WorldWideScience

Sample records for vlf emissions observed

  1. Characteristics of ELF/VLF drifting emissions observed at low latitude station Varanasi during geomagnetic substorms

    If the frequency within a set of periodic emissions changes significantly, the set is called drifting emissions. In this paper, characteristics of drifting ELF/VLF emissions are examined based on the ELF/VLF data recorded at low latitudes ground station Varanasi (geom. lat. 140 55/ N, long. 1540 E, L=1.07) during the period Jan., 1990 to Dec., 1990. Total seven strong events of drifting ELF/VLF emissions have been observed on 28-29 April, 1990 at pre-midnight sector out of which 3 events were analyzed in detail. The observed ELF/VLF emissions exhibit a regular frequency drifts, increasing as well as decreasing drift. The ELF/VLF emissions observed are mainly periodic emissions of rising and falling tone chorus. These emissions were observed during a geomagnetic storm period, when minimum Dst-index was -98 nT and KP-index ≥ 5. The repetition period, sweep rate and the frequency drift rate have been evaluated for all events. We have also computed the spectral power density, location of plasmapause, maximum intensity and maximum frequency attained. The generation mechanism of these drifting ELF/VLF emissions is explained in terms of a quasi-linear electron synchrotron instability model for wave excitation. The frequency drift in these emissions have been interpreted in terms of a combined effect of L-shell drift of energetic electrons and the change in convections electric field during the substorm developments. The computed maximum spectral power density of the wave varies between 1.8 x 10-21 to 4.08 x 10-22 Gauss2/Hz. The computed frequency drift rates of these drifting emissions are found in good agreement with that of experimentally observed values.

  2. Numerical simulation of whistler-triggered VLF emissions observed in Antarctica

    Nunn, D.; Smith, A. J.

    1996-03-01

    The British Antarctic Survey VLF database from Halley (L=4.3) and Faraday (L=2.3) stations, Antarctica, has been searched for clear examples of whistler-triggered emissions (WTEs). Dominant events were the triggering of risers or quasi-constant frequency emissions from the upper arm of a whistler. A fairly frequent occurrence was the triggering of steep fallers from the whistler upper arm. At Faraday most WTE events were the triggering of long steep risers from the lower whistler arm. A VHS/VLF Vlasov hybrid simulation code was run and successfully simulated the main categories of WTE: risers and fallers off the upper arm and risers from the lower arm. Agreement with observations was generally very good, although in the case of triggered fallers and risers from the lower arm, very high frequency sweep rates were not obtained. The Vlasov code is highly efficient and well suited to this problem.

  3. Numerical simulation of whistler-triggered VLF emissions observed in Antartica

    Nunn, D. [Southhampton Univ., Southhampton (United Kingdom); Smith, A.J. [British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    1996-03-01

    The authors have extracted from VLF databases from British Antarctica Survey data taken at Halley and Faraday stations, examples of whistler-triggered emissions (WTE). The WTE are relatively narrow band emissions triggered by natural background whistlers undergoing nonlinear wave particle interactions generally in the equatorial regions. They occur with either rising or falling frequency relative to the triggering waves. Using a Vlasov type code the authors are able to simulate the types of emissions which are observed. 24 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Features of discrete VLF emissions observed at Gulmarg, India during the magnetic storm of 6–7 March, 1986

    R Singh; A K Singh; D Siingh; R P Singh

    2007-12-01

    During the analysis of archived VLF data from Indian low latitude ground stations, some discrete VLF emissions recorded at the low latitude ground station Gulmarg (geomagnetic latitude 24°26′N; geomagnetic longitude 147° 09′E, L = 1.28) during moderate magnetic storm activity ( $K^{−}_{P}$} = 32, index varies from 4 to 6 during the observation period) on 6/7 March, 1986 are presented in this paper. The dynamic spectra of these discrete VLF emissions were observed along with tweeks and its harmonics, which is interesting and complex to explain. In most of the events the harmonic frequency of tweeks correlates with the starting frequency of harmonics of discrete emissions. In order to explain the observed features of discrete VLF emissions, we propose cyclotron resonance interaction between whistler mode wave and energetic electrons of inner radiation belt as possible generation mechanism. An attempt is also made to determine parallel energy, anisotropy and wave growth relevant to the generation process of VLF emissions.

  5. VLF wave emissions by pulsed and dc electron beams in space. I - Spacelab 2 observations

    Reeves, G. D.; Banks, P. M.; Neubert, T.; Bush, R. I.; Williamson, P. R.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of radio waves generated by electron beams in space were investigated using data from the wideband wave receiver on the Spacelab 2. The VLF observations were found to confirm the results of the STS 3/OSS-1 mission. It was found that a 1-keV electron beam injected from the orbiter produced copious broadband electromagnetic emissions. When the electron beam was square-wave modulated, narrow-band emissions at the pulsing frequency and harmonics of that frequency were produced along with the broadband emissions. The observations indicated that dc 50-mA electron beams and pulsed 50-percent duty-cycle 100-mA beams produce broadband radiation which is comparable in intensity and spectral shape at all points for which the wave field was sampled.

  6. Quasi-periodic VLF emissions observed during daytime at a low latitude Indian ground station Jammu

    K K Singh; J Singh; R P Patel; A K Singh; R P Singh; Rejesh Singh; P A Ganai

    2009-06-01

    This paper reports quasi-periodic pulsing hiss emissions recorded during daytime in the frequency range of 50 Hz –15 kHz at low latitude station Jammu (geomag.lat.=22° 26′N; =1.17). It is noted that pulsing VLF emissions are a rare phenomena at low latitudes.The various spectrograms of pulsing VLF hiss emissions presented in this paper clearly show band limited spectrums regularly pulsing with almost equal period of the order of few seconds in the frequency range of ∼3-8 kHz. Generation and propagation mechanism of these emissions are briefly discussed.

  7. Auroral pulsations and accompanying VLF emissions

    V. R. Tagirov

    Full Text Available Results of simultaneous TV observations of pulsating auroral patches and ELF-VLF-emissions in the morning sector carried out in Sodankylä (Finland on February 15, 1991 are presented. Auroral pulsating activity was typical having pulsating patches with characteristic periods of about 7 s. Narrow-band hiss emissions and chorus elements at intervals of 0.3–0.4 s formed the main ELF-VLF activity in the frequency range 1.0–2.5 kHz at the same time. The analysis of auroral images with time resolution of 0.04 s allowed perfectly separate analysis of spatial and temporal variations in the auroral luminosity. Mutual correspondence between the behaviour of the luminous auroral patches and the appearance of ELF noise type hiss emissions and VLF chorus trains was found in two intervals chosen for analysis. While the hiss emissions were associated with the appearance of luminosity inside a limited area close to the zenith, the structured VLF emissions were accompanied by rapid motion of luminosity inside the area. The spatial dimension of the pulsating area was about 45–50 km and luminosity propagated inside it with velocity of about 10–12 kms. We discuss a new approach to explain the 5–15 s auroral pulsation based on the theory of flowing cyclotron maser and relaxation characteristics of ionosphere.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions · Space plasma physics (wave-particle interactions

  8. Propagation properties of quasiperiodic VLF emissions observed by the DEMETER spacecraft

    Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Němec, František; Santolík, Ondřej; Parrot, Michel

    2016-02-01

    Quasiperiodic (QP) emissions are electromagnetic waves in the frequency range of about 0.5-4 kHz observed in the inner magnetosphere that exhibit a periodic time modulation of the wave intensity, with modulation periods from a few seconds up to 10 min. We present results of a detailed wave analysis of nearly 200 events measured by the low-altitude Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) spacecraft. Upper frequency range of studied emissions was limited to 1 kHz due to the sampling rate of the analyzed data. It is found that QP emissions propagate nearly field aligned at larger geomagnetic latitudes; they become more oblique at midlatitudes and eventually perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field at the geomagnetic equator and thus perpendicular to the Earth's surface, allowing their downward propagation through the ionosphere. The observed propagation pattern is consistent with the source of emissions located in the equatorial region at larger radial distances.

  9. Identification of the source of quasiperiodic VLF emissions using ground-based and Van Allen Probes satellite observations

    Titova, E. E.; Kozelov, B. V.; Demekhov, A. G.; Manninen, J.; Santolík, Ondřej; Kletzing, C. A.; Reeves, G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 15 (2015), s. 6137-6145. ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/2280 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : energetic electrons * quasiperiodic emissions * Van Allen Probes * VLF waves Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 4.456, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015GL064911/full

  10. Investigation of propagation properties of quasi-periodic (QP) VLF emissions observed by the DEMETER spacecraft.

    Hayosh, M.; Santolik, O.; Nemec, F.; Parrot, M.; Hanzelka, M.

    2015-12-01

    Quasi-periodic (QP) emissions are whistler mode electromagnetic waves which are observed in the inner magnetosphere, either inside the plasmasphere or near the plasmapause. They exhibit a periodic time modulation of the wave intensity with the modulation periods from several seconds to minutes. The analysis of wave propagation properties of nearly 200 QP events measured by the low-altitude DEMETER spacecraft (altitude 700 km) shows that QP emissions generally propagate nearly field-aligned at larger geomagnetic latitudes (> 55 degrees) and they become more oblique at mid-latitudes (latitudes of 45 degrees). However, we have observed several QP events with unexpected variations of both wave and Poynting vectors directions over a short time/spatial interval at larger latitudes. These seem to contradict the general statistical results. We perform a detailed analysis of three such events. All these events were observed during quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp < 2). A ray-tracing calculation is used to determine the wave paths and the locations of the generation regions. We also discuss the influence of the plasmapause on the wave propagation.

  11. Simultaneous observations of quasi-periodic ELF/VLF wave emissions and electron precipitation by DEMETER satellite: A case study

    Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Pasmanik, D. L.; Demekhov, A. G.; Santolík, Ondřej; Parrot, M.; Titova, E. E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 7 (2013), s. 4523-4533. ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/2280; GA MŠk LH12231 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : quasi-periodic ELF/VLF emissions in the magnetosphere * wave-particle interactions * demeter spacecraft measurements * whistler-mode waves Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jgra.50179/abstract

  12. Propagation properties of quasiperiodic VLF emissions observed by the DEMETER spacecraft

    Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Němec, F.; Santolík, Ondřej; Parrot, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 3 (2016), s. 1007-1014. ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/2280; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31899S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH15304 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : quasiperiodic emissions * wave propagation in ionosphere * DEMETER spacecraft http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015GL067373/pdf

  13. Bispectrum Analysis of Non-linear wave-wave Interaction between VLF Transmitter signal and ELF emission on the Basis of DEMETER satellite observations

    Sondhiya, Deepak Kumar; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Kasde, Satish Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Symmetric sidebands are observed in the ionosphere by the DEMETER (Detection of Electromagnetic Radiation Transmitted through Earthquake Region) satellite, when it passes above the Indian VLF transmitter, named VTX (18.2 kHz), located near Kanyakumari, India. The spectral boarding phenomena may be divided into two types: (1) spectrally broadened components occurring without any association with ELF/VLF emissions under disturbed ionospheric condition, (2) Spectrally broadened components with predominant side band structure in association with ELF emission. Generally spectral analysis at second order (Power spectrum) is used to analyze the frequency component of signal, but it losses the phase information among the different Fourier components. To retain this information the bispectrum (third order) and/or the bicoherence (normalized bispectrum) are used. Results suggest a non-linear mode coupling between the transmitter signal and ELF emission which produces sidebands that are quasi-electrostatic in nature. However, faint spectral broadened components in both types 1 and 2 may be connected with Doppler shift of quasi-electrostatic, whistler mode waves with a broad spectrum near resonance cone, due to scattering of the transmitter signals from ionospheric irregularities in the F-region. Keywords: spectral boarding, wave-wave Interaction, whistler mode waves and Doppler shift

  14. Magnetosphere VLF observation by satellite ISIS

    On the basis of the VLF (50 Hz -- 30 kHz) electric field data from the satellite ISIS, the following works carried out in The Radio Research Laboratories are described: deuteron whistler and whistler duct, detection of plasmapause by LHR hiss, and the origin of 5 kHz hiss at low/middle latitudes. The deuteron whistlers are observable distinctly only at low latitude because of gyro-frequency and the frequency resolution of spectral analyzers. Whistler echo occurs when a whistler moves back and forth through a duct along the line of magnetic force, so it is considered that the ISIS satellite crosses the duct. The variation in ion composition around plasmapause obtained through LHR hiss is explainable by the plasamapause position and the magnetic storm effect on the plasamapause. Concerning the narrow band hiss of 5 kHz +- 1.0 kHz frequently observed on the ground at low/middle latitudes, it may occur around plasmapause, propagate through the ionosphere and then to the ground in waveguide mode, or otherwise, it may occur above the ionosphere and then propagate directly to the ground penetrating through the ionosphere. (J.P.N.)

  15. Similar behaviors of natural ELF/VLF ionospheric emissions and transmitter signals over seismic Adriatic regions

    M. Y. Boudjada

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the analysis of ELF/VLF emissions observed by the Instrument Champ Electrique (ICE experiment onboard the DEMETER micro-satellite. We consider principally selected seismic events reported by Molchanov et al. (2006. These authors studied the VLF signals radiated by ground transmitters and received on board the DEMETER micro-satellite. They revealed a drop of the signals (scattering spot connected with the occurrence of large earthquakes. In our investigations, we proceed to a spectral analysis of ICE observations with the aim to find if the natural ionospheric VLF/ELF emissions show, or not, a similar ''drop'' in the intensity as it is the case of the VLF transmitter signal. We combine our results with those of Molchanov et al. (2006, and we discuss the origin of such interesting ionospheric features in the frame of the investigation of the pre-seismic electromagnetic emissions. We show that the geomagnetic activity is a key parameter which could disturb the natural VLF ionospheric emissions, and also the transmitter signal. We find that it is not possible to conclude the presence, or not, of a preseismic effect when the Kp-index is higher than one.

  16. Perturbations of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling by powerful VLF emissions from ground-based transmitters

    The characteristics of the plasma-wave disturbances stimulated in the near-Earth plasma by powerful VLF radiation from ground-based transmitters are investigated. Radio communication VLF transmitters of about 1 MW in power are shown to produce artificial plasma-wave channels (density ducts) in the near-Earth space that originate in the lower ionosphere above the disturbing emission source and extend through the entire ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth along the magnetic field lines. Measurements with the onboard equipment of the DEMETER satellite have revealed that under the action of emission from the NWC transmitter, which is one of the most powerful VLF radio transmitters, the generation of quasi-electrostatic (plasma) waves is observed on most of the satellite trajectory along the disturbed magnetic flux tube. This may probably be indicative of stimulated emission of a magnetospheric maser.

  17. Perturbations of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling by powerful VLF emissions from ground-based transmitters

    Belov, A. S., E-mail: alexis-belov@yandex.ru; Markov, G. A.; Ryabov, A. O. [Lobachevsky Nizhni Novgorod State University (Russian Federation); Parrot, M. [Environment Physics and Chemistry Laboratory (France)

    2012-12-15

    The characteristics of the plasma-wave disturbances stimulated in the near-Earth plasma by powerful VLF radiation from ground-based transmitters are investigated. Radio communication VLF transmitters of about 1 MW in power are shown to produce artificial plasma-wave channels (density ducts) in the near-Earth space that originate in the lower ionosphere above the disturbing emission source and extend through the entire ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth along the magnetic field lines. Measurements with the onboard equipment of the DEMETER satellite have revealed that under the action of emission from the NWC transmitter, which is one of the most powerful VLF radio transmitters, the generation of quasi-electrostatic (plasma) waves is observed on most of the satellite trajectory along the disturbed magnetic flux tube. This may probably be indicative of stimulated emission of a magnetospheric maser.

  18. Prediction Capabilities of VLF/LF Emission as the Main Precursor of Earthquake

    Kachakhidze, Manana

    2013-01-01

    Recent satellite and ground-based observations proved that in earthquake preparation period in the seismogenic area we have VLF/LF and ULF electromagnetic emissions. According to the opinion of the authors of the present paper this phenomenon is more universal and reliable than other earthquake indicators. Hypothetically, in case of availability of adequate methodological grounds, in the nearest future, earth VLF/LF electromagnetic emission might be declared as the main precursor of earthquake. In particular, permanent monitoring of frequency spectrum of earth electromagnetic emission generated in the earthquake preparation period might turn out very useful with the view of prediction of large (M 5) inland earthquakes. The present paper offers a scheme of the methodology according to which the reality of the above given hypothesis can be checked up. To prove the prediction capabilities of earth electromagnetic emission we have used avalanche-like unstable model of fault formation and an analogous model of ele...

  19. ELF/VLF wave propagation at subauroral latitudes: Conjugate observation between the ground and Van Allen Probes A

    Martinez-Calderon, Claudia; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Keika, Kunihiro; Ozaki, Mitsunori; Schofield, Ian; Connors, Martin; Kletzing, Craig; Hanzelka, Miroslav; Santolik, Ondrej; Kurth, William S.

    2016-06-01

    We report simultaneous observation of ELF/VLF emissions, showing similar spectral and frequency features, between a VLF receiver at Athabasca (ATH), Canada, (L = 4.3) and Van Allen Probes A (Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) A). Using a statistical database from 1 November 2012 to 31 October 2013, we compared a total of 347 emissions observed on the ground with observations made by RBSP in the magnetosphere. On 25 February 2013, from 12:46 to 13:39 UT in the dawn sector (04-06 magnetic local time (MLT)), we observed a quasiperiodic (QP) emission centered at 4 kHz, and an accompanying short pulse lasting less than a second at 4.8 kHz in the dawn sector (04-06 MLT). RBSP A wave data showed both emissions as right-hand polarized with their Poynting vector earthward to the Northern Hemisphere. Using cross-correlation analysis, we did, for the first time, time delay analysis of a conjugate ELF/VLF event between ground and space, finding +2 to +4 s (ATH first) for the QP and -3 s (RBSP A first) for the pulse. Using backward tracing from ATH to the geomagnetic equator and forward tracing from the equator to RBSP A, based on plasmaspheric density observed by the spacecraft, we validate a possible propagation path for the QP emission which is consistent with the observed time delay.

  20. Case studies of quasi-periodic VLF emissions and related ULF fluctuations of the magnetic field

    Hayosh, M.; Santolik, O.; Nemec, F.; Parrot, M.

    2014-12-01

    Quasi-periodic (QP) VLF emissions are observed in the inner magnetosphere mostly on the day-side. These waves exhibit a periodic time modulation of the wave intensity that is possibly a result of the whistler-mode wave growth being periodically modulated by compressional ULF magnetic field pulsations. We have analyzed 50 QP events measured by the DEMETER satellite at altitudes of about 700 km to verify their generation mechanism. The analyzed events have a modulation period between 15 s and 80 s, and they were observed during quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp 30 keV) were observed by DEMETER and by the NOAA-17 satellite. We analyze possible links between these electrons, QP emissions, and ULF magnetic field pulsations.

  1. Observations of ionospheric ELF and VLF wave generation by excitation of the thermal cubic nonlinearity.

    Moore, R C; Fujimaru, S; Kotovsky, D A; Gołkowski, M

    2013-12-01

    Extremely-low-frequency (ELF, 3-3000 Hz) and very-low-frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) waves generated by the excitation of the thermal cubic nonlinearity are observed for the first time at the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program high-frequency transmitter in Gakona, Alaska. The observed ELF and VLF field amplitudes are the strongest generated by any high frequency (HF, 3-30 MHz) heating facility using this mechanism to date. This manner of ELF and VLF generation is independent of naturally forming currents, such as the auroral electrojet current system. Time-of-arrival analysis applied to experimental observations shows that the thermal cubic ELF and VLF source region is located within the collisional D-region ionosphere. Observations are compared with the predictions of a theoretical HF heating model using perturbation theory. For the experiments performed, two X-mode HF waves were transmitted at frequencies ω1 and ω2, with |ω2-2ω1| being in the ELF and VLF frequency range. In contrast with previous work, we determine that the ELF and VLF source is dominantly produced by the interaction between collision frequency oscillations at frequency ω2-ω1 and the polarization current density associated with the lower frequency HF wave at frequency ω1. This specific interaction has been neglected in past cubic thermal nonlinearity work, and it plays a major role in the generation of ELF and VLF waves. PMID:24476285

  2. Subionospheric VLF signatures and their association with sprites observed during EuroSprite 2003

    Mika, A.; Haldoupis, C.; Marshall, R.A.;

    2005-01-01

    In this study, VLF observations during EuroSprite-2003 are analyzed in connection with many sprites observed above thunderstorms in central France. The sprites were detected with a sensitive camera from the Observatoire du Pic du Midi in the Pyrenees overlooking storms monitored by the French...... national lightning detection network. The VLF observations were made in Crete, Greece with a narrowband receiver, and in Nancay, France with a broadband receiver. The storms were in the vicinity of a VLF transmitter (HWV) at Le Blanc, France, whose signal was received on Crete, arriving over a great circle...... path that cut through the storms to the southeast. The Nancay broadband receiver was located near HWV to the northeast of the transmitter. This setup provided a unique observational set for investigation. The receiver in Crete observed early VLF perturbations in nearly one-to-one association...

  3. A study of early/slow VLF perturbations observed at Agra, India

    Pandey, Uma; Singh, Ashutosh K.; Singh, Om P.; Singh, Birbal; Saraswat, Vibhav K.

    2016-06-01

    We present here the results of sub-ionospheric VLF perturbations observed on NWC (19.8 kHz) transmitter signal propagating in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, monitored at our low latitude station Agra. During the period of observation (June-December 2011), we found 89 cases of VLF perturbation, while only 73 cases showing early character associated with strong lightning discharges. Out of 73 events, 64 (~84%) of the early VLF perturbations are found to be early/slow in nature; the remaining 9 events are early/fast. The onset duration of these early/slow VLF perturbations is up to ~ 5 s. A total of 54 observed early events show amplitude change lying between ± 3.0 dB, and phase change ± 12 degree, respectively, and found to occur mainly during nighttime. One of the interesting results we found is that the events with larger recovery time lie far away from the VLF propagation path, while events with smaller duration of recovery are within the ± 50-100 km of signal path. The World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) data is analysed to find the location of causative lightning and temporal variation. The lightning discharge and associated processes that lead to early VLF events are discussed.

  4. Statistical correlation of spectral broadening in VLF transmitter signal and low-frequency ionospheric turbulence from observation on DEMETER satellite

    A. Rozhnoi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In our earlier papers we have found the effect of VLF transmitter signal depression over epicenters of the large earthquakes from observation on the French DEMETER satellite that can be considered as new method of global diagnostics of seismic influence on the ionosphere. At present paper we investigate a possibility VLF signal-ionospheric turbulence interaction using additional characteristic of VLF signal-spectrum broadening. This characteristic is important for estimation of the interaction type: linear or nonlinear scattering. Our main results are the following:
    – There are two zones of increased spectrum broadening, which are centered near magnetic latitudes Φ=±10° and Φ=±40°. Basing on the previous case study research and ground ionosonde registrations, probably it is evidence of nonlinear (active scattering of VLF signal on the ionospheric turbulence. However occurrence rate of spectrum broadening in the middle-latitude area is higher than in the near-equatorial zone (~15–20% in comparison with ~100% in former area that is probably coincides with the rate of ionospheric turbulence.
    – From two years statistics of observation in the selected 3 low-latitude regions and 1 middle-latitude region inside reception area of VLF signal from NWC transmitter we find a correlation of spectrum broadening neither with ion-cyclotron noise (f=150–500 Hz, which possibly means poor representation of the turbulence by the noise due to its mixture with natural ELF emission (which correlates with whistler, nor with magnetic storm activity.
    – We find rather evident correlation of ion-cyclotron frequency noise, VLF signal depression and weak correlation of spectrum broadening with seismicity in the middle-latitude region over Japan. But in the low-latitude regions we do not find such a correlation. Statistical decrease of VLF signal supports our previous case study results. However rather weak spectrum broadening

  5. Simulation of VLF chorus emissions in the magnetosphere and comparison with THEMIS spacecraft data

    Demekhov, A.; Taubenschuss, U.; Santolík, Ondřej

    Prague: International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2015. IUGG-0723. [Earth and Environmental Sciences for Future Generations. General Assembly of International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics /26./. 22.06.2015-02.07.2015, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : VLF chorus emissions * magnetosphere Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://www.iugg2015prague.com/abstractcd/data/HtmlApp/main.html#

  6. Ionospheric plasma Turbulence detection in the VLF data observed by DEMETER Satellite

    Sondhiya, Deepak Kumar; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Sushil

    2016-07-01

    The electromagnetic wave data in the Very Low Frequency (VLF) range detected by DEMETER satellite has been analyzed, with special attention to the variation in spectral characteristics and non-linear effects, using the statistical and wavelet based techniques.The enhancement in statistical parameters shows the coherent structure and intermittent phenomenon which is the signature of turbulence. The characteristics features of VLF disturbances have further been studied using the wavelet and bispectral analysis tools which provide useful information on the plasma turbulence.A more interesting result emerges when the low-frequency turbulence emissions produce turbulence in VLF range. Finally, the relevance of the various turbulence mechanisms and their importance in ionospheric turbulence is discussed. Keywords:DEMETER, Earthquake, Phenomena of Intermittence, Coherent Structure.

  7. Ionospheric effects of the Mt. Kirishima volcanic eruption as seen from subionospheric VLF observations

    Rozhnoi, A.; Hayakawa, M.; Solovieva, M.; Hobara, Y.; Fedun, V.

