years. Therefore, in the presence of factors in favor of MS conversion, close follow-up, including semestral medical consultations and yearly brain MRI, can be recommended. Early immunomodulatory treatment may be individually considered as it can delay conversion and reduce new lesion development rate.

  10. MRI and MRS of human brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Bob L; Hu, Jiani

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of human brain tumors, including the primary applications and basic terminology involved. Readers who wish to know more about this broad subject should seek out the referenced books (1. Tofts (2003) Quantitative MRI of the brain. Measuring changes caused by disease. Wiley; Bradley and Stark (1999) 2. Magnetic resonance imaging, 3rd Edition. Mosby Inc; Brown and Semelka (2003) 3. MRI basic principles and applications, 3rd Edition. Wiley-Liss) or reviews (4. Top Magn Reson Imaging 17:127-36, 2006; 5. JMRI 24:709-724, 2006; 6. Am J Neuroradiol 27:1404-1411, 2006).MRI is the most popular means of diagnosing human brain tumors. The inherent difference in the magnetic resonance (MR) properties of water between normal tissues and tumors results in contrast differences on the image that provide the basis for distinguishing tumors from normal tissues. In contrast to MRI, which provides spatial maps or images using water signals of the tissues, proton MRS detects signals of tissue metabolites. MRS can complement MRI because the observed MRS peaks can be linked to inherent differences in biochemical profiles between normal tissues and tumors.The goal of MRI and MRS is to characterize brain tumors, including tumor core, edge, edema, volume, types, and grade. The commonly used brain tumor MRI protocol includes T2-weighted images and T1-weighted images taken both before and after the injection of a contrast agent (typically gadolinium: Gd). The commonly used MRS technique is either point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) or stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM).

  11. PET/MRI. Methodology and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrio, Ignasi [Autonomous Univ. of Barcelona, Hospital Sant Pau (Spain). Dept. Medicina Nuclear; Ros, Pablo (ed.) [Univ. Hospitals Case, Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Provides detailed information on the methodology and equipment of MRI-PET. Covers a wide range of clinical applications in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Written by an international group of experts in MRI and PET. PET/MRI is an exciting novel diagnostic imaging modality that combines the precise anatomic and physiologic information provided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the molecular data obtained with positron emission tomography (PET). PET/MRI offers the promise of a simplified work flow, reduced radiation, whole-body imaging with superior soft tissue contrast, and time of flight physiologic information. It has been described as the pathway to molecular imaging in medicine. In compiling this textbook, the editors have brought together a truly international group of experts in MRI and PET. The book is divided into two parts. The first part covers methodology and equipment and comprises chapters on basic molecular medicine, development of specific contrast agents, MR attenuation and validation, quantitative MRI and PET motion correction, and technical implications for both MRI and PET. The second part of the book focuses on clinical applications in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Imaging of major neoplasms, including lymphomas and tumors of the breast, prostate, and head and neck, is covered in individual chapters. Further chapters address functional and metabolic cardiovascular examinations and major central nervous system applications such as brain tumors and dementias. Risks, safety aspects, and healthcare costs and impacts are also discussed. This book will be of interest to all radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians who wish to learn more about the latest developments in this important emerging imaging modality and its applications.

  12. Pharmacological fMRI; a clinical exploration

    OpenAIRE

    Goekoop, R.

    2006-01-01

    Dit proefschrift beschrijft de resultaten van een verkennend onderzoek naar een nieuwe techniek die gebruikt kan worden om de effecten van geneesmiddelen op hersenaktiviteit af te beelden: pharmacologische functionele magnetic resonance imaging (farmacologische fMRI of phMRI). Met behulp van deze techniek werden de effecten onderzocht van drie verschillende medicijnen (de bètablokker propranolol, de selectieve oestrogeen-receptor modulator (SERM) raloxifene en de cholinesteraseremmer galantam...

  13. Quantitative Cerebral Blood Flow Measurements Using MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Muir, Eric R; Watts, Lora Talley; Tiwari, Yash Vardhan; Bresnen, Andrew; Timothy Q Duong

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging utilized as a quantitative and noninvasive method to image cerebral blood flow. The two most common techniques used to detect cerebral blood flow are dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI and arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI. Herein we describe the use of these two techniques to measure cerebral blood flow in rodents, including methods, analysis, and important considerations when utilizing these techniques.

  14. POEMS syndrome: radiographic appearance with MRI correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, Suzanne T. [Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Beasley, H.S. [Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Daffner, Richard H. [Allegheny General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Section of Musculoskeletal/Trauma Radiology, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2006-09-15

    POEMS syndrome is a rare disorder in which patients present with the hallmark signs of polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein and skin changes. Many other clinical findings are also often present, most notably osseous lesions. The MRI appearance of the bony lesions in POEMS syndrome has been described in five cases, four of which are in the non-English literature. We report the MRI appearance of the osseous lesions in a patient with POEMS syndrome who presented with sciatic neuropathy. (orig.)

