WorldWideScience

Sample records for water injection oil

  1. Influence of gas injection on the in-situ oil fraction of an oil-water flow in horizontal pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Wu, Y.; Chang, Y. [Key Laboratory for Hydrodynamics and Ocean Engineering, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2009-12-15

    In this work, an experimental study was made on gas injection into an oil-water flow in horizontal pipes with two unequal pipe diameters. Special attention was given to the influence of gas injection on the average in-situ oil fraction. Measurements were made for input water flow rates of 1.25-5 m{sup 3}/h, input oil flow rates of 0-8 m{sup 3}/h and input gas flow rates of 0-9 m{sup 3}/h. It was found that gas injection has a considerable influence on the in-situ oil fraction. In general, a small increase in the rate of air injection leads to greatly decreasing in-situ oil fractions. The in-situ oil fraction with gas injection decreases to a greater extent than that without gas injection, at the same input liquid flow rates. At a given input water flow rate, the value of the in-situ oil fraction in the pipe with the larger diameter is higher than that in the pipe with the smaller diameter. Furthermore, the drift flux models were extended to predict the average in-situ fractions of the oil phase in the intermittent three-phase flow regimes. A good agreement is obtained between theory and data, especially for the in-situ oil fraction range of 0.2-1.0. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Heavy oil water injection for pressure maintenance at Boscan field : a field performance evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montero, A.; Hernandez, C.; Eckerfield, L.; Gomez, P.; Brenneman, R. [PDVSA Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Petroboscan; Kumar, M.; Balasubramanian, G. [Chevron Energy Technology Co., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The Boscan field is a heavy oil field located in western Venezuela, with original oil in place (OOIP) of 35 billion barrels, and current recovery factor of approximately 4 per cent. Although the Boscan field is mostly under primary depletion, pilot projects are underway to evaluate water injection as an improved recovery mechanism. This paper presented actual field data supporting the incremental recovery from heavy oil water injection for pressure maintenance (WIPM), and described the surveillance program in place. The paper presented a geologic overview of the Boscan field and described the reservoir properties. Background of WIPM projects was also presented. WIPM performance was outlined with particular reference to field performance; reservoir pressure; production and recovery factor; and decline rate. WIPM surveillance, lessons learned, and best practices were also discussed. Several challenges remain, including being able to run reliable production logs in open hole completions and water control in open hole conditions. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  3. Managing Injected Water Composition To Improve Oil Recovery: A Case Study of North Sea Chalk Reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahid, Adeel; Shapiro, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, many core displacement experiments of oil by seawater performed on chalk rock samples have reported SO42–, Ca2+, and Mg2+ as potential determining ions for improving oil recovery. Most of these studies were carried out with outcrop chalk core plugs. The objective of this study is to investigate the potential of the advanced waterflooding process by carrying out experiments with reservoir chalk samples. The study results in a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in increasing the oil recovery with potential determining ions. We carried out waterflooding instead of spontaneous imbibition, which has been applied in most of the previous studies. Two different flooding schemes (with and without aging) were used for flooding North Sea reservoir chalk samples. For comparison, two tests were also carried out with Stevns Klint core plugs. The flooding tests were carried out with the following injecting fluids: distilled water, brine with and without sulfate, and brine containing only magnesium ions. The total oil recovery, recovery rate, and interaction mechanisms of ions with rock were studied for different injecting fluids at different temperatures and wettability conditions. Studies of the temperature dependence of the oil recovery indicated that the interaction of the ions contained in brine with the rock cannot be the only determining mechanism of enhanced recovery. We observed no substitution of Ca2+ ions with Mg2+ ions at high temperatures for both rocks. Not only the injection brine composition but also the formation water composition affected the oil recovery at high temperatures from the Stevns Klint chalk rock.

  4. Bacterial diversity in water injection systems of Brazilian offshore oil platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenblum, Elisa; Valoni, Erika; Penna, Mônica; Seldin, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Biogenic souring and microbial-influenced corrosion is a common scenario in water-flooded petroleum reservoirs. Water injection systems are continuously treated to control bacterial contamination, but some bacteria that cause souring and corrosion can persist even after different treatments have been applied. Our aim was to increase our knowledge of the bacterial communities that persist in the water injection systems of three offshore oil platforms in Brazil. To achieve this goal, we used a culture-independent molecular approach (16S ribosomal RNA gene clone libraries) to analyze seawater samples that had been subjected to different treatments. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the bacterial communities from the different platforms were taxonomically different. A predominance of bacterial clones affiliated with Gammaproteobacteria, mostly belonging to the genus Marinobacter (60.7%), were observed in the platform A samples. Clones from platform B were mainly related to the genera Colwellia (37.9%) and Achromobacter (24.6%), whereas clones obtained from platform C were all related to unclassified bacteria. Canonical correspondence analyses showed that different treatments such as chlorination, deoxygenation, and biocide addition did not significantly influence the bacterial diversity in the platforms studied. Our results demonstrated that the injection water used in secondary oil recovery procedures contained potentially hazardous bacteria, which may ultimately cause souring and corrosion. PMID:19830416

  5. Microbial analysis of backflowed injection water from a nitrate-treated North Sea oil reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bødtker, Gunhild; Lysnes, Kristine; Torsvik, Terje; Bjørnestad, Eva Ø; Sunde, Egil

    2009-03-01

    Reservoir souring in offshore oil fields is caused by hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) produced by sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), most often as a consequence of sea water injection. Biocide treatment is commonly used to inhibit SRB, but has now been replaced by nitrate treatment on several North Sea oil fields. At the Statfjord field, injection wells from one nitrate-treated reservoir and one biocide-treated reservoir were reversed (backflowed) and sampled for microbial analysis. The two reservoirs have similar properties and share the same pre-nitrate treatment history. A 16S rRNA gene-based community analysis (PCR-DGGE) combined with enrichment culture studies showed that, after 6 months of nitrate injection (0.25 mM NO(3) (-)), heterotrophic and chemolithotrophic nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) formed major populations in the nitrate-treated reservoir. The NRB community was able to utilize the same substrates as the SRB community. Compared to the biocide-treated reservoir, the microbial community in the nitrate-treated reservoir was more phylogenetically diverse and able to grow on a wider range of substrates. Enrichment culture studies showed that SRB were present in both reservoirs, but the nitrate-treated reservoir had the least diverse SRB community. Isolation and characterisation of one of the dominant populations observed during nitrate treatment (strain STF-07) showed that heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria affiliated to Terasakiella probably contributed significantly to the inhibition of SRB. PMID:19137339

  6. Effect of nitrate injection on the bacterial community in a water-oil tank system analyzed by PCR-DGGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurelevicius, Diogo; von der Weid, Irene; Korenblum, Elisa; Valoni, Erika; Penna, Mônica; Seldin, Lucy

    2008-04-01

    Sulfide production by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a major concern for the petroleum industry since it is toxic and corrosive, and causes plugging due to the formation of insoluble iron sulfides (reservoir souring). In this study, PCR followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) using two sets of primers based on the 16S rRNA gene and on the aps gene (adenosine-5-phosphosulfate reductase) was used to track changes in the total bacterial and SRB communities, respectively, present in the water-oil tank system on an offshore platform in Brazil in which nitrate treatment was applied for 2 months (15 nitrate injections). PCR-DGGE analysis of the total bacterial community showed the existence of a dominant population in the water-oil tank, and that the appearance and/or the increase of intensity of some bands in the gels were not permanently affected by the introduction of nitrate. On the other hand, the SRB community was stimulated following nitrate treatment. Moreover, sulfide production did not exceed the permissible exposure limit in the water-oil separation tank studied treated with nitrate. Therefore, controlling sulfide production by treating the produced water tank with nitrate could reduce the quantity of chemical biocides required to control microbial activities. PMID:18180965

  7. Characterization and Alteration of Wettability States of Alaskan Reserviors to Improve Oil Recovery Efficiency (including the within-scope expansion based on Cyclic Water Injection - a pulsed waterflood for Enhanced Oil Recovery)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhijit Dandekar; Shirish Patil; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31

    Numerous early reports on experimental works relating to the role of wettability in various aspects of oil recovery have been published. Early examples of laboratory waterfloods show oil recovery increasing with increasing water-wetness. This result is consistent with the intuitive notion that strong wetting preference of the rock for water and associated strong capillary-imbibition forces gives the most efficient oil displacement. This report examines the effect of wettability on waterflooding and gasflooding processes respectively. Waterflood oil recoveries were examined for the dual cases of uniform and non-uniform wetting conditions. Based on the results of the literature review on effect of wettability and oil recovery, coreflooding experiments were designed to examine the effect of changing water chemistry (salinity) on residual oil saturation. Numerous corefloods were conducted on reservoir rock material from representative formations on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The corefloods consisted of injecting water (reservoir water and ultra low-salinity ANS lake water) of different salinities in secondary as well as tertiary mode. Additionally, complete reservoir condition corefloods were also conducted using live oil. In all the tests, wettability indices, residual oil saturation, and oil recovery were measured. All results consistently lead to one conclusion; that is, a decrease in injection water salinity causes a reduction in residual oil saturation and a slight increase in water-wetness, both of which are comparable with literature observations. These observations have an intuitive appeal in that water easily imbibes into the core and displaces oil. Therefore, low-salinity waterfloods have the potential for improved oil recovery in the secondary recovery process, and ultra low-salinity ANS lake water is an attractive source of injection water or a source for diluting the high-salinity reservoir water. As part of the within-scope expansion of this project, cyclic water injection tests using high as well as low salinity were also conducted on several representative ANS core samples. These results indicate that less pore volume of water is required to recover the same amount of oil as compared with continuous water injection. Additionally, in cyclic water injection, oil is produced even during the idle time of water injection. It is understood that the injected brine front spreads/smears through the pores and displaces oil out uniformly rather than viscous fingering. The overall benefits of this project include increased oil production from existing Alaskan reservoirs. This conclusion is based on the performed experiments and results obtained on low-salinity water injection (including ANS lake water), vis-a-vis slightly altering the wetting conditions. Similarly, encouraging cyclic water-injection test results indicate that this method can help achieve residual oil saturation earlier than continuous water injection. If proved in field, this would be of great use, as more oil can be recovered through cyclic water injection for the same amount of water injected.

  8. Fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery as a potential problem for the WIPP: Proceedings of a June 1995 workshop and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M.K.

    1996-08-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a facility of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), designed and constructed for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) defense waste. The repository is sited in the New Mexico portion of the Delaware Basin, at a depth of 655 meters, in the salt beds of the Salado Formation. The WIPP is surrounded by reserves and production of potash, crude oil and natural gas. In selecting a repository site, concerns about extensive oil field development eliminated the Mescalero Plains site in Chaves County and concerns about future waterflooding in nearby oil fields helped eliminate the Alternate II site in Lea County. Ultimately, the Los Medanos site in Eddy County was selected, relying in part on the conclusion that there were no oil reserves at the site. For oil field operations, the problem of water migrating from the injection zone, through other formations such as the Salado, and onto adjacent property has long been recognized. In 1980, the DOE intended to prohibit secondary recovery by waterflooding in one mile buffer surrounding the WIPP Site. However, the DOE relinquished the right to restrict waterflooding based on a natural resources report which maintained that there was a minimal amount of crude oil likely to exist at the WIPP site, hence waterflooding adjacent to the WIPP would be unlikely. This document presents the workshop presentations and analyses for the fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery utilizing fluid injection and their potential effects on the WIPP facility.

  9. Fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery as a potential problem for the WIPP: Proceedings of a June 1995 workshop and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a facility of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), designed and constructed for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) defense waste. The repository is sited in the New Mexico portion of the Delaware Basin, at a depth of 655 meters, in the salt beds of the Salado Formation. The WIPP is surrounded by reserves and production of potash, crude oil and natural gas. In selecting a repository site, concerns about extensive oil field development eliminated the Mescalero Plains site in Chaves County and concerns about future waterflooding in nearby oil fields helped eliminate the Alternate II site in Lea County. Ultimately, the Los Medanos site in Eddy County was selected, relying in part on the conclusion that there were no oil reserves at the site. For oil field operations, the problem of water migrating from the injection zone, through other formations such as the Salado, and onto adjacent property has long been recognized. In 1980, the DOE intended to prohibit secondary recovery by waterflooding in one mile buffer surrounding the WIPP Site. However, the DOE relinquished the right to restrict waterflooding based on a natural resources report which maintained that there was a minimal amount of crude oil likely to exist at the WIPP site, hence waterflooding adjacent to the WIPP would be unlikely. This document presents the workshop presentations and analyses for the fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery utilizing fluid injection and their potential effects on the WIPP facility

  10. Water Injected Turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Shouse, D. T.; Roquemore, W. M.

    2005-01-01

    From antiquity, water has been a source of cooling, lubrication, and power for energy transfer devices. More recent applications in gas turbines demonstrate an added facet, emissions control. Fogging gas turbine inlets or direct injection of water into gas turbine combustors, decreases NOx and increases power. Herein we demonstrate that injection of water into the air upstream of the combustor reduces NOx by factors up to three in a natural gas fueled Trapped Vortex Combustor (TVC) and up to two in a liquid JP-8 fueled (TVC) for a range in water/fuel and fuel/air ratios.

  11. Injection Design for Simultaneous Enhanced Oil Recovery and Carbon Storage in a Heavy Oil Reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Sobers, Lorraine Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    We have identified a CO2 and water injection strategy to recover moderately heavy oil and store carbon dioxide (CO2) simultaneously. We propose the use of counter-current injection of gas and water to improve reservoir sweep and trap CO2; water is injected in the upper portion of the reservoir and gas is injected in the lower portion. This process is referred to as water over gas injection or modified simultaneous water alternating gas injection (SWAG). This thesis is based on ...

  12. Cold water injection nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To inject cold water in a reactor without applying heat cycles to a reactor container and to the inner wall of a feedwater nozzle by securing a perforated plate at the outlet of the cold water injection nozzle. Constitution: A disc-like cap is secured to the final end of a return nozzle of a control rod drive. The cap prevents the flow of a high temperature water flowing downward in the reactor from entering into the nozzle. The cap is perforated with a plurality of bore holes for injecting cold water into the reactor. The cap is made to about 100 mm in thickness so that the cold water passing through the bore holes is heated by the heat conduction in the cap. Accordingly, the flow of high temperature water flowing downwardly in the reactor is inhibited by the cap from backward flowing into the nozzle. Moreover, the flow of the cold water in the nozzle is controlled and rectified when passed through the bore holes in the cap and then injected into the reactor. (Yoshino, Y.)

  13. Methodology for the quantification of the uncertainty associated in the prediction of the production behavior of a highly heterogeneous oil field, subject to water injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on an integrated methodology for the prediction of the production behavior of a highly heterogeneous oil field subject to water injection, quantifying the related uncertainty in both, the stratigraphical reference framework and the petrophysical model. The proposed methodology involves the evaluation of the related uncertainty through hierarchical classification and the selection of the geostatistically generated models corresponding to the P1O P50 and P90 quantiles, based on a variable indicating the behavior of the parameter to be evaluated. In the evaluation of the uncertainty related to the stratigraphical reference framework, the percentage of interconnected oil field was used as a hierarchy definition parameter. The sweeping volumetric efficiency at a certain time, as obtained from the flight time of the streamline simulation, was used as the hierarchical classification variable for petrophysical models. This paper shows the application of the proposed methodology to a real case. The example is carried out within a pilot project at the La Cira Field, which includes three productive wells and nine injecting wells, making up three injection-production patterns. Results show the potential of the proposed technique in the case of an oil field like this one, in which a complex distribution of flow channels has been conformed due to fluvial deposits, thus discouraging supervision and prediction of the oil field's behsion and prediction of the oil field's behavior

  14. Gas injection may have triggered earthquakes in the Cogdell oil field, Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Wei; Frohlich, Cliff

    2013-01-01

    Between 2006 and 2011 a series of earthquakes occurred in the Cogdell oil field near Snyder, TX. A previous series of earthquakes occurring 1975–1982 was attributed to the injection of water into wells to enhance oil production. We evaluated injection and extraction of oil, water, and gas in the Cogdell field. Water injection cannot explain the 2006–2011 earthquakes. However, since 2004 significant volumes of gas including CO2 have been injected into Cogdell wells. If this triggered the 2...

  15. Water injection dredging:

    OpenAIRE

    Verhagen , H.J.

    2000-01-01

    Some twenty years ago WIS-dredging has been developed in the Netherlands. By injecting water into the mud layer, the water content of the mud becomes higher, it becomes fluid mud and will start to flow. The advantages of this system are that there is no need of transporting the mud in a hopper, and no need for a pipeline. Also from an energetic point of view the solution is attractive. The system requires however a different way of payment. Most efficient is a maintenance contract with a dred...

  16. Oil injection into the blast furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongsheng Liao; Mannila, P.; Haerkki, J.

    1997-12-31

    Fuel injection techniques have been extensively used in the commercial blast furnaces, a number of publications concerning the fuels injection have been reported. This present report only summarizes the study achievements of oil injection due to the research need the of authors, it includes the following parts: First, the background and the reasons reducing coke rate of oil injection are analyzed. Reducing coke rate and decreasing the ironmaking costs are the main deriving forces, the contents of C, H and ash are direct reasons reducing coke rate. It was also found that oil injection had great effects on the state of blast furnace, it made operation stable, center gas flow develop fully, pressure drop increase, descent speed of burden materials decrease and generation of thermal stagnation phenomena, the quality of iron was improved. Based on these effects, as an ideal mean, oil injection was often used to adjust the state of blast furnace. Secondly, combustion behavior of oil in the raceway and tuyere are discussed. The distribution of gas content was greatly changed, the location of CO, H{sub 2} generation was near the tuyere; the temperature peak shifts from near the raceway boundary to the tuyere. Oxygen concentration and blast velocity were two important factors, it was found that increasing excess oxygen ratio 0.9 to 1.3, the combustion time of oil decreases 0.5 msec, an increase of the blast velocity results in increasing the flame length. In addition, the nozzle position and oil rate had large effects on the combustion of oil. Based on these results, the limit of oil injection is also discussed, soot formation is the main reason limiting to further increase oil injection rate, it was viewed that there were three types of soot which were generated under blast furnace operating conditions. The reason generating soot is the incomplete conversion of the fuel. Finally, three methods improving combustion of oil in the raceway are given: Improvement of oil atomization, increased blast temperature and oxygen and injection of reducing gases into the bosh zone. (orig.) 25 refs.

  17. Water issues associated with heavy oil production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-28

    Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

  18. Influence of Gamma Radiation on the Treatment of Sulfate Reducing Bacteria in the Injection Water Used for the Enhanced Oil Recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The counts of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in the water samples collected from the well head (formation water) and outlet of petroleum treatment plant (Produced water) in a petroleum field in middle delta- Egypt were determined. The data showed a low count of (SRB) in the collected formation water sample and there was an obvious increase in the bacterial counts which appeared in the produced water, that may reveal that the presence of appropriate conditions for the growth of (SRB) in the closed system in treatment plant. Two scale inhibitors were tested through jar test, the scale inhibitor I had maximum efficiency at 20 ppm, two SRB biocides were screened for their bactericidal activities. It was found that the biocides A was slightly superior in respect to the antibacterial efficacy compared to B in presence of 20 ppm scale inhibitor. These biocides were test for the study of the combined treatment with gamma radiation to maximize the efficiency on sulfate reducing bacteria using the minimum effective dose of both radiation and biocides to eliminate the negative impacts of the chemicals used and the radiation applied. The results demonstrated that, the lethal doses of biocides were (300 ppm) of biocides A or (400 ppm) of biocides B at 1 kGy irradiation dose. The treated produced water was evaluated in respect of enhanced oil recovery, the data showed increase of the recovery capacity by the irradiation and chemical treatment. This technology could be used for the water that are injected into reservoirs, and suitable for oil field and pipeline operators, and presented a viable bacteria control method

  19. Geochemical effects of CO2 injection on produced water chemistry at an enhanced oil recovery site in the Permian Basin of northwest Texas, USA: Preliminary geochemical and Li isotope results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, S.; Gardiner, J.; Phan, T. T.; Macpherson, G. L.; Diehl, J. R.; Lopano, C. L.; Stewart, B. W.; Capo, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Injection of supercritical CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) presents an opportunity to evaluate the effects of CO2 on reservoir properties and formation waters during geologic carbon sequestration. Produced water from oil wells tapping a carbonate-hosted reservoir at an active EOR site in the Permian Basin of Texas both before and after injection were sampled to evaluate geochemical and isotopic changes associated with water-rock-CO2 interaction. Produced waters from the carbonate reservoir rock are Na-Cl brines with TDS levels of 16.5-34 g/L and detectable H2S. These brines are potentially diluted with shallow groundwater from earlier EOR water flooding. Initial lithium isotope data (?7Li) from pre-injection produced water in the EOR field fall within the range of Gulf of Mexico Coastal sedimentary basin and Appalachian basin values (Macpherson et al., 2014, Geofluids, doi: 10.1111/gfl.12084). Pre-injection produced water 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70788-0.70795) are consistent with mid-late Permian seawater/carbonate. CO2 injection took place in October 2013, and four of the wells sampled in May 2014 showed CO2 breakthrough. Preliminary comparison of pre- and post-injection produced waters indicates no significant changes in the major inorganic constituents following breakthrough, other than a possible drop in K concentration. Trace element and isotope data from pre- and post-breakthrough wells are currently being evaluated and will be presented.

  20. Water-cooled insulated steam-injection wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, L. H.; Jaffe, L. D.

    1980-01-01

    Water is used as insulated coolant and heat-transfer medium for steam-injection oil wells. Approach is somewhat analogous to cooling system in liquid-propellant rocket. In addition to trapping and delivering heat to steam-injection point, water will also keep casing cooler, preventing or reducing casing failures caused by thermal stresses.

  1. Enhanced oil recovery: air injection in a Potiguar basin light oil reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Alexandre J. M.; Campagnolo, Eugenio A.; Teixeira, Pedro W. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    2000-07-01

    The feasibility of air injection, at reservoir temperature and pressure, is studied with a view towards enhanced oil recovery from the Potiguar Basin (Brazil). The aim is to inject air in such a way that almost all oxygen is consumed and the residual gas, basically nitrogen, displaces the oil. In this work, the reactivity of crude oil samples is studied at conditions of Low Temperature Oxidation (LTO). As a first step, the kinetic and equilibrium properties are measured using a variable volume PVT glass equilibrium cell, which enabled to simultaneously observe the sample and measure the reaction rates and phase compositions, needed for estimating oxygen consumption. Different strategies are then studied for enhanced recovery by water and air injection, using a commercial reservoir simulator for thermal processes. The results show that it was possible to delineate an optimum strategy for LTO recovery of light crude oils. (author)

  2. Enhanced oil recovery: air injection in a Potiguar basin light oil reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of air injection, at reservoir temperature and pressure, is studied with a view towards enhanced oil recovery from the Potiguar Basin (Brazil). The aim is to inject air in such a way that almost all oxygen is consumed and the residual gas, basically nitrogen, displaces the oil. In this work, the reactivity of crude oil samples is studied at conditions of Low Temperature Oxidation (LTO). As a first step, the kinetic and equilibrium properties are measured using a variable volume PVT glass equilibrium cell, which enabled to simultaneously observe the sample and measure the reaction rates and phase compositions, needed for estimating oxygen consumption. Different strategies are then studied for enhanced recovery by water and air injection, using a commercial reservoir simulator for thermal processes. The results show that it was possible to delineate an optimum strategy for LTO recovery of light crude oils. (author)

  3. Bye-bye forms 17 and 17A : Pedigree salt water injection monitoring partners with ND Oil and Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, A. [Pedigree Technologies, Fargo, ND (United States)

    2010-07-01

    North Dakota-based Pedigree Technologies is a leading provider of web-based M2M applications for fleet, asset and supply chain management. This presentation described their simple web-based system which helps companies track, locate, monitor and control their fixed and mobile assets and equipment. It highlighted a typical class 2 injection well problem regarding compliance issues for saltwater injection well equipment. The solution was a cost-effective web-enabled remote monitoring system that activates alarms for equipment health conditions and reporting for compliance needs all in one system. In particular, the system replaces manual data entry of Forms 17 and 17A with automated remote monitoring and reporting. It allows real time access to alarms and trends of injection data. The solar powered monitoring system measures flow rate, pipe pressure and annulus pressure. It provides automated hourly readings and cellular communication. In addition to increasing process efficiency, the system decreases the costs of manual data collection at injection sites. tabs., figs.

  4. Measuring and Modeling the Displacement of Connate Water in Chalk Core Plugs during Water Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbech, Uffe C C; Aage, Helle Karina

    2006-01-01

    The movement of connate water spiked with gamma emitting 22Na was studied during laboratory water flooding of oil saturated chalk from a North Sea oil reservoir. Using a one dimensional gamma monitoring technique is was observed that connate water is piled-up at the front of the injection water and forms a mixed water bank with almost 100% connate water in the front behind which a gradual transition to pure injection water occurs. This result underpins log interpretations from waterflooded chalk reservoirs. An ad hoc model was set up by use of the results, and the process was examined theoretically at a larger scale.

  5. Acetate Production from Oil under Sulfate-Reducing Conditions in Bioreactors Injected with Sulfate and Nitrate

    OpenAIRE

    Callbeck, Cameron M.; Agrawal, Akhil; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2013-01-01

    Oil production by water injection can cause souring in which sulfate in the injection water is reduced to sulfide by resident sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Sulfate (2 mM) in medium injected at a rate of 1 pore volume per day into upflow bioreactors containing residual heavy oil from the Medicine Hat Glauconitic C field was nearly completely reduced to sulfide, and this was associated with the generation of 3 to 4 mM acetate. Inclusion of 4 mM nitrate inhibited souring for 60 days, after wh...

  6. Intramuscular injection of "site enhancement oil": forensic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Maria Louise; Colville-Ebeling, Bonnie; Jensen, Thomas Hartvig Lindkær; Hougen, Hans Petter

    2015-06-01

    The use of intramuscular injection of foreign substances for aesthetic purposes is well known. Complications are usually local to the site of injection but can be potentially lethal. Here, we present a case of "site enhancement oil" use in a 42-year-old man who died from asphyxia due to hanging. Macroscopic and microscopic changes as well as computed tomographic changes in injected musculature are described and the potentially lethal adverse effects after site enhancement oil use are warranted. PMID:25951411

  7. Injected Water Augments Cooling In Turboshaft Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Berger, Brett; Klann, Gary A.; Clark, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes experiments in which water injected into compressor-bleed cooling air of aircraft turboshaft engine. Injection of water previously suggested as way to provide additional cooling needed to sustain operation at power levels higher than usual. Involves turbine-inlet temperatures high enough to shorten lives of first-stage high-pressure turbine blades. Latent heat of vaporization of injected water serves as additional heat sink to maintain blades at design operating temperatures during high-power operation.

  8. Produced water management - clean and safe oil and gas production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference contains 22 presentations on topics within pollution sources and abatement, discharge reductions, water analysis and monitoring, water production, treatment and injection, enhanced recovery, condensate water, produced water markets, separation technologies for oil/gas/condensate and water, oil removal from solids, environmental risks of oil and gas production and environmental impacts on ecosystems and fisheries. Some oil field case histories are presented. The main focus is on the northern areas such as the North Sea, the north Atlantic Ocean and the Barents Sea, and technological aspects (tk)

  9. Produced water management - clean and safe oil and gas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The conference contains 22 presentations on topics within pollution sources and abatement, discharge reductions, water analysis and monitoring, water production, treatment and injection, enhanced recovery, condensate water, produced water markets, separation technologies for oil/gas/condensate and water, oil removal from solids, environmental risks of oil and gas production and environmental impacts on ecosystems and fisheries. Some oil field case histories are presented. The main focus is on the northern areas such as the North Sea, the north Atlantic Ocean and the Barents Sea, and technological aspects (tk)

  10. The Hot Water Oil Expulsion Technique for Geothermal Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhong Wang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of Chinese petroleum industry, Oil production way of burning crude oil to produce steam need change. Heavy oil reservoir with thin layer or edgewater is unsuitable thermal recovery, electric heating leads to considerable electrical consumption, low injection water temperature decreases reservoir temperature and increased crude oil viscosity. The prolonged temperature difference break up reservoir pore throat cement and framework minerals. To improve high-capacity channel communication, we proposed geothermal oil recovery. Broad-sense abundant geothermal resources and existing injection water technique equipment are used, deep-seated high temperature liquid (oil-gas-water mixture draws geothermal warming flowing layer to transit heat upward, decreases viscidity and increases fluidity. Reservoir temperature different offer geothermal fountain. Practicability process is analyzed. statistics and reservoir temperature variation analysis of Gudong Oilfield, Shengli Oilfield Company, SINOPEC, we have designed flow-chart concept for geothermal oil recovery, suggested drilling multi-branch well in heavy oil reservoir as injection-well, at the same position of geothermal fountain well, using free-pressure pump to inject hot liquid directly to aimed oil layer, made oil recovery in surrounding wells. It is proposed that geothermal oil recovery forerunner test should be first conducted in favorable blocks.

  11. Downhole oil-water separation - the `HYDROSEP`

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checknita, L. [Centrilift, Div. of Baker Hughes Canada Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1999-12-01

    The paper outlines in a display format: downhole separation, the Hydrosep, candidate well selection, field installation options, case histories, current situation/options, and a summary. In-situ separation allows the well to produce a concentrated oil stream to the surface while simultaneously injecting clean water into the same borehole. Separation is carried out downhole because of lower lifting costs, increased ultimate recovery, reduced capital spending, extended economic life of wells and fields, environmental compatibility, and marginal discoveries become profitable. The Hydrosep is a downhole oil-water separator that combines Baker Hughes Process Systems high performance Vortoil hydrocyclones with Centrilift`s proven downhole pump systems and Baker Oil Tool`s market-leading completion technologies. The mandatory well selection characteristics are: an injection zone available in the well, high water cut production, and a casing size of 140 mm or bigger. Favorable characteristics include: high water lifting costs, high water handling/disposal costs, and high pump intake pressure due to a production bottleneck. Field installation options include: single or dual pumps, injection to lower or higher zones, single or two stage hydrocyclone geometry, gas well dewatering, and cross-flooding. Some cases histories are covered including: Byron/Garland, Wyoming, Handsworth/Saskatchewan, and Bashaw, Alberta. The downhole separator lowers lifting costs, increases ultimate recovery, reduces capital expenditure, extends the economic life of the well and fields, is environmental friendly, and makes marginal discoveries profitable.

  12. The Hot Water Oil Expulsion Technique for Geothermal Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Xuezhong Wang

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid development of Chinese petroleum industry, Oil production way of burning crude oil to produce steam need change. Heavy oil reservoir with thin layer or edgewater is unsuitable thermal recovery, electric heating leads to considerable electrical consumption, low injection water temperature decreases reservoir temperature and increased crude oil viscosity. The prolonged temperature difference break up reservoir pore throat cement and framework minerals. To improve high-capacity ch...

  13. Injection of heavy fuel oil into the blast furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paloposki, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland); Hakala, J.; Mannila, P.; Laukkanen, J. [Oulu Univ. (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    This study deals with the injection and combustion of heavy fuel oil in blast furnaces. The injection of the oil was studied experimentally in a small-scale test rig. The combustion of the oil was analysed with a commercial computer program for flow and combustion simulations. Results from computer simulations show that the combustion of the oil can be improved by decreasing the size of the oil drops and by enhancing the mixing between the oil drops and the hot blast. The devolatilization rate of the oil mainly depends on the size of the oil drops. The combustion rate of the volatiles mainly depends on the effectiveness of turbulent mixing with combustion air. Methods to decrease the size of the oil drops were sought in the experimental part of the study. Experimental results show that the size of the oil drops increases with increasing mass flow rate of the oil and decreases with increasing velocity of the hot blast. Methods to improve the mixing between the oil drops and the hot blast are suggested but have not yet been experimentally tested. (author) (4 refs.)

  14. Homogenous steam injection technology in heavy oil horizontal wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, S.G.; Guan, Z.; Guo, Y.; Wang, X.R. [PetroChina Liaohe Oilfield Inst. of Drilling and Production Technology, Liaohe (China)

    2009-07-01

    This paper described dual string steam injection and multipoint steam injection technologies developed for heavy oil horizontal wells. The technologies were designed using a dynamic analysis system that calculated the force distribution in the steamed wellbore, as well as the dryness fraction distribution and eyehole size. The dual string steam injection technology used a 1.9 inch integral joint tubing with a 4.5 inch vacuum heat insulated tubing string that could selectively inject into a well via a minor annulus from the heel to the toe. The technology dynamically regulates 2-point steam proportions at the well head. The multipoint steam injection technology uses several steam valves according to test curves and analyses of surrounding conditions. Both technologies form part of an overall homogenous steam injection technology currently being tested at the Liaohe Oilfield in China. It was concluded that use of the technologies has enhanced productivity in heavy oil horizontal wells. 5 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  15. Oil and rising water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middle Eastern oil producers have an obligation to future generations to tackle the causes of global warming. In the Middle East, we have a special need to pay attention to these warnings. As many of the countries of the region are low-lying and short of water, we are under threat from rising sea levels and desertification. Earlier this year the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change concluded that by the end of this century sea levels could rise by as much as 88 centimetres. This could flood not only coastal areas of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), but also much of the heavily populated Nile Delta in Egypt and the lower reaches of the Tigris and Euphrates river system in Iraq

  16. Oil production and water management in Oman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the development of integrated (production) water management in Petroleum Development Oman. In its existing oil fields the water cut is rising rapidly and water production is expected to increase two to three times in the next 15 years. Re-injection of production water will continue to account for less than half of the volume of co-produced water. Current subsurface disposal of production water to shallow Tertiary formations is based on thorough knowledge of the local hydrogeology and does not affect potable water resources. However, in view of the expected increase in production water volume, utilization and disposal options have been re-evaluated. This review has been facilitated by recently acquired data on production water quality and by the results of research in dehydration and de-oiling technologies and of tests with production chemicals. The combined knowledge base is used to arrive at water management strategies for individual oil fields that are sound both in principle and in practice

  17. Investigation of cyclic solvent injection process for heavy oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivory, J.; Chang, J.; Coates, R.; Forshner, K. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Numerical and experimental studies of a cyclic solvent injection (CSI) process were presented. The study formed part of a larger research program investigating the use of solvents as a follow-up process in Cold Lake and Lloydminster reservoirs pressure-depleted using cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS). The CSI process consisted of a primary production process followed by 6 solvent injection cycles using 28 per cent propane and 72 per cent carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Results of the experiments demonstrated a recovery rate of 50 per cent using the CSI process. A numerical model was developed to represent the physical characteristics of the experiments. Non-equilibrium rate equations were used to simulate the delay in the solvent reaching equilibrium concentration as it dissolved or exsolved in the oil in response to pressure and gas phase composition changes. A history match of the primary production portion of the experiment was then obtained using a foamy oil model. The history match was used validate the numerical model of the CSI process. The study showed that the quantity of gas injected in an injection period was insensitive to oil phase diffusion coefficients, but sensitive to solvent solubility in oil, dissolution rates and gas phase relative permeability. It was concluded that gas injections are also sensitive to molar densities in the oil phase and capillary pressure. 20 refs., 40 figs.

  18. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition with Water Injection

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Magnus; Johansson, Bengt

    1999-01-01

    The use of water injection in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine was experimentally investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine whether it is possible to control the ignition timing and slow down the rate of combustion with the use of water injection. The effects of different water flows, air/fuel ratios and inlet pressures were studied for three different fuels, iso-octane, ethanol and natural gas. It is possible to control the ignition timing in a narr...

  19. Oil, Water and Chocolate Mousse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chocolate mousse is a name given to a particular combination of oil and water that sometimes forms when oil is spilled. This publication provides information on oil spills, how to prevent them, and how to clean them up. Topics include the properties of crude and refined petroleum, issues with tankers and transporting oil by ship, preparedness, and response. There is also an experiment in which students try cleaning up a simulated oil spill, using different sorbent materials, and discover why it is such a difficult task. Links to a glossary are embedded in the text. A French translation is available.

  20. THAI : Toe to Heel Air Injection : a revolutionary heavy oil and oil sands in-situ recovery technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomer, C. [Petrobank Energy and Resources Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Orion Oil Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    This paper reviews the evolution of an in-situ recovery method for heavy oil and oil sands called toe-to-heel air injection (THAI). THAI is an integrated horizontal well process for in situ recovery and upgrading of heavy oil and bitumen. It uses both a vertical injection well and a horizontal producer well. The process was developed in 1993 at the University of Bath, in the United Kingdom and has been patented in the United States, Canada, Venezuela and the United Kingdom. Successful field scale runs have been conducted and an application has been submitted to the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board for an experimental pilot test to be performed in 2004 at the Whitesands pilot project site near Fort McMurray. The key pilot experimental parameters will include: oil, water and gas production rates; quality of the produced oil; effectiveness of produced gas lift; production temperatures; quality of the produced water; and, composition of the produced gas. The THAI process has many advantages over the steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) process, including: minimal quantities of fresh water are needed; minimal quantities of natural gas are consumed; 85 per cent less water is produced; recovered heat can be used for electricity generation; the use of upgraded oil eliminates the need for diluent; 50 per cent less carbon dioxide emissions; and, a higher resource recovery rate. 3 tabs., 13 figs.

  1. High permeability heavy oil reservoir nitrogen injection EOR research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaodong; Wang, Yining; Wang, Ruihe; Han, Guoqing; An, Yongsheng

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen chemically very unreactive under normal showed great inertia. It is difficult to burn , dry, non-explosive , non-toxic , non-corrosive , and thus the use of safe and reliable. Coefficient of variation of nitrogen increases with increasing pressure , less affected by temperature . Under the same conditions, the ratio of the nitrogen gas formation volume factor carbon dioxide gas is high, about three times the carbon dioxide , the greater the elastic expansion of nitrogen play a beneficial role in flooding . EOR project trends increase the number of oil and gas injection gas injection from the calendar view, carbon dioxide miscible flooding gas injection EOR is the focus of the flue gas project currently has less to carry , nitrogen flooding is still subject to considerable attention. Note the nitrogen requirements of the basic conditions for enhanced oil recovery from major tectonic conditions , reservoir properties of crude nature of the gas injection timing and other aspects to consider , for different reservoir injected in different ways. Oilfield against a thick , high permeability and other characteristics, to improve oil recovery by injecting nitrogen indoor experiments conducted nitrogen injection process factors and supporting technical studies ; and introduced the field of nitrogen injection EOR field test conditions .

  2. Acetate production from oil under sulfate-reducing conditions in bioreactors injected with sulfate and nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callbeck, Cameron M; Agrawal, Akhil; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2013-08-01

    Oil production by water injection can cause souring in which sulfate in the injection water is reduced to sulfide by resident sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Sulfate (2 mM) in medium injected at a rate of 1 pore volume per day into upflow bioreactors containing residual heavy oil from the Medicine Hat Glauconitic C field was nearly completely reduced to sulfide, and this was associated with the generation of 3 to 4 mM acetate. Inclusion of 4 mM nitrate inhibited souring for 60 days, after which complete sulfate reduction and associated acetate production were once again observed. Sulfate reduction was permanently inhibited when 100 mM nitrate was injected by the nitrite formed under these conditions. Pulsed injection of 4 or 100 mM nitrate inhibited sulfate reduction temporarily. Sulfate reduction resumed once nitrate injection was stopped and was associated with the production of acetate in all cases. The stoichiometry of acetate formation (3 to 4 mM formed per 2 mM sulfate reduced) is consistent with a mechanism in which oil alkanes and water are metabolized to acetate and hydrogen by fermentative and syntrophic bacteria (K. Zengler et al., Nature 401:266-269, 1999), with the hydrogen being used by SRB to reduce sulfate to sulfide. In support of this model, microbial community analyses by pyrosequencing indicated SRB of the genus Desulfovibrio, which use hydrogen but not acetate as an electron donor for sulfate reduction, to be a major community component. The model explains the high concentrations of acetate that are sometimes found in waters produced from water-injected oil fields. PMID:23770914

  3. Radial oil injection applied to main engine bearings: evaluation of injection control rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estupiñan, EA; Santos, Ilmar

    2012-01-01

    The performance of main bearings in a combustion engine affects key functions such as durability, noise and vibration. Thus, with the aim of reducing friction losses and vibrations between the crankshaft and the bearings, the work reported here evaluates different strategies for applying controllable radial oil injection to main crankshaft journal bearings. In an actively lubricated bearing, conventional hydrodynamic lubrication is combined with controllable hydrostatic lubrication, where the oil injection pressures can be modified depending on the operational conditions. In this study, the dynamic behaviour of the main bearing of a medium-size engine is theoretically analysed when the engine operates with controllable radial oil injection and four different injection control rules. The theoretical investigation is based on a single-cylinder combustion engine model. The performance of the actively lubricated bearing is compared with the performance of the conventional lubricated bearing, giving some insights into the minimum fluid film thickness, maximum fluid film pressure, friction losses and maximum vibration levels.

  4. Heavy-oil recovery in naturally fractured reservoirs with varying wettability by steam solvent co-injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Bahlani, A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Babadagli, T. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Canadian Section, Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Steam injection may not be an efficient oil recovery process in certain circumstances, such as in deep reservoirs, where steam injection may be ineffective because of hot-water flooding due to excessive heat loss. Steam injection may also be ineffective in oil-wet fractured carbonates, where steam channels through fracture zones without effectively sweeping the matrix oil. Steam flooding is one of the many solutions for heavy oil recovery in unconsolidated sandstones that is in commercial production. However, heavy-oil fractured carbonates are more challenging, where the recovery is generally limited only to matrix oil drainage gravity due to unfavorable wettability or thermal expansion if heat is introduced during the process. This paper proposed a new approach to improve steam/hot-water injection and efficiency for heavy-oil fractured carbonate reservoirs. The paper provided background information on oil recovery from fractured carbonates and provided a statement of the problem. Three phases were described, including steam/hot-waterflooding phase (spontaneous imbibition); miscible flooding phase (diffusion); and steam/hot-waterflooding phase (spontaneous imbibition or solvent retention). The paper also discussed core preparation and saturation procedures. It was concluded that efficient oil recovery is possible using alternate injection of steam/hot water and solvent. 43 refs., 1 tab., 13 figs.

  5. Flow improvers for water injection based on surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oskarsson, H.; Uneback, I.; Hellsten, M.

    2006-03-15

    In many cases it is desirable to increase the flow of injection water when an oil well deteriorates. It is very costly in offshore operation to lay down an additional water pipe to the injection site. Flow improvers for the injection water will thus be the most cost-effective way to increase the flow rate. During the last years water-soluble polymers have also been applied for this purpose. These drag-reducing polymers are however only slowly biodegraded which has been an incentive for the development of readily biodegradable surfactants as flow improvers for injection water. A combination of a zwitterionic and an anionic surfactant has been tested in a 5.5 inch, 700 m long flow loop containing sulphate brine with salinity similar to sea water. A drag reduction between 75 and 80% was achieved with 119 ppm in solution of the surfactant blend at an average velocity of 1.9 m/s and between 50 and 55% at 2.9 m/s. The surfactants in this formulation were also found to be readily biodegradable in sea water and low bio accumulating which means they have an improved environmental profile compared to the polymers used today. Due to the self-healing properties of the drag-reducing structures formed by surfactants, these may be added before the pump section - contrary to polymers which are permanently destroyed by high shear forces. (Author)

  6. Steam injection and enhanced bioremediation of heavy fuel oil contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steam injection has been shown to be successful in remediating sites impacted by heavy fuel oils. Field demonstrations at both pilot and full scale have removed No. 2 diesel fuel and Navy Special Fuel Oil (No. 5 fuel oil) from impacted soils. Removal mechanisms include enhanced volatilization of vapor- and adsorbed-phase contaminants and enhanced mobility due to decreased viscosity and associated residual saturation of separate- and adsorbed-phase contaminants. Laboratory studies have shown that indigenous biologic populations are significantly reduced, but are not eliminated by steam injection operations. Populations were readily reestablished by augmentation with nutrients. This suggests that biodegradation enhanced by warm, moist, oxygenated environments can be expected to further reduce concentrations of contaminants following cessation of steam injection operations

  7. Water conservation and allocation guideline for oilfield injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper was prepared as a guide for regulatory agencies and developers using non-saline water sources in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) schemes. A systems approach was used to achieve specific environmental outcomes that adhered to the Water Conservation and Allocation Policy for Oilfield Injection. The guide was applicable to licence renewal applications for projects operating and licensed to use non-saline water resources, as well as new licence applications for oilfield injection use. The guide provided recommended water conservation practices and application requirements, and outlined regulatory procedures and steps for obtaining a Water Act licence. The guideline was prepared to eliminate the use of non-saline water in EOR projects where feasible alternatives existed, as well as to identify areas with water shortages and reduce the use of non-saline water. The guide included monitoring and reporting requirements to improve the evaluation of water use practices and outlined current initiatives to address water conservation and research. It was concluded that outcomes from the program will include reliable quality water supplies for a sustainable economy, healthy aquatic ecosystems, and safe, secure drinking water supplies for Albertans. 3 tabs., 5 figs

  8. Effects of nitrate injection on microbial enhanced oil recovery and oilfield reservoir souring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Marcio Luis Busi; Soares, Hugo Moreira; Furigo, Agenor; Schmidell, Willibaldo; Corseuil, Henry Xavier

    2014-11-01

    Column experiments were utilized to investigate the effects of nitrate injection on sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) inhibition and microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). An indigenous microbial consortium collected from the produced water of a Brazilian offshore field was used as inoculum. The presence of 150 mg/L volatile fatty acids (VFA´s) in the injection water contributed to a high biological electron acceptors demand and the establishment of anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions. Continuous injection of nitrate (up to 25 mg/L) for 90 days did not inhibit souring. Contrariwise, in nitrogen-limiting conditions, the addition of nitrate stimulated the proliferation of ?-Proteobacteria (including SRB) and the associated sulfide concentration. Denitrification-specific nirK or nirS genes were not detected. A sharp decrease in water interfacial tension (from 20.8 to 14.5 mN/m) observed concomitantly with nitrate consumption and increased oil recovery (4.3 % v/v) demonstrated the benefits of nitrate injection on MEOR. Overall, the results support the notion that the addition of nitrate, at this particular oil reservoir, can benefit MEOR by stimulating the proliferation of fortuitous biosurfactant-producing bacteria. Higher nitrate concentrations exceeding the stoichiometric volatile fatty acid (VFA) biodegradation demands and/or the use of alternative biogenic souring control strategies may be necessary to warrant effective SRB inhibition down gradient from the injection wells. PMID:25149457

  9. Downhole cuttings injection allows use of oil-base muds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that of the potential methods for handling oily drill cuttings, the most attractive is their injection downhole. This approach, which has been used by BP on its Gyda platform in the North Sea where stringent new environmental regulations are expected, will enable operators to enjoy the economic advantages of using oil-based muds. The discharge of oil-based-mud-contaminated cuttings form offshore drilling operations has a significant, though localized, environmental impact. This is despite the change from diesel-based fluids to less toxic, low aromatic, base oils which occurred in the late 1970s

  10. Dynamical behavior of rapeseed oil and methyl ester of rapeseed oil during high-pressure injection

    OpenAIRE

    Bambuleac Dumitru

    2012-01-01

    Fuels’ physical properties such as density, viscosity, speed of sound and bulk modulus have and important influence on the engine performance. This work will study the behavior of the rapeseed oil and methyl ester of rapeseed oil during high-pressure injection. Several aspects of the injection and combustion process will be analyzed in order to try to find out in what manner these aspects are influenced by the above-mentioned fuels’ characteristics and also by different operating regimes....

  11. Water treatment processes for oilfield steam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon, A.; Pauley, J.C. [Chevron Canada Ltd., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Various water treatment processes are used within the oilfield industry. Processes tend to be common within one region of the world, but different between regions due to untreated water characteristics and treated water quality requirements. This paper summarized Chevron's view of water treatment requirements and processes for oilfield steam injection. It identified water treatment systems that have been used at thermal projects, where they are most commonly utilized, their purpose, and the limits of each process. The advantages and disadvantages of different water treatment systems were also reviewed. The paper focused on the treatment of fresh waters, low-TDS produced waters, high-hardness waters, and high-silica produced waters. Challenges and opportunities were also identified. It was concluded that the challenges created by high-silica, or by high-hardness produced waters lead to more costly processes. 25 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs.

  12. Evaluating oil/water separators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four commercially available oil/water separators were tested at an oil refinery test facility. The separators were the Alfa-Laval OFPX 413 disk-stack centrifuge, the Conoco Vortoil hydrocyclone system, International Separation Technology's Intr-Septor 250, and a modified Flo Trend gravity separator. Each machine was tested against mixtures of salt water and crude oil, and mixtures of salt water and a water-in-oil emulsion. The impact on separator performance from simulated sea motion, and from the addition of emulsion breakers and debris to the influent, were also evaluated. The test equipment, instrumentation, analysis facilities, test plans, and procedures to conduct the tests are described, but test results are not reported. Recommendations for improved test procedures are included. The inability to accurately monitor flow rates was found to have the greatest negative impact on test performance and results. Aspects of the test program that worked well included the use of flexible and semi-rigid hoses for customizing the test setups, the use of modular and leased tanks, and the sea motion simulator swing table design. 3 refs., 2 tabs

  13. HPLC method development for testosterone propionate and cipionate in oil-based injectables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo-Lumbreras, R; García-Miguens, M A; Izquierdo-Hornillos, R

    2005-07-15

    Two isocratic liquid chromatographic methods for the determination of testosterone propionate (TP) and cipionate (TC) in oil-based injectables using methyltestosterone and bolasterone as internal standards, respectively, have been developed and validated. Mobile phases 57% water:acetonitrile 43% (v:v) and 54% water:acetonitrile 46% (v:v) were used for TP and TC, respectively. For both methods, a bonded-silica Luna CN (250 mm x 4.6 mm i.d., 5 microm) (25 degrees C) column, a flow-rate 1 ml min(-1) and UV absorbance detection at 245 nm were used and two separations up to base line were achieved. Prior to HPLC analysis, sample preparation was required, including extraction of TP and TC from oil-based injectables using the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate. PMID:15967305

  14. Produced water from off-shore oil and gas production, a new challenge in marine pollution monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Produced water consists of water naturally present in the oil and gas reservoir (formation water), flood water previously injected into the formation, and/or, in the case of some gas production, condensed water. Produced water is part of the well stream together with oil and/or gas

  15. Can Oil Float Completely Submerged in Water?

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Saurabh; Chatterjee, Souvick

    2013-01-01

    Droplet formation in a system of two or more immiscible fluids is a celebrated topic of research in the fluid mechanics community. In this work, we propose an innovative phenomenon where oil when injected drop-wise into a pool of water moves towards the air-water interface where it floats in a fully submerged condition. The configuration, however, is not stable and a slight perturbation to the system causes the droplet to burst and float in partially submerged condition. The droplet contour is analyzed using edge detection. Temporal variation of a characteristic length of the droplet is analyzed using MATLAB image processing. The constraint of small Bond Number established the assumption of lubrication regime in the thin gap. A brief theoretical formulation also showed the temporal variation of the gap thickness

  16. Tracer injection techniques in flowing surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörman, A.

    2009-04-01

    Residence time distributions for flowing water and reactive matter are commonly used integrated properties of the transport process for determining technical issues of water resource management and in eco-hydrological science. Two general issues for tracer techniques are that the concentration-vs-time relation following a tracer injection (the breakthrough curve) gives unique transport information in different parts of the curve and separation of hydromechanical and reactive mechanisms often require simultaneous tracer injections. This presentation discusses evaluation methods for simultaneous tracer injections based on examples of tracer experiments in small rivers, streams and wetlands. Tritiated water is used as a practically inert substance to reflect the actual hydrodynamics, but other involved tracers are Cr(III)-51, P-32 and N-15. Hydromechanical, in-stream dispersion is reflected as a symmetrical spreading of the spatial concentration distribution. This requires that the transport distance over water depth is larger than about five times the flow Peclet number. Transversal retention of both inert and reactive solutes is reflected in terms of the tail of the breakthrough curve. Especially, reactive solutes can have a substantial magnification of the tailing behaviour depending on reaction rates or partitioning coefficients. To accurately discriminate between the effects of reactions and hydromechanical mixing its is relevant to use simultaneous injections of inert and reactive tracers with a sequential or integrated evaluation procedure. As an example, the slope of the P-32 tailing is consistently smaller than that of a simultaneous tritium injection in Ekeby wetland, Eskilstuna. The same applies to N-15 injected in the same experiment, but nitrogen is affected also by a systematic loss due to denitrification. Uptake in stream-bed sediments can be caused by a pumping effect arising when a variable pressure field is created on the stream bottom due to bed irregularities. The so-called pumping model provided good estimates of the storage in the hyporheic zone under different stream discharges and stream flow conditions along streams. Evaluations Hobøl River, Norway, and Säva Brook, Sweden, at two occasions in both stream indicate that the relative residence time in the hyporheic zone is linearly proportional to the squared Froude Number. The residence time is scaled with water depth and hydraulic conductivity of the bed. The effect of such transient storage in e.g. the hyporheic zone gives rise to a tailing, but the breakthrough curve become increasingly symmetrical with Damköhler number. Such a symmetrical breakthrough can be erroneously taken as an effect of in-stream dispersion, even though this similarity is merely due to the physical analogy of various advection velocities over the transport cross-section, differential advection.

  17. Deep injection of waste water in the Western Canada sedimentary basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Injection of wastes into the deep subsurface has become a contentious issue, particularly in emerging regions of oil and gas production. Experience in other regions suggests that injection is an effective waste management practice and that widespread environmental damage is unlikely. Over the past several decades, 23?km(3) of water has been injected into the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB). The oil and gas industry has injected most of this water but large amounts of injection are associated with mining activities. The amount of water injected into this basin during the past century is 2 to 3 orders magnitude greater than natural recharge to deep formations in the WCSB. Despite this large-scale disturbance to the hydrogeological system, there have been few documented cases of environmental problems related to injection wells. Deep injection of waste appears to be a low risk activity based on this experience but monitoring efforts are insufficient to make definitive statements. Serious uncharacterized legacy issues could be present. Initiating more comprehensive monitoring and research programs on the effects of injection in the WCSB could provide insight into the risks associated with injection in less developed sedimentary basins. PMID:24841226

  18. Quantification of the recovered oil and water fractions during water flooding laboratory experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Halim, Amalia Yunita

    2015-01-01

    During core flooding experiments where water is injected in residual oil saturated core plugs, the fluids are often produced in small amounts. Oil and water come out of the core and are collected in glass vials using a fraction collector. Quantification of these fluids is often difficult since the volume might be less than a few microliters. In this study, we approach the determination of the oil volumes in flooding effluents using predetermined amounts of the North Sea oil with synthetic seawater. The UV/visible spectroscopy method and low-field NMR spectrometry are compared for this determination, and an account of advantages and disadvantages of each method is given. Both methods are reproducible with high accuracy. The NMR method was capable of direct quantification of both oil and water fractions, while the UV/visible spectroscopy quantifies only the oil fraction using a standard curve.

  19. Extraction of oil from stable oil-water emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a process of extracting oil from oil-water emulsions containing suspended solid particulates. It comprises introducing the emulsion into vessel in an extraction system, pressurizing the vessel with a volatile hydrocarbon whereby the volatile hydrocarbon is in the liquified state and forms a two-phase system with the emulsion, maintaining the pressure for a period of time sufficient to effect the replacement of at least some of the oil in the emulsion phase with the volatile hydrocarbon, the replaced oil being dissolved in the volatile hydrocarbon phase, withdrawing at least a portion of the oil-containing volatile hydrocarbon phase while maintaining the pressure on the two-phase system, reducing the pressure on the two-phase system whereby volatile hydrocarbon dissolved in the emulsion is vaporized, and the emulsion separates into a water phase and an oil phase, and recovering the oil phase from the water phase

  20. Removal of oil from water by bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many materials, included activated carbon, peat, coal, fiberglass, polypropylene, organoclay and bentonite have been used for removing oils and grease from water. However, bentonite has been used only rarely for this purpose. In this study Na-bentonite was used to remove oil from oil-in-water emulsions of various kinds such as standard mineral oil, cutting oils, refinery effluent and produced water from production wells at Estevan, Saskatchewan. Removal efficiencies obtained were 85 to 96 per cent for cutting oils, 84 to 86 per cent for produced water and 54 to 87 per cent for refinery effluent. Bentonite proved to be more effective in the removal of oil from oil-in-water emulsions than from actual waste waters; up to 96 percent from oil-in-water emulsions to only 87 per cent from actual waste water. The percentage of oil removed was found to be a function of the amount of bentonite added and the adsorption time up to the equilibrium time. Result also showed that the Langmuir, Freundlich and BET isotherms are well suited to describe the adsorption of oil by bentonite from the various oily waters employed in this study. 15 refs

  1. Performance of Oil-Injected Scroll Compressors for Helium Refrigerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiibayashi, Masao; Izunaga, Yasushi; Sado, Shintaro

    In recent years there arises growing demand of helium liquefaction refrigerators for the magnetic resonance imaging systems, magnetically levitated vehicles and other systems using superconducting magnet. From this background, a small size, scroll type of hermetic helium compressor capable of compressing helium gas to the pressure ratio of 20 in a single stage is developed. Main features of this compressor are as follows. 1) Discharge capacity can be varied from 7 to 20 Nm3/h by changing driving motor frequency from 30 to 80 Hz. 2) The overall adiabatic efficiency showed 72%?79% under the pressure ratio range of 11?20 at 60 Hz using oil injection cooling device.

  2. Fast water oil spill response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the many manuals currently available for oil spill response, few have any information on fast-water conditions even though just more than half of all oil spilled by volume in the United States between 1992 and 1997 happened in waterways with currents exceeding one knot. The Coast Guard recognized the absence of standard terminology that could be used for fast-water responses. For that reason, an initiative was undertaken to create a document that addresses only fast-water issues. Two major parts of the project were to provide information on deployment strategies and techniques to identify equipment that could improve recovery capabilities where existing systems do not work well. This paper described field demonstrations where boom deflectors and boom vanes were used. Efforts to increase the capability of booms and skimmers were also described. A field guide was developed for training and response purposes for spills in fast-water which makes it possible for on-scene commanders and area supervisors to define techniques and terminology for responders in the field. It is particularly useful for Coast Guard Marine Safety Units when working with Coast Guard operational units during an emergency response. 20 refs., 4 figs

  3. Microbial diversity in long-term water-flooded oil reservoirs with different in situ temperatures in China

    OpenAIRE

    Fan Zhang,; Yue-Hui She; Lu-Jun Chai; Banat, Ibrahim M.; Xiao-Tao Zhang; Fu-Chang Shu; Zheng-Liang Wang; Long-Jiang Yu; Du-Jie Hou

    2012-01-01

    Water-flooded oil reservoirs have specific ecological environments due to continual water injection and oil production and water recycling. Using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis, the microbial communities present in injected waters and produced waters from four typical water-flooded oil reservoirs with different in situ temperatures of 25°C, 40°C, 55°C and 70°C were examined. The results obtained showed that the higher the in situ temperatures of the oil reservoirs is, the less the e...

  4. STUDYING OF THE EFFECTIVE PARAMETERS ON ENHANCED HEAVY OIL RECOVERY BY STEAM INJECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Kh.Mohamadbeigy; M. Monavarian

    2006-01-01

    High viscosity of some crude oil makes difficult to recover with primary or secondary production methods. Therefore, thermal oil recovery techniques are recommended for the Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) of heavy oil. In this experimental study, steam injection was used to investigate the effectiveness parameters on heavy oil production rate. The result is shown that, by increasing pressure, steam reaches the breakthrough point sooner, but recovery decreases. If the oils are a little different i...

  5. Did CO2 injection induce 2006-2011 earthquakes in the Cogdell oil field, Texas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    GAN, W.; Frohlich, C.

    2013-12-01

    Induced seismicity related to underground injection of liquids has been widely reported. However, earthquakes triggered by gas injection, particularly having magnitudes M3 and larger, haven't been observed. Davis and Pennington (1) concluded that earthquakes occurring 1974-1982 in the Cogdell oil field north of Snyder, TX were induced by water flooding for secondary recovery that took place between 1956 and 1982. Subsequently the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) reported no further seismicity between 1983 and 2005, but between 2006 and 2011 reported 18 earthquakes having magnitudes 3 and greater. In the present study we analyzed data recorded by six temporary seismograph stations deployed by the USArray program. We identified and carefully relocated 93 well-recorded earthquakes occurring between March 2009 and December 2010. Relocated epicenters occur within several NE-SW-trending linear clusters, with trends corresponding to nodal planes of regional focal mechanisms, possibly indicating the presence of previously unidentified subsurface faults. Moreover, both the rate and b value for the 2009-2011 activity differs from the values for earlier activity, possibly suggesting a different physical origin. We have evaluated data concerning injection and extraction of oil, water, and gas in the Cogdell field. Fluid injection doesn't explain the 2006-2011 earthquakes, especially as net volumes (injection minus extraction) are significantly less than in the 1957-1982 period, and don't appear to have undergone significant recent changes. However, since 2004 significant volumes of CO2 have been injected into the Cogdell fields. The timing of gas injection suggests it may have triggered the recent seismic activity. If so, this is the first reported instance where gas injection has triggered earthquakes having magnitudes M3 and larger. Further analysis may help to evaluate recent concerns about possible risks associated with large-scale carbon capture and storage as a strategy for managing climate change. 1. Davis SD, Pennington WD (1989) Induced seismic deformation in the Cogdell oil field of west Texas. Bull Seismol Soc Amer 79:1477-1495.