    2014-01-01

    Data from the Pacific network of VLF receivers have been used to study the response of the lower ionosphere to the January 2011 Mt. Kirishima (South Japan) volcanic eruption. A major explosive eruption occurred on January 27, which was preceded by several small eruptions. Perturbations of nighttime subionospheric VLF signals have been detected on the day of the first small eruption on January 18 (UT) with the maximum observed about 1.5 h after the eruption. The nighttime signal remained disturbed during the subsequent pre-eruptive and eruptive activity of Mt. Kirishima. The daytime perturbations were not observed. The frequency of the maximum spectral amplitude was found to be in the range of periods of 6-30 min, which corresponds to the periods of internal gravity waves. These results suggest that the observed VLF ionospheric effects can possibly be produced by the penetration of gravity waves caused by the volcanic activity into the ionosphere.

  8. Statistical investigation of VLF quasiperiodic emissions measured by the DEMETER spacecraft

    Hayosh, M.; Němec, F.; Santolík, O.; Parrot, M.

    2014-10-01

    We present a survey of quasiperiodic (QP) ELF/VLF emissions detected onboard the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) satellite (altitude of about 700 km, nearly Sun-synchronous orbit at 10:30/22:30 LT). Six years of data have been visually inspected for the presence of QP emissions with modulation periods higher than 10 s and with frequency bandwidths higher than 200 Hz. It is found that these QP events occur in about 5% of daytime half orbits, while they are basically absent during the night. The events occur predominantly during quiet geomagnetic conditions following the periods of enhanced geomagnetic activity. Their occurrence and properties are systematically analyzed. QP emissions occur most often at frequencies from about 750 Hz to 2 kHz, but they may be observed at frequencies as low as 500 Hz and as high as 8 kHz. Modulation periods of QP events may range from about 10 to 100 s, with typical values of 20 s. Frequency drifts of the identified events are generally positive, but they are lower for events with larger modulation periods. The events are usually limited to higher L values (L > 2). The upper L shell boundary of their occurrence could not be identified using the DEMETER data, but they are found to extend up to at least L ~ 6. The occurrence rate of the events is significantly lower at the longitudes of the South Atlantic anomaly (by a factor of more than 2).

  9. Direct observation of radiation belt electrons precipitation by the controlled injection of VLF signals from a ground-based transmitter

    Radiation belt electrons precipitated by controlled injection of VLF signals from a ground based transmitter have been directly observed for the first time. These observations were part of the SEEP (Stimulated Emission of Energetic Particles) experiment conducted during May-December 1982. Key elements of SEEP were the controlled modulation of VLF transmitters and a sensitive low altitude satellite payload to detect the precipitation. An outstanding example of time-correlated wave and particle data occurred from 8680 to 8740 seconds. U. T. on 17 August 1982 when the satellite passed near the VLF transmitter at Cutler, Maine (NAA) as it was being modulated with a repeated ON (3--s)/OFF (2--s) pattern. During each of twelve consecutive pulses from the transmitter the electron counting rate increased significantly after start of the ON period and reached a maximum about 2 seconds later. The measured energy spectra revealed that approximately 15 to 50 percent of the enhanced electron flux was concentrated near the resonant energies for first order cyclotron interactions occurring close to the magnetic equator with the nearly monochromatic waves emitted from the transmitter

  10. Experience of short term earthquake precursors with VLF?VHF electromagnetic emissions

    Eftaxias, K.; P. Kapiris; Polygiannakis, J.; A. Peratzakis; Kopanas, J.; G. Antonopoulos; Rigas, D.

    2003-01-01

    Electromagnetic anomalies (EMA) covering a wide range of frequencies from ULF, VLF up to VHF have been observed before recent destructive earthquakes in continental Greece. We show that the features of these signals are possibly correlated with the fault model characteristics of the associated earthquake and with the degree of geotectonic heterogeneity within the focal zone. The time evolution of these electromagnetic sequences reveals ...

  11. Meteorological effects in the lower ionosphere as based on VLF/LF signal observations

    A. Rozhnoi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Very low and low frequency (VLF/LF data recorded in the Far Eastern stations Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky (158.92° E, 53.15° N, Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk (142.75° E, 46.95° N and Yuzhno-Kurilsk (145.861° E, 44.03° N are investigated to study the meteorological effects in the lower ionosphere. The results demonstrate the sensitivity of the VLF/LF signals to the variations of atmospheric pressure, humidity, wind velocity and temperature, and the VLF/LF record at the station of Yuzhno-Kurilsk is found to be most sensitive to those variations of atmospheric parameters. The region under consideration is characterized by high winter cyclonic activity in midlatitudes and strong summer and autumn typhoon activity in low latitudes. VLF/LF signal variations during 8 tropical cyclones (TCs with different intensity are considered. Negative nighttime anomalies in the signal amplitude that are most probably caused by TC activity are found for 6 events. Those anomalies are observed during 1–2 days when TCs move inside the sensitivity zones of the subionospheric paths. Perturbations of the VLF signal observed during 2 TCs can be caused by both the TC influence and seismic activity, but no correlation between TC intensity and magnitude of the signal anomalies is found. Spectral analysis of the typhoon-induced disturbed signals revealed the fluctuations with time periods in the range of 7–16 and 15–55 min that corresponds to the range of internal gravity waves periods.

  12. Cluster observations of ELF/VLF signals generated by modulated heating of the lower ionosphere with the HAARP HF transmitter

    Platino, M.; U. S. Inan; Bell, T.F.; Pickett, J.; Kennedy, E. J.; Trotignon, J. G.; Rauch, J. L.; Canu, P.

    2004-01-01

    It is now well known that amplitude modulated HF transmissions into the ionosphere can be used to generate ELF/VLF signals using the so-called "electrojet antenna". Although most observations of the generated ELF/VLF signals have been made on the ground, several low and high-altitude satellite observations have also been reported (James et al., 1990). One of the important unknowns in the physics of ELF/VLF wave generation by ionospheric heating is the volume of the magnetosphere ill...

  13. Cluster observations of ELF/VLF signals generated by modulated heating of the lower ionosphere with the HAARP HF transmitter

    M. Platino

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available It is now well known that amplitude modulated HF transmissions into the ionosphere can be used to generate ELF/VLF signals using the so-called "electrojet antenna". Although most observations of the generated ELF/VLF signals have been made on the ground, several low and high-altitude satellite observations have also been reported (James et al., 1990. One of the important unknowns in the physics of ELF/VLF wave generation by ionospheric heating is the volume of the magnetosphere illuminated by the ELF/VLF waves. In an attempt to investigate this question further, ground-satellite conjunction experiments have recently been conducted using the four Cluster satellites and the HF heater of the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP facility in Gakona, Alaska. Being located on largely closed field lines at L≈4.9, HAARP is currently also being used for ground-to-ground type of ELF/VLF wave-injection experiments, and will be increasingly used for this purpose as it is now being upgraded for higher power operation. In this paper, we describe the HAARP installation and present recent results of the HAARP-Cluster experiments. We give an overview of the detected ELF/VLF signals at Cluster, and a possible explanation of the spectral signature detected, as well as the determination of the location of the point of injection of the HAARP ELF/VLF signals into the magnetosphere using ray tracing.

  14. Observation of lightning-induced signals on the summit of La Grande Montagne: part 2-interferometry and VLF measurements

    Santolík, Ondřej; Kolmašová, Ivana; Uhlíř, Luděk; Lán, Radek

    Parc d'activités de Courtabœuf: EDP Sciences, 2014 - (Febvre, P.; DiBorgo, E.; CoulieCastellani, K.). (E3S Web of Conferences. 4). ISSN 2267-1242. [International conference i-DUST /5th/. Apt (FR), 05.05.2014-07.05.2014] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : VLF instrumentation * VLF observation * VLF measurement Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.e3s-conferences.org/articles/e3sconf/pdf/2014/03/e3sconf-idust2014-04003.pdf

  15. Shipborne LF-VLF oceanic lightning observations and modeling

    Zoghzoghy, F. G.; Cohen, M. B.; Said, R. K.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Inan, U. S.

    2015-10-01

    Approximately 90% of natural lightning occurs over land, but recent observations, using Global Lightning Detection (GLD360) geolocation peak current estimates and satellite optical data, suggested that cloud-to-ground flashes are on average stronger over the ocean. We present initial statistics from a novel experiment using a Low Frequency (LF) magnetic field receiver system installed aboard the National Oceanic Atmospheric Agency (NOAA) Ronald W. Brown research vessel that allowed the detection of impulsive radio emissions from deep-oceanic discharges at short distances. Thousands of LF waveforms were recorded, facilitating the comparison of oceanic waveforms to their land counterparts. A computationally efficient electromagnetic radiation model that accounts for propagation over lossy and curved ground is constructed and compared with previously published models. We include the effects of Earth curvature on LF ground wave propagation and quantify the effects of channel-base current risetime, channel-base current falltime, and return stroke speed on the radiated LF waveforms observed at a given distance. We compare simulation results to data and conclude that previously reported larger GLD360 peak current estimates over the ocean are unlikely to fully result from differences in channel-base current risetime, falltime, or return stroke speed between ocean and land flashes.

  16. Subionospheric VLF Observations of Transmitter-Induced Precipitation of Inner Radiation Belt Electrons

    Golkowski, M.; Inan, U.; Peter, W.

    2006-12-01

    Ionospheric effects of energetic electron precipitation induced by controlled injection of VLF signals from a ground based transmitter are observed via subionospheric VLF remote sensing. The 21.4 kHz NPM transmitter in Lualualei, Hawaii is keyed ON-OFF in a periodic sequence lasting 30 minutes. The same periodicity is observed in the amplitude and phase of the sub-ionospherically propagating signals of the 24.8 kHz NLK (Jim Creek, Washington) and 25.2 kHz NLM (LaMoure, North Dakota) transmitters measured at Midway Island. The NLM and NLK signal paths pass underneath the region of electron precipitation induced by the NPM transmitter, as predicted theoretically on the basis of cyclotron resonance interaction between energetic electrons and obliquely propagating whistler-mode waves injected by NPM. The ionospheric disturbances are consistent with that caused by conductivity enhancements resulting from secondary ionization produced by the precipitation of pitch angle scattered electrons in the 100-300 keV energy range. Periodic perturbations of the NLK signal observed at Palmer, Antarctica suggest that energetic electrons are scattered into both the bounce and drift loss cones. Utilizing a comprehensive model of magnetospheric wave-particle interaction, ionospheric energy deposition, and subionospheric VLF propagation, the precipitated energy flux is estimated to peak at L ~ 2 and ~ 3 x 10-4 [ergs s-1 cm-2

  17. On the possibility of precursors of earthquakes in VLF range observed by DEMETER Satellite

    Sondhiya, D. K.; Kumar, S.; Gwal, A. K.

    2014-05-01

    Very Low Frequency (VLF) disturbances in the ionospheric electric field observed by DEMETER satellite prior to three different earthquakes that occurred during the years 2008-2009 have been presented. The electromagnetic wave data has been analyzed for few days before the earthquake with special attention to the variation in spectral characteristics and non-linear effects using the statistical and wavelet based techniques. Results indicate that the earthquake preparation process may disturb the ionospheric plasma and these disturbances can reach the non-linear stage leading to the strong variations in the electromagnetic field and plasma parameters. The enhancement in statistical parameters shows the coherent structure and intermittent phenomenon which is the signature of turbulence. The characteristics features of VLF disturbances have further been studied using the wavelet and bispectral analysis tools which provide useful information on the plasma turbulence.

  18. Statistical investigation of VLF quasiperiodic emissions measured by the DEMETER spacecraft

    Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Němec, F.; Santolík, Ondřej; Parrot, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 10 (2014), s. 8063-8072. ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/2280; GA MŠk LH12231 Grant ostatní: Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR M100421206 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : VLF waves in ionosphere * QP emissions * DEMETER spacecraft Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2013JA019731/abstract

  19. The quasi-periodical VLF/ELF emissions detected onboard the DEMETER spacecraft: statistical and theoretical analysis

    Pasmanik, Dmitry; Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Demekhov, Andrei; Santolík, Ondřej; Nemec, František; Parrot, Michel

    2015-04-01

    We present a statistical study of the quasi-periodic (QP) ELF/VLF emissions measured by the DEMETER spacecraft. Events with modulation period larger than 10 s and frequency bandwidth more than 200 Hz were visually selected among the six year of measurements. Selected QP-emissions events occur mostly at frequencies from about 750 Hz to 2 kHz, but they may be observed at frequencies as low as 500 Hz and as high as 8 kHz. The statistical analysis clearly shows that QP events with larger modulation periods have lower frequency drift and smaller wave amplitude. Intense QP events have higher frequency drifts and larger values of the frequency bandwiths. Numerical simulation of the QP emissions based on the theoretical model of the flow cyclotron maser is performed. Calculations were made for wide range of plasma parameters (i.e. cold plasma density, L-shell, energetic electron flux and etc.) The numerical results are in good agreement with the observed relationship between different parameters of the QP emissions. The comparison between theoretical results and observations allow us to estimate the typical properties of the source of the QP emissions observed by the DEMETER satellite.

  20. Relationship between median intensities of electromagnetic emissions in the VLF range and lightning activity

    Němec, F.; Santolík, O; M. Parrot; Rodger, C. J.

    2010-01-01

    [1] We present results of a survey of VLF electromagnetic waves observed by the DEMETER spacecraft (altitude about 700 km, launched in June 2004, and still operating). The median value of the power spectral density of electric field fluctuations in the frequency range 1–10 kHz is evaluated as a function of the position of the spacecraft, frequency, magnetic local time, and season of the year. It is shown that there are significant seasonal differences between the satellite observed wave inten...

  1. Characteristic of Tweek Atmospherics Observed in Mid-latitude using AWESOME VLF Receiver

    Norbayah Yusop; Nor Azlan Mohd Aris; S.A.M. Chachuli; Maizatul Alice Meor Said

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the analysis of tweek atmospherics received by AWESOME VLF receiver at station of Gakona (62.71°N, 143.99°W) during four months observation from January to April 2011. Tweek which originates from lightning discharge are used to monitor the nighttime D-region ionosphere using the fundamental cut-off frequency to measure the variations of the lower ionosphere’s reflection height, the equivalent electron density at the reflection height and the propagation distance travel by ...

  2. Detection of VLF and LF emissions of fluorescent light for efficient management of power consumption

    In this research work, a detection probe of Very Low Frequency and Low Frequency (LF) emissions of fluorescent light is developed by using low cost loop antenna. The developed loop antenna is able to operate at VLF and LF bandwidth. The developed antenna is tested and measured with signal generator and oscilloscope in order to verify the usefulness of antenna. The developed antenna is subsequently used to detect the signal emitted by the fluorescent light. The antenna probe is located at different distance in order to obtain the peak voltage of received signal. Besides that, the fluorescent light is switch on and off respectively in order to verify the source of signal. From the oscilloscope, the received signal is operating at approximately 28 KHz. Hence, the developed antenna probe can be used for efficient management of power consumption as 28 KHz signal is detected if the light is on.

  3. Characteristic of Tweek Atmospherics Observed in Mid-latitude using AWESOME VLF Receiver

    Norbayah Yusop

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the analysis of tweek atmospherics received by AWESOME VLF receiver at station of Gakona (62.71°N, 143.99°W during four months observation from January to April 2011. Tweek which originates from lightning discharge are used to monitor the nighttime D-region ionosphere using the fundamental cut-off frequency to measure the variations of the lower ionosphere’s reflection height, the equivalent electron density at the reflection height and the propagation distance travel by tweeks. In this study, a total of 1316 tweeks are analyzed and from the analysis, it shows that equinox’s season has the highest tweek occurrence compared to winter season in March and April. The maximum harmonic (m of t weeks is found to be up to fourth ( m = 4 and tweeks with mode number one (m = 1 are more dominantly occurred. Our observations indicate that the equivalent electron densities for tweeks varies from 22-27 eL/cm3 in the altitude ranged of 75 to 91 km and demonstrate that these ELF/VLF signals travel considerable distances up to 6700 km from the causative lightning discharges. The ionospheric parameters for three locations (high, middle and low latitude respectively were compared and the results show that they are almost consistent for all the locations.

  4. VLF observations of ionospheric disturbances in association with TLEs from the EuroSprite-2007 campaign

    NaitAmor, S.; AlAbdoadaim, M. A.; Cohen, M. B.;

    2010-01-01

    Two Very Low Frequency (VLF) AWESOME remote sensing systems located at Algiers, Algeria (36.45°N, 3.28°E) and Sebha, Libya (27.02°N, 14.26°E) monitor VLF signal perturbations for evidence of ionospheric disturbances. During the EuroSprite-2007 campaign a number of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs...

  5. Study of the effects of solar activities on the ionosphere as observed by VLF signals recorded at TNU station, Vietnam

    Tan, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    A SuperSID monitor installed at Tay Nguyen University (TNU), Vietnam is used to detect the temporal variations of Very Low Frequency (VLF) signals during 2013 and 2014 to understand the responses of the ionosphere to sunset/sunrise transitions and solar flares. Two VLF station signals are tracked, JJI/22.2 kHz in Japan and NWC/19.8 kHz in Australia. Results show that the effects of sunrise, sunset and solar flares on the NWC signal are more significantly different than those on the JJI signal. Sunset and sunrise spikes only occur on the JJI-TNU path because of longitudinal differences between the receiver and transmitter. Two sunset dips and three sunrise dips appear on the NWC signal during summer season. During intense solar flares, the dips occur after the maximum disturbance of the VLF signals for the North-South path. The appearance of these dips is explained by modal interference patterns. Observing temporal variations of sunrise and sunset dips or spikes of VLF signals during different seasons enhances the understanding of the behavior of the ionosphere.

  6. Unusual attenuation events in the VLF range observed by the DEMETER spacecraft

    Zahlava, Jan; Nemec, Frantisek; Parrot, Michel; Rodger, Craig J.; Santolik, Ondrej

    2015-04-01

    Results of a systematic study of unusual attenuation events observed by the DEMETER spacecraft in the VLF range are presented. In the frequency-time spectrograms of wave intensity, these attenuation events consist of several lines with significantly lower intensity. Detailed analysis of the events shows that they are formed by consecutive lightning generated whistlers. These whistlers are attenuated at some specific frequencies which vary continuously during the event, resulting in lines of lower intensity. We inspected all available DEMETER data for the presence of these attenuation events. Altogether, 1580 events have been identified. They occur exclusively during the nighttime. We compare the overall geographic distribution of the total event duration with the geographic distribution of the mean lightning occurrence. It is found that the event locations are closely related to the areas of enhanced lightning activity, but they are shifted by about 30 degrees westward. We present a simple model of a possible event formation based on a basic theory of wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. This model, however, does not explain the observed longitudinal shift. We believe that the shift is due to an azimuthal dependence of the wave attenuation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, which is not considered in the used simplified waveguide theory.

  7. Relationship between median intensities of electromagnetic emissions in the VLF range and lightning activity

    Němec, František; Santolík, Ondřej; Parrot, M.; Rodger, C. J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 115, - (2010), A08315/1-A08315/10. ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1253; GA ČR GAP205/10/2279; GA MŠk ME09107 Grant ostatní: MŠMT(CZ) MSM0021620860 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : lightning activity * VLF electromagnetic waves * DEMETER satellite Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2010

  8. Possible Seismic Influence on VLF Wave Intensity: Observations by a Low-Altitude Satellite

    Němec, František; Santolík, Ondřej; Parrot, M.

    Vol. 2. Praha: MATFYZPRESS, Praha, 2008 - (Šafranková, J.; Pavlů, J.), s. 168-171 ISBN 978-80-7378-066-1. [Week of Doctoral Students 2008 /17./. Prague (CZ), 03.06.2008-06.06.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/06/1267 Grant ostatní: CNRS/DREI(FR) PICS-3725 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : seismo-electromagnetic effects * VLF electromagnetic waves * DEMETER Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://oberon.troja.mff.cuni.cz/~nemef1am/work/articles/08wds.pdf

  9. Additional attenuation of natural VLF electromagnetic waves observed by the DEMETER spacecraft resulting from preseismic activity

    Píša, David; Němec, F.; Santolík, Ondřej; Parrot, M.; Rycroft, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 8 (2013), s. 5286-5295. ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/2280; GA ČR GA205/09/1253 Grant ostatní: European Community Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013),(XE) 262005; AV ČR(CZ) M100431206. Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : DEMETER * VLF waves * preseismic activity * Earth-ionosphere waveguide Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jgra.50469/abstract

  10. Rocket observations of the precipitation of electrons by ground VLF transmitters

    Below an altitude of 400 km or less over the NASA Wallops Island range, stably trapped particles do not exist because of the South Atlantic Anomaly. In an experiment to measure scattered electrons at these altitudes (NASA flight 36:013), electron detectors clearly measured two monoenergetic electron peaks above the low background. The two monoernergetic peaks are attributed to the resonant interaction of electrons with VLF waves from Navy ground transmitters at Cutler, Maine, and Annapolis, Maryland. The transmitter signals were measured with electric and magnetic receivers aboard the rocket, and their propagation through the ionosphere and correlation with the precipitated electrons are discussed. In addition, energetic ions were also measured to be in the bounce loss cone during this rocket flight. Because of increased geomagnetic activity, it apears that the ring current extended inward to at least the L=2.5 magnetic shell and enhanced convection eroded the plasmasphere. The inward movement or compression of the plasmapause is consistent with a steep gradient in the equatorial cold plasma density and a localized equatorial interaction region needed to account for the monoenergetic elecrtron precipitation. The role of the geomagnetic activity in ''priming'' the trapped electron population for cyclotron resonance with VLF waves such that there is continuous scattering into the bounce loss cone remains uncertain. copyright American Geophysical Union 1989

  11. The Ionospheric Precursor to the 2011 March 11 Earthquake Based upon Observations Obtained from the Japan-Pacific Subionospheric VLF/LF Network

    Masashi Hayakawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available By using network observation of subionospheric VLF (very low frequency/LF (low frequency signals in Japan and in Russia, we have found a significant ionospheric perturbation prior to the recent 2011 March 11 Japan earthquake (EQ which occurred at sea proximate to the Tohoku area on the main island (Honshu of Japan was an exceptionally huge plate-type EQ. A remarkable anomaly (with a decrease in the nighttime amplitude and also with enhancement in dispersion was detected on March 5 and 6 along the propagation path from the NLK (Seattle, USA transmitter to Chofu (together with Kochi and Kasugai. We also have observed the corresponding VLF anomaly during a prolonged period of March 1 - 6, with minima in the nighttime amplitude on March 3 and 4 along the path from JJI (Miyazaki, Kyushu to Kamchatka, Russia. This ionospheric perturbation has been discussed extensively with respect to its reliability. (1 How abnormal is this VLF/LF propagation anomaly? (2 What was the temporal evolution of terminator times? (3 Were there any solar-terrestrial effects (especially the effect from geomagnetic storms on the VLF/LF propagation anomaly? (4 The effect of any other EQs and foreshock activities on the VLF/LF anomaly? (5 Were there any correlations with other related phenomena? Finally, (6 are there any other examples of a VLF/LF propagation anomaly for oceanic EQs? We then compared the temporal properties of ionospheric perturbations for this EQ with those of a huge number of inland EQs and compared the corresponding spatial scale with the former result of the same oceanic 2004 Sumatra EQ with nearly the same magnitude. Finally, the generation mechanism of those seismo-ionospheric perturbations is briefly discussed.

  12. The ionospheric precursor to the 2011 March 11 earthquake as based on the Japan-Pacific subionospheric VLF/LF network observation

    Hayakawa, M.; Hobara, Y.; Rozhnoi, A.; Solovieva, M.; Ohta, K.; Izutsu, J.; Nakamura, T.; Yasuda, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kasahara, Y.

    2013-01-01

    By using the network observation of subionospheric VLF/LF signals in Japan and in Russia, we have found a significant ionospheric perturbation prior to the recent 2011 3.11 Japan earthquake (EQ) in the off-sea of the Tohoku area, which was an exceptionally huge plate-type EQ. A remarkable anomaly (with decrease in the nighttime amplitude and also with enhancement in dispersion) has been detected on March 5 and 6 on the propagation path from the NLK (Seattle, USA) transmitter to Chofu (together with Kochi and Kasugai), and also we have observed the corresponding VLF anomaly during a prolonged period of March 1 - 6, with minima in the nighttime amplitude on March 3 and 4 on the path from JJI (Miyazaki, Kyushu) to Kamchatka, Russia. This ionospheric perturbation has been discussed extensively with respect to its reliability: (1) How abnormal is this VLF/LF propagation anomaly ?, (2) how about the temporal evolution of terminator times ?, (3) any solar-terrestrial effects (especially the effect of geomagnetic storms) on the VLF/LF propagation anomaly ?, (4) the effect of any other EQs and foreshock activities on the VLF/LF anomaly ?, (5) any correlation with other related phenomena ?, and (6) any other examples of VLF/LF propagation anomaly for oceanic EQs ?. We then compared the temporal properties of ionospheric perturbations for this EQ with those of a huge number of inland EQs, and compared the corresponding spatial scale with the former result of the same oceanic 2004 Sumatra EQ with nearly the same magnitude. Finally, the generation mechanism of those seismo-ionospheric perturbations is briefly commented.