  15. Infantile Refsum disease: serial evaluation with MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakirer, Sinan; Savas, Mahmut R

    2005-02-01

    Refsum disease is a rare metabolic disorder, which is characterized by the accumulation of phytanic acid in the blood and tissues, including the brain. A variant of this condition that occurs in young children is called infantile Refsum disease. The MRI findings of symmetrical signal change involving the corticospinal tracts, cerebellar dentate nuclei, and corpus callosum are characteristic. We report the serial MRI findings of a child with this rare metabolic disorder.

  16. Infantile Refsum disease: serial evaluation with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cakirer, Sinan; Savas, Mahmut R. [Sisli Etfal Hospital, Neuroradiology Section, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-02-01

    Refsum disease is a rare metabolic disorder, which is characterized by the accumulation of phytanic acid in the blood and tissues, including the brain. A variant of this condition that occurs in young children is called infantile Refsum disease. The MRI findings of symmetrical signal change involving the corticospinal tracts, cerebellar dentate nuclei, and corpus callosum are characteristic. We report the serial MRI findings of a child with this rare metabolic disorder. (orig.)

  17. MRI Brain Tumor Segmentation Methods- A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gursangeet, Kaur; Jyoti, Rani

    2016-01-01

    Medical image processing and its segmentation is an active and interesting area for  researchers. It has reached at the tremendous place in diagnosing tumors after the discovery of CT and MRI. MRI is an useful tool to detect the brain tumor and segmentation is performed to carry out the useful portion from an image. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of different image segmentation methods like watershed algorithm, morphological operations, neutrosophic sets, thresholding, K-...

  18. Vertebral involvement in SAPHO syndrome: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachtigal, A.; Cardinal, E.; Bureau, N.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. de Montreal, QC (Canada); Sainte-Marie, L.G. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. de Montreal, QC (Canada); Milette, F. [Department of Pathology, Univ. de Montreal, QC (Canada)

    1999-03-01

    We report on the MRI findings in the vertebrae and surrounding soft tissues in two patients with the SAPHO syndrome (Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis, Osteitis). The MRI findings include abnormal bone marrow signal, either focal or diffuse, of the vertebral bodies and posterior elements; hyperintense paravertebral soft tissue swelling and abnormal signal of the intervertebral discs. These changes are consistent with discitis and osteitis. (orig.) With 6 figs., 17 refs.

  19. MRI of the transverse and alar ligaments in rheumatoid arthritis: feasibility and relations to atlantoaxial subluxation and disease activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetti, Nils; Kraakenes, Jostein; Roervik, Jarle; Espeland, Ansgar [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Section for Radiology, Department of Surgical Sciences, Bergen (Norway); Alsing, Rikke; Brun, Johan Gorgas [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Section for Rheumatology, Institute of Medicine, Bergen (Norway); Gilhus, Nils Erik [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Section for Neurology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Bergen (Norway)

    2010-03-15

    Dysfunctional transverse and alar craniovertebral ligaments can cause instability and osseous destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study examined (1) the feasibility of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of these ligaments in RA and (2) the relation between ligament high-signal changes and atlantoaxial subluxation and RA duration/severity. Consecutive RA patients (n=46) underwent clinical examination, functional radiography, and high-resolution MRI. Two blinded radiologists rated MRI image quality, graded ligament high-signal changes 0-3 on proton-weighted sequences using an existing grading system, and assessed cervical spine rheumatic changes on short tau inversion recovery images. Agreement was analyzed using kappa and relations using multiple logistic regression. MRI images had good quality in 42 (91.3%) of 46 patients and were interpretable in 44 (32 women and 12 men, median age/disease duration 60.4/9.1 years). MRI grades 2-3 changes of the transverse and alar ligaments showed moderate and good interobserver agreement (kappa 0.59 and 0.78), respectively, and prevalence 31.8% and 34.1%. Such ligament changes were more frequent with increasing anterior atlantoaxial subluxation (p=0.012 transverse, p=0.028 alar), higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.003 transverse), positive rheumatoid factor (p=0.002 alar), and neck pain (p = 0.004 alar). This first study of high-resolution MRI of these ligaments in RA showed high feasibility and relations with atlantoaxial subluxation, RA disease activity, and neck pain. The clinical usefulness of such MRI needs further evaluation. (orig.)

  20. Copy number of tandem direct repeats within the inverted repeats of Marek's disease virus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, A; Nakajima, K; Ikuta, K; Ueda, S; Kato, S; Hirai, K

    1986-12-01

    We previously reported that DNA of the oncogenic strain BC-1 of Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV1) contains three units of tandem direct repeats with 132 base pair (bp) repeats within the inverted repeats of the long regions of the MDV1 genome, whereas the attenuated, nononcogenic viral DNA contains multiple units of tandem direct repeats (Maotani et al., 1986). In the present study, the difference in the copy numbers of 132 bp repeats of oncogenic and nononcogenic MDV1 DNAs in other strains of MDV1 was investigated by Southern blot hybridization. The main copy numbers in different oncogenic MDV1 strains differed: those of BC-1, JM and highly oncogenic Md5 were 3, 5 to 12 and 2, respectively. The viral DNA population with two units of repeats was small, but detectable, in cells infected with either the oncogenic BC-1 or JM strain. The MDV1 DNA in various MD cell lines contained either two units or both two and three units of repeats. The significance of the copy number of repeats in oncogenicity of MDV1 is discussed.