  6. Downhole oil-water separation - the 'HYDROSEP'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checknita, L. (Centrilift, Div. of Baker Hughes Canada Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada))

    1999-01-01

    The paper outlines in a display format: downhole separation, the Hydrosep, candidate well selection, field installation options, case histories, current situation/options, and a summary. In-situ separation allows the well to produce a concentrated oil stream to the surface while simultaneously injecting clean water into the same borehole. Separation is carried out downhole because of lower lifting costs, increased ultimate recovery, reduced capital spending, extended economic life of wells and fields, environmental compatibility, and marginal discoveries become profitable. The Hydrosep is a downhole oil-water separator that combines Baker Hughes Process Systems high performance Vortoil hydrocyclones with Centrilift's proven downhole pump systems and Baker Oil Tool's market-leading completion technologies. The mandatory well selection characteristics are: an injection zone available in the well, high water cut production, and a casing size of 140 mm or bigger. Favorable characteristics include: high water lifting costs, high water handling/disposal costs, and high pump intake pressure due to a production bottleneck. Field installation options include: single or dual pumps, injection to lower or higher zones, single or two stage hydrocyclone geometry, gas well dewatering, and cross-flooding. Some cases histories are covered including: Byron/Garland, Wyoming, Handsworth/Saskatchewan, and Bashaw, Alberta. The downhole separator lowers lifting costs, increases ultimate recovery, reduces capital expenditure, extends the economic life of the well and fields, is environmental friendly, and makes marginal discoveries profitable.

  7. Performance and exhaust emission characteristics of direct-injection Diesel engine when operating on shale oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents the comparative bench testing results of a naturally aspirated, four stroke, four cylinder, water cooled, direct injection Diesel engine when running on Diesel fuel and shale oil that is produced in Estonia from local oil shale. The purpose of this research is to investigate the possibility of practical usage of the shale oil as the alternative fuel for a high speed Diesel engine as well as to evaluate the combustion efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption, emission composition changes and the smoke opacity of the exhausts. Test results show that when fuelling a fully loaded engine with shale oil, the brake specific fuel consumption at the maximum torque and rated power is correspondingly higher by 12.3% and 20.4%. However, the brake thermal efficiencies do not differ widely and their maximum values remain equal to 0.36-0.37 for Diesel fuel and 0.32-0.33 for shale oil. The total nitrogen oxide emissions from the shale oil at engine partial loads remain considerably lower although when running at the maximum torque and rated power, the NOx emissions become correspondingly higher by 21.8% and 27.6%. The smoke opacity of the fully loaded engine at a wide range of speeds is lower by 30-35%, whereas the carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emissions in the exhausts at moderate and full load regimes do not undergo significant changes

  8. Feasibility of steam injection process in a thin, low-permeability heavy oil reservoir of Arkansas -- a numerical simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, A.K.; Sarathi, P.S.

    1993-12-01

    This report details the findings of an in-depth study undertaken to assess the viability of the steam injection process in the heavy oil bearing Nacatoch sands of Arkansas. Published screening criteria and DOE`s steamflood predictive models were utilized to screen and select reservoirs for further scrutiny. Although, several prospects satisfied the steam injection screening criteria, only a single candidate was selected for detailed simulation studies. The selection was based on the availability of needed data for simulation and the uniqueness of the reservoir. The reservoir investigated is a shallow, thin, low-permeability reservoir with low initial oil saturation and has an underlying water sand. The study showed that the reservoir will respond favorably to steamdrive, but not to cyclic steaming. Steam stimulation, however, is necessary to improve steam injectivity during subsequent steamdrive. Further, in such marginal heavy oil reservoirs (i.e., reservoir characterized by thin pay zone and low initial oil saturation) conventional steamdrive (i.e., steam injection using vertical wells) is unlikely to be economical, and nonconventional methods must be utilized. It was found that the use of horizontal injectors and horizontal producers significantly improved the recovery and oil-steam ratio and improved the economics. It is recommended that the applicability of horizontal steam injection technology in this reservoir be further investigated.

  9. Study on Technical Measures of Romashkino Oil Field after Entering Ultra-High Water Cut Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuli Lu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Romashkino oil field has large oilfield area, small formation dip, many reservoir layers, wide oil-water transition zone and complicated sedimentary environment. Since development, 3 overall development plannings and adjustments of individual block have been established. This achieves a high oil production. However, the recoverable reserves of major oil layer with high production become smaller and smaller and the water cut increases over time, the production ability of oil layer decreases. The development status of oil layer of mining siltstone, oil-water transition zone and oil layer with upswept injected water cannot be changed under present dilute well network condition, because there is no reinforced measurement to water well. This results the low oil production of Romashkino oil field. In order to improve oil production rate and reach the designed oil recovery, Romashkino oil field has been implemented many added cuttings since development. Resent researches about Romashkino oil field show: in later oilfield development stage, sidetrack and lateral drilling horizontal wells technology is very reasonable; formation hydraulic fracturing technology has been widely used in recent years; in tertiary oil recovery, sweep efficiency and flooding efficiency related technologies have been taken. This offers reference and guidance for the effective and reasonable oil field development in later period.

  10. Separation of oil and water in oil spill recovery operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separation of water from oil that is collected in any oil spill recovery operation is a continuing and necessary requirement during every stage of the effort. Its importance is reflected in the cost of transport and storage of large volumes of oily water, the salvage value of separated oil and the added labor costs associated with long-term recovery operations. This paper addresses the effects of weathering and emulsion generation which increase the problems normally associated with water extraction. Separation theory, practical separation technology and recommendations for the future direction of research and development are presented. (author)

  11. Electromagnetic assisted carbonated water flooding for heavy oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, T.S.; Zitha, P.L. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); De Rouffignac, E. [Shell International Exploration and Production, Rijswijk (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    This study examined the benefits of combining carbonated water flooding (CWF) with low frequency electromagnetic (EM) heating in heavy oil fields. The CWF process consists of flooding oil reservoirs with water containing dissolved carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), which is transferred from the water phase into the oil phase in order to swell the oil and reduce its viscosity. EM heating is used as a preconditioning treatment. This study used a heavy oil reservoir simulator to analyze various scenarios in which EM pre-heating of the reservoir was used for a period of months before applying the CWF procedure. The study showed that EM heating strategies can increase temperatures in the reservoir and can result in a uniform decrease of oil viscosity. The combined CWF and EM process significantly increased oil recovery rates. It was concluded that the expansion of the heating region provides great contact between the injected and reservoir fluids. Pore volumes after EM-CWF procedures were 1.5 times larger than when CWF was used alone. 13 refs., 6 tabs., 11 figs.

  12. PCA: uma ferramenta para identificação de traçadores químicos para água de formação e água de injeção associadas à produção de petróleo / PCA: a tool for identification of chemical tracers for formation and injection waters associated with oil production

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Fabiana Alves de Lima, Ribeiro; Guilherme Alvarenga, Mantovani; Ronei Jesus, Poppi; Francisca Ferreira do, Rosário; Maria Carmen Moreira, Bezerra; Andre Luis Mathias, Bastos; Vera Lúcia Alves de, Melo.

    Full Text Available [...] Abstract in english This study describes the use of Principal Component Analysis to evaluate the chemical composition of water produced from eight oil wells in three different production areas. A total of 609 samples of produced water, and a reference sample of seawater, were characterized according to their levels of [...] salinity, calcium, magnesium, strontium, barium and sulphate (mg L-1) contents, and analyzed by using PCA with autoscaled data. The method allowed the identification of variables salinity, calcium and strontium as tracers for formation water, and variables magnesium and sulphate as tracers for seawater.

  13. Steam injection into water-saturated porous rock

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    J., Bruining; D., Marchesin; C.J., Van Duijn.

    Full Text Available We formulate conservation laws governing steam injection in a linear porous medium containing water. Heat losses to the outside are neglected. We find a complete and systematic description of all solutions of the Riemann problem for the injection of a mixture of steam and water into a water-saturate [...] d porous medium. For ambient pressure, there are three kinds of solutions, depending on injection and reservoir conditions. We show that the solution is unique for each initial data.

  14. Characterization of crude oil-water and solid -water interfaces and adsorption / desorption properties of crude oil fractions: The effect of low salinity water and pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farooq, Umer

    2010-09-15

    The reservoirs of conventional oil are rapidly depleting because of increased production and consumption of crude oil in the world. Mature and mostly depleted oil reservoirs require advanced recovery techniques to sustain the production rates. During the past years, a variety of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods have been developed and implemented to increase the oil recovery from mature reservoirs. Low Salinity Waterflooding (LSW) is an emerging EOR process of injecting water containing low concentrations (<4000 ppm) of total dissolved solids into the reservoir. This moderate cost process yields relatively higher incremental recoveries than other water based recovery methods. Investigation of mechanisms for increased recovery is quite challenging because this process depends upon complex crude oil/water/rock properties. This work was done to study the surface chemistry of typical reservoir surfaces where LSW can be used for EOR. The oil water and solid-water interfaces were characterised in low salinity aqueous solutions and investigated how the electrolytes and pH of solutions affect the interfacial and surface properties. The influence of low saline aqueous solution on the desorption behaviour of different fractions (acid-free oil and base-free oil) of crude oils was also explored. Reservoir minerals are sensitive to small changes in solution properties and therefore model, outcrop and reservoir particles were characterized in low salinity aqueous solutions. The extent of ionic adsorption on the mineral surfaces was found by various techniques. Particles were also characterized with respect to their elemental compositions. Asphaltene adsorption/desorption on reservoir rock surfaces play an important role in EOR processes. Various injection sequences of low saline aqueous solution of Na +, Ca2+ and sea water were considered to study the desorption of asphaltenes from silica surfaces. Composition of the aqueous phase influenced the interfacial properties of crude oil. Acids, bases and asphaltenes were selectively removed from crude oils and demonstrated the significance of each component on the interfacial behaviour in the aqueous phase under various electrolyte concentrations, type of electrolytes and pH ranges. It was determined that the crude oil acids and electrolyte type played an important role for interfacial properties at high pH conditions. Adsorption/desorption properties of various crude oil fractions on silica coated quartz surfaces were also studied. The influence of electrolyte types and pH conditions of low salinity aqueous solutions on desorption behaviour of different oil fractions was considered. Finally, the dynamic interfacial behaviour of two different crude oils and their fractions were evaluated in different aqueous solutions. The effects of mono and divalent ionic concentrations on interfacial properties were compared. (Author)

  15. Application of naturally occurring isotopes and artificial radioactive tracer for monitoring water flooding in oil field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water flooding is an important operation to enhance oil recovery. Water is injected in the oil formation under high pressure through an injection well. Movement of the injected water is needed to be traced to test the performance of water flood, investigate unexpected anomalies in flow and verify suspected geological barriers or flow channels, etc. In the present study environmental isotopes and artificial radiotracer (tritium) were used at Fimkassar Oil Field of Oil and Gas Development Company Limited (OGDCL) where water flooding was started in March 1996 in Sakessar formation to maintain its pressure and enhance the oil recovery. Environmental isotopes: /sup 18/O, /sup 2/H and /sup 3/H, and chloride contents were used to determine the breakthrough/transit time and contribution of fresh injected water. Water samples were collected from the injection well, production well and some other fields for reference indices of Sakessar Formation during June 1998 to August 1999. These samples were analyzed for the /sup 18/O, /sup 2/H and /sup 3/H, and chloride contents. Results show that the water of production well is mixture of fresh water and formation water. The fresh water contribution varied from 67% to 80%, while remaining component was the old recharged formation water. This percentage did not change significantly from the time of break-through till the last sampling which indicates good mixing in the reservoir and absence of any quick channel. The initial breakthrough time was 27 months as the fresh water contributed significantly in the first appearance of water in the production well in June 1998. Tritium tracer, which was injected in November 1998, appeared in the production well after 8 months. It show that breakthrough time decreased with the passage of time. /sup 14/C of inorganic carbon in the water in Chorgali and Sakessar Formations was also analyzed which indicates that the water is at least few thousand years old. (author)

  16. Coupling immiscible CO{sub 2} technology and polymer injection to maximize EOR performance for heavy oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y. [Saskatchewan Research Council, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Energy Resources Conservation Board, Calgary, AB (Canada); Huang, S.; Luo, P. [Saskatchewan Research Council, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    There is excellent potential for the application of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods and new technologies in the province of Saskatchewan, where approximately 90 per cent of the original heavy oil in place is undeveloped. This study examined whether a new proposed process of coupling carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and polymer injection can increase EOR performance for heavy oil reservoirs. The paper presented a comparison of the oil recovery performance of three EOR modes, including water-alternating-gas (CO{sub 2} WAG) injection; polymer-alone flood; and coupled CO{sub 2} and polymer injection in laboratory-scale linear coreflood tests in waterflooded cores. The specific purposes of this study were to select polymers and to determine viscosities of polymer solutions; to determine phase behaviour properties of the reservoir fluid and CO{sub 2}-saturated reservoir fluid; and to demonstrate the application of the CO{sub 2} polymer process that avoids gas fingering and provides mobility control to achieve successful recovery. It was concluded that this performance comparison demonstrates two of the biggest advantages of coupled CO{sub 2} and polymer injection. It could effectively reduce the pressure drop across the core and obtain very encouraging recovery if the optimal polymer concentration is added to the water. 14 refs., 5 tabs., 9 figs.

  17. Diffusion as an Oil Recovery Mechanism During CO2 Injection in Fractured Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Lie, Stig Holme

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is part of an ongoing study of enhanced oil recovery by CO2 injection in the Reservoir Physics research group at the Department of Physics and Technology (IFT) at the University of Bergen. This work investigates the feasibility of oil recovery from diffusion during miscible CO2 injection in fractured core plugs by conducting appropriate laboratory tests and numerical simulations. A total of 10 miscible CO2 injection tests were conducted in the laboratory using artificially fractur...

  18. Oil, Gas, and Injection Wells in Louisiana, Geographic NAD83, LDNR (2007) [oil_gas_wells_LDNR_2007

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a point dataset containing the location of over 230,000 oil and gas and injection wells in the state of Louisiana. It was developed from the DNR Office of...

  19. Eos modeling and reservoir simulation study of bakken gas injection improved oil recovery in the elm coulee field, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Wanli

    The Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin is one of the most productive liquid-rich unconventional plays. The Bakken Formation is divided into three members, and the Middle Bakken Member is the primary target for horizontal wellbore landing and hydraulic fracturing because of its better rock properties. Even with this new technology, the primary recovery factor is believed to be only around 10%. This study is to evaluate various gas injection EOR methods to try to improve on that low recovery factor of 10%. In this study, the Elm Coulee Oil Field in the Williston Basin was selected as the area of interest. Static reservoir models featuring the rock property heterogeneity of the Middle Bakken Member were built, and fluid property models were built based on Bakken reservoir fluid sample PVT data. By employing both compositional model simulation and Todd-Longstaff solvent model simulation methods, miscible gas injections were simulated and the simulations speculated that oil recovery increased by 10% to 20% of OOIP in 30 years. The compositional simulations yielded lower oil recovery compared to the solvent model simulations. Compared to the homogeneous model, the reservoir model featuring rock property heterogeneity in the vertical direction resulted in slightly better oil recovery, but with earlier CO2 break-through and larger CO2 production, suggesting that rock property heterogeneity is an important property for modeling because it has a big effect on the simulation results. Long hydraulic fractures shortened CO2 break-through time greatly and increased CO 2 production. Water-alternating-gas injection schemes and injection-alternating-shut-in schemes can provide more options for gas injection EOR projects, especially for gas production management. Compared to CO2 injection, separator gas injection yielded slightly better oil recovery, meaning separator gas could be a good candidate for gas injection EOR; lean gas generated the worst results. Reservoir simulations also indicate that original rock properties are the dominant factor for the ultimate oil recovery for both primary recovery and gas injection EOR. Because reservoir simulations provide critical inputs for project planning and management, more effort needs to be invested into reservoir modeling and simulation, including building enhanced geologic models, fracture characterization and modeling, and history matching with field data. Gas injection EOR projects are integrated projects, and the viability of a project also depends on different economic conditions.

  20. Operation and Combustion Characteristics of a Direct Injection Diesel Engine Fuelled with Esterified Cotton Seed Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugu Mohan Kumar Kandasamy

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable oils are renewable in nature and can be directly used as fuels in diesel engines.  However, their high viscosity and poor volatility lead to reduced thermal efficiency and increased hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide and smoke emissions. Transesterification is one of the methods by which viscosity could be drastically reduced and the fuel could be adopted for use in diesel engine.  This Esterified vegetable oil is popularly known as Bio-diesel and that is commercially available in the developed countries due to its distinct advantage over the conventional diesel. In this work, neat cotton seed oil was converted into  Bio diesel  by  the   transesterification  process  and  the  viscosity  was  reduced from 21.4 ×10-6 m2/s to 4.8×10-6 m2/s (viscosity of the neat Cotton seed oil. A single cylinder water-cooled, direct injection diesel engine developing a power output of 3.7 kW at 1500 rpm was used for the experimental investigations which include combustion, performance and emission characteristics of the engine. Base data was generated for diesel first and subsequently, it was replaced by the Bio diesel and both the results were compared and discussed.

  1. Studies of water-in-oil emulsions : formation of water-in-oil states from heavy oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of water-in-oil states from heavy oils was examined. Previous studies have demonstrated that viscosity is a significant factor affecting the formation and stability of water-in-oil emulsions. It was suggested that a viscosity window is a necessary requirement for the formation of stable emulsions. Highly viscous oils produce an entrained water state. A stable or meso-stable emulsion is rarely produced by heavy oils. In most cases, heavy oils result in an entrained water-in-oil state that lasts days longer than the entrained water-on-oil state of lighter oils. This can be explained by the lower migration rate of water droplets from a heavy oil compared to that of a light oil. These results were used to conduct an evaluation of the basis for using the stability index. This index provides a quantitative characterization of the stability of an emulsion, under varying formation regimes. The stability factor has been previously defined as the complex modulus of the water-in-oil state after emulsion formation, divided by the starting oil viscosity. It was shown that this stability factor remains a robust indicator, despite being less predictive in the case of heavy oils. The use of the newly developed stability scale produced values that were similar for water-in-oil states of both light and heavy oils. It was concluded that this new stability scale is complex, but the discriminating power over the old stability scale is not better. 6 refs., 6 tabs., 2 figss not better. 6 refs., 6 tabs., 2 figs

  2. Stability Proxies for Water-in-Oil Emulsions and Implications in Aqueous-based Enhanced Oil Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrnoosh Moradi; Xiuyu Wang; Vladimir Alvarado

    2011-01-01

    Several researchers have proposed that mobility control mechanisms can positively contribute to oil recovery in the case of emulsions generated in Enhanced-Oil Recovery (EOR) operations. Chemical EOR techniques that use alkaline components or/and surfactants are known to produce undesirable emulsions that create operational problems and are difficult to break. Other water-based methods have been less studied in this sense. EOR processes such as polymer flooding and LoSalTM injection require a...

  3. Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR by Miscible CO2 and Water Flooding of Asphaltenic and Non-Asphaltenic Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin A. Chukwudeme

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available An EOR study has been performed applying miscible CO2 flooding and compared with that for water flooding. Three different oils are used, reference oil (n-decane, model oil (n-C10, SA, toluene and 0.35 wt % asphaltene and crude oil (10 wt % asphaltene obtained from the Middle East. Stearic acid (SA is added representing a natural surfactant in oil. For the non-asphaltenic oil, miscible CO2 flooding is shown to be more favourable than that by water. However, it is interesting to see that for first years after the start of the injection (< 3 years it is shown that there is almost no difference between the recovered oils by water and CO2, after which (> 3 years oil recovery by gas injection showed a significant increase. This may be due to the enhanced performance at the increased reservoir pressure during the first period. Maximum oil recovery is shown by miscible CO2 flooding of asphaltenic oil at combined temperatures and pressures of 50 °C/90 bar and 70 °C/120 bar (no significant difference between the two cases, about 1% compared to 80 °C/140 bar. This may support the positive influence of the high combined temperatures and pressures for the miscible CO2 flooding; however beyond a certain limit the oil recovery declined due to increased asphaltene deposition. Another interesting finding in this work is that for single phase oil, an almost linear relationship is observed between the pressure drop and the asphaltene deposition regardless of the flowing fluid pressure.

  4. Particle retention in porous media: Applications to water injectivity decline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wennberg, Kjell Erik

    1998-12-31

    This thesis studies the problem of migration and deposition of colloidal particles within porous media, theoretically and by computerized simulation. Special emphasis is put on the prediction of injectivity decline in water injection wells due to inherent particles in the injection water. The study of particle deposition within porous media requires a correct prediction of the deposition rate or filtration coefficient. A thorough review of the modeling approaches used in the past are combined with new ideas in order to arrive at an improved model for the prediction of the filtration coefficient. A new way of determining the transition time for the dominant deposition mechanism to change from internal deposition to external cake formation is proposed. From this fundamental theory, equations are given for water injectivity decline predictions. A computer program called WID for water injectivity decline predictions was developed. Using water quality, formation properties, injection rate/pressure and completion information as input, WID predicts decline in vertical and horizontal injection wells with openhole, perforated and fractured completions. The calculations agree fairly well with field data; in some cases the agreement is excellent. A poor match in a few cases indicates that more mechanisms may be responsible for injectivity decline than those presently accounted for by the simulator. The second part of the study deals with a theoretical investigation of the multi-dimensional nature of particle deposition in porous media. 112 refs., 100 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. In situ upgrading of heavy oil under steam injection with tetralin and catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammad, A.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Mamora, D.D. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Steam injection has become the most successful thermal recovery method for heavy oil production. Heavy oil refineries use upgrading processes to improve oil quality. They generally involve the use of catalysts that are used to remove heavy metals, sulfur and nitrogen, or used in hydro-treating and hydro-cracking. In-situ upgrading is thought to have advantages over conventional surface upgrading technology. Experiments were performed to verify the feasibility of in-situ upgrading of heavy crude oil. A hydrogen donor called tetralin was used along with an organometallic catalyst, at steam injection temperatures and pressures normally encountered in the field. Crude oil from the Jobo Oil Field, located in Venezuela was used. The paper described the experimental methodology with reference to the injection cell; fluid injection system; fluid production system; data measurement and recording system; and experimental procedure. It also discussed the extent of upgrading by comparing the properties of the original and produced oil. Oil properties that were measured and compared included hydrogen-to-carbon ratio; heavy metal content; viscosity; and API gravity. The paper also presented a comparison of oil recovery and fluid production between all cases. It was concluded that in the field, the reaction time was significantly longer than encountered in the experiments and may lead to further upgrading, assuming the catalyst could be dispersed in the formation. 10 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  6. Modelling of water-in-oil emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water-in-oil emulsions are grouped into the following four states: stable, mesostable, unstable and entrained water. Only stable and mesostable states are characterized as emulsions. The states are established by their stability over time, their appearance, and by rheological measurements. This paper described the development of a new modelling scheme in which density, viscosity, saturate, asphaltene and resin contents are used to compute a class index, which predicts an unstable or entrained water-in-oil state of a meso-stable or stable emulsion. A prediction scheme was also presented to estimate the water content and viscosity of the resulting water-in-oil state and the time to formation given a sea wave-height. The study demonstrated that empirical data can be used to predict the formation and characteristics of emulsions. 16 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs

  7. Feasibility evaluation of downhole oil/water separator (DOWS) technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.; Langhus, B. G.; Belieu, S.

    1999-01-31

    The largest volume waste stream associated with oil and gas production is produced water. A survey conducted by the American Petroleum Institute estimated that 20.9 billion barrels of produced water were disposed of in 1985 (Wakim 1987). Of this total, 91% was disposed of through disposal wells or was injected for enhanced oil recovery projects. Treatment and disposal of produced water represents a significant cost for operators. A relatively new technology, downhole oil/water separators (DOWS), has been developed to reduce the cost of handling produced water. DOWS separate oil and gas from produced water at the bottom of the well and reinject some of the produced water into another formation or another horizon within the same formation, while the oil and gas are pumped to the surface. Since much of the produced water is not pumped to the surface, treated, and pumped from the surface back into a deep formation, the cost of handling produced water is greatly reduced. When DOWS are used, additional oil may be recovered as well. In cases where surface processing or disposal capacity is a limiting factor for further production within a field, the use of DOWS to dispose of some of the produced water can allow additional production within that field. Simultaneous injection using DOWS minimizes the opportunity for contamination of underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) through leaks in tubing and casing during the injection process. This report uses the acronym 'DOWS' although the technology may also be referred to as DHOWS or as dual injection and lifting systems (DIALS). Simultaneous injection using DOWS has the potential to profoundly influence the domestic oil industry. The technology has been shown to work in limited oil field applications in the United States and Canada. Several technical papers describing DOWS have been presented at oil and gas industry conferences, but for the most part, the information on the DOWS technology has not been widely transferred to operators, particularly to small or medium-sized independent U.S. companies. One of the missions of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO) is to assess the feasibility of promising oil and gas technologies that offer improved operating performance, reduced operating costs, or greater environmental protection. To further this mission, the NPTO provided funding to a partnership of three organizations a DOE national laboratory (Argonne National Laboratory), a private-sector consulting firm (CH2M-Hill), and a state government agency (Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission) to assess the feasibility of DOWS. The purpose of this report is to provide general information to the industry on DOWS by describing the existing uses of simultaneous injection, summarizing the regulatory implications of simultaneous injection, and assessing the potential future uses of the technology. Chapter 2 provides a more detailed description of the two major types of DOWS. Chapter 3 summarizes the existing U.S. and Canadian installations of DOWS equipment, to the extent that operators have been willing to share their data. Data are provided on the location and geology of existing installations, production information before and after installation of the DOWS, and costs. Chapter 4 provides an overview of DOWS-specific regulatory requirements imposed by some state agencies and discusses the regulatory implications of handling produced water downhole, rather than pumping it to the surface and reinjecting it. Findings and conclusions are presented in Chapter 5 and a list of the references cited in the report is provided in Chapter 6. Appendix A presents detailed data on DOWS installations. This report presents the findings of Phase 1 of the simultaneous injection project, the feasibility assessment. Another activity of the Phase 1 investigation is to design a study plan for Phase 2 of the project, field pilot studies. The Phase 2 study plan is being developed separately and is not included in this report.

  8. Factors influencing time course of pain after depot oil intramuscular injection of testosterone undecanoate

    OpenAIRE

    Sartorius, Gideon; Fennell, Carolyn; Spasevska, Sasa; Turner, Leo; Conway, Ann J.; Handelsman, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Pain following depot intramuscular (IM) injection of oil vehicle-based drugs has been little studied. This study aimed to determine prospectively the prevalence, determinants, severity and functional consequences of pain during the week after IM injection of 1 000 mg testosterone undecanoate (TU) in a 4-mL castor oil vehicle. Androgen-deficient men receiving regular T replacement therapy at an academic andrology clinic were recruited to report pain scores using a coloured visual linear analog...

  9. Simulation bidimensional of water and gas alternative injection; Simulacao bidimensional de injecao alternada de agua e gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Ana Paula Silva C. de

    1999-07-01

    This dissertation presents a study of the unidimensional of water and gas alternate injection (WAG) using the stream line theory. It is considered incompressible fluid., unit mobility ratio, negligible capillary and gravitational effects, homogeneous and isotropic reservoir, isothermal flow two phases, oil and water, and three components, oil, water and gas. In the stream line theory, the following injection schemes are considered: staggered line five-spot, direct line and seven-spot. It is also considered that there is no flow among the streams. In the WAG calculations it is used the fractional flow theory and the method of characteristics, which consists of shock waves and rarefactions. The composition of these waves is said compatible if it satisfies the entropy condition. The solution goes through a certain path from the left to the right side constrained by the initial and boundary conditions. The gas injection is at a high pressure to ensure miscible displacement. It is considered first injection of a water bank and then, injection of a gas bank. We concluded that the gas injection at a high pressure recoveries all residual oil and the water saturation remains is greater than initial saturation. (author)

  10. Organically modified clay removes oil from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When bentonite or other clays and zeolite are modified with quaternary amines, they become organophilic. Such modified bentonites are used to remove mechanically emulsified oil and grease, and other sparingly soluble organics. Types of oil found in water can include fats, lubricants, cutting fluids, heavy hydrocarbons such as tars, grease, crude oil, diesel oils; and light hydrocarbons such as kerosene, jet fuel, and gasoline. If the organoclay is granulated, it is placed into a liquid phase carbon filter vessel to remove FOGs (Free Oil and Grease) and chlorinated hydrocarbons. In this application the clay is mixed with anthrazite to prevent early plugging of the filter by oil or grease droplets. In batch systems a powdered organoclay is employed. Organoclay removes mechanically emulsified oil and grease at 5--7 times the rate of activated carbon, or 50% of its dry weight. Oil and grease and other large sparingly soluble chlorinated hydrocarbons and NOMs (Natural Organic Matter) blind the pores of activated carbon (and ion-exchange resins), reducing its effectiveness significantly. It is therefore economically advantageous for the end user to prepolish the water before it enters carbon vessels. Operating costs can often be reduced by 50% or more

  11. The reconstitution of powders for injection with ?-irradiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earlier studies on the use of ?-radiation for the sterilization of water for injections have demonstrated the production of H2O2. The effect of irradiated water on oxidation-susceptible drugs has been tested. The results show that such drugs are not generally degraded by radiation-sterilized water. (author)

  12. Prokaryotic Community Structure and Sulfate Reducer Activity in Water from High-Temperature Oil Reservoirs with and without Nitrate Treatment? †

    OpenAIRE

    Gittel, Antje; Sørensen, Ketil Bernt; Skovhus, Torben Lund; Ingvorsen, Kjeld; Schramm, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP) cause severe problems like microbial corrosion and reservoir souring in seawater-injected oil production systems. One strategy to control SRP activity is the addition of nitrate to the injection water. Production waters from two adjacent, hot (80°C) oil reservoirs, one with and one without nitrate treatment, were compared for prokaryotic community structure and activity of SRP. Bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene analyses revealed higher prokaryotic abunda...

  13. Water Local Volume Fraction on Oil in Water Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    siti aslina hussain

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The phase distribution of water-oil flows was studied experimentally from a separated flow without mixer to a oil in water or water in oil dispersed in horizontal tubes. Under most conditions the pattern was oil continuous in water dispersed or water continuous in oil dispersed flow continuously and there is entrainment in the form of drops of phase into the other. The investigations were carried out through the cross-sectional phase distribution in the flow of mixtures of water and kerosene such as EXXSOL-D80 in a horizontal 25.4 mm bore stainless steel section. The phase fraction distribution was determined using a traversing beam gamma densitometer, with the beam being traversed in three directions (00, 450 and 900 of the vertical line passing through the axis of the tube. Measurements were made at three positions spaced along the 9.7 m test section length (1.0 m, 5.85 m and 7.72 m along the horizontal tube. The measurements were done in the Two-phase Oil Water Experimental Rig (TOWER facility. This facility allows the two fluids to be fed to the test section before they are separated and returned once more to the test line. The flow developed naturally from an initial stratified flow in which the oil and water were introduced separately at the top and the bottom of the test section respectively. It was found that the liquids were fully inter-dispersed by the end of the test section. The results were also used to define the flow patterns in water-oil liquid-liquid flow system. The phase fraction distribution was shown to be homogeneously mixed near to the outlet of the test section.

  14. Investigating New Innovations to Detect Small Salt-Water Fraction Component in Mineral Oil and Small Oil Fraction Component in Salt-Water Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R.R. Mucunguzi-Rugwebe

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to present the key findings on the effects of small salt-water fraction component, ? expressed in volume % per L on rotation are presented in the temperature range of 19.0 to 24.0ºC. It was found that rotations in oils with low boiling point known as light oils like Final diesel No. 2 were greater than the rotations which occurred in oils with high boiling point called heavy oils such as Esso diesel. Small oil fraction components, ?s expressed in mL/L of salt water down to 10 ppm were detected. The greatest impact on rotation of these oils was found in light oils like Fina No. 2 diesel. At 40 ppm which is the oil content level below which the environment authority considers process water to be free from oil environmental hazards, the observed rotation angles were 23.2º for Esso, 36.7º for Nors Hydro AS, and 71.8º in Fina No. 2 diesel. It was observed that light oils molecules have drastic effect on optical properties of the mixture in which they exist. It was found that for all oils, oil fractions greater than 100 ppm, caused the medium to be optically dense. This technology has shown a very high potential of being used as an environmental monitor to detect oil fractions down to 10 ppm and the technique can use laser beam to control re-injected process water with oil fractions between 100-2000 ppm.

  15. A Performance, Emission and Combustion Investigation on Hot Air Assisted Eucalyptus Oil Direct Injected Compression Ignition Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Tamilvendhan, D.; Ilangovan, V.

    2011-01-01

    A diesel engine modified for eucalyptus oil direct injection (EuDI) has been tested to study eucalyptus oil behavior. Since the eucalyptus oil possesses low cetane number fails to auto ignite, the test engine was modified to supply hot air during suction stroke which helps to auto-ignite the injected eucalyptus oil. The engine with this facility was operated using eucalyptus oil under various load conditions and at various intake temperatures. The results of the investigation were proved that...

  16. Integrated use of NMR, petrel and modflow in the modeling of SAGD produced water re-injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, K. [Miswaco(CANADA); Phair, C [Mneme Corp, CALGARY (Canada); Alloisio, S [SWS, Vancouver (CANADA); Novotny, M [SWS, Denver, (United States); Raven, S [Oilsands Quest Inc., Calgary (CANADA)

    2011-07-01

    In the oil industry, steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is a method used to enhance oil recovery in which production water disposal is a challenge. During this process, production water is re-injected into the reservoir and operators have to verify that it will not affect the quality of the surrounding fresh groundwater. This research aimed at determining the flow path and the time that produced water would take to reach an adjacent aquifer. This study was carried out on a horizontal well pair at the Axe Lake Area in northwestern Saskatchewan, using existing site data in Petrel to create a static hydrogeological model which was then exported to Modflow to simulate injection scenarios. This innovative method provided flow path of the re-injected water and time to reach the fresh with advantages over conventional hydrogeological modeling. The innovative workflow presented herein successfully provided useful information to assess the feasibility of the SAGD project and could be used for other projects.

  17. Injection of Emulsified Vegetable Oil for Long-Term Bioreduction of Uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, S. C.; Watson, D. B.; Schadt, C. W.; Jardine, P. M.; Gihring, T. M.; Zhang, G.; Mehlhorn, T.; Lowe, K.; Phillips, J.; Earles, J.; Wu, W.; Criddle, C. S.; Kemner, K. M.; Boyanov, M.

    2011-12-01

    In situ bioremediation of a uranium and nitrate-contaminated aquifer with the slow-release electron donor, emulsified vegetable oil (EVO), was tested at the US DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program (SBR) Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site, in Oak Ridge, TN. The EVO injection took place in Area 2 of the IFRC located about 300 m downgradient of the former S-3 disposal ponds. Liquid wastes, disposed in the ponds from 1951 to 1983, were primarily composed of nitric acid, plating wastes containing various metals (Cr, Ni) radionuclides (U, Tc), inorganics (nitrate, sulfate) and organic contaminants (tetrachloroethylene, acetone). Prior pond closure in 1987, large volumes of waste fluids migrated into the subsurface, down Bear Creek Valley and into Bear Creek. Contaminants detected at Area 2 were transported through a high permeability gravelly fill that is considered a preferred transport pathway for U to Bear Creek. Groundwater in the gravelly fill is contaminated with U (1-3 mg/L), sulfate (95-130 mg/L), and nitrate (20-40 mg/L) and 500 mg/kg or higher U has been detected on the solid phase of the fill material. The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility and long-term sustainability of U(VI) reduction and immobilization, and nitrate degradation in the high permeability, high flow gravel fill using EVO as the electron donor. A one-time EVO injection was conducted over a 2 hour period in the highly permeable gravel (hydraulic conductivity 0.08 cm/sec) in the well instrumented IFRC Area 2 field plot. Extensive monitoring of geochemical parameters, dissolved gases and microbial populations were conducted during the test. A bromide tracer test was conducted prior to the injection of the EVO to assess transport pathways and rates. Geochemical analysis of site groundwater demonstrated the sequential bioreduction of oxygen, nitrate, Mn(IV), Fe(III) and sulfate. Transient accumulation of acetate was observed as an intermediate in the oil degradation. Reduction and removal of U and nitrate from groundwater was observed in all wells in hydraulic connection to the injection wells after 2-4 weeks. U concentrations in groundwater were reduced to below 30 ppb (US EPA drinking water standard) at some well locations and nitrate was reduced to below detectable levels. Rebound of U in groundwater was observed together with the rebound of sulfate concentrations as the EVO was consumed. The flux of U and nitrate contamination from groundwater to the surface water receptor (Bear Creek) was significantly reduced by the EVO injection over a one year period. Uranium (VI) reduction to U(IV) in the field tests was confirmed by X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis. The reduced U(IV) was determined by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) to be in an Fe-U complex, not uraninite. The activities of major Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacteria with U(VI)-reducing capability as well as methanogens was stimulated after injection of the oil.

  18. Bacteria in the injection water differently impacts the bacterial communities of production wells in high-temperature petroleum reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongyan; Xiong, Shunzi; Gao, Guangjun; Song, Yongting; Cao, Gongze; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Water flooding is widely used for oil recovery. However, how the introduction of bacteria via water flooding affects the subsurface ecosystem remains unknown. In the present study, the distinct bacterial communities of an injection well and six adjacent production wells were revealed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing. All sequences of the variable region 3 of the 16S rRNA gene retrieved from pyrosequencing were divided into 543 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on 97% similarity. Approximately 13.5% of the total sequences could not be assigned to any recognized phylum. The Unifrac distance analysis showed significant differences in the bacterial community structures between the production well and injection water samples. However, highly similar bacterial structures were shown for samples obtained from the same oil-bearing strata. More than 69% of the OTUs detected in the injection water sample were absent or detected in low abundance in the production wells. However, the abundance of two OTUs reached as high as 17.5 and 26.9% in two samples of production water, although the OTUs greatly varied among all samples. Combined with the differentiated water flow rate measured through ion tracing, we speculated that the transportation of injected bacteria was impacted through the varied permeability from the injection well to each of the production wells. Whether the injected bacteria predominate the production well bacterial community might depend both on the permeability of the strata and the reservoir conditions. PMID:26052321

  19. Bacteria in the injection water differently impacts the bacterial communities of production wells in high-temperature petroleum reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongyan; Xiong, Shunzi; Gao, Guangjun; Song, Yongting; Cao, Gongze; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Water flooding is widely used for oil recovery. However, how the introduction of bacteria via water flooding affects the subsurface ecosystem remains unknown. In the present study, the distinct bacterial communities of an injection well and six adjacent production wells were revealed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing. All sequences of the variable region 3 of the 16S rRNA gene retrieved from pyrosequencing were divided into 543 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on 97% similarity. Approximately 13.5% of the total sequences could not be assigned to any recognized phylum. The Unifrac distance analysis showed significant differences in the bacterial community structures between the production well and injection water samples. However, highly similar bacterial structures were shown for samples obtained from the same oil-bearing strata. More than 69% of the OTUs detected in the injection water sample were absent or detected in low abundance in the production wells. However, the abundance of two OTUs reached as high as 17.5 and 26.9% in two samples of production water, although the OTUs greatly varied among all samples. Combined with the differentiated water flow rate measured through ion tracing, we speculated that the transportation of injected bacteria was impacted through the varied permeability from the injection well to each of the production wells. Whether the injected bacteria predominate the production well bacterial community might depend both on the permeability of the strata and the reservoir conditions. PMID:26052321

  20. Enhanced oil recovery by CO{sub 2} injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moctezuma Berthier, Andres E. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-07-15

    Firstly are presented some basic concepts on the enhanced oil recovery; then a description is made of where the oil deposits in Mexico are located; comments are made over what has been done in Mexico in terms of enhanced oil recovery, the projects of the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo that have dealt with the subject of enhanced oil recovery, and finally an approach is presented towards the problem of oil recovery using CO{sub 2}. [Spanish] Primeramente se presentan unos conceptos basicos sobre la recuperacion mejorada de petroleo; luego se hace una descripcion de donde se encuentran los yacimientos de petroleo en Mexico; se comenta sobre que se ha hecho en Mexico en terminos de recuperacion mejorada de petroleo; se mencionan los proyectos del Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo que han abordado el tema de la recuperacion mejorada del petroleo y por ultimo se presenta un enfoque hacia el problema de la recuperacion del petroleo usando CO{sub 2}.

  1. Research on Dispersed Oil Droplets Breakage and Emulsification in the Dynamic Oil and Water Hydrocyclone

    OpenAIRE

    Guangdong Guo; Songsheng Deng

    2013-01-01

    Oil and water dynamic hydrocyclone is one type of facilities that separate two phases or multiple phases applied widely in the fields such as food processing, environmental protection, biological pharmacy, petroleum and chemistry. The dispersed oil droplets in the dynamic oil and water hydrocyclone were often broken into small drops by shear force, which decreased the separation efficiency of dynamic oil-water hydrocyclone greatly. To avoid the breakage of the oil droplets, the turbulence fie...

  2. The Influence of CO2 Solubility in Brine on Simulation of CO2 Injection into Water Flooded Reservoir and CO2 WAG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Wei; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2010-01-01

    Injection of CO2 into depleted oil reservoirs is not only a traditional way to enhance oil recovery but also a relatively cheaper way to sequester CO2 underground since the increased oil production can offset some sequestration cost. CO2 injection process is often applied to water flooded reservoirs and in many situations alternating injection of water and CO2 is required to stabilize the injection front. Both scenarios involve a large amount of water, making CO2 solubility in brine, which is around ten times higher than methane solubility, a non-negligible factor in the relevant reservoir simulations. In our previous study, a 1-D slimtube simulator, which rigorously accounts for both CO2 solubility in brine and water content in hydrocarbon phases using the Peng-Robinson EoS modified by Soreide and Whitson, has been used to investigate the influence of CO2 solubility on the simulation of continuous CO2 flooding with uniform initial water saturation. As a follow-up of the previous study, this study extends theinvestigation to two more realistic scenarios (1) CO2 injection into water flooded reservoir and (2) water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection with CO2 as the injection gas. A series of 1-D simulations were made for seven oil samples within a wide range of temperature, pressure and salinity. The results were analyzed in terms of the change in oil recovery due to different phase equilibrium descriptions, the delay in breakthrough and the CO2 lost to the aqueous phase. The influence of different factors, including temperature, pressure, salinity, water injection pore volume, WAG ratio and CO2 slug size, on the simulation results was also discussed. In addition, the results for CO2 injection into water flooded reservoirs were also compared with those from the previous study.

  3. In situ generation of steam and alkaline surfactant for enhanced oil recovery using an exothermic water reactant (EWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Eric P

    2011-05-24

    A method for oil recovery whereby an exothermic water reactant (EWR) encapsulated in a water soluble coating is placed in water and pumped into one or more oil wells in contact with an oil bearing formation. After the water carries the EWR to the bottom of the injection well, the water soluble coating dissolves and the EWR reacts with the water to produce heat, an alkali solution, and hydrogen. The heat from the EWR reaction generates steam, which is forced into the oil bearing formation where it condenses and transfers heat to the oil, elevating its temperature and decreasing the viscosity of the oil. The aqueous alkali solution mixes with the oil in the oil bearing formation and forms a surfactant that reduces the interfacial tension between the oil and water. The hydrogen may be used to react with the oil at these elevated temperatures to form lighter molecules, thus upgrading to a certain extent the oil in situ. As a result, the oil can flow more efficiently and easily through the oil bearing formation towards and into one or more production wells.

  4. Water injected fuel cell system compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepierski, James S. (Williamsville, NY); Moore, Barbara S. (Victor, NY); Hoch, Martin Monroe (Webster, NY)

    2001-01-01

    A fuel cell system including a dry compressor for pressurizing air supplied to the cathode side of the fuel cell. An injector sprays a controlled amount of water on to the compressor's rotor(s) to improve the energy efficiency of the compressor. The amount of water sprayed out the rotor(s) is controlled relative to the mass flow rate of air inputted to the compressor.

  5. Investigations on matrix recovery during steam injection into heavy-oil containing carbonate rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babadagli, Tayfun [University of Alberta, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, School of Mining and Petroleum, 3-112 Markin CNRL-NREF, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Al-Bemani, Ali [Sultan Qaboos University, College of Eng. Department of Petroleum and Chemical Eng., PO Box 33, Al-Khod, Muscat 123 (Oman)

    2007-08-15

    We studied the steam injection potential of heavy-oil containing fractured carbonate reservoirs and analyzed the effects and contribution of different mechanisms on matrix recovery. Qarn Alam field, located in the central part of Oman, was considered as a specific case. Static (capillary) imbibition experiments at different temperatures varying between 20 C and 200 C were conducted using aged Berea sandstone, Indiana limestone, and original - preserved and unpreserved - core samples from the Qarn Alam field. The recovery from the Qarn Alam rock samples at the temperature below the bubble point of water (90 C) is expected to be dominated by three mechanisms, i.e., thermal expansion, capillary imbibition and gravity drainage. Based on the amount measured as the recovery and thermal expansion potential of Qarn Alam crude, the recovery was predominantly controlled by the thermal expansion over the time period applied for respective experiments. Other two mechanisms require longer time than applied in this study to be effective for weakly-water-wet/oil-wet Qarn Alam cores. Some tests at higher temperatures were conducted to gain some ideas about the recovery potential as well as having background information for further studies. The temperature value was selected as 200 C-212 C by nearly doubling the previous applied value (90 C). At the temperature of 200 C significant increase in the recovery was observed. No capillary imbibition recovery was added because no fluid (water or steam condensate) surrounded the matrix and the samples were exposed only to heating. Therefore, only thermal expansion and internal drive (any recovery mechanism caused by the change in the fluid properties in the rock due to thermal effect, i.e., gas, generation, steam distillation, solution gas-drive etc.) were the effective recovery mechanisms. Gravity drainage was thought to be ineffective as the duration of experiments was too short in order for this mechanism to play a role (1-2 h). Finally, the results were used to test the scaling relationships. (author)

  6. Multi-Phase Modeling of Rainbird Water Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Moss, Nicholas; Sampson, Zoe

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a Volume of Fluid (VOF) multiphase model to simulate the water injected from a rainbird nozzle used in the sound suppression system during launch. The simulations help determine the projectile motion for different water flow rates employed at the pad, as it is critical to know if water will splash on the first-stage rocket engine during liftoff.

  7. Treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma by transarterial injection of anticancer agents in iodized oil suspension or of radioactive iodized oil solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transarterial injection of modified iodized oil was performed in 48 patients with hepatoma. In 41 cases an adriamycin and/or mitomycin C-iodized oil suspension was administered into the proper hepatic artery or peripheral hepatic branches. A reduction in tumor size of over 50% was obtained in 14 of the 33 patients in whom CT examination was performed before and after treatment. Serum alpha-fetoprotein levels decreased in 20 of 21 cases within the first month after injection. The one-year survival rate was estimated at 55% in advanced hepatoma. In 7 patients, transarterial internal irradiation using radioactive iodized oil was carried out. A decrease in tumor size was observed in all cases and in alpha-fetoprotein levels in 6 cases. One patient with severe liver cirrhosis died in hepatorenal failure. No severe complications or other adverse reactions were encountered with either of the methods. (orig.)

  8. Intercomparison of oil spill prediction models for accidental blowout scenarios with and without subsea chemical dispersant injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolofsky, Scott A; Adams, E Eric; Boufadel, Michel C; Aman, Zachary M; Johansen, Øistein; Konkel, Wolfgang J; Lindo, David; Madsen, Mads N; North, Elizabeth W; Paris, Claire B; Rasmussen, Dorte; Reed, Mark; Rønningen, Petter; Sim, Lawrence H; Uhrenholdt, Thomas; Anderson, Karl G; Cooper, Cortis; Nedwed, Tim J

    2015-07-15

    We compare oil spill model predictions for a prototype subsea blowout with and without subsea injection of chemical dispersants in deep and shallow water, for high and low gas-oil ratio, and in weak to strong crossflows. Model results are compared for initial oil droplet size distribution, the nearfield plume, and the farfield Lagrangian particle tracking stage of hydrocarbon transport. For the conditions tested (a blowout with oil flow rate of 20,000 bbl/d, about 1/3 of the Deepwater Horizon), the models predict the volume median droplet diameter at the source to range from 0.3 to 6mm without dispersant and 0.01 to 0.8mm with dispersant. This reduced droplet size owing to reduced interfacial tension results in a one to two order of magnitude increase in the downstream displacement of the initial oil surfacing zone and may lead to a significant fraction of the spilled oil not reaching the sea surface. PMID:26021288

  9. Stability Proxies for Water-in-Oil Emulsions and Implications in Aqueous-based Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnoosh Moradi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Several researchers have proposed that mobility control mechanisms can positively contribute to oil recovery in the case of emulsions generated in Enhanced-Oil Recovery (EOR operations. Chemical EOR techniques that use alkaline components or/and surfactants are known to produce undesirable emulsions that create operational problems and are difficult to break. Other water-based methods have been less studied in this sense. EOR processes such as polymer flooding and LoSalTM injection require adjustments of water chemistry, mainly by lowering the ionic strength of the solution or by decreasing hardness. The decreased ionic strength of EOR solutions can give rise to more stable water-in-oil emulsions, which are speculated to improve mobility ratio between the injectant and the displaced oil. The first step toward understanding the connection between the emulsions and EOR mechanisms is to show that EOR conditions, such as salinity and hardness requirements, among others, are conducive to stabilizing emulsions. In order to do this, adequate stability proxies are required. This paper reviews commonly used emulsion stability proxies and explains the advantages and disadvantage of methods reviewed. This paper also reviews aqueous-based EOR processes with focus on heavy oil to contextualize in-situ emulsion stabilization conditions. This context sets the basis for comparison of emulsion stability proxies.

  10. Ultra high-temperature solids-free insulating packer fluid for oil and gas production, steam injection and geothermal wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezell, R.G.; Harrison, D.J. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Canadian Section, Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Halliburton Energy Services, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Uncontrolled heat transfer from production/injection tubing during thermal oil recovery via steam injection can be detrimental to the integrity of the casing and to the quality of the steam that is injected into the reservoir. An aqueous-based insulating packer fluid (IPF) was introduced to improve the steam injection process by controlling the total heat loss from the produced fluids to the surrounding wellbore, internal annuli and formation. The IPF was developed for elevated temperature environments through extensive investigation across multidisciplinary technology. The innovative system delivers performance beyond conventional systems of comparable thermal conductivity. Its density range and conductivity measurements were presented in this paper. High-temperature static aging tests showed superior gel integrity without any phase separation after exposure to temperatures higher than 260 degrees C. The new fluids are hydrate inhibitive, non-corrosive and pass oil and grease testing. They are considered to be environmentally sound by Gulf of Mexico standards. It was concluded that the new ultra high-performance insulating packer fluid (HTIPF) reduced the heat loss significantly by both conduction and convection. Heat transfer within the aqueous-based HTIPF was 97 per cent less than that of pure water. It was concluded that the HTIPF can be substituted for conventional packer fluids without compromising any well control issues. 21 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  11. Distribution of Complex Chemicals in Oil-Water Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    The deepwater energy sector represents one of the major growth areas of the oil and gas industry today. In order to meet the challenges of hydrate formation, corrosion, scaling and foaming the oil and gas industry uses many chemicals and their use has increased significantly over the years. In order to inhibit gas hydrate formation in subsea pipelines monoethylene glycol (MEG) and methanol are injected in large amounts. It is important to know the distribution of these chemicals in oil and water systems for economical operation of a production facility and to evaluate their impact on marine life. Furthermore distribution of chemicals is important information for downstream processing of oil and gas. The purpose of this project is the experimental measurement and the thermodynamic modeling of distribution of these complex chemicals in oil-water systems. Traditionally distribution of chemicals in oil-water system is calculated using octanol-water partition coefficients. But experiments carried out by StatoilR & D have shown that octanol-water partition coefficients (Kow) do not always mimic oil-water partition coefficients (Koil-water) and therefore calculations may not be always correct. In the first phase of this project experimental data on Kow, Koil-water and Khw (hexane-water partition coefficients) are collected and investigations were carried out to develop correlations so that Koil-water can be predicted using Kow and Khw. However, due to scarcity of experimental data and limited information about the molecular structure of production chemicals the correlation could only be obtained for few families like alcohols, glycols and alkanolamines with varying degree of reliability. In order to develop a thermodynamic model for the distribution of chemicals in oil-water systems experimental data are required but such data with natural gas-condensate/oil systems are very rare in the literature. In this project experimental work has been carried at Statoil R & D and an experimental method has been established and tested for such measurements. The mutual solubility of two North Sea condensates, MEG and water has been measured in the temperature range of 275-326 K at atmospheric pressure. The detailed composition of condensates is measured by GC analysis and 85 components are identified up to n-nonane and hundreds of ill-defined components in decane plus fraction. In order to develop a thermodynamic model for the distribution of chemicals in oil-water systems experimental data are required but such data with natural gas-condensate/oil systems are very rare in the literature. In this project experimental work has been carried at Statoil R & D and an experimental method has been established and tested for such measurements. The mutual solubility of two North Sea condensates, MEG and water has been measured in the temperature range of 275-326 K at atmospheric pressure. The detailed composition of condensates is measured by GC analysis and 85 components are identified up to n-nonane and hundreds of ill-defined components in decane plus fraction. When methanol and MEG are used as gas hydrate inhibitors, the most significant disadvantage, especially for methanol, is their loss in hydrocarbon phase(s). The successful estimation of inhibitor loss would enable the inhibitors injection optimization as a function of the system parameters such as temperature and water cut. In this project the distribution of water and inhibitors (methanol, MEG) in various phases is modeled using the CPA EoS. The hydrocarbon phase consists of mixture-1 (methane, ethane, n-butane) or mixture-2 (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, n-heptane, toluene and n-decane). CPA can satisfactorily predict water content in the gas phase of the multicomponent systems containing mixture-1 over a range of temperature and pressure. Similarly the methanol content in gas phase of mixture-1 + water + methanol systems is predicted satisfactorily with accuracy in the range of experimental uncertainty. For VLLE of mixture-2 + water, mixture-2 + MEG + water and mixture-2 + methano

  12. Use of tobacco seed oil methyl ester in a turbocharged indirect injection diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegetable oils and their methyl/ethyl esters are alternative renewable fuels for compression ignition engines. Different kinds of vegetable oils and their methyl/ethyl esters have been tested in diesel engines. However, tobacco seed oil and tobacco seed oil methyl ester have not been tested in diesel engines, yet. Tobacco seed oil is a non-edible vegetable oil and a by-product of tobacco leaves production. To the author's best knowledge, this is the first study on tobacco seed oil methyl ester as a fuel in diesel engines. In this study, potential tobacco seed production throughout the world, the oil extraction process from tobacco seed and the transesterification process for biodiesel production were examined. The produced tobacco seed oil methyl ester was characterized by exposing its major properties. The effects of tobacco seed oil methyl ester addition to diesel No. 2 on the performance and emissions of a four cycle, four cylinder turbocharged indirect injection (IDI) diesel engine were examined at both full and partial loads. Experimental results showed that tobacco seed oil methyl ester can be partially substituted for the diesel fuel at most operating conditions in terms of performance parameters and emissions without any engine modification and preheating of the blends. (Author)

  13. Stabilization of Oil-Water Emulsions by Hydrophobic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Dorobantu, Loredana S.; Yeung, Anthony K. C.; Foght, Julia M.; Murray R. Gray

    2004-01-01

    Formation of oil-water emulsions during bacterial growth on hydrocarbons is often attributed to biosurfactants. Here we report the ability of certain intact bacterial cells to stabilize oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsions without changing the interfacial tension, by inhibition of droplet coalescence as observed in emulsion stabilization by solid particles like silica.

  14. Modeling of Ion Injection in Oil-Pressboard Insulation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sonehag, Christian

    2012-01-01

    To make a High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission more energy efficient, the voltage of the system has to be increased. To allow for that the components of the system must be constructed to handle the increases AC and DC stresses that this leads to. One key component in such a transmission is the HVDC converter transformer. The insulation system of the transformer usually consists of oil and oil-impregnated pressboard. Modeling of the electric DC field in the insulation system is curr...

  15. Irreversible muscle damage in bodybuilding due to long-term intramuscular oil injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banke, I J; Prodinger, P M; Waldt, S; Weirich, G; Holzapfel, B M; Gradinger, R; Rechl, H

    2012-10-01

    Intramuscular oil injections generating slowly degrading oil-based depots represent a controversial subject in bodybuilding and fitness. However they seem to be commonly reported in a large number of non-medical reports, movies and application protocols for 'site-injections'. Surprisingly the impact of long-term (ab)use on the musculature as well as potential side-effects compromising health and sports ability are lacking in the medical literature. We present the case of a 40 year old male semi-professional bodybuilder with systemic infection and painful reddened swellings of the right upper arm forcing him to discontinue weightlifting. Over the last 8 years he daily self-injected sterilized sesame seed oil at numerous intramuscular locations for the purpose of massive muscle building. Whole body MRI showed more than 100 intramuscular rather than subcutaneous oil cysts and loss of normal muscle anatomy. 2-step septic surgery of the right upper arm revealed pus-filled cystic scar tissue with the near-complete absence of normal muscle. MRI 1 year later revealed the absence of relevant muscle regeneration. Persistent pain and inability to perform normal weight training were evident for at least 3 years post-surgery. This alarming finding indicating irreversible muscle mutilation may hopefully discourage people interested in bodybuilding and fitness from oil-injections. The impact of such chronic tissue stress on other diseases like malignancy remains to be determined. PMID:22592548

  16. Oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs by steam injection methods. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, J.C.; Miller, M.A.

    1995-05-01

    Oil recovery by steam injection is a proven, successful technology for nonfractured reservoirs, but has received only limited study for fractured reservoirs. Preliminary studies suggest recovery efficiencies in fractured reservoirs may be increased by as much as 50% with the application of steam relative to that of low temperature processes. The key mechanisms enhancing oil production at high temperature are the differential thermal expansion between oil and the pore volume, and the generation of gases within matrix blocks. Other mechanisms may also contribute to increased production. These mechanisms are relatively independent of oil gravity, making steam injection into naturally fractured reservoirs equally attractive to light and heavy oil deposits. The objectives of this research program are to quantify the amount of oil expelled by these recovery mechanisms and to develop a numerical model for predicting oil recovery in naturally fractured reservoirs during steam injection. The experimental study consists of constructing and operating several apparatuses to isolate each of these mechanisms. The first measures thermal expansion and capillary imbibition rates at relatively low temperature, but for various lithologies and matrix block shapes. The second apparatus measures the same parameters, but at high temperatures and for only one shape. A third experimental apparatus measures the maximum gas saturations that could build up within a matrix block. A fourth apparatus measures thermal conductivity and diffusivity of porous media. The numerical study consists of developing transfer functions for oil expulsion from matrix blocks to fractures at high temperatures and incorporating them, along with the energy equation, into a dual porosity thermal reservoir simulator. This simulator can be utilized to make predictions for steam injection processes in naturally-fractured reservoirs. Analytical models for capillary imbibition have also been developed.

  17. Nuclear-energy application studied as source of injection steam for heavy-oil recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study into the feasibility of adapting a well-proven nuclear reactor as a centralized source of injection steam for the recovery of heavy oil has shown that the reactor modifications are practicable and well within the bounds of current technology. The gas-cooled reactor is capable of meeting the highest steam supply pressure requirement and it possesses a high degree of inherent safety. The injection of steam for the recovery of heavy oil is the most well developed of the available options. At current price levels of oil and uranium, nuclear heat can be generated at a fraction of the running costs of oil fired thermal plant. Taken over a project lifetime of 25 years for the field model used for this assessment, the improved earnings for the nuclear option could amount to as much as /10 billion. The program requirements for a typical development have been examined and the construction times for the gas reactor steam plant, the oil-field development and the upgrading plant are compatible at between five and six years. The economic advantage of steam generation by nuclear energy gives a further recovery breakthrough. It becomes possible to continue the steam drive process up to much more adverse recovery ratios of steam quantity injected for unit oil produced if nuclear energy is employed

  18. Effect of advanced injection timing on the performance of rapeseed oil in diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combustion studies on both diesel fuel and vegetable oil fuels, with the standard and advanced injection timing, were carried out using the same engine and test procedures so that comparative assessments may be made. The diesel engine principle demands self-ignition of the fuel as it is injected at some degrees before top dead centre (BTDC) into the hot compressed cylinder gas. Longer delays between injection and ignition lead to unacceptable rates of pressure rise with the result of diesel knock because too much fuel is ready to take part in premixed combustion. Alternative fuels have been noted to exhibit longer delay periods and slower burning rate especially at low load operating conditions hence resulting in late combustion in the expansion stroke. Advanced injection timing is expected to compensate these effects. The engine has standard injection timing of 30degC BTDC. The injection was first advanced by 5.5degC given injection timing of 35.5degC BTDC. The engine performance was very erratic on this timing. The injection was then advanced by 3.5degC and the effects are presented in this paper. The engine performance was smooth especially at low load levels. The ignition delay was reduced through advanced injection but tended to incur a slight increase in fuel consumption. Moderate advanced injection timing is recommended for low speed operations. (Author)

  19. Influence of fat crystals in the oil phase on stability of oil-in-water emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Boekel, M. A. J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Coalescence at rest and during flow was studied in emulsions of paraffin oil in water with several surfactants and with crystals of solid paraffin or tristearate in the oil phase. Solid fat in the oil phase was estimated by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. Without crystals, oil-in-water emulsions were mostly stable and flow hardly influenced coalescence, even of unstable emulsions. Emulsions with crystals in the dispersed oil phase were less stable if crystals appeared at the interface. The...