  13. Multiple-Station Observation of Frequency Dependence and Polarization Characteristics of ELF/VLF waves generated via Ionospheric Modification

    Maxworth, A. S.; Golkowski, M.; Cohen, M.; Moore, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Generation of Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) signals through ionospheric modification has been practiced for many years. Heating the lower ionosphere with high power HF waves allows for modulation of natural current systems. Our experiments were carried out at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. In this experiment, the ionosphere was heated with a vertical amplitude modulating signal and the modulation frequency was changed sequentially within an array of 40 frequencies followed by a frequency ramp. The observed magnetic field amplitude and polarization of the generated ELF/VLF signals were analyzed for multiple sites and as a function of modulation frequency. Our three observation sites: Chistochina, Paxson and Paradise are located within 36km (azimuth 47.7°), 50.2km (azimuth -20°) and 99km (azimuth 80.3°) respectively. We show that the peak amplitudes observed as a function of frequency result from vertical resonance in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and can be used to diagnose the D-region profile. Polarization analysis showed that out of the three sites Paxson shows the highest circularity in the magnetic field polarization, compared to Chistochina and Paradise which show highly linear polarizations. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical simulation model results and it was clear that in both cases, the modulated Hall current dominates the observed signals at Chistochina and Paradise sites and at Paxson there is an equal contribution from Hall and Pedersen currents. The Chistochina site shows the highest magnetic field amplitudes in both experimental and simulation environments. Depending upon the experimental and simulation observations at the three sites, a radiation pattern for the HAARP ionospheric heater can be mapped

  14. Survey of ELF-VLF plasma waves in outer radiation belt observed by Cluster STAFF-SA experiment

    D. Pokhotelov

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Various types of plasma waves have profound effects on acceleration and scattering of radiation belt particles. For the purposes of radiation belt modeling it is necessary to know statistical distributions of plasma wave parameters. This paper analyzes four years of plasma wave observations in the Earth's outer radiation belt obtained by the STAFF-SA experiment on board Cluster spacecraft. Statistical distributions of spectral density of different plasma waves observed in ELF-VLF range (chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, magnetosonic waves are presented as a function of magnetospheric coordinates and geomagnetic activity indices. Comparison with other spacecraft studies supports some earlier conclusions about the distribution of chorus and hiss waves and helps to remove the long-term controversy regarding the distribution of equatorial magnetosonic waves. This study represents a step towards the development of multi-spacecraft database of plasma wave activity in radiation belts.

  15. Decrease of VLF transmitter signal and Chorus-whistler waves before l'Aquila earthquake occurrence

    M. Y. Boudjada

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the VLF emissions observed by the Instrument Champ Electrique (ICE experiment onboard the DEMETER micro-satellite. We analyze intensity level variation 10 days before and after the occurrence of l'Aquila earthquake (EQ. We found a clear decrease of the VLF received signal related to ionospheric whistler mode (mainly Chorus emission and to signal transmitted by the DFY VLF station in Germany, few days (more than one week before the earthquake. The VLF power spectral density decreases of more than two orders of magnitude until the EQ, and it recovers to normal levels just after the EQ occurrence. The geomagnetic activity is principally weak four days before EQ and increases again one day before l'Aquila seismic event. Our results are discussed in the frame of short- and long-terms earthquakes prediction focusing on the crucial role of the magnetic field of the Earth.

  16. VLF/LF EM emissions as main precursor of earthquakes and their searching possibilities for Georgian s/a region

    Kachakhidze, Manana; Kachakhidze, Nino

    2016-04-01

    Authors of abstract have created work which offers model of earth electromagnetic emissions generation detected in the process of earthquake preparation on the basis of electrodynamics. The model gives qualitative explanation of a mechanism of generation of electromagnetic waves emitted in the earthquake preparation period. Besides, scheme of the methodology of earthquake forecasting is created based on avalanche-like unstable model of fault formation and an analogous model of electromagnetic contour, synthesis of which, is rather harmonious. According to the authors of the work electromagnetic emissions in radiodiapason is more universal and reliable than other anomalous variations of various geophysical phenomena in earthquake preparation period; Besides, VLF/LF electromagnetic emissions might be declared as the main precursor of earthquake because it might turn out very useful with the view of prediction of large (M ≥5) inland earthquakes and to govern processes going on in lithosphere-atmosphere - ionosphere coupling (LAIC) system. Since the other geophysical phenomena, which may accompany earthquake preparation process and expose themselves several months, weeks or days prior to earthquakes are less informative with the view of earthquake forecasting, it is admissible to consider them as earthquake indicators. Physical mechanisms of mentioned phenomena are explained on the basis of the model of generation of electromagnetic emissions detected before earthquake, where a process of earthquake preparation and its realization are considered taking into account distributed and conservative systems properties. Up to these days electromagnetic emissions detection network did not exist in Georgia. European colleagues helped us (Prof. Dr. PF Biagi, Prof. Dr. Aydın BÜYÜKSARAÇ) and made possible the installation of a receiver. We are going to develop network and put our share in searching of earthquakes problem. Participation in conference is supported by financial

  17. Lightning characteristics observed by a VLF/LF lightning detection network (LINET in Brazil, Australia, Africa and Germany

    H. Höller

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes lightning characteristics as obtained in four sets of lightning measurements during recent field campaigns in different parts of the world from mid-latitudes to the tropics by the novel VLF/LF (very low frequency/low frequency lightning detection network (LINET. The paper gives a general overview on the approach, and a synopsis of the statistical results for the observation periods as a whole and for one special day in each region. The focus is on the characteristics of lightning which can specifically be observed by this system like intra-cloud and cloud-to-ground stroke statistics, vertical distributions of intra-cloud strokes or peak current distributions. Some conclusions regarding lightning produced NOx are also presented as this was one of the aims of the tropical field campaigns TROCCINOX (Tropical Convection, Cirrus and Nitrogen Oxides Experiment and TroCCiBras (Tropical Convection and Cirrus Experiment Brazil in Brazil during January/February 2005, SCOUT-O3 (Stratospheric-Climate Links with Emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere and TWP-ICE (Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment during November/December 2005 and January/February 2006, respectively, in the Darwin area in N-Australia, and of AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses in W-Africa during June–November 2006.

    Regional and temporal characteristics of lightning are found to be dependent on orographic effects (e.g. S-Germany, Brazil, Benin, land-sea breeze circulations (N-Australia and especially the evolution of the monsoons (Benin, N-Australia. Large intra-seasonal variability in lightning occurrence was found for the Australian monsoon between the strong convection during build-up and break phases and the weak active monsoon phase with only minor lightning activity. Total daily lightning stroke rates can be of comparable intensity in all regions with the heaviest events found in Germany and N

  18. Lightning characteristics observed by a VLF/LF lightning detection network (LINET in Brazil, Australia, Africa and Germany

    H. Höller

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes lightning characteristics as obtained in four sets of lightning measurements during recent field campaigns in different parts of the world from mid-latitudes to the tropics by the novel VLF/LF (very low frequency/low frequency lightning detection network (LINET. The paper gives a general overview on the approach, and a synopsis of the statistical results for the observation periods as a whole and for one special day in each region. The focus is on the characteristics of lightning which can specifically be observed by this system like intra-cloud and cloud-to-ground stroke statistics, vertical distributions of intra-cloud strokes or peak current distributions. Some conclusions regarding lightning produced NOx are also presented as this was one of the aims of the tropical field campaigns TROCCINOX (Tropical Convection, Cirrus and Nitrogen Oxides Experiment and TroCCiBras (Tropical Convection and Cirrus Experiment Brazil in Brazil during January/February 2005, SCOUT-O3 (Stratospheric-Climate Links with Emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere and TWP-ICE (Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment during November/December 2005 and January/February 2006, respectively, in the Darwin area in N-Australia, and of AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses in W-Africa during June–November 2006.

    Regional and temporal characteristics of lightning are found to be dependent on orographic effects (e.g. S-Germany, Brazil, Benin, land-sea breeze circulations (N-Australia and especially the evolution of the monsoons (Benin, N-Australia. Large intra-seasonal variability in lightning occurrence was found for the Australian monsoon between the strong convection during build-up and break phases and the weak wet monsoon phase with only minor lightning activity. Total daily lightning rates can be of comparable intensity in all regions with the heaviest events found in Germany and N

  19. Observed Barium Emission Rates

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The barium releases from the CRRES satellite have provided an opportunity for verifying theoretically calculated barium ion and neutral emission rates. Spectra of the five Caribbean releases in the summer of 1991 were taken with a spectrograph on board a U.S. Air Force jet aircraft. Because the line of sight release densities are not known, only relative rates could be obtained. The observed relative rates agree well with the theoretically calculated rates and, together with other observations, confirm the earlier detailed theoretical emission rates. The calculated emission rates can thus with good accuracy be used with photometric observations. It has been postulated that charge exchange between neutral barium and oxygen ions represents a significant source for ionization. If so. it should be associated with emissions at 4957.15 A and 5013.00 A, but these emissions were not detected.

  20. Multispacecraft observations of quasi-periodic emissions

    Nemec, Frantisek; Picket, Jolene S.; Santolik, Ondrej

    2014-05-01

    Quasi-periodic (QP) emissions are VLF electromagnetic waves in the frequency range of about 0.5-5 kHz which exhibit a periodic time modulation of the wave intensity. The modulation period is usually on the order of a few tens of seconds. The generation mechanism of these emissions is still not understood, but at least in some cases it appears to be related to ULF magnetic field pulsations which result in periodic modifications of the resonant conditions in the source region. We use multipoint measurements of QP emissions by the 4 Cluster spacecraft. The observations are obtained close to the equatorial region at radial distances of about 4 Earth radii, i.e. close to a possible generation region. A combined analysis of the high resolution data obtained by the WBD instruments and the ULF magnetic field data obtained by the FGM instruments allows for a detailed case-study analysis of these unique emissions. The presented analysis benefits from the recent close-separation configuration of three of the Cluster spacecraft (≡20-100 km) and a related timing analysis, which would be impossible otherwise.

  1. Unique Observation of a Solar Flare by Lunar Occultation During the 2010 Annular Solar Eclipse Through Ionospheric Disturbances of VLF Signals

    Maji, Surya K.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Mondal, Sushanta K.

    2012-06-01

    Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves propagate through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. Irregularities caused by excess or deficient extreme ultra-violet and X-rays, which otherwise sustain the ionosphere, change the waveguide properties and hence the signals are modified. We report the results of monitoring of the NWC transmitter (19.8 kHz) by a receiver placed at Khukurdaha (22°27'N, 87°45'E) during the partial solar eclipse (75 %) of 15th January, 2010. The propagation path from the transmitter to the receiver crosses the annular eclipse belt. We got a clear depression in the data during the period of the eclipse. Most interestingly, there was also a X-ray flaring activity in the sun on that day which reached its peak (C-type) right after the time when the eclipse reached its maximum. We saw the effects of the occultation of this flare in our VLF signal since a part of the X-ray active region was clearly blocked by the moon. We quantitatively compared by using analogies with previous observations and found best fitting parameters for the time when the flare was occulted. We then reconstructed the VLF signal in the absence of the occulted flare. To our knowledge, this is the first such incident where the solar flare was observed through lunar occultation and that too during a partial eclipse.

  2. ELF/VLF signatures of sprite-producing lightning discharges observed during the 2005 EuroSprite campaign

    Greenberg, E.; Price, C.; Yair, Y.;

    2009-01-01

    in Israel, located about 3300 km from the area of the parent lightning discharges responsible for the generation of sprites. Additionally, narrowband VLF data were collected in Crete, at about 2300 km away from the region of sprites. The motivation for the present study was to identify the signature...... of the sprite-producing lightning discharges in the ELF and VLF electromagnetic frequency bands, to qualify and compare their parameters, and to study the influence of the thunderstorm-activated region on its overlaying ionosphere. For the 15 sprites analyzed, their causative positive cloud......-to-ground (+CG) discharges had peak current intensities between +8 and +130 kA whereas their charge moment changes (CMC) ranged from 500 to 3500 C km. Furthermore, the peak current reported by the Météorage lightning network are well correlated with the amplitudes of the VLF bursts, while showing poor...

  3. Hiss emissions during quiet and disturbed periods

    D K Singh; R P Singh

    2002-10-01

    The characteristic features of VLF hiss emissions during quiet and disturbed conditions observed at ground stations and on-board satellites are summarized. The increased intensity of the hiss emissions during magnetic storm period is explained by considering the enhanced flux of energetic electrons during magnetic storm period. The generation and propagation mechanism of VLF hiss are also briefly discussed.

  4. Unique observation of a Solar Flare by Lunar Occultation during the 2010 Annular Solar Eclipse through ionospheric disturbances in VLF waves

    Kanta Maji, Surya; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves propagate through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. Irregularities caused by excess or deficient solar extreme ultra-violet and X-rays, which otherwise sustain the ionosphere, changes the waveguide properties and hence the signals are modified. We report the results of monitoring of the NWC transmitter (19.8kHz) by a receiver placed at Khukurdaha (~80 km away from Kolkata) during the partial solar eclipse (75%) of 15th January, 2010. The receiving station and the transmitter were on two opposite sides of the annular eclipse belt. We got a clear depression in the data during the period of partial eclipse. Most interestingly, there was also a flaring activity in the sun on that day which reached its peak (C-type) just after the time when the eclipse was near maximum. We saw effects of the occultation of this flare in our VLF signal since a part of the active region was clearly blocking the moon. We model this occultation, and reconstructed the VLF signal in the absence of the flare. To our knowledge, this is the first such incident where the solar flare was observed through lunar occultation and that too during a partial eclipse.

  5. Possible production of lower hybrid parametric instabilities by VLF ground transmitter and by natural emissions

    A parametric instability at the lower hybrid frequency which is known as the ion quasi-mode instability may be excited in the ionosphere. The instability considered is a three-wave interaction in which an incident whistler mode wave near the lower hybrid frequency dcays into a lower hybrid wave and an ion acoustic type of oscillation. Threshold calculations are made at intervals along the L = 4 magnetic field line starting at the earth's surface (the geomagnetic position of Siple Station, Antarctica) and proceeding to the equatorial plane. A model is developed for the ionospheric plasma parameters needed to evaluate the expression for threshold field strength. The field directly radiated by the Siple transmitter are not strong enough to meet the requirement for threshold. However, it is possible that the threshold can be met for Siple transmissions which are amplified by natural processes and also for natural emissions

  6. Modeling of long-path propagation characteristics of VLF radio waves as observed from Indian Antarctic station Maitri

    Sasmal, Sudipta; Palit, Sourav; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2015-10-01

    Propagation of very low frequency (VLF) radio signal through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide depends strongly on the plasma properties of the ionospheric D layer. Solar extreme ultraviolet radiation plays the central role in controlling physical and chemical properties of the lower ionospheric layers and hence determining the propagation characteristics of a VLF signal. The nature of interference among different propagating modes varies widely with the length of the propagation path. For a very long path, exposure of solar radiation and thus the degree of ionization vary by a large amount along the path. This influences the VLF signal profile by modulating the sky wave propagation. To understand the propagation characteristics over such a long path, we need a thorough investigation of the chemical reactions of the lower ionosphere which is lacking in the literature. Study of radio signal characteristics in the Antarctic region during summer period in the Southern Hemisphere gives us a unique opportunity to explore such a possibility. In addition, there is an extra feature in this path—the presence of solar radiation and hence the D region for the whole day during summer in at least some sections of the path. In this paper, we present long-distance propagation characteristics of VLF signals transmitted from VTX (18.2 kHz) and NWC (19.8 kHz) transmitters recorded at the Indian permanent station Maitri (latitude 70°45'S, longitude 114°40'E) in 2007-2008. A very stable diurnal variation of the signal has been obtained with no signature of nighttime fluctuation due the presence of 24 h of sunlight. Using ion production and recombination profiles by solar irradiance and incorporating D region ion chemistry processes, we calculate the electron density profile at different heights. Using this profile in the Long Wavelength Propagation Capability code, we are able to reproduce the amplitude of VLF signal.

  7. Longitudinal drift of substorm electrons as the reason of impulsive precipitation events and VLF emissions

    A. A. Lubchich

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Using the data from satellite CRRES and three geostationary LANL spacecraft, the propagation of an electron cloud from midnight to the evening sector is investigated. An electron cloud was injected during a weak isolated substorm that developed on a quiet geomagnetic background. It is found that within the local time sector from 03:00 until at least 08:00 MLT, the propagation of electrons at perpendicular pitch-angles is well described by a simple model of drift in the dipole magnetic field. The flux levels in the field-aligned electrons increase simultaneously with the flux at perpendicular pitch angles, which is attributed to the pitch angle diffusion by the whistler mode. This pitch-angle diffusion leads to precipitation of electrons from a drifting cloud and an increase in the ionospheric electron density, simultaneously observed above Tromsø, Norway, by the EISCAT UHF radar in the morning sector (04:40–05:25 MLT. The precipitation develops as quasi-periodic pulses with a period of about 100 s. We discuss the models of pulsating precipitation due to the whistler cyclotron instability and show that our observations can be explained by such a model.

  8. Transionospheric VLF Propagation as an Ionospheric Diagnostic

    Worthington, E. R.; Cohen, M.

    2015-12-01

    Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio waves emitted from ground-based sources, such as VLF transmitters or lightning strokes, are attenuated as they travel through the D-region of the ionosphere, making measurements taken of the VLF energy that has escaped this region useful in estimating the electron density. It has been also been suggested that F-region irregularities may contribute additional attenuation to the VLF signal. Additionally, energy at these frequencies that escapes the ionosphere altogether strongly impacts the radiation belts, driving electron precipitation via whistler-electron gyroresonance, and contributes to the formation of the slot region. We present an analysis of measurements captured by the DEMETER satellite over VLF transmitters. During its six-year mission, DEMETER completed hundreds of passes above well-characterized VLF transmitters while recording electric and magnetic field strengths. Statistically significant (daytime and nighttime) seasonal variations were observed in this data set. We compare observations with estimates obtained using a sophisticated full wave model of trans-ionospheric propagation, and discuss the viability of the International Reference Ionosphere in correctly predicting transionospheric VLF energy.

  9. VLF/LF signal studies of the ionospheric response to strong seismic activity in the Far Eastern region combining the DEMETER and ground-based observations

    Rozhnoi, A.; Solovieva, M.; Parrot, M.; Hayakawa, M.; Biagi, P.-F.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Fedun, V.

    The paper presents the results of a joint analysis of ground-based and satellite observations of very low-frequency and low-frequency (VLF/LF) signals during periods of strong seismic activity in the region of Kuril Islands and Japan in 2004-2010. Ground and satellite data was processed using a method based on the difference between the real signal in nighttime and that of a model. The results of the analysis show a good correlation between ground-based and satellite data for several cases of strong (M ⩾ 6.8) earthquakes.

  10. Ionospheric turbulence from ground-based and satellite VLF/LF transmitter signal observations for the Simushir earthquake (November 15, 2006

    Pier Francesco Biagi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Signals from very low frequency (VLF/ low frequency (LF transmitters recorded on the ground station at Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and on board the French DEMETER satellite were analyzed for the Simushir earthquake (M 8.3; November 15, 2006. The period of analysis was from October 1, 2006, to January 31, 2007. The ground and satellite data were processed by a method based on the difference between the real signal at night-time and the model signal. The model for the ground observations was the monthly averaged signal amplitudes and phases, as calculated for the quiet days of every month. For the satellite data, a two-dimensional model of the signal distribution over the selected area was constructed. Preseismic effects were found several days before the earthquake, in both the ground and satellite observations.

     

  11. Observations of whistler-type echoes on signals of a ground VLF transmitter on board the Interkosmos-19 satellite

    Whistler-type echoes were received on board the Interkosmos 19 satellite with signals at frequencies between 10.2 and 13.6 kHz from a VLF transmitter of the Omega navigation system located in the auroral zone (66.4 deg N, 13.2 deg E, L 5). The echoes occur predominately in periods of low geomagnetic activity the occurrence region in the outer ionosphere has the dimension of about 1000 km, and its position is about L 2.5 and L 4.4. The delay of the echo signal is practically the same during one satellite pass, but its values for different satellite revolutions lie between 2.5 and 3.5 s. The experimental results are consistent with the theory of nonlinear ducting assuming quasi-ducting of whistler waves in the equatorial region due to interaction with ion cyclotron waves that permanently exist in this region

  12. Modeling solar flare induced lower ionosphere changes using VLF/LF transmitter amplitude and phase observations at a midlatitude site

    E. D. Schmitter

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing of the ionosphere bottom using long wave radio signal propagation is a still going strong and inexpensive method for continuous monitoring purposes. We present a propagation model describing the time development of solar flare effects. Based on monitored amplitude and phase data from VLF/LF transmitters gained at a mid-latitude site during the currently increasing solar cycle no. 24 a parameterized electron density profile is calculated as a function of time and fed into propagation calculations using the LWPC (Long Wave Propagation Capability. The model allows to include lower ionosphere recombination and attachment coefficients, as well as to identify the relevant forcing X-ray wavelength band, and is intended to be a small step forward to a better understanding of the solar–lower ionosphere interaction mechanisms within a consistent framework.

  13. A generation mechanism for discrete very low frequency emissions observed at Varanasi

    A K Singh; S B Singh; R P Singh

    2005-12-01

    A new type of discrete VLF emissions recorded at the low-latitude ground station Varanasi (geomag. lat. 14° 55'$ N, geomag. long. 154°E; = 1.07) during the strong magnetic activity on 29–30 April 1990 have been reported. A generation mechanism for various temporal and spectral features of discrete VLF emissions recorded at Varanasi is presented on the basis of cyclotron resonance interaction between whistler mode wave and energetic electrons ejected by substorm electric fields. An attempt is also made to determine parallel energy and wave growth relevant to the generation process of discrete VLF emissions. Finally, our results are discussed with other published works.

  14. Whistler precursors on a VLF transmitter signal

    Whistler precursors are discrete emissions which are occasionally seen just before two-hop whistlers. Most theories of precursors assume they are triggered emissions and focus on creating a triggering signal with the proper time delay from the causative sferic. Whistler precursors have now been seen on a signal from the Siple VLF transmitter. Phase analysis shows that these precursors are caused by a rapid increase in growth activity, and not by a triggering signal

  15. Variations of VLF/LF signals observed on the ground and satellite during a seismic activity in Japan region in May–June 2008

    A. Rozhnoi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Signals of two Japanese transmitters (22.2 kHz and 40 kHz recorded on the ground VLF/LF station in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and on board the DEMETER French satellite have been analyzed during a seismic activity in Japan in May–June 2008. The period of analysis was from 18 April to 27 June. During this time two rather large earthquakes occurred in the north part of Honshu Island – 7 May (M=6.8 and 13 June (M=6.9. The ground and satellite data were processed by a method based on the difference between the real signal in nighttime and the model one. For ground observations a clear decrease in both signals has been found several days before the first earthquake. For the second earthquake anomalies were detected only in JJI signal. The epicenters of earthquakes were in reliable reception zone of 40 kHz signal on board the DEMETER. Signal enhancement above the seismic active region and significant signal intensity depletion in the magnetically conjugate area has been found for satellite observation before the first earthquake. Anomalies in satellite data coincide in time with those in the ground-based observation.

  16. Investigation of propagation properties of quasi-periodic (QP) VLF emissions observed by the DEMETER spacecraft

    Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Santolík, Ondřej; Němec, F.; Parrot, M.; Hanzelka, M.

    San Francisco: American Geophysical Union, 2015. SM21A-2479. [AGU Fall Meeting 2015. 14.12.2015-18.12.2015, San Francisco] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : whistler-mode waves * inner magnetosphere * plasmasphere Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  17. On the spectral broadening of the ground-based VLF transmitter signals in the high-latitude ionosphere observed from Intercosmos-19 and Aureol-3 satellites

    The effect of spectral broadening of VLF signals as they propagate through the turbulent polar ionosphere (300-500 HZ) is discussed. The two-satellite observation results have shown that (a) electric component prevails in a broadened signal (BS), (b) the effect is independent of transmitter power, (c) BS is in a good correlation with the appearance of ELF electrostatic noise, (d) the digital processing of BS reveals the 20-50 ms temporal variations and the harmonic components at a 30-40 recurrence frequency, (e) at altitudes of > 700 km a BS is as a rule no seshaped with the characteristic rate of frequency variation df/dt = 3 x 103 - 104 s-2. These facts seem to indicate an effective scattering of wistler waves by ion-cyclotron turbulence near the oxygen ion gyrofrequency (fBi ∼ 30 HZ) involving the transformation of an initial wave into the electrostatic plasme mode in the upper ionosphere. Theoretical estimates the proposed hypothesis are presented

  18. VLF and ELF effects in the upper ionosphere caused by large-scale acoustic waves in the lower ionosphere observed from AUREOL-3 satellite

    The active MASSA(or MARS) experiment concerning the study of the effects generated in the upper atmosphere and in the magnetosphere by a large-scale acoustic wave reaching ionospheric altitudes, was realized in such a way, that the AUREOL-3 satellite crossed the corresponding magnetic force tubes by the time of the development of the electromagnetic processes expected in the lower ionosphere E-region above the explosion. The measurements performed revealed, in the ionospheric and magnetospheric plasmas, electromagnetic effects generated by a large-scale acoustic wave produced as a result of chemical ground explosion with a kinetic energy 288 TNT(Tons). These effects include nearly electrostatic ELF and VLF-noises in the magnetic force tube based on the E-layer ionosphere above explosion, their area expands with a velocity of about 0.6 km/sec, that is, as of an acoustic wave in the lower ionosphere. Besides, an intense MHD wave was detected at the L = 1.31, that is, equator-wards form the explosion L-shell (L = 1.5). This electromagnetic signal has a steep front and than a slow decay. The results of the MARS experiment were confirmed and extended during further similar experiments when industrial ground explosions (barrages'construction, etc.) were conducted at the predetermined times to achieve the coordinated data from AUREOL-3 and from ground-based observations

  19. ELF and VLF signatures of sprites registered onboard the low altitude satellite DEMETER

    J. Błęcki

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We report the observation of ELF and VLF signature of sprites recorded on the low altitude satellite DEMETER during thunderstorm activity. At an altitude of ~700 km, waves observed on the E-field spectrograms at mid-to-low latitudes during night time are mainly dominated by up-going 0+ whistlers. During the night of 20 July 2007 two sprites have been observed around 20:10:08 UT from the observatory located on the top of the mountain Śnieżka in Poland (50°44'09" N, 15°44'21" E, 1603 m and, ELF and VLF data have been recorded by the satellite at about 1200 km from the region of thunderstorm activity. During this event, the DEMETER instruments were switched in the burst mode and it was possible to register the wave forms. It is shown that the two sprites have been triggered by two intense +CG lightning strokes (100 kA occurring during the same millisecond but not at the same location. Despite the distance DEMETER has recorded at the same time intense and unusual ELF and VLF emissions. It is shown that the whistler wave propagates from the thunderstorm regions in the Earth-ionosphere guide and enters in the ionosphere below the satellite. They last several tens of milliseconds and the intensity of the ELF waveform is close to 1 mV/m. A particularly intense proton whistler is also associated with these emissions.

  20. Lightning VLF wave propagation from source, through ionosphere to inner magnetosphere using WWLLN and Van Allen Probes

    Zheng, H.; Holzworth, R. H.; Brundell, J. B.; Wygant, J. R.; Mozer, F.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Jacobson, A. R.; Hutchins, M. L.; Bonnell, J. W.; Breneman, A. W.; Kersten, K.

    2013-12-01

    Lightning produces strong broadband radio waves, called "sferics", which propagate in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and are detected thousands kilometers away from their source. Global real-time detection of lightning strokes including their time, location and energy, is conducted with the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). In the ionosphere, these sferics couple into very low frequency (VLF) whistler waves which propagate obliquely to the Earth's magnetic field. Lightning generated VLF whistler dispersion in the ionosphere has been previously observed both from thunderstorm rockets and low altitude satellites. Previous studies also show a clear match and related attenuation between sferics detected by WWLLN and VLF whistlers observed by C/NOFS satellite. This global study can now be expanded to the magnetosphere using data from the Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP)) with high sampling rates for vector electric and magnetic fields, and extended altitude cover from ~600km to ~5 Re above the ground. In our work, we will show the one-to-one coincidence between WWLLN sferics and RBSP VLF whistlers. This talk will explore the relationship between these one to one lightning whistler waves with stimulated emissions such as lower hybrid waves, and possible energy deposition as the large amplitude lightning whistlers propagate into the outer magnetosphere.

  1. Higher harmonic tweek sferics observed at low latitude: estimation of VLF reflection heights and tweek propagation distance

    S. Kumar

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Lightning generated signals recorded at a low-latitude station, Suva (18.2° S, 178.3° E Fiji, in the South Pacific region, during September 2003–July 2004, are used to study the propagation features and the reflection heights of tweek atmospherics in the waveguide formed by the Earth's surface and the lower ionosphere. Tweeks are observed only during the local night and the maximum harmonic (n recorded is six. The occurrence of tweeks with higher n progressively decreases as n increases. The dispersed part of tweeks decreases as n increases. The attenuation factor has been calculated for tweeks with n=1–3. The ionospheric reflection heights obtained assuming the transverse magnetic mode of propagation for tweek signals vary from 83–92 km. A higher harmonic of the same tweek is reflected from about 2.0 km higher than the lower harmonic. For 90% of tweeks, propagation distances are estimated to be between 1000–5000 km. Tweeks with lower n propagate longer distances than the tweeks with higher n.

  2. Observations of the coupling efficiency of VLF lightning-generated whistlers into the low-latitude plasmasphere

    Jacobson, A. R.; Holzworth, R. H., II; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Heelis, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The C/NOFS satellite [de La Beaujardiere, 2004] has provided a vast archive of multi-sensor data on the low-latitude ionosphere/plasmasphere since 2008. As part of the project, the VEFI payload [Pfaff et al., 2010] has recorded the 3-D electric field from DC through 16 kHz with high fidelity. The relative calibrations track between the three E-field antennas with sufficient accuracy and stability to allow retrieval of the wave polarization for a wide range of lightning-generated whistler waves [Jacobson et al., 2014]. The wave polarization in turn allows retrieval of the wavevector (within a sign ambiguity), which in turn allows an inverse-raytrace of the whistler raypath from the satellite to the ionospheric entry point. We will compare the raytrace predictions with ground-truth from the WWLLN global lightning-monitoring system [Lay et al., 2004; Rodger et al., 2005; Rodger et al., 2004]. In addition to providing location and time of lightning strokes, WWLLN provides an estimate of the radiated radio energy in the whistler passband [Hutchins et al., 2012]. Finally, the CINDI payload [Heelis et al., 2009] on C/NOFS provides ion composition at the satellite, permitting the index of refraction to be inferred. We will compare these estimates to the Poynting fluence density observed by VEFI, thereby providing a direct test of the coupling of lightning radio energy into plasmaspheric whistlers.

  3. E.l.f./v.l.f. emissions observed on Ariel 4. [wave-particle phenomena in magnetosphere

    Bullough, K.; Denby, M.; Gibbons, W.; Hughes, A. R. W.; Kaiser, T. R.; Tatnall, A. R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The Ariel 4 satellite was designed to study wave-particle phenomena in the magnetosphere by measuring the electromagnetic wave fields over a wide frequency range and the fluxes and pitch angle distributions of energetic particles. We describe here the results of a preliminary study of the various v.l.f./e.l.f. electromagnetic wave phenomena which are observed. These include man-made signals from v.l.f. transmitters, impulsive noise originating in thunderstorms and emissions arising from magnetospheric energetic charged particles.

  4. Midlatitude propagation of VLF to MF waves through nighttime ionosphere above powerful VLF transmitters

    Lefeuvre, François; Pinçon, Jean-Louis; Parrot, Michel

    2013-01-01

    [1] Midlatitude nighttime observations made by the DEMETER satellite in the very low frequency (VLF) to medium frequency (MF) bands (3 kHz to 3 MHz) have demonstrated the propagation of radio waves from the bottom of ionosphere up to the satellite altitude (~700 km). Propagation characteristics derived from the magneto-ionic theory [Budden, 1985] are used to explain the absence of wave observations between ~1 and 2 MHz. Under hypotheses made for the Appleton and Hartree (or Appleton and Lasse...

  5. Possibility of Earthquake-prediction by analyzing VLF signals

    Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sasmal, Sudipta

    2016-07-01

    Prediction of seismic events is one of the most challenging jobs for the scientific community. Conventional ways for prediction of earthquakes are to monitor crustal structure movements, though this method has not yet yield satisfactory results. Furthermore, this method fails to give any short-term prediction. Recently, it is noticed that prior to any seismic event a huge amount of energy is released which may create disturbances in the lower part of D-layer/E-layer of the ionosphere. This ionospheric disturbance may be used as a precursor of earthquakes. Since VLF radio waves propagate inside the wave-guide formed by lower ionosphere and Earth's surface, this signal may be used to identify ionospheric disturbances due to seismic activity. We have analyzed VLF signals to find out the correlations, if any, between the VLF signal anomalies and seismic activities. We have done both the case by case study and also the statistical analysis using a whole year data. In both the methods we found that the night time amplitude of VLF signals fluctuated anomalously three days before the seismic events. Also we found that the terminator time of the VLF signals shifted anomalously towards night time before few days of any major seismic events. We calculate the D-layer preparation time and D-layer disappearance time from the VLF signals. We have observed that this D-layer preparation time and D-layer disappearance time become anomalously high 1-2 days before seismic events. Also we found some strong evidences which indicate that it may possible to predict the location of epicenters of earthquakes in future by analyzing VLF signals for multiple propagation paths.

  6. Optimizing an ELF/VLF Phased Array at HAARP

    Fujimaru, S.; Moore, R. C.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study is to maximize the amplitude of 1-5 kHz ELF/VLF waves generated by ionospheric HF heating and measured at a ground-based ELF/VLF receiver. The optimization makes use of experimental observations performed during ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) Observatory in Gakona, Alaska. During these experiments, the amplitude, phase, and propagation delay of the ELF/VLF waves were carefully measured. The HF beam was aimed at 15 degrees zenith angle in 8 different azimuthal directions, equally spaced in a circle, while broadcasting a 3.25 MHz (X-mode) signal that was amplitude modulated (square wave) with a linear frequency-time chirp between 1 and 5 kHz. The experimental observations are used to provide reference amplitudes, phases, and propagation delays for ELF/VLF waves generated at these specific locations. The presented optimization accounts for the trade-off between duty cycle, heated area, and the distributed nature of the source region in order to construct a "most efficient" phased array. The amplitudes and phases generated by modulated heating at each location are combined in post-processing to find an optimal combination of duty cycle, heating location, and heating order.

  7. Multi Station Frequency Response and Polarization of ELF/VLF Signals Generated via Ionospheric Modification

    Maxworth, Ashanthi; Golkowski, Mark; University of Colorado Denver Team

    2013-10-01

    ELF/VLF wave generation via HF modulated ionospheric heating has been practiced for many years as a unique way to generate waves in the ELF/VLF band (3 Hz - 30 kHz). This paper presents experimental results and associated theoretical modeling from work performed at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. An experiment was designed to investigate the modulation frequency dependence of the generated ELF/VLF signal amplitudes and polarization at multiple sites at distances of 37 km, 50 km and 99 km from the facility. While no difference is observed for X mode versus O mode modulation of the heating wave, it is found that ELF/VLF amplitude and polarization as a function of modulated ELF/VLF frequency is different for each site. An ionospheric heating code is used to determine the primary current sources leading to the observations.

  8. Pollution Markets with Imperfectly Observed Emissions

    Montero, Juan-Pablo

    2004-01-01

    I study the advantages of pollution permit markets over traditional standard regulations when the regulator has incomplete information on firms? emissions and costs of production and abatement (e.g., air pollution in large cities). Because the regulator only observes each firm?s abatement technology but neither its emissions nor its output, there are cases in which standards can lead to lower emissions and, hence, welfare dominate permits. If permits are optimally combined with standards, in ...

  9. Observational characteristics of ionospheric magnetic VLF wave in the solar minimum year%太阳活动低年电离层磁场VLF波的观测特性研究

    路立; 杨俊英; 曹晋滨; 张学民; 陈化然

    2011-01-01

    Ionospheric VLF wave recorded by the Instrument Magnetometer Search-Coil (IMSC) onboard the DEMETER spacecraft during 2007. The solar minimum year, were investigated statistically. By excluding the influence of geomagnetic activity with geomagnetic active indexes Dst ≤-30 nT, Kp≥3 and AE≥200 nT, the quiet global distributions of power intensity spectrum of VLF wave, and the corresponding statistical error, were displayed for different seasons in both the dayside and the nightside. By using the power spectral global distribution background, the spectrum characteristics, seasonal variations and geomagnetic active responses of the VLF wave were analyzed statistically. The magnetic VLF wave observation in the solar synchronous orbit can also be sensitive to the magnetic anomalies produced from the Earth. At the frequency channel of 15 kHz and 17. 5 kHz, the south Atlantic magnetic anomaly contour was presented clearly with the power spectral enhancement under the global background. The Bermuda geomagnetic anomalies caused VLF wave power spectral increase in almost all spectral bands at the nighttime, and showed about similar geomagnetic active responses as observed at higher latitude. Especially in the frequency band 12. 5~17. 5 kHz, we found that the power spectral increase along the edge of geographical plates, which will enhance our search for ionospheric seismo-response caused by the plate motion, and accumulate experiential background references for such anomalous signal identification quantitatively.%本文利用搭载在DEMETER卫星上的感应式磁力仪(Instrument Magnetometer Search-Coil,IMSC)探测数据分析了磁场甚低频(Very Low Frequency,VLF)波功率谱的空间分布.在排除地磁扰动影响(Dst≤-30 nT,Kp≥3,AE≥200 nT)的前提下,我们给出2007年不同季节,日侧和夜侧,磁场VLF波功率谱的全球分布的背景场探测和对应的统计误差分布.利用太阳活动低年的背景场探测统计分析了磁场VLF

  10. Time-of-arrival analysis applied to ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at HAARP

    Moore, R. C.; Fujimaru, S.

    2012-12-01

    Time-of-arrival (TOA) analysis is applied to observations performed during ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) HF transmitter in Gakona, Alaska. In 2012, a variety of ELF/VLF wave generation techniques were employed to identify the dominant source altitude for each case. Observations were performed for beat-wave modulation, AM modulation, STF modulation, ICD modulation, and cubic frequency modulation, among others. For each of these cases, we identify the dominant ELF/VLF source altitude and compare the experimental results with theoretical HF heating predictions.

  11. Characteristics of VLF/LF Sferics from Elve-producing Lightning Discharges

    Blaes, P.; Zoghzoghy, F. G.; Marshall, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Lightning return strokes radiate an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) which interacts with the D-region ionosphere; the largest EMPs produce new ionization, heating, and optical emissions known as elves. Elves are at least six times more common than sprites and other transient luminous events. Though the probability that a lightning return stroke will produce an elve is correlated with the return stroke peak current, many large peak current strokes do not produce visible elves. Apart from the lightning peak current, elve production may depend on the return stroke speed, lightning altitude, and ionospheric conditions. In this work we investigate the detailed structure of lightning that gives rise to elves by analyzing the characteristics of VLF/LF lightning sferics in conjunction with optical elve observations. Lightning sferics were observed using an array of six VLF/LF receivers (1 MHz sample-rate) in Oklahoma, and elves were observed using two high-speed photometers pointed over the Oklahoma region: one located at Langmuir Laboratory, NM and the other at McDonald Observatory, TX. Hundreds of elves with coincident LF sferics were observed during the summer months of 2013. We present data comparing the characteristics of elve-producing and non-elve producing lightning as measured by LF sferics. In addition, we compare these sferic and elve observations with FDTD simulations to determine key properties of elve-producing lightning.

  12. Observation of very low frequency emissions at Indian Antarctic station, Maitri

    R P Patel; R P Singh; Ashok K Singh; A K Gwal; D Hamar

    2003-10-01

    Recently, we have succeeded in recording VLF emissions at the Indian Antarctic station, Maitri (geom. lat. 62° S, geom. long. 57.23°E, =4.5) using a T-type antenna, pre/main amplifiers and digital audio tape recorder. VLF hiss in the frequency ranges 11–13 kHz and 13–14.5 kHz and some riser-type emissions in the frequency range 3–5 kHz and magnetospheric lines at about 6.2, 8.0 and 9.2 kHz are reported for the first time. The generation and propagation mechanism of these emissions are discussed briefly.

  13. VLF wave injections from the ground

    Helliwell, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments on wave-particle interactions using VLF whistler-mode waves injected into the magnetosphere from Antartica are described. The injected signals are single-frequency coherent waves whose amplitudes and frequencies may be changed slowly with time, or else two or more coherent wave trains transmitted simultaneously to determine the nature of the response to multifrequency excitation. The waves may be amplified 30 dB or more and may trigger intense emissions having bandwidths that vary from a few to several hundred Hertz. In most cases significant growth and triggering occur only when the driving signal is essentially monochromatic (bandwidth 10 Hz). If two frequencies are transmitted simultaneously the signal at the lower frequency tends to be suppressed by 20 dB or more. These results are interpreted in terms of a feedback interaction between the waves and counter-streaming cyclotron resonant electrons in a region several hundred wavelengths long, centered on the magnetic equator.

  14. Simultaneous observations of quasi-periodic (QP) VLF wave emissions and related ULF fluctuations of the geomagnetic field

    Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Santolík, O.; Parrot, M.; Němec, F.

    Paříž: COSPAR, 2014. C0.4-37-14. [COSPAR Scientific Assembly /40th/. 02.08.2014-10.08.2014, in Moscow, Russia, Moskva] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E1176H

  15. Multi-spacecraft observations of quasiperiodic emissions

    Nemec, Frantisek; Pickett, Jolene S.; Hospodarsky, George; Santolik, Ondrej; Bezdekova, Barbora; Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Parrot, Michel; Kurth, William; Kletzing, Craig

    2016-04-01

    Whistler mode electromagnetic waves observed in the inner magnetosphere at frequencies of a few kilohertz sometimes exhibit a nearly periodic modulation of the wave intensity. The modulation periods may range from several tens of seconds up to a few minutes, and such emissions are usually called quasiperiodic (QP) emissions. The origin of these events is still unclear, but it seems that their generation might be related to compressional ULF magnetic field pulsations which periodically modulate resonance conditions in the source region. From an observational point of view, single-point measurements are quite insufficient, as they do not allow us to distinguish between spatial and temporal variations of the emissions. Multipoint observations of these events are, on the other hand, rather rare. We present several QP wave events observed simultaneously by several different spacecraft (Cluster, Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, DEMETER). We demonstrate that although the quasiperiodic modulation is observed over a huge spatial region, individual spacecraft do not see the QP elements at exactly the same times. Moreover, when an event is observed simultaneously on the dawnside and on the duskside, the modulation period observed on the duskside is about twice larger than the modulation period observed on the dawnside. We present a qualitative explanation of these phenomena.

  16. VLF-ELF measurement system

    Chum, Jaroslav; Vojta, Jaroslav

    Lindau : European Geophysical Society, 2001, s. PS12. ISSN 1029-7006. [26th General Assembly of European Geophysical Society. Nice (FR), 25.03.2001-30.03.2001] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 435; GA MŠk ME 391 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Keywords : VLF-ELF measurement system Subject RIV: JV - Space Technology

  17. Influence of power line harmonic radiation on the VLF wave activity in the upper ionosphere: Is it capable to trigger new emissions?

    Němec, František; Parrot, M.; Santolík, Ondřej

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 115, - (2010), A11301/1-A11301/9. ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1253; GA MŠk ME09107 Grant ostatní: MŠMT(CZ) MSM0021620860 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : PLHR events * triggered emissions * DEMETER satellite Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2010

  18. Whistler propagation in ionospheric density ducts: Simulations and DEMETER observations

    Woodroffe, J. R.; Streltsov, A. V.; Vartanyan, A.; Milikh, G. M.

    2013-11-01

    On 16 October 2009, the Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) satellite observed VLF whistler wave activity coincident with an ionospheric heating experiment conducted at HAARP. At the same time, density measurements by DEMETER indicate the presence of multiple field-aligned enhancements. Using an electron MHD model, we show that the distribution of VLF power observed by DEMETER is consistent with the propagation of whistlers from the heating region inside the observed density enhancements. We also discuss other interesting features of this event, including coupling of the lower hybrid and whistler modes, whistler trapping in artificial density ducts, and the interference of whistlers waves from two adjacent ducts.

  19. Magion 5 observations of chorus-like emissions and their propagation features as inferred from ray-tracing simulation

    J. Chum

    Full Text Available After reviewing briefly the present state of knowledge about chorus-like emissions, we present an overview of Magion 5 satellite observations of these emissions in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth. From the extensive VLF data recorded on board the Magion 5 satellite, we show examples of different types of discrete elements, representing rising and falling tones, and discuss their spectral properties, such as the bandwidth and the characteristic frequency as compared to the equatorial electron gyrofrequency. We analyse the possibility of satellite observation of discrete elements, assuming nonducted wave propagation from the source. As for the characteristic dimension of the generation region, we apply the figures obtained from the recently published correlation analysis of chorus emission recorded by four satellites in the Cluster experiment. We conclude that different frequencies in the chorus element should be emitted in a certain span of wave normal angles, so that the whole element could be observed far from the generation region.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere; plasma waves and instabilities – Space plasma physics (wave-particle interactions – Ionosphere (wave propagation

  20. Unexpected Very Low Frequency (VLF) Radio Events Recorded by the Ionospheric Satellite DEMETER

    Parrot, M.; Berthelier, J. J.; Blecki, J.; Brochot, J. Y.; Hobara, Y.; Lagoutte, D.; Lebreton, J. P.; Němec, F.; Onishi, T.; Pinçon, J. L.; Píša, D.; Santolík, O.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Slominska, E.

    2015-05-01

    DEMETER was a low Earth orbiting microsatellite in operation between July 2004 and December 2010. Its scientific objective was the study of ionospheric perturbations in relation to seismic activity and man-made activities. Its payload was designed to measure electromagnetic waves over a large frequency range as well as ionospheric plasma parameters (electron and ion densities, fluxes of energetic charged particles). This paper will show both expected and unusual events recorded by the satellite when it was in operation. These latter events have been selected from the DEMETER database because they are rare or even have never been observed before, because they have a very high intensity, or because they are related to abnormalities of the experiments under particular plasma conditions. Some events are related to man-made radio waves emitted by VLF ground-based transmitters or power line harmonic radiation. Natural waves, such as atypical quasi-periodic emissions or uncommon whistlers, are also shown.

  1. Terrestrial VLF transmitter injection into the magnetosphere

    İnan, Umran Savaş; Cohen, M. B.

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial VLF transmitter injection into the magnetosphere M. B. Cohen1 and U. S. Inan1,2 Received 1 June 2012; revised 15 June 2012; accepted 18 June 2012; published 9 August 2012. [1] Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3–30 kHz) radio waves emitted from ground sources (transmitters and lightning) strongly impact the radiation belts, driving electron precipitation via whistler-electron gyroresonance, and contributing to the formation of the slot region. However, calculations of the...

  2. Satellite observation of plasma-wave disturbances induced by high-power radio emission from the NWC transmitter

    In this work, we present the results of in-situ measurements of the characteristics of electromagnetic and plasma disturbances in the ionospheric region modified by high-power emission from the NWC transmitter, which were obtained using the onboard equipment of the French microsatellite DEMETER. It is shown that under the influence of VLF emissions from the ground-based transmitters, artificial plasma-wave channels with typical transverse scales of about 1000 km can be formed in the ionospheric plasma.

  3. The stopping time of the ULF/VLF wave and energetic (

    Anagnostopoulos, George; Athanasiou, Michael; Vassiliadis, Basil; Karli, Anna; Fotinopoulos, Stavros

    2014-05-01

    An elaboration of the Demeter observations made in the topside ionosphere above Greece reveals the following constrains with the great (M≥6.4) earthquakes (EQs) occurred in the Greek territory: (1) ULF/VLF wave and electron precipitation (EP) activity was recorded by DEMETER for some days before the earthquake occurrence time, (2) all three phenomena (ULF/VLF/EP) ceased a few hours before all the Greek earthquakes. Therefore, we infer that the satellite observations above Greece during the period 2005-2010 are consistent with the stopping time of ULF/VLF/EP activity as a short time (few hours) earthquake predictor. These results for Greek EQs are in agreement with statistical results from an examination of the ULF/VLF/EP variations observed by DEMETER before the majority of the great (M≥7) earthquakes occurred worldwide, during the same period (2005-2010). Precise statistical results of the ULF/VLF/EP beginning and stopping times before the M≥7 before EQs are also presented in this work.

  4. 100 Days of ELF/VLF Generation via HF Heating with HAARP (Invited)

    Cohen, M.; Golkowski, M.

    2013-12-01

    ELF/VLF radio waves are difficult to generate with conventional antennas. Ionospheric HF heating facilities generate ELF/VLF waves via modulated heating of the lower ionosphere. HF heating of the ionosphere changes the lower ionospheric conductivity, which in the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet, creates an antenna in the sky when heating is modulated at ELF/VLF frequencies. We present a summary of nearly 100 days of ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the 3.6 MW HAARP facility near Gakona, Alaska, and provide a baseline reference of ELF/VLF generation capabilities with HF heating. Between February 2007 and August 2008, HAARP was operated on close to 100 days for ELF/VLF wave generation experiments, at a variety of ELF/VLF frequencies, seasons and times of day. We present comprehensive statistics of generated ELF/VLF magnetic fields observed at a nearby site, in the 500-3500 Hz band. Transmissions with a specific HF beam configuration (3.25 MHz, vertical beam, amplitude modulation) are isolated so the data comparison is self-consistent, across nearly 5 million individual measurements of either a tone or a piece of a frequency-time ramp. There is a minimum in the average generation close to local midnight. It is found that generation during local nighttime is on average weaker, but more highly variable, with a small number of very strong generation periods. Signal amplitudes from day to day may vary by as much as 20-30 dB. Generation strengthens by ~5 dB during the first ~30 minutes of transmission, which may be a signature of slow electron density changes from sustained HF heating. Theoretical calculations are made to relate the amplitude observed to the power injected into the waveguide and reaching 250 km. The median power generated by HAARP and injected into the waveguide is ~0.05-0.1 W in this base-line configuration (vertical beam, 3.25 MHz, amplitude modulation), but may have generated hundreds of Watts for brief durations

  5. Comparative statistical and spectral studies of seismic and non-seismic sub-ionospheric VLF anomalies

    Wolbang, Daniel; Biernat, Helfried; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Eichelberger, Hans; Prattes, Gustav; Besser, Bruno; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Rozhnoi, Alexander; Solovieva, Maria; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Friedrich, Martin

    2013-04-01

    measured and derived VLF parameters are compared with VLF observations several weeks before an earthquake (e.g. L'Aquila, Italy, April 6, 2009) and with co- and post-seismic phenomena. It is shown that this comparative study will improve the one parameter seismo-electromagnetic VLF methods. References: [1] A. Molchanov, M. Hayakawa: Seismo-Electromagnetics and related Phenomena: History and latest results, Terrapub, 2008. [2] S. Pulinets, K. Boyarchuk: Ionospheric Precursors of Earthquakes, Springer, 2004 [3] A. Rozhnoi et al.: Observation evidences of atmospheric Gravity Waves induced by seismic activity from analysis of subionospheric LF signal spectra, National Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 7, 625-628, 2007.