  20. Comparison of water use for hydraulic fracturing for unconventional oil and gas versus conventional oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, B R; Reedy, R C; Nicot, J-P

    2014-10-21

    We compared water use for hydraulic fracturing (HF) for oil versus gas production within the Eagle Ford shale. We then compared HF water use for Eagle Ford oil with Bakken oil, both plays accounting for two-thirds of U.S. unconventional oil production in 2013. In the Eagle Ford, we found similar average water use in oil and gas zones per well (4.7-4.9 × 10(6) gallons [gal]/well). However, about twice as much water is used per unit of energy (water-to-oil ratio, WOR, vol water/vol oil) in the oil zone (WOR: 1.4) as in the gas zone (water-to-oil-equivalent-ratio, WOER: 0.6). We also found large differences in water use for oil between the two plays, with mean Bakken water use/well (2.0 × 10(6) gal/well) about half that in the Eagle Ford, and a third per energy unit. We attribute these variations mostly to geological differences. Water-to-oil ratios for these plays (0.6-1.4) will further decrease (0.2-0.4) based on estimated ultimate oil recovery of wells. These unconventional water-to-oil ratios (0.2-1.4) are within the lower range of those for U.S. conventional oil production (WOR: 0.1-5). Therefore, the U.S. is using more water because HF has expanded oil production, not because HF is using more water per unit of oil production. PMID:25233450

  1. Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents an introduction to beam injection. Especially considered are single-turn injection, multi-turn injection, H- charge-exchange injection, and injection from a cyclotron into a synchrotron. Finally some novel injection schemes are briefly mentioned. (HSI)

  2. Highly efficient 6-stroke engine cycle with water injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szybist, James P; Conklin, James C

    2012-10-23

    A six-stroke engine cycle having improved efficiency. Heat is recovered from the engine combustion gases by using a 6-stroke engine cycle in which combustion gases are partially vented proximate the bottom-dead-center position of the fourth stroke cycle, and water is injected proximate the top-dead-center position of the fourth stroke cycle.

  3. Monitoring oil–water mixture separation by time domain reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective separation of water and oil is an essential part of petroleum production. Time domain reflectometry (TDR) can be used to profile the separation of hydrocarbon oil–water mixtures. In such two-component systems, metal electrodes will become oil-coated due to their affinity to oil. This coating layer will impact water content measurements. By combining the TDR signals from two probes in a novel configuration, the thickness of the oil layer on the electrodes can be estimated and its effect on the TDR measurements corrected for. The probes consist of two rods of different diameter and spacing to a common ground/guard electrode. The measurement principle is demonstrated using a light fuel oil and a thicker organic oil. The results indicate that oil and water levels can be monitored during separation if the metal electrode oil-coating effect is accounted for. (paper)

  4. Studies on water-in-oil products from crude oils and petroleum products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingas, Merv; Fieldhouse, Ben

    2012-02-01

    Water-in-oil mixtures such as emulsions, often form and complicate oil spill countermeasures. The formation of water-in-oil mixtures was studied using more than 300 crude oils and petroleum products. Water-in-oil types were characterized by resolution of water at 1 and 7 days, and some after 1 year. Rheology measurements were carried out at the same intervals. The objective of this laboratory study was to characterize the formed water-in-oil products and relate these properties to starting oil properties. Analysis of the starting oil properties of these water-in-oil types shows that the existence of each type relates to the starting oil viscosity and its asphaltene and resin contents. This confirms that water-in-oil emulsification is a result of physical stabilization by oil viscosity and chemical stabilization by asphaltenes and resins. This stabilization is illustrated using simple graphical techniques. Four water-in-oil types exist: stable, unstable, meso-stable and entrained. Each of these has distinct physical properties. PMID:22183525

  5. Microgels at oil/water interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Brugger, Bastian Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Particle-stabilized emulsions, so called Pickering Emulsions, are known for more than a century. In such emulsions particles, mostly inorganic particles in the nm to µm range, adsorb to oil/water interfaces and stabilize emulsions by coulomb and sterical repulsion. Pickering emulsions are usually of very high stability, and a lot of energy is needed when such emulsions should be broken. Emulsions which stability depends on external stimuli have drawn much attention in recent years, as they a...

  6. Differences in microbial community composition between injection and production water samples of water flooding petroleum reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, P. K.; Li, G. Q.; Tian, H. M.; Wang, Y. S.; Sun, H. W.; Ma, T.

    2015-06-01

    Microbial communities in injected water are expected to have significant influence on those of reservoir strata in long-term water flooding petroleum reservoirs. To investigate the similarities and differences in microbial communities in injected water and reservoir strata, high-throughput sequencing of microbial partial 16S rRNA of the water samples collected from the wellhead and downhole of injection wells, and from production wells in a homogeneous sandstone reservoir and a heterogeneous conglomerate reservoir were performed. The results indicate that a small number of microbial populations are shared between the water samples from the injection and production wells in the sandstone reservoir, whereas a large number of microbial populations are shared in the conglomerate reservoir. The bacterial and archaeal communities in the reservoir strata have high concentrations, which are similar to those in the injected water. However, microbial population abundance exhibited large differences between the water samples from the injection and production wells. The number of shared populations reflects the influence of microbial communities in injected water on those in reservoir strata to some extent, and show strong association with the unique variation of reservoir environments.

  7. Bio-physicochemical treatment of oil contaminated sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article introduces a combined physicochemical and biological process for treatment of oil contaminated sea water. In this process, a new polymeric surfactant is successfully applied with a dosage of 0.0015 g/g of crude oil to accumulate oil spots on the sea water in a microcosm. In the next step, microbial degradation of accumulated oil spots using isolated bacteria from oil contaminated Caspian Sea water was studied. The results of a proposed process for treatment of contaminated sea water in a pilot scale, using a 1500-l microcosm with several basins at different conditions are presented

  8. Effect of Combined Low Salinity and Surfactant Injection on Oil Recovery in Aged Bentheimer Sandstones at Different Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Riisøen, Solveig

    2012-01-01

    A moderate increase in crude oil recovery by reduction in salinity of the injection brine has been observed for numerous laboratory core flood experiments. The underlying mechanisms behind increased recovery by low salinity injection are not fully understood and are suggested to relate to complex crude oil/rock/brine interactions. Recent studies have also shown a positive effect by combining injection of low salinity brine and surfactant flooding. In this study, ...

  9. EMISSION ANALYSIS OF DI-DIESEL ENGINE AT DIFFERENT INJECTION PRESSURES USING JATROPHA AND RUBBER SEED OIL BLENDED WITH DIESEL

    OpenAIRE

    S. Mahalingam; B.R.RameshBapu

    2014-01-01

    Biodiesel as a renewable fuel has been considered as the best alternate for diesel fuel now a days.This fossil fuel can be used in diesel engine with or without any modi?cation.The injection pressure and injection timing are the major influencing parameters forthe performance and emission of diesel engine.In thispresentstudy,the emission analysis of vegetable oil, Jatropha oil and rubber seed oil crushed from the seed, esterified and blended with pure diesel fuel. A single cyl...

  10. Modelling geomechanics into petroleum reservoir numerical simulation : a coupled technique in a water injection project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, L.G.; Cunha, L.B.; Chalaturnyk, R. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    It is important to characterize a reservoir accurately once it has been discovered in order to determine the most effective method of draining the recoverable oil. A great amount of data is required in reservoir characterization with an important data aspect being whether or not to consider geomechanical effects on the reservoir response. Oil production from subsurface reservoirs is a complex process in which rock mechanical properties and fluid flow parameters are coupled variables. Using coupled numerical modeling, production induced stress sensitivity can be simulated, whereas the relationship of stress with permeability and porosity can be set up based on sufficient laboratory tests. In order to improve reservoir understanding and performance forecasting, this paper described a study that coupled a nonlinear finite difference geomechanics model with a finite difference numerical fluid flow simulator to study the behavior of a typical oil reservoir located in Campos Basin, Brazil. The purpose of the study was to explore uncertainties of flow through an oil reservoir that contained a major fault and which was producing under water injection. The study also investigated and discussed the role of geomechanics in the fault reactivation. It was concluded that the study revealed important geomechanical features that should be examined when limited information and production uncertainties exist in complex oil exploitation project scenarios. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  11. A Performance, Emission and Combustion Investigation on Hot Air Assisted Eucalyptus Oil Direct Injected Compression Ignition Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. TAMILVENDHAN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A diesel engine modified for eucalyptus oil direct injection (EuDI has been tested to study eucalyptus oil behavior. Since the eucalyptus oil possesses low cetane number fails to auto ignite, the test engine was modified to supply hot air during suction stroke which helps to auto-ignite the injected eucalyptus oil. The engine with this facility was operated using eucalyptus oil under various load conditions and at various intake temperatures. The results of the investigation were proved that eucalyptus oil could be direct injectable in a regular diesel engine after little engine modification. This method showed almost same brake thermal efficiency (BTE at full load compared to standard diesel operation. Except NOx emission other emissions were found closer to diesel baseline operation. This mode offered almost 50% smoke free operation at all loads compared to standard diesel operation. Also this method successfully proved the complete replacement of diesel fuel by eucalyptus oil.

  12. Numerical and experimental study of water/oil emulsified fuel combustion in a diesel engine

    OpenAIRE

    Samec, Niko; Kegl, Breda; Dibble, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical and experimental studies were made on some of the chemical and physical properties of wateržoil emulsified fuel (W/OEF) combustion characteristics. Numerical investigations of W/OEF combustion's chemical kinetic aspects have been performed by simulation of water/n-heptane mixture combustion, assuming a model of a homogenous reactor's concentric shells. The injection and fuel spray characteristics are analyzed numerically also in order to study indirectly the physical effects of wate...

  13. COMBUSTION ANALYSIS OF ALGAL OIL METHYL ESTER IN A DIRECT INJECTION COMPRESSION IGNITION ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARIRAM V.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Algal oil methyl ester was derived from microalgae (Spirulina sp. The microalga was cultivated in BG 11 media composition in a photobioreactor. Upon harvesting, the biomass was filtered and dried. The algal oil was obtained by a two step solvent extraction method using hexane and ether solvent. Cyclohexane was added to biomass to expel the remaining algal oil. By this method 92% of algal oil is obtained. Transesterification process was carried out to produce AOME by adding sodium hydroxide and methanol. The AOME was blended with straight diesel in 5%, 10% and 15% blend ratio. Combustion parameters were analyzed on a Kirloskar single cylinder direct injection compression ignition engine. The cylinder pressure characteristics, the rate of pressure rise, heat release analysis, performance and emissions were studied for straight diesel and the blends of AOME’s. AOME 15% blend exhibits significant variation in cylinder pressure and rate of heat release.

  14. Foam as an agent to reduce gravity override effect during gas injection in oil reservoirs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, J.C.; Sanyal, S.K.; Castanier, L.M.; Brigham, W.E.; Shah, D.O.

    1980-08-01

    A two-dimensional, vertical, rectangular plexiglas model holding a 45-1/2 in. high by 11-3/8 in. wide by 1/4 in. thick sandpack (1.147 x 0.237 x 0.008 m) was used to investigate gravity override of injected gases in gas drive processes. Saturation of the sandpack by a surfactant solution instead of pure water sharply increased liquid recovery and breakthrough time in a nitrogen flooding process. The improvement in production was shown to be due to a reduction of gravity override caused by in-situ generation of foam at the gas-liquid interface. Solutions of two different surfactants (Suntech IX and IV) of various concentrations with different amounts of alcohol were studied to determine their effectiveness as foamers. Surface tension and rate of drainage of the foamers as functions of surfactant concentration were measured. In-situ foaming in the model increased generally with surfactant concentration until an optimum concentration was reached; above this concentration, additional amounts of surfactant had very little effect on the phenomenon. Alcohols seem to improve the performance of low molecular weight surfactants and exhibitied a negative effect on the others. A similar increase of recovery and delay in the breakthrough time was observed in the oil flooding process. A slug of surfactant solution was injected into the pack which was saturated with a white mineral oil and water at irreducible water saturation, and then nitrogen was injected. Gravity override was much less than in the cases when no surfactant was present.

  15. Underground upgrading of heavy oil using THAI : toe-to-heel air injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greaves, M.; Xia, T.X. [Bath Univ., Bath, England (United Kingdom); Ayasse, C. [Petrobank Energy and Resources Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2005-11-01

    Petrobank Energy and Resources Ltd. is building its first field test of the Toe-to-Heel Air Injection (THAI) process through its subsidiary, Whitesands Insitu Ltd. THAI is a thermal recovery method that achieves very stable combustion performance in heavy oil wells by controlling gas override. It also captures the underground upgrading because the horizontal producer well process operates through by a short-distance displacement mechanism, similar to that of the steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) process. In the THAI process, injected air migrates preferentially to the combustion front into a horizontal producer well. This paper described the reservoir and site features, processing plant design, pilot objectives and the expected economics and environmental benefits of the pilot project at Christina Lake, Alberta. There is a stable combustion front propagation in all THAI direct line-drive well configurations, which include a parallel pair arrangement. Very high sweep efficiencies are achieved, according to the movement of the high temperature front through the sandpack. A well-controlled, narrow mobile oil zone (MOZ) lies just ahead ahead of the combustion front, creating a pathway for the injected air to reach the combustion front and for combustion gases and mobilized fluids to be produced via the open section of the horizontal producer well. A cold heavy oil layer exists downstream of the combustion front-MOZ region. Results indicate that excellent upgrading can be achieved and there were several positive indicators regarding the quality of the produced oil. 8 refs., 5 tabs., 13 figs.

  16. Sustainable water management in Alberta's oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, Bill; Usher, Robyn; Roach, Andrea [CH2M HILL, Englewood, CO (United States); Lambert, Gord; Kotecha, Prit [Suncor Energy Inc., Calgary (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers forecast published in 2011 predicts that oil production from oil sands will increase by 50% in the next 3 years and double by 2020. This rate of growth will result in significant pressure on water resources; water use per barrel of oil sands production is comparable to other energy resources - about 2.5 barrels of fresh water per barrel of oil produced are used by mining operations and 0.5 barrels by in-situ operations. Suncor Energy Inc. (Suncor) was the first company to develop the oil sands in northern Alberta and holds one of the largest oil sands positions in Canada. In 2010, Suncor announced plans to increase production to more than 1 million barrels of oil equivalent per day by 2020, which it plans to achieve through oil sands production growth of approximately 10% per year. Because water supply and potential impacts to water quality are critical to its future growth, in 2010-2011 Suncor conducted a risk assessment to identify water-related business risks related to its northern Alberta operations. The assessment identified more than 20 high level business risks in strategic water risk areas including water supply, water reuse, storm water management, groundwater, waste management and river water return. The risk assessment results prompted development of a strategic roadmap to guide water stewardship across Suncor's regional operations. The roadmap describes goals, objectives, and specific activities for each of six key water risk areas, and informs prioritization and selection of prospective water management activities. Suncor is not only exploring water within its own boundaries, but is also collaborating with other oil sands producers to explore ways of integrating its water systems through industry consortia; Suncor is a member of the Oil Sands Leadership Initiative and of the recently formed Canadian Oil Sands Innovation Alliance, among others. (author)

  17. Hot gas injection as an artificial lift system through a concentric tubing completion in a heavy oil well, Pilon field, Faja Petrolifera del Orinoco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marfissi, S.; Lujan, A. [PDVSA EandP (Venezuela)

    2011-07-01

    The Pilon Field in the Morichal District, Venezuela is producing heavy oil with numerous gas lift wells. Some of these wells are now inactive due to casing damage. The purpose of this paper is to assess the benefits of using hot gas injection as an artificial lift system through a concentric tubing completion in such wells. A pilot test was conducted on a well presenting a low water cut and 12 degree API, an indirect fire heater was installed near the wells. Results showed that heat losses were minimized thanks to the concentric pipe completion. In addition hot gas injection resulted in an oil production increase of 57%. The hot gas injection method used with a concentric tubing completion was proved to be a good alternative to the use of diluent but an economic analysis is nevertheless recommended to determine the costs of installing heating equipment.

  18. Sensitivities to Component Characterizations of Heavy Oil Viscosity in Numerical Reservoir Simulation of Steam-Injection Processes

    OpenAIRE

    La Porte, Jacoba

    2013-01-01

    This work examines heavy oil viscosity modelling during simulation of steam injection processes, such as steam-line-drive and SAGD, and the sensitivity of oil recovery predictions to the uncertainty in the oil viscosity. Analytical models to predict the sensitivity have been developed, confirmed by numerical simulation. Heavy oil compositional component viscosities are modelled with the Free Volume model. The model is extended in this thesis to estimate the viscosities of long-chain n-alka...

  19. Flow oscillations induced by subcooled water injection into steam flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condensation of steam occurs when subcooled water is injected into steam flow in pipe, and steam-water condensing flow oscillates under a certain condition. The mechanisms of the oscillations and also the predominant parameters to them were made clear through both small scale simulation experiments and simplified analyses. Oscillation threshold was analyzed using the linear stability criterion. Frequencies of both plug oscillation and ON-OFF oscillation were analyzed basing on the linear oscillation theory and on a simplified analytical model, respectively. The analyses were also applied to explain the experiments by Akimoto et al. and CREARE. Heat transfer coefficients at direct contact condensation during oscillation were also discussed

  20. Spontaneous Formation of Water Droplets at Oil-Solid Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhongqiang; NICHOLAS L. ABBOTT

    2010-01-01

    We report observations of spontaneous formation of micrometer-sized water droplets within micrometer-thick films of a range of different oils (isotropic and nematic 4-cyano-4’-pentylbiphenyl (5CB), and silicone, olive and corn oil) that are supported on glass substrates treated with octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) and immersed under water. Confocal imaging was used to determine that the water droplets nucleate and grow at the interface between the oils and OTS-treated glass with a contact an...

  1. Adhesion of oil to kaolinite in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Evgenia V; Fogden, Andrew

    2010-12-15

    Uniform coats of kaolinite particles on a flat glass substrate were prepared to be sufficiently smooth and thin to allow reliable measurement of contact angles of captive crude oil drops in a range of salt solutions, without any particle removal. The contact angle hysteresis was used to infer the extent of oil adhesion via rupture of the intervening water film and anchoring of charged groups to kaolinite. For sodium chloride solutions, adhesion decreases monotonically with pH and/or salinity, with strong adhesion only manifested under acidic conditions with salinity at most 0.1 M. Calcium chloride solutions at pH around 6 switch from strong adhesion in the range 0.001-0.01 M to weak adhesion at higher concentrations. For all mixtures of sodium and calcium chlorides investigated, a total ionic strength above 0.1 M guarantees a weak adhesion of oil to kaolinite. Results are qualitatively consistent with theoretical expectations of electrostatic interactions, with H(+) and Ca(2+) being potential-determining ions for both interfaces. PMID:21105728

  2. Water-in-crude oil emulsion formation and stability for crude oils in fresh, brackish and salt water. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crude oil spilled at sea is subjected to weathering. The main physical process of weathering are water-in-oil emulsification, evaporation, dispersion, dissolution and oil-sediment interaction. For medium to heavy oils, evaporation and dispersion are less important, and the onset of water-in-oil emulsion formation becomes the most important weathering process for spill response. Emulsification involves the incorporation of water droplets into the continuous oil phase. As such, it has a pronounced effect on the physical properties and characteristics of an oil, affecting its behaviour and ultimate fate. Emulsions formed from heavy oils contain higher proportions of asphaltenes and resins and may persist for long periods or indefinitely. This paper provided a direct comparison of stability for emulsions formed from crude oils with both fresh and salt water containing 20 or 33 per cent sodium chloride. Emulsions from 5 crude oil were compared. It was noted that oils that form emulsions in salt water will also form in fresh water, in the same stability class. Stable fresh water emulsions have lower values of the viscoelastic parameters, indicating decreased stability compared to stable salt water emulsions. The difference between stable and meso-stable emulsions formed from water of 20 and 33 per cent salinity was small, but meso-stable emulsions from fresh water could achieve higher levels of water content and have higher initial values of the viscoelastic parameters thanvalues of the viscoelastic parameters than with salt water. The nature of stabilizer deficiency determines the form of degraded meso-stable emulsions. It was concluded that since entrained water states are created by a different chemical-physical process or mixing mode, there is no difference in emulsions product due to the ionic content of salt water. However, wax content may be a contributor to the stabilization for entrained water states. 14 refs., 5 tabs., 6 figs

  3. Performance of Scroll-Type Helium Compressor with Oil Injection Cooling Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiibayashi, Masao; Tomita, Yoshikatsu; Izunaga, Yasushi; Maeda, Naoki

    In the cryoelectronics field where the helium gas is utilized as a working field, rotary-type and reciprocating-type compressors are popular for the discharge capacity of less than 200Nm3/h and screw-type compressor for a larger capacity. In this study, scroll-type fluid machinery, featuring both high efficiency and high reliability, is applied to a helium compressor with the discharge capacity of 50 Nm3/h. Experimental investigations are performed about oil injection cooling methods and improvement of the compression efficiency. As a result, a volumetric efficiency of 92 % and an overall adiabatic efficiency of 79 % are obtained under the condition of a theoretical compression ratio of 5.2 by a developed scroll compressor with a nominal motor output 2.2 kW. At the same time an effective cooling method with a single oil injection port is obtained.

  4. Mathematical modeling of the working cycle of oil injected rotary twin screw compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oil injected twin-screw air and gas compressors are widely used for medium pressure applications in many industries. Low cost air compressors can be adopted for compression of helium and special gases, leading to significant cost saving. Mathematical analysis of oil injected twin-screw compressor is carried out on the basis of the laws of perfect gas and standard thermodynamic relations. Heat transfer coefficient required for computer simulation is experimentally obtained and used in performance prediction, when the working medium being air or helium. A mathematical model has been developed for calculating the compressor performance and for validating the results with experimental data. The flow coefficients required for numerical simulation to calculate leakage flow rates are obtained from efficiency verses clearance curves. Effect of some of the compressor operating and design parameters on power and volumetric efficiencies have been analyzed and presented

  5. Mathematical modeling of the working cycle of oil injected rotary twin screw compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshaiah, N. [Cryogenics and Gas dynamics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Sector-2, NIT Campus, Rourkela 769008, Orissa (India)]. E-mail: seshuet@yahoo.com; Ghosh, Subrata Kr. [Cryogenics and Gas dynamics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Sector-2, NIT Campus, Rourkela 769008, Orissa (India); Sahoo, R.K. [Cryogenics and Gas dynamics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Sector-2, NIT Campus, Rourkela 769008, Orissa (India); Sarangi, Sunil Kr. [Cryogenics and Gas dynamics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Sector-2, NIT Campus, Rourkela 769008, Orissa (India)

    2007-01-15

    Oil injected twin-screw air and gas compressors are widely used for medium pressure applications in many industries. Low cost air compressors can be adopted for compression of helium and special gases, leading to significant cost saving. Mathematical analysis of oil injected twin-screw compressor is carried out on the basis of the laws of perfect gas and standard thermodynamic relations. Heat transfer coefficient required for computer simulation is experimentally obtained and used in performance prediction, when the working medium being air or helium. A mathematical model has been developed for calculating the compressor performance and for validating the results with experimental data. The flow coefficients required for numerical simulation to calculate leakage flow rates are obtained from efficiency verses clearance curves. Effect of some of the compressor operating and design parameters on power and volumetric efficiencies have been analyzed and presented.

  6. The water footprint of olives and olive oil in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Salmoral Portillo, Gloria; Aldaya, Maite M.; Chico Zamanillo, Daniel; Garrido Colmenero, Alberto; Llamas Madurga, Manuel Ramón

    2011-01-01

    This paper evaluates the water footprint of Spanish olives and olive oil over the period 1997-2008. In particular, it analyses the three colour components of the water footprint: green (rainwater stored in the soil), blue (surface and groundwater) and grey (freshwater required to assimilate load of pollutants). Apparent water productivity and virtual water embedded in olive oil exports have also been studied. Results show more than 99.5% of the water footprint of one liter of bottled olive oi...

  7. Water Injection on Commercial Aircraft to Reduce Airport Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daggett, David L.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Fucke, Lars; Eames, David J. H.

    2010-01-01

    The potential nitrogen oxide (NO(x) reductions, cost savings, and performance enhancements identified in these initial studies of waterinjection technology strongly suggest that it be further pursued. The potential for engine maintenance cost savings from this system should make it very attractive to airline operators and assure its implementation. Further system tradeoff studies and engine tests are needed to answer the optimal system design question. Namely, would a low-risk combustor injection system with 70- to 90-percent NO(x) reduction be preferable, or would a low-pressure compressor (LPC) misting system with only 50-percent NO(x) reduction but larger turbine inlet temperature reductions be preferable? The low-pressure compressor injection design and operability issues identified in the report need to be addressed because they might prevent implementation of the LPC type of water-misting system. If water-injection technology challenges are overcome, any of the systems studied would offer dramatic engine NO(x) reductions at the airport. Coupling this technology with future emissions-reduction technologies, such as fuel-cell auxiliary power units will allow the aviation sector to address the serious challenges of environmental stewardship, and NO(x) emissions will no longer be an issue at airports.

  8. Combustion of oil on water: an experimental program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-02-01

    This study determined how well crude and fuel oils burn on water. Objectives were: (1) to measure the burning rates for several oils; (2) to determine whether adding heat improves the oils' combustibility; (3) to identify the conditions necessary to ignite fuels known to be difficult to ignite on ocean waters (e.g., diesel and Bunker C fuel oils); and (4) to evaluate the accuracy of an oil-burning model proposed by Thompson, Dawson, and Goodier (1979). Observations were made about how weathering and the thickness of the oil layer affect the combustion of crude and fuel oils. Nine oils commonly transported on the world's major waterways were tested. Burns were first conducted in Oklahoma under warm-weather conditions (approx. 30/sup 0/C) and later in Ohio under cold-weather conditions (approx. 0/sup 0/C to 10/sup 0/C).

  9. Geochemical monitoring of fluid-rock interaction and CO2 storage at the Weyburn CO2-injection enhanced oil recovery site, Saskatchewan, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Weyburn Oil Field, Saskatchewan is the site of a large (5000 tonnes/day of CO2) CO2-EOR injection project By EnCana Corporation. Pre- and post-injection samples (Baseline and Monitor-1, respectively) of produced fluids from approximately 45 vertical wells were taken and chemically analyzed to determine changes in the fluid chemistry and isotope composition between August 2000 and March 2001. After 6 months of CO2 injection, geochemical parameters including pH, [HCO3], [Ca], [Mg], and ?13CO2(g) point to areas in which injected CO2 dissolution and reservoir carbonate mineral dissolution have occurred. Pre-injection fluid compositions suggest that the reservoir brine in the injection area may be capable of storing as much as 100 million tonnes of dissolved CO2. Modeling of water-rock reactions show that clay minerals and feldspar, although volumetrically insignificant, may be capable of acting as pH buffers, allowing injected CO2 to be stored as bicarbonate in the formation water or as newly precipitated carbonate minerals, given favorable reaction kinetics

  10. Effect of stratification on segregation in carbon dioxide miscible flooding in a water-flooded oil reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oil reservoirs are subjected to tertiary recovery by deploying any enhanced oil recovery (EOR) technique for the recovery of left over oil. Amongst many EOR methods one of the widely applied worldwide is CO/sub 2/ flooding through miscible, near miscible or immiscible displacement processes. CO/sub 2/ flooding process responds to a number of reservoir and fluid characteristics. These characteristics have strong effect on overall efficiency of the displacement process. Better understanding of the effect of different characteristics on displacement process is important to plan an efficient displacement process. In this work, the effect of stratification resulting in gravity segregation of the injected fluid is studied in an oil reservoir which is water-flooded during secondary phase of recovery. Sensitivity analysis is performed through successive simulation on Eclipse 300 (compositional) reservoir simulator. Process involves the continuous CO/sub 2/ injection in an oil reservoir with more than 1/3rd of original oil in place left after water flooding. Reservoir model with four different permeability layers is studied. Four patterns by changing the arrangement of the permeabilities of the layers are analysed. The effect of different arrangement or stratification on segregation of CO/sub 2/ and ultimately on the incremental oil recovery, is investigated. It has been observed that out of four arrangements, upward fining pattern relatively overcame the issue of the segregation of CO/sub 2/ and consequently 33% more oil with half injection volume is recovered when compared with the downward fining pattern. (author)

  11. Water-in-oil emulsification and development of model EMU

    OpenAIRE

    Kvo?ka, Davor

    2013-01-01

    Oil-spill at sea represents one of the greatest threats for the environment. Immediately after occurence of an oil-spill several physical, chemical and biological processes occur, among which the process of emulsification is one of the most important. Emulsified oil is very difficult to clean; therefore, understnding of the emulsification processes is of great importance for successful clean-up. Preconditions for formation of water-in-oil emulsion are adequate chemical conditions ...

  12. Influence of pumpkin seed oil in continuous phase on droplet size and stability of water-in-oil emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolovski Branislava G.; Ili? Jelena D.; Sovilj Milan N.; Nikoli? Milan P.; Milanovi? Jadranka L.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to contribute to the optimized production of water-in-oil emulsions with pumpkin seed oil in the oil phase using a high-speed homogenizer. Pumpkin seed oil is a valuable natural source of essential fatty acids and biologically active micronutrients that contribute to its nutritive value and medical uses, and reduce interfacial tension between water and the oil phases. Therefore, pumpkin seed oil can be considered as a prosperous oil phase whose use can possibly ...

  13. Sandwich structures at oil-water interfaces under alkaline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth-Szabó, Géza; Czarnecki, Jan; Masliyah, Jacob H

    2002-09-15

    Equilibrium liquid crystal (LC) layer on an interface between crude oils and water was observed at high pH. This layer is composed mainly of sodium naphthenates produced in situ at the water/oil interface. Transient LC layer was also evolved at the interface of aqueous phase of sodium hydroxide solutions and oleic phase of naphthenic acid (NA) solutions as result of a chemical reaction between NaOH and NA. This chemical reaction causes transport process resulting in a disturbance of the interface. Optical observation of this interface disturbance reviled that the interface covered with LC shows considerably lower flexibility as compared to LC free interface. The LC layer eventually dissolves in the water phase at low oil-to-water ratio, while at high oil-to-water ratio it can form an equilibrium phase, which spreads spontaneously at the oil-water interface. PMID:16290874

  14. Panorama 2011: Water in fuel production Oil production and refining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water plays a vital role in the production of fuels. Against a background of extremely high pressure to do with the need to protect the environment, better manage energy use and operate in a socially responsible manner - as well as the need to protect water as a resource and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, water management has become a major issue for the oil industry. These issues have all more or less been factored into the integrated water management programmes which have been introduced both in oil production and oil refining. These programmes have been designed to keep waste and emissions to a minimum, and to reduce the quantities of water required. (author)

  15. Cold water injection into two-phase mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a review of the international literature regarding the dynamic loadings associated with the injection of cold water into two-phase mixtures. The review placed emphasis on waterhammer in nuclear power plants. Waterhammmer incidence data were reviewed for information related to thermalhydraulic conditions, underlying causes and consequential damage. Condensation induced waterhammer was found to be the most significant consequence of injecting cold water into a two-phase system. Several severe waterhammer incidents have been attributed to slug formation and steam bubble collapse under conditions of stratified steam and cold water flows. These phenomena are complex and not well understood. The current body of experimental and analytical knowledge is not large enough to establish maps of expected regimes of condensation induced waterhammer. The Electric Power Research Institute, in the United States, has undertaken a major research and development programme to develop the knowledge base for this area. The limited models and data currently available show that mechanical parameters are as important as thermodynamic conditions for the initiation of condensation induced waterhammer. Examples of bounds for avoiding two-phase waterhammer are given. These bounds are system specific and depend upon parameters such as pump capacity, pipe length and pipe orientation

  16. Operation Clean Feather: Reducing oil pollution in Newfoundland waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oil pollution of marine waters around Newfoundland, and particularly in the vicinity of Placentia Bay, is a frequent occurrence. Many oiled seabirds are found on beaches in the bay, particularly in winter. The most likely pollution sources are ship operators who dump waste oils from bilges and slop tanks. In an effort to reduce the chronic discharge of waste oil into Placentia Bay, and thus the incidence of bird oiling, Operation Clean Feather was launched in 1991-92 and consisted of weekly surveys of Placentia Bay beaches, sampling of oil from vessels using the bay and from oiled birds and beaches, and experimentation to determine possible recovery rates of birds oiled at sea. The operation was considered a success at a number of levels. Significant reductions in numbers of oiled birds were noted in both 1991 and 1992 compared to 1989 or 1990. Estimated oil-related mortality was reduced to ca 25% of levels seen in the two years prior to the operation. The operation also provided the opportunity to test and refine an organizational framework designed to deal with the problem of chronic oil pollution reports. Communication efforts heightened the awareness of the oil pollution problem in Newfoundland waters. These efforts included distribution of pamphlets in various languages to ship operators, describing the seriousness of oil-related marine bird mortality and warning of the substantial fines that can be imposed under the Canada Shipping Act. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tabda Shipping Act. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  17. Determination of aluminum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy in lubricating oils emulsified in a sequential injection analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguera, José L; Burguera, Marcela; Antón, Raquel E; Salager, Jean-Louis; Arandia, María A; Rondón, Carlos; Carrero, Pablo; de Peña, Yaneira Petit; Brunetto, Rosario; Gallignani, Máximo

    2005-12-15

    The sequential injection (SIA) technique was applied for the on-line preparation of an "oil in water" microemulsion and for the determination of aluminum in new and used lubricating oils by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS) with Zeeman-effect background correction. Respectively, 1.0, 0.5 and 1.0ml of surfactants mixture, sample and co-surfactant (sec-butanol) solutions were sequentially aspirated to a holding coil. The sonication and repetitive change of the flowing direction improved the stability of the different emulsion types (oil in water, water in oil and microemulsion). The emulsified zone was pumped to fill the sampling arm of the spectrometer with a sub-sample of 200mul. Then, 10mul of this sample solution were introduced by means of air displacement in the graphite tube atomizer. This sequence was timed to synchronize with the previous introduction of 15mug of Mg(NO(3))(2) (in a 10mul) by the spectrometer autosampler. The entire SIA system was controlled by a computer, independent of the spectrometer. The furnace program was carried out by employing a heating cycle in four steps: drying (two steps at 110 and 130 degrees C), pyrolisis (at 1500 degrees C), atomization (at 2400 degrees C) and cleaning (at 2400 degrees C). The calibration graph was linear from 7.7 to 120mugAll(-1). The characteristic mass (mo) was 33.2pg/0.0044s and the detection limit was 2.3mugAll(-1). The relative standard (RSD) of the method, evaluated by replicate analyses of different lubricating oil samples varied in all cases between 1.5 and 1.7%, and the recovery values found in the analysis of spiked samples ranged from 97.2 to 100.4%. The agreement between the observed and reference values obtained from two NIST Standard Certified Materials was good. The method was simple and satisfactory for determining aluminum in new and used lubricating oils. PMID:18970302

  18. The effect of hot water injection on sandstone permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Haugwitz, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal energy storage can be achieved by hot water injection in geothermal sandstone aquifers. We present an analysis of literature data in combination with new short-term flow through permeability experiments in order to address physical and physico-chemical mechanisms that can alter permeability when sandstones are heated from 20°C to 70–200°C. The pore surface area per unit pore volume was used to normalise permeability data, so that the temperature effect on samples with different pore size could be compared. In sandstones containing the clay mineral kaolinite, heating reduced permeability, suggesting that the observed permeability reduction was due to kaolinite mobilisation. The effect was partly reversible.

  19. The determination of water in crude oil and transformer oil reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Sam A; Hagwood, Charles

    2003-05-01

    The measurement of the amount of water in oils is of significant economic importance to the industrial community, particularly to the electric power and crude oil industries. The amount of water in transformer oils is critical to their normal function and the amount of water in crude oils affects the cost of the crude oil at the well head, the pipeline, and the refinery. Water in oil Certified Reference Materials (CRM) are essential for the accurate calibration of instruments that are used by these industries. Three NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) have been prepared for this purpose. The water in these oils has been measured by both coulometric and volumetric Karl Fischer methods. The compounds (such as sulfur compounds) that interfere with the Karl Fischer reaction (interfering substances) and inflate the values for water by also reacting with iodine have been measured coulometrically. The measured water content of Reference Material (RM) 8506a Transformer Oil is 12.1+/-1.9 mg kg(-1) (plus an additional 6.2+/-0.9 mg kg(-1) of interfering substances). The measured water content of SRM 2722 Sweet Crude Oil, is 99+/-6 mg kg(-1) (plus an additional 5+/-2 mg kg(-1) of interfering substances). The measured water content of SRM 2721 Sour Crude Oil, is 134+/-18 mg kg(-1) plus an additional 807+/-43 mg kg(-1) of interfering substances. Interlaboratory studies conducted with these oil samples (using SRM 2890, water saturated 1-octanol, as a calibrant) are reported. Some of the possible sources of bias in these measurements were identified, These include: improperly calibrated instruments, inability to measure the calibrant accurately, Karl Fischer reagent selection, and volatilization of the interfering substances in SRM 2721. PMID:12748749

  20. EMISSION ANALYSIS OF DI-DIESEL ENGINE AT DIFFERENT INJECTION PRESSURES USING JATROPHA AND RUBBER SEED OIL BLENDED WITH DIESEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mahalingam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel as a renewable fuel has been considered as the best alternate for diesel fuel now a days.This fossil fuel can be used in diesel engine with or without any modi?cation.The injection pressure and injection timing are the major influencing parameters forthe performance and emission of diesel engine.In thispresentstudy,the emission analysis of vegetable oil, Jatropha oil and rubber seed oil crushed from the seed, esterified and blended with pure diesel fuel. A single cylinder constant speed direct injection (DI diesel engine has been used to analyze the emission characteristics of biodiesel.The diesel engine for various fuel injection pressures (210,220 and 240 bar at no load to full load wasinvestigated. The injection pressure was changed in the engine head by adjusting the fuel injector spring tension. The two proportions of biodiesel were used in diesel engine such as 20% of biodiesel (Jatropha oil and Rubber seed oil with 80% of pure diesel fuel named as B20 and 40% of biodiesel with 60% of pure diesel fuel named as B40.From the test result,the nitric oxide (NOx was analyzed for different injection pressures. In emission characteristicsanalysis, it was found that the increase in injector opening pressure increases the NOxemission. The injection pressure of 240 bar and B20 proportion gives better emission reduction compared to other blended fuels.

  1. Determination of Zinc-Based Additives in Lubricating Oils by Flow-Injection Analysis with Flame-AAS Detection Exploiting Injection with a Computer-Controlled Syringe

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo Pignalosa; Moisés Knochen; Noel Cabrera

    2005-01-01

    A flow-injection system is proposed for the determination of metal-based additives in lubricating oils. The system, operating under computer control uses a motorised syringe for measuring and injecting the oil sample (200 μL) in a kerosene stream, where it is dispersed by means of a packed mixing reactor and carried to an atomic absorption spectrometer which is used as detector. Zinc was used as model analyte. Two different systems were evaluated, one for low concentrations (range 0–1...

  2. Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200 degrees C (2,200 degrees F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed

  3. Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conley, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, C.F. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200{degrees}C (2,200{degrees}F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed.

  4. Numerical modeling of oil spills in continental and estuarine waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of the European Water Framework Directive on water quality for human consumption and industrial activities creates a need for water quality assessment and monitoring systems. The MIGR'HYCAR research project (http://www.migrhycar.com) was initiated to provide decisional tools for risks connected to oil spills in continental waters (rivers, lakes and estuaries), which represent more than 50% of accidental spills in France. Within the framework of this project, a new numerical oil spill model has been developed, as part of the TELEMAC hydro-informatics system (http://www.opentelemac.org), by combining Lagrangian and Eulerian methods. The Lagrangian model describes the transport of an oil spill near the free surface. The oil spill model enables to simulate the main processes driving oil plumes: advection, diffusion, oil beaching, oil re-floating, evaporation, dissolution, spreading and volatilization. Though generally considered as a minor process, dissolution is important from the point of view of toxicity. To model dissolved oil in water, an Eulerian advection-diffusion model is used. The fraction of dissolved oil is represented by a passive tracer. This approach is able to follow dissolved hydrocarbons in the water column. Laboratory experiments were conducted to characterise the numerous kinetics of the processes listed above. In addition, meso-scale dynamic experiments in artificial channels and test cases derived from the literature are used to validate the numerical model. (author)

  5. Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David B. Burnett

    2005-09-29

    This study is developing a comprehensive study of what is involved in the desalination of oil field produced brine and the technical developments and regulatory changes needed to make the concept a commercial reality. It was originally based on ''conventional'' produced water treatment and reviewed (1) the basics of produced water management, (2) the potential for desalination of produced brine in order to make the resource more useful and available in areas of limited fresh water availability, and (3) the potential beneficial uses of produced water for other than oil production operations. Since we have begun however, a new area of interest has appeared that of brine water treatment at the well site. Details are discussed in this technical progress report. One way to reduce the impact of O&G operations is to treat produced brine by desalination. The main body of the report contains information showing where oil field brine is produced, its composition, and the volume available for treatment and desalination. This collection of information all relates to what the oil and gas industry refers to as ''produced water management''. It is a critical issue for the industry as produced water accounts for more than 80% of all the byproducts produced in oil and gas exploration and production. The expense of handling unwanted waste fluids draws scarce capital away for the development of new petroleum resources, decreases the economic lifetimes of existing oil and gas reservoirs, and makes environmental compliance more expensive to achieve. More than 200 million barrels of produced water are generated worldwide each day; this adds up to more than 75 billion barrels per year. For the United States, the American Petroleum Institute estimated about 18 billion barrels per year were generated from onshore wells in 1995, and similar volumes are generated today. Offshore wells in the United States generate several hundred million barrels of produced water per year. Internationally, three barrels of water are produced for each barrel of oil. Production in the United States is more mature; the US average is about 7 barrels of water per barrel of oil. Closer to home, in Texas the Permian Basin produces more than 9 barrels of water per barrel of oil and represents more than 400 million gallons of water per day processed and re-injected.

  6. Application of tritiated water as a tracer for quantitative determination of water flow distribution in an oil-field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the flow of water in an underground oil reservoir, tritiated water was injected in a well and, subsequently, tritium was determined in the water produced by the surrounding wells. Since the specific radioactivity of the water produced by the more remote wells appeared to be rather low, partly owing to dilution of the tritium water by the water present in the formation, enrichment methods were used, in order to increase counting sensitivity. Three methods of enrichment were examined: exchange with ethanol, conversion to toluene, and electrolysis. The latter method proved to be the most useful. The tritium was determined with a liquid scintillation counter; the scintillator consisted of a toluene-ethanol (2:1) mixture with DPO and POPOP, the water sample being dissolved in this liquid. Some statistical problems in connexion with the minimum detectable specific activity and the reduction of background are discussed briefly. (author)

  7. Condensation induced water hammer and steam assisted gravity drainage in the Athabasca oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most people will have been exposed to some aspect of the debate about the Athabasca Oil Sands in North-Eastern Alberta and the significant role that the oil sands are expected to play in supplying conventional fossil fuels. Part of the bitumen is recovered from mines and part is recovered from in situ projects utilizing the Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage Process (SAGD). SAGD utilizes a considerable amount of steam, that is injected into geological formations. Hot water, bitumen and some vapour are recovered from the production wells. With significant steam generation, transmission and injection, there is the very real possibility of condensation induced water hammers. There have been a number of catastrophic failures to date. The intent of the paper is to provide interesting background information on the in situ oil sands industry. More importantly, to show some interesting and broader applications of thermalhydraulics developed in the nuclear industry. The expertise developed may have potential markets, with some adaptation, to the oil sands industry. Finally, there has been some discussion about using nuclear power for steam generation in the oil sands. (orig.)

  8. Condensation induced water hammer and steam assisted gravity drainage in the Athabasca oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Mike R. [RPS Energy Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2012-05-15

    Most people will have been exposed to some aspect of the debate about the Athabasca Oil Sands in North-Eastern Alberta and the significant role that the oil sands are expected to play in supplying conventional fossil fuels. Part of the bitumen is recovered from mines and part is recovered from in situ projects utilizing the Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage Process (SAGD). SAGD utilizes a considerable amount of steam, that is injected into geological formations. Hot water, bitumen and some vapour are recovered from the production wells. With significant steam generation, transmission and injection, there is the very real possibility of condensation induced water hammers. There have been a number of catastrophic failures to date. The intent of the paper is to provide interesting background information on the in situ oil sands industry. More importantly, to show some interesting and broader applications of thermalhydraulics developed in the nuclear industry. The expertise developed may have potential markets, with some adaptation, to the oil sands industry. Finally, there has been some discussion about using nuclear power for steam generation in the oil sands. (orig.)

  9. Multisyringe flow injection spectrophotometric determination of uranium in water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multisyringe flow injection analysis method for the determination of uranium in water samples was developed. The methodology was based on the complexation reaction of uranium with arsenazo (III) at pH 2.0. Uranium concentrations were spectrophotometrically detected at 649 nm using a light emitting diode. Under the optimized conditions, a linear dynamic range from 0.1 to 4.0 ?g mL-1, a 3? detection limit of 0.04 ?g mL-1, and a 10? quantification limit of 0.10 ?g mL-1 were obtained. The reproducibility (%) at 0.5, 2.5, and 4.0 ?g mL-1 was 2.5, 0.9, and 0.6%, respectively (n = 10). The interference effect of some ions was tested. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of uranium in water samples. (author)

  10. Gas/oil/water flow measurement by electrical capacitance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the oil industry, it is important to measure gas/oil/water flows produced from oil wells. To determine oil production, it is necessary to measure the water-in-liquid ratio (WLR), liquid fraction and some other parameters, which are related to multiphase flow rates. A research team from the University of Manchester and Schlumberger Gould Research have developed an experimental apparatus for gas/oil/water flow measurement based on a flow-conditioning device and electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) and microwave sensors. This paper presents the ECT part of the developed apparatus, including the re-engineering of an ECT sensor and a model-based image reconstruction algorithm, which is used to derive the WLR and the thickness of the liquid layer in oil-continuous annular flows formed by the flow-conditioning device. The ECT sensor was tested both at Schlumberger and on TUV-NEL's Multiphase Flow Facility. The experimental results are promising. (paper)

  11. Three-phase pressure drop in heavy oil, water and gas flow in a horizontal pipe for application in heavy oil transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevisan, Francisco E.; Bannwart, Antonio Carlos [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    A significant extent of the Brazilian oil reserves consists of heavy oil, and its importance and economic value have been increasing in the last years. However, these oils, besides their elevated densities (API degree lower than 20), have viscosities higher than 100 mPa.s , which makes it more difficult to transport them through pipelines. A solution for this problem is the injection of water in the pipe, in such a way to reduce friction and, consequently, the energy expend for a given oil flow rate. The two-phase flow of heavy oil and water has been the object of a number of recent studies, and concepts such as the core-flow technology can be useful for heavy oil transportation. But in production operations, gas is also present, initially dissolved in the oil phase then leaving the solution to form a free gas phase if the pressure is below the bubble point pressure. Thus the study of three-phase flow of heavy oil, water and gas is in order. The present paper presents the three-phase flow pressure drop measured in a horizontal glass tube of 2.84 cm i.d. at several combinations of the individual flow rates. Initially, for the development of the experiment, two-phase flow of heavy oil-water and gas-water were studied to establish the flow rate ranges that cover the main patterns already known. The superficial velocities used varied from 0.04 to 0.5 m/s for water, 0.04 to 9.0 m/s for gas and 0.02 to 1.2 m/s for oil. For each test run, the three-phase flow pressure drop was determined with the help of absolute and differential pressure transducers. The results are shown in the form of maps in terms of superficial velocities. (author)

  12. The separation of stable water-in-oil emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable oil-in-water emulsions are a major problem in the recovery of spilled oils. Such emulsions can contain as little as 10% oil and can have properties very different from the original oils, making their storage and disposal difficult. These problems have led to experiments testing the feasibility of a process for separating these stable emulsions into dischargeable water and reusable oil. The technique investigated involves use of a recyclable solvent to remove the oil and subsequent distillation and/or membrane treatment to recover the oil and recycle the solvent. Results of preliminary tests show that stable water-in-oil emulsions can be separated quite readily with a regenerated solvent system. The only products of these systems are oil, which can be sent to a refinery, and dischargeable water. The recycled solvent can be used many times without any significant decrease in separation efficiency. In order to enhance the throughput of the system, a solvent vapor stripping method was invented. This stripping method also improves the quality of the products and the recycled solvent. Membrane methods can be used as a post-treatment for the produced water in order to achieve more adequate compliance with discharge limits. 4 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  13. Research on Dispersed Oil Droplets Breakage and Emulsification in the Dynamic Oil and Water Hydrocyclone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangdong Guo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Oil and water dynamic hydrocyclone is one type of facilities that separate two phases or multiple phases applied widely in the fields such as food processing, environmental protection, biological pharmacy, petroleum and chemistry. The dispersed oil droplets in the dynamic oil and water hydrocyclone were often broken into small drops by shear force, which decreased the separation efficiency of dynamic oil-water hydrocyclone greatly. To avoid the breakage of the oil droplets, the turbulence field and the velocity field of the dynamic hydrocyclone were studied by the software of Fluent to analyze the main reason that led to breakage of oil droplets. Results indicated that the deformation of oil droplets was caused by the viscous shear force; the breakage of oil droplets was caused by the Reynolds shear stress and the local pressure fluctuations. The main area that the drops were prone to breakup of the dynamic hydrocyclone is that the rotating grating nearby, the wall boundary layer of the drum and center axis of the drum. Finally, the breakage of oil droplets and emulsification of oil and water in the dynamic hydrocyclone were verified by the experiments.

  14. Modeling surface deformation due to CO2 injection at an enhanced oil recovery field in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Q.; Abdollahzadeh, M.; Dixon, T. H.; Malservisi, R.; Hosseini, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Geodesy Laboratory at the University of South Florida has operated 3 C-GPS stations at an enhanced oil recovery field in Texas since October 2011. Our GPS sites recorded vertical uplift during the injection phase when the reservoir was initially pressurized, and localized subsidence in phase with reservoir pressure after oil extraction started. In this study, we use analytical and numerical models to better understand the small-scale surface deformation observed by GPS due to CO2 injection. First, we use an analytical model of a pressurized horizontal circular crack in an elastic half-space to fit the surface deformation data. Then, constrained by the analytical modeling results, we develop a poroelastic Finite Element Model (FEM) to investigate the influence of reservoir geometry and overlying stratigraphy on surface displacement. A sensitivity study is carried out to understand the effects of realistic geometry and material properties on surface deformation. Our preliminary results show that a poroelastic FEM can explain the location-dependant time delay between the injection and surface response.

  15. A new Experimental Rig for Oil Burning on Water : Results for Crude and Pure Oils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Nicholas L.; SØrensen, Martin X.

    2014-01-01

    A new experimental apparatus, the Crude Oil Flammability Apparatus (COFA), has been developed to study in-situ burning of crude and pure oils spilled on water in a controlled laboratory environment with large water-to-oil ratios. The parameters and phenomena studied for an asphaltic crude oil (Grane) and two pure oils (n-Octane and dodecane) with different initial oil layer thicknesses include burning efficiency, burning rate, regression rate, flame height and boilover. Pyrex glass cylinders (157 and 260 mm ID) placed on top of a steel foot in a water basin (1m x 1m x 0.5m) enabled free circulation of the water, which, along with the large water-to-oil ratios (up to 10,000) ensured that the oil burning barely increased the temperature of the surrounding water environment, which created more realistic offshore conditions than seen in many other laboratory studies. The burning efficiency was found to be nearly 100% for n-Octane and of dodecane, whereas the crude oil burning efficiency ranged between 35% and 65%. The main reason for this variation proved to be the onset of an extremely violent boilover, which occurs for oils with relatively high boiling temperatures when the water sub layer is superheated. When the initial crude oil layer thickness exceeded 20 mm the oil became solid and no boilover occurred. The heat-loss to the water sub-layer also had an effect on the burning efficiency and the regression rate was found to reach a constant value after increasing continuously as the oil was heated. Similar results were found regarding the flame height which reached a steady flame height. The pure fuels, n-Octane and dodecane, produced a much higher steady flame height than the crude oil, however they did not reach boilover, though dodecane showed boilover tendencies. Theoretical predictions with existing correlations and input data specific for the current oils generally compared well with the experimental data for both the time to boilover and the regression rates. As such, the COFA is envisioned to produce high-fidelity results in the future and thereby contribute to the further development of in-situ burning as an alternative response technique for oil spills on water.

  16. Treatment of Renal Colic Using Intracutaneous Injection of Sterile Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmadnia

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Purpose: To evaluate the intracutaneous injection of sterile water in the treatment of renal colic.

    Materials and Methods: One hundred patients with renal colic were randomly divided into two groups of 50 patients and underwent the treatment. In the first (study group 0.5 ml of sterile water and in the control group, 0.5 ml of normal saline was intradermally injected. The severity of pain was assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS system before and 30 and 90 minutes after the injection. Patients in whom the presence of stone was not proved were excluded from the study.

    Results: Before the treatment mean pain severity in the study group was 9.86±0.4 and in the control group was 9.96±0.19, so that the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.12. Thirty and 90 minutes after the injection, the means were 0.76±2.3 and 1.02±2.63 in study group and 5.94±4 and 6.7±4.19 in control group, respectively. The results in 30 and 90 minutes between the two groups were statistically significant (p=0.000 and p=0.000, respectively. Pain in all patients in the study group was relieved; however, only %34 of the patients in the control group reported a decrease in pain. There was no complication among the patients of both groups and only a severe and transient pain during injection was reported by the patients.

    Conclusion: This study along with many other existing studies indicates the efficacy of intradermal injection of sterile water for the treatment of severe pain syndromes such as renal colic. The advantages of this method are its efficacy, availability, cost benefits, and easy application. We recommend the use of this approach for the treatment of renal colic.

  17. Resolution of oil-in-water emulsions containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of resolving oil-in-water emulsions resulting from the organic solvent extraction of uranium from aqueous acidic leach liquors which comprises treating the emulsions in accordance with the following steps: (a) adding to the emulsions a water-in-oil emulsion which contains from 2 to 50% by weight of a water-soluble acrylamide copolymer which contains from 5 to 50% by weight of a lower alkyl substituted tertiary aminoethyl methacrylate and quaternary ammonium salts thereof in an amount to provide at least 20 parts per million of the acrylamide copolymer; (b) adjusting the pH of the emulsion being treated with ammonia to at least 9; (c) adding to the ammonia treated emulsion a water-soluble surfactant which is capable of inverting the water-in-oil emulsion which contains the polymer; and then (d) slowly mixing the treated oil-in-water emulsion for at least one-half hour to obtain good resolution thereof

  18. A fast alternative to core plug tests for optimising injection water salinity for EOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassenkam, Tue; Andersson, Martin Peter

    2014-01-01

    Core tests have demonstrated that decreasing the salinity of injection water can increase oil recovery. Although recovery is enhanced by simply decreasing salt content, optimising injection water salinty would offer a clear economic advantage for several reasons. Too low salinity risks swelling of the clays which would lead to permanent reservoir damage but evidence of effectiveness at moderate salinity would offer the opportunity to dispose of produced water. The goal is to define boundary conditions so injection water salinity is high enough to prevent reservoir damage and low enough to induce the low salinity effect while keeping costs and operational requirements at a minimum. Traditional core plug testing for optimising conditions has some limitations. Each test requires a fresh sample, core testing requires sophisticated and expensive equipment, and reliable core test data requires several months because cores must be cleaned, restored and aged before the tests can begin. It is also difficult to comparedata from one core with results from another because no two cores are identical, making it difficult to distinguish between effects resulting from different conditions and effects resulting from different cores. Gathering statistics is limited by the time required for each test and the fact that core material is in short supply. Thus, our aim was to explore the possibility of a cheaper, faster alternative. We developed a method that uses atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the relationship between the wettability of pore surfaces and water salinity. We functionalise AFM tips with organic molecules and use them to represent tiny oil droplets of nonpolar or polar molecules and we use sand grains removed from core plugs to represent the pore walls in sandstone. We bring our "oil" close to the sand grain surface and measure the work of adhesion between the tip and the surface. Repeated "feeling" the surface with the tip produces data that can be converted to maps of adhesion and contact angle. Adhesion work is proportional to wettability and is directly correlated with the salinity of the fluid in contact with the tip and the particle surface. From our measurements, the threshold values for the onset of the low salinity response is 5,000 to 8,000 ppm, which benchmarks remarkably well with observations from core plug tests. Changing either the type of "oil" on our probe or the character of the grain surface both affect the adhesion response. From a mechanistic perspective, the correlation between salinity and adhesion provides evidence for the role of electrical double layer expansion in the low salinity response; expansion of the double layer decreases oil wettability. Because AFM experiments can be done relatively quickly on very little material, it gives the possibility of testing salinity response on samples from throughout a reservoir and for gathering statistics. Our approach provides a range of data that can be used to screen core plug testing conditions and to provide extra data that would be too time consuming or too expensive using traditional methods alone. © 2014, Society of Petroleum Engineers.

  19. Mechanical- and oil-durable superhydrophobic polyester materials for selective oil absorption and oil/water separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Zhang, Junping; Li, Bucheng; Wang, Aiqin

    2014-01-01

    The low stability and complicated fabrication procedures seriously hindered practical applications of superhydrophobic materials. Here we present a facile approach for preparing durable superhydrophobic polyester materials by dip-coating in a nanocomposite solution of polymerized tetraethoxysilane and n-hexadecyltriethoxysilane. The coated samples exhibit excellent superhydrophobicity, superoleophilicity, mechanical and chemical stabilities. This is attributed to the tight binding of the nanocomposite on the polyester fibers and the inherent stability of silicone. The coated samples can quickly absorb petrol, diesel and crude oil, and show very high selectivity in oil/water separation. In addition, the coated samples could maintain their superhydrophobicity, oil absorption capacity and oil/water selectivity after harsh mechanical damage, 90 days of immersion in oils and ten cycles of absorption-desorption. Moreover, this approach is simple and can be easily scaled up for producing samples on a large size, which makes it very promising for practical oil absorption. PMID:24183438

  20. Technique for locating injected gas in oil bearing formations behind casing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for determining the location of injected gas in an oil well comprising the steps of: obtaining data representing a near count rate from a compensated neutron logging tool; obtaining data representing a far count rate from a compensated neutron logging tool; scaling the near count rate and the far count rate; plotting the scaled near count rate and the scaled far rate; comparing the scaled near count rate plot and the scaled far count rate plot and; determining the location of injected gas whenever the plot of the scaled near count rate and the plot of the scaled far count rate differ by a predetermined factor; obtaining data representing a second near count rate for a compensated neutron logging tool at a second time; obtaining data representing a second far count rate from a compensated neutron logging tool at the second time; scaling the second near count rate and the second far count rate; plotting the scaled second near count rate and the scaled second far count rate; comparing the scaled second near count rate plot and the scaled second far count rate plot; determining a second location of injected gas whenever the plot of the scaled second near count rate and the plot of the scaled second far count rate differ by a predetermined factor; and determining the migration of the injected gas by comparing the location with the second location

  1. Test of an improved oil injected helium screw compressor at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermilab has tested a modified helium oil injected two-stage Mycom screwcompressor for possible use in the Tevatron. The tests are part of a joint venture with Mycom. Modifications to the compressor include a new modified rotor profile and new generation lubricant which resulted in increased performance and efficiency. The effects of the modifications on shaft-power and isothermal efficiency are included. The results of these tests will determine the practicality of incorporating these modifications to the thirty-four existing screw compressors of the Tevatron

  2. Microbiological treatment of oil mill waste waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranalli, A.

    1992-02-01

    Full Text Available Experiments of the biological treatment of the oil mill waste waters, deriving from continuous system, have been carried out with selected mutant ferments, adapted to rather forced toxic conditions. The commercial microbio formulations SNKD, LLMO and PSBIO have been utilized; the last two are liquid suspensions, constituted by living micro-organisms that, in contrast to those frozen or lyophilized, do not need be revitalized before their use and became completely active in short time. The experiments with the SNKD biological preparation were carried out both on filtered oil mill outflows (type A with an initial COD of approximately 43 g/l and on waste water dephenolized by Caro-acid (type B with a COD equal to 30 g/l. The experiments with LLMO and PSBIO complexes were conduced both on oil mill outflows filtered and diluted (ratio 1:0.5 with an initial COD equal to 44 g/l (type C, and on waste water that were filtered and preventatively subjected to a cryogenic treatment (type D, with an initial COD of approximately 22 g/l. The residual COD with the microbio formulation SNKD, was about 15 g/l (type A and 5 g/l (type B; with the PSBIO It was about 7 g/l (type C and 1.5 g/l (type D; with the microbio formulation LLMO it resulted in 6 g/l (type C and 1.3 g/l (type D.