  6. Radio emission modelization - Observables and interpretation

    Riviere, C., E-mail: riviere@in2p3.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, UJF, INPG, CNRS/IN2P3, Grenoble (France); Chauvin, J.; Montanet, F.; Lebrun, D. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, UJF, INPG, CNRS/IN2P3, Grenoble (France); Revenu, B. [SUBATECH, Universite de Nantes/Ecole des Mines de Nantes/IN2P3-CNRS, Nantes (France)

    2012-01-11

    Radio detection techniques of extensive air shower are currently being reinvested. Experiment with unprecedented quality of data are ongoing and different emission models are being investigated. We report here two complementary approaches of the geosynchrotron emission, trying to emphasize field features which can be confronted to experimental data or help its interpretation - among which a -v Multiplication-Sign B dependency.

  7. ELF/VLF wave disturbances detected by the DEMETER satellite over the HAARP transmitter

    Titova, Elena; Demekhov, Andrei; Parrot, Michel; Mogilevsky, Mikhail; Mochalov, Alexey; Pashin, Anatoly

    We report observations of electromagnetic the ELF/VLF wave disturbances by the DEMETER satellite (670 km altitude) overflying the HAARP heating facility (62.39(°) N, 145.15(°) W, L = 4.9). The HAARP HF transmitter operated at the maximum available power of 3.6 MW, O-mode polarization, and the beam directed towards the magnetic zenith. ELF/VLF waves caused by the HAARP heating are detected by the DEMETER satellite when the HF radio wave frequency was close to the critical frequency (foF2) of the ionospheric F2 layer but below it. ELF/VLF wave disturbances observed above the HAARP transmitter were detected by electrical antennas in an area with characteristic size 10 (2) km. We analyze amplitude and polarization spectra of the ELF disturbances and compare them with the characteristics of natural ELF hiss above HAARP. The VLF wave disturbances in the topside ionosphere above the HAARP transmitter were detected in the frequency ranges 8-17 kHz and 15-18 kHz which are close to the lower hybrid resonance frequency f _LHR in the heating region and its second harmonic (2f _LHR), respectively. In the case where the HAARP HF power was modulated, the detected VLF waves were also modulated with the same frequency whereas in the ELF frequency range the modulation period of the HAARP power was not observed. Possible mechanisms of generation of the ELF/VLF disturbances produced by the HAARP transmitter in the topside ionosphere are discussed.

  8. Detection of local and long-path VLF/ELF radiation from modulated ionospheric current systems

    Lunnen, R. J.; Ferraro, A. J.; Lee, H. S.; Allshouse, R.; Carroll, K.; Werner, D.; Collins, T. W.

    1985-06-01

    The characteristics of long-path VLF/ELF radiation detected in an RF-heated region of the ionosphere are described. The heating transmitter was modulated by a VLF/ELF frequency. Transmitters were located at sites in Puerto Rico, Norway and Peru, and receivers were in Puerto Rico and Pennsylvania. Heating was carried out at 3.17 MHz. The data indicated that the heating radiation traveled for thousands of kilometers in the atmospheric waveguide. The development of automated FFTs and correlators is recommended in order to take advantage of the communications opportunities offered by the long paths observed.

  9. Multi-spacecraft observations of quasiperiodic emissions

    Němec, F.; Pickett, J. S.; Hospodarsky, G.; Santolík, Ondřej; Bezděková, B.; Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Parrot, M.; Kurth, W.; Kletzing, C.

    Göttingen: European Geosciences Union, 2016. EGU 2016-2629-1. ISSN 1607-7962. [EGU General Assembly 2016. 17.04.2016-22.04.2016, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : QP emissions * inner magnetosphere Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2016/EGU2016-2629-1.pdf

  10. Cosmic rays from multiwavelength observations of the Galactic diffuse emission

    Orlando, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic rays (CRs) generate diffuse emission while interacting with the Galactic magnetic field (B-field), the interstellar gas and the radiation field. This diffuse emission extends from radio, microwaves, through X-rays, to high-energy gamma rays. Diffuse emission has considerably increased the interest of the astrophysical community due to recent detailed observations by Planck, Fermi-LAT, and by very-high-energy Cherenkov telescopes. Observations of this emission and comparison with detailed predictions are used to gain information on the properties of CRs, such as their density, spectra, distribution and propagation in the Galaxy. Unfortunately disentangling and characterizing this diffuse emission strongly depends on uncertainties in the knowledge of unresolved sources, gas, radiation fields, and B-fields, other than CRs throughout the Galaxy. We report here on recent multiwavelength observations of the Galactic diffuse emission, and discuss the diffuse emission produced by CRs and its model uncertaintie...

  11. Prompt Emission Observations of Swift BAT Bursts

    Barthelmy, Scott

    2009-01-01

    We review the prompt emission properties of Swift BAT gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We present the global properties of BAT GRBs based on their spectral and temporal characteristics. The BAT T90 and T50 durations peak at 80 and 20 s, respectively. The peak energy (Epeak) of about 60% of BAT GRBs is very likely to be less than 1.00 keV. We also present the BAT characteristics of GRBs with soft spectra, so called Xray flashes (XRFs). We will compare the BAT GRBs and XRFs parameter distribution to the other missions.

  12. Excitation of VLF quasi-electrostatic oscillations in the ionospheric plasma

    B. Lundin

    Full Text Available A numerical solution of the dispersion equation for electromagnetic waves in a hot magnetized collisionless plasma has shown that, in a current-free ionospheric plasma, the distortion of the electron distribution function reproducing the downward flow of a thermal electron component and the compensating upward flow of the suprathermal electrons, which are responsible for the resulting heat flux, can destabilize quasi-electrostatic ion sound waves. The numerical analysis, performed with ion densities and electron temperature taken from the data recorded by the Interkosmos-24 (IK-24, Aktivny satellite, is compared with a VLF spectrum registered at the same time on board. This spectrum shows a wide frequency band emission below the local ion plasma frequency. The direction of the electron heat flux inherent to the assumed model of VLF emission generation is discussed

  13. Excitation of whistler mode signals via injection of polarized VLF waves with the Siple transmitter

    Whistler mode waves of various polarizations were transmitted by the Siple Station, Antarctica, VLF transmitter and received near the geomagnetic conjugate point at Lake Mistissini, Quebec. Crossed 21-km horizontal dipole antennas on top of the 2-km-thick ice sheet were used to transmit 2- to 4-kHz waves alternately with right-hand circular, left-hand circular, and linear polarizations. Excitation of a multiplicity of magnetospheric propagation paths and the received signal strength were observed to depend on the transmitter antenna polarization. Where whistler mode growth and emission triggering occurred, saturated peak values of received signals were independent of antenna polarization and initial injected power levels, in agreement with previous findings. Propagation paths of ducted Siple signals observed at Lake Mistissini were identified with propagation paths deduced from natural whistlers, from which the L shell values and equatorial number densities for the paths were calculated. A combination of L shell data and models of antenna coupling into the whistler mode may aid in the location of ducts. Dynamics Explorer I satellite recordings of unducted Siple signals showed trends similar to the ground data on ducted signals. The observations are discussed in the context of a simplified model of the coupling from the Siple antenna into the ionosphere, which provides reasonable agreement with observations. 14 refs

  14. Study of the effect of solar flares on VLF signals during D-layer preparation or disappearance time

    Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Palit, Sourav

    2016-07-01

    "Very Low Frequency" (VLF) is one of the bands of the Radio waves having frequency 3-30 KHz, which propagates through the Earth-ionosphere wave-guide. In relation to propagation of radio waves through ionosphere, low mass and high mobility cause electrons to play a vital role. Electrons are not distributed uniformly in the ionosphere and depending on this factor, ionosphere has different layers namely D, E and F. Different ionospheric layers generally exist during day and night time. During day-time when the main source of the ionization of the ionosphere is Sun, the lower most layer of ionosphere is D-layer. But during the night-time when Sun is absent and cosmic ray is the main source of the ionization of the ionosphere, this D-layer disappears and E-layer becomes the lower most region of the ionosphere. Normally, patterns of VLF signal depend on regular solar flux variations. However, during solar flares extra energetic particles are released from Sun, which makes the changes in the ionization of the ionosphere and these changes can perturb VLF signal amplitude. Usually if a solar flare occurs during any time of day, it only affects the amplitude and phase of the VLF signals. But in the present work, we found the if the flare occurs during D-layer preparation / disappearance time, then it will not only affect to amplitude and phase of the VLF signals but also to terminator times of VLF signals. We have observed that the sun set terminator time of the VLF signals shifted towards night time due to the effect of a M-class solar flare which occurred during the D-layer disappearance time. The shift is so high that it crossed 5σ level. We are now trying to a make model using the ion-chemistry and LWPC code to explain this observed effect.

  15. Observation of infrared emission spectra from silicon combustion products

    Smit, Kenneth J.; De Yong, Leo V.; Gray, Rodney

    1996-05-01

    The combustion of silicon based pyrotechnic compositions is observed with time resolved infrared spectrometry. This revealed the build up of strong emission at 9.1 ± 0.1 μm, which is associated with condensed silicon dioxide particulates. Time averaged spectra for compositions containing different oxidants or binders illustrate the dependence of SiO 2 emission intensity on composition.

  16. Suzaku Observations of Charge Exchange Emission from Solar System Objects

    Ezoe, Y.; Fujimoto, R.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Ohashi, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Oishi, S.; Miyoshi, Y; Terada, N.; Futaana, Y.; Porter, F. S.; Brown, G. V.

    2012-01-01

    Recent results of charge exchange emission from solar system objects observed with the Japanese Suzaku satellite are reviewed. Suzaku is of great importance to investigate diffuse X-ray emission like the charge exchange from planetary exospheres and comets. The Suzaku studies of Earth's exosphere, Martian exosphere, Jupiter's aurorae, and comets are overviewed.

  17. VLF radio propagation conditions. Computational analysis techniques

    Complete text of publication follows. Very low frequency (VLF) radio waves propagate within the Earth-ionosphere waveguide with very little attenuation. Modifications of the waveguide geometry effect the propagation conditions, and hence, the attenuation. Changes in the ionosphere, such as the presence of the D-region during the day, or the precipitation of energetic particles, are the main causes of this modification. Using narrowband receivers monitoring VLF transmitters, the amplitude and phase of these signals are recorded. Multivariate data analysis techniques, namely Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA), are applied to the data in order to determine parameters, such as seasonal and diurnal changes, affecting the variation of these signals. Transient effects may then be easier to detect.

  18. Investigation of TEC and VLF space measurements associated to L'Aquila (Italy earthquakes

    G. Stangl

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report on Total Electron Content (TEC and Very Low Frequency (VLF space measurements derived from Global Positioning System (GPS and DEMETER satellites, respectively. These measurements are associated with the earthquake (EQ of a magnitude of 6.3, which occurred on 6 April 2009, in L'Aquila (Italy. Anomaly features are derived from the analysis of TEC and VLF observations recorded two weeks before and after the seismic event occurrence. A TEC map with an interpolated regional pixel resolution of 1° × 1° × 15 min in latitude, longitude and time was generated, allowing for the checking of a possible presence of disturbances over the L'Aquila region. This analysis is combined with the study of the time profile associated to the VLF flux density variations recorded by the Instrument Champ Electrique (ICE experiment on-board DEMETER satellite. We discuss, on the one hand, the combination efficiency of the electronic density and the VLF electromagnetic measurements and, on the other hand, the difficulty to distinguish between global effects and regional ones related to the earthquake.

  19. Study of latitudinal effects on VLF transmitter signals recorded by DEMETER/ICE experiment

    Boudjada, M. Y.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Berthelier, J. J.; Döller, R.; Galopeau, P. H. M.; Parrot, M.; Stangl, G.; Biernat, H.; Voller, W.; Besser, B.

    2010-05-01

    We report on VLF transmitter signals observed by the ‘Instrument Capteur Electrique' (ICE) experiment onboard the DEMETER micro-satellite. The DEMETER polar and circular sun-synchronous orbits lead to cover an invariant latitude range between -65° and +65° where up- and down-going half-orbits correspond to night-time (22:00 LT) and day-time (10:00 LT), respectively. The DEMETER orbit features permit to record signals emitted by some VLF ground-stations and detected by ICE experiment. We consider three transmitter signals emitted by stations in Europe (Germany, DFY, 16.58 kHz), in Asia (Japan, JP, 17.8 kHz) and in Australia (Australia, NWC, 19.8 kHz). We study the variation of these VLF signals taking into consideration the DEMETER satellite latitudes .We emphasis on latitudes where the satellite is close to the Earth's sub-auroral regions. We discuss particularly the presence, or not, of auroral magnetic activity effect on the VLF transmitter signals.

  20. Power line emission 50/60 Hz and Schumann resonances observed by microsatellite Chibis-M in the Earth's ionosphere

    Dudkin, Denys; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Dudkin, Fedir; Pronenko, Vira; Klimov, Stanislav

    2015-04-01

    The overhead power lines are the sources of intense wideband electromagnetic (EM) emission, especially in ELF-VLF range, because of significant length (up to a few thousand kilometers) and strong 50/60 Hz currents with noticeable distortion. The radiation efficiency of the power line emission (PLE) increases with the harmonic order, so they are well observed by ground-based EM sensors. However their observations by low orbiting satellites (LEO) are very rare, particularly at basic harmonic 50/60 Hz, because of the ionospheric plasma opacity in ELF band. The Schumann resonance (SR) is the narrow-band EM noise that occurs due to the global thunderstorm activity in the Earth-ionosphere cavity. The first five eigenmodes of the SR are 7.8, 14.3, 20.8, 27.3 and 33.8 Hz and, thus, SR harmonics are also strongly absorbed by the Earth ionosphere. The published numerical simulations show that the penetration depth of such an ELF emission into the Earth's ionosphere is limited to 50-70 km for electric field and 120-240 km for magnetic field. From this follows, that PLE and SR can hardly ever be detected by LEO satellites, i.e. above the F-layer of ionosphere. In spite of this fact, these emissions were recently observed with use of the electric field antennas placed on the satellites C/NOFS (USA) and Chibis-M (Russia). Microsatellite Chibis-M was launched on January 24, 2012, at 23:18:30 UTC from the cargo ship "Progress M-13M" to circular orbit with altitude ~500 km and inclination ~52° . Chibis-M mass is about 40 kg where one third is a scientific instrumentation. The dimensions of the microsatellite case are 0.26x0.26x0.54 m with the outside mounted solar panels, service and scientific instrumentation. The main scientific objective of Chibis-M is the theoretical model verification for the atmospheric gamma-ray bursts. It requires the study of the accompanying EM processes such as the plasma waves produced by the lightning discharges in the VLF band. Chibis-M decayed on 15

  1. 100 days of ELF/VLF generation via HF heating with HAARP

    Cohen, M. B.; Gołkowski, M.

    2013-10-01

    Extremely low frequency/very low frequency (ELF/VLF) radio waves are difficult to generate with conventional antennas. Ionospheric high frequency (HF) heating facilities generate ELF/VLF waves via modulated heating of the lower ionosphere. HF heating of the ionosphere changes the lower ionospheric conductivity, which in the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet creates an antenna in the sky when heating is modulated at ELF/VLF frequencies. We present a summary of nearly 100 days of ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the 3.6 MW High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility near Gakona, Alaska, at a variety of ELF/VLF frequencies, seasons, and times of day. We present comprehensive statistics of generated ELF/VLF magnetic fields observed at a nearby site, in the 500-3500 Hz band. Transmissions with a specific HF beam configuration (3.25 MHz, vertical beam, amplitude modulation) are isolated so the data comparison is self-consistent, across nearly 5 million individual measurements of either a tone or a piece of a frequency-time ramp. There is a minimum in the average generation close to local midnight. It is found that generation during local nighttime is on average weaker but more highly variable, with a small number of very strong generation periods. Signal amplitudes from day to day may vary by as much as 20-30 dB. Generation strengthens by ˜5 dB during the first ˜30 min of transmission, which may be a signature of slow electron density changes from sustained HF heating. Theoretical calculations are made to relate the amplitude observed to the power injected into the waveguide and reaching 250 km. The median power generated by HAARP and injected into the waveguide is ˜0.05-0.1 W in this baseline configuration (vertical beam, 3.25 MHz, amplitude modulation) but may have generated hundreds of watts for brief durations. Several efficiency improvements have improved the ELF/VLF wave generation efficiency further.

  2. Observation of Polarised Microwave Emission from Cosmic Ray Air Showers

    Smida, R; Engel, R; Arteaga-Velazquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hoerandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kroemer, O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Mathys, S; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Neunteufel, P; Oehlschlaeger, J; Palmieri, N; Pekala, J; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Riegel, M; Roth, M; Salamida, F; Schieler, H; Schoo, S; Schroeder, F G; Sima, O; Stasielak, J; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Unger, M; Weber, M; Weindl, A; Wilczynski, H; Will, M; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first direct measurement of the basic features of microwave radio emission from extensive air showers. Using a trigger provided by the KASCADE-Grande air shower array, the signals of the microwave antennas of the CROME (Cosmic-Ray Observation via Microwave Emission) experiment have been read out and searched for signatures of radio emission by high-energy air showers. Microwave signals have been detected for more than 30 showers with energies above $3\\times10^{16}$\\,eV. The observations presented in this Letter are consistent with a mainly forward-beamed, coherent and polarised emission process in the GHz frequency range. An isotropic, unpolarised radiation is disfavoured as the dominant emission model. The measurements show that microwave radiation offers a new means of studying air showers at very high energy.

  3. MSX Observations of Diffuse UV Emission in Orion

    Murthy, J; Paxton, L J; Price, S D; Murthy, Jayant

    2001-01-01

    We have observed intense diffuse radiation in the UV (1400 A - 2600 A) from three fields around M42 in Orion. Intensities of 20000 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1 A-1 were observed to the east and west of M42 with 8000 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1 A-1 south of the nebula. Enhanced emission, perhaps associated with a nearby complex of molecular clouds observed in CO, was detected in one of the fields. The IRAS 100 micron emission in that region is highly correlated with the UV intensity with a UV-IR ratio of 40 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1 A-1 (MJy sr-1)-1. In the other two fields there was no structure in the diffuse emission nor was there any correlation with the IRAS emission.

  4. Tectonomagnetic and VLF electromagnetic signals in Central Italy

    P. Palangio

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Tectonomagnetic field observations from absolute magnetic field level measurements were undertaken in Central Italy in an area extending between latitude 41°N and 43°N and between longitude 13°E and 15°E. Moreover,natural electromagnetic signals from a system of two VLF search coil wide-band antennas were collected at the geomagnetic observatory of L Aquila (42º23'N, 13º19'E. The analysis of these data allowed the investigation of the electromagnetic properties of the study area at different time and spatial lengthscales. Tectonomagnetic field observations were obtained comparing data simultaneously recorded at three magnetometer stations using L'Aquila Observatory as a reference for differentiation. We report on the time evolution of magnetic and electromagnetic indicators related to local and regional seismic activity.

  5. Observations of gamma-ray emission in solar flares

    This paper reviews the observations of gamma-ray emission made from the OSO-7 satellite in connection with two solar flares in early August 1972. The details of the measurements and a preliminary interpretation of some of the observed features are given. (U.S.)

  6. Upper Limits on O VI Emission from Voyager Observations

    Jayant Murthy

    2002-03-01

    We have examined 426 Voyager fields distributed across the sky for O VI ( 1032/1038 Å) emission from the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium. No such emission was detected in any of our observed fields. Our most constraining limit was a 90% confidence upper limit of 2600 photons cm-2 sr-1 s-1 on the doublet emission in the direction (l, b) = (117.3, 50.6). Combining this with an absorption line measurement in nearly the same direction allows us to place an upper limit of 0.01 cm-3 on the electron density of the hot gas in this direction. We have placed 90% confidence upper limits of less than or equal to 10,000 photons cm-2 sr-1 s-1 on the O VI emission in 16 of our 426 observations.

  7. Jupiter's Various Auroral Emission Enhancements Observed by Hisaki/EXCEED

    Tao, Chihiro

    2016-07-01

    Onboard a JAXA Earth-orbiting platform, the planetary telescope Hisaki monitors extreme ultraviolet emissions from Jovian aurora and Io plasma torus continuously. Hisaki succeeded to detect sporadic, large auroral power enhancements displaying both short- (a few rotations) variations and their modulations by Io's volcanic activity over several weeks. The spectral information taken by Hisaki enables us to investigate (1) the time variation of the auroral electron precipitating fluxes during these emission enhancements, (2) the occurrence statistics of polar-dominant events, and (3) the associated magnetospheric dynamics for these emission enhancement events using Knight's aurora acceleration theory. Expected collaborative observations with Juno will be discussed.

  8. Observed impact of aerosols on Arctic cloud emissivity

    2011-01-01

    IPCC results indicate that the main bulk of uncertainties on global warming is within aerosol-cloud interactions. Based on observations this thesis aims to measure how anthropogenic aerosol from mid-latitudes increase emissivity of clouds in the Arctic, thus increasing Arctic surface temperatures. Until recently this effect have been thought insignificant, but recent studies indicate that in the Arctic, many clouds may be susceptible to changes in emissivity. This is due to the few CCN an...

  9. Quantifying surface emissions of methanol using observations from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer

    Wells, K. C.; Millet, D. B.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Shephard, M. W.; Luo, M.; Henze, D. K.

    2012-12-01

    Methanol is the most abundant non-methane organic compound in the atmosphere, and a precursor of carbon monoxide, formaldehyde and ozone. Biogenic emissions from terrestrial plants constitute the largest fraction of the global methanol source, while biomass burning and anthropogenic emissions can make significant contributions on a regional scale. The recent availability of tropospheric methanol observations from space provides a powerful new constraint for understanding methanol emission processes on a global scale. Here we employ two years of global methanol observations from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) with the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem CTM to quantify the surface methanol flux, and interpret the results in terms of emission rates from different plant functional types. The satellite data imply a downward revision of the model emissions in portions of the tropics, and an upward revision in midlatitudes. The largest increases to the model emissions occur in areas that are dominated by shrubs and grasses, suggesting a refinement in methanol emission factors as a function of plant functional type. Applying the optimized emission rates in the model results in an improvement of the simulation as compared to an ensemble of airborne and ground-based observations.

  10. Effect of a heated patch of auroral ionosphere on VLF-radio wave propagation

    The development of a unique high frequency heating facility near Tromso, Norway, has made the generation of movable controlled anomalies in the D-region become possible. The authors describe here some initial observations, made in Norway, of the effect of such a movable D-region anomaly on the VLF signals received from the 12.1-kHz Omega transmitter at Aldra. The observations confirm the validity of earlier theoretical predictions. (author)

  11. Observation of Broadband Ultraviolet Emission From Hg 3 *

    Chen, Wenting; Glavin, Thomas; Eden, James; Laboratory for Optical Physics; Engineering Team

    2016-05-01

    A previously-unobserved emission continuum, peaking at ~ 380 nm, has been observed when Hg vapor is photoexcited at 248 nm (KrF laser). Attributed to the mercury trimer, Hg3, this emission continuum has a spectral breadth (FWHM) which increases from ~ 65 nm to ~ 90 nm when the Hg number density rises from ~1016 cm-3 to ~ 2 ×1019 cm-3. Over the same interval in [Hg], the emission decay rate increases only slightly (~ 6 ×103 s-1 to ~ 7 ×103 s-1). Comparisons of the observed spectrum with theory suggest that the observed continuum is the result of transitions between pairs of electronic states having a linear or equilateral triangular configuration.

  12. Statistical analysis of VLF radio emissions triggered by power line harmonic radiation and observed by the low-altitude satellite DEMETER

    Parrot, M.; Němec, F.; Santolík, Ondřej

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 7 (2014), s. 5744-5754. ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2279; GA MŠk LH12231 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : man-made waves * ionosphere Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JA020139/abstract

  13. SCIAMACHY formaldehyde observations: constraint for isoprene emission estimates over Europe?

    G. Dufour

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde (HCHO is an important intermediate compound in the degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs in the troposphere. Sources of HCHO are largely dominated by its secondary production from VOC oxidation, methane and isoprene being the main precursors in unpolluted areas. As a result of the moderate lifetime of HCHO, its spatial distribution is determined by reactive hydrocarbon emissions. We focus here on Europe and investigate the influence of the different emissions on HCHO tropospheric columns with the CHIMERE chemical transport model in order to interpret the comparisons between SCIAMACHY and simulated HCHO columns. Europe was never specifically studied before for these purposes using satellite observations. The bias between measurements and model is less than 20% on average. The differences are discussed according to the errors on the model and the observations and remaining discrepancies are attributed to a misrepresentation of biogenic emissions. This study requires the characterisation of: (1 the model errors and performances concerning formaldehyde. The errors on the HCHO columns, mainly related to chemistry and mixed emission types, are evaluated to 2×1015 molecule/cm2 and the model performances evaluated using surface measurements are satisfactory (~13%; (2 the observation errors that define the needs in spatial and temporal averaging for meaningful comparisons. Using SCIAMACHY observations as constraint for biogenic isoprene emissions in an inverse modelling scheme reduces their uncertainties by about a factor of two in region of intense emissions. The retrieved correction factors for the isoprene emissions range from a factor of 0.15 (North Africa to a factor of 2 (Poland, the United Kingdom depending on the regions.

  14. Radio emission from magnetic exoplanets: GMRT observations and results

    Majid, W.; Winterhalter, D.; Kuiper, T.; Lazio, J.

    2011-10-01

    Massive extrasolar planets are expected to emit, in analogy with Jupiter and Saturn, detectable radio emission at low frequencies. We have carried out a series of observations of known extrasolar planetary systems at 150 MHz with the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) in both interferometric and phased array modes. We will describe our observing campaign, target list, and preliminary results from studies of dynamic spectra. As low frequency observations are plagued with RFI, we will focus on observing strategies and analysis techniques to minimize, identify and remove RFI effects from dynamic spectra. We will also briefly discuss prospects for similar searches with future instruments such as LOFAR, the LWA, and the SKA instruments.

  15. Land Surface Microwave Emissivity Dynamics: Observations, Analysis and Modeling

    Tian, Yudong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Kumar, Sujay; Ringerud, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Land surface microwave emissivity affects remote sensing of both the atmosphere and the land surface. The dynamical behavior of microwave emissivity over a very diverse sample of land surface types is studied. With seven years of satellite measurements from AMSR-E, we identified various dynamical regimes of the land surface emission. In addition, we used two radiative transfer models (RTMs), the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) and the Community Microwave Emission Modeling Platform (CMEM), to simulate land surface emissivity dynamics. With both CRTM and CMEM coupled to NASA's Land Information System, global-scale land surface microwave emissivities were simulated for five years, and evaluated against AMSR-E observations. It is found that both models have successes and failures over various types of land surfaces. Among them, the desert shows the most consistent underestimates (by approx. 70-80%), due to limitations of the physical models used, and requires a revision in both systems. Other snow-free surface types exhibit various degrees of success and it is expected that parameter tuning can improve their performances.

  16. Models of ionospheric VLF absorption of powerful ground based transmitters

    İnan, Umran Savaş; Cohen, M. B; Lehtinen, N. G

    2012-01-01

    Models of ionospheric VLF absorption of powerful ground based transmitters M. B. Cohen,1 N. G. Lehtinen,1 and U. S. Inan1,2 Received 5 November 2012; accepted 16 November 2012; published 29 December 2012. [1] Ground based Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3–30 kHz) radio transmitters play a role in precipitation of energetic Van Allen electrons. Initial analyses of the contribution of VLF transmitters to radiation belt losses were based on early models of trans-ionospheric prop...

  17. Multi-Spacecraft Observations of Saturn Kilometric Radio Emission

    MacDowall, R. J.; Hess, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) is the auroral radio emission of Saturn, which has been observed by Voyager 1 & 2, Cassini, and Ulysses. Ulysses is able to detect the intense intervals of SKR from distances up to 10 AU, because of its long antennas (72 m tip-to-tip) and sensitive radio receivers. Studies of SKR by A. Lecacheux gave the surprising result that the periodicity of SKR varied with time; it was not locked to a planetary rotation of Saturn. This result has been confirmed by Cassini radio observations. Here, we compare Ulysses and Cassini observations of SKR to constrain a mode! for the SKR emission geometry. SpecifIcally, we examine the question - are the brighter sources of 5KR fixed in Saturn longitude or local time? The results have significant consequences for our understanding of SKR and its varying periodicity

  18. Evidence for Nonlinear VLF Wave Physics from Van Allen Probe Data

    Crabtree, C. E.; Tejero, E. M.; Ganguli, G.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    VLF waves in the whistler mode branch in the Earth's radiation belts play a critical role in both the acceleration and loss of energetic electrons. VLF waves are often observed with magnetic field amplitudes that are a significant fraction of the background magnetic field suggesting that nonlinear effects may be important. We develop new Bayesian time-series analysis tools to investigate magnetic and electric field data from the EMFISIS instrument on board the Van Allen Probes. We also validate the analysis techniques through laboratory experiments. We apply these tools to Chorus waves to show that the picture of a single coherent plane wave is insufficient to explain EMFISIS data and that nonlinear collective wave interactions play an important role in moderating Chorus wave growth. We also apply these techniques to show that nonlinear induced scattering by thermal electrons can play a significant role in controlling the propagation of large amplitude lightning generated whistlers inside the plasmasphere.

  19. Cyclotron side-band emissions from ring-current electrons

    Maeda, K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines temporal variations in electron energy spectra and pitch-angle distributions during a VLF-emission event observed by Explorer 45 in the main phase of a magnetic storm. It is noted that the observed event occurred outside the plasmasphere on the night side of the magnetosphere and that the dusk-side plasmapause had a double structure during the event. It is found that the VLF emissions consisted of two frequency bands, corresponding to the whistler and electrostatic modes, and that there was a sharp band of 'missing emissions' along frequencies equal to half the equatorial electron gyrofrequency. A peculiar pitch-angle distribution for high-energy electrons (50 to 350 keV) is noted. It is concluded that the VLF-producing particles were enhanced low-energy (about 5 keV) ring-current electrons which penetrated into the night side of the magnetosphere from the magnetotail plasma sheet and which drifted eastward after encountering the steep gradient of the geomagnetic field.

  20. Optical emission spectroscopy observations of fast pulsed capillary discharge plasmas

    Avaria, G.; Ruiz, M.; Guzmán, F.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E. S.; Chuaqui, H.; Bhuyan, H.

    2014-05-01

    We present time resolved optical emission spectroscopic (OES) observations of a low energy, pulsed capillary discharage (PCD). The optical emission from the capillary plasma and plasma jets emitted from the capillary volume was recorded with with a SpectraPro 275 spectrograph, fitted with a MCP gated OMA system, with 15 ns time resolution. The discharge was operated with different gases, including argon, nitrogen, hydrogen and methane, in a repetitive pulsed discharge mode at 10-50 Hz, with, 10-12 kV pulses applied at the cathode side. The time evolution of the electron density was measured using Stark broadening of the Hβ line. Several features of the capillary plasma dynamics, such as ionization growth, wall effects and plasma jet evolution, are inferred from the time evolution of the optical emission.

  1. Observation of dispersive wave emission by temporal cavity solitons.

    Jang, Jae K; Erkintalo, Miro; Murdoch, Stuart G; Coen, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    We examine a coherently-driven, dispersion-managed, passive Kerr fiber ring resonator and report, to the best of our knowledge, the first direct experimental observation of dispersive wave emission by temporal cavity solitons (CSs). Our observations are in excellent agreement with analytical predictions and they are fully corroborated by numerical simulations. These results lead to a better understanding of the behavior of temporal CSs under conditions where higher-order dispersion plays a significant role. Significantly, since temporal CSs manifest themselves in monolithic microresonators, our results are likely to explain the origins of spectral features observed in broadband Kerr frequency combs. PMID:25360913

  2. Hydrogeological investigation in Santiago Island (Cabo Verde) using magnetotellurics and VLF methods

    Monteiro Santos, Fernando A.; Almeida, Eugénio P.; Gomes, Mota; Pina, António

    2006-08-01

    A geoelectromagnetic research was carried out in the Santa Cruz region (Santiago Island, Cabo Verde) during June 2004. The survey comprised MT soundings and VLF profiles. The main purpose of the MT profile, carried out across three important valleys associated with freshwater aquifers, was to study the tectonic structures correlated to seawater infiltration. The VLF method was used inside of the valleys for investigating shallow structures related to the aquifer contamination by seawater. Numerical modelling shows that the ocean effect is not important for MT data collected at periods shorter than 1 s. The MT data were inverted using a two-dimensional approach, to obtain the sub-superficial electrical conductivity distribution. The VLF data were processed applying the Karous-Hjelt filters to obtain the equivalent current distribution and inverted using 2-D approach. The results obtained in one of the most important valleys show anomalous current concentration/low resistivity (<20 Ω m) areas at depths greater than 40 m that may correspond to an increase in seawater content. The MT data modelling show that the deep zones beneath the valley are strongly fractured representing good pathways for seawater circulation. The depth of the conductive zones increases from south to north, suggesting a northward decreasing of the seawater infiltration effect. This observation correlates very well with in situ geochemical observations.

  3. Ground and space observations of medium frequency auroral radio emissions

    Broughton, Matthew C.

    The auroral zone is a rich source of natural radio emissions that can be observed in space and at ground-level. By studying these waves, scientists can gain insight into the plasma processes that generate them and use the near-Earth space environment as a large-scale plasma physics laboratory. This thesis uses both ground-level and in situ observations to study two kinds of natural radio emissions. First, we report observations of a new kind of auroral radio emission. The waves have frequencies ranging from 1.3-2.2 MHz, bandwidths ranging from 90-272 kHz, and durations ranging from 16-355 s. Spectral analysis of the waveform data has revealed that the emission has a complex combination of at least three kinds of fine structures. For model auroral electron distributions, calculations indicate that Langmuir waves could be excited at frequencies consistent with observations. The remainder of the thesis discusses auroral medium frequency (MF) burst, an impulsive, broadband natural radio emission observed at ground-level within a few minutes of local substorm onset. LaBelle [2011] proposed that MF burst originates as Langmuir/Z-mode waves on the topside of the ionosphere that subsequently mode convert to L-mode waves and propagate to ground-level. Using continuous waveform measurements and combined observations with the Sondrestrom Incoherent Scatter Radar, we have performed two tests of this mechanism. The results of these tests are consistent with the mechanism described in LaBelle [2011]. A survey of 8,624 half-orbits of the DEMETER spacecraft has revealed 68 observations of bursty MF waves. We have compared the wave properties of these waves to those of MF burst and have found that although it is uncertain, the balance of the evidence suggests that the bursty MF waves observed with DEMETER are the same phenomenon as the ground-level MF burst. Finally, we have used numerical simulations to model both the fine structure of MF burst and to estimate the attenuation the

  4. Broad Iron Emission from Gravitationally Lensed Quasars Observed by Chandra

    Walton, D J; Miller, J M; Reis, R C; Stern, D; Harrison, F A

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated the potential of gravitationally lensed quasars to extend measurements of black hole spin out to high-redshift with the current generation of X-ray observatories. Here we present an analysis of a large sample of 27 lensed quasars in the redshift range 1.0observed with Chandra, utilizing over 1.6 Ms of total observing time, focusing on the rest-frame iron K emission from these sources. Although the X-ray signal-to-noise (S/N) currently available does not permit the detection of iron emission from the inner accretion disk in individual cases in our sample, we find significant structure in the stacked residuals. In addition to the narrow core, seen almost ubiquitously in local AGN, we find evidence for an additional underlying broad component from the inner accretion disk, with a clear red wing to the emission profile. Based on simulations, we find the detection of this broader component to be significant at greater than the 3-sigma level. This implies that iron emission...

  5. Deep 1.4-GHz observations of diffuse polarized emission

    Carretti, E; Reich, W; Reich, P; Fürst, E; Bernardi, G; Cortiglioni, S; Sbarra, C

    2006-01-01

    Polarized diffuse emission observations at 1.4-GHz in a high Galactic latitude area of the northern Celestial hemisphere are presented. The 3.2 X 3.2 deg^2 field, centred at RA = 10h 58m, Dec = +42deg 18' (B1950), has Galactic coordinates l~172deg, b~+63deg and is located in the region selected as northern target of the BaR-SPOrt experiment. Observations have been performed with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope. We find that the angular power spectra of the E- and B-modes have slopes of beta_E = -1.79 +/- 0.13 and beta_B = -1.74 +/- 0.12, respectively. Because of the very high Galactic latitude and the smooth emission, a weak Faraday rotation action is expected, which allows both a fair extrapolation to Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization (CMBP) frequencies and an estimate of the contamination by Galactic synchrotron emission. We extrapolate the E-mode spectrum up to 32-GHz and confirm the possibility to safely detect the CMBP E-mode signal in the Ka band found in another low emission region (Carretti et a...

  6. Optimal VLF Parameters for Pitch Angle Scattering of Trapped Electrons

    Albert, J. M.; Inan, U. S.

    2001-12-01

    VLF waves are known to determine the lifetimes of energetic radiation belt electrons in the inner radiation belt and slot regions. Artificial injection of such waves from ground- or space-based transmitters may thus be used to affect the trapped electron population. In this paper, we seek to determine the optimal parameters (frequency and wave normal angle) of a quasi-monochromatic VLF wave using bounce-averaged quasi-linear theory. We consider the cumulative effects of all harmonic resonances and determine the diffusion rates of particles with selected energies on particular L-shells. We also compare the effects of the VLF wave to diffusion driven by other whistler-mode waves (plasmaspheric hiss, lightning, and VLF transmitters). With appropriate choice of the wave parameters, it may be possible to substantially reduce the lifetime of selected classes of particles.

  7. Coherent whistler emissions in the magnetosphere – Cluster observations

    I. Dandouras

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The STAFF-SC observations complemented by the data from other instruments on Cluster spacecraft were used to study the main properties of magnetospheric lion roars: sporadic bursts of whistler emissions at f~0.1–0.2fe where fe is the electron gyrofrequency. Magnetospheric lion roars are shown to be similar to the emissions in the magnetosheath while the conditions for their generation are much less favorable: the growth rate of the cyclotron temperature anisotropy instability is much smaller due to a smaller number of the resonant electrons. This implies a nonlinear mechanism of generation of the observed wave emissions. It is shown that the observed whistler turbulence, in reality, consists of many nearly monochromatic wave packets. It is suggested that these structures are nonlinear Gendrin's whistler solitary waves. Properties of these waves are widely discussed. Since the group velocity of Gendrin's waves is aligned with the magnetic field, these well guided wave packets can propagate through many magnetic "bottles" associated with mirror structures, without being trapped.

  8. Application of differential analysis of VLF signals for seismic-ionospheric precursor detection from multiple receivers

    Skeberis, Christos; Zaharis, Zaharias; Xenos, Thomas; Contadakis, Michael; Stratakis, Dimitrios; Tommaso, Maggipinto; Biagi, Pier Francesco

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the application of differential analysis on VLF signals emitted from a single transmitter and received by multiple stations in order to filter and detect disturbances that can be attributed to seismic-ionospheric precursor phenomena. The cross-correlation analysis applied on multiple VLF signals provides a way of discerning the nature of a given disturbance and accounts for more widespread geomagnetic interferences compared to local precursor phenomena. For the purpose of this paper, data acquired in Thessaloniki (40.59N, 22,78E) and in Heraklion (35.31N, 25.10E) from the VLF station in Tavolara, Italy (ICV station Lat. 40.923, Lon. 9.731) for a period of four months (September 2014 - December 2014) are used. The receivers have been developed by Elettronika Srl and are part of the International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors (INFREP). A normalization process and an improved variant of the Hilbert-Huang transform are initially applied to the received VLF signals. The signals derived from the first two Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF1 and IMF2) undergo a cross-correlation analysis and, in this way, time series from the two receivers can be compared. The efficacy of the processing method and the results produced by the proposed process are then discussed. Finally, results are presented along with an evaluation of the discrimination and detection capabilities of the method on disturbances of the received signals. Based upon the results, the merits of such a processing method are discussed to further improve the current method by using differential analysis to better classify between different disturbances but, more importantly, discriminate between points of interest in the provided spectra. This could provide an improved method of detecting disturbances attributed to seismic-ionospheric precursor phenomena and also contribute to a real-time method for correlating seismic activity with the observed disturbances.

  9. Observation of microwave emission from extensive air showers with CROME

    Wilczyński H.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on the measurement of microwave radio signals from air showers with the CROME (Cosmic Ray Observation via Microwave Emission experiment. CROME is located in the center of the KASCADE-Grande air shower array. The radio signals of the CROME antennas are stored for each high-energy trigger from the KASCADE-Grande array and matched offine with the KASCADE-Grande data. After almost one year of data taking microwave signals have been observed for more than ten air showers.

  10. Observation of Field-Emission Dependence on Stored Energy

    Shao, Jiahang; Antipov, Sergey P.; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Doran, Darrell S.; Gai, Wei; Jing, Chunguang; Liu, Wanming; Power, John; Qiu, Jiaqi; Shi, Jiaru; Wang, Dan; Wang, Faya; Whiteford, Charles E.; Wisniewski, Eric; Xiao, Liling

    2015-12-01

    Field emission from a solid metal surface has been continuously studied for a century over macroscopic to atomic scales. It is general knowledge that, other than the surface properties, the emitted current is governed solely by the applied electric field. A pin cathode has been used to study the dependence of field emission on stored energy in an L -band rf gun. The stored energy was changed by adjusting the axial position (distance between the cathode base and the gun back surface) of the cathode while the applied electric field on the cathode tip is kept constant. A very strong correlation of the field-emission current with the stored energy has been observed. While eliminating all possible interfering sources, an enhancement of the current by a factor of 5 was obtained as the stored energy was increased by a factor of 3. It implies that under certain circumstances a localized field emission may be significantly altered by the global parameters in a system.

  11. Energetic electron precipitation and VLF phase disturbances at middle latitudes following the magnetic storm of December 6, 1971

    Enhanced fluxes of electrons precipitating over middle latitudes (L approx. 3--4) were detected by the polar-orbiting satellite 1971-089A following a period of magnetic activity starting on December 16, 1971. The electron fluxes measured in 256 differential channels between 130 and 2800 keV have been coordinated with phase observations of VLF radio waves propagating in the earth-ionosphere waveguide. The VLF paths in question, NLK (near Seattle, Washington) and GBR (at Rugby, England) to APL (near Washington, D. C.), cover approx. =1200 in longitude and range from L approx. 2.5 to L approx. 4.0 in invariant latitude. These paths showed marked daytime and nighttime phase advances from 1650 UT on December 17 (in excess of 10 μs during maximum disturbance). The phase values did not return to prestorm levels before December 22--23. The unusual presence of these daytime VLF disturbances is offered as evidence for the widespread precipitation at low L shell vales of nearly relativistic electrons (E/sub e/> approx.200 keV) which would be required to penetrate below approx.70-km altitude to affect the daytime VLF transmissions. Wave guide mode calculations using D region electron density profiles deduced from the satellite particle data predict phase advances which agree reasonably well with the observed values. It is concluded that the observed long-lived VLF phase disturbances can be explained by excess D region ionization caused by energetic electrons precipitating from the earth's radiation belt following their injection deep into the magnetosphere during the magnetic storm

  12. Airborne observations of the Orion molecular hydrogen emission spectrum

    We have observed the Orion near-IR H2 emission spectrum from an altitude of 12.5 km in order to measure line intensities free from interference by terrestrial H2O. Three new transitions [H n = 6→4 and H2 v = 1→0 O(2) and Q(7)] have been detected. Analysis of the data indicate that earlier estimates of source extinction, temperature, and luminosity are all too high. We find E/sub 2.1-2.4/ μm = 0.59 +- 0.06, T(v = 1) = 1540 +- 100 K and L2(vib) = 200--400 L. There is strong evidence for an anomalous 3.5:1 ortho/para H2 abundance ratio for the excited H2. Line luminosities and line-of-sight position constraints support a mass outflow model for the emission region. Subject headings: infrared: spectra: interstellar: molecules: nebulae: Orion Nebula

  13. FERMI Observations of Gamma -Ray Emission From the Moon

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwoo, W. B.; Baldini, I.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Gehrels, N.; Hays, E.; Thompson, D. J.; McEnery, J. E.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the detection of high-energy ? -ray emission from the Moon during the first 24 months of observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). This emission comes from particle cascades produced by cosmicray (CR) nuclei and electrons interacting with the lunar surface. The differential spectrum of the Moon is soft and can be described as a log-parabolic function with an effective cutoff at 2-3 GeV, while the average integral flux measured with the LAT from the beginning of observations in 2008 August to the end of 2010 August is F(greater than100 MeV) = (1.04 plus or minus 0.01 [statistical error] plus or minus 0.1 [systematic error]) × 10(sup -6) cm(sup -2) s(sup -1). This flux is about a factor 2-3 higher than that observed between 1991 and 1994 by the EGRET experiment on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, F(greater than100 MeV)˜5×10(sup -7) cm(sup -2) s(sup -1), when solar activity was relatively high. The higher gamma -ray flux measured by Fermi is consistent with the deep solar minimum conditions during the first 24 months of the mission, which reduced effects of heliospheric modulation, and thus increased the heliospheric flux of Galactic CRs. A detailed comparison of the light curve with McMurdo Neutron Monitor rates suggests a correlation of the trends. The Moon and the Sun are so far the only known bright emitters of gamma-rays with fast celestial motion. Their paths across the sky are projected onto the Galactic center and high Galactic latitudes as well as onto other areas crowded with high-energy gamma-ray sources. Analysis of the lunar and solar emission may thus be important for studies of weak and transient sources near the ecliptic.

  14. Lunar gamma-ray emission observed by FERMI

    Giglietto, N.; Collaboration, for the Fermi-LAT

    2009-01-01

    FERMI-LAT is performing an all-sky gamma-ray survey from 30 MeV to 300 GeV with unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution. FERMI has detected high-energy gamma rays from the Moon produced by interactions of cosmic rays with the lunar surface. This radiation was previously observed by EGRET on CGRO with significantly lower statistical significance. We present the lunar analysis for the first six months of the Mission and showing images of the lunar gamma-ray emission. We also compare th...

  15. VLF Science at Indian Centre for Space Physics

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics has been monitoring VLF signals from stations around the world at its laboratories at Kolkata and Sitapur (Ionospheric and Earthquake Research Centre) as well as at several places throughout India when in a campaign mode. We have been interested to study high energy events from space, such as solar flares and gamma ray bursts. We have made studies during multiple solar eclipses and most importantly made substantial progress in the problem of lithosphere-ionosphere coupling while understanding various types of anomalies prior to major earthquakes. Other effects such as AGWs and LEPs are being studied. We have experience of two antarctic expedition and obtained VLF data from both Maitri and Bharati stations of India, which revealed, among other things, how the signal attenuation can indicate the extent of ice mass in Antarctica. We have been able to reproduce various VLF perturbation events using Atmospheric Chemical evolution model coupled with LWPC code. For instance we have reproduced solar flare induced VLF amplitude perturbation pattern by completely ab initio calculation. We also targeted the inverse problem, namely, deduction of the injected radiation spectra from space from the VLF signal alone, thereby establishing that the Earth can be used as a gigantic detector. These interesting results would be presented in my review talk.

  16. VLF propagation measurements in the Canadian Arctic

    Lauber, Wilfred R.; Bertrand, Jean M.

    1993-05-01

    For the past three years, during a period of high sun spot numbers, propagation measurements were made on the reception of VLF signals in the Canadian Arctic. Between Aug. and Dec. 1989, the received signal strengths were measured on the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker, John A. MacDonald in the Eastern Canadian Arctic. Between Jul. 1991 and Jun. 1992, the received signal strengths were measured at Nanisivik, Baffin Island. The purposes of this work were to check the accuracy and estimate variances of the Naval Ocean Systems Center's (NOSC) Long Wave Propagation Capability (LWPC) predictions in the Canadian Arctic and to gather ionospheric storm data. In addition, the NOSC data taken at Fort Smith and our data at Nanisivik were used to test the newly developed Longwave Noise Prediction (LNP) program and the CCIR noise predictions, at 21.4 and 24.0 kHz. The results of the work presented and discussed in this paper show that in general the LWPC predicts accurate values of received signal strength in the Canadian Arctic with standard deviations of 1 to 2 dB over several months. Ionospheric storms can gauge the received signal strengths to decrease some 10 dB for a period of several hours or days. However, the effects of these storms are highly dependent on the propagation path. Finally the new LNP atmospheric noise model predicts lower values of noise in the Arctic than the CCIR model and our limited measurements tend to support these lower values.

  17. Electron precipitation in the vicinity of a VLF transmitter

    Using high-resolution pitch angle measurements made by a magnetic focusing electron spectrometer on the S3-3 satellite, angular distributions of 235-keV electrons precipitated in the slot region of the magnetosphere by a ground-based VLF transmitter are compared with the pitch angle distributions that would be produced by various patterns of longitudinal interaction regions.The observed electrons are in the drift loss cone, necessitating the use of a trace-back-to-longitude-of-origin technique coupled with a two-dimensional convolution program describing the response of the electron spectrometer. The data are well fit both with theoretical calculations of ionospheric field intensity patterns above a transmitter and with a similar pattern of received field intensities measured along a traverse in the conjugate region. The agreement between the data dna field patterns implies a linear or quasi-linear wave-particle interaction. The energy-frequency relationship between the electrons and the waves implies an interaction region low on the magnetic field line rather than near the equator, as has been determined for similar precipitations in the inner zone

  18. Cyclotron side-band emissions from ring-current electrons

    VLF-emissions with subharmonic cyclotron frequency from magnetospheric electrons have been detected by the S3-A satellite (Explorer 45) whose orbit is close to the magnetic equatorial plane where the wave-particle interaction is most efficient. These emissions are observed during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm in the nightside of the magnetosphere outside of the plasmasphere around L = 3 to 5. The emissions consist essentially of two frequency regimes, one below the equatorial electron gyro-frequency (fsub(H0) and the other above. The emissions below fsub(H0) are whistler mode and there is a sharp band of 'missing emissions' along f = fsub(H0)/2. The emissions above fsub(H0) are electrostatic mode and the frequency ranges up to 3fsub(H0)/2. It is concluded that these emissions are generated by the enhanced relativity low energy (1 to 5 keV) ring current electrons, penetrating into the nightside magnetosphere during the main phase of a magnetic storm. Although the high energy (50 to 350 keV) electrons showed remarkable changes of pitch angle distribution, their associations with VLF-emissions are not so significant as those of low energy electrons. (author)

  19. Surface slope characteristics from Thermal Emission Spectrometer emission phase function observations

    Edwards, C. S.; Bandfield, J. L.; Christensen, P. R.