    Han sido efectuadas pruebas de tratamiento biológico de alpechines, provenientes de sistemas continuos, con fermentos seleccionados adaptados a condiciones de toxicidad muy elevadas. Han sido utilizadas las formulaciones microbianas SNKD, LLMO y PSBIO; las dos últimas son suspensiones líquidas, constituidas por microorganismos vivos, los cuales a diferencia de los liofilizados o congelados, no deben ser revitalizados antes del uso; estos tienen una fase «lag» más breve y entran antes en completa actividad. Las pruebas con la preparación biológica SNKD han sido efectuadas en los alpechines filtrados (tipo A con DQO inicial alrededor de 43 g/l, y también con alpechín filtrado «defenolado» con ácido de Caro (H2SO5 (tipo B, con DCX igual a 30 g/l; los complexos LLMO y PSBIO se utilizan en alpechines provenientes de la elaboración de otras variedades de aceitunas, filtradas y diluidas en la relación 1:0,5 (tipo C con DQO inicial igual a 44 g/l, y también en alpechín filtrado y sometido previamente a criotratamiento (tipo D, con DQO inicial de 22 g/l aproximadamente. La DQO residual, con la formulación microbiana SNKD, ha resultado igual a 15 g/l (Tipo A y a 5 g/l (tipo B, con el PSBIO a 7 g/l (tipo C y a 1,5 g/l (tipo D; con la formulación microbiana LLMO a 6 g/l (tipo C y a 1,3 g/l (tipo D.

  3. Comparative toxicity test of water-accommodated fractions of oils and oil dispersants to marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This reference method describes a simple procedure for comparing the toxicity of oil, oil dispersants, and mixtures thereof, to marine animals. It allows the toxicity of different dispersants to be rapidly compared to that of oil, or of a mixture of oil an oil dispersant. It is designed for routine monitoring and screening purposes and is not appropriate as a research method. The physical and chemical properties of oil dispersants create many difficulties in the measurements of their toxicity to marine organisms. Strictly speaking, their toxicity can only be accurately estimated using complex procedures and apparatus. (A relatively simple apparatus for preparing oil/water or oil/water/oil dispersant emulsions is described in Appendix B). Simpler methods can provide useful information, provided their limitations are clearly understood and taken into consideration in the assessment and application of their results. Some of the special considerations relating to the measurement of the toxicity of oil and oil dispersants are described in Appendix A. The Appendix also explains the rationale and limitations of the method described here. 3 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  4. Breaking of Oil -Water Emulsion for the Improvement of Oil Recovery Operations in the Niger Delta Oilfields

    OpenAIRE

    C. Ijogbemeye Oseghale; Akpabio E. J; Udottong, G

    2012-01-01

    Emulsified water is generally present in crude oil as a result of mixing occurring during production operations. The formation of emulsion leads to problems in production and also transportation. Therefore the need to break oil/water emulsions system through demulsification process using chemical surfactants for improved oil recovery operations. Selected cationic surfactants were effective in separating oil-water emulsions expected during a surfactant/polymer (SP) process for improved oil rec...

  5. Stability Investigation of Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Abdurahman. H. Nour; Rosli Mohd Yunus

    2006-01-01

    The water in-crude oil emulsion has great importance in the oil industry. Experimental data are presented to investigate the stability of water-in-crude oil emulsions in both creaming and coalescence states were measured as a function of sodium chloride concentration. Also the stability of w/o emulsion is investigated over a wide range of parameters. These parameters are salt concentration (0-5.5%), mixing speed (800-1600 rpm), water concentration (10-80%) and temperature. For economic and op...

  6. Successful water management for the oil sands industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water is a key requirement to produce oil from thermal oil sands projects. Historically, water was considered as a renewable resource that could be used when necessary. Water use is currently examined in a wider context. Canadian Natural Resources Limited has used fresh water for thermal projects in the past, including its thermal operations at Primrose and Wolf Lake. However, technical advancements have made it possible to use recycled water. This allows companies to survive within their licenses while increasing production. Other advances include the use of brackish water, and innovations such as using depleted reservoir sections to store water to increase the use of recycled water. It was noted that brackish water resources need to be mapped and understood in greater detail. The objective is to use brackish water at a cost equal to, or less, than fresh water

  7. Oil spill dispersants. Risk assessment for Swedish waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IVL has compiled a list of the international usage of oil spill dispersants and presents the technical limitations with the use of such agents as well as the biological effects of these chemical products. IVL, has also conducted an analysis of the pros and cons to using dispersants against oil spills in waters and has applied this with a risk assessment of chemical methods to combat oil spills in the Kattegat and Skagerrak and the Baltic Sea

  8. Heating of Oil Well by Hot Water Circulation

    CERN Document Server

    Jurak, M; Jurak, Mladen; Prnic, Zarko

    2005-01-01

    When highly viscous oil is produced at low temperatures, large pressure drops will significantly decrease production rate. One of possible solutions to this problem is heating of oil well by hot water recycling. We construct and analyze a mathematical model of oil-well heating composed of three linear parabolic PDE coupled with one Volterra integral equation. Further on we construct numerical method for the model and present some simulation results.

  9. Water-in-oil emulsions : studies on water resolution and rheology over time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water-in-oil emulsions, which often form following oil spills, make cleanup very difficult because the physical properties and characteristics of the oil change significantly after the spill. In this study, water-in-oil mixtures from crude oil and petroleum products were studied in a laboratory for up to one year. The types of mixtures were characterized by resolution of water and rheology measurements at one and seven days, and some after one year. Oil and petroleum products formed 4 clearly-defined water-in-oil types when mixed with water. These were categorized as stable, unstable, mesostable and entrained. The distinct physical properties of each category were described in this paper. The water-in-oil types were characterized using a newly developed numerical stability index which is the product of the ratio of viscosity increase and a ratio of the elasticity increase. The index was also used to correlate stability with oil compositions and properties. The asphaltene and resin content in the starting oil, along with its viscosity and density were the most important factors for water uptake and emulsion formation, as determined by a comparative evaluation of the properties of the starting oils before mixing. The saturate content and asphaltene-to-resin ratio are other important factors. 42 refs., 7 tabs., 8 figs

  10. From oil-based mud to water-based mud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maersk Olie og Gas AS has used low toxic oil-based muds extensively since 1982 for drilling development wells and later in the development of horizontal well drilling techniques. However, in view of the strong drive towards a reduction in the amount of oil discharged to the North Sea from the oil industry, Maersk Olie og Gas AS initiated trials with new or improved types of water-based mud, first in deviated wells (1989) and then in horizontal wells (1990). The paper reviews Maersk Olie og Gas As experience with oil-based mud since the drilling of the first horizontal well in 1987, specifically with respect to cuttings washing equipment, oil retention on cuttings, and the procedure for monitoring of this parameter. It describes the circumstances leading to the decision to revert to water-based mud systems. Finally, it reviews the experience gained so far with the new improved types of water-based mud systems, mainly glycol and KCl/polymer mud systems. Comparison of operational data, such as rate of penetration, torque and drag, etc., is made between wells drilled with oil-based mud and water-based mud. The trials with the new improved types of water-based mud systems have been positive, i.e. horizontal wells can be drilled successfully with water-based mud. As a result, Maersk Olie og and Gas AS has decided to discontinue the use of low toxic oil-based muds in the Danish sector of the North Sea

  11. Conversion of crude oil to methane by a microbial consortium enriched from oil reservoir production waters

    OpenAIRE

    LisaGieg

    2014-01-01

    The methanogenic biodegradation of crude oil is an important process occurring in petroleum reservoirs and other oil-containing environments such as contaminated aquifers. In this process, syntrophic bacteria degrade hydrocarbon substrates to products such as acetate, and/or H2 and CO2 that are then used by methanogens to produce methane in a thermodynamically dependent manner. We enriched a methanogenic crude oil-degrading consortium from production waters sampled from a low temperature heav...

  12. Water production in extra heavy oil environment : controlling the risks, optimizing the production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cermeno, E.; Draoui, E.; Gamez, Y.; Inizan, M.; Alves, Y. [Petrocedeno, Caracas (Venezuela)

    2008-07-01

    This paper reviewed reservoir completion technologies and strategies used at Orinoco Belt in Venezuela. The reservoir in the belt are fluvio-deltaic with higher permeability sand and a large regional aquifer that has contributed to the region's wide-ranging oil viscosities. Oilfields in the belt are typically produced using directional drilling techniques. Monitoring programs in the region have identified that water production from the aquifer is determined by water entry points. Wells accumulate large volumes of extra heavy oil (EHO) after water breakthrough. However, the risk of water interference between wells is high. Results of the monitoring programs were used to develop a water production policy that relies on weekly production follow-ups; analyses of structural, geological, and dynamic data in order to understand water production; and water invasion control techniques. The completion technique was adapted to high water cut wells and was designed to consider the use of electro-submersible pumps (ESP). Methods of producing water directly from the aquifer for subsequent re-injection are also being considered. Weekly production tests are currently being conducted on all producer wells. Water cut developments are identified, monitored and registered. Data is then integrated with static analysis from geologists in order to improve water production techniques. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  13. Modeling and detection of oil in sea water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The challenge of a deep-water oil leak is that a significant quantity of oil remains in the water column and possibly changes properties. There is a need to quantify the oil settled within the water column and determine its physical properties to assist in the oil recovery. There are currently no methods to map acoustically submerged oil in the sea. In this paper, high-frequency acoustic methods are proposed to localize the oil polluted area and characterize the parameters of its spatial covariance, i.e., variance and correlation. A model is implemented to study the underlying mechanisms of backscattering due to spatial heterogeneity of the medium and predict backscattering returns. An algorithm for synthetically generating stationary, Gaussian random fields is introduced which provides great flexibility in implementing the physical model of an inhomogeneous field with spatial covariance. A method for inference of spatial covariance parameters is proposed to describe the scattering field in terms of its second-order statistics from the backscattered returns. The results indicate that high-frequency acoustic methods not only are suitable for large-scale detection of oil contamination in the water column but also allow inference of the spatial covariance parameters resulting in a statistical description of the oil field.

  14. Injection of multi-azimuth permeable planes in weakly cemented formations for enhanced heavy-oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocking, G. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States)]|[GeoSierra LLC, Norcross, GA (United States); Cavender, T.; Schultz, R.L. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Canadian Section, Calgary, AB (Canada)]|[Halliburton Energy Services, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Weakly cemented formations have minimal strength without fracture toughness. As such, the well stimulation process must be different from the fracturing process that occurs in hard rocks. This paper presented field injection experiments of multi-azimuth, injected, vertical planar geometries in several weakly cemented formations. The application of the method to shallow petroleum soft rock reservoirs was described, with particular reference to the thermal and solvent recovery of heavy oil. This study showed that in weakly cemented formations, a well-initiation device can control the azimuth of injected vertical planes, thereby controlling the rate of injection and the viscosity of the injected fluid. The concept of using the multi-azimuth, vertical permeable planes has strong potential in soft-rock formations for enhanced production in both shallow gas and shallow heavy-oil reservoirs. The method can be applied in a single well injector-producer for the continuous injection of steam and the continuous extraction of oil, similar to steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) and may be more efficient than a confined horizontal well pair typically used in SAGD. However, the authors noted that the effectiveness of the multi-azimuth process has yet to be proven for oil sand formations. 13 refs., 1 tab., 13 figs.

  15. Water-in-oil emulsions results of formation studies and applicability to oil spill modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarises studies of water-in-oil emulsions, their stability, and modelling of their formation. Studies show that water-in-oil emulsions might be characterised into three categories (stable, mesostable and unstable). These categories were established by visual appearance, elasticity and viscosity difference. It was also shown that water content was not an important factor. A fourth category of water-in-oil exists, that of water entrainment, which is not an emulsion. Water-in-oil emulsions made from crude oils have different classes of stabilities as a result of the asphaltene and resin contents. The differences in the emulsion types are readily distinguished both by their rheological properties, and simply by appearance. The apparent viscosity of a stable emulsion at a shear rate of one reciprocal second, is at least three orders-of-magnitude greater than the starting oil. An unstable emulsion usually has a viscosity no more than one order-of-magnitude greater than that of the starting oil. A stable emulsion has a significant elasticity, whereas an unstable emulsion does not. Stable emulsions have sufficient asphaltenes (>?7%) to establish films of these compounds around water droplets. Mesostable emulsions have insufficient asphaltenes to render them completely stable. Stability is achieved by visco-elastic retention of water and secondarily by the presence of asphaltene or resin films. Mesostable emulsions display apparent viscosities of about 80-600 ty apparent viscosities of about 80-600 times that of the starting oil and true viscosities of 20-200 times that of the starting oil. Mesostable emulsions have an asphaltene and resin content greater than 3%. Entrained water occurs when a viscous oil retains larger water droplets, but conditions are not suitable for the formation of an emulsion. Entrained water may have a viscosity that is similar or slightly greater (? 2-10 times) than the starting oil. It was found that emulsion formation occurs at a threshold energy, however this energy has not been accurately defined. Emulsions from many oils have been characterised. This information is used to describe how this process can be accurately modelled and what information gaps exist for complete description of the physical process. The modelling of emulsions is reviewed. A new modelling scheme based on the new physical findings, is suggested. (Author)

  16. Intraplantar injection of bergamot essential oil into the mouse hindpaw: effects on capsaicin-induced nociceptive behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurada, Tsukasa; Kuwahata, Hikari; Katsuyama, Soh; Komatsu, Takaaki; Morrone, Luigi Antonio; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana; Bagetta, Giacinto; Sakurada, Shinobu

    2009-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of aromatherapy oils, there have not been many studies exploring the biological activities of bergamot (Citrus bergamia, Risso) essential oil (BEO). Recently, we have investigated the effects of BEO injected into the plantar surface of the hindpaw in the capsaicin test in mice. The intraplantar injection of capsaicin produced an intense and short-lived licking/biting response toward the injected hindpaw. The capsaicin-induced nociceptive response was reduced significantly by intraplantar injection of BEO. The essential oils of Clary Sage (Salvia sclarea), Thyme ct. linalool (linalool chemotype of Thymus vulgaris), Lavender Reydovan (Lavandula hybrida reydovan), and True Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), had similar antinociceptive effects on the capsaicin-induced nociceptive response, while Orange Sweet (Citrus sinensis) essential oil was without effect. In contrast to a small number of pharmacological studies of BEO, there is ample evidence regarding isolated components of BEO which are also found in other essential oils. The most abundant compounds found in the volatile fraction are the monoterpene hydrocarbons, such as limonene, gamma-terpinene, beta-pinene, and oxygenated derivatives, linalool and linalyl acetate. Of these monoterpenes, the pharmacological activities of linalool have been examined. Following intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration in mice, linalool produces antinociceptive and antihyperalgesic effects in different animal models in addition to anti-inflammatory properties. Linalool also possesses anticonvulsant activity in experimental models of epilepsy. We address the importance of linalool or linalyl acetate in BEO-or the other essential oil-induced antinociception. PMID:19607974

  17. Analysis of thrust augmentation of turbojet engines by water injection at compressor inlet including charts for calculating compression processes with water injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, E Clinton; Trout, Arthur M

    1951-01-01

    A psychrometric chart having total pressure (sum of partial pressures of air and water vapor) as a variable, a Mollier diagram for air saturated with water vapor, and charts showing the thermodynamic properties of various air-water vapor and exhaust gas-water vapor mixtures are presented as aids in calculating the thrust augmentation of a turbojet engine resulting from the injection of water at the compressor inlet. Curves are presented that show the theoretical performance of the augmentation method for various amounts of water injected and the effects of varying flight Mach number, altitude, ambient-air temperature, ambient relative humidity, compressor pressure ratio, and inlet-diffuser efficiency. Numerical examples, illustrating the use of the psychrometric chart and the Mollier diagram in calculating both compressor-inlet and compressor-outlet conditions when water is injected at the compressor inlet, are presented.

  18. The effect of long-term nitrate treatment on SRB activity, corrosion rate and bacterial community composition in offshore water injection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bødtker, Gunhild; Thorstenson, Tore; Lillebø, Bente-Lise P; Thorbjørnsen, Bente E; Ulvøen, Rikke Helen; Sunde, Egil; Torsvik, Terje

    2008-12-01

    Biogenic production of hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) is a problem for the oil industry as it leads to corrosion and reservoir souring. Continuous injection of a low nitrate concentration (0.25-0.33 mM) replaced glutaraldehyde as corrosion and souring control at the Veslefrikk and Gullfaks oil field (North Sea) in 1999. The response to nitrate treatment was a rapid reduction in number and activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the water injection system biofilm at both fields. The present long-term study shows that SRB activity has remained low at SRB in sea water injection systems, and that corrosion may be significantly reduced when compared to traditional biocide treatment. PMID:18752014

  19. Optimizing Injection Molding Processing Parameters for Enhanced Mechanical Performance of Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch High Density Polyethylene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Ramli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on the influence of injection molding processing parameters on mechanical properties of oil palm Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB filled High Density Poly Ethylene (HDPE. The biocomposite pellets were first prepared using an extruder with 20 wt% EFB content before being processed in an injection-molding machine for specimen fabrication. Two processing parameters were varied systematically and independently during the composite sample fabrication. The holding pressure was increased from 60 to 90 bars while the injection temperature was varied from 150 to 210°C. The highest tensile strength of the composites was achieved at 70 bar holding pressure and 150°C injection temperature. However, the highest fracture strength was achieved at 80 bars whilst maintaining the injection temperature at 150°C. Flexural strength was shown to be unaffected by the varying pressure. The optimal processing parameters for highest mechanical performance were found to be at holding pressure of 80 bars and injection tempera

  20. The containment of heavy oil in flowing water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viscous bitumen from Alberta oil sand deposits is diluted with a gas condensate before pipeline transport. Because of its unique properties, the diluent/bitumen mix (dilbit) may require novel containment and recovery techniques in the case of an accidental spill. Preliminary experiments were conducted in a large flowing water channel to determine whether several conventional containment devices could be utilized to trap weathered and emulsified dilbit and bitumen. These devices included a conventional river boom, a nylon fine-weave net, and a low-pressure bubble barrier. The behavior of the oil samples during boom failure was noted in order to understand more completely the mechanisms of failure. The river boom failed to hold viscous floating oil by vortex shedding at flows of under 0.25 m/s. A fine mesh net successfully trapped both floating and mid-channel neutrally buoyant oil but the retention time depends on the oil viscosity. The bubble barrier was not successful in trapping either floating viscous oil or neutrally buoyant oil. At low water velocities, the barrier was able to divert some oils but in an inconsistent manner. The results indicate that conventional barriers need improvement to be effective at higher water velocities and suggest that new concepts in containment should be considered. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Novel concepts for the containment of oil in flowing water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both a laboratory study of the hydrodynamic properties of variously shaped objects and a meso-scale flume study of several containment concepts have been undertaken to determine whether these can be used to contain oil in fast flowing water. The laboratory study showed that stable vortices are difficult to generate and that spilled oil is not easily trapped by them. Only two of the structures studied showed some promise of trapping oil in fast moving water: a partially submerged barrier with fins placed at an angle across the flume and a horizontal hydrofoil placed across the channel near the surface. Several filter materials were tested in an outdoor flowing channel with both floating and neutrally buoyant oil. Although some of these materials trapped and held heavy oil, they were not a significant improvement over nylon fishing nets which had been tested previously. The filter materials would not hold a medium gravity oil. A hydrofoil device which generated a horizontal eddy successfully trapped and held surface oil at water speeds up to 0.35 m/s. Neutrally buoyant oil was often caught by the eddy but was never held for more than 1-2 minutes. 9 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  2. 40 CFR 60.4335 - How do I demonstrate compliance for NOX if I use water or steam injection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...Stationary Combustion Turbines Monitoring § 60... if I use water or steam injection? (a...the ratio of water or steam to fuel being fired in the turbine when burning a fuel that requires water or steam injection for...

  3. Behavior of Malondialdehyde in Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandemoortele, Angelique; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2015-06-17

    The impact of temperature, emulsifier, and protein type on the reactivity of malondialdehyde in oil-in-water emulsions was elucidated. Malondialdehyde recoveries in aqueous buffer, protein solutions, saturated oil, and fully hydrogenated coconut oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by whey proteins or Tween 20 at 4 or 40 °C were compared. At both temperatures, the reactivity of malondialdehyde in aqueous buffer was the same. In protein solutions, malondialdehyde concentrations were reduced further and its decrease was protein-dependent. Similar trends were found for emulsions. Surprisingly, malondialdehyde was very reactive in saturated oil because only 15% was recovered at 40 °C. However, the degradation in oil proved to be strongly temperature-dependent; at 4 °C, losses amounted to only 8%. This study revealed that malondialdehyde is a very reactive molecule, both in the presence and absence of proteins. Its use as a general oxidation marker should therefore be considered with care. PMID:26016781

  4. Modeling of Miscible WAG Injection Using Real Geological Field Data

    OpenAIRE

    Shpak, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing oil recovery is the challenge for the oil industry in the North Sea and world wide. Norwegian national company Statoil set the goal to reach oil recovery of 60% for their fields on NCS. To achieve this target a number of enhanced oil recovery technologies are being applied, including water alternating gas injection. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility of effective improvement of oil recovery with WAG injection for the field, which has high permeability zone ...

  5. Oil Extraction From Oil Sludge and TPH Elimination of Solids/Water by Ozonation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misri Gozan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available About 1.1 million barrels of oil sludge are generated yearly in Indonesia by many oil and refinery industrial activities. Oil is strongly bound with solid particles in the sludge. Oilin the sludge may range from benzene, phenols to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons which are classified as toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic for human and pollute the environment. Oilextraction is favorable option because of environmental and economical reasons. Oil sludge from an oil fields inSumatra, Indonesia was extracted at low temperature (40–70 °C resulting in Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH around 1–2%. After addition of 10,000 ppm REKLIN G04 surfactant, TPH extraction was improved to 9%. After decantation, effluent water containing ± 15,000 ppm TPH was ozonated for 60 minutes resulting in TPH reduction to ± 5 ppm. After ozonation, TPH of discharge solids was only 7–40 ppm. Fingerprint by gas chromatography showed removal of light fraction of oil after ozonation.

  6. Layered double hydroxide functionalized textile for effective oil/water separation and selective oil adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Ge, Lei; Li, Wei; Wang, Xiuzhong; Li, Feng

    2015-01-14

    The removal of oil and organic pollutants from water is highly desired due to frequent oil spill accidents, as well as the increase of industrial oily wastewater. Here, superhydrophobic and superoleophilic textile has been successfully prepared for the application of effective oil/water separation and selective oil adsorption. This textile was fabricated by functionalizing the commercial textile with layered double hydroxide (LDH) microcrystals and low surface energy molecules. The LDH microcrystals were immobilized on the microfibers of the textile through an in situ growth method, and they formed a nestlike microstructure. The combination of the hierarchical structure and the low surface energy molecules made the textile superhydrophobic and superoleophilic. Further experiments demonstrated that the as-prepared textile not only can be applied as effective membrane materials for the separation of oil and water mixtures with high separation efficiency (>97%), but also can be used as a bag for the selective oil adsorption from water. Thus, such superhydrophobic and superoleophilic textile is a very promising material for the application of oil spill cleanup and industrial oily wastewater treatment. PMID:25490110

  7. Separation of oil from a water/oil mixed drop using two nonparallel plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cheng; Heng, Xin

    2014-08-26

    In this work, we have developed a simple approach to separate oil from a microliter-scaled water/oil mixture by squeezing the mixture using two nonparallel plates. Three pairs of plates with Teflon, SU-8, and SiO2 coatings, respectively, are used in the tests, and all of these plates are capable of separating the water/oil mixed drops. 95.5% silicone oil and 97.0% light mineral oil have been collected from their corresponding mixtures with water through the pair of Teflon plates. Furthermore, on the basis of pressure difference inside a liquid drop, theoretical models have been developed to interpret the corresponding mechanisms of the separation process, as well as the observed phenomena. To judge whether two immiscible liquids could be separated using the developed approach, a sufficient condition has also been derived, which includes three theoretical relations. The sufficient condition is subsequently validated by experiments. This condition also provides criteria for choosing a good plate coating. Such a coating should ensure (i) the oil wets the plate surface with a relatively large contact angle, and has small contact angle hysteresis, and (ii) the advancing contact angle that the water/oil interface forms on the plate surface is larger than 90°. PMID:25073653

  8. Effect of mixed gas solvent injection on performance of the Vapex process in an Iranian heavy oil sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derakhshanfar, M.; Kharrat, R.; Rostami, B. [Petroleum Univ. of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Etminan, S.R. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The vapor extraction (VAPEX) process involves the injection of vaporized hydrocarbon solvents into oil reservoirs in order to decrease in-situ oil viscosity. The solvents are often used with non-condensable gases in high pressure reservoirs to lower the dew point of the gas mixture and prevent condensation. This study investigated the effects of mixed gas solvent injection on the VAPEX process with an Iranian heavy oil sample. A set of experiments were conducted at low, medium, and high pressure rates on a 2-D visual model. A transparent face was used in the model in order to monitor the size of the vapor chamber and the position of the gas-oil interface. Production and injection wells were placed above each other and at the center of the model. The effects of solvent concentration, and carrier gas type on production parameters and produced oil properties were also investigated. Propane was used as a solvent, and methane and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) were used as carrier gases. Results of the study showed that high injection pressures caused fluctuations in system behaviour. The solvent chamber grew in a lateral direction, and less asphaltene precipitation was observed. It was concluded that the VAPEX process can be used in high pressure reservoirs when combined with non-condensable carrier gases. 14 refs., 3 tabs., 12 figs.

  9. Optimizing Injection Molding Processing Parameters for Enhanced Mechanical Performance of Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch High Density Polyethylene Composites

    OpenAIRE

    M. S. Ramli; M.R. Abdul Latif; P.S.M. Megat-Yusoff

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on the influence of injection molding processing parameters on mechanical properties of oil palm Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) filled High Density Poly Ethylene (HDPE). The biocomposite pellets were first prepared using an extruder with 20 wt% EFB content before being processed in an injection-molding machine for specimen fabrication. Two processing parameters were varied systematically and independently during the composite sample fabrication. The holding pressure was increased ...

  10. A review of knowledge on water-in-oil emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlined the basics of water-in-oil emulsification which is often considered to be the second most important behavioural characteristic of oil after evaporation. In the event of oil spills on water, water in-oil emulsions are formed by the emulsification process which changes the physical properties and characteristics of the oil. Stable emulsions contain from 60 to 80 per cent water, thereby expanding the spilled material from 2 to 5 times the original volume. The density of the resulting emulsion is also greater than the starting density and the viscosity of the oil generally increases. The liquid product is thus transformed into a heavy, semi-solid material. As a result of emulsification, evaporation of oil spills slows by orders-of-magnitude, spreading slows and the oil rides lower in the water column. Emulsification also affects cleanup response because emulsions are hard to treat, burn or recover mechanically. This paper also reviewed dielectric and rheological methods that study the formation mechanisms and stability of emulsions made from different types of oils. Other standard chemical techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), chemical analysis techniques, near-infrared spectroscopy, microscopy, interfacial pressure and interfacial tension have also been applied to emulsions. After 15 years of studies, data on water-in-oil emulsions have shown good correlation between laboratory, test tank and field scale studies. Reported test results oeld scale studies. Reported test results on about 400 oils and petroleum products have shown that emulsions can be grouped into 3 categories, each with distinct physical properties. These include stable, unstable and meso-stable emulsions. An examination of the asphaltene and resin content has shown that the stability of emulsions can be predicted by the asphaltene content and its viscosity. Emulsion formation was found to occur at a threshold energy, defined in terms of relative sea state. A recently proposed numerical modeling scheme based on empirical data and corresponding physical knowledge of emulsion formation has been proposed. A class index of unstable or entrained water-in-oil state and a meso-stable or stable emulsion was determined based on density, viscosity, saturate, asphaltene and resin content. 133 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs

  11. Effect Of Hot Water Injection On Sandstone Permeability : An Analysis Of Experimental Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2012-01-01

    The seasonal imbalance between supply and demand of renewable energy requires temporary storage, which can be achieved by hot water injection in warm aquifers. This requires that the permeability and porosity of the aquifer are not reduced significantly by heating. We present an overview of published results regarding the effect of temperature on sandstone permeability. These tests are performed with mineral oil, nitrogen gas, distilled water and solutions of NaCl, KCl, CaCl2 as well as brines that contain a mixture of salts. Thirteen sandstone formations, ranging from quartz arenites to formations with a significant fraction of fine particles including clay minerals are investigated. The porosities range from 0.10 to 0.30 and permeabilities span the range from 1 to 1000 md. To compare different rock types, specific surface is determined from permeability and porosity using Kozeny’s equation. Heating causes thermal expansion, which results in porosity reduction if the sandstone is confined. The maximum effect of porosity reduction as a result of thermal expansion on permeability is modelled and compared the change in specific surface that is computed from the reported data. This does not account for all the permeability reductions observed. Permeablity reduction occurs both when distilled water is the saturating fluid as well as in tests with NaCl, KCl or CaCl2 solutions, however, this is not the case in tests with mineral oil or nitrogen gas. The formation of a filter cake or influx of colloidal particles due to corrosion of the apparatus at elevated temperature causes permeability reduction in a number of investigations. Mobilisation of internal particles, particularly kaolinite particles, is considered a probable mechanism of permeability reduction for the other experiments reviewed here. The parameters that strongly affect the success of heat storage therefore include the quality of the equipment and particularly the prevention of corrosion, as well as the sandstone lithology and its interaction with the reservoir fluid.

  12. Policy Analysis of Water Availability and Use Issues for Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruple, John; Keiter, Robert

    2010-12-31

    Oil shale and oil sands resources located within the intermountain west represent a vast, and as of yet, commercially untapped source of energy. Development will require water, and demand for scarce water resources stands at the front of a long list of barriers to commercialization. Water requirements and the consequences of commercial development will depend on the number, size, and location of facilities, as well as the technologies employed to develop these unconventional fuels. While the details remain unclear, the implication is not – unconventional fuel development will increase demand for water in an arid region where demand for water often exceeds supply. Water demands in excess of supplies have long been the norm in the west, and for more than a century water has been apportioned on a first-come, first-served basis. Unconventional fuel developers who have not already secured water rights stand at the back of a long line and will need to obtain water from willing water purveyors. However, uncertainty regarding the nature and extent of some senior water claims combine with indeterminate interstate river management to cast a cloud over water resource allocation and management. Quantitative and qualitative water requirements associated with Endangered Species protection also stand as barriers to significant water development, and complex water quality regulations will apply to unconventional fuel development. Legal and political decisions can give shape to an indeterminate landscape. Settlement of Northern Ute reserved rights claims would help clarify the worth of existing water rights and viability of alternative sources of supply. Interstate apportionment of the White River would go a long way towards resolving water availability in downstream Utah. And energy policy clarification will help determine the role oil shale and oil sands will play in our nation’s future.

  13. Simultaneous extraction of oil- and water-soluble phase from sunflower seeds with subcritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravber, Matej; Knez, Željko; Škerget, Mojca

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the subcritical water extraction is proposed as an alternative and greener processing method for simultaneous removal of oil- and water-soluble phase from sunflower seeds. Extraction kinetics were studied at different temperatures and material/solvent ratios in a batch extractor. Degree of hydrothermal degradation of oils was observed by analysing amount of formed free fatty acids and their antioxidant capacities. Results were compared to oils obtained by conventional methods. Water soluble extracts were analysed for total proteins, carbohydrates and phenolics and some single products of hydrothermal degradation. Highest amount of oil was obtained at 130 °C at a material/solvent ratio of 1/20 g/mL after 30 min of extraction. For all obtained oils minimal degree of hydrothermal degradation could be identified. High antioxidant capacities of oil samples could be observed. Water soluble extracts were degraded at temperatures ?100 °C, producing various products of hydrothermal degradation. PMID:25053062

  14. The Description of Oil Displacement Mechanism in Steam Injection of Multi-Field Synergy with Exergy Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglin Cheng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Steam injection is a most effective way for improving heavy oil recovery efficiency, and it has academic and practical significance for the mechanism of multi-field synergy oil displacement. Mechanism of “diversified” oil displacement which is obtained by traditional study methods in the exploitation territory of oil and gas fields has both respective roles and mutual cross shortages. To describe and analyze the displacement process of multi-field coupling with exergy transfer can simplify this kind of problem by introducing a unified goal-driving exergy. It needs to use the method of theoretical modeling, numerical simulation and experimental validation to study the basic law of exergy transfer in the oil displacement process of multi-field synergy, make a thorough research for the flooding process of steam injection with exergy transfer theory and reveal the oil displacement mechanism in steam injection of multi-field synergy. Thus the theory instruction and technical support can be provided to improve reservoirs producing degree and extraction ratio.

  15. What Happens to Oil in the Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-10

    When different kinds of oil enter the sea, many physical, chemical and biological degradation processes start acting on them. This resource describes the factors that decide the physical, chemical and biological degradation of the oil, as well as potential environmental damage, effects on wildlife, and effects on habitats, of the spill. The text is color-coded to reflect the sources of the information, and links to additional material on topic are also provided.

  16. Bacteria motility at oil-water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Gabriel; Smirga, Steven; Fernandez, Vicente; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    The swimming dynamics of bacteria are strongly influenced by interfaces: Motile bacteria often accumulate at rigid boundaries, such as liquid-solid interfaces, and at soft boundaries, such as liquid-air or liquid-liquid interfaces. Attachment of bacteria to these interfaces is crucial for the formation of biofilms (liquid-solid), pellicles (liquid-air), and oil-degrading communities (liquid-liquid). We investigated the motility of the oil-degrading bacteria Marinobacter aquaeolei in the presence of oil droplets. We created individual oil droplets using dedicated microfluidic devices and captured the swimming behavior of individual bacteria near the interface and their attachment dynamics to the droplets with high-speed and epifluorescent microscopy. We find that Marinobacter aquaeolei has a high affinity towards interfaces and their swimming dynamics at soft interfaces differ from both those in the bulk and at rigid boundaries. Characterizing the interaction and attachment of motile bacteria to liquid-liquid interfaces will promote a fundamental understanding to oil-microbe interactions in aquatic environments and potentially lead to improved oil bioremediation strategies.

  17. Application of a bayesian framework to decision making regarding maintenance and intervention of subsea water injection pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Ringdal, Ingvar

    2007-01-01

    As more and more oil fields in the North Sea are developed as subsea fields, the monitoring and maintenance availability is becoming difficult to perform on the equipment used for subsea boosting. Often maintenance is looked upon as a necessary evil (Arthur, 2005, Bevilacqua et al., 2003) rather than a way to optimize the production of the field. This paper is looking at the problem of when to pull a damaged Subsea Water Injection Pump and replace it. Usually the practice is to keep the pump ...

  18. Study of transient air injection into a pool of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been conducted to study the hydrodynamic phenomena associated with the transient injection of air into a pool of water through single and double vent tubes placed in an axisymmetric vessel. The effect of such geometric parameters as submergence depth, distance of vent exit from the bottom of the test chamber, and the ratio of the cross-sectional area of the tube to that of the test chamber has been studied for single tubes. The data show that the bottom maximum pressure increases with submergence depth and that two-dimensional effects start to play a role at submergence depths of about 20 cm (test chamber diameter = 45 cm). The minimum downward force is observed to occur when the momentum of the expanding bubble is at its maximum. The double vent data show that a superposition principle will tend to overestimate the maximum downward force, while a reduction in cell size will reduce the magnitude of the local maximum and tend to make the pressure uniform over the bottom of the test chamber. Prediction of the maximum average downward force for double vents is found to be possible from single vent observations if the single vent is assumed to be placed in between the double vents and if it has a cross-sectional area equal to the sum of the areas of the two vents. A comparison of predictions based on the present work with the experimentally observed forces in a 1/5th scale Mark I BWR torus has been made

  19. Field studies of microbiological corrosion in water injection plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elboujdaini, M.; Sastri, V.S. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Metals Technology Labs.

    1995-12-01

    Electrochemical impedance, weight loss and potentiodyne techniques were used to determine the corrosion rates of carbon steel along with the determination of activities of both sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and acid-producing bacteria (APB) in a water injection field test facility. Corrosion rates determined by the potentiodyne technique did not correlate with the bacterial activity. Corrosion rates obtained by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were comparable to the rates obtained by weight loss measurements. The average corrosion rates obtained by EIS paralleled the cumulative SRB activity over 84 days, and the addition of biocide resulted in reduced bacterial activity and corrosion rate. The depression angles in Nyquist plots were high (30{degree}, 29{degree}) for control and biocide lines respectively indicating a fair degree of pitting corrosion. After 42 days, the values were lower, 11{degree} for biocide line compared to 22{degree} for control he showing the decrease in pitting tendency in line to which biocide was added at the end of 28 days.

  20. Numerical Study of Water Control with Downhole Oil-Water Separation Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Yin Khor Yin; Al-Kayiem Hussain H.; Pao William

    2014-01-01

    The maturing oil fields with increasing water production can pose a challenging produced water handling and disposal issues. This paper presents a numerical study of a motorless hydrocyclone to enhance understanding of the downhole oil-water separation. The turbulence of fluid flow is obtained using K-? Realizable Turbulence model for complex swirl dominated flow, while the interface between hydrocarbon and water is described using the Discrete Phase model. In this approach, factors which co...

  1. Microbial response to reinjection of produced water in an oil reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysnes, Kristine; Bødtker, Gunhild; Torsvik, Terje; Bjørnestad, Eva O; Sunde, Egil

    2009-07-01

    The microbial response to produced water reinjection (PWRI) in a North Sea oil field was investigated by a combination of cultivation and culture-independent molecular phylogenetic techniques. Special emphasise was put on the relationship between sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB), and results were used to evaluate the possibility of nitrate treatment as a souring management tool during PWRI. Samples were collected by reversing the flow of the injection water, which provided samples from around the injection area. The backflowed samples were compared to produced water from the same platform and to backflowed samples from a biocide-treated seawater injector, which was the previous injection water treatment of the PWRI well. Results showed that reinjection of produced water promoted growth of thermophilic SRB. Thermophilic fatty acid oxidising NRB and potential nitrate-reducing sulphide-oxidising bacteria were also found. The finding of thermophilic NRB makes nitrate treatment during PWRI possible, although higher nitrate concentration will be necessary to compensate for the increased SRB activity. PMID:19430774

  2. Geohydrology and water quality in northern Portage County, Ohio, in relation to deep-well brine injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberts, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    Geohydrology and water quality of the principal freshwater aquifers near oilfield and gasfield brine-injection wells in northern Portage County, Ohio, were evaluated. Since 1975, 13 wells in this part of the Country have been used to dispose of more than 4.5 million barrels of brine by injection into Silurian carbonate and sandstone rocks that generally are greater than 3,500 feet below land surface. More than 3,000 feet of interbedded shales, sandstones, carbonates, and evaporites separate the freshwater aquifers from these brine-injection zones. The shallowest brine-injection zone is greater than 2,200 feet below sea level. Native fluids in the injection zones have dissolved-solids concentrations greater than 125,000 milligrams per liter and are hydraulically isolated from the freshwater aquifers. No known faults or fracture systems are present in northern Portage County, although abandoned oil and gas wells could exist and serve as conduits for migration of injected brine. Pennsylvanian clastic units are freshwater bearing in northern Portage County, and two bedrock aquifers generally are recognized. The shallower bedrock aquifer (Connoquenessing Sandstone Member of the Pottsville Formation) principally consists of sandstone; this aquifer is separated from a deeper sandstone and conglomerate aquifer in the lower part of the Sharon Member (Pottsville Formation) by shale in the upper part of the Sharon Member that acts as a confining unit. The upper sandstone aquifer is the surficial aquifer where overlying glacial deposits are unsaturated in the uplands; glacial deposits comprise the surficial aquifer in buried valleys where the sandstone is absent. These two surficial aquifers are hydraulically connected and act as a single unit. The lower sandstone and conglomerate aquifer is the most areally extensive aquifer within the project area. From November 1987 through August 1988, ground-water levels remained at least 60 feet higher in the upper sandstone aquifer than in the lower sandstone and conglomerate aquifer at a topographically high recharge area. Water levels in the surficial aquifers and the lower sandstone and conglomerate aquifer were nearly the same along the Cuyahoga River. Ground water in the upper sandstone aquifer flows radially from topographically high recharge areas into the glacial deposits in the buried valleys. Much of the ground water in these surficial aquifers discharges into the Cuyahoga River. Most ground water in the lower sandstone and conglomerate aquifer flows toward discharge areas near the Cuyahoga River and Eagle Creek. In June 1988, the Cuyahoga River gained 15.8 cubic feet per second of water from the aquifers between the northern edge of Portage County and State Route 303. Ground water may have discharged into the upstream end of Lake Rockwell but did not discharge into the downstream end of the Lake during most of the period from October 1987 through September 1988. Measurements of the specific conductance of ground water sampled from areas near the 13 brine-injection wells and along the Cuyahoga River indicate no widespread ground-water contamination related to brine injection. Chemical analysis of water from 25 wells indicates that most ground waters are a calcium bicarbonate type. Water analyses show that four wells sampled contain water with chloride concentrations greater than 250 milligrams per liter. Sodium concentrations in water from these four wells ranged from 67 to 190 milligrams per liter. A mixing diagram constructed from bromide and chloride data was used to distinguish between the sources of elevated chloride concentrations in these four wells. Waters from two of the wells have been mixed with oilfield and gasfield brine, and waters from the other two wells have been mixed with a salt-solution brine such as that derived from diluted highway-deicing salts.

  3. Quantitation of Testosterone,Cypionate-in-Oil Injection Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, V Das; Pramar, Y

    1999-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography assay method for the quantitation of testosterone-cypionate-in-oil injection has been developed. The assay method is very simple, accurate and precise, with a percent relative standard deviation of 1.2 based on five readings. The extraction procedure is very simple compared with a very tedious and time-consuming procedure given in the United States Pharmacopoeia/National Formulary. The USP-NF assay method is based on gas chromatography. The benzyl alcohol (preservative) did not interfere with the assay preocedure. The newly developed method could not be applied to the quantitation of testosterone enanthate since the results were consistently low (-87%). The average recovery of testosterone cypionate from a commercial dosage form was 98.7%. PMID:23985714

  4. Selection of potential cold water marine species for testing of oil dispersants, and chemically dispersed oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study regarding marine species for toxicity testing for Alaska conditions was presented and the potential adverse impacts of a large marine oil spill in cold water were discussed with the objective to determine if the spill should be treated by the use of oil dispersants. Without dispersion, the oil can pollute marine epifauna and can deposit on beaches. The decision to apply dispersants to a marine oil spill requires knowledge of the toxicity of the undispersed oil to pelagic marine life occurring via natural dispersion as opposed to the toxicity of the oil-dispersant mixture. Most standard toxicity tests apply to warm water species. This paper discussed the need to have a standard test species relevant to Alaska waters for toxicity testing. In this study, toxicity testing was done according to the methods of the Chemical Response to Oil Spills : Ecological Effects Research Forum (CROSERF). The testing included capturing adult species in the winter and holding them until larval hatching. Toxicity testing was completed in a narrow time frame before hatching ceased. Many chemical samples were tested. Topsmelt, urchins, shellfish, mysids, copepods, pink salmon fry, and tidepool sculpin were considered by the author to be the most useful for certain types of toxicity testing. 29 refs

  5. Engine Company Evaluation of Feasibility of Aircraft Retrofit Water-Injected Turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    This study supports the NASA Glenn Research Center and the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory in their efforts to evaluate the effect of water injection on aircraft engine performance and emissions. In this study, water is only injected during the takeoff and initial climb phase of a flight. There is no water injection during engine start or ground operations, nor during climb, cruise, descent, or landing. This study determined the maintenance benefit of water injection during takeoff and initial climb and evaluated the feasibility of retrofitting a current production engine, the PW4062 (Pratt & Whitney, East Hartford, CT), with a water injection system. Predicted NO(x) emissions based on a 1:1 water-tofuel ratio are likely to be reduced between 30 to 60 percent in Environmental Protection Agency parameter (EPAP). The maintenance cost benefit for an idealized combustor water injection system installed on a PW4062 engine in a Boeing 747-400ER aircraft (The Boeing Company, Chicago, IL) is computed to be $22 per engine flight hour (EFH). Adding water injection as a retrofit kit would cost up to $375,000 per engine because of the required modifications to the fuel system and addition of the water supply system. There would also be significant nonrecurring costs associated with the development and certification of the system that may drive the system price beyond affordability.

  6. Effect of water injection on hydrogen generation during severe accident in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of water injection on hydrogen generation during severe accident in a 1000 MWe pressurized water reactor was studied. The analyses were carried out with different water injection rates at different core damage stages. The core can be quenched and accident progression can be terminated by water injection at the time before cohesive core debris is formed at lower core region. Hydrogen generation rate decreases with water injection into the core at the peak core temperature of 1700 K, because the core is quenched and reflooded quickly. The water injection at the peak core temperature of 1900 K, the hydrogen generation rate increases at low injection rates of the water, as the core is quenched slowly and the core remains in uncovered condition at high temperatures for a longer time than the situation of high injection rate. At peak core temperature of 2100-2300 K, the Hydrogen generation rate increases by water injection because of the steam serving to the high temperature steam-starved core. Hydrogen generation rate increases significantly after water injection into the core at peak core temperature of 2500 K because of the steam serving to the relocating Zr-U-O mixture. Almost no hydrogen generation can be seen in base case after formation of the molten pool at the lower core region. However, hydrogen is generated if water is injected into the molten pool, because steam serves to the crust supporting the molten pool. Reactor coolant system (RCS) depressurization tor coolant system (RCS) depressurization by opening power operated relief valves has important effect on hydrogen generation. Special attention should be paid to hydrogen generation enhancement caused by RCS depressurization. (authors)

  7. Direct numerical simulation of water droplet coalescence in the oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ? VOF computational technique has been used to simulate coalescence of two water droplets in oil. ? The model was validated with the experimental data for binary droplet coalescence. ? Based on the CFD simulation results a correlation has been proposed to predict the coalescence time. - Abstract: Coalescence of two water droplets in the oil was simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. The finite volume numerical method was applied to solve the Navier–Stokes equations in conjunction with the Volume of Fluid (VOF) approach for interface tracking. The effects of some parameters consisting of the collision velocity, off-center collision parameter, oil viscosity and water–oil interfacial tension on the coalescence time were investigated. The simulation results were validated against the experimental data available in the literature. The results revealed that quicker coalescence could be achieved if the head-on collisions occur or the droplets approach each other with a high velocity. In addition, low oil viscosities or large water–oil interfacial tensions cause less coalescence time. Moreover, a correlation was developed to predict coalescence efficiency as a function of the mentioned parameters.

  8. SURFACE WATER QUALITY PARAMETERS FOR MONITORING OIL SHALE DEVELOPMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report develops and recommends prioritized listings of chemical, physical, and biological parameters which can be used to assess the environmental impact of oil shale development on surface water resources. Each of the potential water-related problems is addressed in the con...

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF OIL SHALE MINE WATERS, CENTRAL PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted to characterize the oil shale mine waters in the Piceance Basin. The study sites were Federal Prototype Lease Tracts C-a and C-b, located in the central portion of the basin. The objective was to collect water quality data in order to characterize the mine w...

  10. An environmentally safe water-based alternative to oil muds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a mechanism describing the onset of bit balling is given. On the basis of this mechanism, a new copolymer/polypropylene glycol (COP/PPG) water-based drilling fluid was developed. The properties of this fluid are described, and field test comparisons are made with water- and oil-based fluids

  11. Oil conversion of vinasse with high-density water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serikawa, R.M.; Funazukuri, T.; Wakao, N. (Yokohama National University, Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-03-01

    Vinasse, residue from the ethanol distillation of alcohol-fermented sugar-cane juice, was treated with high-density water at temperatures from 200 to 500{degree}C. The products were separated into ether soluble, ether/water insoluble and aqueous fractions, and char. The ether soluble and ether/water insoluble fractions were referred to as oil. At 350{degree}C for example, 15.8 wt% of dried vinasse turned into oil. The gaseous products were found to consist of mainly CO{sub 2} with a small amount of CO and CH{sub 4}.

  12. Countercurrent steam/water flow above a perforated plate-vertical injection of water. Topical report, August 1980-July 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Countercurrent flow limiting phenomenon above a perforated plate has been studied in a steam/water environment. Water was injected as a vertical jet and the injection height above the perforated plate was changed from 0 cm to 35.6 cm. The 15 hole perforated plate has a rectangular cross section with a perforation ratio of 0.423. The weep-points and total dumping points have been determined for low and high water injection heights above the perforated plate and the results have been compared to those of the horizontal water spray experiments. The data corresponding to high water injection heights were similar to those of the horizontal water spray experiments. However, a different behavior was observed for the weep-point data with low water inlet heights. The dumping point was little affected by the water inlet position above the perforated plate. The dimensionless effective steam flow rate defined for the experiments with horizontal water spray was used to correlate the data corresponding to both the onset of weeping and the total dumping points. The correlation was successful for the weep-point data with high water injection heights. However the dimensionless parameter was redefined for the weeping-point data with low water injection heights

  13. Comparative toxicity of water-accommodated fractions of oil and dispersed oil to marine fish larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of chemical dispersants to clean oil spills on water can increase the risk of toxic effects to early life stages of fish by increasing their exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this study, water-accommodated fractions of dispersed crude oil were prepared with weathered Mesa light crude oil and filtered seawater with and without Corexit 9500. Newly hatched larvae of mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, were exposed to the mixtures to examine the biological effects on the larvae. For an oil loading of 0.2 g/L, the addition of dispersant caused a 2-fold and 7-fold increase in total PAH and high molecular weight PAH with 3 or more benzene rings. A 5-fold increase in ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity was observed in larvae exposed to dispersed crude oil water accommodated fractions at a loading of 0.05 g/L. A 4-fold increase was noted when the crude oil water accommodated fractions were loaded at 1 g/L. Both mixtures resulted in reduced body length. The study confirmed that dispersants increase the risk of toxic effects for the early life stage of fish

  14. 40 CFR 60.692-3 - Standards: Oil-water separators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...slop oil tank, storage vessel, or other...b) Each oil-water separator tank...with a design capacity to treat more...reconstructed oil-water separator tank with a maximum design capacity to treat less...tank. (d) Storage vessels, including...from an oil-water separator...

  15. Subcritical Water Extraction of Monosaccharides from Oil Palm Fronds Hemicelluloses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oil palm plantations in Malaysia generate more than 36 million tones of pruned and felled oil palm fronds (OPF) and are generally considered as waste. The composition of monosaccharide in oil palm frond can be extracted using hydrothermal treatment for useful applications. The objectives of this study were to quantify the yield of monosaccharides at various reaction conditions; temperature 170 to 200 degree Celsius, pressure from 500 psi to 800 psi, reaction time from 5 to 15 min using subcritical water extraction and to determine the composition of oil palm frond hemicelluloses at optimum condition. The monosaccharides composition of oil palm frond hemicelluloses were analysed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The highest yield of monosaccharides can be extracted from OPF at temperature of 190 degree Celsius, pressure of 600 psi and 10 min of contact time which is xylose the most abundant composition (11.79 %) followed with arabinose (2.82 %), glucose (0.61 %) and mannose (0.66 %). (author)

  16. ?????????????????? Research on Numerical Simulations of Heavy Oil Thermal Recovery by Steam Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ???

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????B-L????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????–???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? The works on the developments of the numerical scheme for multi-phase flows in porous media and the adaptive mesh refinement in numerical simulations of heavy oil thermal recovery by steam injection are introduced. First, a finite analytic method was developed to deal with a challenging problem in numerical simulations in the case of strong geological heterogeneity, which cause the upscaling permeability to have a rapid change cross the grid interfaces and therefore the nodal flow effects will lead the flow fingering to the high permeability region. With the traditional numerical scheme, refining the coarse grid enough is the only manner to describe the flow pattern accurately. Second, for the incompressible two-phase flows, a numerical scheme, which could avoid the grid orientation effects efficiently, was proposed. Next, the adaptive mesh refinement technique was applied to the numerical simulations for the processes of thermal recovery by steam injection, where the different heterogeneous cases of the reservoir were considered, like the reservoir with the permeability variations, the different rock-types, the fractured porous media, the complex faulted reservoir or complex boundary reservoirs. The proposed AMR technique is fast and can give good accuracy. At last, on the basis of above theoretical research, a software package for the reservoir simulations, where the AMR technique was included, was developed.

  17. Use of Drag Reducer in Improving Water (Flooding) Injectivity in Ukpokiti Field, Niger Delta

    OpenAIRE

    Amieibibama JOSEPH; Joseph Atubokiki AJIENKA

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of water-flooding injectivity involves identifying the causes of the problem(s) of the operation and coming up with possible solutions. Ukpokiti field was projected to be injected with 40,000BWPD, however, on commencement of operation only about 30,000BWPD could be injected. This live field experimental work identified pipeline restriction to the injector wellheads as responsible for the lower injectivity. The test involved injecting 15ppm, 20pm and 27ppm of Conoco drag reducer (CD...

  18. Stability of additive-free water-in-oil emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate ion distributions near a planar oil-water interface within nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theory, taking into account the Born self-energy of the ions in the two media. For unequal self-energies of cations and anions a spontaneous charge separation is found, such that the water and oil phases become oppositely charged in slabs with a typical thickness of the Debye screening length in the two media. From the analytical solutions, the corresponding interfacial charge density and the contribution to the interfacial tension is derived, together with an estimate for the Yukawa potential between two spherical water droplets in oil. The parameter regime is explored where the plasma coupling parameter exceeds the crystallization threshold, i.e. where the droplets are expected to form crystalline structures due to a strong Yukawa repulsion, as recently observed experimentally. Extensions of the theory that we discuss briefly, include numerical calculations on spherical water droplets in oil, and analytical calculations of the linear PB-equation for a finite oil-water interfacial width.

  19. 21 CFR 522.2005 - Propofol injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Propofol injection. 522.2005 Section...522.2005 Propofol injection. (a) Specifications...nonpyrogenic, oil-in-water emulsion containing...follows: As a single injection to provide general...for induction and maintenance of general...

  20. [Recognition of water-injected meat based on visible/near-infrared spectrum and sparse representation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Dong-mei; Zhou, Ya-nan; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Song; Yang, Yi-min; Lin, Ling; Li, Gang; Wang, Xiu-li

    2015-01-01

    The present paper proposed a new nondestructive method based on visible/near infrared spectrum (Vis/NIRS) and sparse representation to rapidly and accurately discriminate between raw meat and water-injected meat. Water-injected meat model was built by injecting water into non-destructed meat samples comprising pigskin, fat layer and muscle layer. Vis/NIRS data were collected from raw meat and six scales of water-injected meat with spectrometers. To reduce the redundant information in the spectrum and improve the difference between the samples,. some preprocessing steps were performed for the spectral data, including light modulation and normalization. Effective spectral bands were extracted from the preprocessed spectral data. The meat samples were classified as raw meat and water-injected meat, and further, water-injected meat with different water injection rates. All the training samples were used to compose an atom dictionary, and test samples were represented by the sparsest linear combinations of these atoms via l1-minimization. Projection errors of test samples with respect to each category were calculated. A test sample was classified to the category with the minimum projection error, and leave-one-out cross-validation was conducted. The recognition performance from sparse representation was compared with that from support vector machine (SVM).. Experimental results showed that the overall recognition accuracy of sparse representation for raw meat and water-injected meat was more than 90%, which was higher than that of SVM. For water-injected meat samples with different water injection rates, the recognition accuracy presented a positive correlation with the water injection rate difference. Spare representation-based classifier eliminates the need for the training and feature extraction steps required by conventional pattern recognition models, and is suitable for processing data of high dimensionality and small sample size. Furthermore, it has a low computational cost. In this paper, spare representation is employed for the first time to identify water-injected meat based on Vis/NIRS, with a promising recognition accuracy. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can be effectively used for discriminating water-injected meat from raw meat. PMID:25993827

  1. Theoretical and experimental studies of water injection scroll compressor in automotive fuel cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuanyang Zhao; Liansheng Li; Huagen Wu; Pengcheng Shu [Xian Jiaotong University (China). School of Energy and Power Engineering

    2005-06-01

    A water injection scroll compressor to supply clean compressed air to an automotive fuel cell system is researched. The water is used as both the lubricant and coolant in the compressor. A thermodynamic model of the water injection scroll compressor considering leakage and heat exchange for use with an automotive fuel cell system was developed using the conservation of energy and mass equations and the equation of state. The results show that the scroll compressor has nearly isothermal compression when injecting water in it. Increasing the compressor rotation speed increases the discharge loss and the volumetric efficiency of the scroll compressor. The difference between the calculated power and the isothermal power increases as the compressor rotation speed rises, which means the efficiency of the compressor decreases. Increasing the flow rate of water injected increases the indicated isothermal efficiency and decreases the discharge temperature. Under the condition studied, the mass flow rate of water has the greatest effect on the discharge temperature. (author)

  2. Quantifying the concentration of crude oil microdroplets in oil-water preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Aaron D; McGrath, Joy A; Stubblefield, William A; Maki, Al W; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2012-08-01

    Dissolved constituents of crude oil, particularly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), can contribute substantially to the toxicity of aquatic organisms. Measured aqueous concentrations of high-molecular weight PAHs (e.g., chrysenes, benzo[a]pyrene) as well as long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbons can exceed the theoretical solubility of these sparingly soluble compounds. This is attributed to the presence of a "microdroplet" or colloidal oil phase. It is important to be able to quantify the dissolved fraction of these compounds in oil-in-water preparations that are commonly used in toxicity assays because the interpretation of test results often assumes that the compounds are dissolved. A method is presented to determine the microdroplet contribution in crude oil-in-water preparations using a comparison of predicted and measured aqueous concentrations. Measured concentrations are reproduced in the model by including both microdroplets and dissolved constituents of petroleum hydrocarbons. Microdroplets were found in all oil-water preparation data sets analyzed. Estimated microdroplet oil concentrations typically ranged from 10 to 700 µg oil/L water. The fraction of dissolved individual petroleum hydrocarbons ranges from 1.0 for highly soluble compounds (e.g., benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene) to far less than 0.1 for sparingly soluble compounds (e.g., chrysenes) depending on the microdroplet oil concentration. The presence of these microdroplets complicates the interpretation of toxicity test data because they may exert an additional toxic effect due to a change in the exposure profile. The implications of the droplet model on toxicity are also discussed in terms of both dissolved hydrocarbons and microdroplets. PMID:22585433

  3. Soil water repellency at old crude oil spill sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents the current state of knowledge regarding the cause of soil water repellency and characterizes disaggregated nonwettable surface soils found at old crude oil spill sites. Pollution-induced water repellency generally develops following prolonged exposures of soil to liquid- or vapour-phase petroleum hydrocarbons. The condition varies significantly in terms of severity and persistence. Soil water repellency retards plant growth and disturbs the hydrological balance of ecosystems. Disaggregated water-repellent soils are also very susceptible to dispersal by erosion, posing a threat to the productivity of surrounding soils. The author described the probable causes of soil water repellency under the following three main themes: (1) accumulation of hydrophobic organic material in soil, (2) redistribution and re-organisation of this material in soil, and (3) stabilisation of the hydrophobic organic material. This final process is necessary to ensure persistence of induced water repellency symptoms. Petroleum residues as water-repellent substances in weathered nonwettable oil-contaminated soils were also discussed and a hypothesis about soil water repellency was presented which deals with flexible conformation in organic matter coatings. Processes leading to the development of soil water repellency following crude oil contamination were also described. It was determined that soil water repellency is a function of the packing density and the chain conformathe packing density and the chain conformation of amphiphilic organic molecules in the outermost layer of soil organic matter coatings. This research suggests that the fractional coverage of alkyl chains on soil particle surfaces determines the degree of water repellency that is displayed by soil. It was shown that prompt remediation of some oil-contaminated plots can effectively prevent the development of soil water repellency. 4 refs., 32 tabs., 22 figs., 5 appendices

  4. Retention of polar oil components in low salinity water flooding

    OpenAIRE

    Sokama-neuyam, Yen Adams

    2013-01-01

    The influence of brine chemistry, salinity and composition on the retention of polar oil components onto reservoir rock mineral surface in relation to low salinity water flooding (LSWF) was studied and evaluated in this piece of work using ultra-violet visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. Five different brine compositions; sea water (SW), formation water (FW), LSW1 (FW diluted 100 times), LSW2 (FW diluted 1000 times) and KCl low salinity brine were studied and their effect on the retention of polar...