    2006-12-01

    It is possible to obtain surface roughness characteristics, by measuring a single surface from multiple emission angles and azimuths in the thermal infrared. Surfaces will have different temperatures depending on their orientation relative to the sun. A different proportion of sunlit versus shaded surfaces will be in the field of view based on the viewing orientation, resulting in apparent temperature differences. This difference in temperature can be utilized to calculate the slope characteristics for the observed area. This technique can be useful for determining surface slope characteristics not resolvable by orbital imagery. There are two main components to this model, a surface DEM, in this case a synthetic, two dimensional sine wave surface, and a thermal model (provided by H. Kieffer). Using albedo, solar longitude, slope, azimuth, along with several other parameters, the temperature for each cell of the DEM is calculated using the thermal model. A temperature is then predicted using the same observation geometries as the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations. A temperature difference is calculated for the two complementary viewing azimuths and emission angles from the DEM. These values are then compared to the observed temperature difference to determine the surface slope. This method has been applied to TES Emission Phase Function (EPF) observations for both the spectrometer and bolometer data, with a footprint size of 10s of kilometers. These specialized types of TES observations measure nearly the same surface from several angles. Accurate surface kinetic temperatures are obtained after the application of an atmospheric correction for the TES bolometer and/or spectrometer. Initial results include an application to the northern circumpolar dunes. An average maximum slope of ~33 degrees has been obtained, which makes physical sense since this is near the angle of repose for sand sized particles. There is some scatter in the data from separate

  20. Precipitation of inner zone electrons by whistler mode waves from the VLF transmitters UMS and NWC

    The precipitation of energetic electrons which are commonly observed in the drift loss cone east of 600 east longitude between Lapprox.1.6 and Lapprox.1.8 can be accounted for by a Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance between the electrons and nonducted whistler mode waves from high-power, ground-based VLF transmitters. A ray-tracing analysis using a diffusive-equilibrium model shows that 17.1-kHz waves starting with vertical wave normals between 230 and 310 magnetic latitude cross the magnetic equator between Lapprox.1.6 and f Lapprox.1.8 with wave normals of approximately 630. A relativistic cyclotron-resonance analysis for the same model plasmasphere using the ray-tracing results gives an energy versus L shell dependence for the precipitated ray electron which is in excellent agreement with the observed dependence. The primary VLF transmitter is most probably the UMS transmitter located near Gorki, USSR. It transmits on 17.1 kHz. VLF records covering this frequency band were available for only three of the time periods when electrons were observed. In two cases UMS was transmitting at the time required to account for the observations. In the third case a higher frequency is required to fit the data. At the time, the NWC transmitter at North West Cape, Australia was operating at 22.3 kHz. These data are consistent with a model in which weak pitch angle scattering by whistler mode waves from NWC does not completely fill the drift loss cone at the longitude of NWC

  1. On the numerical modelling of VLF chorus dynamical spectra

    D. Nunn

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the use of a one-dimensional Vlasov Hybrid Simulation (VHS computer code to simulate the dynamical spectra (i.e. frequency versus time spectrograms of ELF/VLF chorus signals (from ~a fraction to ~10 kHz. Recently excellent measurements of chorus have been made in the source region close to the geomagnetic equator aboard the four spacecraft Cluster mission. Using Cluster data for wave amplitude, which is up to 300 pT, local gyrofrequency, cold plasma density, and L-shell, observed chorus signals are reproduced with remarkable fidelity and, in particular, sweep rates in the range 1–10 kHz result as observed. Further, we find that the sweep rate is a falling function of increasing cold plasma density, again in accord with observations. Finally, we have satisfactorily simulated the rather rare falling frequency elements of chorus which are sometimes observed aboard Cluster in the generation region. For both rising and falling chorus we have presented detailed structural analyses of the generation regions. The main contributor to the frequency sweep rate is primarily the establishment of wave number/frequency gradients across the generation region by the out of phase component of the resonant particle current. The secondary contributor is the shortening of the wavelength of resonant particle current relative to that of the wave field. In view of the close agreement between observation and simulation, we conclude that nonlinear electron cyclotron resonance is indeed the mechanism underlying the generation of chorus signals just outside the plasmasphere.

  2. Modeling of the lower ionospheric response and VLF signal modulation during a total solar eclipse using ionospheric chemistry and LWPC

    Chakraborty, Suman; Palit, Sourav; Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-02-01

    The variation in the solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation flux by any measure is the most dominant natural source to produce perturbations or modulations in the ionospheric chemical and plasma properties. A solar eclipse, though a very rare phenomenon, is similarly bound to produce a significant short time effect on the local ionospheric properties. The influence of the ionizing solar flux reduction during a solar eclipse on the lower ionosphere or, more precisely, the D-region, can be studied with the observation of Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio wave signal modulation. The interpretation of such an effect on VLF signals requires a knowledge of the D-region ion chemistry, which is not well studied till date. Dominant parameters which govern the ion chemistry, such as the recombination coefficients, are poorly known. The occurrence of events such as a solar eclipse provides us with an excellent opportunity to investigate the accuracy of our knowledge of the chemical condition in this part of Earth's atmosphere and the properties which control the ionospheric stability under such disturbances. In this paper, using existing knowledge of the lower ionospheric chemical and physical properties we carry out an interpretation of the effects obtained during the total solar eclipse of 22 of July 2009 on the VLF signal. Data obtained from a week long campaign conducted by the Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP) over the Indian subcontinent has been used for this purpose. Both positive and negative amplitude changes during the eclipse were observed along various receiver locations. In this paper, data for a propagation path between a Indian Navy VLF transmitter named VTX3 and a pair of receivers in India are used. We start from the observed solar flux during the eclipse and calculate the ionization during the whole time span over most of the influenced region in a range of height. We incorporate a D-region ion-chemistry model to find the equilibrium ion density over

  3. VLF effects in the outer ionosphere from the underground nuclear explosion of 24 October 1990 on the New Land island (Interkosmos-24 satellite data)

    Results on numerical treatment of the VLF auroral hiss and whistling atmospherics, registered at the height approximately 900 km on board of the Interkosmos-24 satellite over the New Land island 17 minutes after the underground nuclear explosion are presented. As the result of powerful acoustic effect there took place sharp increase (∼ 20 db) in the VLF hiss within the narrow range of invariant latitudes including the excitation source. Simultaneously decrease in the low frequency of the noise spectrum cut-off, coinciding with the frequency of the low hybrid resonance was observed

  4. Proton precipitation by a whistler-mode wave from a VLF transmitter

    Protons with 50 keV< E<530 keV were detected by sensors aboard satellite 1972-76B at an altitude of 700 km in the region conjugate to the transportable very-low-frequency (TVLF) transmitter which was being operated near Anchorage, Alaska Lapprox.4). Temporal maxima in the proton count rates can be identified on a one-to-one basis with short pulsed transmissions by the VLF transmitter. The observed time delay between the center of a transmitted pulse and the detection of the next maximum in the proton count rate at the sensor agrees well with the delay predicted from a simple plasmaspheric model. (auth)

  5. Source location of chorus emissions observed by Cluster

    M. Parrot

    Full Text Available One of the objectives of the Cluster mission is to study sources of various electromagnetic waves using the four satellites. This paper describes the methods we have applied to data recorded from the STAFF spectrum analyser. This instrument provides the cross spectral matrix of three magnetic and two electric field components. This spectral matrix is analysed to determine, for each satellite, the direction of the wave normal relative to the Earth’s magnetic field as a function of frequency and of time. Due to the Cluster orbit, chorus emissions are often observed close to perigee, and the data analysis determines the direction of these waves. Three events observed during different levels of magnetic activity are reported. It is shown that the component of the Poynting vector parallel to the magnetic field changes its sense when the satellites cross the magnetic equator, which indicates that the chorus waves propagate away from the equator. Detailed analysis indicates that the source is located in close vicinity of the plane of the geomagnetic equator.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities; storms and substorms; Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities

  6. Airborne observations of the Orion molecular hydrogen emission spectrum

    Davis, D. S.; Larson, H. P.; Smith, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Orion near-infrared H2 emission spectrum was observed from an altitude of 12.5 km in order to measure line intensities free from interference by terrestrial H2O. For the peak source, the observations indicate that the differential extinction between 4126 and 4712 per cm is 0.59 + or -0.06 mag, and the relative line intensities are consistent with those expected from a homogeneous source in approximate LTE at 1540 + or -100 K. An anomalous ortho/para H2 abundance ratio of 3.5(+ or - 0.2):1 is found, and the estimated total luminosity in vibrationally excited H2 lines is 300 + or - 100 solar luminosities. Rough molecular abundance limits, based on the missing H2 Q(6) line and the good agreement between other line intensities and the LTE model, place the H2 region no deeper within OMC-1 than the IR cluster and no shallower than 50 percent of the depth to the cluster.

  7. EMISSION PATTERNS OF SOLAR TYPE III RADIO BURSTS: STEREOSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS

    Simultaneous observations of solar type III radio bursts obtained by the STEREO A, B, and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies from different vantage points in the ecliptic plane are used to determine their directivity. The heliolongitudes of the sources of these bursts, estimated at different frequencies by assuming that they are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere, and the heliolongitudes of the spacecraft are used to estimate the viewing angle, which is the angle between the direction of the magnetic field at the source and the line connecting the source to the spacecraft. The normalized peak intensities at each spacecraft Rj = Ij /ΣIj (the subscript j corresponds to the spacecraft STEREO A, B, and WIND), which are defined as the directivity factors are determined using the time profiles of the type III bursts. It is shown that the distribution of the viewing angles divides the type III bursts into: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field with angular width of ∼2° and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone with angular width spanning from ∼ – 100° to ∼100°. The plots of the directivity factors versus the viewing angles of the sources from all three spacecraft indicate that the type III emissions are very intense along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source, and steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. The comparison of these emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relatively weaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  8. Aperture synthesis observations of solar and stellar radio emission

    The work presented in this thesis relied upon the radio astronomical instrument, The Very Large Array. The thesis is divided into three major sections. In the first the author applied maximum entropy-type image reconstruction techniques, using both single dish and iterferometer data, to generate full disk images of the Sun at a wavelength λ ∼ 21 cm. Using a set of six such images obtained during the Sun's decline from sunspot maximum to minimum, he has noted a number of previously unreported phenomena. Among these: (1) a systematic decrease in quiet Sun's brightness temperature as it declined to minimum; (2) a systematic decrease in the Sun's radius at 21 cm; (3) evidence for the evolution of polar coronal holes during the course of the solar cycle. The observed variation, though not noted previously at radio wavelengths, is entirely consistent with white light K coronagraph data. The results reported here explain the conflicting nature of a number of past observations. In the second section of the thesis, he presents the results of a long term survey of magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs). Cataclysmic variables are close binary systems which contain a white dwarf accreting mass from a late-type secondary, typically a dwarf of spectral type, G, K, or M. The survey resulted in the detection of two out of the eighteen systems observed. In the third section of the thesis, he presents new results on flare stars in the solar neighborhood and in the Pleiades. He has successfully employed the technique of dynamic spectroscopy to constrain the mechanisms(s) for radio flaring on other stars. The second part of section three is devoted to a search for radio emission from flare stars in the Pleiades which was motivated by the evolutionary questions raised by flare stars and the Pleiades lower main sequence

  9. Investigations of natural and artificial disturbances in the Earth-ionosphere cavity via VLF radio links for the time span 2009-2015 (sunspot cycle 24)

    Eichelberger, Hans; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Besser, B. P.; Prattes, Gustav; Aydogar; Wolbang, Daniel; Rozhnoi, Alexander; Solovieva, Maria; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Boudjada, Mohammed

    2016-07-01

    We focus on natural disturbances of the sub-ionospheric VLF waveguide in the time span 2009 to 2015 (sunspot cycle 24), i.e. variations in amplitude and phase measurements of the radio paths are considered. In particular we're investigating numerous solar flares (up to X-class), geomagnetic storms and substorms, therefore discuss how to discriminate natural from artificial variations between different transmitters and receivers. Meteorological effects could be important [1] and we estimate the possibility to detect the influence of lithospheric sources in the VLF radio links. As part of the VLF multistation network we're using the single receiver mid-latitude station in Graz, Austria. This facility receives up to 12 transmitter simultaneously (frequency range 10-50 kHz), has 20 sec temporal resolution, and is running continuously since 2009 [2]. We obtain the statistics relating VLF amplitude and phase fluctuations with C/M/X-class solar flares, and characterise night time fluctuations in connection with enhanced particle precipitation in the northern latitude path (Iceland transmitter). The statistics is important to improve the quality of seismo-electromagnetic studies. We conclude that for ionospheric perturbations (D-layer), e.g. solar flares, a reliable real time monitoring service can be established. Atmospheric and lithospheric variations are generally difficult to characterise, it's harder to distinguish between natural and man made signals, therefore - as a future outlook - complementary ground and satellite based measurements can deliver valuable additional information for environmental monitoring. References: [1] A. Rozhnoi et al.: Meteorological effects in the lower ionosphere as based on VLF/LF signal observations, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 14, 2671-2679, 2014. [2] K. Schwingenschuh et al.: The Graz seismo-electromagnetic VLF facility, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 1121-1127, 2011.

  10. Observations of exoelectron emission associated with heterogeneous catalysis

    Hoenig, S. A.; Utter, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested that the exoelectron emission from the catalyst may be used to monitor the rate of oxidation of CO and CH4 over palladium catalysts. Indirect heating of the catalyst and atmospheric pressure have no effect upon this monitoring system. Although the mechanism relating catalysis to exoelectron emission is not clear, it is considered possible that electron emission is triggered by the adsorption-desorption cycle.

  11. Electric fields, electron precipitation, and VLF radiation during a simultaneous magnetospheric substorm and atmospheric thunderstorm

    A balloon payload instrumented with a double-probe electric field detector and an X ray scintillation counter was launched from Roberval, Quebec, Canada (L=4.1) at 0828 UT (0328 LT) on July 9, 1975. A magnetospheric substorm was observed locally between 0815 and 1100 UT, which produced a maximum ΔB of approx.500 nT at approx.0930 UT. A single-cell atmospheric thunderstorm developed northeast of Roberval beginning around 0925 UT which was most intense from approx.1000 to 1035 UT. Detailed study of the electrical properties of the thunderstorm, the X ray precipitation data, and VLF spheric data leads to three conclusions. First, the electrical coupling from the thunderstorm to the magnetosphere increases with frequency from dc to the VLF; for the observed storm the amplitude at the ionosphere of thunderstorm produced electric fields was not significant at frequencies below 0.1 Hz. Second, the atmospheric conductivity above the thunderstorm was observed to be about one-half the fair weather value prior to 1000 UT; decreased to about one-quarter the fair weather value at about 1000 UT; and remained depressed after the end of the thunderstorm. This result was contrary to that expected on the basis of previous work and is one which merits considerably more investigation. Third, the data show a high probability that half-hop whistlers initiated by sferics from the thunderstorm triggered energetic electron precipitation from the magnetosphere

  12. Study of Ionospheric Perturbations in D-Layer Using VLF Receiver at Tashkent IHY Station

    Ahmedov, Bobomurat

    2016-07-01

    Tashkent International Heliophysical Year (IHY) station is a member of Atmospheric Weather Electromagnetic System for Observation, Modeling and Education (AWESOME) network being operated globally to study the ionosphere and the magnetosphere with the help of electromagnetic waves in Very Low Frequency (VLF) band. Regular monitoring of the D- and F-layers of ionosphere over Central Asia territory is being performed on the permanent basis starting year 2008 when one VLF receiver and two SuperSID receivers were provided to Uzbekistan IHY cite by Stanford University. The results obtained at Tashkent IHY station are applied to earthquake electromagnetic precursors, lightning, and Solar flares and to ionospheric disturbances originating from gamma ray flares of Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters connected with evolution of strongly magnetized neutron stars believed as magnetars. Regular monitoring of the D-layer of ionosphere over Central Asia territory has been performed on the permanent basis. Several Solar events are observed and the analysis has shown that there is simultaneous correlation between the times of change of amplitude of the waves and the Solar flares. Features of the lightning discharge generated by radio atmospherics are studied and its effectiveness in D-region ionosphere diagnostics is examined.

  13. Improving UK greenhouse gas emission estimates using tall tower observations

    Howie, James Edward

    2014-01-01

    Greenhouse gases in the Earth’s atmosphere play an important role in regulating surface temperatures. The UK is signatory to international agreements that legally commit the UK to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, and there is a scientific and political need to better understand greenhouse gas sources on regional scales. The current methods used to provide greenhouse gas emission inventories rely on ‘bottom-up’ techniques and have large associated errors. However, it is also...

  14. Motorcycles, mopeds: polluting emissions and energy consumption. Initial observations

    Barbusse, St.

    2001-05-01

    The present French fleet of two-wheel vehicles is very heterogeneous (2- and 4-stroke engines with cubic capacity from 50 cm{sup 3} to 1300 cm{sup 3} and automatic or manual transmissions) and generally lacking in any anti-pollution system, which leads to high emission levels of carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons. Mopeds have high emission levels compared to those of 4-wheel vehicles, which have decreased markedly since 1970. The following chart of limit values confirms that the gap between these two vehicle categories in polluting emissions has increased in just a few years. The implementation of more restrictive regulations about pollution emissions was delayed for a long time because of cumulative technological delays in comparison to private vehicles. But in the end a European directive differentiating two kinds of two-wheel vehicles: mopeds and motorcycles was voted in 1997 (no. 97/24). There are two stages (in 1999 and 2002 respectively) for lowering emissions levels for mopeds (engine size smaller than 50 cm{sup 3}). For motorcycles a single stage was set for 1999, with a second stage still under consideration. Given the high stakes in terms of decreased pollution emission rom the necessary technological leap for the shift from outmoded carburetor engines to more refined technology (injection + post-treatment) under ADEME's guidance, the issue of exhaust-pollution reduction of two-wheel vehicles was included in both the PRIMEQUAL programme, 'Automobile Pollution Emissions' and the PREDIT call for proposals, 'Cycle Fuel Engine Pollution Reduction' in 1999. Several projects of varying technical natures (evaluations of existing engines and technological studies of new solutions in engines and exhaust pollution reduction) have been implemented in partnership with specialist research laboratories (such as the IFP) and manufacturers and outfitters in the sector (Sagem, Arvin Exhaust, Peugeot Motorcycles). Moreover, as the principle

  15. Response of the low ionosphere to X-ray and Lyman-α solar flare emissions

    Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Trottet, GéRard; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Macotela, Edith L.; Pacini, Alessandra; Bertoni, Fernando C. P.; Dammasch, Ingolf E.

    2013-01-01

    Using soft X-ray measurements from detectors onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and simultaneous high-cadence Lyman-α observations from the Large Yield Radiometer (LYRA) onboard the Project for On-Board Autonomy 2 (PROBA2) ESA spacecraft, we study the response of the lower part of the ionosphere, the D region, to seven moderate to medium-size solar flares that occurred in February and March of 2010. The ionospheric disturbances are analyzed by monitoring the resulting sub-ionospheric wave propagation anomalies detected by the South America Very Low Frequency (VLF) Network (SAVNET). We find that the ionospheric disturbances, which are characterized by changes of the VLF wave phase, do not depend on the presence of Lyman-α radiation excesses during the flares. Indeed, Lyman-α excesses associated with flares do not produce measurable phase changes. Our results are in agreement with what is expected in terms of forcing of the lower ionosphere by quiescent Lyman-α emission along the solar activity cycle. Therefore, while phase changes using the VLF technique may be a good indicator of quiescent Lyman-α variations along the solar cycle, they cannot be used to scale explosive Lyman-α emission during flares.

  16. Fast emission estimates in China and South Africa constrained by satellite observations

    Mijling, Bas; van der A, Ronald

    2013-04-01

    Emission inventories of air pollutants are crucial information for policy makers and form important input data for air quality models. Unfortunately, bottom-up emission inventories, compiled from large quantities of statistical data, are easily outdated for emerging economies such as China and South Africa, where rapid economic growth change emissions accordingly. Alternatively, top-down emission estimates from satellite observations of air constituents have important advantages of being spatial consistent, having high temporal resolution, and enabling emission updates shortly after the satellite data become available. However, constraining emissions from observations of concentrations is computationally challenging. Within the GlobEmission project (part of the Data User Element programme of ESA) a new algorithm has been developed, specifically designed for fast daily emission estimates of short-lived atmospheric species on a mesoscopic scale (0.25 × 0.25 degree) from satellite observations of column concentrations. The algorithm needs only one forward model run from a chemical transport model to calculate the sensitivity of concentration to emission, using trajectory analysis to account for transport away from the source. By using a Kalman filter in the inverse step, optimal use of the a priori knowledge and the newly observed data is made. We apply the algorithm for NOx emission estimates in East China and South Africa, using the CHIMERE chemical transport model together with tropospheric NO2 column retrievals of the OMI and GOME-2 satellite instruments. The observations are used to construct a monthly emission time series, which reveal important emission trends such as the emission reduction measures during the Beijing Olympic Games, and the impact and recovery from the global economic crisis. The algorithm is also able to detect emerging sources (e.g. new power plants) and improve emission information for areas where proxy data are not or badly known (e

  17. Very exceptional cases of VLF/LF ionospheric perturbations for deep oceanic earthquakes offshore the Japan island

    Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Hayakawa, Masashi

    2015-12-01

    It is so far believed that ionospheric perturbations as detected by subionospheric VLF/LF (very low frequency/low frequency) propagation, are generated above and around the earthquake (EQ) epicenter. This paper presents very rare cases, which are in complete contrast to the above fact. We have found that in extremely rare cases when EQs happened (i) in the Pacific Ocean or (ii) offshore the Soya cape (Hokkaido) both with very large depths (300-400 km), corresponding ionospheric perturbations take place far away from the EQ epicenter and above the regions with considerable seismic intensity at the time of each EQ. Two EQs happened in the Torishima area of Izu islands (magnitude ∼7 and depth ∼400 km), and corresponding seismic intensity was observed in the Tokyo and Ibaraki districts. Our VLF data have indicated that the ionospheric perturbation takes place over such regions with high seismic intensity. Another group is two EQs (magnitude ∼5) offshore the Soya cape of Hokkaido, and the spatial distribution of seismic intensity at the time of each EQ is just around Aomori prefecture. VLF data have indicated the ionospheric perturbations taken place over the same Aomori area, which is in complete coincidence with the spatial distribution of seismic intensity. As a conclusion, these exceptional examples are, in principle, very similar to the concept of 'selectivity' (or sensitive zone) of geoelectric measurement by the Greek group, and we try to interpret these cases in the context of lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling.

  18. Mapping man-made CO2 emissions using satellite-observed nighttime lights

    Oda, T.; Maksyutov, S. S.; Andres, R. J.; Elvidge, C.; Baugh, K.; Hsu, F. C.; Roman, M. O.

    2015-12-01

    The Open-Data Inventory for Anthropogenic Carbon dioxide (ODIAC) is a global high spatial resolution (1x1km) emission dataset for CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion. The original version of ODIAC was developed at the Japanese Greenhouse Gas Observing Satellite (GOSAT) project to prescribe their inverse model. ODIAC first introduced the combined use of satellite-observed nighttime light data and individual power plant emission/geolocation information to estimate the spatial extent of fossil fuel CO2. The ODIAC emission data has been widely used by the international carbon cycle research community and appeared in a number of publications in the literature. Since its original publication in 2011, we have made numerous modifications to the ODIAC emission model and the emission data have been updated on annual basis. We are switching from BP statistical data based emission estimates to estimates made by Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In recent versions of ODIAC data, the emission seasonality has been adopted from the CDIAC monthly emission dataset. The emissions from international bunkers, which are not included in the CDIAC gridded emission data, are estimated using the UN Energy Database and included with the spatial distributions. In the next version of ODIAC emission model, we will explore the use of satellite data collected by the NASA's Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite. We will estimate emission spatial distributions using global 500x500m nighttime lights data created from VIIRS data. We will also utilize a combustion detection algorithm Nightfire developed at NOAA National Geophysical Data Center to map gas flaring emissions. We also plan to expand our two emission sector emission distributing approach (power plant emission and non-point source emissions) by introducing a transportation emission sector which should improve emission distributions in urban and rural areas.