  5. Strontium isotopes test long-term zonal isolation of injected and Marcellus formation water after hydraulic fracturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Courtney A Kolesar; Capo, Rosemary C; Stewart, Brian W; Wall, Andrew J; Schroeder, Karl T; Hammack, Richard W; Guthrie, George D

    2014-08-19

    One concern regarding unconventional hydrocarbon production from organic-rich shale is that hydraulic fracture stimulation could create pathways that allow injected fluids and deep brines from the target formation or adjacent units to migrate upward into shallow drinking water aquifers. This study presents Sr isotope and geochemical data from a well-constrained site in Greene County, Pennsylvania, in which samples were collected before and after hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale. Results spanning a 15-month period indicated no significant migration of Marcellus-derived fluids into Upper Devonian/Lower Mississippian units located 900-1200 m above the lateral Marcellus boreholes or into groundwater sampled at a spring near the site. Monitoring the Sr isotope ratio of water from legacy oil and gas wells or drinking water wells can provide a sensitive early warning of upward brine migration for many years after well stimulation. PMID:25024106

  6. Oil-in-water monitoring using membrane inlet mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brki?, Boris; France, Neil; Taylor, Stephen

    2011-08-15

    A membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) system has been used for detection and analysis of two types of North Sea crude oil. The system was installed on-field on the Flotta Oil Terminal (Orkney, UK). It consisted of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) connected to the capillary probe with a silicone-based membrane. The produced mass spectra and calibration plots from the MIMS instrument showed the capability to measure levels of individual hydrocarbons within crude oil in seawater. The generated mass spectra from the field tests also showed the ability to distinguish between different types of oil and to determine concentrations of toxic hydrocarbons in oil (e.g., benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX)). The performance of the instrument at different temperatures of seawater and oil droplet sizes was also investigated. The results showed that the QMS-based MIMS system has a potential to complement existing oil-in-water (OiW) monitors by being able to detect different oil types and specific hydrocarbon concentrations with high accuracy, which are currently not supported in commercially available OiW monitors. PMID:21718034

  7. Oil Spectral Characteristics with High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer - A Case Study of Oil from Deep Water Horizon, 2010

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Crude oil spilled in coastal waters is a severe threat to the environment and can cause catastrophic consequence to the coastal ecological systems. Such an oil...

  8. Use of Drag Reducer in Improving Water (Flooding Injectivity in Ukpokiti Field, Niger Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amieibibama JOSEPH

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of water-flooding injectivity involves identifying the causes of the problem(s of the operation and coming up with possible solutions. Ukpokiti field was projected to be injected with 40,000BWPD, however, on commencement of operation only about 30,000BWPD could be injected. This live field experimental work identified pipeline restriction to the injector wellheads as responsible for the lower injectivity. The test involved injecting 15ppm, 20pm and 27ppm of Conoco drag reducer (CDR downstream the turbine pumps that supply water to the injector wells. Velocity and the injection rate of water to the injector wells (with no CDR added were measured. From the field results, 20ppm of CDR injection gave optimum injection increase of 13% and adding a third side outlet 3? pipeline into the wellheads gives independent 16% increase in injectivity. The test had no negative impact on the environment. The result could be applied as an aid and quick means of predicting water-flooding operation in similar operating condition as Ukpokiti field.

  9. Theoretical analysis of the effect of water and ethanol injection on axial compressor instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of instabilities that occur in compression systems rotating stall and surge have an adverse effect on the compressor performance. Several techniques have been explored to minimize the effect of these instabilities. It has been observed that injection of a liquid into the compressor not only improves thermodynamic efficiencies but also results in stabilizing the system. Therefore, water and ethanol injection has been investigated as an effective tool for controlling these compressor instabilities. In the present paper a modified Moore-Greitzer model has been proposed for wet compression-based system using water and ethanol. Under this work the effect of injection of water (1) at various stages of compressor, (2) at different altitudes and (3) by varying amounts has also been presented. The effect of various parameters on wet compression such as (a) Optimum stage for liquid injection (b) Optimum amount of liquid injection and (c) Effect of altitude on liquid injection is also examined in the present work which shows that the liquid injection helps in improving the performance of compression systems in terms of increase in the stall margin and pressure rise coefficient. - Highlights: ? We model the effect of liquid injection on the performance of axial flow compressors. ? The basic Moore-Grietzer's model has been appropriately modified. ? Injection of liquid in the later stages of the compressor resulted in improved stall margin and pressure rise. ? Usell margin and pressure rise. ? Use of ethanol was found to give better performance than water.

  10. Estimation of gas/liquid and oil/water interface levels in an oil/water/gas separator based on pressure measurements and regression modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Arvoh, Benjamin Kaku; Skeie, Nils Olav; Halstensen, Maths

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Gravity separators are widely used for separation of gas/oil/water/sand from both offshore and onshore oil production facilities. Estimation of the gas/liquid and oil/water interface levels in gravity separators have been a concern since these parameters are important for reliable operation. Most of the instruments on the market today do not provide reliable measurements of both gas/liquid and oil/water interface levels. The few instruments that do provide reliable measurements ar...

  11. Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) by Miscible CO2 and Water Flooding of Asphaltenic and Non-Asphaltenic Oils

    OpenAIRE

    Edwin A. Chukwudeme; Aly A. Hamouda

    2009-01-01

    An EOR study has been performed applying miscible CO2 flooding and compared with that for water flooding. Three different oils are used, reference oil (n-decane), model oil (n-C10, SA, toluene and 0.35 wt % asphaltene) and crude oil (10 wt % asphaltene) obtained from the Middle East. Stearic acid (SA) is added representing a natural surfactant in oil. For the non-asphaltenic oil, miscible CO2 flooding is shown to be more favourable than that by water. However, it is interesting to see that fo...

  12. Design and operation of laboratory combustion cell for air injection into light oil reservoirs: potential application in Sindh field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historical experimental work on the combustion oil recovery processes consists of both laboratory and field studies. Although field experiments are the ultimate test of any oil recovery process, they are costly, time consuming and difficult to analyze quantitatively. Laboratory CC (Combustion Cell) experiments are cost effective and less time consuming, but are subject to scaling and interpretation challenges. Experimental set up has been developed to understand air injection process for improving oil recovery from light oil reservoirs taking into account the sand pack petro physical and fluid properties. Some important design problems; operational criteria and considerations important to interpretation of results are pointed out. To replicate subsurface reservoir conditions or pressure and temperature, experiments up to 6895 KPa, at non-isothermal conditions with 5 deg. C/min ramp-up are performed on unconsolidated cores with reservoir oil samples. Correlations were obtained for low temperature oxidation rate of oil, the fuel deposition rate and the rate of burning fuel as a fuel concentration. Various parameters such as (sand pack, pressure, oil saturation and flow rate/air flux) were changed to investigate their impact on reaction and chemical nature of the fuel burned. To determine the importance of distribution and pyrolysis on these reactions, he hydrogen-carbon ratio and m-ratio was calculated. For further confirmation Arrhenius graphs were drawn by assuming 1.Arrhenius graphs were drawn by assuming 1.0 order of reaction with carbon concentration which is also confirmed.This research will contribute to the overall understanding of air injection process; help to determine the most appropriate lOR (Improved Oil Recovery) technique in the development of the tertiary phase of production in light oil reservoirs in Lower Indus Basin (Sindh) fields. (author)

  13. Effect of connate-water saturation, oil viscosity, and matrix permeability on rate of gravity drainage during immiscible and miscible displacement tests in matrix-fracture experimental model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torabi, F.; Asghari, K. [Regina Univ., SK (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    There has been a substantial increase in interest regarding miscible injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) for the purpose of enhanced oil recovery in conventional oil reservoirs. However, due to presumed low performance efficiency, naturally fractured reservoirs, which are among the largest oil reserves in the world, are considered bad candidates for this process. This paper presented the results of an experimental study on the effect of connate water saturation, matrix permeability, and oil viscosity on the performance of gravity drainage from the matrix into fracture when it was surrounded by a CO{sub 2}-filled fracture. An experimental model was used under different operating pressures to study both immiscible and miscible conditions. Experiments were conducted using synthetic oil and light crude oil in two Berea cores having large differences in permeability. The effect of connate water saturation was also examined by performing experiments in an initially brine saturated Berea core and comparing the results with those obtained when the core was 100 per cent saturated with oil. The paper described the laboratory study including the materials, experimental setup, and experimental procedure. Results were presented for the effect of connate water saturation; effect of oil viscosity; effect of matrix permeability; and oil in place. It was concluded that matrix permeability has a significant effect on the rate of gravity drainage when CO{sub 2} is injected under immiscible conditions. 11 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  14. Finding Balance Between Biological Groundwater Treatment and Treated Injection Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Mark A.; Nielsen, Kellin R.; Byrnes, Mark E.; Simmons, Sally A.; Morse, John J.; Geiger, James B.; Watkins, Louis E.; McFee, Phillip M.; Martins, K.

    2015-01-14

    At the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company operates the 200 West Pump and Treat which was engineered to treat radiological and chemical contaminants in groundwater as a result of the site’s former plutonium production years. Fluidized bed bioreactors (FBRs) are used to remove nitrate, metals, and volatile organic compounds. Increasing nitrate concentrations in the treatment plant effluent and the presence of a slimy biomass (a typical microorganism response to stress) in the FBRs triggered an investigation of nutrient levels in the system. Little, if any, micronutrient feed was coming into the bioreactors. Additionally, carbon substrate (used to promote biological growth) was passing through to the injection wells, causing biological fouling of the wells and reduced specific injectivity. Adjustments to the micronutrient feed improved microorganism health, but the micronutrients were being overfed (particularly manganese) plugging the injection wells further. Injection well rehabilitation to restore specific injectivity required repeated treatments to remove the biological fouling and precipitated metal oxides. A combination of sulfamic and citric acids worked well to dissolve metal oxides and sodium hypochlorite effectively removed the biological growth. Intensive surging and development techniques successfully removed clogging material from the injection wells. Ultimately, the investigation and nutrient adjustments took months to restore proper balance to the microbial system and over a year to stabilize injection well capacities. Carefully tracking and managing the FBRs and well performance monitoring are critical to balancing the needs of the treatment system while reducing fouling mechanisms in the injection wells.

  15. Paclitaxel Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraxane® ... Paclitaxel injection manufactured with human albumin is used to treat breast cancer that has not improved or that has come back after treatment with other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to ...

  16. Studies of water-in-oil emulsions : stability and oil properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of water-in-oil emulsions were studied by examining the asphaltene and resin content of oils. The visco-elastic properties of 82 oils from Environment Canada's Emergencies Science Division were also examined to determine which factors are responsible for the stability regimes. The stability of emulsions were grouped into three categories: (1) stable, (2) unstable, and (3) meso-stable. It was shown that there is a range of compositions and viscosities in which each type of water-in-oil state exists. It was also shown that the viscosity of a stable emulsion at a shear rate of one reciprocal second is about three times greater than that of the starting oil. An unstable emulsion typically had a viscosity of 20 times greater than that of the starting oil. A stable emulsion had pronounced elasticity, but an unstable emulsion did not. A meso-stable emulsion had properties between stable and unstable, but broke down after a few days of standing. It was concluded that the formation of both stable and meso-stable emulsions is due to the combination of surface-active forces from resins and asphaltenes from viscous forces. Only a small difference was detected between stable and meso-stable emulsions. Stable emulsions were found to have more asphaltenes and less resins and a narrow viscosity window. Instability results when the oil has either a high viscosity or a very low viscosity and when the resins and asphaltenes are less than about 3 per cent. In highly viscouss than about 3 per cent. In highly viscous oils, the migration of asphaltenes and resins is too low to permit droplet stabilization, therefore the formation of stable or meso-stable emulsions does not occur in highly viscous oils. 18 refs., 8 tabs., 8 figs

  17. Conversion of Crude Oil to Methane by a Microbial Consortium Enriched From Oil Reservoir Production Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LisaGieg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The methanogenic biodegradation of crude oil is an important process occurring in petroleum reservoirs and other oil-containing environments such as contaminated aquifers. In this process, syntrophic bacteria degrade hydrocarbon substrates to products such as acetate, and/or H2 and CO2 that are then used by methanogens to produce methane in a thermodynamically dependent manner. We enriched a methanogenic crude oil-degrading consortium from production waters sampled from a low temperature heavy oil reservoir. Alkylsuccinates indicative of fumarate addition to C5 and C6 n-alkanes were identified in the culture (above levels found in controls, corresponding to the detection of an alkyl succinate synthase gene (assA in the culture. In addition, the enrichment culture was tested for its ability to produce methane from residual oil in a sandstone-packed column system simulating a mature field. Methane production rates of up 5.8 ?mol CH4/g of oil/day were measured in the column system. Amounts of produced methane were in relatively good agreement with hydrocarbon loss showing depletion of more than 50% of saturate and aromatic hydrocarbons. Microbial community analysis revealed that the enrichment culture was dominated by members of the genus Smithella, Methanosaeta, and Methanoculleus. However, a shift in microbial community occurred following incubation of the enrichment in the sandstone columns. Here, Methanobacterium sp. were most abundant, as were bacterial members of the genus Pseudomonas and other known biofilm forming organisms. Our findings show that microorganisms enriched from petroleum reservoir waters can bioconvert crude oil components to methane both planktonically and in sandstone-packed columns as test systems. Further, the results suggest that different organisms may contribute to oil biodegradation within different phases (e.g., planktonic versus sessile within a subsurface crude oil reservoir.

  18. Determination of Zinc-Based Additives in Lubricating Oils by Flow-Injection Analysis with Flame-AAS Detection Exploiting Injection with a Computer-Controlled Syringe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Pignalosa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A flow-injection system is proposed for the determination of metal-based additives in lubricating oils. The system, operating under computer control uses a motorised syringe for measuring and injecting the oil sample (200 μL in a kerosene stream, where it is dispersed by means of a packed mixing reactor and carried to an atomic absorption spectrometer which is used as detector. Zinc was used as model analyte. Two different systems were evaluated, one for low concentrations (range 0–10 ppm and the second capable of providing higher dilution rates for high concentrations (range 0.02%–0.2% w/w. The sampling frequency was about 30 samples/h. Calibration curves fitted a second-degree regression model (r2 = 0.996. Commercial samples with high and low zinc levels were analysed by the proposed method and the results were compared with those obtained with the standard ASTM method. The t test for mean values showed no significant differences at the 95% confidence level. Precision (RSD% was better than 5% (2% typical for the high concentrations system. The carryover between successive injections was found to be negligible.

  19. Analysis of nitrogen injection as alternative fluid to steam in heavy oil reservoir; Analise da injecao de nitrogenio como fluido alternativo ao vapor em reservatorio de oleo pesado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Marcos Allyson Felipe; Galvao, Edney Rafael Viana Pinheiro; Barillas, Jennys Lourdes; Mata, Wilson da; Dutra Junior, Tarcilio Viana [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), RN (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Many of hydrocarbon reserves existing in the world are formed by heavy oils (deg API between 10 and 20). Moreover, several heavy oil fields are mature and, thus, offer great challenges for oil industry. Among the thermal methods used to recover these resources, steam flooding has been the main economically viable alternative. Latent heat carried by steam heats the reservoir, reducing oil viscosity and facilitating the production. This method has many variations and has been studied both theoretically and experimentally (in pilot projects and in full field applications). In order to increase oil recovery and reduce steam injection costs, the injection of alternative fluid has been used on three main ways: alternately, co-injected with steam and after steam injection interruption. The main objective of these injection systems is to reduce the amount of heat supplied to the reservoir, using cheaper fluids and maintaining the same oil production levels. In this paper, the use of N{sub 2} as an alternative fluid to the steam was investigated. The analyzed parameters were oil recoveries and net cumulative oil productions. The reservoir simulation model corresponds to an oil reservoir of 100 m x 100 m x 28 m size, on a Cartesian coordinates system (x, y and z directions). It is a semi synthetic model with some reservoir data similar to those found in Potiguar Basin, Brazil. All studied cases were done using the simulator STARS from CMG (Computer Modelling Group, version 2009.10). It was found that N{sub 2} injection after steam injection interruption achieved the highest net cumulative oil compared to others injection system. Moreover, it was observed that N2 as alternative fluid to steam did not present increase on oil recovery. (author)

  20. Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsions: Its Stabilization and Demulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurahman H. Nour

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional ways of breaking emulsions using heat and chemicals are disadvantageous from both economic and environmental perspectives. In this research, the potentials of microwave technology in demulsification of water-in-crude oil emulsions are investigated. The study began with some characterization studies to provide understandings of fundamental issues such as formation, formulation and breaking of emulsions by both chemical and microwave approaches. The aim was to obtain optimized operating conditions as well as fundamental understanding of water-in-oil emulsion stability upon which further developments on demulsification processes could be developed. It was found that emulsion stability was related to some parameters such as, the surfactant concentration, water content, temperature and agitation speed. Experimental results found that microwave radiation method can enhance the demulsification of water-in-oil emulsions in a very short time compared to the conventional heating methods. The results obtained in this study have exposed the capability of microwave technology in demulsification of water-in-oil emulsion. Further works are nevertheless required to provide deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved to facilitate the development of an optimum system applicable to the industry.

  1. In-situ burning of water-in-oil emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes an experimental program on the in-situ burning of emulsions. This study is the third in a series of experimental studies on the in-situ burning of water-in-oil emulsions. The main objective of this study was to improve the capabilities and reduce the limitations of existing systems for igniting water-in-oil emulsions. A secondary objective was to study the feasibility of ferrocene as a soot reducing agent for oils and emulsions, and was incorporated into the experimental program. The experimental work for this research project was accomplished by conducting small-scale laboratory burns and heat transfer experiments, and by conducting meso-scale field experiments under Arctic springtime conditions. Experiments conducted to study emulsion burning processes revealed that: in order to ignite and burn the emulsion, water is first removed from the emulsion and released mainly through evaporation and that the temperature of the water-in-oil emulsions does not exceed approximately 100oC. Improvements were made to an existing igniter technology. It was found that the addition of emulsion breakers to gelled crude oil can increase the effectiveness of this igniter when dealing with emulsions with water contents greater than 50%. Experiments with ferrocene show this compound to be an effective soot inhibitor when mixed with oil or emulsions at concentrations as low as 0.13 wt%. Ferrocene may have some effect on the burning process but further testit on the burning process but further testing is required to conform this. 38 refs., 86 figs., 27 tabs

  2. The role of pore geometry and connate water on miscible displacement of heavy oil with hydrocarbon solvents in strongly water-wet and oil-wet media using five-spot micromodels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehghan, A.A. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada); Tehran Petroleum Research Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Petroleum Univ. of Technology Research Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farzaneh, S.A.; Kharrat, R.; Ghazanfari, M.H. [Tehran Petroleum Research Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Petroleum Univ. of Technology Research Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    This paper reported on a study in which five-spot glass micromodels were used to investigate the hydrocarbon solvent flooding behaviour on heavy oil recovery in different wettability and pore geometries. This included the effects of wettability, connate water, different pore throat size ratio, throat-to-pore coordination number, and type of nonrandom heterogeneity of the porous media. The study demonstrated the successful use of micromodel experiments for studying enhanced oil recovery techniques in well defined five-spot models. It revealed that the displacement efficiency of the solvents depends on the surface wettability and is generally higher in strongly water-wet medium. A thin film of water coated the surface during hydrocarbon solvent injection in the water-wet condition in presence of connate water, thereby causing the oil to be displaced more easily. Also, some droplets in narrow throats caused the solvent to be more dispersed providing conditions for higher sweep efficiency. The study showed that there are more access routes connecting pores in pore systems with higher coordination numbers, which favors high displacement efficiency. Lowering the pore to throat ratio was shown to facilitate solvent propagation, causing higher recovery efficiency for miscible displacement. Heterogeneities provided higher residual oil saturation by making it easier for the solvent to bypass and causing the oil to be trapped. 11 refs., 2 tabs., 13 figs.

  3. Immiscible displacement of oil by water in a microchannel: Asymmetric flow behavior and nonlinear stability analysis of core-annular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Hooman; Abbasi, Alireza; Das, Kausik S.; Kawaji, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    The immiscible displacement of oil by water in a circular microchannel was investigated. A fused silica microchannel with an inner diameter of 250 ?m and a length of 7 cm was initially filled with a viscous silicone oil. Only water then was injected into the channel. We describe our flow observations based on the two-dimensional images captured in the middle of the channel. The water finger displaced the oil and left an oil film on the channel wall. While the oil was being displaced at the core, the flow resistance decreased, which resulted in increases in water flow rate and inertia. Eventually, the water finger reached the channel exit and formed a core-annular flow pattern. The wavelength of the waves formed at the oil-water interface also increased with the increase in inertia. The initially symmetric interfacial waves became asymmetric with time. Also, the water core shifted from the center of the channel and left a thinner oil film on one side of the microchannel. Under all flow rates tested in this study, as long as the water was continuously injected, the water core was stable and no breakup into droplets was observed. We also discuss the flow stability based on nonlinear and linear stability analyses performed on the core-annular flow. Compared to the linear analysis, which ignores the inertia effects, the nonlinear analysis, which includes the inertia effects, predicts longer interfacial wavelengths by a factor of (1)/(1-(ao)/(2)(Wew+Weo(ao2)/(1-ao2))) where Wew and Weo are the Weber numbers of the water and the oil phases, respectively, and ao is the unperturbed water core radius made dimensionless by the channel radius.

  4. Stabilizing oil-in-water emulsions with regenerated chitin nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Chen, Zhigang; Bian, Wenyang; Feng, Li; Wu, Zongwei; Wang, Peng; Zeng, Xiaoxiong; Wu, Tao

    2015-09-15

    Natural chitin is a highly crystalline biopolymer with poor aqueous solubility. Thus direct application of chitin is rather limited unless chemical modifications are made to improve its solubility in aqueous media. Through a simple dissolution and regeneration process, we have successfully prepared chitin nanofibers with diameters around 50nm, which form a stable suspension at concentrations higher than 0.50% and a self-supporting gel at concentrations higher than 1.00%. Additionally, these nanofibers can stabilize oil-in-water emulsions with oil fraction more than 0.50 at chitin usage level of 0.01g/g oil. The droplet sizes of the resulting emulsions decrease with increasing chitin concentrations and decreasing oil fraction. Confocal laser scanning micrographs demonstrate the adsorption of chitin nanofibers on the emulsion droplet surface, which indicates the emulsion stabilization is through a Pickering mechanism. Our findings allow the direct application of chitin in the food industry without chemical modifications. PMID:25863618

  5. Mechanics and upscaling of heavy oil bitumen recovery by steam-over-solvent injection in fractured reservoirs method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, R.; Babadagli, T. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2011-01-15

    This paper discussed a numerical modelling scheme applied to the steam-over-solvent injection in fractured reservoirs (SOS-FR) method for a single-matrix block. After modelling the process at the core scale, sensitivity tests were performed to determine the optimal injection conditions for efficient oil recovery and solvent retrieval. The basic mechanisms and physics of the process were described along with the amount of injectant and the time required for recovering target oil for field-scale application. In the physics of the recovery mechanism, gravity was found to have a substantial effect on oil recovery when the matrix was exposed to solvent. Special attention was paid to the solvent retrieval rate and amount in the third cycle and the permeability reduction caused by asphaltene precipitation in the solvent injection phase; the latter factor was observed to be substantially critical for the process. An upscaling analysis yielded an encouraging straight-line relationship between the time value to reach ultimate recovery and the matrix size with a non-integer exponent less than 2. 21 refs., 1 tab., 15 figs.

  6. Influence of water injection on performance and emissions of a direct-injection hydrogen research engine.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nande, A. M.; Wallner, T.; Naber, J. (Energy Systems); (MIchigan Technological Univ.)

    2008-10-06

    The application of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as an internal combustion (IC) engine fuel has been under investigation for several decades. The favorable physical properties of hydrogen make it an excellent alternative fuel for IC engines and hence it is widely regarded as the energy carrier of the future. Direct injection of hydrogen allows optimizing this potential as it provides multiple degrees of freedom to influence the in-cylinder combustion processes and consequently engine efficiency and exhaust emissions.

  7. Breaking oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Guilherme F; Picone, Carolina S F; Cuellar, Maria C; Cunha, Rosiane L

    2015-04-01

    Several biotechnological processes can show an undesirable formation of emulsions making difficult phase separation and product recovery. The breakup of oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by yeast was studied using different physical and chemical methods. These emulsions were composed by deionized water, hexadecane and commercial yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The stability of the emulsions was evaluated varying the yeast concentration from 7.47 to 22.11% (w/w) and the phases obtained after gravity separation were evaluated on chemical composition, droplet size distribution, rheological behavior and optical microscopy. The cream phase showed kinetic stability attributed to mechanisms as electrostatic repulsion between the droplets, a possible Pickering-type stabilization and the viscoelastic properties of the concentrated emulsion. Oil recovery from cream phase was performed using gravity separation, centrifugation, heating and addition of demulsifier agents (alcohols and magnetic nanoparticles). Long centrifugation time and high centrifugal forces (2h/150,000×g) were necessary to obtain a complete oil recovery. The heat treatment (60°C) was not enough to promote a satisfactory oil separation. Addition of alcohols followed by centrifugation enhanced oil recovery: butanol addition allowed almost complete phase separation of the emulsion while ethanol addition resulted in 84% of oil recovery. Implementation of this method, however, would require additional steps for solvent separation. Addition of charged magnetic nanoparticles was effective by interacting electrostatically with the interface, resulting in emulsion destabilization under a magnetic field. This method reached almost 96% of oil recovery and it was potentially advantageous since no additional steps might be necessary for further purifying the recovered oil. PMID:25791419

  8. Massive dominance of Epsilonproteobacteria in formation waters from a Canadian oil sands reservoir containing severely biodegraded oil

    OpenAIRE

    Hubert, Casey R. J.; Oldenburg, Thomas B. P.; Fustic, Milovan; Gray, Neil D.; Larter, Stephen R.; Penn, Kevin; Rowan, Arlene K.; Seshadri, Rekha; Sherry, Angela; Swainsbury, Richard; Voordouw, Gerrit; Voordouw, Johanna K.; Head, Ian M.

    2012-01-01

    The subsurface microbiology of an Athabasca oil sands reservoir in western Canada containing severely biodegraded oil was investigated by combining 16S rRNA gene- and polar lipid-based analyses of reservoir formation water with geochemical analyses of the crude oil and formation water. Biomass was filtered from formation water, DNA was extracted using two different methods, and 16S rRNA gene fragments were amplified with several different primer pairs prior to cloning and sequencing or commun...

  9. Chitosan microspheres applied for removal of oil from produced water in the oil industry

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Izabel Cristina da Silva, Grem; Bianca Natividade Barreto, Lima; Wiliam Ferreira, Carneiro; Yure Gomes de Carvalho, Queirós; Claudia Regina Elias, Mansur.

    Full Text Available The discharge of oily wastewaters in the environment is steadily increasing, causing serious damages. Among various treatment methods, adsorption is generally considered the most appropriate, since it can remove both organic and inorganic pollutants. Adsorption using low-cost alternative biopolymers [...] for removal of contaminants from wastewater has been widely investigated. In this context, chitosan has been drawing particular attention because, among its many applications, it can be used in the treatment of aqueous effluents. In this study, microspheres were prepared by reticulation of chitosan with sodium triphosphate (STP) and studied for the treatment of water containing crude oil. The microspheres were regular and had surface pores. These microspheres were packed in treatment columns and their ability to remove oil was measured with a fluorometer, by the difference in the oil concentration before and after passing through the column. The microspheres that presented porosity about 80 % were highly efficient in oil removal, with rates above 90%.

  10. Approaching viscosity control: electrical heating of extra heavy oil as alternative to diluent injection in down hole in Cerro Negro Field, Faja Petrolifera del Orinoco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, Manuel [Petroleos de Venezuela SA, PDVSA (Venezuela)

    2011-07-01

    Electrical heating is a method used to enhance oil recovery in extra heavy oil reservoirs. This method can be used when diluent injection or other methods are not able to reduce oil viscosity sufficiently or when problems of product quality or quantity arise. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the performance of electrical heating, individually and simultaneously with injection of diluents. For this purpose, simulations were undertaken in one well with integrated electrical heating and diluent injection in Cerro Negro Field in the Orinoco oil belt, Venezuela. Results have shown that the application of both methods together is more profitable than the application of electrical heating alone. This paper demonstrated that the use of electrical heating and diluent injection combined is a valid alternative to diluent injection alone, reducing production loss.

  11. Air-water mixing experiments for direct vessel injection of KNGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two air-water mixing experiments are conducted to understand the flow behavior in the downcomer for Direct Vessel Injection (DVI) of Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR). In the first experiment which is an air-water experiment in the rectangular channel with the gap size of 1cm, the width of water film is proportional to the water and air velocities and the inclined angle is proportional to the water velocity only, regardless of the water velocity injected in the rectangular channel. It is observed that the amount of entrained water is negligible. In the second experiment which is a full-scaled water jetting experiment without air flow, the width of water film is proportional to the flow rate injected from the pipe exit and the film thickness of water varies from 1.0mm to 5.0mm, and the maximum thickness does not exceed 5.0mm. The amount of water separated from the liquid film after striking of water jetting on the wall is measured. The amount of separation water is proportional to the flow rate, but the separation ratio in the full-scaled water jetting is not over 15%. A simplified physical model, which is designed to predict the trajectories of the width of water film, is validated through the comparison with experiment results. The 13 .deg. upward water droplet of the water injected from the pipe constitutes the outermost boundary at 1.7m below from pipe level, after the water impinges against the wall. In the model, the parameter, ? which represents the relationship between the jetting velocity and the initial spreading velocity, is inversely proportional to the water velocity when it impinges against the wall. The error of the predictions by the model is decreased within 14% to the experimental data through use of exponential fitting of ? for the jetting water velocity

  12. Subacute fat-embolism-like syndrome following high-volume intramuscular and accidental intravascular injection of mineral oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjort, Mathias; Hoegberg, Lotte Christine Groth

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We present a rare case of subacute fat-embolism-like syndrome (FES-like) following intravascular injection of mineral oil-steroid solution with delayed diagnosis, acute onset of pulmonary distress, and transient clinical deterioration. Case report. A 40-year-old man was admitted following as a pedestrian being hit by a car. Examinations revealed sternum fracture and lung contusion. The patient was discharged with oral analgesics. Seven days later he returned presenting with coughing, hemoptysis, elevated leucocytes, and increased C-reactive protein. Chest radiograph revealed basal infiltrations. Suspecting pneumonia, the patient was discharged with antibiotics. Unkown to the clinicians, the patient had self-administered a mineral oil with added anabolic steroids by intramuscular injections for cosmetic purposes. The patient had observed blood on aspiration, and then relocated the needle before injecting 140 ml in his biceps muscle. Shortly after, the patient described near fainting and hemoptysis suggesting an accidental intravascular injection. Over the next 3 days the patient experienced increasing shortness of breath and hemoptysis. Examinations confirmed the diagnosis and the patient was treated with organ-specific supportive measures, tranexamic acid, and prednisolone and discharged after 11 days in the hospital. Conclusion. Subacute FES-like was associated with injection of body filler in muscle tissue. FES-like can mimic pneumonia, posttraumatic lung injury, and other more frequent causes to respiratory failure.

  13. Application of Waste Plastic Pyrolysis Oil in a Direct Injection Diesel Engine: For a Small Scale Non-Grid Electrification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunbong Lee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Waste plastic can be transformed to oil by the pyrolysis and it may be applicable as a fuel for diesel engines. The pyrolysis oil property varies depending on the raw waste plastic and the pyrolysis condition, which is different from that of diesel and gasoline. Considering the thermal efficiency, the running stability and the reliability, diesel engines are the most promising energy converter to generate electricity by using the pyrolysis oil. In this research, plastics from municipal wastes were converted into oil through the pyrolysis and the catalytic reforming process in a commercial facility. Compared with diesel fuel, the raw pyrolysis oil showed slightly lower kinematic viscosity than the minimum level of diesel fuel and almost the same heating value. Its carbon class differed from diesel, gasoline and kerosene and is mainly composed of naphethenes and olefins which have poor self-ignition quality. A single cylinder direct injection diesel engine was used for the test to show the compatibility of the pyrolysis oil to diesel fuel. The pyrolysis oil was blended with diesel fuel with different mixing ratios. The full load performance, the exhaust emission and the thermal efficiency were investigated from the view point of the compatibility to diesel based on the US EPA regulation mode.

  14. Mannans as stabilizers of oil-in-water beverage emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant polysaccharides and gums such as gum arabic (GA) are commonly used as stabilizers of oil-in-water emulsions. O-acetyl-galactoglucomannan (GGM), a by-product from mechanical pulping of spruce wood, is able to stabilize colloidal wood resin emulsions (Hannuksela and Holmbom, 2004), but its use a...

  15. Kinetic Stability and Rheology of Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsion Stabilized by Cocamide at Different Water Volume Fractions

    OpenAIRE

    Rasha Mohammed Abd; Abdurhman Hamid Nour; Ahmad Ziad Sulaiman

    2014-01-01

    The formation of water-in-crude oil encountered in many stages such drilling, transporting, and processing of crude oil. To enhance and control these processes, it is necessary to understand the emulsion mechanisms. The present study aims to investigate the stability and the rheology of the crude oil emulsion stabilized by Cocamide DEA. Two types of Malaysian crude oil namely; heavy crude oil, and light-heavy blended crude oil (40-60) vol. % were Physio-chemically characterized, and fractiona...

  16. Effect of pressure on forward combustion by injecting air into light oil reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been performed at non isothermal conditions ramp of 5 degree C/min., for the purpose of extending data on forward combustion from 2069 KPa pressure to 6895 KPa with unconsolidated cores (sand pack) impregnated with light oil at representative conditions of the reservoir for air injection process. Forward combustion appears to be fuel dominated process where in peak temperature and combustion zone velocity are not very sensitive to changes in pressure. The moderate effect of pressure shows that most of the oxygen has been consumed upto 97% at 3585 KPa. However, at higher pressure 6895 KPa the consumption of oxygen was decreased upto 80%. With this provision, increasing the pressure decreases the frontal velocity and increases the peak temperature. To investigate the reaction and chemical nature of the fuel burned by changing pressure as a parameter and to see the importance of distribution and pyrolysis on these reactions, the apparent Hydrogen-Carbon ratio and the molar carbon oxides ratio were calculated. For further confirmation an Arrhenius plot was obtained by Relative reaction rate versus inverse of temperature, which also confirmed that at higher pressure low activation energy is required and vice versa. (author)

  17. Influence of ethanol-amine injection on flow accelerated corrosion rate in pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants have introduced ethanol-amine (ETA) injection for the purpose of decreasing iron transfer in steam generator (SG). The ETA injection is supposed to decrease flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) rate, because of secondary system pH increase. But the water chemistry in the secondary system is very complicated. So water chemistry following ETA injection and the effect of ETA injection on FAC rate have not been studied systematically. To assess the influence of ETA injection on FAC rate, it is assumed that the model of FAC rate is proportional to the concentration gradient of magnetite. Then chemical concentration and magnetite solubility of the secondary system are calculated and the change of FAC rate is evaluated in the outline. It has been clarified that the effect of ETA injection reduces the FAC rate to about 1/3-1/22 of that of ammonia. In some portions of the secondary system, the effects of ETA injection have been measured experimentally by rotary disk test. The FAC rate of ETA injection is larger than that of ammonia at high temperature. And the FAC rate peaks at about 180degC in the case of ammonia, but the peak seems to shift to higher temperatures in the case of ETA. (author)

  18. Influence of ethanol-amine injection on flow accelerated corrosion rate in pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants have introduced ethanol-amine (ETA) injection for the purpose of decreasing iron transfer in the steam generator (SG). The ETA injection is supposed to decrease the rate of flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) by increasing the pH of the secondary system. However, the water chemistry in the secondary system is very complicated and so water chemistry following ETA injection and the effect of ETA injection on FAC rate have not been studied systematically. To assess the influence of ETA injection on FAC rate, we use a model that assumes the FAC rate is proportional to the concentration gradient of magnetite. We then calculate the chemical concentration and magnetite solubility of the secondary system and approximately evaluate the change of FAC rate. It is shown that ETA injection reduces the FAC rate to about 1/3 - 1/22 of that of ammonia. In some portions of the secondary system, we also measured the effects of ETA injection experimentally by rotating disk test, and found that the FAC rate decreases under ETA conditions. The peak FAC rate shifted to a higher temperature after ETA injection. At 274degC, the FAC rates are nearly the same under the conditions of high pH of ETA and low pH of ammonia. (author)

  19. Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieske, Joel A.

    2002-01-01

    The first site, offered by the Institute of Petroleum, is called Fossils into Fuel (1). It describes how oil and gas are formed and processed, as well as offering short quizzes on each section. The second site (2) is maintained by the Department of Energy. Visitors can learn about the history of oil use, how itâ??s found and extracted, and more. The next site, called Picture an Oil Well (3), is a one-page illustration and description of the workings of an oil well, offered by the California Department of Conservation. The fourth site, hosted by the Minerals Management Service, is called Stacey Visits an Offshore Oil Rig (4). It tells the story of a girl taking a field trip on an offshore oil rig and what she finds when sheâ??s there. The Especially for Kids Web site (5) is presented by NOAA and explores facts about the effects of oil spills. Kids can do experiments, get help writing a report, find further information on the provided additional links, and more. From the Environmental Protection Agency, the sixth site is called Oil Spill Program (6), and it also delves into the topic of oil spills. It provides information about the EPA's program for preventing, preparing for, and responding to oil spills that occur in and around inland waters of the United States. The next site, offered by How Stuff Works.com, is called How Oil Refining Works (7). Descriptions of crude oil, fractional distillation, chemical processing, and more is presented in a succinct but informative way. The last site is from The Center for Subsurface Modeling (CSM) of the Texas Institute for Computational and Applied Mathematics and is called CSMâ??s Picture Gallery (8). After clicking the Gallery link, visitors will find animations and images that represent CSMâ??s work such as oil spill simulations, discontinuous galerkin, the tyranny of scale, contaminant remediation, etc.

  20. Insights into Cold Water Injection Stimulation Effects through Analytical Solutions to Flow and Heat Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Plummer

    2013-09-01

    Wells in traditional hydrothermal reservoirs are used to extract heat and to dispose of cooled water. In the first case, high productivity (the ratio of production flow rate to the pressure differential required to produce that rate) to is preferred in order to maximize power generation, while minimizing the parasitic energy loss of pumping. In the second case, high injectivity (the ratio of injection flow rate to the pressure differential required to produce that rate) is preferred, in order to reduce pumping costs. In order to improve productivity or injectivity, cold water is sometimes injected into the reservoir in an attempt to cool and contract the surrounding rock matrix and thereby induce dilation and/or extension of existing fractures or to generate new fractures. Though the increases in permeability associated with these changes are likely localized, by improving connectivity to more extensive high-permeability fractures they can at least temporarily provide substantially improved productivity or injectivity.

  1. The estimation of oil water displacement functions

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    G. B., Savioli; E. M., Fernández-Berdaguer.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We introduce an algorithm to solve an inverse problem for a non-linear hyperbolic partial differential equation. It can be used to estimate the oil-fractional flow function from the Buckley-Leverett equation. The direct model is non-linear: the sought for parameter is a function of the solution of t [...] he equation. Traditionally, the estimation of functions requires the election of a fitting parametric model. The algorithm that we develop does not require a predetermined parameter model. Therefore, the estimation problem is carried out over a set of parameters which are functions. The parameter is inferred from measurements of saturation at different spatial points as a function of time. The estimation procedure is carried out linearizing the solution of the direct model with respect to the parameter and then computing the least-squares solution in functional spaces. The sensitivity equations are derived. We test the algorithm with several numerical experiments.

  2. Theoretical investigation of the injection and evaporation of water in a hydrogen/oxygen steam generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Stefan

    1991-07-01

    Water is injected into the gas stream for the purpose of cooling the reaction products resulting from the stochiometric combustion of hydrogen with oxygen. The penetration of the jet decisively influences the temperature profile across the flow cross section in the water vapor. The penetration of the water jet into the stream is calculated using the jet shedding model and compared with the garden hose model. Models for the evaporation of water droplets in superheated steam are developed for calculating the evaporation paths. The parameters which influence the injection and evaporation process are subjected to variation and their effects in the evaporation paths are analyzed.

  3. Influence of pumpkin seed oil in continuous phase on droplet size and stability of water-in-oil emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolovski Branislava G.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to contribute to the optimized production of water-in-oil emulsions with pumpkin seed oil in the oil phase using a high-speed homogenizer. Pumpkin seed oil is a valuable natural source of essential fatty acids and biologically active micronutrients that contribute to its nutritive value and medical uses, and reduce interfacial tension between water and the oil phases. Therefore, pumpkin seed oil can be considered as a prosperous oil phase whose use can possibly decrease the amount of some emulsifier that is normally involved in every emulsification process. A central composite rotatable experimental design was implemented to analyze the impact of the contents of polyglycerol polyricinoleate and pumpkin seed oil in the continuous phase, as well as water phase content in the emulsion on droplet size distribution and the response surface methodology was used to obtain optimal conditions for water-in-oil emulsion preparation. Mean size diameter of water droplets was in a range from 400 to 850 nm, with mean peak width of 100 to 220 nm, respectively. The influence of all three investigated factors on the emulsification was determined. Additionally, the emulsions prepared with pumpkin seed oil showed a higher stability during the storage time compared to the emulsions with sunflower oil.

  4. Permeability of fissured rock - an experimental study with special regard to the water injection test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The permeability to water of fissured rock is one of the most important design parameters for many underground projects, such as, e.g. the final deposition of radioactive waste. Because the conventional water injection test according to LUGEON for the calculation of permeability to water is associated with a high degree of uncertainty, new test equipment was developed. This equipment works on the principle of the water injection tracer test and multi-level measurements, enabling detailed measurement of the flow process at injection site and in the rock. The tests were carried out in Bunter sandstone and granite. The LUGEON test concept was varied in short-term and long-term tests at identical geological boundary conditions, and with test control at constant pressure on the one hand and at constant injection volume on the other. The test results show that non-steady-state flow occurs with short injection times, whereby the range is limited to the local rock at injection site. An increasing in injection time can lead to an increase in range by a number of factors as well as to steady-state flow conditions. The permeability of the rock types investigated is inhomgeneous and anistropic as a result of the fissured structure. (orig./HP) With 114 figs., 4 tabs

  5. A study of water-in-oil emulsification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic mechanisms by which asphaltenes, resins, and waxes stabilize water-in-oil emulsions are examined. Experiments were conducted on the emulsification behavior of model oils which consisted of an alkane component, an aromatic component, and the emulsifying agents. Results from this study clearly demonstrate the importance that the physical state of an emulsifying agent has upon its ability to stabilize emulsions. It was found that to be effective emulsifiers, asphaltenes, resins, and waxes must be in the form of sub-micron particles. In addition, it was shown that the solvency strength of an oil, which is determined by its alkane and aromatic components, controls the solubility/precipitation behavior of these emulsifiers. The chemical composition of the oil determines not only the amount and size of precipitated particles, but also the composition and wetting properties of the particles. All these factors were found to have an influence upon emulsification. The potential application of a solubility model, using the Hildebrand-Scatchard equation, to predict the physicochemical conditions which favor water-in-oil emulsification, is discussed. Theories on various emulsification processes are also discussed in terms of mousse formation at sea. 52 refs., 46 figs., 1 tab

  6. Management of Water for Unconventional Oil and Gas Operations Enhanced with the Expanded U.S.Geological Survey Produced Waters Geochemical Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, K. D.; Blondes, M. S.; Thordsen, J. J.; Thomas, B.; Reidy, M. E.; Engle, M.; Kharaka, Y. K.; Rowan, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    Increases in hydraulic fracturing practices for shale gas and tight oil reservoirs have dramatically increased petroleum production in the USA, but have also made the issue of water management from these operations a high priority. Hydraulic fracturing requires ~ 10,000 to 50,000 m3 of water per well for injection in addition to water used to drill the well. Initially much of the water used for hydraulic fracturing was fresh water, but attitudes and operations are changing in response to costs and concerns. Concerns about groundwater depletion and contamination have prompted operators to increase the amount of produced water that can be recycled for hydraulic fracturing and to find suitable locations for salt-water injection. Knowledge of the geochemistry of produced waters is valuable in determining the feasibility of produced water recycling. Water with low salinity can be reclaimed for use outside of the petroleum industry (e.g. irrigation, municipal uses, and industrial operations). The updated and expanded USGS Produced Waters Database available at http://eerscmap.usgs.gov/pwapp/ will facilitate and enhance studies on management of water, including produced water, for unconventional oil and gas drilling and production. The USGS database contains > 160,000 samples. Expanding on the 2002 database, we have filled in state and regional gaps with information from conventional and unconventional wells and have increased the number of constituents to include minor and trace chemicals, isotopes, and time series data. We currently have produced water data from 5,200 tight gas wells, 4,500 coal-bed methane (CBM) wells, 3,500 shale gas wells, and 700 tight oil wells. These numbers will increase as we continue to receive positive responses from oil companies, state oil and gas commissions, and scientists wanting to contribute their data. This database is an important resource for a wide range of interested parties. Scientists from universities, government agencies, public municipalities and citizens can determine the geochemical nature of deep groundwater supplies, contamination sources, and impacts of hydraulic fracturing. Energy companies can utilize the database for determining the suitability of water reuse and for identifying regions where non-potable hydraulic fracturing water may be obtainable.

  7. Water Pollution, and Treatments Part III: Biodegradation of Oil in Refineries Waste Water and Oils Adsorbed in Agricultural Wastes by Selected Strains of Cyanobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this study is to determine the biological degradation of oil hydrocarbons and sulfur compounds of Marine Balayim crude oil and its refined products by selected indigenous Cyanobacteria strains. The oils used were Marine Balayim crude oil, skimmed oil and some refined products such as gasoline, kerosene, gas oil, fuel oil and petroleum coke. The selected organisms in the current study are the Blue-Green Algae Cyanobacteria, Oscillatoria limentica. This organism was collected from the hyper saline environment of the solar lake in Taba, Sinai, Egypt. The results obtained revealed that the utilization of such strains can be used for the bioremediation of oily waste water.

  8. Enhancement of Biogenic Coalbed Methane Production and Back Injection of Coalbed Methane Co-Produced Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Jin

    2007-05-31

    Biogenic methane is a common constituent in deep subsurface environments such as coalbeds and oil shale beds. Coalbed methane (CBM) makes significant contributions to world natural gas industry and CBM production continues to increase. With increasing CBM production, the production of CBM co-produced water increases, which is an environmental concern. This study investigated the feasibility in re-using CBM co-produced water and other high sodic/saline water to enhance biogenic methane production from coal and other unconventional sources, such as oil shale. Microcosms were established with the selected carbon sources which included coal, oil shale, lignite, peat, and diesel-contaminated soil. Each microcosm contained either CBM coproduced water or groundwater with various enhancement and inhibitor combinations. Results indicated that the addition of nutrients and nutrients with additional carbon can enhance biogenic methane production from coal and oil shale. Methane production from oil shale was much greater than that from coal, which is possibly due to the greater amount of available Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from oil shale. Inconclusive results were observed from the other sources since the incubation period was too low. WRI is continuing studies with biogenic methane production from oil shale.

  9. Temperature-Induced Protein Release from Water-in-Oil-in-Water Double Emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas, Edith C.; Staton, Jennifer A.; John, Vijay T.; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos D.

    2008-01-01

    A model water-in-oil-in-water (W1/O/W2) double emulsion was prepared by a two-step emulsification procedure and subsequently subjected to temperature changes that caused the oil phase to freeze and thaw while the two aqueous phases remained liquid. Our previous work on individual double-emulsion globules1 demonstrated that crystallizing the oil phase (O) preserves stability, while subsequent thawing triggers coalescence of the droplets of the internal aqueous phase (W1) with the external aque...

  10. The visibility and detectability of oil slicks and oil discharges on water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Literature on the visibility of oil slicks and oil discharges on water are reviewed. Except for some work done recently, the literature on oil slick visibility is very old, dating back to the early part of this century. Considerable differences were found between recent experiments and some of the older thickness-visibility relationship tables. This finding was attributed to the the fact that evaporation and inhomogeneity of the slick were ignored in the early studies. Literature on the visibility of oil discharges was also reviewed and compared to slick visibility results. Some correlation was achieved in converting discharge to approximate slick thickness. A new correlation table relating wind speed and vessel discharge speed wth the visibility threshold is also presented. Overall, the data indicated that the minimum visible threshold for discharge is about 100 ppm oil in water, except for a calm situation at two knots where it may be as little as 50 ppm. Data collected on remote sensing thresholds showed that the thresholds could be lowered somewhat by both video and traditional photography. 33 refs., 6 tabs

  11. Radiolytic reduction of sodium tetrachloroaurate (III) in water and water-in oil microemulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulse radiolysis technique has been employed to investigate the reduction of NaAuCl4 in water and water-in-oil micro emulsion. The bimolecular rate constant for the reaction of hydrated electrons with Au3+ was determined in water-in-oil micro emulsion. Gold colloid formation has been formed when water is being used as the medium and gelatin as stabilizer. In micro emulsion gold colloid has not been observed up to a dose of 3.6 kGy. (author)

  12. Analysis of method of polarization surveying of water surface oil pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    A method of polarization surveying of oil films on the water surface is analyzed. Model calculations of contrasted oil and water obtained with different orientations of the analyzer are discussed. The model depends on the spectral range, water transparency and oil film, and the selection of observational direction.

  13. 33 CFR 157.33 - Water ballast in fuel oil tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Water ballast in fuel oil tanks. 157.33 Section 157...Operation § 157.33 Water ballast in fuel oil tanks. A new vessel may not carry ballast water in a fuel oil tank. [CGD 74-32, 40 FR...

  14. Blowdown and cold water injection experiments: comparisons with the FIREBIRD-III and RELAP-5 codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermohydraulics computer codes FIREBIRD-III and RELAP-5 have been used to simulate a cold water injection experiment done at Washington Canada Incorporated and a blowdown plus injection experiment done in the RD-12 loop at Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment. The cold water injection experimental facility contains two parallel horizontal channels, each containing a 6-m long, 37-element electrically heated bundle. RD-12 is an integrated facility containing pumps, boilers and two electrically heated test sections. Parametric trands have been studied by simulaing several additional cold water injection experiments using FIREBIRD-III. The predictions of the two codes are compared to measurements. Overall, the predictions are reasonable, although some discrepancies occur

  15. Treatment methods for breaking certain oil and water emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealock, Jr., L. John (W. Richland, WA); Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed are treatment methods for breaking emulsions of petroleum oil and salt water, fatty oil and water, and those resulting from liquefication of organic material. The emulsions are broken by heating to a predetermined temperature at or above about 200.degree. C. and pressurizing to a predetermined pressure above the vapor pressure of water at the predetermined temperature to produce a heated and pressurized fluid. The heated and pressurized fluid is contained in a single vessel at the predetermined temperature and pressure for a predetermined period of time to effectively separate the emulsion into substantially distinct first and second phases, the first phase comprising primarily the petroleum oil, the second phase comprising primarily the water. The first and second phases are separately withdrawn from the vessel at a withdraw temperature between about 200.degree. C. and 374.degree. C. and a withdraw pressure above the vapor pressure of water at the withdraw temperature. Where solids are present in the certain emulsions, the above described treatment may also effectively separate the certain emulsion into a substantially distinct third phase comprising primarily the solids.

  16. Synthesis of ceramic microfiltration membranes for oil/water separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, Sang H.; Kim, Gye T. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Democratic People`s Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Alumina and zirconia composite membranes without defects for oil/water separation have been produced by the reverse dip-drawing technique. The thickness (5-15 {mu}m) and the uniformity of the top layer could be appropriately controlled by adjusting process variables such as the slurry concentration and the flow rate of the slurry. The effective average pore sizes of alumina and zirconia top-layers are 0.16 {mu}m and less than 0.07 {mu}, respectively. The composite membranes are found to be very effective for removing oil from o/w emulsions.

  17. Bacterial motility near crude oil and water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Jomayra E. Sánchez; Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Study of biodegradation of crude oil by microbes requires profound understanding of their movement near oil-water interface as well as in/out of phase movement. Bacterial motilities are known to be modified by the presence of an interface through hydrodynamic interactions in addition to the chemotactic behavior towards the oil phase. Using digital holographic microscopy and phase contrast microscopy, we study locomotion of Pseudomonas sp (P62), a well-known hydrocarbon degrader under various chemo- and mechano-environmental conditions. Baseline experiments have been performed at different nutrient levels and Ion levels to identify effects of chemical environment on cell motility. Utilizing novel microfluidics and surface functionalization, we have established a stable vertical oil-water interface between top and bottom surfaces of the microfluidics, which allow clear optical access to observe bacterial movement near the interface. Three-dimensional trajectories of bacteria, obtained by analyzing recorded by digital holography microscopy, enable us to characterize bacterial swimming and orientation near interfaces. Chemotaxis velocity and swimming induced dispersion are measured directly as well as cell concentration distributions with respect to the distance to the interface. Study of biodegradation of crude oil by microbes requires profound understanding of their movement near oil-water interface as well as in/out of phase movement. Bacterial motilities are known to be modified by the presence of an interface through hydrodynamic interactions in addition to the chemotactic behavior towards the oil phase. Using digital holographic microscopy and phase contrast microscopy, we study locomotion of Pseudomonas sp (P62), a well-known hydrocarbon degrader under various chemo- and mechano-environmental conditions. Baseline experiments have been performed at different nutrient levels and Ion levels to identify effects of chemical environment on cell motility. Utilizing novel microfluidics and surface functionalization, we have established a stable vertical oil-water interface between top and bottom surfaces of the microfluidics, which allow clear optical access to observe bacterial movement near the interface. Three-dimensional trajectories of bacteria, obtained by analyzing recorded by digital holography microscopy, enable us to characterize bacterial swimming and orientation near interfaces. Chemotaxis velocity and swimming induced dispersion are measured directly as well as cell concentration distributions with respect to the distance to the interface. NIH, NSF, GoMRI.

  18. STP boosts injectivity rate in Oklahoma waterflood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, L.W.; Csaszar, A.K.; Bernard, G.G.

    1965-03-01

    Sodium tripolyphosphate (STP) in the amount of 20 ppm is responsible for the increased injectivity rate in Pure Oil Co.'s water-input wells in a Nowata County, Okla. waterflood. Before using STP, extensive scale formation and plugging of the injection system were experienced. Analysis of the scale showed that it contained principally iron oxide, iron sulfide, and calcium carbonate. The scale reduced water-injection rates in the flood. Also, because of the scale, water meters, valves, and sections of pipes had to be cleaned and/or replaced frequently, resulting in additional expense. Addition of small amounts of STP to a working water-injection system cleaned scale from flowlines, meters, and other surface equipment, and increased injectivity by 50%. The nominal cost of about 70 cents per 1,000 bbl of water is easily justified. Graphs illustrate how injectivity increased in the pilot area. An analysis is given of the injection water.

  19. Integrated hydraulic and organophosphate pesticide injection simulations for enhancing event detection in water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Rafi; Lahav, Ori; Ostfeld, Avi

    2014-10-15

    As a complementary step towards solving the general event detection problem of water distribution systems, injection of the organophosphate pesticides, chlorpyrifos (CP) and parathion (PA), were simulated at various locations within example networks and hydraulic parameters were calculated over 24-h duration. The uniqueness of this study is that the chemical reactions and byproducts of the contaminants' oxidation were also simulated, as well as other indicative water quality parameters such as alkalinity, acidity, pH and the total concentration of free chlorine species. The information on the change in water quality parameters induced by the contaminant injection may facilitate on-line detection of an actual event involving this specific substance and pave the way to development of a generic methodology for detecting events involving introduction of pesticides into water distribution systems. Simulation of the contaminant injection was performed at several nodes within two different networks. For each injection, concentrations of the relevant contaminants' mother and daughter species, free chlorine species and water quality parameters, were simulated at nodes downstream of the injection location. The results indicate that injection of these substances can be detected at certain conditions by a very rapid drop in Cl2, functioning as the indicative parameter, as well as a drop in alkalinity concentration and a small decrease in pH, both functioning as supporting parameters, whose usage may reduce false positive alarms. PMID:25016300

  20. A high efficiency oxyfuel internal combustion engine cycle with water direct injection for waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a novel concept of combining water injection process with an oxyfuel internal combustion engine cycle to enhance thermal efficiency. Since the emission of NOx is eliminated by using oxygen instead of air as oxidant, the exhaust gas is CO2–water vapor mixture, and CO2 is recovered through condensation of the exhaust gas at low cost. In this way, an ultra-low emission working cycle is achieved. The evaporation of injected water not only moderates the peak in-cylinder temperature, but also increases the mass of working gas inside the cylinder, therefore improves the thermal efficiency of the cycle. An ideal thermodynamic model combining an oxyfuel Otto cycle with water injection process was established to investigate the potential of the cycle thermal efficiency. Calculation results show that thermal efficiency reaches 53% when water injection temperature is 120 °C and 67% when water injection temperature reaches 200 °C. Moreover, bench tests were carried out on prototype engine based on this working cycle. Experimental results show that the thermal efficiency improves with the increase of both engine load and water injection mass, and indicated thermal efficiency increases from 32.1% to 41.5% under appropriate test condition. - Highlights: • We present an oxy-fuel combustion cycle coupled with water injection for IC engines. • High thermo efficiency can be realized with the potential of CO2 capture. • Steam is employed as working gas of an reciprocating engine cycle. • An efficiency increase of 33% is achievable based on thermodynamic analysis. • Thermo efficiency increases from 32.1% to 41.5% through engine tests

  1. Simulation and experiment research on the proportional pressure control of water-assisted injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Chen, Yinglong; Zhang, Zengmeng; Yang, Huayong

    2012-05-01

    Water-assisted injection molding (WAIM), a newly developed fluid-assisted injection molding technology has drawn more and more attentions for the energy saving, short cooling circle time and high quality of products. Existing research for the process of WAIM has shown that the pressure control of the injecting water is mostly important for the WAIM. However, the proportional pressure control for the WAIM system is quite complex due to the existence of nonlinearities in the water hydraulic system. In order to achieve better pressure control performance of the injecting water to meet the requirements of the WAIM, the proportional pressure control of the WAIM system is investigated both numerically and experimentally. A newly designed water hydraulic system for WAIM is first modeled in AMEsim environment, the load characteristics and the nonlinearities of water hydraulic system are both considered, then the main factors affecting the injecting pressure and load flow rate are extensively studied. Meanwhile, an open-loop model-based compensation control strategy is employed to regulate the water injection pressure and a feedback proportional integrator controller is further adopted to achieve better control performance. In order to verify the AMEsim simulation results WAIM experiment for particular Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) parts is implemented and the measured experimental data including injecting pressure and flow rate results are compared with the simulation. The good coincidence between experiment and simulation shows that the AMEsim model is accurate, and the tracking performance of the load pressure indicates that the proposed control strategy is effective for the proportional pressure control of the nonlinear WAIM system. The proposed proportional pressure control strategy and the conclusions drawn from simulation and experiment contribute to the application of water hydraulic proportional control and WAIM technology.

  2. Condensation of steam bubbles injected into sub-cooled water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubble condensation plays an important role e.g. in sub-cooled boiling or steam injection into pools. Since the condensation rate is proportional to the interfacial area density, bubble size distributions have to be considered in an adequate modeling of the condensation process. The effect of bubble sizes was clearly shown in experimental investigations done previously at the TOPFLOW facility of FZD. Steam bubbles were injected into a sub-cooled upward pipe flow via orifices in the pipe wall located at different distances from measuring plane. 1 mm and 4 mm injection orifices were used to vary the initial bubble size distribution. Measurements were done using a wire-mesh sensor. Condensation is clearly faster in case of the injection via the smaller orifices, i.e. in case of smaller bubble sizes. In a previous work a simplified test solver, developed especially to test models for vertical pipe flow was used to simulate these effects. Now the results will be transferred to the CFD code CFX from ANSYS. Recently the Inhomogeneous MUSIG model was implemented into the code enabling the simulation of poly-dispersed flows including the effects of separation of small and large bubbles due to bubble size dependent lift force inversion. It allows to divide the dispersed phase into size classes regarding the mass as well as regarding the momentum balance. Up to now transfers between the classes in the mass balance can be considered only by bubble coalescence and breakup (populatby bubble coalescence and breakup (population balance). Now an extension of the model is proposed to include the effects due to phase transfer. The paper focuses on the derivation of equations for the extension of the Inhomogeneous MUSIG model and presents a new experimental setup for the investigation on steam bubble condensation. (author)

  3. Preparation characteristics of water-in-oil-in-water multiple emulsions using microchannel emulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Shinji; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi; Yamamoto, Koji; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Oda, Tatsuya; Satake, Mitsuo; Seki, Minoru

    2004-02-01

    Microchannel (MC) emulsification is a novel technique for preparing monodispersed emulsions. This study demonstrates preparing water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsions using MC emulsification. The W/O/W emulsions were prepared by a two-step emulsification process employing MC emulsification as the second step. We investigated the behavior of internal water droplets penetrating the MCs. Using decane, ethyl oleate, and medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) as oil phases, we observed successful MC emulsification and prepared monodispersed oil droplets that contained small water droplets. MC emulsification was possible using triolein as the oil phase, but polydispersed oil droplets were formed from some of the channels. No leakage of the internal water phase was observed during the MC emulsification process. The internal water droplets penetrated the MC without disruption, even though the internal water droplets were larger than the resulting W/O/W emulsion droplets. The W/O/W emulsion entrapment yield was measured fluorometrically and found to be 91%. The mild action of droplet formation based on spontaneous transformation led to a high entrapment yield during MC emulsification. PMID:14693154

  4. Purification of trona ores by conditioning with an oil-in-water emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. D. (Salt Lake City, UT); Wang, Xuming (Salt Lake City, UT); Li, Minhua (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2009-04-14

    The present invention is a trona concentrate and a process for floating gangue material from trona ore that comprises forming an emulsion, conditioning the trona ore at a high solids content in a saturated trona suspension, and then floating and removing the gangue material. The process for separating trona from gangue materials in trona ore can include emulsifying an oil in an aqueous solution to form an oil-in-water emulsion. A saturated trona suspension having a high solids content can also be formed having trona of a desired particle size. The undissolved trona in the saturated suspension can be conditioned by mixing the saturated suspension and the oil-in-water emulsion to form a conditioning solid suspension of trona and gangue material. A gas can be injected through the conditioning solid suspension to float the gangue material. Thus, the floated gangue material can be readily separated from the trona to form a purified trona concentrate without requirements of additional heat or other expensive processing steps.

  5. A water-in-oil emulsion containing Kelex-100 for the speciation analysis of trace heavy metals in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion containing Kelex-100 (7-dodecenyl-8-quinolinol) and Span-80 (sorbitan monooleate, non-ionic surfactant) was ultrasonically prepared from 1.0 mol l-1 hydrochloric acid and a (1 + 3) mixture of toluene and n-heptane. The resulting emulsion was gradually injected into water sample and dispersed as numerous tiny globules (0.01-0.1 mm in diameter). Dissolved inorganic species (free metal species) of heavy metals (e.g., Fe, Co, Cu, Cd, and Pb) were selectively transported through the oil layer into the internal aqueous phase of the emulsion, leaving other species, such as humic complexes and suspended particles (larger than 1 ?m), in the sample solution. After collecting the dispersed emulsion globules, they were demulsified and the heavy metals in the segregated aqueous phase were determined by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The emulsion-based separation method allowed the selective collection of free metal species with a high concentration factor of 100, whereas the conventional solvent extraction did not offer such discrimination. This unique property of the emulsion method was successfully applied to the selective determination of free species of heavy metals in fresh water samples

  6. Study on Technical Measures of Romashkino Oil Field after Entering Ultra-High Water Cut Stage

    OpenAIRE

    Liuli Lu; Zhibin Liu; Haohan Liu; Yongqin Yan

    2013-01-01

    Romashkino oil field has large oilfield area, small formation dip, many reservoir layers, wide oil-water transition zone and complicated sedimentary environment. Since development, 3 overall development plannings and adjustments of individual block have been established. This achieves a high oil production. However, the recoverable reserves of major oil layer with high production become smaller and smaller and the water cut increases over time, the production ability of oil layer decreases. ...

  7. Effects of Three Types of Oil Dispersants on Biodegradation of Dispersed Crude Oil in Water Surrounding Two Persian Gulf Provinces

    OpenAIRE

    Azadeh Zolfaghari-Baghbaderani; Mozhgan Emtyazjoo; Parinaz Poursafa; Sedigheh Mehrabian; Samira Bijani; Daryoush Farkhani; Parisa Mirmoghtadaee

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the most effective and biodegradable dispersant of spilled oil in water surrounding two Persian Gulf provinces. Methods. This study compared the effects of three dispersants, Pars 1, Pars 2, and Gamlen OD4000 on removal of oil in two Persian Gulf provinces' water. Overall, 16 stations were selected. Using the Well method, the growth rate of isolated bacteria and fungi was identified. To specify the growth rate of microorganisms and their usage of oil in the presence of...

  8. Shale oil from the LLNL pilot retort: Metal ions as markers for water and dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coburn, T.T.; Duewer, T.I.; King, K.J.; Baldwin, D.E.; Cena, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    A metal ion found primarily in one of the three phases (oil, water, or dust) can serve as a marker for that phase. Emulsified water contains most of the magnesium detected in a shale oil. Extraction with saturated salt solution removes most of that Mg. The Mg content of retort water and the percentage of water in the oil (by ASTM D-4006) provides a good estimate of an oil`s Mg content. Mineral matter elements with poorly water soluble carbonates (or oxides) at pH 8 (calcium, for example) serve as markers for dust. When the water is separated from the main and light oil fractions before adding the heavy fraction containing dust, a much drier oil can be obtained. However, when done in this way, a powder containing Ca and Si remains in the oil; it cannot be completely removed even by filtering through a 0.24-{mu} frit. Iron, and certain other transition metal ions, is quite oil soluble. Extraction with dilute nitric acid to remove basic amines reduces the Fe content of shale oil. Unlike carboxylate- complexed metal ions in crude oils, the iron in shale oil does not extract efficiently into an aqueous EDTA solution (pH 5.9). Distillation of shale oil leaves most of the iron and other metals behind in the vacuum residum. Shale oil corrodes the hottest condenser`s steel interior; this is the chief source of iron in the oil.

  9. Effects of caffeic acid and bovine serum albumin in reducing the rate of development of rancidity in oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Conde, Enma; Gordon, Micheal H.; Moure, Andres; Dominguez, Herminia

    2011-01-01

    The antioxidant properties of caffeic acid and bovine serum albumin in oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsions were studied. Caffeic acid (5 mmol/kg emulsion) showed good antioxidant properties in both 30% sunflower oil-in-water (OW) and 20% water-in-sunflower oil emulsions (WO), pH 5.4, during storage at 50 ºC. Although bovine serum albumin (BSA) (0.2%) had a slight antioxidant effect, the combination of caffeic acid and BSA showed a synergistic reduction in the rate of development of ranci...

  10. Oil spill trajectory analysis for US coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under Section 4111(b)(7) of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA 90), the US Coast Guard must evaluate whether areas of navigable waters and the Exclusive Economic Zone should be designated as zones where the movement of tankers should be limited or prohibited. The legislative history of OPA 90 specifies that the open-quotes tanker-free zoneclose quotes evaluation should particularly include areas where oil and gas leasing, exploration, or development are presently prohibited by legislative action. The Minerals Management Service (MMS) and the Coast Guard have combined efforts to provide offshore oil spill trajectory estimates in support of that evaluation. Multiple runs of the MMS Oil Spill Risk Analysis (OSRA) model were used to characterize potential movements of tanker oil spills in US coastal waters off the east and west coasts and in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The mapped locations of 220 sensitive environmental resources were provided for the analysis by coastal academic institutions under subcontract to the Coast Guard. More than 3 million oil-spill trajectories were simulated in a stochastic analysis over all seasons. The modeled spills were moved in increments of 3 hours for up to 30 days at sea, based on a suite of wind and oceanographic data and models. Trajectory results from multiple spill sites offshore are expressed as mapped open-quotes risk contoursclose quotes showing the chance of seasonal contacts with coastal resources, assuming spill occurrence. Eal resources, assuming spill occurrence. Examples of the information used and the results of the simulations are shown

  11. A versatile approach to produce superhydrophobic materials used for oil-water separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaotao; Zhang, Zhaozhu; Ge, Bo; Men, Xuehu; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Xue, Qunji

    2014-10-15

    Designing functional materials that can be used for oil-water separation in an efficient and cost-effective process is highly desired yet still challenging. Herein, three functional materials used for oil-water separation are readily produced by a dip coating process. Three typical porous materials including copper mesh, fabric, and sponge were dipped into the solution of polyfluorowax-hydrophobic SiO2 to alter their surface texture and chemistry, allowing them to exhibit superhydrophobic property. It was found that the resulting superhydrophobic copper mesh and fabric can be used as a membrane to separate oil-water mixture efficiency; while the obtained superhydrophobic sponge was demonstrated as an oil sorbent scaffold to absorb oil from the oil-water mixture selectively. More importantly, these superhydrophobic materials can retain their oil-water separation efficiency even after 10 cycles of oil-water separation. PMID:25086383

  12. Interfacial behaviour in water-oil-amphiphile mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsen, M. W.; Sullivan, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Using a lattice model for water-oil-amphiphile mixtures, we examine the interfaces between the water-rich, and disordered phases in the mean-field and Bethe approximations. By calculating the surface tensions between these phases along their coexistence triple line, we find that the disordered phase wets the water-oil interface when it is an ordinary disordered fluid but not when it is a microemulsion, where the associated wetting transition is weakly first order. Here, we use the disorder line as the dividing line between the “ordinary” and microemulsion regions, rather than the Lifshitz line. In the region of two-phase coexistence between water-rich and oil-rich phases, we find three distinct water/oil interfacial phases and the transitions between them. One of these interfacial phases, which contains a strongly oriented amphiphile monolayer, typically exhibits ultralow surface tension. Utilisant un modèle en réseau pour des mélanges eau-huile-amphiphile, nous examinons les interfaces entre les phases riches en eau, riches en huile et désordonnée, avec les approximations de Bethe et champ moyen. En calculant les tensions de surface entre ces phases le long de leur triple ligne de coexistenc, on trouve que la phase désordonnée mouille l'interface eau-huile lorsque le fluide est un fluide désordonné ordinaire mais non lorsque celui-ci est une micro-émulsion, la transition de mouillage associée étant faiblement de premier ordre. Nous utilisons ici la ligne de d?ordre comme division entre les régions ordinaires et de micro-émulsion plutôt que la ligne de Lifshitz. Dand la région de coexistence double-phase entre les phases riches en eau et riches en huile, on trouve trois différentes phases d'interface eau-huile, ainsi que les transitions entre celles-ci. Une de ces phases, contenant une monocouche d'amphiphile fortement orientée, présente une très faible tension de surface.

  13. INFLUENCE OF INJECTION TIMING ON EMISSION ANALYSIS OF A DI ENGINE RUNNING ON RUBBER SEED AND JATROPHA OIL FUELLED WITH DIESEL FUEL

    OpenAIRE

    S. Mahalingam; B.R.RameshBapu

    2014-01-01

    The petroleum fuels availability and cost concerns the nonedible oils used as raw materials can be obtained from different oil crops that may be used to reduce the environmental pollution.In the development of alternative, biodegradable, and renewable fuels used forinternal combustion (IC) engines to obtain the power. Therefore, in this present study, in?uence of fuel injection timing on the exhaust emission of a single cylinder, four stroke, and direct injection(DI) diesel en...

  14. COMBUSTION ANALYSIS OF ALGAL OIL METHYL ESTER IN A DIRECT INJECTION COMPRESSION IGNITION ENGINE

    OpenAIRE

    Hariram, V.; Mohan Kumar, G.

    2013-01-01

    Algal oil methyl ester was derived from microalgae (Spirulina sp). The microalga was cultivated in BG 11 media composition in a photobioreactor. Upon harvesting, the biomass was filtered and dried. The algal oil was obtained by a two step solvent extraction method using hexane and ether solvent. Cyclohexane was added to biomass to expel the remaining algal oil. By this method 92% of algal oil is obtained. Transesterification process was carried out to produce AOME by adding sodium hydroxide ...

  15. Three Dimensional Visualization for the Steam Injection into Water Pool using Electrical Resistance Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The direct injection of steam into a water pool is a method of heat transfer used in many process industries. The amount of research in this area however is limited to the nuclear industry, with applications relating to reactor cooling systems. Electrical resistance tomography (ERT), a low cost, non-invasive and which has high temporal resolution characteristics, can be used as a visualization tool for the resistivity distribution for the steam injection into water pool such as IRWST. In this paper, three dimensional resistivity distribution of the process is obtained through ERT using iterative Gauss-Newton method. Numerical experiments are performed by assuming different resistive objects in the water pool. Numerical results show that ERT is successful in estimating the resistivity distribution for the injection of steam in the water pool

  16. Research on the performance of water-injection twin screw compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the development of the automotive fuel cell systems, the study on water-injection twin screw compressor has been aroused again. Twin screw compressors with water injection can be used to supply the clean compressed air for the Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. In this research, a thermodynamic model of the working process of water-injection twin screw compressor was established based on the equations of conservation of mass and energy. The effects of internal leakage and air-water heat transfer were taken into account simultaneously in the present mathematical model. The experiments of the performance of a prototype compressor operating under various conditions were conducted to verify the model. The results show that the predictions of the model are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Stabilization Mechanisms of Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurahman H. Nour

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available During the lifting and production of crude oil, water/oil emulsions are created. They are stabilized by asphaltenes and resins which are colloidally dispersed in the crude oil. Asphaltenes consist mainly of polar heterocompounds. It is known that they decrease the interfacial tension between oil and water and form stable interfacial films. Both effects favour the formation and stabilization of emulsions. Resins are complex high-molecular-weight compounds that are not soluble in ethylacetate, but are soluble in n-heptane. Their interfacial activity is less than that of asphaltenes. The role of resins in stabilizing emulsions has also been debated in literature. This study reports the results of experimental investigation of various factors affecting the stability of emulsions which are considered to be undesirable for a number of reasons, including both up-stream and down-stream operation in the petroleum industry. It was found that, the (R/A ratio affects the emulsion and dispersion stabilities. High resin/asphaltene ratios decrease the emulsion stability.

  18. Protection subsoil waters from their pollution of oil materials at the airport Ko?ice

    OpenAIRE

    Kozáková ¼ubica; Mesarèová Jana

    2002-01-01

    Subsoil waters together with surface waters constitute an important part of environment. Among materials which can cause an accident worsement the quality of waters with a negative impact for other components of environment belong oil materials.Towards potential sources of soiling subsoil waters by oil materials relates the airport Ko?ice. Results of monitoring an escape oil materials by measurement of a multitude diffusing soil gases confirmed that protection of subsoil waters at this subje...

  19. In-situ burning of oil in coastal marshes. 2. Oil spill cleanup efficiency as a function of oil type, marsh type, and water depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qianxin; Mendelssohn, Irving A; Carney, Kenneth; Miles, Scott M; Bryner, Nelson P; Walton, William D

    2005-03-15

    In-situ burning of spilled oil, which receives considerable attention in marine conditions, could be an effective way to cleanup wetland oil spills. An experimental in-situ burn was conducted to study the effects of oil type, marsh type, and water depth on oil chemistry and oil removal efficiency from the water surface and sediment. In-situ burning decreased the totaltargeted alkanes and total targeted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the burn residues as compared to the pre-burn diesel and crude oils. Removal was even more effective for short-chain alkanes and low ring-number PAHs. Removal efficiencies for alkanes and PAHs were >98% in terms of mass balance although concentrations of some long-chain alkanes and high ring-number PAHs increased in the burn residue as compared to the pre-burn oils. Thus, in-situ burning potentially prevents floating oil from drifting into and contaminating adjacent habitats and penetrating the sediment. In addition, in-situ burning significantly removed diesel oil that had penetrated the sediment for all water depths. Furthermore, in-situ burning at a water depth 2 cm below the soil surface significantly removed crude oil that had penetrated the sediment. As a result, in-situ burning may reduce the long-term impacts of oil on benthic organisms. PMID:15819247

  20. Stability of Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsion Using Cocamide Surfactant

    OpenAIRE

    Rasha Mohammed Abd; Abdurhman H. Nour; Ahmad Ziad Sulaiman

    2014-01-01

    The formation of water-in-crude oil emulsion can be encountered in many stages such as drilling, transporting and processing of crude oil. To enhance and control these processes, it is necessary to understand the emulsion mechanisms. In this study, two types of Malaysian crude oil namely; heavy crude oil and light-heavy blended crude oil (40-60 vol%) were characterized physically to use as the oil phase. Cocaamide DEA was used as a natural surfactant. The stability of water-in-crude oil emuls...

  1. A many-body dissipative particle dynamics study of forced water-oil displacement in capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Zhuang, Lin; Li, Xuefeng; Dong, Jinfeng; Lu, Juntao

    2012-01-17

    The forced water-oil displacement in capillary is a model that has important applications such as the groundwater remediation and the oil recovery. Whereas it is difficult for experimental studies to observe the displacement process in a capillary at nanoscale, the computational simulation is a unique approach in this regard. In the present work, the many-body dissipative particle dynamics (MDPD) method is employed to simulate the process of water-oil displacement in capillary with external force applied by a piston. As the property of all interfaces involved in this system can be manipulated independently, the dynamic displacement process is studied systematically under various conditions of distinct wettability of water in capillary and miscibility between water and oil as well as of different external forces. By analyzing the dependence of the starting force on the properties of water/capillary and water/oil interfaces, we find that there exist two different modes of the water-oil displacement. In the case of stronger water-oil interaction, the water particles cannot displace those oil particles sticking to the capillary wall, leaving a low oil recovery efficiency. To minimize the residual oil content in capillary, enhancing the wettability of water and reducing the external force will be beneficial. This simulation study provides microscopic insights into the water-oil displacement process in capillary and guiding information for relevant applications. PMID:22133087

  2. Construction of a Direct Water-Injected Two-Stroke Engine for Phased Direct Fuel Injection-High Pressure Charging Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somsel, James P.

    1998-01-01

    The development of a water injected Orbital Combustion Process (OCP) engine was conducted to assess the viability of using the powerplant for high altitude NASA aircraft and General Aviation (GA) applications. An OCP direct fuel injected, 1.2 liter, three cylinder, two-stroke engine has been enhanced to independently inject water directly into the combustion chamber. The engine currently demonstrates low brake specific fuel consumption capability and an excellent power to weight ratio. With direct water injection, significant improvements can be made to engine power, to knock limits/ignition advance timing, and to engine NO(x) emissions. The principal aim of the testing was to validate a cyclic model developed by the Systems Analysis Branch at NASA Ames Research Center. The work is a continuation of Ames' investigations into a Phased Direct Fuel Injection Engine with High Pressure Charging (PDFI-ITPC).

  3. Radiative shielding by water mist : comparisons between downward, upward and impacting injection of droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechêne, S.; Acem, Z.; Parent, G.; Collin, A.; Boulet, P.

    2012-06-01

    Radiative shielding with water curtain has been studied numerically, investigating three different possibilities of droplet injection : downward, upward and impacting on a wall to be protected. The efficiency has been evaluated based on radiation attenuation predicted considering a given incident flux attenuated when crossing the area where water is injected. For upward and downward injection, a simple water curtain is considered. For the impacting spray case, a water film streaming on the wall is considered in addition to the spray (an idealized film with constant and fixed thickness for the moment). The dynamics has been imported from an Eulerian-Lagrangian simulation and radiative transfer has been addressed with a Monte Carlo method. Results show that the upward injection performs better than the downward injection due to a favoring dynamics that increases the residence time of droplets. The impacting spray could be even more efficient owing to the possible high attenuation efficiency of films, but present results still make use of simplifications on the water film falling on the wall and present promising observations require further verification.

  4. Radiative shielding by water mist: comparisons between downward, upward and impacting injection of droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiative shielding with water curtain has been studied numerically, investigating three different possibilities of droplet injection: downward, upward and impacting on a wall to be protected. The efficiency has been evaluated based on radiation attenuation predicted considering a given incident flux attenuated when crossing the area where water is injected. For upward and downward injection, a simple water curtain is considered. For the impacting spray case, a water film streaming on the wall is considered in addition to the spray (an idealized film with constant and fixed thickness for the moment). The dynamics has been imported from an Eulerian-Lagrangian simulation and radiative transfer has been addressed with a Monte Carlo method. Results show that the upward injection performs better than the downward injection due to a favoring dynamics that increases the residence time of droplets. The impacting spray could be even more efficient owing to the possible high attenuation efficiency of films, but present results still make use of simplifications on the water film falling on the wall and present promising observations require further verification.

  5. Separation kinetics of an oil-in-water emulsion under enhanced gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Krebs, T.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    The breakup of crude oil emulsions to produce clean oil and water phases is an important task in crude oil processing. We have investigated the demulsification kinetics of a model oil-in-water emulsion in a centrifugal field to mimic the forces acting on emulsion droplets in oil/water separators such as hydrocyclones. The rate of growth of separated oil phase and the change in mean droplet diameter of the emulsion layer was measured as a function of surfactant concentration, centrifugal accel...

  6. Thermal-neutron fluxes in glycerin, base oil and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal-neutron fluxes produced in water, glycerin or base oil by two isotopic sources, 1 Ci (Am-Be) and 1.07 mCi (252Cf), used in turn, were measured by Au-foil activation. Activities produced in bare and cadmium-covered foils were determined with a 3 in.X3 in. NaI(Tl) scintillation counter. (orig.)

  7. Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsions: Its Stabilization and Demulsification

    OpenAIRE

    Abdurahman. H. Nour; R. Mohd. Yunus; H. Anwaruddin

    2007-01-01

    Traditional ways of breaking emulsions using heat and chemicals are disadvantageous from both economic and environmental perspectives. In this research, the potentials of microwave technology in demulsification of water-in-crude oil emulsions are investigated. The study began with some characterization studies to provide understandings of fundamental issues such as formation, formulation and breaking of emulsions by both chemical and microwave approaches. The aim was to obtain optimized opera...

  8. Factors governing partial coalescence in oil-in-water emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Fredrick, E.; Walstra, P.; Dewettinck, K.

    2010-01-01

    The consequences of the instability mechanism partial coalescence in oil-in-water food emulsions show a discrepancy. On the one hand, it needs to be avoided in order to achieve an extended shelf life in food products like sauces, creams and several milk products. On the other hand, during the manufacturing of products like ice cream. butter and whipped toppings partial coalescence is required to achieve the desired product properties. It contributes to the structure formation, the physicochem...

  9. pH-responsive bidirectional oil-water separation material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ben; Guo, Zhiguang

    2013-10-21

    A superhydrophobic copper mesh film (CMF) with pH-responsive property was synthesized via an electrochemical deposition strategy, followed by Au sputter-coating process and surface modification with a thiol mixture of HS(CH2)9CH3 and HS(CH2)10COOH. As-prepared CMF can be applied to separate an oil-and-water mixture bidirectionally. PMID:24002324

  10. Natural oil slicks fuel surface water microbial activities in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    KaiZiervogel; UtaPassow; NigelD'souza

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a series of roller tank incubations with surface seawater from the Green Canyon oil reservoir, northern Gulf of Mexico, amended with either a natural oil slick (GCS-oil) or pristine oil. The goal was to test whether bacterial activities of natural surface water communities facilitate the formation of oil-rich marine snow (oil snow). Although oil snow did not form during any of our experiments, we found specific bacterial metabolic responses to the addition of GCS-oil that profoun...

  11. Radiation-thermal purification of waste water from oil pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: During the extraction, preparation, transportation and refining of oil the sewages containing oil contaminations are produced. The concentration of oil content in the water depends on used technology and may vary from a thousandths parts up to tens percents. There is a necessity of cleaning this pollution up to a permissible level. There are numerous methods (adsorption, mechanical, chemical and etc) of treating of waster water from oil contaminations. Radiation-chemical method is one of the effective among the above mentioned methods. The results of radiation-thermal decomposition of n-heptane micro-admixtures in water medium are adduced. The main parameters of radiolysis change within the intervals: temperature 20-400oC, absorbed dose - 0†10.8 kGy at dose rate 3.6 kGy/h. The correlation of n-heptane concentration and water steam changed within [C5H12]/[H2O] (1-100) 10-5. Total concentration of steam was about 1020 molec/ml. As a product of decomposition are observed H2, CO, CH4, C2H4, C2H6, C3H8, C3H6, C4H8, hydrocarbons C5, and C6. The changes of n-heptane concentration in the reactor also were established. The chain regime of n-heptane decomposition at high temperatures in the irradiated mixture is observed. The critical value of temperature and mixture ratio of components, under which the break of chain process of normal n-heptane occurs are defined. The mechanisms of proceeding radiation thermal processes in hydrocarbons-water system are discussed. At the temperatures higher than 300oC the radiation-thermal decompositions of hydrocarbon micro-impurities in water into gas products occurs according a chain mechanism and the radiation-chemical yield of the decomposition exceeds 100 molec/100eV. This method can be used for purification of sewages from oil contaminations

  12. Ultrasonic splitting of oil-in-water emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Jens; König, Ralf

    1999-01-01

    Standing resonant ultrasonic wave fields can be utilized for liquid–liquid separation of the dispersed particles and the fluid caused by the acoustic radiation pressure and the induced particle agglomeration or coagulation/coalescence process. For the splitting of oil-in-water emulsions, the available piezoelectric composite transducer technology was improved and a dedicated resonator with crossed plane wave sonication geometry has been developed. The resonator chamber is entirely made of aluminium or tempax glass and the PZT piezoceramic transducer delivers an acoustic energy flow density of up to 24 W/cm2 into the sonication volume. The chosen resonance frequency is kept stable by automatic frequency control utilizing the maximum true power criterion. Physically and chemically well-defined low and high density pure laboratory and also industrially used cooling-lubricating oil-in-water emulsion samples have been investigated. The quality of the ultrasonic-induced particle separation/coagulation process is characterized by physical–chemical analysis of the separated oil- and water phase and by determining the change of the particle size distribution of the initial emulsion due to the ultrasonic treatment. [Work supported by the European Commission, Contract Nos. ERBFMBICT960916 and ERBFMRXCT970156.

  13. Clear well physical water treatment technology for the oil field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troncoso y Troncoso, Joao Ricardo [Weatherford Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rzeznik, Lawrence; Parker, Wiley L. [Weatherford International, Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Deposits of various types are common problems associated with oil and gas production. Deposits of scale, paraffin can block tubing, cause pumps to stick and clog valves and chokes. The expense and widespread occurrence of deposition problems have resulted in the development of a variety of treatment options which have been marginally successful at best. This paper discusses a new and novel approach for controlling scale, paraffin using an electronic physical water treating device and results that have been achieved. This physical water treatment technology has been applied to oil and gas production wells which incorporate all forms of product lift. Units are now also being installed in several South American locations. This paper will discuss the results obtained from the use of these physical water treatment devices and discuss the criteria which are used to ascertain whether a particular well site's problems can be eased by use of these devices. These criteria will be discussed for both land based and offshore oil wells. (author)

  14. Water quality changes at three reclaimed mine sites related to the injection of coal combustion residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface and groundwater pollution is a common problem associated with post-surface mining operations. The US Bureau of Mines (BOM) participated in the testing of subsurface injections of coal combustion residues (CCR) at three reclaimed surface mine sites. The addition of alkaline CCR to the subsurface environment can raise the pH, limit propagation of pyrite oxidizing bacteria and reduce the rate of acid generation. Many CCR's can also form cement-like grout, which when injected into buried spoil may decrease its permeability and porosity, diverting water away from the pyritic material. The objective of this work was to develop an effective, economical and permanent method to abate or reduce post-mining water pollution. The effectiveness of CCR injection as an acid mine drainage abatement technique was evaluated by the BOM by monitoring water quality at three sites in: Upshur County, WV, Clinton County, PA and Greene County, PA. Geophysical techniques were used at all sites to locate monitoring and injection wells that were subsequently drilled into the spoil. Grout injection work was completed between 1990 and 1994 at the three sites. Baseline water quality data were collected at all three sites for a minimum of one year. Post-grouting water quality at the discharge of the three sites showed a slight, long-term improvement and no apparent degradation in water quality resulting from the injection of the coal combustion residues. Notable and long-term improvements in es. Notable and long-term improvements in water quality at various monitoring wells (on all sites) were also observed

  15. AN OVERVIEW OF THE POLYMER GEL TECHNIQUE TO IMPROVE THE EFFICIENCY OF WATER FLOODING INTO OIL RESERVOIRS (WITH INTRODUCTION OF A NEW POLYMER)

    OpenAIRE

    O. Arjmand; M Ahmadi; L Hosseini

    2013-01-01

    An important property of polymer gels is that the injected fluid in the fracture area with high permeability moves and can form a solid mass, in result of water and gas permeability because of the formation of this layer will be decreased. In gel polymer techniques first amount of the polymer solution is injected into the reservoir with a low rate, then the cross link solution such as aluminum or magnesium citrate is injected into the reservoir and gel to be figured. Therefore, improves oil r...

  16. The effect of seasonal changes on the selection of biocide inhibitors for Arabian Gulf seawater for water injection purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hashem, A.; Salman, M.; Al-Muhanna, K.; Al-Bazzaz, W. [Kuwait Inst. for Scientific Research, Safat (Kuwait)

    1997-08-01

    This investigation was carried out to determine the most effective biocide inhibitor for Northern Arabian Gulf Seawater. This seawater will be used for water injection purposes for some oil fields in Kuwait. Arabian Gulf Seawater is known to be very saline during the summer months and less saline during the rainy season of spring. The biocide inhibitors were tested in a rig with six side streams biofouling monitoring tubes (SBMT). Bacterial nutrients were added to the system and carbon steel studs were placed along the tubes of the biocide evaluation test rig (BETR). After a month, a thin, slimy, and black deposit was formed on the carbon steel studs. The deposit contained 107 general aerobic bacteria (GAB), 107 general anaerobic bacteria (GAnB) and 105 sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). The most effective biocide inhibitor was found to be a fatty amine aryl quaternary inhibitor at 50% dosage.

  17. Petrophysical and rock-mechanics effects of CO2 injection for enhanced oil recovery : Experimental study on chalk from South Arne field, North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Hjuler, Morten Leth

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced oil recovery by CO2 injection (CO2-EOR) is a tertiary oil recovery process which has a prospective for being used, at the same time, as an effective technique for carbon dioxide storage. There is a huge potential for additional oil production and CO2 storage in the North Sea depleted chalk reservoirs. North Sea chalk is characterized by high porosity but also high specific surface causing low permeability. A high porosity provides room for CO2 storage, while a high specific surface causes a high risk for chemical reaction and consequently for mechanical weakening. In order to address this issue we studied two types of chalk from South Arne field, North Sea: (1) Ekofisk Formation having >12% non-carbonate and (2) Tor Formation, which has less than 5% non-carbonate. We performed a series of laboratory experiments to reveal the changes in petrophysical and rock-mechanics properties due to the injection of CO2 at supercritical state. We analyzed these changes with respect to the differences in porosity, specific surface, pore stiffness, wettability, mineralogy and mechanical strength. We observed a 2–3% increase in porosity, a minor decrease of specific surface and consequently a small increase in permeability. A decrease in elastic stiffness is indicated by an increase of Biot?s effective stress coefficient (?) by 1–2%. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) data indicated no change in wettability and the samples remained water wet. We found that the effect of CO2 injection on both petrophysical and mechanical properties of chalk depends on carbonate content. Pure chalk with high carbonate content was found to be vulnerable to mechanical weakening due to CO2 injection, whereas, no significant mechanical effect was observed in the impure chalk of Ekofisk Formation. It should in this context be noted that the experiments spanned only 8 days, therefore long term effects cannot be ruled out. In spite of weakening of the chalk, we expect only minor mechanical effects, because the weakening also causes a lowering of effective stress due to an increase in effective stress coefficient. Extensive time-lapse monitoring strategies are required during a CO2-EOR process for the measurement of changes in reservoir properties that may cause deformation of and leakage from a reservoir. Results of this study will provide data for designing future monitoring strategies based on 4D seismic.

  18. Coupled Flow and Geomechanical Modeling of Fluid Production and Injection in the Cavone Oil Field, Northern Italy: an Assessment of the Potential for Induced Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, B.; Plesch, A.; Shaw, J. H.; Hager, B. H.; Juanes, R.

    2014-12-01

    There has been a recent increase in the number of earthquakes reported in proximity of active oil and gas fields. In particular, the occurrence of a sequence of damaging earthquakes in May 2012 near the Cavone oil field, in Northern Italy, raised the question of whether these earthquakes might have been triggered, or, if not, if future activities might trigger other damaging events. Production and injection of fluids in the underground reservoirs are known to be capable of triggering seismicity by inducing slip on seismogenic faults. However, the effects of injection and production on fault stability in real fields are not always intuitively obvious, and require the development of new-generation coupled flow-geomechanical models that capture the effect of multiphase poromechanics on faults. We study, by way of numerical modeling and simulation, the potential for induced seismicity at the Cavone field. Using a coupled flow and geomechanics model of the field that honors reservoir geology and historical well schedule, we simulate oil production and water injection in the field for a period of three decades leading up to the earthquake sequence. We calculate the change in Coulomb stress on the bounding Mirandola fault, which sourced the May 29, 2012 M 5.8 earthquake. This quantity varies in space and evolves in time with changing pore pressure and total stress in the reservoir. A novel and important aspect of our work is the identification of a potential instability mechanism for a bounding fault at the edge of a reservoir experiencing pressure depletion. The discontinuity in pore pressure across the fault means that there is a discontinuity in effective normal stress and that, therefore, the Coulomb failure criterion must be evaluated locally on both sides of the fault. We track the evolution of the Coulomb stress at the earthquake hypocenter and compare it with the regional tectonic stressing rate to conclude in favor of tectonic origin of the earthquake. In addition, analysis of the locations of aftershocks of the May 2012 sequence shows a lack of seismicity in the area where the stressing rates from contraction of the reservoir are largest. This observed lack of seismic activity within 1-2 km from the reservoir suggests that fluid production and injection from the Cavone field was not an important driver for the observed seismicity.

  19. Direct ?-flow injection isotope dilution ICP-MS for the determination of heavy metals in oil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of trace elements in oil samples and their products is of high interest as their presence significantly affects refinery processes and the environment by possible impact of their combustion products. In this context, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) plays an important role due to its outstanding analytical properties in the quantification of trace elements. In this work, we present the accurate and precise determination of selected heavy metals in oil samples by making use of the combination of ?-flow direct injection and isotope dilution ICP-MS (ICP-IDMS). Spike solutions of 62Ni, 97Mo, 117Sn and 206Pb were prepared in an organic solvent, mixed directly with the diluted oil samples and tested to be fit for purpose for the intended ID approach. The analysis of real samples revealed strong matrix effects affecting the ICP-MS sensitivity, but not the isotope ratio measurements, so that accurate results are obtained by ICP-IDMS. Typical relative standard deviations were about 15% for peak area and peak height measurements, whereas the isotope ratios were not significantly affected (RSD < 2%). The developed method was validated by the analysis of a metallo-organic multi-element standard (SCP-21, typically applied as a calibration standard) and the standard reference material SRM1084a (wear metals in lubricating oil). The obtained results were in excellent agreement with the certified valueellent agreement with the certified values (recoveries between 98% and 102%), so the proposed methodology of combining ?-flow direct injection and ICP-IDMS can be regarded as a new tool for the matrix-independent, multi-element and reliable determination of trace elements in oil and related organic liquids. (orig.)

  20. Preserving drinking water quality in geotechnical operations: predicting the feedback between fluid injection, fluid flow, and contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Frank R.

    2014-05-01

    Not only in densely populated areas the preservation of drinking water quality is of vital interest. On the other side, our modern economies request for a sustained energy supply and a secure storage of waste materials. As energy sources with a high security of supply, oil, natural gas, and geothermal energy cover ca. 60% of Europe's energy demand; together with coal more than 75% (IEA 2011). Besides geothermal energy, all of the resources have a high greenhouse gas footprint. All these production activities are related to fluid injection and/or fluid production. The same holds true for gas storage operations in porous reservoirs, to store natural gases, oil, or greenhouse gases. Different concerns are discussed in the public and geoscientific community to influence the drinking water quality: - wastewater discharges from field exploration, drilling, production, well treatment and completion - wastewater sequestration - gas storage - tight gas and tight oil production (including hydraulic fracturing) - Shale gas production (including hydraulic fracturing) - mine drainage This overview contribution focusses on strategies to systematically reduce the risk of water pollution in geotechnical operations of deep reservoirs. The principals will be exemplarily revealed for different geotechnical operations. - How to control hydraulic fracturing operations to reduce the risk of enhanced seismic activity and avoiding the connection of originally separated aquifers. The presented approach to quantitatively predict the impact of stimulation activities is based on petrophysical models taking the feedback of geomechanical processes and fluid flow in porous media, fissures and faults into account. The specific flow patterns in various rock types lead to distinguished differences in operational risk. - How can a proper planning of geotechnical operations reduce the involved risks. A systematic risk reduction strategy will be discussed. On selected samples the role of exploration, operation, monitoring, and proper abandonment will be presented. - Which critical parameters can be monitored? The chances and limitation of different monitoring technologies will be discoursed for a storage site. - How can public involvement reduce risks? This will be shown for hydraulic fracturing operations. - How can geotechnical operation reduce the risk for the groundwater and environment? Some examples will be given to show, that geotechnical operations have the inherent capability to enhance the security of our drinking water. The presentation will discuss how the use of underlying physical and chemical principles can significantly reduce geotechnical risks during fluid injection.

  1. SATCAP-C : a program for thermal hydraulic design of pressurized water injection type capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are capsules called 'Pressure Water Injection Type Capsule' as a kind of irradiation devices at the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). A type of the capsules is a 'Boiling Water Capsule' (usually named BOCA). The other type is a 'Saturated Temperature Capsule' (named SATCAP). When the water is kept at a constant pressure, the water temperature does not become higher than the saturated temperature so far as the water does not fully change to steam. These type capsules are designed on the basis of the conception of applying the water characteristic to the control of irradiation temperature of specimens in the capsules. In designing of the capsules in which the pressurized water is injected, thermal performances have to be understood as exactly as possible. It is not easy however to predict thermal performances such as axially temperature distribution of water injected in the capsule, because there are heat-sinks at both side of inner and outer of capsule casing as the result that the water is fluid. Then, a program (named SATCAP-C) for the BOCA and SATCAP was compiled to grasp the thermal performances in the capsules and has been used the design of the capsules and analysis of the data obtained from some actual irradiation capsules. It was confirmed that the program was effective in thermal analysis for the capsules. The analysis found out the values for heat transfer coefficients at various surfaces of capsule components and some thermal characteristics of capsules. (author)

  2. Origin of late pleistocene formation water in Mexican oil reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brine water invasion into petroleum reservoirs, especially in sedimentary basins, are known from a variety of global oil field, such as the Western Canada sedimentary basin and, the central Mississippi Salt Dome basin (Kharaka et al., 1987). The majority of oil wells, especially in the more mature North American fields, produce more water than they do oil (Peachey et al., 1998). In the case of Mexican oil fields, increasing volumes of invading water into the petroleum wells were detected during the past few years. Major oil reserves in the SE-part of the Gulf of Mexico are economically affected due to decreases in production rate, pipeline corrosion and well closure. The origin of deep formation water in many sedimentary basins is still controversial: Former hypothesis mainly in the 60's, explained the formation of formation water by entrapment of seawater during sediment deposition. Subsequent water-rock interaction processes explain the chemical evolution of hydrostatic connate water. More recent hydrodynamic models, mainly based on isotopic data, suggest the partial migration of connate fluids, whereas the subsequent invasion of surface water causes mixing processes (Carpenter 1978). As part of the presented study, a total of 90 oil production wells were sampled from 1998 to 2004 to obtain chemical (Major and trace elements) and isotopic composition (2H, 13C, 14C, 18O 36Cl, 37Cl, 87Sr, Cl, 37Cl, 87Sr, 129I, tritium) of deep formation water at the Mexican Gulf coast. Samples were extracted from carbonate-type reservoirs of the oil fields Luna, Samaria-Sitio Grande, Jujo-Tecominoac (on-shore), and Pol-Chuc (off-shore, including Abkatun, Batab, Caan, and Taratunich) at a depth between 2,900 m b.s.l. and 6,100 m b.s.l. During the field work, the influence of atmospheric contamination e.g. by CO2-atmospheric input was avoided by using an interval sampler to get in-situ samples from the extraction zone of selected bore holes. For wellhead samples, a 20 liter-sampling-reagent was previously filled with N2-gas for the collection and phase separation of the pressurized gas-water-crude oil mixture. No differences in 14C-concentrations were detected applying, both, conventional and AMS-techniques. In contradiction to the expected 'fossil age' of reservoir water as part of a stagnant hydraulic system, measured 14C-concentrations between 0.89 pmC and 31.86 pmC indicate a late Pleistocene-early Holocene, regional event for the infiltration of surface water into the reservoir. The variety in water mineralization from meteoric (TDSmax = 0.5 g/l) to hyper-saline composition (TDSmax = 338 g/l) is not caused by halite dissolution from adjacent salt domes, as shown by elevated Br/Cl ratios. In contrary, the linear correlation between 18O and Cl values reflect varying mixing proportions of two components - meteoric water and evaporated seawater. Instead of water/rock-interaction, evaporation of seawater at the surface prior to infiltration represents the principal process for fluid enrichment in 18O and chlorine, with maximum values of 17.2 %o and 228 g/l, respectively. The young residence time of formation water in Mexican oil reservoirs implies following: - The common assumption of 'hydraulically-frozen' reservoirs is not correct, as main descending fluid migration occurred during glacial period. Probably, major infiltration processes are related to periods with climatic changes and increased humidity - as observed for the adjacent Yucatan region in SE-Mexico during early-mid Holocene (6,000 yr BP) (Metcalfe et al. 2000) - with the probable transgression of Mexican Gulf seawater into the recent Mexican coastal plain. - The common hypothesis of hydrocarbon maturation within Jurassic organic-rich layers, and its subsequent expulsion and migration into Cretaceous/Tertiary sedimentary units must be expanded by a last-step-process: As glacial ground water level is actually located below the hydrocarbon column (due to differences in density), a general mobilization of the entire column of reservoir fluids and the displacement of the organic p

  3. A study of gas lift on oil/water flow in vertical risers

    OpenAIRE

    Brini Ahmed, Salem Kalifa

    2014-01-01

    Gas lift is a means of enhancing oil recovery from hydrocarbon reservoirs. Gas injected at the production riser base reduces the gravity component of the pressure drop and thereby, increases the supply of oil from the reservoir. Also, gas injection at the base of a riser helps to mitigate slugging and thus, improving the performance of the topside facility. In order to improve the efficiency of the gas lifting technique, a good understanding of the characteristics of gas-liq...

  4. Viscous-Gravity Spreading of Oil on Water: Modeling and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Chebbi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Oil spreading is one of the major factors affecting the fate of oil spills on water. Modeling spreading is required to study the impact of oil slicks on the environment and plants using sea water including desalination units. Spreading of oil on water undergoes three stages. In the second stage, gravity acts as the main driving force against the viscous force, which is the main resisting force in stages 2 and 3. The paper presents the state of the art in modeling the second stage of spreading. Challenges in analyzing viscous-gravity spreading of continuously discharged oil on water are also presented

  5. Flow oscillations induced by injection of subcooled water into steam flow in horizontal pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow oscillation phenomena have been studied as the problem when emergency core cooling water is injected at the time of LOCA in PWRs. As the result, it was clarified that water plugs are formed in pipes under a certain condition, and those oscillate in the vicinity of water injection nozzles. In this study, experiment was carried out with a small scale setup simulating the injection of emergency core cooling water in PWRs, and the effects of the throttles installed upstream and downstream of a water injection nozzle, the volume of steam part, the length of a water plug and the diameter of a pipe exerted on the change of pressure and temperature during oscillation were examined. Moreover, by applying the linear stability theory to the analysis model made on the basis of the observation of the phenomena, the threshold of oscillation occurrence was determined, and compared with the experimental data. At the same time, the mechanism of the hysteresis phenomena of the oscillation threshold observed in this experimental setup was examined. The experiment and the analysis of an oscillation threshold are reported. (Kako, I.)

  6. Perspectives on Severe Accident Management by Depressurization and External Water Injection under Extended SBO Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three major issues of severe accident management guideline (SAMG) after this sort of extended SBO would be depressurization of the primary system, external water injection and hydrogen management inside a containment. Under this situation, typical SAM actions would be depressurization and external water delivery into the core. However, limited amount of external water would necessitate optimization between core cooling, containment integrity and fission product removal. In this paper, effects of SAM actions such as depressurization and external water injection on the reactor and containment conditions after extended SBO are analyzed using MAAP4 code. Positive and negative aspects are discussed with respect to core cooling and fission product retention inside a primary system. Conclusions are made as following: Firstly, early depressurization action itself has two-faces: positive with respect to delay of the reactor vessel failure but negative with respect to the containment failure and fission product retention inside the primary system. Secondly, in order to prevent containment overpressure failure after external water injection, re-closing of PORV later should be considered in SAM, which has never been considered in the previous SAMG. Finally, in case of external water injection, the flow rate should be optimized considering not only the cooling effect but also the long term fission product retention inside the primary system

  7. Efecto de la inyección de vapor sobre la composición de crudos / Effects of steam injection on chemical composition of oils

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Liliana, López; Karla, Quintero; Patricia, Lugo; Salvador, Lo Mónaco.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Con la finalidad de conocer los cambios en la composición SARA (saturados, aromáticos, resinas y asfaltenos), elementos mayoritarios (C, S), traza (V, Ni), grupos funcionales en la fracción de asfaltenos y biomarcadores (terpanos y esteranos) en crudos de pozos sometidos a inyección de vapor, se est [...] udiaron 20 muestras provenientes de Campo Lagunillas (Cuenca de Maracaibo) tomadas de un pozo sin inyección de vapor (LS-SE), dos pozos en un primer ciclo (LS-A, LS-B) y un pozo en segundo ciclo (LS-C) de inyección de vapor. Los crudos analizados son extra-pesados ( Abstract in english In order to know the changes in SARA composition (saturated, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes), major (C, S), trace (V, Ni) elements, functional groups in the asphaltenes fraction and biomarkers (terpanes and steranes) in oils from wells under steam injection, 20 samples were studied from Lagunilla [...] s field (Maracaibo Basin) taken from a well without stem injection (LS-SE), two wells in a first cycle (LS-A, LS- B), and a well in the second cycle (LS-C) of steam injection. Oils analyzed are extra heavy ones (

  8. Water injection into vapor- and liquid-dominated reservoirs: Modeling of heat transfer and mass transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, K.; Oldenburg, C.; Moridis, G.; Finsterle, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes recent advances in methods for simulating water and tracer injection, and presents illustrative applications to liquid- and vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs. High-resolution simulations of water injection into heterogeneous, vertical fractures in superheated vapor zones were performed. Injected water was found to move in dendritic patterns, and to experience stronger lateral flow effects than predicted from homogeneous medium models. Higher-order differencing methods were applied to modeling water and tracer injection into liquid-dominated systems. Conventional upstream weighting techniques were shown to be adequate for predicting the migration of thermal fronts, while higher-order methods give far better accuracy for tracer transport. A new fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator is described which allows a more accurate description of geofluids, and includes mineral dissolution and precipitation effects with associated porosity and permeability change. Comparisons between numerical simulation predictions and data for laboratory and field injection experiments are summarized. Enhanced simulation capabilities include a new linear solver package for TOUGH2, and inverse modeling techniques for automatic history matching and optimization.

  9. Turbine Inlet Analysis of Injected Water Droplet Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, Kevin

    Gas turbines have become widely used in the generation of power for cities. They are used all over the world and must operate under a wide variety of ambient conditions. Every turbine has a temperature at which it operates at peak capacity. In order to attain this temperature in the hotter months various cooling methods are used such as refrigeration inlet cooling systems, evaporative methods, and thermal energy storage systems. One of the more widely used is the evaporative systems because it is one of the safest and easiest to utilize method. However, the behavior of water droplets within the inlet to the turbine has not been extensively studied or documented. It is important to understand how the droplets behave within the inlet so that water droplets above a critical diameter will not enter the compressor and cause damage to the compressor blades. In order to do this a FLUENT simulation was constructed in order to determine the behavior of the water droplets and if any droplets remain at the exit of the inlet, along with their size. In order to do this several engineering drawings were obtained from SRP and studies in order to obtain the correct dimensions. Then the simulation was set up using data obtained from SRP and Parker-Hannifin, the maker of the spray nozzles. Then several sets of simulations were run in order to see how the water droplets behaved under various conditions. These results were then analyzed and quantified so that they could be easily understood. The results showed that the possible damage to the compressor increased with increasing temperature at a constant relative humidity. This is due in part to the fact that in order to keep a constant relative humidity at varying temperatures the mass fraction of water vapor in the air must be changed. As temperature increases the water vapor mass fraction must increase in order to maintain a constant relative humidity. This in turn makes it slightly increases the evaporation time of the water droplets. This will then lead to more droplets exiting the inlet and at larger diameters.

  10. Techniques for Determining Small Fractions of Oil Components in the Sea Water Flow by Rotation of Vibration Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Mucunguzi-Rugwebe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the results of the effect of water-flow rate and air fraction component on intensity, I, are presented and discussed. The study which was carried out at Bergen University in Norway, presents the impact of monochromatic defects on polarization and measurements of small oil fractions of various crude oils are presented. When there was refraction, it was observed that in static sea-water &mustatic = 0.38 and in running water &muflow = 0.42 When refraction was eliminated by grafting windows in the pipe, &mustatic = 0, &muflow = 0.11 and in both cases &muflow was independent of the flow rate. Air fraction component, &alpha> = 0.12 reduced light intensity. With rate flow Q = 13.6m3/h and Q = 27.2 m3/h critical air fraction was found at &alphac = 0.18 and &alphac = 0.12 respectively. For &alphac = 0.18 up to &alpha 0.87 at Q = 13.6m3/h and &alphac = 0.12 up to &alpha = 0.78 at Q = 27.2 m3/h light intensity was found independent of &alpha. The highest rotation was found in Gullfaks crude oil, followed by Heidrun, the rotation is Statfjord crude oil was less than one in Heidrun and the least rotation was observed in 0A sg 0a rd crude oil. At 40ppm, the rotation was as follows: Gullfaks &empty = 27.0±0.20, Heidrun &empty = 23.9±0.20, Statfjord &empty = 20.0±0.20 and 0Asg 0ard &empty = 10.0±0.10. This method studys very well when small oil fractions from 5.0-70 ppm are in sea-water flow. This technique can be deployed to monitor the environment and to control the re-injected process water.

  11. Toxicity of water-soluble fractions of biodiesel fuels derived from castor oil, palm oil, and waste cooking oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Maria Bernadete Neiva Lemos; de Araújo, Milena Maria Sampaio; Nascimento, Iracema Andrade; da Cruz, Andrea Cristina Santos; Pereira, Solange Andrade; do Nascimento, Núbia Costa

    2011-04-01

    Concerns over the sustained availability of fossil fuels and their impact on global warming and pollution have led to the search for fuels from renewable sources to address worldwide rising energy demands. Biodiesel is emerging as one of the possible solutions for the transport sector. It shows comparable engine performance to that of conventional diesel fuel, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, the toxicity of products and effluents from the biodiesel industry has not yet been sufficiently investigated. Brazil has a very high potential as a biodiesel producer, in view of its climatic conditions and vast areas for cropland, with consequent environmental risks because of possible accidental biodiesel spillages into water bodies and runoff to coastal areas. This research determined the toxicity to two marine organisms of the water-soluble fractions (WSF) of three different biodiesel fuels obtained by methanol transesterification of castor oil (CO), palm oil (PO), and waste cooking oil (WCO). Microalgae and sea urchins were used as the test organisms, respectively, for culture-growth-inhibition and early-life-stage-toxicity tests. The toxicity levels of the analyzed biodiesel WSF showed the highest toxicity for the CO, followed by WCO and the PO. Methanol was the most prominent contaminant; concentrations increased over time in WSF samples stored up to 120 d. PMID:21184529

  12. The Use of Demulsifiers for Separating Water from Anthracene Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze?evi?, N.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The main feedstocks for the production of oil-furnace carbon black are different kinds of liquid hydrocarbons. The quality and utilization of oil-furnace carbon black mainly depends on the type of liquid hydrocarbons contained in the oil feedstocks.In practice, both carbochemical and petrochemical oils are used as feedstock sources. Carbochemical oils are fractions obtained during coal tar distillation. Anthracene oil is one of these oils. Depending on the conditions of distillation, coal tars contain up to w = 18·10 –2 highly aromatic fractions, which can be used as carbon black feedstock. The sulphur fraction of these oils can vary between w = 0.5 and 0.7·10 –2, depending on the origin of the coal. The availability of carbochemical oils obtained from coal tar is largely dependent on the production of coke used in the manufacture of steel. The quantities available today are insufficient to satisfy the demand for carbon black feedstock. In addition, in highly industrialized countries, production of carbochemicaloils is declining.Although, carbochemical oils are preferred in terms of efficiency, petrochemical oils are more important in terms of quantities available, particularly in the production of furnace blacks. These are residual oils resulting either from catalytic cracking processes or from the production of olefins in steam crackers using naphtha or gas oil as raw material. Nevertheless, the choice of carbon black feedstock is not determined merely by price and efficiency, but also by specific quality criteria. However, due to their origin, the feedstocks are mixtures of a large number of individual substances and are, therefore, not easy to characterize. More than 200 different components have been recorded in the range detectable by gas chromatography.Some important components of carbon black feedstock are listed in table 1.1 An important parameter for the evaluation of carbon black feedstock is density, since it increases with increasing aromaticity. It is also used for determination of the Bureau of Mines Correlation Index (BMCI,2 which is obtained either from density and midboiling point, or from density andviscosity for those feedstocks which cannot be distilled completely. This index is used by the carbon black industry as an important criteria for feedstock evaluation.The sulphur fraction in feedstocks should not exceed w = 2.5 ·10–2, because a higher content greatly affects the quality of carbon black, pollutes the atmosphere, and accelerates corrosion of the facility. The maximum sulphur content in the typical hydrocarbon feedstock is w = 1.2 · 10–2.3. A very important factor of hydrocarbon feedstock is the fraction of alkaline earth metals, especially sodium and potassium. The maximum sodium fraction may be w = 20·10–6, while the maximum potassium fraction is w = 2·10 –6.The maximum fraction of asphalthenes is w = 15 ·10–2. Asphalthenes, determined as pentane-insoluble matter, provide indications concerning the possibility of grit formation. Another very important factor is the temperature range of distillation, which should be low enough, because the hydrocarbon feedstock must evaporize before entering the hot region of the reactor. The viscosity, the pour point, and for safety reasons, the flash point determines the handling properties and storage conditions of the feedstock.In addition, the water fraction in the hydrocarbon feedstock is one of the most important factors. The water fraction in hydrocarbon feedstock influences the handling properties of the same. The maximum water fraction in hydrocarbon feedstock may be w = 2.0·10–2, and desirably below w = 1.0·10–2. A higher water fraction represent a considerable impact on the financial construction. Also, it is very difficult to manipulate such feedstock, especially unloading, and in the production of oil-furnace carbon black. Namely, every water fraction higher than w = 2.0·10–2 in the hydrocarbon feedstock, causes the phenomenon of cavitations.In the oil-furnace carbon black plant of Petrokemija d.

  13. Comparative performance of direct injection diesel engine operating on ethanol, petrol and rapeseed oil blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents the bench testing results of a four stroke, four cylinder, direct injection, unmodified, diesel engine operating on pure rapeseed oil (RO) and its 2.5 vol%, 5 vol%, 7.5 vol% and 10 vol% blends with ethanol (ERO), petrol (PRO) and both improving agents applied in equal proportions as 50:50 vol% (EPRO). The purpose of the research is to examine the effect of ethanol and petrol addition into RO on the biofuel kinematical viscosity, brake mean effective pressure (bmep), brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) of a diesel engine and its brake thermal efficiency (bte). Addition into RO from 2.5 to 7.5 vol% of ethanol and petrol its viscosity at ambient temperature of 20 deg. C diminishes by 9.2-28.3% and 14.1-31.7%, respectively. Heating up to the temperature of 60 deg. C the viscosity of pure RO, blends ERO2.5-7.5 and PRO2.5-10 further diminishes 4.2, 3.9-3.8 and 3.9-3.6 times. At 1800 min-1 speed, the maximum brake mean effective pressure (bmep) higher up to 1.6% comparing with that of pure RO (0.77 MPa) ensure three agent blends EPRO5-7.5, whereas at rated 2200 min-1 speed, the bmep higher by 5.6% can be obtained when fuelling the engine with blend PRO2.5. Brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) at maximum torque (240.2 g/kWh) and rated power (234.0 g/kWh) is correspondingly lower by 3.4% and 5.5% in comparison with pure RO when biofuel blends EPRO5 and PRO2.5 are used. The biggest brake thermal efficiency at maximum torque (0.40thermal efficiency at maximum torque (0.40-0.41) and rated power (0.42-0.43) relative to that of RO (0.39) suggest blends PRO2.5 and EPRO5-7.5, respectively

  14. Study of the feasibility of chemical dispersion of viscous oils and water-in-oil emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of chemically dispersing high viscosity-oils and water-in-oil emulsions with recently developed modern dispersants is discussed. Laboratory dispersibility tests were performed using the Warren Spring Laboratory (WSL) method and the Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP) dilution method. Larger scale tests were done in the Polludrome. The laboratory methods produced high efficiency results for oils with viscosities of up to 10,000 to 20,000 cSt, depending on dispersant used. For emulsified oils the efficiency was much lower, less than 15 per cent for similar viscosities. In the Polludrome, it was necessary to adopt special strategies such as double dispersant applications to get significant dispersions of emulsions. Results led to the conclusion that laboratory tests do not accurately simulate the dispersion process at sea. Efficiencies are generally overestimated and the test protocol must be adapted to the viscosity range. In addition, emulsions prepared in the laboratory are poorly dispersible, even when subjected to strong mixing. Polludrome tests produce more reliable results and also allow the assessment of alternative treatment strategies. 6 refs., 11 figs

  15. Monitoring of fluid-rock interaction and CO2 storage through produced fluid sampling at the Weyburn CO2-injection enhanced oil recovery site, Saskatchewan, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Weyburn Oil Field is a carbonate reservoir in south central Saskatchewan, Canada and is the site of a large CO2 injection project for purposes of enhanced oil recovery. The Weyburn Field, in the Mississippian Midale Formation, was discovered in 1954 and was under primary production until secondary recovery by water flood began in 1964. The reservoir comprises two units, the Vuggy and the Marly, and primary and secondary recovery are thought to only have significantly depleted the Vuggy zone, leaving the Marly with higher oil saturations. In 2000, PanCanadian Resources (now EnCana), the operator of the field, began tertiary recovery by injection of CO2 and water, primarily into the Marly. The advent of this project was an opportunity to study the potential for geological storage of CO2. Using 43 Baseline samples collected in August 2000, before CO2 injection at Weyburn, and 44 monitoring samples collected in March 2001, changes in the fluid chemistry and isotope composition have been tracked. The initial fluid distribution showed water from discovery through water flood in the Midale Formation with Cl ranging from 25,000 to 60,000 mg/L, from the NW to the SE across the Phase 1A area. By the time of Baseline sampling the produced water had been diluted to Cl of 25,000-50,000 mg/L as a result of the addition of make up water from the low TDS Blairmore Formation, but the pattern of distribution was still present. The Cl dististribution was still present. The Cl distribution is mimicked by the distribution of other dissolved ions and variables, with Ca (1250-1500 mg/L) and NH3(aq) increasing from NW to SE, and alkalinity (700-300 mg/L), resistivity, and H2S (300-100 mg/L) decreasing. Based on chemical and isotopic data, the H2S is interpreted to result from bacterial SO4 reduction. After 6 months of injection of CO2, the general patterns are changed very little, except that the pH has decreased by 0.5 units and alkalinity has increased, with values over 1400 mg/L in the NW, decreasing to 500 mg/L in the SE. Calcium has increased to range from 1250 to 1750 mg/L, but the pattern of NW-SE distribution is altered. Chemical and isotopic data suggest this change in distribution is caused by the dissolution of calcite due to water-rock reactions driven by CO2. The Baseline samples varied from -22 to -12%o ? 13C (V-PDB) for CO2 gas. The injected CO2 has an isotope ratio of -20%o. The Monitor-1 samples of produced CO2 ranged from -18 to -13%o, requiring a heavy source of C, most easily attributed to dissolution of carbonate minerals. Field measured pH had increased and alkalinity had decreased by the second monitoring trip (July 2001) to near Baseline values, suggesting continued reaction with reservoir minerals. Addition of CO2 to water-rock mixtures comprising carbonate minerals causes dissolution of carbonates and production of alkalinity. Geochemical modeling suggests dissolution is taking place, however more detail on water-oil-gas ratios needs to be gathered to obtain more accurate estimates of pH at the formation level. Geological storage of CO2 relies on the potential that, over the longer term, silicate minerals will buffer the pH, causing any added CO2 to be precipitated as calcite. Some initial modeling of water-rock reactions suggests that silica sources are available to the water resident in the Midale Formation, and that clay minerals may well be capable of acting as pH buffers, allowing injected CO2 to be stored as carbonate minerals. Further work is underway to document the mineralogy of the Midale Formation and associated units so as to define more accurately the potential for geological storage

  16. Numerical Study of Water Control with Downhole Oil-Water Separation Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Khor Yin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The maturing oil fields with increasing water production can pose a challenging produced water handling and disposal issues. This paper presents a numerical study of a motorless hydrocyclone to enhance understanding of the downhole oil-water separation. The turbulence of fluid flow is obtained using K-? Realizable Turbulence model for complex swirl dominated flow, while the interface between hydrocarbon and water is described using the Discrete Phase model. In this approach, factors which contribute to the hydrocyclone separation instability were discussed. Discussion is then extended to the relationship of residence time with pressure difference between overflow and underflow. These pressure differences are able to relate to pressure condition for high water cut well which require downhole separation.

  17. Laboratory effectiveness testing of water-in-oil emulsion breakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics and chemistry of water-in-oil emulsions dominate the development of effectiveness tests. Emulsions are variable in stability--this variability is largely dependent on oil type and degree of weathering. These factors complicate the development of a test. Emulsions which have low stability will apparently break easily with chemical emulsion breakers. Broken emulsions will form a foam-like material, called rag, which retains water which is not part of the stable emulsions. Analytical methods used to determine the final stability of the broken or unbroken emulsion were evaluated. Measurements of water content and viscosity measurements show correlation to emulsion stability. Viscosity provides a more reliable measure of emulsion stability but water content measurements are more convenient and are largely used in this study. Twelve tests were developed in the past. Two testing methods have been developed to a usable stage. These tests are described and data using them provided. The effects of mixing time, agent amount, settling time and mixing energy on effectiveness results are presented

  18. Can Water-Injected Turbomachines Provide Cost-Effective Emissions and Maintenance Reductions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Daggett, David L.; Shouse, Dale T.; Roquemore, William M.; Brankovic, Andreja; Ryder, Robert C., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    An investigation has been performed to evaluate the effect of water injection on the performance of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB)) experimental trapped vortex combustor (TVC) over a range of fuel-to-air and water-to-fuel ratios. Performance is characterized by combustor exit quantities: temperature and emissions measurements using rakes, and overall pressure drop, from upstream plenum to combustor exit. Combustor visualization is performed using gray-scale and color still photographs and high-frame-rate videos. A parallel investigation evaluated the performance of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool for the prediction of the reacting flow in a liquid fueled combustor (e.g., TVC) that uses water injection for control of pollutant emissions and turbine inlet temperature. Generally, reasonable agreement is found between data and NO(x) computations. Based on a study assessing the feasibility and performance impact of using water injection on a Boeing 747-400 aircraft to reduce NO(x) emissions during takeoff, retrofitting does not appear to be cost effective; however, an operator of a newly designed engine and airframe might be able to save up to 1.0 percent in operating costs. Other challenges of water injection will be discussed.

  19. Metabolism and transfer pattern of tritium in mice after single injection of tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolism and transfer pattern of tritium from pregnant mice into fetuses after intra peritoneal injection of tritiated water was investigated. The pregnant mice were divided into three experimental groups: group 1 was injected with tritiated water on the first day of gestation to obtain the transfer coefficient of tritium from pregnant mice into fetuses through placenta; group 2 was injected with tritiated water on the first day of parturition to study the transfer coefficient of tritium from pregnant mice into their babies through milk: group 3 was injected with tritiated water in different periods of gestation. The results show that in group 1, tritiated water was almost uniformly distributed in the whole body, including placenta, foetal membrane and amniotic fluid; placenta did not affect tritium transfer from pregnant mouse into foetus. In groups 2 and 3, concentrations of tritium in the baby's tissues were evidently higher than those in the pregnant mouse, and the transfer coefficients in groups 2 and 3 were higher than that in group 1

  20. Development of Polymer Gel Systems to Improve Volumetric Sweep and Reduce Producing Water/Oil Ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Feiyan Chen

    2005-12-31

    Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of a 42-month research program that focused on the understanding of gelation chemistry and the fundamental mechanisms that alter the flows of oil and water in reservoir rocks after a gel treatment. Work was conducted on a widely applied system in the field, the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide-chromium acetate gel. Gelation occurs by network formation through the crosslinking of polyacrylamide molecules as a result of reaction with chromium acetate. Pre-gel aggregates form and grow as reactions between chromium acetate and polyacrylamide proceed. A rate equation that describes the reaction between chromium acetate and polymer molecules was regressed from experimental data. A mathematical model that describes the crosslinking reaction between two polymer molecules as a function of time was derived. The model was based on probability concepts and provides molecular-weight averages and molecular-weight distributions of the pre-gel aggregates as a function of time and initial system conditions. Average molecular weights of pre-gel aggregates were measured as a function of time and were comparable to model simulations. Experimental methods to determine molecular weight distributions of pre-gel aggregates were unsuccessful. Dissolution of carbonate minerals during the injection of gelants causes the pH of the gelant to increase. Chromium precipitates from solution at the higher pH values robbing the gelant of crosslinker. Experimental data on the transport of chromium acetate solutions through dolomite cores were obtained. A mathematical model that describes the transport of brine and chromium acetate solutions through rocks containing carbonate minerals was used to simulate the experimental results and data from literature. Gel treatments usually reduce the permeability to water to a greater extent than the permeability to oil is reduced. This phenomenon is referred to as disproportionate permeability reduction (DPR). Flow experiments were conducted in sandpacks to determine the effect of polymer and chromium concentrations on DPR. All gels studied reduced the permeability to water by a greater factor than the factor by which the oil permeability was reduced. Greater DPR was observed as the concentrations of polymer and chromium were increased. A conceptual model of the mechanisms responsible for DPR is presented. Primary features of the model are (1) the development of flow channels through the gel by dehydration and displacement of the gel and by re-connection of pre-treatment, residual oil volume and (2) high flow resistance in the channels during water flow is caused by significant saturations of oil remaining in the channels. A similar study of DPR was conducted in Berea sandstone cores. Both oil and water permeabilities were reduced by much smaller factors in Berea sandstone cores than in similar treatments in sandpacks. Poor maturation of the gelant in the Berea rock was thought to be caused by fluid-rock interactions that interfered with the gelation process.

  1. An Experimental Study of Oil / Water Flow in Horizontal Pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elseth, Geir

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study the behaviour of the simultaneous flow of oil and water in horizontal pipes. In this connection, two test facilities are used. Both facilities have horizontal test sections with inner pipe diameters equal to 2 inches. The largest facility, called the model oil facility, has reservoirs of 1 m{sub 3} of each medium enabling flow rates as high as 30 m{sub 3}/h, which corresponds to mixture velocities as high as 3.35 m/s. The flow rates of oil and water can be varied individually producing different flow patterns according to variations in mixture velocity and input water cut. Two main classes of flows are seen, stratified and dispersed. In this facility, the main focus has been on stratified flows. Pressure drops and local phase fractions are measured for a large number of flow conditions. Among the instruments used are differential pressure transmitters and a traversing gamma densitometer, respectively. The flow patterns that appear are classified in flow pattern maps as functions of either mixture velocity and water cut or superficial velocities. From these experiments a smaller number of stratified flows are selected for studies of velocity and turbulence. A laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) is applied for these measurements in a transparent part of the test section. To be able to produce accurate measurements a partial refractive index matching procedure is used. The other facility, called the matched refractive index facility, has a 0.2 m{sub 3} reservoir enabling mainly dispersed flows. Mixture velocities range from 0.75 m/s to 3 m/s. The fluids in this facility are carefully selected to match the refractive index of the transparent part of the test section. A full refractive index matching procedure is carried out producing excellent optical conditions for velocity and turbulence studies by LDA. In addition, pressure drops and local phase fractions are measured. (author)

  2. Muscle enhancement using intramuscular injections of oil in bodybuilding : review on epidemiology, complications, clinical evaluation and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, Ch. N.; Hvolris, JØrgen Jesper

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Self-administered intramuscular injection of site enhancement oil (SEO) is a cosmetic and performance-enhancing procedure used to reshape muscles in the bodybuilder subculture, but its consequences and complications are only sporadically described. Methods: A systematic search in MEDLINE and EMBASE databases during the spring of 2009 and 2010. Internet searches were performed, and bodybuilder pharmacopoeias were consulted to describe SEO use and the clinical complications known. Results: One review and seven case reports were identified. Eight case reports describe oleomas caused by repeated intramuscular injections of anabolic steroids. Conclusions: SEOs cause sclerosing lipogranulomatosis and its progression may lead to lifelong complications. Thorough radiologic evaluation is important to plan surgical revisions in active phases. Also antibiotics, steroids, and compression therapy have been successful and should be employed at different stages.

  3. Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsions for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, David; Golomb, Dan; Shi, Guang; Shih, Cherry; Lewczuk, Rob; Miksch, Joshua; Manmode, Rahul; Mulagapati, Srihariraju; Malepati, Chetankurmar

    2011-09-30

    This project involves the use of an innovative new invention ? Particle Stabilized Emulsions (PSEs) of Carbon Dioxide-in-Water and Water-in-Carbon Dioxide for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. The EOR emulsion would be injected into a semi-depleted oil reservoir such as Dover 33 in Otsego County, Michigan. It is expected that the emulsion would dislocate the stranded heavy crude oil from the rock granule surfaces, reduce its viscosity, and increase its mobility. The advancing emulsion front should provide viscosity control which drives the reduced-viscosity oil toward the production wells. The make-up of the emulsion would be subsequently changed so it interacts with the surrounding rock minerals in order to enhance mineralization, thereby providing permanent sequestration of the injected CO{sub 2}. In Phase 1 of the project, the following tasks were accomplished: 1. Perform laboratory scale (mL/min) refinements on existing procedures for producing liquid carbon dioxide-in-water (C/W) and water-in-liquid carbon dioxide (W/C) emulsion stabilized by hydrophilic and hydrophobic fine particles, respectively, using a Kenics-type static mixer. 2. Design and cost evaluate scaled up (gal/min) C/W and W/C emulsification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 at the Otsego County semi-depleted oil field. 3. Design the modifications necessary to the present CO{sub 2} flooding system at Otsego County for emulsion injection. 4. Design monitoring and verification systems to be deployed in Phase 2 for measuring potential leakage of CO{sub 2} after emulsion injection. 5. Design production protocol to assess enhanced oil recovery with emulsion injection compared to present recovery with neat CO{sub 2} flooding. 6. Obtain Federal and State permits for emulsion injection. Initial research focused on creating particle stabilized emulsions with the smallest possible globule size so that the emulsion can penetrate even low-permeability crude oilcontaining formations or saline aquifers. The term ?globule? refers to the water or liquid carbon dioxide droplets sheathed with ultrafine particles dispersed in the continuous external medium, liquid CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O, respectively. The key to obtaining very small globules is the shear force acting on the two intermixing fluids, and the use of ultrafine stabilizing particles or nanoparticles. We found that using Kenics-type static mixers with a shear rate in the range of 2700 to 9800 s{sup -1} and nanoparticles between 100-300 nm produced globule sizes in the 10 to 20 ?m range. Particle stabilized emulsions with that kind of globule size should easily penetrate oil-bearing formations or saline aquifers where the pore and throat size can be on the order of 50 ?m or larger. Subsequent research focused on creating particle stabilized emulsions that are deemed particularly suitable for Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. Based on a survey of the literature an emulsion consisting of 70% by volume of water, 30% by volume of liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide, and 2% by weight of finely pulverized limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) was selected as the most promising agent for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2}. In order to assure penetration of the emulsion into tight formations of sandstone or other silicate rocks and carbonate or dolomite rock, it is necessary to use an emulsion consisting of the smallest possible globule size. In previous reports we described a high shear static mixer that can create such small globules. In addition to the high shear mixer, it is also necessary that the emulsion stabilizing particles be in the submicron size, preferably in the range of 0.1 to 0.2 ?m (100 to 200 nm) size. We found a commercial source of such pulverized limestone particles, in addition we purchased under this DOE Project a particle grinding apparatus that can provide particles in the desired size range. Additional work focused on attempts to generate particle stabilized emulsions with a flow through, static mixer based apparatus under a variety

  4. Water-oil drainage dynamics in oil-wet random microfluidic porous media analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Wei; Neeves, Keith; Yin, Xiaolong

    2012-01-01

    Displacement experiments carried out in microfluidic porous media analogs show that reduced surface tension leads to a more stable displacement, opposite to the process in Hele-Shaw cells where surface tension stabilizes the displacement of a more viscous fluid by a less viscous fluid. In addition, geometry of porous media is observed to play an important role. Three random microfluidic porous media analogs were made to study water-oil drainage dynamics, featuring a pattern of randomly connected channels with a uniform width, a pattern with Gaussian channel width distribution, and a pattern with large isolated pores. The microfluidic chips fabricated using Polydimenthylsiloxane with glass covers have the internal surface treated by Trichlorosilane to achieve a uniform oil-wet condition. The aqueous phase displaces the oil phase, with a viscosity ratio of about 1:40 and a density ratio of 1:0.85. Videos 1-3 show water flooding processes. It is observed that both channel size distribution (Video 2) and heteroge...

  5. Mechanical Evolution of Bacterial Films at Oil-Water Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Daniel; Vaccari, Liana; Sheng, Jian; Leheny, Robert; Stebe, Kathleen

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria can assemble at the interface between oil and water to form films that strongly affect the mechanical properties of the interface. In comparison with biofilms on solid substrates, such biofilm formation at fluid-fluid interfaces has been the subject of relatively little study. The microstructure of the films, which can include not only packings of bacteria but macromolecular surfactants secreted by the bacteria and the remains of dead bacteria, resembles a quasi-two-dimensional colloidal suspension in a polymer solution. We have characterized the mechanical response of bacterial films at oil-aqueous interfaces during their formation via passive microrheology and pendant drop imaging. With increasing age, the films undergo a transition from a viscous to an elastic interfacial shear rheology and eventually acquire a bending rigidity. These findings will be discussed in terms of viscoelstic models and in the context of the active nature of the bacteria in the films and in the adjoining aqueous suspension.

  6. Study of performance and emission characteristics of a direct injection diesel engine using rice bran oil ethanol and petrol blends

    OpenAIRE

    Venkata Subbaiah, G.; Raja Gopal, K.; Durga Prasad, B.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, influence on the engine performance and exhaust emissions of a naturally aspirated, single cylinder direct injection diesel engine has been experimentally investigated using pure rice bran oil (RBO), and its 2.5%, 5% and 7.5% blends with ethanol (ERBO) and petrol (PRBO). The influence on the viscosity of the RBO with the addition of the ethanol and petrol from 200C to 700C has also been studied. The tests conducted from no load to full load of the engine with an increment of ...

  7. The possible influences of dietary oil supplementation in ameliorating metabolic disturbances and oxidative stress in Alloxan injected rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multifactor disease that is associated with a number of different metabolic abnormalities. Clinical research has confirmed the efficacy of several plant extracts in the modulation of oxidative stress associated with DM. The present work was conducted to examine the protective or treating effects of two different dietary oils rich in medium chain fatty acids (MCFA) as coconut oil (CO) or omega-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids (?-3-PUFAs)as flaxseed oil (FO) on the severity of DM induced experimentally by alloxan injection. Wistar strain albino rats (17 Og) were fed commercial rat chow diet supplemented with either CO or FO for four weeks. A single dose of alloxan (150 mg/kg) resulted in hyperglycemia, decreases in serum insulin, thyroxine (T4), and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels, elevated triglycerides, total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations. Concurrent with those changes, an increased liver malonaldehyde (MDA) level was observed. This oxidative stress was related to decreases in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione (GSH) content in the liver of alloxan diabetic rats. Oils supplementation after diabetes induction ameliorated hyperglycemia, increased insulin and thyroxine hormone levels, improved lipid profiles, blunted the increase in MDA, modulated the levels of hepatic SOD activity and GSH content of alloxan treated rats. It could be suggested that each of CO or FO could be suggested that each of CO or FO could be used as antidiabetic complement in case of DM. This may be related to their anti oxidative properties

  8. [Treatment of retinal detachment by vitrectomy and injection of silicone oil. Long-term results and complications in 105 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussat, B; Ruellan, Y M

    1984-01-01

    The present study is a two year-follow up of 105 eyes (including 27 aphakic eyes), operated on retinal detachment by silicone oil injection after pars plana vitrectomy. This procedure was chosen either as an initial treatment (37 eyes) or after a classical treatment by external indentation had failed (68 eyes). All cases of retinal detachment were of bad prognosis: macular hole, massive periretinal proliferation, isolated or associated with a tear. Cases of vitrectomy with silicone injection for proliferative retinopathy due to diabetes or hemoglobinopathy were excluded. Operations were performed under a surgical microscope with the help of a corneal contact lens (Goldmann, Kl oti or O' Malley ). Functional and anatomical results, as well as complications, were evaluated at least 2 years after treatment. In 24,7% of cases, vision was improved as compared to preoperative visual acuity. Cataract was a constant complication in all phakic eyes, as silicone oil had not been removed within the first 6 months. Intraocular hypertension developed frequently both in phakic and in aphakic eyes (29,5 and 33% of cases, respectively) and responded poorly to medical or surgical treatment. Other complications occurred less frequently. They were corneal edema, conjunctival hyperemia and uveitis. Pain imposed the evisceration of 2 eyes. These complications were the consequence of silicone oil toxicity and/or the mechanical effects of intraocular oil. Besides treatment-associated complications, early (36 during the first 6 months) as well as late (2 between the 12th and 18th months) recurrences of retinal detachment were observed. In contrast to these fair functional results, anatomical results were good in most cases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6470412

  9. Composition and fate of gas and oil released to the water column during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Christopher M; Arey, J Samuel; Seewald, Jeffrey S; Sylva, Sean P; Lemkau, Karin L; Nelson, Robert K; Carmichael, Catherine A; McIntyre, Cameron P; Fenwick, Judith; Ventura, G Todd; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S; Camilli, Richard

    2012-12-11

    Quantitative information regarding the endmember composition of the gas and oil that flowed from the Macondo well during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill is essential for determining the oil flow rate, total oil volume released, and trajectories and fates of hydrocarbon components in the marine environment. Using isobaric gas-tight samplers, we collected discrete samples directly above the Macondo well on June 21, 2010, and analyzed the gas and oil. We found that the fluids flowing from the Macondo well had a gas-to-oil ratio of 1,600 standard cubic feet per petroleum barrel. Based on the measured endmember gas-to-oil ratio and the Federally estimated net liquid oil release of 4.1 million barrels, the total amount of C(1)-C(5) hydrocarbons released to the water column was 1.7 10(11) g. The endmember gas and oil compositions then enabled us to study the fractionation of petroleum hydrocarbons in discrete water samples collected in June 2010 within a southwest trending hydrocarbon-enriched plume of neutrally buoyant water at a water depth of 1,100 m. The most abundant petroleum hydrocarbons larger than C(1)-C(5) were benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and total xylenes at concentrations up to 78 ?g L(-1). Comparison of the endmember gas and oil composition with the composition of water column samples showed that the plume was preferentially enriched with water-soluble components, indicating that aqueous dissolution played a major role in plume formation, whereas the fates of relatively insoluble petroleum components were initially controlled by other processes. PMID:21768331

  10. Water injection test and finite element calculations of water percolation through fissured granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the German/Swiss Cooperation agreed in 1983 it is intended to test and further develop engineering geological rock-mechanical investigative methods for use in crystalline rock. Partners involved are the Nationale Genossenschaft fuer die Lagerung radioaktiver Abfaelle (NAGRA), the Institut fuer Tieflagerung der Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung (GSF) and the Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources - BGR). The NAGRA Rock Laboratory at Grimsel is situated in the Aare and Gotthardt massiv in the Swiss Alps, in the vicinity of the Grimsel Pass. The main access tunnel to the control centre of Grimsel II, of the Kraftwerke Oberhasli AG (Electricity Generating Company), was investigated by NAGRA and an area below the Juchlistock at a depth of approximately 450 - 500 m was chosen for the rock laboratory. The laboratory tunnel and the test sites were cut in 1983/84. This report describes the planning of the modified water injection test and the accompanying investigations proposed of the BGR. 9 refs.; 16 figs

  11. Oil and Water Don't Mix: The Gulf Coast Oil Disaster as a Preschool Social Studies Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Tricia

    2010-01-01

    On April 20, 2010, an offshore oil-drilling platform exploded, spilling millions of gallons of oil into the gulf. From Louisiana to the Gulf Coast of Florida the effects are being felt by fisherman, shrimpers, dive charters, and other hardworking folks who depend on the water for their livelihood. But there is another population in these coastal…

  12. Injection and Combustion of RME with Water Emulsions in a Diesel Engine

    OpenAIRE

    J. Cisek

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents ways of using the fully-digitised triggerable AVL VideoScope 513D video system for analysing the injection and combustion inside a diesel engine cylinder fuelled by RME with water emulsions.The research objects were: standard diesel fuel, rapeseed methyl ester (RME) and RME – water emulsions. With the aid of a helical flow reactor, stable emulsions with the water fraction up to 30 % weight were obtained, using an additive to prevent the water from separating out of the emu...

  13. A cost-benefit analysis of produced water management opportunities in selected unconventional oil and gas plays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsters, P.; Macknick, J.; Bazilian, M.; Newmark, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Unconventional oil and gas production in North America has grown enormously over the past decade. The combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing has made production from shale and other unconventional resources economically attractive for oil and gas operators, but has also resulted in concerns over potential water use and pollution issues. Hydraulic fracturing operations must manage large volumes of water on both the front end as well as the back end of operations, as significant amounts of water are coproduced with hydrocarbons. This water--often called flowback or produced water--can contain chemicals from the hydraulic fracturing fluid, salts dissolved from the source rock, various minerals, volatile organic chemicals, and radioactive constituents, all of which pose potential management, safety, and public health issues. While the long-term effects of hydraulic fracturing on aquifers, drinking water supplies, and surface water resources are still being assessed, the immediate impacts of produced water on local infrastructure and water supplies are readily evident. Produced water management options are often limited to underground injection, disposal at centralized treatment facilities, or recycling for future hydraulic fracturing operations. The costs of treatment, transport, and recycling are heavily dependent on local regulations, existing infrastructure, and technologies utilized. Produced water treatment costs also change over time during energy production as the quality of the produced water often changes. To date there is no publicly available model that evaluates the cost tradeoffs associated with different produced water management techniques in different regions. This study addresses that gap by characterizing the volume, qualities, and temporal dynamics of produced water in several unconventional oil and gas plays; evaluating potential produced water management options, including reuse and recycling; and assessing how hydraulic fracturing and produced water issues relate to the larger water-energy nexus. Specifically, this study develops a play-specific model to compare the decision factors and costs involved in managing produced water. For example, when transport distances to a wastewater disposal site are far enough, options for recycling water become more favorable, depending on the characteristics of each play. This model can provide policymakers and other interested parties with cost estimates of different water management options, including a better understanding of the costs and opportunities associated with recycling produced water. This work provides a cross-play assessment of produced water management options and costs and could serve as the foundation for more detailed analyses of opportunities to minimize hydraulic fracturing's impacts on freshwater resources.

  14. Essentials of water systems design in the oil, gas, and chemical processing industries

    CERN Document Server

    Bahadori, Alireza; Boyd, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Essentials of Water Systems Design in the Oil, Gas and Chemical Processing Industries provides valuable insight for decision makers by outlining key technical considerations and requirements of four critical systems in industrial processing plants—water treatment systems, raw water and plant water systems, cooling water distribution and return systems, and fire water distribution and storage facilities. The authors identify the key technical issues and minimum requirements related to the process design and selection of various water supply systems used in the oil, gas, and chemical processing industries. This book is an ideal, multidisciplinary work for mechanical engineers, environmental scientists, and oil and gas process engineers.

  15. Test facility for fast gas injections into a vessel filled with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fast Gas Injection Facility (SGI) was set up to study the hydrodynamics during the expansion of a gas bubble into a vessel filled with water. The gas stored in a pressure vessel expands against gravity through a circular duct into a large cylindrical vessel partly with water. This report covers the description of the test facility and the data acquisition. Results of the first test series are added. (orig.)

  16. Injection and Combustion of RME with Water Emulsions in a Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cisek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents ways of using the fully-digitised triggerable AVL VideoScope 513D video system for analysing the injection and combustion inside a diesel engine cylinder fuelled by RME with water emulsions.The research objects were: standard diesel fuel, rapeseed methyl ester (RME and RME – water emulsions. With the aid of a helical flow reactor, stable emulsions with the water fraction up to 30 % weight were obtained, using an additive to prevent the water from separating out of the emulsion.An investigation was made of the effect of the emulsions on exhaust gas emissions (NOX, CO and HC, particulate matter emissions, smoke and the fuel consumption of a one-cylinder HD diesel engine with direct injection. Additionally, the maximum cylinder pressure rise was calculated from the indicator diagram. The test engine was operated at a constant speed of 1 600 rpm and 4 bar BMEP load conditions. The fuel injection and combustion processes were observed and analysed using endoscopes and a digital camera. The temperature distribution in the combustion chamber was analysed quantitatively using the two-colour method. The injection and combustion phenomena were described and compared.A way to reduce NOX formation in the combustion chamber of diesel engines by adding water in the combustion zone was presented. Evaporating water efficiently lowers the peak flame temperature and the temperature in the post-flame zone. For diesel engines, there is an exponential relationship between NOX emissions and peak combustion temperatures. The energy needed to vaporize the water results in lower peak temperatures of the combusted gases, with a consequent reduction in nitrogen oxide formation. The experimental results show up to 50 % NOX emission reduction with the use of 30% water in an RME emulsion, with unchanged engine performance.

  17. Conducting SAGD in shoreface oil sands with associated basal water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, J.A.; Riva, D.T.; Connelly, M.E.; Solanki, S.C.; Edmunds, N.R. [Laricina Energy Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The use of steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) processes has been concentrated around the McMurray Formation in the eastern Athabasca deposit. This paper discussed a SAGD scheme configured to maximize bitumen recovery from shoreface oil sands in the Grand Rapids formation in the Wabasca area. The region features clean sand with a homogenous and continuous reservoir pay. Producer wells were placed within the basal water zone at the base of the porosity region. A scaled 2-D physical model with an active aquifer system was used to examine well configurations in relation to oil-water content and their impacts on resource recovery. Simulations were conducted to compare the well placements. Results of the study showed that fluids flowed towards the producer in a radial pattern. Bitumen was drawn down towards the bottom water leg regardless of whether the chamber pressure was above that of the aquifer. Thirty-eight per cent more bitumen was produced as a result of increased reservoir sweep. It was concluded that placement of the producer well at the base of the porous interval improved the overall economics of the project. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 10 figs.

  18. Spectrophotometric determination of Bromate in water using multisyringe flow injection analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Sara M.; Segundo, Marcela A.; Rangel, António O. S. S; José L. F. C. Lima; Cerdà, Víctor

    2011-01-01

    A multisyringe flow injection system for the spectrophotometric determination of bromate in water is proposed, based on the oxidation of phenothiazine compounds by bromate in acidic medium. Several phenothiazines were tested, including chlorpromazine, trifluoperazine, and thioridazine. Higher sensitivity and lower LOD were attained for chlorpromazine. Interference from nitrite, hypochlorite, and chlorite was eliminated in-line, without any changes in the manifold. The automatic...

  19. Analysis of boron injection transients in pressurized water reactors at natural circulation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to analyze boron injection transients at natural circulation conditions in anticipation of preoperational testing in commercial Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The results of the analysis are expected to aid in identifying important phenomena affecting the mixing process and to help to define the measurements needed to assess the results of such tests

  20. Studies of water-in-oil emulsions : long-term stability, oil properties, and emulsions formed at sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of water-in-oil emulsions of more than 100 oils, including a sample from the ERIKA spill, were determined. An emulsion must be characterized as stable, meso-stable or unstable before its unique properties can be characterized. The samples from this study were analysed after one year of storage to study the change in properties over time. The samples were made in a rotary agitator and then their rheometric, viscosity and water content characteristics were studied. Observations were made on the appearance of the emulsions and were used to classify them. A summary of the property changes for the different types of emulsions over three time periods was tabulated. It was confirmed that water can occur in oil as entrained water where large droplets are suspended temporarily by viscous forces. Results also showed that the viscosity of a stable emulsion at a shear rate of one reciprocal second is about three times greater than that of the starting oil, and is highly elastic. An unstable emulsion generally has a viscosity of up to 20 time greater than that of the starting oil and is not elastic. A meso-stable emulsion has properties between stable and unstable and breaks down within a few days. It was concluded that asphaltene and resin content plus the viscosity of the starting oil are the most important property factors in determining what type of water-in-oil state is produced. 4 refs., 6 tabs

  1. Analysis of the influence of well spacing on the injection rate behaviour for water injection under fracturing conditions; Analise da influencia do espacamento de pocos na determinacao da vazao de injecao para o processo de injecao com pressao cima da pressao de fratura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz Mazo, Eduin Orlando [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Centro de Estudo do Petroleo. Lab. de Simulacao de Fluxo em Meios Porosos (UNISIM); Costa, Odair Jose; Schiozer, Denis Jose [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia de Petroleo

    2008-07-01

    Water injection under fracturing conditions is a proved manner of overcoming injectivity loss in reservoirs affected by formation damage. Nevertheless, as shown by Munoz Mazo et al. (2006), there is the possibility of the generated and propagated fractures intercept the producer wells making that the injected water shall be re-circulated into the reservoir instead of its main function which is to drive the oil contained in the reservoir pore space. The objective of this work is to determine the influence of well spacing on the determination of the water injection rate under fracturing conditions, aiming to study its effects on the production performance and the sweep efficiency. To accomplish the work, an analytical model for representing the absolute permeability reduction near the wellbore and a model which reproduces the fracture propagation in a coupled manner are used. In this way the model sensitivity to several well spacing and the injection rate effects are analyzed using the Net Present Value and the sweep efficiency is evaluated as a function of the Recovery Factor. The results show that the water injection under fracturing conditions is an effective way of overcoming the injectivity loss problem and evidence its sensitivity to different spacing between the injector and the producer wells. (author)

  2. Optimization of water-borne crude oil transport

    OpenAIRE

    Vatn, Karsten Dånmark

    2007-01-01

    A ship scheduling problem in optimization of water-borne crude oil transportation has been investigated. The classic optimization problem the most closely related to the problem at hand is the Multi-Vehicle-Pick-up-and-Delivery Problem with Time Windows (m-PDPTW). In addition to the basic characteristics of the m-PDPTW, the studied problem has an additional degree of freedom due to having pick-ups and deliveries that are not matched. This extra freedom gives new possibilities when creat...

  3. Orange oil/water nanoemulsions prepared by high pressure homogenizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was to use the high-pressure homogenizer (HPH) to prepare stable oil/water nanoemulsions presenting narrow particle size distribution. The dispersions were prepared using nonionic surfactants based on ethoxylated ether. The size and distribution of the droplets formed, along with their stability, were determined in a Zetasizer Nano ZS particle size analyzer. The stability and the droplet size distribution in these systems do not present the significant differences with the increase of the processing pressure in the HPH). The processing time can promote the biggest dispersion in the size of particles, thus reducing its stability. (author)

  4. A new generation of models for water-in-oil emulsion formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water-in-oil emulsions form after oil or petroleum products are spilled, and can make the cleanup of oil spills difficult. This paper discussed new modelling schemes designed for the formation of water-in-oil emulsions. Density, viscosity, asphaltene and resin contents were used to compute a class index for unstable, entrained water-in-oil states, meso-stable, or stable emulsions. Prediction schemes were used to estimate the water content and viscosity of the water-in-oil states and the time to formation with wave height inputs. A numerical values was used for each type of water-in-oil type. The properties of the starting oil were correlated with the numerical scheme. New regressions were then performed using a Gaussian-style regression expansion technique. Data obtained from the models suggested that water-in-oil types are stabilized by both asphaltenes and resins. The optimized model was then compared with earlier models. The study showed that the new model has the capacity to accurately predict oil-in-water types approximately 90 per cent of the time using only resin, saturate, asphaltene, viscosity, and density data. 17 refs., 8 tabs., 8 figs

  5. Remote sensing of water-in-oil emulsions : initial laser fluorosensor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of a study in which laser-induced fluorescence spectra were collected in a controlled environment for fresh oils, water-in-oil emulsions of the same oils and of the emulsions in water. Water-in-oil emulsions and other neutrally buoyant oils can be difficult or impossible to detect using commercial sensors, but preliminary airborne field experiments have shown that laser fluorosensors can detect and properly classify oils. Laser fluorosensors provide their own source of illumination and can be used during the night or day. They detect the fluorescence spectral signature and intensity of specific oils. This study analyzed Point Arguello Light, Mississippi Canyon and Bunker C oils. The fluorescence spectra of the water-in-oil emulsions were found to be identical to the spectra of the fresh oils, both in spectral shape and signal intensity, confirming that laser-induced fluorescence can be used to detect and classify fresh and water-in-oil emulsified forms of hydrocarbons. It was concluded that laser fluorosensor are promising sensors for airborne detection, classification and mapping of oil and related petroleum products in both marine and terrestrial environments. 4 refs., 1 tab., 14 figs

  6. Performance of single cylinder, direct injection Diesel engine using water fuel emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single cylinder Diesel engine study of water-in-Diesel emulsions was conducted to investigate the effect of water emulsification on the engine performance and gases exhaust temperature. Emulsified Diesel fuels of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 water/Diesel ratios by volume, were used in a single cylinder, direct injection Diesel engine, operating at 1200-3300 rpm. The results indicate that the addition of water in the form of emulsion improves combustion efficiency. The engine torque, power and brake thermal efficiency increase as the water percentage in the emulsion increases. The average increase in the brake thermal efficiency for 20% water emulsion is approximately 3.5% over the use of Diesel for the engine speed range studied. The proper brake specific fuel consumption and gases exhaust temperature decrease as the percentage of water in the emulsion increases

  7. Vapor injection system for internal combustion engine. [Patent: water supplied to carburator for mixing with fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, B.

    1974-01-30

    A vapor injection system is described for an internal combustion engine having a carburetor and an air inlet to the carburetor having a flow axis toward the carburetor. A mist chamber has a perforated section for the passage of water mist particles of a predetermined size to the carburetor. A water tube and an air tube are positioned in the mist chamber to force a stream of air to intercept a stream of water at an acute angle. The compressed air atomizes the intercepted stream of water and forces the atomized water particles in a path at a substantial angle to the flow axis of the carburetor air inlet. A baffle further atomizes the water particles and deflects the water particles through the perforated section and into the carburetor air inlet.

  8. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Produced in Water-in-oil Emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium dioxide (titania) particles were prepared by a water-in-oil emulsion system, and studied for the photodecomposition property of methylene blue. Microemulsion (ME) consisted of water, cyclohexane or octane, and surfactant, such as polyoxyethylene (10) octylphenyl ether (TX-100), polyoxyethylene lauryl ether, or bis (2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate. Titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) was dropped into the ME solution and then titania particles were formed by the hydrolysis reaction between TTIP in the organic solvent and the water in the core of ME. It was found that ME could be classified to the reversed micelle (RM) region and the swelling reversed micelle (SM) region according to the water content. The water droplets in RM were almost monodispersed, where the water content was small. On the other hand, the water droplets in SM had a size distribution, although most of the water molecules associated with surfactant molecules. The size of the particles prepared in the RM region was smaller than the ME size. In contrast, the size of the particles formed in the SM region was larger than the ME size, and coagulation of the particles was observed within a few hours. The smallest diameter of the particles was 2 nm in the system of cyclohexane with TX-100 surfactant when the molar ratio of water to surfactant was 2. Titania particles prepared in this condition were collected as amorphous powder, and converted to anatase phase at less than 500 K, which is lower thaase at less than 500 K, which is lower than the ordinal phase transition temperature. These anatase phase titania particles only showed a significant photodecomposition of methylene blue by illumination with a Xenon lamp

  9. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Produced in Water-in-oil Emulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Yasushige, E-mail: ymori@mail.doshisha.ac.jp; Okastu, Yasuhiro; Tsujimoto, Yuki [Doshisha University, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science (Japan)

    2001-06-15

    Titanium dioxide (titania) particles were prepared by a water-in-oil emulsion system, and studied for the photodecomposition property of methylene blue. Microemulsion (ME) consisted of water, cyclohexane or octane, and surfactant, such as polyoxyethylene (10) octylphenyl ether (TX-100), polyoxyethylene lauryl ether, or bis (2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate. Titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) was dropped into the ME solution and then titania particles were formed by the hydrolysis reaction between TTIP in the organic solvent and the water in the core of ME. It was found that ME could be classified to the reversed micelle (RM) region and the swelling reversed micelle (SM) region according to the water content. The water droplets in RM were almost monodispersed, where the water content was small. On the other hand, the water droplets in SM had a size distribution, although most of the water molecules associated with surfactant molecules. The size of the particles prepared in the RM region was smaller than the ME size. In contrast, the size of the particles formed in the SM region was larger than the ME size, and coagulation of the particles was observed within a few hours. The smallest diameter of the particles was 2 nm in the system of cyclohexane with TX-100 surfactant when the molar ratio of water to surfactant was 2. Titania particles prepared in this condition were collected as amorphous powder, and converted to anatase phase at less than 500 K, which is lower than the ordinal phase transition temperature. These anatase phase titania particles only showed a significant photodecomposition of methylene blue by illumination with a Xenon lamp.

  10. An intelligent superwetting PVDF membrane showing switchable transport performance for oil/water separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Mimi; Xue, Lixin; Liu, Fu; Jiang, Lei

    2014-05-01

    A superamphiphilic poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membrane with superoleophobicity under water and superhydrophobicity under oil is successfully prepared. Due to the switchable transport performance, the membrane is applicable to the separation of various oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsions with a droplet size greater than 20 nm, and shows superior permeability and antifouling properties, as well as a high separation efficiency. PMID:24677285

  11. Mineral-Coated Polymer Membranes with Superhydrophilicity and Underwater Superoleophobicity for Effective Oil/Water Separation

    OpenAIRE

    Peng-Cheng Chen; Zhi-Kang Xu

    2013-01-01

    Oil-polluted water is a worldwide problem due to the increasing industrial oily wastewater and the frequent oil spill accidents. Here, we report a novel kind of superhydrophilic hybrid membranes for effective oil/water separation. They were prepared by depositing CaCO3-based mineral coating on PAA-grafted polypropylene microfiltration membranes. The rigid mineral-coating traps abundant water in aqueous environment and forms a robust hydrated layer on the membrane pore surface, thus endowing t...

  12. 77 FR 29665 - Determination That PITRESSIN TANNATE IN OIL (Vasopressin Tannate) Injection, 5 Pressor Units...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ...Parke-Davis). PITRESSIN TANNATE IN OIL is indicated for the control or prevention of the symptoms and complications of diabetes insipidus due to a deficiency of endogenous posterior pituitary antidiuretic hormone. In a letter dated April 23,...

  13. Partitioning of semi-soluble organic compounds between the water phase and oil droplets in produced water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When selecting produced water treatment technologies, one should focus on reducing the major contributors to the total environmental impact. These are dispersed oil and semi-soluble hydrocarbons, alkylated phenols, and added chemicals. Experiments with produced water have been performed offshore on the Statoil operated platforms Gullfaks C and Statfjord B. These experiments were designed to find how much of the environmentally relevant compounds were dissolved in the water phase and not associated to the dispersed oil in the produced water. Results show that the distribution between the dispersed oil and the water phase varies highly for the different components groups. For example the concentration of PAHs and the C6-C9 alkylated phenols is strongly correlated to the content of dispersed oil. Therefore, the technologies enhancing the removal of dispersed oil have a higher potential for reducing the environmental impact of the produced water than previously considered

  14. Partitioning of semi-soluble organic compounds between the water phase and oil droplets in produced water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faksness, Liv-Guri; Grini, Per Gerhard; Daling, Per S

    2004-04-01

    When selecting produced water treatment technologies, one should focus on reducing the major contributors to the total environmental impact. These are dispersed oil and semi-soluble hydrocarbons, alkylated phenols, and added chemicals. Experiments with produced water have been performed offshore on the Statoil operated platforms Gullfaks C and Statfjord B. These experiments were designed to find how much of the environmentally relevant compounds were dissolved in the water phase and not associated to the dispersed oil in the produced water. Results show that the distribution between the dispersed oil and the water phase varies highly for the different components groups. For example the concentration of PAHs and the C6-C9 alkylated phenols is strongly correlated to the content of dispersed oil. Therefore, the technologies enhancing the removal of dispersed oil have a higher potential for reducing the environmental impact of the produced water than previously considered. PMID:15041429

  15. The behavior of heavy oil in a fresh water lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the weathering process of a fresh water oil spill. The objective of this study is to gather information from samples collected at different stages of the spill to demonstrate the effects of aging and weathering on the oil's chemical and physical state. Samples from the impacted lake were taken at different periods of the year in which the spill happened. The samples were subjected to a series of chemical treatments to measure parameters like oil viscosities and densities, and hydrocarbon levels. Results showed that most samples went through a weathering process over the course of the year and, at a late stage of the study, spills took one of the following forms: either a large-flat conglomeration that appeared to be highly weathered and have limited mobility, or a small-spherical ball that was lightly weathered and had more mobility. Finally, it was mentioned that high levels of PAH might be detected in the lake for up to 10 years.

  16. An experimental study on tissue damage following subcutaneous injection of water soluble contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Hyup; Park, Jae Hyung; Kang, Heung Sik; Kim, Chu Wan; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Yong Il [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-04-15

    The water soluble contrast media cause tissue necrosis infrequently by extravasation during intravenous injection in various radiological examinations. However, it has not been well documented that what kind and what concentration of contrast media can cause tissue necrosis. And also, the mechanism of tissue necrosis by extravasated contrast media has not been well known. The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate the frequency and severity of tissue damage following subcutaneous injection of various water soluble contrast media to investigate the characteristics of the contrast media acting on the tissue damage, and to provide the basic data for the clinical application. Meglumine ioxithalamate,sodium and meglumine ioxithalamate, iopromide, iopamidol, ioxaglate,meglumine diatrizoate and sodium diatrizoate of various iodine content and osmolality were injected into subcutaneous tissue of the dorsum of 970 feet of 485 rats. The tissue reaction of injection sites were grossly examined with period from 1 day to 8 weeks after the injection. Representative gross changes were correlated with histologic findings. The results were as follows; 1. The basic tissue damage by extravasated contrast media was acute and chronic inflammatory reaction of the soft tissue with subsequent progress into the hemorrhagic and necrotizing lesion. 2. Lager volume of contrast media caused more severe tissue damage. 3. Contrast media of higher osmolality caused more severe tissue damage. 4. At same osmolality, contrast media of higher iodine content caused more severe tissue damage.

  17. An experimental study on tissue damage following subcutaneous injection of water soluble contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water soluble contrast media cause tissue necrosis infrequently by extravasation during intravenous injection in various radiological examinations. However, it has not been well documented that what kind and what concentration of contrast media can cause tissue necrosis. And also, the mechanism of tissue necrosis by extravasated contrast media has not been well known. The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate the frequency and severity of tissue damage following subcutaneous injection of various water soluble contrast media to investigate the characteristics of the contrast media acting on the tissue damage, and to provide the basic data for the clinical application. Meglumine ioxithalamate,sodium and meglumine ioxithalamate, iopromide, iopamidol, ioxaglate,meglumine diatrizoate and sodium diatrizoate of various iodine content and osmolality were injected into subcutaneous tissue of the dorsum of 970 feet of 485 rats. The tissue reaction of injection sites were grossly examined with period from 1 day to 8 weeks after the injection. Representative gross changes were correlated with histologic findings. The results were as follows; 1. The basic tissue damage by extravasated contrast media was acute and chronic inflammatory reaction of the soft tissue with subsequent progress into the hemorrhagic and necrotizing lesion. 2. Lager volume of contrast media caused more severe tissue damage. 3. Contrast media of higher osmolality caused more severe tissue damr osmolality caused more severe tissue damage. 4. At same osmolality, contrast media of higher iodine content caused more severe tissue damage

  18. Operation and Combustion Characteristics of a Direct Injection Diesel Engine Fuelled with Esterified Cotton Seed Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Murugu Mohan Kumar Kandasamy; Sarangan Jeganathan; Rajamohan Ganesan

    2009-01-01

    Vegetable oils are renewable in nature and can be directly used as fuels in diesel engines.  However, their high viscosity and poor volatility lead to reduced thermal efficiency and increased hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide and smoke emissions. Transesterification is one of the methods by which viscosity could be drastically reduced and the fuel could be adopted for use in diesel engine.  This Esterified vegetable oil is popularly known as Bio-diesel and that is commercially available in the d...

  19. Transporting of a Cell-Sized Phospholipid Vesicle Across Water/Oil Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Hase, Masahiko; Yamada, Ayako; Hamada, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    When a cell-sized water droplet, with a diameter of several tens of micro meter, is placed in oil containing phospholipids, a stable cell-sized vesicle is spontaneously formed as a water-in-oil phospholipid emulsion (W/O CE) with a phospholipid monolayer. We transferred the lipid vesicle thus formed in the oil phase to the water phase across the water/oil interface by micromanipulation, which suggests that the vesicle is transformed from a phospholipid monolayer as W/O CE in...

  20. A multi-functional oil-water separator from a selectively pre-wetted superamphiphobic paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Dengteng; Yang, Lili; Wang, Chenbo; Lee, Elaine; Zhang, Yongquan; Yang, Shu

    2015-04-11

    A multi-functional oil-water separator is prepared from a paper towel spray coated with superamphiphobic (i.e., superhydrophobic and superoleophobic) nanoparticles. After the separator is pre-wetted with ethanol, followed by water, water can be removed from the light oil-water mixture and emulsions by gravity with high separation efficiency (99.9%) and separation flux. Vice versa, heavy oil can be removed by gravity on an ethanol-oil pre-wetted SA-paper. PMID:25750982

  1. Oil-water liquid flow rate determined from measured pressure drop and water hold-up in horizontal pipes

    OpenAIRE

    René Oliemans

    2011-01-01

    Stimulated by rapid progress in down-hole measuring techniques production engineers wonder whether in the near-future monitoring of oil/water production rates for horizontal wells can become possible on the basis of measured oil/water pressure losses and water hold-ups. A complicating issue is that these measured data depend on the oil and water flow patterns. The question then is if we use a flow-pattern-dependent model for pressure drop and water hold-up in an inverse mode, what then will b...

  2. Development of Polymer Gel Systems to Improve Volumetric Sweep and Reduce Producing Water/Oil Ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Paul Willhite; Stan McCool; Don W. Green; Min Cheng; Feiyan Chen

    2005-04-03

    Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of the third year of a 42 month research program that is aimed at an understanding of gelation chemistry and the fundamental mechanisms that alter the flows of oil and water in reservoir rocks after a gel treatment. Work focused on a widely applied system in the field, the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide-chromium acetate gel. Gelation occurs by network formation through the crosslinking of polyacrylamide molecules as a result of reaction with chromium acetate. Pre-gel aggregates form and grow as reactions between chromium acetate and polyacrylamide proceed. A mathematical model that describes uptake and crosslinking reactions as a function of time was derived. The model was probability based and provides molecular-weight averages and molecular-weight distributions of the pre-gel aggregates as a function of time and initial system conditions. A liquid chromatography apparatus to experimentally measure the size and molecular weight distributions of polymer samples was developed. The method worked well for polymer samples without the chromium crosslinker. Sample retention observed during measurements of gelant samples during the gelation process compromised the results. Other methods will be tested to measure size distributions of the pre-gel aggregates. Dissolution of carbonate minerals during the injection of gelants causes the pH of the gelant to increase. Chromium precipitates from solution at the higher pH values robbing the gelant of crosslinker. Experimental data on the transport of chromium acetate solutions through dolomite cores were obtained. A mathematical model that describes the transport of brine and chromium acetate solutions through rocks containing carbonate minerals was used to simulate the experimental results.

  3. The Geopolitics of Water and Oil in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    Throughout history, few nations have been as successful in leveraging their geographic location as Turkey. As the center of two of the most powerful civilizations of all time, the Byzantine and Ottoman Empires, Turkey was the bridge between East and West, a bustling center of trade and a strategic economic and political nexus between regions of the world. In addition to its geographic power, Turkey has historically possessed substantial water resources. Unlike many water parched areas of the Middle East, Turkey's water capacity has allowed it to grow large populations and build elaborate cities. In the modern era, Turkey once again has an opportunity to regain its historical role, as the state where today's geopolitics of energy coincides with Turkey's traditional geopolitics of water. Turkey's central location, this time not between East and West, but between producers and consumers of energy, gives it a central, geopolitical role in world affairs, both in oil and gas. Moreover, Turkey's water resources can be utilized to reinforce Turkey's strategic energy role in the region, by building a strategy of cooperation with water-poor countries from the Levant to the Arabian Peninsula. Throughout history, water and energy have been among the most fundamental resources of civilization, at the very base of Maslow's hierarchy of needs essential to fostering human growth and development for thousands of years. It is seldom appreciated how linked water and energy truly are. Producing, transferring, and supplying energy requires a significant amount of water, just as the extraction, purification, and even desalination of water requires a significant amount of energy. As both energy and water grow scarcer throughout the future, nations such as Turkey can gain considerable influence as a result of their geographic locations and natural endowments. Turkey can benefit from pipeline diplomacy, taking advantage of its geographical location to make it a crossroads of multiple commodity pipeline projects. Through a series of water and energy pipelines, Turkey can gain significant political, economic, and social influence, while contributing to regional integration and stability. This paper addresses the background to Turkey's geopolitical future, with regard to both energy and water resources. It also aims to provide some suggestions as to how Turkey can take greater advantage of its geopolitical potential. Section I of the paper discusses Turkey's geopolitical potential; Section II details Turkey's complex and conflicted political relationships with regional nations; Section III examines specific pipeline projects held back by political conflicts; Section IV conclusively analyzes the situation and offers policy suggestions for Turkey. (author)

  4. The Geopolitics of Water and Oil in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout history, few nations have been as successful in leveraging their geographic location as Turkey. As the center of two of the most powerful civilizations of all time, the Byzantine and Ottoman Empires, Turkey was the bridge between East and West, a bustling center of trade and a strategic economic and political nexus between regions of the world. In addition to its geographic power, Turkey has historically possessed substantial water resources. Unlike many water parched areas of the Middle East, Turkey's water capacity has allowed it to grow large populations and build elaborate cities. In the modern era, Turkey once again has an opportunity to regain its historical role, as the state where today's geopolitics of energy coincides with Turkey's traditional geopolitics of water. Turkey's central location, this time not between East and West, but between producers and consumers of energy, gives it a central, geopolitical role in world affairs, both in oil and gas. Moreover, Turkey's water resources can be utilized to reinforce Turkey's strategic energy role in the region, by building a strategy of cooperation with water-poor countries from the Levant to the Arabian Peninsula. Throughout history, water and energy have been among the most fundamental resources of civilization, at the very base of Maslow's hierarchy of needs essential to fostering human growth and development for thousands of years. It is seldom appreciated how linked water and energy truly are. Producing, transferring, and supplying energy requires a significant amount of water, just as the extraction, purification, and even desalination of water requires a significant amount of energy. As both energy and water grow scarcer throughout the future, nations such as Turkey can gain considerable influence as a result of their geographic locations and natural endowments. Turkey can benefit from pipeline diplomacy, taking advantage of its geographical location to make it a crossroads of multiple commodity pipeline projects. Through a series of water and energy pipelines, Turkey can gain significant political, economic, and social influence, while contributing to regional integration and stability. This paper addresses the background to Turkey's geopolitical future, with regard to both energy and water resources. It also aims to provide some suggestions as to how Turkey can take greater advantage of its geopolitical potential. Section I of the paper discusses Turkey's geopolitical potential; Section II details Turkey's complex and conflicted political relationships with regional nations; Section III examines specific pipeline projects held back by political conflicts; Section IV conclusively analyzes the situation and offers policy suggestions for Turkey. (author)

  5. Downhole water injection review of Addison Energy 6-18-59-14W5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, D. [Kudu Industries Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation outlined the natural gas production history of the Windfall 6-18-59-14W5 well which was put into production in December 1984. The last production was in 1993 after a cumulative gas production of 4.3 Bcf over nine years. The well was abandoned in 1996 and re-entered in 1998 by Addison Energy. This presentation included several schematics and a description of the downhole water injection (DHI) system which was installed in July 2000 to workover the well. By September 2002, production had peaked to 529 mcf/day. The total production to date using the DHI system has been 0.177 Bcf, and the injected water has averaged 75 bbls/day. An estimated $159,390 has been saved in water disposal costs and more than $545,833 has been earned from additional recovered gas. tabs., figs.

  6. Effect of Ultrasonication on Stability of Oil in Water Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Shyamsunder

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Effect of ultrasonic waves on stability of oil in water system of light liquid paraffin oil (HLB = 12 as internal phase and tween20 (HLB = 16.7, span20 (HLB = 8.6 as emulsifying agents was studied. A comparison was made to determine the stability of emulsions prepared by mechanical agitation method and ultrasonication technique. Droplet size measurement method was used to determine the stability of emulsions. Physico-chemical parameters like concentration of emulsifying agent, volume fraction of dispersed phase, viscosity of continuous phase by adding glycerin to water were compared apart from the effect of emulsification time on stability of emulsions prepared with mechanical stirring and ultrasound. Ocular micrometer was used to determine the droplet size of the dispersed phase.Emulsions prepared by ultrasonic technique were found to be more stable for longer duration of time when compared to emulsions prepared by mechanical agitation which can be attributed to the small droplet size which is thermodynamically stabilized.Ultrasonic technique gave more stable emulsions than with mechanical agitation method. Emulsification time, volume fraction of dispersed phase, viscosity of continuous phase and concentration of emulsifying agents played a major role in the stability of emulsions.Keywords: Liquid paraffin, Tween 20, Span 20, emulsification, ultrasound technique, volume fraction of dispersed phase

  7. Microbial community succession in a bioreactor modeling a souring low-temperature oil reservoir subjected to nitrate injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callbeck, Cameron M; Dong, Xiaoli; Chatterjee, Indranil; Agrawal, Akhil; Caffrey, Sean M; Sensen, Christoph W; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2011-08-01

    Injection of up-flow packed-bed bioreactors with excess volatile fatty acids and limiting concentrations of nitrate and sulfate gave complete reduction of nitrate from 0 to 5.5 cm and complete or near-complete reduction of sulfate from 3.2 to 11.5 cm along the bioreactor flow path. Most of the biomass (85%) and most of the genes for nitrate reduction (narG, 96%; napA, 99%) and for sulfate reduction (dsrB, 91%) were present near the inlet (0-5.5 cm) of the 37-cm-long bioreactor. Microbial community analysis by a combination of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons indicated that nitrate-reducing Arcobacter and Pseudomonas species were located from 0 to 3.2 cm and throughout, respectively. Desulfobulbus species were the main sulfate reducers present and acetotrophic methanogens of the genus Methanosaeta predominated at 20-37 cm. Overall, the results indicated a succession of microbial communities along the bioreactor flow path. In the absence of nitrate, the sulfate reduction zone moved nearer to the bioreactor inlet. The sulfide concentration in the bioreactor effluent was temporarily lowered after nitrate injection was re-started. Hence, the bioreactor sulfide output could be disrupted by pulsed, not by constant nitrate injection, as demonstrated also previously in a low-temperature oil field. PMID:21538114

  8. Experimental evaluation of desuperheating and oil cooling process through liquid injection in two-staged ammonia refrigeration systems with screw compressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the problem of achieving desuperheating through liquid injection in two-staged refrigeration systems based on screw compressors. The oil cooling process by refrigerant injection is also included. The basic thermodynamic principles of desuperheating and compressor cooling as well as short comparison with traditional method with a thermosyphon system have also been presented. Finally, the collected data referring to a big refrigeration plant are analyzed in the paper. Specific ammonia system concept applied in this refrigeration plant has demonstrated its advantages and disadvantages. - Highlights: ? An experiment was setup during a frozen food factory refrigeration system reconstruction and adaptation. ? Desuperheating and low-stage compressors oil cooling process were investigated. ? Efficiency of compression process and high-stage compressors functioning were examined. ? Evaporation temperature reduction has great influence on the need for injected liquid refrigerant. ? Several cases in which desuperheating and oil cooling process application are justified were determined.

  9. Natural oil slicks fuel surface water microbial activities in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KaiZiervogel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a series of roller tank incubations with surface seawater from the Green Canyon oil reservoir, northern Gulf of Mexico, amended with either a natural oil slick (GCS-oil or pristine oil. The goal was to test whether bacterial activities of natural surface water communities facilitate the formation of oil-rich marine snow (oil snow. Although oil snow did not form during any of our experiments, we found specific bacterial metabolic responses to the addition of GCS-oil that profoundly affected carbon cycling within our 4-days incubations. Peptidase and ?-glucosidase activities indicative of bacterial enzymatic hydrolysis of peptides and carbohydrates, respectively, were suppressed upon the addition of GCS-oil relative to the non-oil treatment, suggesting that ascending oil and gas initially inhibits bacterial metabolism in surface water. Biodegradation of physically dispersed GCS-oil components indicated by the degradation of lower molecular weight n-alkanes as well as the rapid transformation of particulate oil-carbon (C: N >40 into the DOC pool, led to the production of carbohydrate- and peptide-rich degradation byproducts and bacterial metabolites such as transparent exopolymer particles (TEP. TEP formation was highest at day 4 in the presence of GCS-oil; in contrast, TEP levels in the non-oil treatment already peaked at day 2. Cell-specific enzymatic activities closely followed TEP concentrations in the presence and absence of GCS-oil. These results demonstrate that the formation of oil slicks and activities of oil-degrading bacteria result in a temporal offset of microbial cycling of organic matter, affecting food web interactions and carbon cycling in surface waters over cold seeps.

  10. AN OVERVIEW OF THE POLYMER GEL TECHNIQUE TO IMPROVE THE EFFICIENCY OF WATER FLOODING INTO OIL RESERVOIRS (WITH INTRODUCTION OF A NEW POLYMER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Arjmand

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An important property of polymer gels is that the injected fluid in the fracture area with high permeability moves and can form a solid mass, in result of water and gas permeability because of the formation of this layer will be decreased. In gel polymer techniques first amount of the polymer solution is injected into the reservoir with a low rate, then the cross link solution such as aluminum or magnesium citrate is injected into the reservoir and gel to be figured. Therefore, improves oil recovery and reduces the percent of water production. This study concerns a light review on gel polymer process and this study introduces a new polymer with superior flooding property to water shut - off, too.

  11. Morphology of soy protein isolate at oil/water and oil/air interfaces

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Samira J., Fayad; Betina G., Zanetti-Ramos; Pedro L. M., Barreto; Valdir, Soldi; Edson, Minatti.

    1012-10-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, as propriedades emulsificantes da proteína isolada de soja (SPI) foram evidenciadas mostrando que estas macromoléculas sofrem mudanças conformacionais quando adsorvidas em interfaces. Investigou-se a conformação das cadeias proteicas ancoradas nas regiões interfaciais de emulsões de ól [...] eo em água (o/a) através de técnicas de espalhamento de raios X (SAXS) e de imagem (microscopia eletrônica de varredura (SEM)). O valor médio do raio de giro (Rg) da SPI (aq) é 20 nm e aumenta para 30 nm em emulsões o/a; as proteínas atuam como moléculas anfifílicas expondo seus núcleos hidrofóbicos ao óleo e os resíduos hidrofílicos à fase aquosa. Este valor ainda é maior após o spray drying das emulsões, na interface o/ar das respectivas microcápsulas. As paredes das microcápsulas são fractais de objetos agregados com superfícies rugosas, que são alisadas pela presença de um agente de reticulação. Abstract in english Herein, the emulsifying properties of soy protein isolate (SPI) were highlighted by showing that the macromolecules undergo conformational changes when adsorbed at interfaces. The conformation of protein chains nested at the interfacial region of oil in water (o/w) emulsions by means of X-ray scatte [...] ring (SAXS) and direct imaging (scanning electron microscopy (SEM)) techniques was investigated. The mean radius of gyration (Rg) for SPI (aq) is 20 nm and increases up to 30 nm in o/w emulsions; the proteins act as amphiphilic molecules by exposing their hydrophobic core to the oil and their hydrophilic amino acid residues to the water phase. By spray drying the emulsions, it was also possible to measure the size (Rg = 40 nm) and to evaluate the morphology of these proteins at the oil/air interface of the respective microcapsules. The walls of microcapsules are fractals of clustered objects with rough surfaces, which are smoothed by the presence of a cross-linking agent.

  12. Decontamination of water polluted with oil through the use of tanned solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of chrome shavings (CS) and buffing dusts of crust leather (BDCL) to remove oily wastes from demineralized water and natural seawater was investigated. The aim of the study was to discover environmentally friendly alternatives for the disposal of solid tannery wastes. The specific surface area of the CS and the BDCL were examined to determine ash content; chromium oxide; fat; and the pH of soluble matter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was then used to examine the structure and morphology of the samples. Three types of oil were used in the experiment: diesel motor oil; premium motor oil; and used motor oil. Sorbent materials were added to a beaker containing 1000 ml of water and 5.5 g of oil. The amount of residual oil in the water was then extracted with petroleum ether. The amount of oil sorbed on the wastes was calculated by subtracting the amount of residual oil in water from the initial mass of oil added to the beakers. Results suggested that the tanned solid wastes efficiently removed the oil from the water. It was concluded that the waste materials were able to absorb many times their weight in oil. 21 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs

  13. A comparison of water-diesel emulsion and timed injection of water into the intake manifold of a diesel engine for simultaneous control of NO and smoke emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were conducted to compare the effects of water-diesel emulsion and water injection into the intake manifold on performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a DI diesel engine under similar operating conditions. The water to diesel ratio for the emulsion was 0.4:1 by mass. The same water-diesel ratio was maintained for water injection method in order to assess both potential benefits. All tests were done at the constant speed of 1500 rpm at different outputs. The static injection timing of 23o BTDC was kept as constant for all experimental tests. In the first phase, experiments were carried out to asses the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of the engine using the water-diesel emulsion. The emulsion was prepared using the surfactant of HLB:7. The emulsion was injected using the conventional injection system during the compression stroke. The second phase of work was that water was injected into the intake manifold of the engine using an auxiliary injector during the suction stroke. An electronic control unit (ECU) was developed to control the injector operation such as start of injection and water injection duration with respect to the desired crank angle. The experimental result indicates the both methods (emulsion and injection) could reduce NO emission drastically in diesel engines. At full load, NO emission decreased drastically from 1034 ppm with base diesel to 645 ppm with emulsion and 643 ppm with injection. Bith emulsion and 643 ppm with injection. But, NO emission reduction is lesser with injection than emulsion at part loads. Smoke emission is lower with the emulsion (2.7 BSU) than with water injection (3.2 BSU) as compared to base diesel (3.6 BSU). However, CO and HC levels were higher with emulsion than water injection. As regards NO and smoke reduction, the emulsion was superior to injection at all loads. Peak pressure, ignition delay and maximum rate of pressure rise were lesser with water injection as compared to the emulsion. It is well demonstrated through this comparative study that the emulsion method has higher potential of simultaneous reduction of NO and smoke emissions at all loads than injection method.

  14. An experimental study of tracers for labelling of injection gas in oil reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of the PMCP and PMCH as tracers in field experiments. These compounds have properties which make them as well suited for well to well studies as the more common tracers CH3T and 85Kr. In an injection project carried out at the Gullfaks field in the North Sea the two PFCs verified communication between wells. This implies communication between different geological layers in the reservoir and also communication across faults within the same layers. Laboratory studies carried out have focused on the retention of the tracers in dynamic flooding experiments under conditions comparable with those in the petroleum reservoirs. Simultaneous injection of a variety of tracers has shown individual variations in tracer retention which are caused by important reservoir parameters as fluid saturation and rock properties. By proper design of field injection programs the tracers response may therefore be used to estimate fluid saturation if actual rock properties are known. 45 refs., 20 figs., 13 tabs

  15. Emission control for a glow plug direct injection CI engine using preheated coconut oil blended diesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the experimental study on the reduction of energy utilisation and thereby abiding an indirect control on the emission strategies for a CI engine. Three different methods for the control of emission were carried out and the results were compared. The first method was to improve the combustion by incorporating a copper perforated medium beneath the atomised fuel spray and thereby improve the combustion through vaporisation. The second method was to use coconut oil directly as an additive to diesel. The last method was to preheat the coconut oil blended diesel. The analysis showed that of all the coconut blends, namely, 10% to 50%, 20% blended ratio found a good place in both fuel efficiency and reduced emissions. Similarly, the preheated blends showed still drastic reductions in emissions even for higher proportions of coconut oil.

  16. Study on MELCOR Modeling for Emergency External Water Injection Scenario of SBO in APR1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, a MELCOR model for APR1400 was developed and applied to analyze a SBO scenario selected to confirm the effectiveness of the means. In this analysis, the primary and secondary emergency cooling water injection were considered. Leakage from the Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) seal and opening of the Atmosphere Dump Valve (ADV) were modeled as well to simulate the external pump injection strategy. In this study, the analysis results showed that the external injection strategy with an ADV manual opening could successfully cool down the reactor for a station blackout accident through its effective implementation. It was found that the RCP seal leakage rate is a sensitive parameter for depressurization of the RCS. In this regard, further study is needed to develop a realistic RCP seal leakage model, referring to detailed technical data

  17. Oil components modulate the skin delivery of 5-aminolevulinic acid and its ester prodrug from oil-in-water and water-in-oil nanoemulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang LW

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Li-Wen Zhang1, Saleh A Al-Suwayeh2, Chi-Feng Hung3, Chih-Chieh Chen1, Jia-You Fang1,2,41Pharmaceutics Laboratory, Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 2Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei County, Taiwan; 4Department of Cosmetic Science, Chang Gung Institute of Technology, Kweishan, Taoyuan, TaiwanAbstract: The study evaluated the potential of nanoemulsions for the topical delivery of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA and methyl ALA (mALA. The drugs were incorporated in oil-in-water (O/W and water-in-oil (W/O formulations obtained by using soybean oil or squalene as the oil phase. The droplet size, zeta potential, and environmental polarity of the nanocarriers were assessed as physicochemical properties. The O/W and W/O emulsions showed diameters of 216–256 and 18–125 nm, which, respectively, were within the range of submicron- and nano-sized dispersions. In vitro diffusion experiments using Franz-type cells and porcine skin were performed. Nude mice were used, and skin fluorescence derived from protoporphyrin IX was documented by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. The loading of ALA or mALA into the emulsions resulted in slower release across cellulose membranes. The release rate and skin flux of topical drug application were adjusted by changing the type of nanocarrier, the soybean oil O/W systems showing the highest skin permeation. This formulation increased ALA flux via porcine skin to 180 nmol/cm2/h, which was 2.6-fold that of the aqueous control. The CLSM results showed that soybean oil systems promoted mALA permeation to deeper layers of the skin from ~100 µm to ~140 µm, which would be beneficial for treating subepidermal and subcutaneous lesions. Drug permeation from W/O systems did not surpass that from the aqueous solution. An in vivo dermal irritation test indicated that the emulsions were safe for topical administration of ALA and mALA.Keywords: nanoemulsions, 5-aminolevulinic acid, methyl 5-aminolevulinic acid, skin permeation, soybean oil, squalene

  18. Water Misting and Injection of Commercial Aircraft Engines to Reduce Airport NOx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daggett, David L.; Hendricks, Robert C. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    This report provides the first high level look at system design, airplane performance, maintenance, and cost implications of using water misting and water injection technology in aircraft engines for takeoff and climb-out NOx emissions reduction. With an engine compressor inlet water misting rate of 2.2 percent water-to-air ratio, a 47 percent NOx reduction was calculated. Combustor water injection could achieve greater reductions of about 85 percent, but with some performance penalties. For the water misting system on days above 59 F, a fuel efficiency benefit of about 3.5 percent would be experienced. Reductions of up to 436 F in turbine inlet temperature were also estimated, which could lead to increased hot section life. A 0.61 db noise reduction will occur. A nominal airplane weight penalty of less than 360 lb (no water) was estimated for a 305 passenger airplane. The airplane system cost is initially estimated at $40.92 per takeoff giving an attractive NOx emissions reduction cost/benefit ratio of about $1,663/ton.

  19. About regulation of rheological parameters and preparation of emulsions with oil-water content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: During various technological processes for the use of operation in oil wells it is necessary to prepare emulsions. There is a great importance to obtaion emulsions with set theological properties. In a special laboratory installation have been studied water and oil formation and showed that the main requirements is the quantity of the asphalt-resin compounds in oil content and dispersion of water with certain limit. Oil and water samples from Balakhany Oil OGDC 3951,35081 numbered wells and commodity reservoirs were studied for ability of emulsions formations. Research works have shown that in the preperation of emulsions with necessary rheological parameters the quality of oil has of great importance and thus the main criterion should be the reduction of oil consumption to minimum

  20. Effects of crossflow velocity and transmembrane pressure on microfiltration of oil-in-water emulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Darvishzadeh, Tohid

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the issue of oil removal from water using hydrophilic porous membranes. The effective separation of oil-in-water dispersions involves high flux of water through the membrane and, at the same time, high rejection rate of the oil phase. The effects of transmembrane pressure and crossflow velocity on rejection of oil droplets and thin oil films by pores of different cross-section are investigated numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equation. We found that in the absence of crossflow, the critical transmembrane pressure, which is required for the oil droplet entry into a circular pore of a given surface hydrophilicity, agrees well with analytical predictions based on the Young-Laplace equation. With increasing crossflow velocity, the shape of the oil droplet is strongly deformed near the pore entrance and the critical pressure of permeation increases. We determined numerically the phase diagram for the droplet rejection, permeation, and breakup depending of the transmembrane pressure and...

  1. A literature review on flow-through fluorometers for monitoring oil-in-water levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive bench-scale test program was conducted to evaluate the performance 5 different Turner model fluorometers for measuring real-time oil-in-water concentrations. Fluorometers have been used for more than 2 decades to monitor dispersed oil levels of spills on water. This paper outlined specific information about how the instruments were used, including setup and calibration procedures, the dispersant and oil measured, and the concentration of oil in the water column. This paper also outlined how real-time data compares to traditional laboratory techniques. The objective of the study was to evaluate how the instruments perform when given oils of different weathered states. The study, in turn, lead to a review of the influence of an oil's chemical composition on the instrument and detection technique. It was determined that several factors in addition to an oil's chemical composition can effect the response of the fluorometers. 66 refs

  2. Production of high quality water for oil sands application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaudette-Hodsman, C.; Macleod, B. [Pall Corp., Mississauga, ON (Canada); Venkatadri, R. [Pall Corp., East Hills, NY (United States)

    2008-10-15

    This paper described a pressurized microfiltration membrane system installed at an oil sands extraction site in Alberta. The system was designed to complement a reverse osmosis (RO) system installed at the site to produce the high quality feed water required by the system's boilers. Groundwater in the region exhibited moderate total suspended solids and high alkalinity and hardness levels, and the RO system required feed water with a silt density index of 3 or less. The conventional pretreatment system used at the site was slowing down production due to the severe fouling of the RO membranes. The new microfiltration system contained an automated PVDF hollow fiber microfiltration membrane system contained in a trailer. Suspended particles and bacteria were captured within the filter, and permeate was sent to the RO unit. Within 6 hours of being installed, the unit was producing water with SDI values in the range of 1.0 to 2.5. It was concluded that the microfiltration system performed reliably regardless of wide variations in feed water quality and flow rates. 3 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  3. Experiments and network model of flow of oil-water emulsion in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Mao Illich; Carvalho, Marcio S; Alvarado, Vladimir

    2011-10-01

    Transport of emulsions in porous media is relevant to several subsurface applications. Many enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes lead to emulsion formation and as a result conformance originating in the flow of a dispersed phase may arise. In some EOR processes, emulsion is injected directly as a mobility control agent. Modeling the flow of emulsion in porous media is extremely challenging due to the complex nature of the associated flows and numerous interfaces. The descriptions based on effective viscosity are not valid when the drop size is of the same order of magnitude as the pore-throat characteristic length scale. An accurate model of emulsion flow through porous media should describe this local change in mobility. The available filtration models do not take into account the variation of the straining and capturing rates with the local capillary number. In this work, we present experiments of emulsion flow through sandstone cores of different permeability and a first step on a capillary network model that uses experimentally determined pore-level constitutive relationships between flow rate and pressure drop in constricted capillaries to obtain representative macroscopic flow behavior emerging from microscopic emulsion flow at the pore level. A parametric analysis is conducted to study the effect of the permeability and dispersed phase droplet size on the flow response to emulsion flooding in porous media. The network model predictions qualitatively describe the oil-water emulsion flow behavior observed in the experiments. PMID:22181259

  4. Rheological Study of Petroleum Fluid and Oil-in-Water Emulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Liyana Nadirah,; M.S; Abdurahman

    2014-01-01

    he rheological behavior of two types of crude oil and oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion were thoroughly studied. These rheological properties were investigated including steady flow behavior, shear stress, shear rate, and fluid flow behavior by using a Brookfield Rotational Digital Rheometer. Both of crude oils were prepared by homogenized at 10,000 rpm in 5-10 min, thermodynamically stable. The pure heavy and blend oil exhibit a Newtonian character for the temperature between 30°C...

  5. Effects of garlic oil and two of its major organosulfur compounds, diallyl disulfide and diallyl trisulfide, on intestinal damage in rats injected with endotoxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garlic and its active components are known to possess antioxidant and antiinflammatory effects. The present study investigated the effects of garlic oil and its organosulfur compounds on endotoxin-induced intestinal mucosal damage. Wistar rats received by gavage 50 or 200 mg/kg body weight garlic oil (GO), 0.5 mmol/kg body weight diallyl disulfide or diallyl trisulfide, or the vehicle (corn oil; 2 ml/kg body weight) every other day for 2 weeks before being injected with endotoxin (i.p., 5 mg/kg body weight). Control rats were administered with corn oil and were injected with sterile saline. Samples for the measurement of proinflammatory cytokines were collected 3 h after injection, and all other samples were collected 18 h after injection. The low dose of GO suppressed endotoxin-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity, ulceration, and apoptosis in the intestinal mucosa (P < 0.05). The high dose of GO significantly lowered the peripheral level of nitrate/nitrite and endotoxin-induced iNOS activity in the intestinal mucosa (P < 0.05) but worsened intestinal mucosal damage accompanied by elevated peripheral proinflammatory cytokines. Diallyl trisulfide but not diallyl disulfide showed similar toxic effect as that of high-dose GO. These results suggest the preventive effect and possible toxicity of garlic oil and its organosulfur compounds in endotoxin-induced systemic inflammation and intestinal damage

  6. Toxicity assessment of oil field produced water treated by evaporative processes to produce water to irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, V T; Andrade, B G; Costa, B R S; Pereira, O A; Dezotti, M

    2010-01-01

    During the productive life of an oil well, a high quantity of produced water is extracted together with the oil, and it may achieve up to 99% in the end of the well's economical life. Desalination is one of mankind's earliest forms of saline water treatment, and nowadays, it is still a common process used throughout the world. A single-effect mechanical vapor compression (MVC) process was tested. This paper aims to assess the potential toxicity of produced water to be re-used in irrigation. Samples of both produced and distilled water were evaluated by 84 chemical parameters. The distilled produced water presented a reduction up to 97% for the majority of the analyzed parameters, including PAHs. Toxicity bioassays were performed with distilled produced water to evaluate the growth inhibition of Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata algae, the acute toxicity to Danio rerio fish, the germination inhibition of Lactuca sativa vegetable and the severity of toxicity, as well as behavior test with Lumbricid Earthworm Eisenia fetida. The ecotoxicological assays results showed no toxicity, indicating that the referred evaporative process can produce water to be reused in irrigation. PMID:20706017

  7. Performance Characteristics and Analysis of 4-Stroke Single Cylinder Diesel Engine Blend With 50% of Honne Oil at Various Fuel Injection Pressures

    OpenAIRE

    R. Bhaskar Reddy; B. Siddeswararao

    2014-01-01

    In future demand for fossil fuels and environmental effects, a number of renewable sources of energy have been studied in worldwide. An attempt is made to apt of vegetable oil for diesel engine operation, without any change in its old construction. One of the important factors which influence the performance and emission characteristics of D.I diesel engine is fuel injection pressure. In this project honne oil has to be investigated in a constant speed, on D.I diesel engine wit...

  8. Experimental study of displacement of viscous oil in pipes by water

    OpenAIRE

    Kazemihatami, Milad

    2013-01-01

    This study is specifically concerned with the understanding of real restart procedure that is very crucial for prediction of oil-water columns displacement after un-expected shut down at water-viscous crude oil transportation. This issue gets more important for subsea pipeline which is generally located in ups and downs topology and in average cold medium. At subsea pipelines the risk of formation of oil-water columns is high and in addition the viscosity of crude oil gets higher due to heat ...

  9. Water footprint assessment of oil palm in Malaysia: A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad-Muaz, A.; Marlia, M. H.

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluates the water footprint of growing oil palm in Malaysia based on the water footprint method. The crop water use was determined using the CROPWAT 8.0 model developed by the Land and Water Development Division of FAO. The total water footprint for growing oil palm is 243 m3/ton. The result of this study showed that the green water footprint is 1.5 orders of magnitude larger compared to the blue water footprint. Besides providing updated status of total water used from the oil palm plantation, our result also shows that this baseline information helps in identifying which areas need to be conserved and what type of recommendation that should be drawn. As the results of the water footprint can differ between locations, the inclusion of local water stress index should be considered in the calculation of water footprint.

  10. Radiation-thermal purification of waster water from oil pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: During the extraction, refining and transportation of oil sewages arise, which contain oil in various concentrations depending on used technology. At present different methods for cleaning of these wastes from oil pollution are used. The radiation- thermal method is one of the effective ways of decomposition of carbohydrogens admixtures. The chain decomposition of carbohydrogens during the joint impact of radiation and heat in certain conditions was established early. On an example of individual carbohydrogens - n-heptane, hexadecane, pentadecane were shown that radiation chemical yield of decomposition can reach hundreds molecules. In this work the results of radiation-thermal decomposition of heptane admixtures in water medium are adduced. The main parameters of radiolysis changes within the bounds: temperature 20-400 degrees centigrade, absorbed dose -0-10.8 kGy on dose rate 3.6 kGy/h. The correlation of n.heptane concentration and water steam changed within [carbon5H12] [H2O]=(0.6-60)10-4. Total concentration of steam was about 1020 mol/ml. As a product of decomposition are observed hydrogen2, carbon oxide, carbonhydrogen4, carbon2hydrogen4, carbon2hydrogen6, carbon3hydrogen8, carbon3hydrogen6, carbon4hydrogen8, traces of carbohydrogens carbon5, carbon65, carbon6. The changes of n.heptane concentration in the reactor also were established. The chain regime of n.heptane decomposition in irradiated mixture was observed. The critical meaning of temperature and mixture of components are defined, on which the break of chain of process of normal n.heptane occurs. Maximal radiation-chemical yields of products are : G(hydrogen2)=19,8, G(carbon oxide)=7,3, G(carbonhydrogen4)=237,1, G(carbon2hydrogen4)=383,9, G(carbon2hydrogen6)=248,1, G(carbon3hydrogen6)=167,8, G(carbon3hydrogen8)=196,8, G(carbon4hydrogen8)=143,8 mol/100 eV. The mechanisms of proceeding radiation thermal processes in carbohydrogen-water system are discussed

  11. Water-in-oil emulsions formed when oil is spilt at sea. A literature review. ESCOST report no. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the literature on water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions formed when oil is spilt at sea. The review has three main sections: Formation of w/o emulsions, Stability of w/o emulsions and Rheology. Many aspects of emulsion formation and stabilization are poorly understood. Three mechanisms have been suggested for the emulsification process. The w/o emulsions are stabilized by asphaltenes and waxes which form a mechanical barrier around the water droplets and prevent water-water coalescence. Studies in rheology have mainly concentrated on the flow behaviour of waxy crude oils. The report uncovers a need for further studies on the determination of droplet size and distribution and the rheology of w/o emulsions. 38 refs., 2 figs

  12. Superhydrophobic cuprous oxide nanostructures on phosphor-copper meshes and their oil-water separation and oil spill cleanup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ling-Hao; Chen, Xin-Hua; Yu, Lai-Gui; Wu, Zhi-Shen; Zhang, Ping-Yu

    2015-02-01

    A simple aqueous solution-immersion process was established to fabricate highly dense ordered Cu2O nanorods on commercial phosphor-copper mesh, with which the preparation was accomplished in distilled water. The present method, with the advantages of simple operation, low cost, short reaction time, and environmental friendliness, can be well adopted to fabricate desired Cu2O nanostructures on the phosphor-copper mesh under mild conditions. After surface modification with 1-dodecanethiol, the Cu2O nanostructure obtained on the phosphor-copper mesh exhibits excellent superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity. Besides, a "mini boat" made from the as-prepared superhydrophobic phosphor-copper mesh can float freely on water surface and in situ collect oil from water surface. This demonstrates that the present approach, being facile, inexpensive, and environmentally friendly, could find promising application in oil-water separation and off shore oil spill cleanup. PMID:25590434

  13. USANS of concentrated oil-in-water emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: USANS spectra were measured on various oil-in-water (D2O) emulsions stabilised with SDS at oil concentrations from 2 to 50 vol% with the perfect crystal diffractometer at the thermal neutron beam port, BT-5, at NIST. The systems proved to be extremely strong scatterers and excellent signal:noise was obtained with short counting times. Preliminary analysis of the data yielded results consistent with expectations. The Porod limit behaves as expected with volume fraction; spectra are superimposable at wide angles (10 -3 -1) -2 ) when scaled by volume fraction, and fits to the USANS spectra in this range are broadly in agreement with average droplet sizes derived from electroacoustic measurements. The droplet size depends only weakly on preparation conditions. Some systematic effects of sample history are however readily discerned from the spectra. For example, spectra of emulsions prepared at volume fraction 0.10 differ from those prepared at 0.50 and subsequently diluted at low angles (q(1/Angstroms) -3 ). The individual spectra are consistent with either (i) a small population of large droplets coexisting with the main droplet population, or (ii) large aggregates formed by attractions between the droplets. Both lead to a high scattered intensity at the lowest angles, and to an unphysical polydispersity if fitted to a unimodal log-normal distribution. This is consistent with the behaviour of theis is consistent with the behaviour of the scattering invariant, q*, which yields low oil volume fractions, i.e. The contribution to q* from very large structures is not detected

  14. Contingency power for a small turboshaft engine by using water injection into turbine cooling air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Klann, Gary A.

    1992-01-01

    Because of one-engine-inoperative (OEI) requirements, together with hot-gas reingestion and hot-day, high-altitude take-off situations, power augmentation for multiengine rotorcraft has always been of critical interest. However, power augmentation by using overtemperature at the turbine inlet will shorten turbine life unless a method of limiting thermal and mechanical stress is found. A possible solution involves allowing the turbine inlet temperature to rise to augment power while injecting water into the turbine cooling air to limit hot-section metal temperatures. An experimental water injection device was installed in an engine and successfully tested. Although concern for unprotected subcomponents in the engine hot section prevented demonstration of the technique's maximum potential, it was still possible to demonstrate increases in power while maintaining nearly constant turbine rotor blade temperature.

  15. Contingency power for small turboshaft engines using water injection into turbine cooling air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Berger, Brett; Klann, Gary A.; Clark, David A.

    1987-01-01

    Because of one engine inoperative requirements, together with hot-gas reingestion and hot day, high altitude takeoff situations, power augmentation for multiengine rotorcraft has always been of critical interest. However, power augmentation using overtemperature at the turbine inlet will shorten turbine life unless a method of limiting thermal and mechanical stresses is found. A possible solution involves allowing the turbine inlet temperature to rise to augment power while injecting water into the turbine cooling air to limit hot-section metal temperatures. An experimental water injection device was installed in an engine and successfully tested. Although concern for unprotected subcomponents in the engine hot section prevented demonstration of the technique's maximum potential, it was still possible to demonstrate increases in power while maintaining nearly constant turbine rotor blade temperature.

  16. Effects of oil production on water resources in the Kentucky River basin, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a comprehensive study of water quality in the Kentucky River basin, Kentucky, an area of intense oil-production activity was investigated. Groundwater sampling indicated that shallow groundwater in valley alluvial areas was probably not affected by oil-production activities, that water flooding had decreased the mineral content of water in the oil-production units but not in the overlying formations, and that the character of water in a shallow bedrock formation may reflect mixing of freshwater from the overlying alluvium and mineralized water from deeper units. Surface water from oil-production basins was determined to be a sodium chloride type water, differing from the calcium bicarbonate type water generally found in basins unaffected by oil production. The average annual yields of bromide, chloride, sodium, and strontium from one oil-production basin were at least 10 times greater than from a non-production basin. The largest concentrations of chloride and bromide in the Kentucky River downstream of the oil basins typically occur in the fall of the year, as precipitation and runoff increase following the dry late-summer months. Conceptually, these large concentrations are a result of the flushing of ionic constituents from the oil-production basins that have accumulated during the dry season

  17. Water in soybean oil microemulsions as medium for electrochemical measurements

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Carla R. B., Mendonça; Clara I. D., Bica; Clarisse M. S., Piatnicki.

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Microemulsões de água em óleo de soja (w/o ME) foram preparadas com dodecil sulfato de sódio (SDS) como surfactante e com os álcoois amílico ou isoamílico, como co-surfactantes. A composição 40,0% de óleo, 43,2% de álcool, 10,8% de SDS e 6,0% de água, em massa, na razão 1:4 [SDS]:[álcool], apresento [...] u a maior estabilidade termodinâmica. O tamanho das gotículas e seu coeficiente de difusão nas microemulsões, Dw/o, foram determinados por medidas de espalhamento de luz dinâmico (DLS). As reações de oxidação de ferroceno (Fc) e de água, e a redução de ácido oleico foram observadas nas ME por voltametria em um ultramicroeletrodo (ume) de disco de Pt. Os valores de Dw/o determinados a partir de medidas eletroquímicas são menores do que os calculados a partir daquelas por DLS. Isto indica que a oxidação da água requer a difusão para o eletrodo tanto das gotículas como das moléculas de água nelas contidas. Os resultados evidenciam a possibilidade de determinação de analitos em óleos vegetais por métodos eletroanalíticos. Abstract in english Microemulsions of water in soybean oil (w/o ME) were prepared with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as surfactant and amyl or isoamyl alcohol, as co-surfactants. Microemulsions containing 40.0% oil, 43.2% alcohol, 10.8% SDS and 6.0% water in weight, in the ratio 1:4 [SDS]:[alcohol] showed the highest th [...] ermodynamic stability. The aqueous droplet size and its diffusion coefficient Dw/o in the ME were determined through dynamic light scattering (DLS). Voltammetric measurements in the ME at a Pt disk ultramicroelectrode (ume) evidenced the oxidation of both water and ferrocene (Fc), and the reduction of oleic acid. The Dw/o values calculated from the limiting current being lower than the ones obtained from DLS indicate that water oxidation probably requires diffusion towards the electrode of both the droplets and the water molecules from inside the droplets. The results show that electroanalytical determinations can be carried out in w/o ME.

  18. Antimicrobial use through feed, water, and injection in 20 swine farms in Alberta and Saskatchewan

    OpenAIRE

    Rosengren, Leigh B.; Waldner, Cheryl L.; Reid-smith, Richard J.; Harding, John C. S.; Gow, Sheryl P.; Wilkins, Wendy L.

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an emerging animal welfare and public health issue linked to antimicrobial use (AMU) in livestock. This study was conducted in 2004 on 20 swine farms in Alberta and Saskatchewan. On-farm records and questionnaires were used to retrospectively describe the antimicrobial exposures of pigs through feed, water, and injection. Antimicrobial use in all production categories was described over 12 months. On-farm records and questionnaires provided sufficient data to...

  19. Partition of selected food preservatives in fish oil-water systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Hongyuan; Friis, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The partition coefficients (Kow) of benzoic acid and sorbic acid in systems of fish oil (sand eel)–water, fish oil–buffer solution, rape oil–water and olive oil–water were experimentally determined in a temperature range from 5 to 43 °C and pH from 4.5 to 6.5 °C. The dimerization of benzoic acid in fish oil–water system was observed at 25 °C. Two modifications have been made to the Nordic Food Analysis Standard for the determination of sorbic acid by HPLC. The experimental results show that the Kow of benzoic acid and sorbic acid in fish oil–buffer system is ca. 100 times lower than that in fish oil–water system. The Kow values of benzoic acid and sorbic acid in fish oil and water system decrease with increasing system pH values. The partition coefficients of plant origin and fish origin oils are in the same order of magnitude even though their molecular structures are very different.

  20. Measurement of tritiated water transpiration from tree leaves following root injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sydney Water Board were looking for a means of assessing the efficacy and practicality of using tritiated water (HTO) for the treatment of sewer systems infested by tree roots. After discussion, it was agreed that ANSTO would assess the use of tritiated water as a means of determining the water transport function in roots. The proposed method of assessment is based upon measuring the rate at which tritiated water is moved away from the root infesting the sewer by the normal transpiration stream. The method assumes that the treatment applied to the sewer drastically reduces, if not destroys, root function. This should be reflected in a significant increase in the delay of HTO arrival at the leaves following application to the affected root. Any significant flux from the affected root would indicate inadequate treatment as water flow from the affected root would encourage subsequent re-invasion of the sewer. If deemed suitable, this tracer would in turn be used to determine the efficacy of the treatment in inhibiting root function. Constraints on the study as well as the optimal conditions for using HTO are discussed. The method which involves injection of tritium into the xylem tissue of the tree followed by collection of transpirate to observe the pattern of tritium arrival, is amenable to the task of assessing the efficiency of the treatment process if the site of infestation can be excavate without damage to the roots and if HDO can be injected and sealed with ad if HDO can be injected and sealed with a root of adequate dimensions. 2 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  1. Assessment of water injection as severe accident management using SAMPSON code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severe accident phenomena were analyzed with the SAMPSON code. The plant type calculated was a 3-loop steel-dry containment, 2440 MWt PWR. The accident scenario supposed was AE; 6-inch hot leg failure and failures of ECCS and containment spray. The power distribution at the end of cycle operation was supposed. Analyses without accident managements and in the case of water injection as the accident management were performed. The analysis results showed that the proposed water injection by restart of the RCP pump at the time when the core outlet temperature reaches 923 K is not effective to prevent core melt, because the time is after occurrence of core relocation and violent Zr-H2O reaction occurs resulting in rapid increase of fuel temperature. Then other analyses were performed with a parameter of a fuel surface temperature. The latter analysis showed that earlier water injection before the time when the fuel surface temperature reaches 1,750 K is effective to prevent further core melt. Since fuel surface and fluid temperatures have spatial distribution and depend on a period of cycle operation, further analyses are required to determine the suitable location for temperature measurement which is an index for the pump restart. (authors)

  2. Janus polymer/carbon nanotube hybrid membranes for oil/water separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jincui; Xiao, Peng; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Jiawei; Huang, Youju; Chen, Tao

    2014-09-24

    A robust and simple method is provided to fabricate Janus polymer/carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrid membranes for oil/water separation. Starting from CNT membranes formed by dispensing, hydrophobic poly(styrene) (PS) and hydrophilic poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) were grated from different sides of the photoactive CNT membranes via self-initiated photografting and photopolymerization (SIPGP) to achieve Janus polymer/CNTs hybrid membranes. The obtained membranes have excellent oil/water selectivity in the removal of oil from water. Moreover, they can effectively separate both surfactant-stabilized oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsions because of the anisotropic wettability of the membranes. PMID:25157932

  3. A simulation study on the enhancement of the shift reaction by water injection into a gasifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although coal gasification is a clean and efficient use of coal, a reduction of CO2 emissions is needed to mitigate global warming. The aim of this study was to improve the thermal efficiency of fuel production and electricity generation by dry coal feed gasification. The primary cause of thermal efficiency loss is steam use in a water-gas shift reactor. The shift reactor, installed downstream from the gasifier, uses a catalyst to adjust the H2/CO ratio of the syngas. We have proposed a new process in which water is injected at the outlet of the gasifier and is vaporized to enhance the extent of the shift reaction. This process utilizes the high temperature of the syngas, which is sufficient for the shift reaction to occur without a catalyst. We have developed a model that incorporates the shift reaction velocity to evaluate our proposed process. In an optimized 5-stage water supply case, we found that the CO conversion reaches 9.9% at a water/syngas ratio of 0.14 mol/mol (water/CO = 0.25 mol/mol); the CO conversion needed for dimethyl ether production is 31%. This new process can improve the efficiency and reduce the cost of coal gasification. -- Highlights: ? The process enhancing the shift reaction by water injection into a Gasifier was proposed. ? Five-stage water supply to prevent a rapid temperature drop is optimal. ? CO conversion reaches 9.9% at a water/syngas ratio of 0.14 mol/mol (water/CO = 0.25 mol/mol). ? Amount of steam required for the shift reactor in fuel production process can be reduced.

  4. Emission control for a glow plug direct injection CI engine using preheated coconut oil blended diesel

    OpenAIRE

    Suresh. R; Durga Prasad, B.; Muthu Raman, S.; Nibin, T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the experimental study on the reduction of energy utilisation and thereby abiding an indirect control on the emission strategies for a CI engine. Three different methods for the control of emission were carried out and the results were compared. The first method was to improve the combustion by incorporating a copper perforated medium beneath the atomised fuel spray and thereby improve the combustion through vaporisation. The second method was to use coconut oil directly ...

  5. Water washing pre-treatment on empty fruit bunches oil palm wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The water washing pre-treatment on empty fruit bunches oil palm [EFB] wastes is investigated in this study. The objective is to remove ash from EFB wastes in order to improve the quality of bio-oil and to increase bio-oil yields. It was found that the feedstock with ash content less than about 3 mf wt % is required to produce homogenous bio-oil via fast pyrolysis technology [1]. The optimum parameter of water washing pre-treatment is required to produce the feedstock with ash content approximately about 1 mf wt %. Therefore, this study is investigating the effectiveness of water washing to remove ash by using variable of water washing pre-treatments. Tap water is used through out the work as washing in tap water would have a significant economic advantage over washing in distilled water. (author)

  6. Optimal dose of injection in activation study with O-15 water and PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In activation studies with the bolus method for O-15 water and PET, the radiotracer concentration may reach the limits of the system in terms of dead time correction and accidental coincidence. To obtain the optimal injection dose of O-15 water, we performed a normal volunteer study to evaluate the relationship between the injection dose and the radioactivity concentration in the brain and a phantom study to evaluate the performance of the PET scanner (PCT3600W) under high count rate conditions and the effect of averaging on the signal to noise ratio for the PET images. A linear relationship was noted between the injected dose (normalized for each body weight: ?) and the mean radiotracer concentration in the brain measured by PET (y) (y=2.52 + 30.1 ?, n=64, r=0.87, p<0.001). The percent error in the measurement of radioactivity with PET was within ±5% in the 100 to 2000 nCi/ml (3.7-74 KBq/ml) range. Below 100 nCi/ml (3.7 KBq/ml), the percent error increased due to the rapid increase in noise in the reconstructed images. Over 1000 nCi/ml (37 KBq/ml), on the other hand, the noise was almost unchanged. With our PET scanner, the optimal range of the radiotracer concentration in the brain is below 1000 nCi/ml (37 KBq/ml), corresponding to an injection dose of 33 mCi (1.22 GBq)/60 kg body weight. With the same total dose, the increment of number of repeated measurements for averaging provided the better signal to noise ratio. In designing a paradigm for an activation PETigning a paradigm for an activation PET study, the injection dose and the number of repeated measurements for averaging should be considered. (author)

  7. Fungi isolated from produced water and water-soluble fraction of crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was sought to determine the fungi present in the produced water (PW) and water-soluble fraction (WSF) of crude oil as a preliminary approach to determining that fungi can survive in crude oil polluted water and their possible use in bioremediation. Different concentrations of PW and WSF of crude oil samples from Ughelli East Flow Station in Delta State of Nigeria were exposed to onion (Allium cepa) primordial cells at different concentrations for twelve days. Thereafter; samples of the PW and WSF were cultured on Potato Dextrose Agar. Isolates of Thamnidium sp, Gelasinospora sp, Zygorhynchu. sp and Colletotrichum sp were found. Zygorhynchus and Colletotrichum were associated with PW while thaminidium and Gelasinospora associated with the WSF. There were changes in the pH and turbidity of the PW and WSF before and after exposure to Allium cepa cells. At 25% level of treatments there were significant differences in pH and turbidity values of the PW and WSF at P 0.01 before and after exposure to the plant. (author)

  8. Antioxidant Activity of Potato Peel Extracts in a Fish-RapeseedOil Mixture and in Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin, Sabeena; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of the present work were (a) to extract the phenolic fraction from the peels of two Danish varieties of potatoes, viz. Sava and Bintje, and examine their antioxidant capacity in in-vitro systems (b) to evaluate the effect of these extracts on the storage stability of a fish- rapeseed oil mixture and oil-in-water emulsions. Multiple antioxidant activity of the potato peel extracts was evident from in-vitro systems as they showed strong reducing power, radical scavenging ability, ferrous ion chelating activity and prevented oxidation in a liposome model system. The Sava variety, which showed strong antioxidant activity in in-vitro systems, was tested in oil and oil-in- water emulsions. Ethanolic extracts of Sava (C1,600 mg/kg) prevented lipid oxidation in emulsions and in oil. Water extracts showed no antioxidant activity in oil whereas it showed pro-oxidant activity in emulsions. Thus, the results of the present study show the possibility of utilizing waste potato peel as a promising source ofnatural antioxidants for retarding lipid oxidation.

  9. Radioactivity in Oily Sludge and Produced Waste Water from Oil: Environmental Concerns and Potential Remedial Measures

    OpenAIRE

    Pillay, Avin E.; Salih, Fadhil M.; Maleek, Muthana I.

    2010-01-01

    Produced water separated from oil is usually returned to the environment and could permeate through the water table. If such water is contaminated with radioactive substances, it could create a definite threat to the water supply, especially in arid regions where ground water and overhead streams are sources of potable water. Low-level radioactive contamination of oily sludge is equally hazardous and also leads to detrimental pollution of water resources. We investigated the distribution of 2...

  10. Pure water injection into porous rock with superheated steam and salt in a solid state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montegrossi, G.; Tsypkin, G.; Calore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Most of geothermal fields require injection of fluid into the hot rock to maintain pressure and productivity. The presence of solid salt in porous space may cause an unexpected change in the characteristics of the reservoir and produced fluids, and dramatically affect the profitability of the project. We consider an injection problem of pure water into high temperature geothermal reservoir, saturated with superheated vapour and solid salt. Pure water moves away from injection point and dissolves solid salt. When salty water reaches the low-pressure hot domain, water evaporation occurs and, consequently, salt precipitates. We develop a simplified analytical model of the process and derive the similarity solutions for a 1-D semi-infinite reservoir. These solutions are multi-valued and describe the reduction in permeability and porosity due to salt precipitation at the leading boiling front. If the parameters of the system exceed critical values, then similarity solution ceases to exist. We identify this mathematical behaviour with reservoir sealing in the physical system. The TOUGH2-EWASG code has been used to verify this hypothesis and investigate the precipitate formation for an idealized bounded 1-D geothermal system of a length of 500 m with water injection at one extreme and fluid extraction at the other one. Both boundaries are kept at constant pressure and temperature. The result for the semi-infinite numerical model show that the monotonic grow of the solid salt saturation to reach asymptotic similarity solution generally occurs over a very large length starting from the injection point. Reservoir sealing occurs if solid salt at the initial state occupies a considerable part of the porous space. Numerical experiments for the bounded 500 m system demonstrate that a small amount of salt is enough to get reservoir sealing. Generally, salt tend to accumulate near the production well, and salt plug forms at the elements adjacent to the extraction point. This type of simulation studies can be applied to Hot Dry Rock systems to investigate the effects of dissolution/precipitation of solid salt, if present in the system, on the feasibility of the project.

  11. Evaluation of thermal performance in fields subjected to steam injection (SW-SAGD mode), Orinoco oil belt, Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armas, F.; Mago, R.; Franco, L.; Rodriguez, J.; Gil, E. [PDVSA EandP (Venezuela)

    2011-07-01

    The first well to operate the SW-SAGD process in the Orinoco oil belt in Venezuela was built in 2006 by Petroleos de Venezuela S.A (PDVSA). SW-SAGD is a thermal recovery process consisting in the injection of steam through a horizontal well pipe insulation. In order to follow the behavior of steam and the movement of heated fluids in such a process better, PDVSA installed a monitoring system composed of high temperature fiber optic and thermocouple type sensors. The aim of this paper is to assess the thermal behavior of reservoirs in wells under the SW-SAGD process. A pilot test has been conducted over the last 3 years. Results show an increase in production and estimations show a recovery factor twice as high as in other wells. This study demonstrated that SW-SAGD is an excellent alternative solution to stimulate reservoirs in the Orinoco oil belt and valuable information on the reservoir's thermal behavior was established.

  12. Quantifying saline groundwater seepage to surface waters in the Athabasca oil sands region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Western Canadian oil sands contain over 170 billion barrels of proven unconventional petroleum reserves currently extracted at 1.8 million barrels per day by either surface mining, or by in situ techniques that require subsurface injection of steam and hydrocarbon solvents. Natural high-salinity springs are known to add water and entrained inorganic and organic constituents to the Athabasca River and its tributaries in the region of ongoing bitumen production. However, the magnitude and synoptic distribution of these saline inputs has remained unquantified. Here, a chloride mass balance is used to estimate saline groundwater discharge to the Athabasca River from 1987 to 2010. Results show that the highest saline water discharge rate to the Athabasca River occurs between Ft. McMurray and the Peace-Athabasca Delta, supported by subcrop exposure of lower Cretaceous- and Devonian-aged formations bearing saline waters. Further, the input of saline groundwater is found to be an important control on the chemistry of the lower Athabasca River, despite comprising 10?1 to 3% of the Athabasca River’s discharge. The flux of natural saline groundwater entering the Athabasca does not appear to have increased or decreased from 1987 to 2010. The origin of seep salinity is interpreted as relict subglacial meltwater that has dissolved Devonian-aged evaporites, supported by saline Na-Cl type waters with low 18O/16O and 2H/1H rat>O and 2H/1H ratios relative to modern precipitation. The magnitude of groundwater discharge and its impact on the Athabasca River’s chemistry in the area of ongoing bitumen development warrants the incorporation of natural groundwater seepages into surface water quality monitoring networks.

  13. Biodegradation in seawater of oil components in the water-accommodated fraction (WAF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Net Environmental Benefit Analysis (NEBA) is a process of comparing advantages and disadvantages of alternative oil spill response options. This paper describes preliminary biodegradation results for water-accommodated fractions (WAFs) to be included in a model for computation of fate and behaviour of spilled oil. The Oil Spill Contingency and Response (OSCAR) model uses multi-component representation of crude oils and petroleum products to compute the fates and behaviour of oil spills. By using the OSCAR model for quantifying NEBA, SINTEF aims to develop combat strategies that reduce the overall impacts of oil spills. Data to be incorporated into the model includes WAF compound degradation rates and half-times, and corresponding data from mechanically dispersed oil and from oil deposited in seabed sediments. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  14. Dual high adhesion surface for water in air and for oil underwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Liping; Su, Junxin; Zhai, Jin; Yang, Qinglin; Jiang, Lei

    2011-10-18

    A new type of dual high surface adhesion both in an oil/water/solid system and in a water/air/solid system is reported. A walnutlike cuprous iodide (CuI) microcrystal surface, which is composed of numerous CuI nanocrystals, shows an amphiphobic, highly adhesive surface for water in air and for oil underwater. The maximum adhesive force is about 120.3 ± 1.6 ?N in the air for a water droplet and about 23.8 ± 2.1 ?N underwater for an oil droplet. These findings will help us to design novel high adhesive materials in two-phase or multiphase mediums. PMID:21879713

  15. 40 CFR 60.4340 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance for NOX if I do not use water or steam injection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...I do not use water or steam injection? 60.4340...Stationary Combustion Turbines Monitoring § 60...I do not use water or steam injection? (a) If you are not using water or steam injection to control...emission limit for the turbine, you may...

  16. The clinical application of ultrasonography-guided percutaneous transhepatic injection of iodized oil containing chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of hilar lymphatic metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the technique and the clinical effect of ultrasonography-guided percutaneous transhepatic injection of iodized oil containing chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of hepatic hilar lymphatic metastasis. Methods: Under ultrasonographic guidance,percutaneous transhepatic injection of iodized oil containing chemotherapeutic agent, so-called chemo-ablation, into the diseased lymph nodes was performed in thirteen patients with hepatic hilar lymphatic metastasis. The therapeutic results were evaluated based on the post-operative imaging examinations as well as the alleviation of the clinical symptoms. Results: Percutaneous transhepatic injection of iodized oil containing chemotherapeutic agent into the diseased lymph nodes was successfully carried out in all thirteen patients. After the procedure,the patients were followed up for a mean period of 13.5 months. The therapeutic effectiveness was 100%, while the regression rate of the lesions was 76.9%. No operation-related complications occurred. Conclusion: Percutaneous transhepatic injection of iodized oil containing chemotherapeutic agent into the diseased lymph nodes under ultrasonographic guidance is an effective and safe treatment for hepatic hilar lymphatic metastasis with reliable effectiveness. (authors)

  17. Injection Molding of Titanium Alloy Implant For Biomedical Application Using Novel Binder System Based on Palm Oil Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V has been widely used as an implant for biomedical application. In this study, the implant had been fabricated using high technology of Powder Injection Molding (PIM process due to the cost effective technique for producing small, complex and precision parts in high volume compared with conventional method through machining. Approach: Through PIM, the binder system is one of the most important criteria in order to successfully fabricate the implants. Even though, the binder system is a temporary, but failure in the selection and removal of the binder system will affect on the final properties of the sintered parts. Therefore, the binder system based on palm oil derivative which is palm stearin had been formulated and developed to replace the conventional binder system. Results: The rheological studies of the mixture between the powder and binders system had been determined properly in order to be successful during injection into injection molding machine. After molding, the binder held the particles in place. The binder system had to be removed completely through debinding step. During debinding step, solvent debinding and thermal pyrolysis had been used to remove completely of the binder system. The debound part was then sintered to give the required physical and mechanical properties. The in vitro biocompatibility also was tested using Neutral Red (NR and mouse fibroblast cell lines L-929 for the direct contact assay. Conclusion: The results showed that the properties of the final sintered parts fulfill the Standard Metal Powder Industries Federation (MPIF 35 for PIM parts except for tensile strength and elongation due to the formation of titanium carbide. The in vitro biocompatibility on the extraction using mouse fibroblast cell line L-929 by means of NR assays showed non toxic for the sintered specimen titanium alloy parts.

  18. Oil-water separation phenomenon due to corrosion cavity and scale sediments build-up in horizontal pipeline

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullahi, Nuhu

    2012-01-01

    The concurrent flow of two immiscible liquids (Oil-Water) in pipelines is usually encountered in oil production and pipeline transportation. Water is present in crude oil and separation facilities. The aim of this thesis is to investigate the effect of pipe deformations caused by corrosion cavity and scale sediments build-up on the water cut at the pipe wall. An extensive literature review survey on both experimental and numerical investigation has been performed on oil-water flows in horizon...

  19. INFLUENCE OF INJECTION TIMING ON EMISSION ANALYSIS OF A DI ENGINE RUNNING ON RUBBER SEED AND JATROPHA OIL FUELLED WITH DIESEL FUEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mahalingam

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The petroleum fuels availability and cost concerns the nonedible oils used as raw materials can be obtained from different oil crops that may be used to reduce the environmental pollution.In the development of alternative, biodegradable, and renewable fuels used forinternal combustion (IC engines to obtain the power. Therefore, in this present study, in?uence of fuel injection timing on the exhaust emission of a single cylinder, four stroke, and direct injection(DI diesel engine was considered. It has been experimentally investigated using rubber seed and jatropha seed oil blended diesel fuel from 20%(B20to 40%(B40 with an increment of 10%. The engine was tested at different loads from no load to full load conditions with diesel fuel at normal injection pressure of 220 bar and fuel injection timing of 240CA BTDC. The experimental tests were performed at 210CA BTDC injection timings by changing the thickness of advance shim. The experimental results obtained show that CO and UHC emissions were decreasedfor the proportion of B20,NOx and exhaust gas temperatureincreased with increasing amount of biodiesel concentration in the fuel mixture.

  20. Petroleum coke adsorption as a water management option for oil sands process-affected water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water is integral to both operational and environmental aspects of the oil sands industry. A water treatment option based on the use of petroleum coke (PC), a by-product of bitumen upgrading, was examined as an opportunity to reduce site oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) inventories and net raw water demand. Changes in OSPW quality when treated with PC included increments in pH levels and concentrations of vanadium, molybdenum, and sulphate. Constituents that decreased in concentration after PC adsorption included total acid-extractable organics (TAO), bicarbonate, calcium, barium, magnesium, and strontium. Changes in naphthenic acids (NAs) speciation were observed after PC adsorption. A battery of bioassays was used to measure the OSPW toxicity. The results indicated that untreated OSPW was toxic towards Vibrio fischeri and rainbow trout. However, OSPW treated with PC at appropriate dosages was not acutely toxic towards these test organisms. Removal of TAO was found to be an adsorption process, fitting the Langmuir and Langmuir–Freundlich isotherm models. For TAO concentrations of 60 mg/L, adsorption capacities ranged between 0.1 and 0.46 mg/g. This study demonstrates that freshly produced PC from fluid cokers provides an effective treatment of OSPW in terms of key constituents' removal and toxicity reduction. - Highlights: ? Treatment of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) using petroleum coke (PC) adsorption was investigated. ? PC was effective at anvestigated. ? PC was effective at adsorbing naphthenic acids with higher cyclicity. ? OSPW treated with PC at appropriate dosages was not toxic towards Vibrio fisheri and rainbow trout. ? The adsorption of organic acids fitted the Langmuir and Langmuir–Freundlich isotherm models. ? PC has the potential to be an effective adsorbent to treat OSPW either directly or as a pretreatment step.

  1. Method for resolution of oil-in-water emulsions containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of resolving oil-in-water emulsions resulting from the organic solvent extraction of uranium from aqueous acidic leach liquors which comprises treating said emulsions in accordance with the following steps: (a) adding to said emulsions a water-in-oil emulsion which contains from 2-50% by weight of a water-soluble acrylamide copolymer which contains from 5-50% by weight of a lower alkyl substituted tertiary aminoethyl methacrylate and quaternary ammonium slats therof in an amount to provide at least 20 parts per million of the acrylamide copolymer; (b) adjusting the pH of the emulsion being treated with ammonia to at least 9; (c) adding to the ammonia treated emulsion a water-soluble surfactant which is capable of inverting the water-in-oil emulsion which contains the polymer; and then (d) slowly mixing the treated oil-in-water emulsion for at least one-half hour to obtain good resolution therof

  2. Adelphi-Goddard emulsified fuel project. [using water/oil emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Thermal efficiency and particle emissions were studied using water/oil emulsions. These studies were done using number 2 and number 6 fuel oil. The number 6 oil had a sulfur content greater than one percent and experiments were conducted to remove the sulfur dioxide from the stack gases. Test findings include: (1) emulsion effected a reduction in soot at a low excess air levels; (2) a steam atomizing system will produce a water/oil emulsion. The fuel in the study was emulsified in the steam atomization process, hence, pre-emulsification did not yield a dramatic reduction in soot or an increase in thermal efficiency.

  3. Characterization of Emulsions of Fish Oil and Water by Cryo Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene SØgaard; Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt

    Addition of fish oil to industrially prepared food products is attractive to the food industry because of the well-documented health effects of the omega 3 fatty acids in the fish oil [1]. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids including omega 3 fatty acids are highly susceptible to lipid oxidation due to the many double bonds. Emulsions of fish oil in water are potential candidates for a delivery system of fish oil to food products. It has been suggested that oxidation of oil-in-water emulsions is initiated at the interface between oil and water. It has also been proposed that oxidation is to some extent dependent on the ultra structure of the emulsion; including the size of oil droplets, their distribution and the thickness of the interface between oil and water. This interface is stabilized by macromolecules such as proteins, phospholipids and hydrocolloids. The main objective of this study is to characterize fish oil in water emulsions with respect to oil droplet size, distribution, and ultimately to view the structure and thickness of the interface layer. A freeze-fractured surface viewed at low temperatures under the scanning electron microscope is a promising strategy to reveal variations in the microstructures of the emulsions. Freeze-fractured emulsions tend to break along the oil and water interface which provides direct access to the surface of the interface layer. The interface layer can be either viewed directly or water can be sublimated from the surface to reveal more of the oil droplets. A second option is to view droplets that are broken across the interface. This will display the actual interface layer, which can be seen after etching for a short period of time. We have found this method to show promising results for characterization of emulsions with oil droplet sizes ranging from 100 nm - 20 µm, various distribution of droplets and diverse amounts and types of emulsifiers. Here we present results for emulsions with different amounts of fish oil and different protein or milk phospholipid based emulsifiers. We aim to refine the technique further in order to enable us to derive a correlation between the oil/water interface thickness and microstructure and the stability against oxidation of the fish oil.

  4. Transporting of a Cell-Sized Phospholipid Vesicle Across Water/Oil Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Hase, M; Hamada, T; Yoshikawa, K; Hase, Masahiko; Yamada, Ayako; Hamada, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    When a cell-sized water droplet, with a diameter of several tens of micro meter, is placed in oil containing phospholipids, a stable cell-sized vesicle is spontaneously formed as a water-in-oil phospholipid emulsion (W/O CE) with a phospholipid monolayer. We transferred the lipid vesicle thus formed in the oil phase to the water phase across the water/oil interface by micromanipulation, which suggests that the vesicle is transformed from a phospholipid monolayer as W/O CE into a bilayer. The lipid vesicle can then be transported back into the oil phase. This novel experimental procedure may be a useful tool for creating a model cellular system, which, together with a microreactor, is applicable as a micrometer-scale biochemical reaction field.

  5. Predicting for thermodynamic instabilities in water/oil/surfactant microemulsions: A mesoscopic modelling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvail, Magali, E-mail: magali.duvail@icsm.fr; Zemb, Thomas; Dufrêche, Jean-François [Institut de Chimie Séparative de Marcoule (ICSM), UMR 5257, CEA-CNRS-Université Montpellier 2-ENSCM, Site de Marcoule, Bâtiment 426, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Arleth, Lise [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark)

    2014-04-28

    The thermodynamics and structural properties of flexible and rigid nonionic water/oil/surfactant microemulsions have been investigated using a two level-cut Gaussian random field method based on the Helfrich formalism. Ternary stability diagrams and scattering spectra have been calculated for different surfactant rigidities and spontaneous curvatures. A more important contribution of the Gaussian elastic constants compared to the bending one is observed on the ternary stability diagrams. Furthermore, influence of the spontaneous curvature of the surfactant points out a displacement of the instability domains which corresponds to the difference between the spontaneous and effective curvatures. We enlighten that a continuous transition from a connected water in oil droplets to a frustrated locally lamellar (oil in water in oil droplets) microstructure is found to occur when increasing the temperature for an oil-rich microemulsion. This continuous transition translated in a shift in the scattering functions, points out that the phase inversion phenomenon occurs by a coalescence of the water droplets.

  6. Predicting for thermodynamic instabilities in water/oil/surfactant microemulsions: A mesoscopic modelling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermodynamics and structural properties of flexible and rigid nonionic water/oil/surfactant microemulsions have been investigated using a two level-cut Gaussian random field method based on the Helfrich formalism. Ternary stability diagrams and scattering spectra have been calculated for different surfactant rigidities and spontaneous curvatures. A more important contribution of the Gaussian elastic constants compared to the bending one is observed on the ternary stability diagrams. Furthermore, influence of the spontaneous curvature of the surfactant points out a displacement of the instability domains which corresponds to the difference between the spontaneous and effective curvatures. We enlighten that a continuous transition from a connected water in oil droplets to a frustrated locally lamellar (oil in water in oil droplets) microstructure is found to occur when increasing the temperature for an oil-rich microemulsion. This continuous transition translated in a shift in the scattering functions, points out that the phase inversion phenomenon occurs by a coalescence of the water droplets

  7. Characteristics of heavy-oil-in-water emulsions containing produced sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamaluddin, A.K.M.; Bowen, C.T. (Noranda Technology Centre, Pointe-Claire, PQ (Canada)); Gillies, R.; Small, M. (Saskatchewan Research Council, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)); Nazarko, T.W. (Norcen Energy Resources Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada))

    1994-04-01

    Heavy-oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions containing produced sand were prepared using commercially available emulsifiers. The emulsions were tested in beakers for emulsion type, quality, and sand-retention characteristics. The apparent viscosities of the o/w emulsions were measured. The effects of polymer addition on the apparent viscosity and sand-carrying capability of the emulsions were also studied. The results of the beaker tests indicate that most emulsifier solutions water-wet the beaker wall and temporarily improve heavy-oil flow characteristics. However, most of the chemicals also water-wet the sand particles and cause sand dropout. Oil-in-water dispersions drop sand more readily than slug type emulsions. The Flothin F2 chemical alone showed stable oil dispersion and, in combination with the Flocon 4800C polymer, showed very good sand-retention, viscosity-reduction, and stable oil-dispersion characteristics. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Phase fraction distribution measurement of oil–water flow using a capacitance wire-mesh sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a novel wire-mesh sensor based on permittivity (capacitance) measurements is applied to generate images of the phase fraction distribution and investigate the flow of viscous oil and water in a horizontal pipe. Phase fraction values were calculated from the raw data delivered by the wire-mesh sensor using different mixture permittivity models. Furthermore, these data were validated against quick-closing valve measurements. Investigated flow patterns were dispersion of oil in water (Do/w) and dispersion of oil in water and water in oil (Do/w and w/o). The Maxwell–Garnett mixing model is better suited for Dw/o and the logarithmic model for Do/w and w/o flow pattern. Images of the time-averaged cross-sectional oil fraction distribution along with axial slice images were used to visualize and disclose some details of the flow

  9. Antibacterial polyphenols from olive oil mill waste waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, R; Evidente, A; Schivo, L; Orru, G; Marcialis, M A; Cristinzio, G

    1995-10-01

    Olive oil vegetation waters (VW) were highly toxic to both phytopathogenic Pseudomonas syringae (Smith, Yung et al.) pv. savastanoi (Gram-negative) and Corynebacterium michiganense (Gram-positive) and showed bactericidal activity in their original concentration (in raw form). Among the main polyphenols, present in the waste waters, methylcatechol proved to be the most toxic to Ps. savastanoi at 10(-4) mol l-1, and also demonstrated bactericidal activity, while on Coryne. michiganense it was only slightly active; catechol and hydroxytyrosol were less active on Ps. savastanoi, but inactive on Coryne. michiganense; tyrosol and its synthetic isomers 1,2- and 1,3-tyrosol were completely inactive on both bacteria. Among the derivatives of VW polyphenols considered, acetylcatechol and guaiacol were selectively toxic for Ps. savastanoi, while o-quinone was strongly toxic for both bacteria. The minor carboxylic polyphenols of VW at 10(-4) mol l-1 were all inactive on the bacteria. VW, catechol, 4-methylcatechol and the less abundant carboxylic polyphenols proved to be toxic on Hep2 human cells. Finally the possibility of using the active polyphenols in agriculture in an integrated pest management program for the protection of the olive plant is discussed. PMID:7592132

  10. Water, oil, climate: a dried-up broken down world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate crisis, oil crisis, water crisis, food crisis: the 21. century has started badly. Climate is deteriorating under man's action and natural resources are drying up while demand is still on the rise under the double effect of demographic and economic growth. Even worse, tensions are working together and worsen each other in a climate of financial crisis. All warning lights are on the red and a huge challenge has been launched which involves all countries, developed and developing. Solutions are urgently needed, otherwise our civilization would be threatened. The reasoned use of technologies, but also the abatement of poverty and inequalities and the education of people are essential points to take up the challenge. The authors examine the interconnections between energy, water, food at the time of climate change and explore the possible alternative solutions. The lesson that should be learnt from their analysis is that everyone should contribute to the complex decisions that will have an impact on the future of humanity. (J.S.)

  11. Development of a Fully Automated Flow Injection Analyzer Implementing Bioluminescent Biosensors for Water Toxicity Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantinos Georgiou

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of an automated Flow Injection analyzer for water toxicity assessment. The analyzer is validated by assessing the toxicity of heavy metal (Pb2+, Hg2+ and Cu2+ solutions. One hundred ?L of a Vibrio fischeri suspension are injected in a carrier solution containing different heavy metal concentrations. Biosensor cells are mixed with the toxic carrier solution in the mixing coil on the way to the detector. Response registered is % inhibition of biosensor bioluminescence due to heavy metal toxicity in comparison to that resulting by injecting the Vibrio fischeri suspension in deionised water. Carrier solutions of mercury showed higher toxicity than the other heavy metals, whereas all metals show concentration related levels of toxicity. The biosensor’s response to carrier solutions of different pHs was tested. Vibrio fischeri’s bioluminescence is promoted in the pH 5–10 range. Experiments indicate that the whole cell biosensor, as applied in the automated fluidic system, responds to various toxic solutions.

  12. Magnetic, durable, and superhydrophobic polyurethane@Fe3O4@SiO2@fluoropolymer sponges for selective oil absorption and oil/water separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Li, Lingxiao; Li, Bucheng; Zhang, Junping; Wang, Aiqin

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic, durable, and superhydrophobic polyurethane (PU) sponges were fabricated by chemical v