  19. Amplitude and phase perturbations on VLF/LF signals at Belgrade due to X-ray flare intensity

    Sulic, Desanka

    2016-07-01

    Narrowband very low frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) and low frequency (LF, 30-300 kHz) radio signals are powerful tool for long-range remote sensing of the ionospheric D-region electron density. Propagation of VLF/LF signals emitted by man-made transmitters takes place in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and strongly depends on the electrical properties of the ionosphere. Changes in the D-region electron density cause changes in the received amplitude and phase on VLF/LF signals. Comparing the measured VLF/LF perturbations with LWPC simulations based on the predicted changes to the D-region, so as to infer the average D-region electron density profiles along the waveguide. The data were recorded at a Belgrade (44.85 ^{0} N, 20.38 ^{0} E) Serbia by AbsPAL and AWESOME receivers since 2003 and 2008 up to 2015, respectively. The first purpose of this paper is to give an account on the dropping amplitude phenomena on one long and three short VLF paths. The NAA-BEL path is sufficiently long, D = 6540 km and oriented west-east to show well-developed sunrise and sunset effects on amplitude and phase. Measured NAA/24.00 kHz signal at Belgrade shows three amplitude minima in time interval when sunrise reaches Belgrade and Maine, USA. Similar but less evident changes occur in time interval defined by sunsets at receiver and transmitter sites. The results show that at the times of amplitude minima the rate of change of phase becomes quite large. GQD/22.10 kHz, DHO/23.40 kHz and NSC/45.90 kHz signals propagate over short paths, D flare. During occurrence of solar flare the altitude profile of ionospheric conductivity changes, a VLF/LF signal reflects from lower height and these changes result that VLF/LF propagation is performed with more discrete modes than in normal ionospheric condition. Amplitude and phase perturbations on different VLF/LF signals observed at Belgrade have sensitive dependence on: X-ray flare intensity, solar zenith angle, occurrence of solar flare under solar

  20. Unexpected very low frequency (VLF) radio events recorded by the ionospheric satellite DEMETER

    Parrot, M.; Berthelier, J. J.; Blecki, J.; Brochot, J. Y.; Hobara, Y.; Lagoutte, D.; Lebreton, J. P.; Němec, F.; Onishi, T.; Pincon, J. L.; Píša, David; Santolík, Ondřej; Sauvaud, J. A.; Slominska, E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 3 (2015), s. 483-511. ISSN 0169-3298 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31899S; GA MŠk LH12231 Grant ostatní: Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M100421206; Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M100421206 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : ionosphere * natural and man-made VLF radio emissions * anomalies Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.447, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10712-015-9315-5

  1. Estimation of NOx Emissions from megacities using mobile MAX-DOAS and satellite observations

    Shaiganfar, Reza

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study is on the quantification of NOx emissions. We characterized and quantfified vertically integrated NO2 concentrations (VCDs) and NOx emissions by using mobile MAX-DOAS and satellite observations. The mobile MAX-DOAS observations are conducted on different circles around megacities. From the combination of MAX-DOAS observations with meteorological data, total NOx emissions from different megacities were estimated. In this thesis, several correction methods were develo...

  2. Excitation of guided ELF-VLF waves through modification of the F{sub 2} ionospheric layer by high-power radio waves

    Markov, G. A.; Belov, A. S.; Komrakov, G. P. [Lobachevsky State University (Russian Federation); Parrot, M. [Environmental Physics and Chemistry Laboratory (France)

    2012-03-15

    The possibility of controlled excitation of ELF-VLF electromagnetic waves through modification of the F{sub 2} ionospheric layer by high-power high-frequency emission is demonstrated in a natural experiment by using the Sura midlatitude heating facility. The excited low-frequency waves can be used to explore the near-Earth space and stimulate the excitation of a magnetospheric maser.

  3. Investigation of VLF and HF waves showing seismo-ionosphericanomalies induced by the 29 September 2009 Samoa earthquake(Mw=8.1)

    M. Akhoondzadeh; M. Parrot; Saradjian, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    In Samoa Islands, a powerful earthquake took place at 17:48:10.99 UTC (06:48:10.99 LT) on 29 September 2009 with a magnitude Mw=8.1. Using ICE (Instrument Champ Electrique) and IMSC (Instrument Magnetic Search Coil) experiments onboard the DEMETER (Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) satellite we have surveyed possible variations in electromagnetic signals transmitted by the ground-based VLF transmitter NPM in Hawaii and in HF plasma waves close to the ...

  4. The South America VLF Network - SAVNET: Achievements, Latest Results and Future Directions

    Raulin, J.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we present recent results obtained by the South America VLF Network (SAVNET). The use of the VLF technique by tracking subionospheric propagation anomalies appears as a very promising tool to study various aspects of Space Weather disturbances. On long timescales it is possible to indirectly monitor the solar Lyman-alpha radiation along the solar cycles. Short time phenomena like solar explosive events can be observed with 100% probability, even for the small intensity events. The effect of high-energy precipitating solar particles can be tracked in the low ionosphere. The same technique is also relevant to study the ionospheric perturbations caused by geomagnetic storms on typical timescales of a day to few days. Extra solar and terrestrial high-energy phenomena are naturally detected in the very sensitive low ionospheric plasma, as Gamma-ray bursts and Soft Gamma-ray repeaters. Finally, the remote sensing of the low ionosphere is also used to search for seismic-electromagnetic effects prior to Earthquakes. At the present time, SAVNET is composed of nine (9) tracking receiver stations in Brazil, Peru, Argentina and Mexico. In this presentation we will describe our future plans for expanding the array. Eastern Europe, Ecuador and Asia are good host candidates to participate in these forthcoming activities. The array expansion is necessary to improve the probability detection of very high-energy remote phenomena, and to demonstrate that these processes of great astrophysical importance can be easily detected using a cheap and simple technique.

  5. Can the envisaged reductions of fossil fuel CO2 emissions be detected by atmospheric observations?

    Levin, Ingeborg; Rödenbeck, Christian

    2007-01-01

    The lower troposphere is an excellent receptacle, which integrates anthropogenic greenhouse gases emissions over large areas. Therefore, atmospheric concentration observations over populated regions would provide the ultimate proof if sustained emissions changes have occurred. The most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO2), also shows large natural concentration variations, which need to be disentangled from anthropogenic signals to assess changes in associated emission...

  6. Optimization of NOx emissions in Yangtze Delta Region using in-situ observations

    Wang, Hengmao; Jiang, Fei; Jiang, Ziqiang; Liu, Jane; Chen, Jing Ming; Ju, Weimin

    2016-04-01

    Well quantified NOx emissions are essential for air quality forecasting and air pollution mitigation. The traditional "bottom-up" estimates of NOx emissions, using activity data and emission factors, are subject to large uncertainties, especially in China. Inverse modelling, often referred to as "top-down" approach, using atmospheric observations made from satellites and ground stations, provides an effective means to optimize bottom-up NOx emission inventory. The rapid expansion of air quality monitoring network in China offers an opportunity to constrain NOx emissions using in-situ ground measurements. We explore the potential of using NO2 observations from the air quality monitoring network to improve NOx emissions estimates in China. The four dimensional variational data assimilation (4DVAR) scheme in the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) adjoint model is implemented to infer NOx emissions in Yangtze Delta Region at 12 km resolution. The optimized NOx emissions are presented. The uncertainly reduction of estimates is analyzed and discussed.

  7. Modeling of the Very Low Frequency (VLF radio wave signal profile due to solar flares using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation coupled with ionospheric chemistry

    S. Palit

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available X-ray photons emitted during solar flares cause ionization in the lower ionosphere (~ 60 to 100 km in excess of what is expected from a quiet sun. Very Low Frequency (VLF radio wave signals reflected from the D region are affected by this excess ionization. In this paper, we reproduce the deviation in VLF signal strength during solar flares by numerical modeling. We use GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code to compute the rate of ionization due to a M-class and a X-class flare. The output of the simulation is then used in a simplified ionospheric chemistry model to calculate the time variation of electron density at different altitudes in the lower ionosphere. The resulting electron density variation profile is then self-consistently used in the LWPC code to obtain the time variation of the VLF signal change. We did the modeling of the VLF signal along the NWC (Australia to IERC/ICSP (India propagation path and compared the results with observations. The agreement is found to be very satisfactory.

  8. Modeling of very low frequency (VLF radio wave signal profile due to solar flares using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation coupled with ionospheric chemistry

    S. Palit

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray photons emitted during solar flares cause ionization in the lower ionosphere (~60 to 100 km in excess of what is expected to occur due to a quiet sun. Very low frequency (VLF radio wave signals reflected from the D-region of the ionosphere are affected by this excess ionization. In this paper, we reproduce the deviation in VLF signal strength during solar flares by numerical modeling. We use GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code to compute the rate of ionization due to a M-class flare and a X-class flare. The output of the simulation is then used in a simplified ionospheric chemistry model to calculate the time variation of electron density at different altitudes in the D-region of the ionosphere. The resulting electron density variation profile is then self-consistently used in the LWPC code to obtain the time variation of the change in VLF signal. We did the modeling of the VLF signal along the NWC (Australia to IERC/ICSP (India propagation path and compared the results with observations. The agreement is found to be very satisfactory.

  9. Cluster observations of reflected EMIC-triggered emission

    Grison, B.; Darrouzet, F.; Santolík, O.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Masson, A.

    2016-05-01

    On 19 March 2001, the Cluster fleet recorded an electromagnetic rising tone on the nightside of the plasmasphere. The emission was found to propagate toward the Earth and toward the magnetic equator at a group velocity of about 200 km/s. The Poynting vector is mainly oblique to the background magnetic field and directed toward the Earth. The propagation angle θk,B0 becomes more oblique with increasing magnetic latitude. Inside each rising tone θk,B0 is more field aligned for higher frequencies. Comparing our results to previous ray tracing analysis we conclude that this emission is a triggered electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave generated at the nightside plasmapause. We detect the wave just after its reflection in the plasmasphere. The reflection makes the tone slope shallower. This process can contribute to the formation of pearl pulsations.

  10. A generation mechanism of chorus emissions using BWO theory

    In this paper, discrete VLF chorus emissions recorded at low latitude ground station Jammu (geomag. Lat. = 220 26/ N, L = 1.17) are reported and their characteristics based on complete spectral analysis have been carried out. These discrete chorus emissions are generated during a strong geomagnetic storm period of 2-7 May, 1998. We have computed the sweep rate, repetition period, source region, and drift rate of the individual chorus elements. It is observed that the sweep rate increases with time. To explain the various temporal and spectral features of these emissions, a possible generation mechanism has been presented based on the backward wave oscillator (BWO) regime in the magnetospheric cyclotron maser. On the basis of this model, we have computed some discrete chorus emission parameters as well as magnetospheric parameters relevant to the generation process. A comparison of the computed and observed magnetospheric parameters has been presented. These results show a good agreement with the BWO model.

  11. A generation mechanism of chorus emissions using BWO theory

    Singh, Ashutosh K; Singh, K K; Singh, A K; Patel, R P [Department of Physics, M. M. H. P. G. College, Ghaziabad (India); Singh, R, E-mail: abhay_s@rediffmail.co [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India)

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, discrete VLF chorus emissions recorded at low latitude ground station Jammu (geomag. Lat. = 22{sup 0} 26{sup /} N, L = 1.17) are reported and their characteristics based on complete spectral analysis have been carried out. These discrete chorus emissions are generated during a strong geomagnetic storm period of 2-7 May, 1998. We have computed the sweep rate, repetition period, source region, and drift rate of the individual chorus elements. It is observed that the sweep rate increases with time. To explain the various temporal and spectral features of these emissions, a possible generation mechanism has been presented based on the backward wave oscillator (BWO) regime in the magnetospheric cyclotron maser. On the basis of this model, we have computed some discrete chorus emission parameters as well as magnetospheric parameters relevant to the generation process. A comparison of the computed and observed magnetospheric parameters has been presented. These results show a good agreement with the BWO model.

  12. Extended emission sources observed via two-proton correlations

    Two-proton correlations were measured as a function of the total energy and relative momentum of the proton. The correlation is analyzed for different orientations of the relative momentum, which allows information on the size and lifetime of the emission source to be extracted. The most energetic particles are emitted from a short- lived source of compound nucleus dimensions while the lower energy protons appear to be emitted from a source considerably larger than the compound nucleus. 9 refs., 3 figs

  13. Study of electromagnetic emissions associated with seismic activity in Kamchatka region

    V. Gladychev

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of data processing of electromagnetic emission observation collected at the Complex Geophysical Observatory Karimshino (Kamchatka peninsula during the first 5 months (July–November, 2000 of its operation is given. The main goal of this study addresses the detection of the phenomena associated with Kamchatka seismic activity. The following observations have been conducted at CGO: variations of ULF/ELF magnetic field, geoelectric potentials (telluric currents, and VLF signals from navigation radio transmitters. The methods of data processing of these observations are discussed. The examples of the first experimental results are presented.

  14. Satellite observations indicate substantial spatiotemporal variability in biomass burning NOx emission factors for South America

    P. Castellanos

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning is an important contributor to global total emissions of NOx (NO + NO2. Generally bottom-up fire emissions models calculate NOx emissions by multiplying fuel consumption estimates with static biome specific emission factors, defined in units of grams of NO per kilogram of dry matter consumed. Emission factors are a significant source of uncertainty in bottom-up fire emissions modeling because relatively few observations are available to characterize the large spatial and temporal variability of burning conditions. In this paper we use NO2 tropospheric column observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI from the year 2005 over South America to calculate monthly NOx emission factors for four fire types: deforestation, savanna/grassland, woodland, and agricultural waste burning. In general, the spatial trends in NOx emission factors calculated in this work are consistent with emission factors derived from in situ measurements from the region, but are more variable than published biome specific global average emission factors widely used in bottom up fire emissions inventories such as the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED v3. Satellite based NOx emission factors also indicate substantial temporal variability in burning conditions. Overall, we found that deforestation fires have the lowest NOx emission factors, on average 30 % lower than the emission factors used in GFED v3. Agricultural fire NOx emission factors were the highest, on average a factor of 2 higher than GFED v3 values. For savanna, woodland, and deforestation fires early dry season NOx emission factors were a factor of ~1.5–2.0 higher than late dry season emission factors. A minimum in the NOx emission factor seasonal cycle for deforestation fires occurred in August, the time period of severe drought in South America in 2005. Our results support the hypothesis that prolonged dry spells may lead to an increase in the contribution of smoldering combustion

  15. Analysis of auroral infrared emissions observed during the ELIAS experiment

    G. E. Caledonia

    Full Text Available The ELIAS (Earth Limb Infrared Atmospheric Structure experiment was flown from the Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska in 1983 and successfully monitored visible and infrared emissions from an IBC III+ aurora. Measurements were performed in both staring and scanning modes over several hundred seconds. The data for short- and mid-wave infrared regions have been analyzed in terms of auroral excitation of the NO and NO+ vibrational bands. Auroral excitation efficiencies and kinetic implications are presented.

  16. Satellite observations indicate substantial spatiotemporal variability in biomass burning NOx emission factors for South America

    Castellanos, P.; Boersma, K. F.; van der Werf, G. R.

    2014-04-01

    Biomass burning is an important contributor to global total emissions of NOx (NO+NO2). Generally bottom-up fire emissions models calculate NOx emissions by multiplying fuel consumption estimates with static biome-specific emission factors, defined in units of grams of NO per kilogram of dry matter consumed. Emission factors are a significant source of uncertainty in bottom-up fire emissions modeling because relatively few observations are available to characterize the large spatial and temporal variability of burning conditions. In this paper we use NO2 tropospheric column observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) from the year 2005 over South America to calculate monthly NOx emission factors for four fire types: deforestation, savanna/grassland, woodland, and agricultural waste burning. In general, the spatial patterns in NOx emission factors calculated in this work are consistent with emission factors derived from in situ measurements from the region but are more variable than published biome-specific global average emission factors widely used in bottom-up fire emissions inventories such as the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED). Satellite-based NOx emission factors also indicate substantial temporal variability in burning conditions. Overall, we found that deforestation fires have the lowest NOx emission factors, on average 30% lower than the emission factors used in GFED v3. Agricultural fire NOx emission factors were the highest, on average a factor of 1.8 higher than GFED v3 values. For savanna, woodland, and deforestation fires, early dry season NOx emission factors were a factor of ~1.5-2 higher than late dry season emission factors. A minimum in the NOx emission factor seasonal cycle for deforestation fires occurred in August, the time period of severe drought in South America in 2005, supporting the hypothesis that prolonged dry spells may lead to an increase in the contribution of smoldering combustion from large-diameter fuels

  17. Recent Observations of Venus' OI and O2 Emission from

    Gray, C. L.; Chanover, N. J.; Slanger, T. G.

    2011-10-01

    Past observations of the Venusian night glow features O(1S -1 D) at 5577.3 Å (atomic oxygen green line) and O2 (a - X) 0 - 0 at 1.27 μm were found to be temporally and spatially variable. We report on the analysis of recent observations of these two features, obtained using optical and infrared spectrographs on the 3.5-meter Astrophysical Research Consortium Telescope at Apache Point Observatory (APO) in December 2010.

  18. Regional nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia observed from space

    B. Mijling

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to changing economic activity, emissions of air pollutants in East Asia change rapidly in space and time. Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides derived from satellite observations provide valuable insight in the evolution of anthropogenic activity on a regional scale. We present the first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emissions of short-lived atmospheric constituents on a~mesoscopic scale (~ 0.25° × 0.25°. The algorithm is used to construct a monthly NOx emission time series for 2007–2011 from tropospheric NO2 observations of GOME-2 for East Chinese provinces and surrounding countries. The new emission estimates correspond well with the bottom-up inventory of EDGAR v4.2, but are smaller than the inventories of INTEX-B and MEIC. They reveal a strong positive trend during 2007–2011 for almost all Chinese provinces, related to the country's economic development. We find a 41% increment of NOx emissions in East China during this period, which shows the need to update emission inventories in this region on a regular basis. Negative emission trends are found in Japan and South Korea, which can be attributed to a combined effect of local environmental policy and global economic crises. Analysis of seasonal variation distinguishes between regions with dominant anthropogenic or biogenic emissions. For regions with a mixed anthropogenic and biogenic signature, the opposite seasonality can be used for an estimation of the separate emission contributions. Finally, the non-local concentration/emission relationships calculated by the algorithm are used to quantify the direct effect of regional NOx emissions on tropospheric NO2 concentrations outside the region. For regions such as North Korea and Beijing province, a substantial part of the tropospheric NO2 originates from emissions elsewhere.

  19. The Search for VLF Precursors to Major Earthquakes: A Case Study with the M9.0 Earthquake of 11-Mar-2011 (Invited)

    Cohen, M.; Kosovichev, P.; Marshall, R. A.; Droscoll, A.; Scherrer, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    It has been proposed that Very Low Frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio remote sensing may be used to detect ionospheric changes which may precede major earthquakes by hours or days. We report the results of a search for VLF precursors to the M9.0 Tohoku earthquake of 11-Mar-2011, the fifth most powerful earthquake in recorded history. Broadband and narrowband radio recordings were made at a site in Onagawa, Japan located ~102 km from the epicenter. The receiver operated for about two minutes after the start of the earthquake, after which the receiver lost power. Examination of the VLF data shows no radio emissions preceding or coincident with the onset of the earthquake. However, once the secondary seismic waves reached the receiver, a number of impulses and diffuse noise bands arose which may result from the entire power grid shaking or from radio emissions from compressing or fracturing rocks. Examination of the ELF data (0.2-1 kHz) shows no precursor effect in the hours preceding the seismic activity. We also examine the amplitudes of VLF subionospherically propagating transmitter signals going back months before the earthquake. We apply previously proposed techniques to extract properties of the diurnal amplitude profile that have been thought to correlate with earthquake precursors, but find no anomalous effect despite the remarkable intensity of the earthquake and proximity of the receiver to the epicenter. In general there are anomalous deviations but they cannot be reliably correlated with seismic activity. We also report the results of a global search for a lightning precursor effect on lightning flash rates, using the GLD360 network.

  20. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    M. Zavala; Lei, W.; M. J. Molina; L. T. Molina

    2008-01-01

    The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies and improvements in fuel quality, among others. Along with these changes, concurrent non-linear changes in photochemical levels and criteria pollutants have been observed, providing a unique opportunity to understand the effects of perturbations of mobile emission levels on...

  1. ALMA Capabilities for Observations of Spectral Line Emission

    Wootten, A

    2007-01-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) combines large collecting area and location on a high dry site to provide it with unparalleled potential for sensitive millimeter/submillimeter spectral line observations. Its wide frequency coverage, superb receivers and flexible spectrometer will ensure that its potential is met. Since the 1999 meeting on ALMA Science\\cite{RefA}, the ALMA team has substantially enhanced its capability for line observations. ALMA's sensitivity increased when Japan joined the project, bringing the 16 antennas of the Atacama Compcat Array (ACA), equivalent to eight additional 12m telescopes. The first four receiver cartridges for the baseline ALMA (Japan's entry has brought two additional bands to ALMA's receiver retinue) have been accepted, with performance above the already-challenging specifications. ALMA's flexibility has increased with the enhancement of the baseline correlator with additional channels and flexibility, and with the addition of a separate correlator f...

  2. Observations and predictions of EUV emission from classical novae

    Theoretical modeling of novae in outburst predicts that they should be active emitters of radiation both in the EUV and soft X-ray wavelengths twice during the outburst. The first time is very early in the outburst when only an all sky survey can detect them. This period lasts only a few hours. They again become bright EUV and soft X-ray emitters late in the outburst when the remnant object becomes very hot and is still luminous. The predictions imply both that a nova can remain very hot for months to years and that the peak temperature at this time strongly depends upon the mass of the white dwarf. It is important to observe novae at these late times because a measurement of both the flux and temperature can provide information about the mass of the white dwarf, the tun-off time scale, and the energy budget of the outburst. We review the existing observations of novae in late stages of their outburst and present some newly obtained data for GQ Mus 1983. We then provide results of new hydrodynamic simulations of novae in outburst and compare the predictions to the observations. 43 refs., 6 figs

  3. Observation of optical emission from high refractive index waveguide excited by traveling electron beam

    Kuwamura, Yuji; Yamada, Minoru; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Kanai, Takeshi; Fares, Hesham

    2008-01-01

    A new scheme for optical emission using a high refractive index waveguide and the traveling electron beam in vacuum was demonstrated. Optical emission around wavelength of 1.5 pm was observed for electron acceleration voltage of 40KV. © 2008 Optical Society of America.

  4. Detection efficiency of the VLF World-Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN: initial case study

    C. J. Rodger

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental Very Low Frequency (VLF World-Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN has been developed through collaborations with research institutions across the world, providing global real-time locations of lightning discharges. As of April 2006, the network included 25 stations providing coverage for much of the Earth. In this paper we examine the detection efficiency of the WWLLN by comparing the locations from this network with lightning location data purchased from a commercial lightning location network operating in New Zealand. Our analysis confirms that WWLLN favours high peak current return stroke lightning discharges, and that discharges with larger currents are observed by more stations across the global network. We then construct a first principles detection efficiency model to describe the WWLLN, combining calibration information for each station with theoretical modelling to describe the expected amplitudes of the VLF sferics observed by the network. This detection efficiency model allows the prediction of the global variation in WWLLN lightning detection, and an estimate of the minimum CG return stroke peak current required to trigger the network. There are strong spatial variations across the globe, primarily due to station density and sensitivity.

    The WWLLN is currently best suited to study the occurrence and impacts of high peak-current lightning. For example, in 2005 about 12% of the global elve-producing lightning will have been located by the network. Since the lightning-EMP which produce elves has a high mean rate (210 per minute it has the potential to significantly influence the ionosphere on regional scales.

  5. On the numerical modelling of VLF chorus dynamical spectra

    Nunn, D; O. Santolik; Rycroft, M.; Trakhtengerts, V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the use of a one-dimensional Vlasov Hybrid Simulation (VHS) computer code to simulate the dynamical spectra (i.e. frequency versus time spectrograms) of ELF/VLF chorus signals (from ~a fraction to ~10 kHz). Recently excellent measurements of chorus have been made in the source region close to the geomagnetic equator aboard the four spacecraft Cluster mission. Using Cluster data for wave amplitude, which is up to 300 pT, local gyrofrequency, cold plasma density, ...

  6. VLF study of low magnitude Earthquakes (4.5

    Wolbang, Daniel; Biernat, Helfried; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Eichelberger, Hans; Prattes, Gustav; Besser, Bruno; Boudjada, Mohammed; Rozhnoi, Alexander; Solovieva, Maria; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Friedrich, Martin

    2014-05-01

    In the course of the European VLF/LF radio receiver network (International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors, INFREP), radio signals in the frequency range from 10-50 kilohertz are received, continuously recorded (temporal resolution 20 seconds) and analyzed in the Graz/Austria knot. The radio signals are generated by dedicated distributed transmitters and detected by INFREP receivers in Europe. In case the signal is crossing an earthquake preparation zone, we are in principle able to detect seismic activity if the signal to noise ratio is high enough. The requirements to detect a seismic event with the radio link methods are given by the magnitude M of the Earthquake (EQ), the EQ preparation zone and the Fresnel zone. As pointed out by Rozhnoi et al. (2009), the VLF methods are suitable for earthquakes M>5.0. Furthermore, the VLF/LF radio link gets only disturbed if it is crossing the EQ preparation zone which is described by Molchanov et al. (2008). In the frame of this project I analyze low seismicity EQs (M≤5.6) in south/eastern Europe in the time period 2011-2013. My emphasis is on two seismic events with magnitudes 5.6 and 4.8 which we are not able to adequately characterize using our single parameter VLF method. I perform a fine structure analysis of the residua of various radio links crossing the area around the particular 2 EQs. Depending on the individual paths not all radio links are crossing the EQ preparation zone directly, so a comparative study is possible. As a comparison I analyze with the same method the already good described EQ of L'Aquila/Italy in 2009 with M=6.3 and radio links which are crossing directly the EQ preparation zone. In the course of this project we try to understand in more detail why it is so difficult to detect EQs with 4.5Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 9, 1727-1732, 2009. [2] A. Molchanov, M. Hayakawa: Seismo-Electromagnetics and related Phenomena: History and latest results, Terrapub, 2008.

  7. Observation of radio frequency emissions from electrochemical loading experiments

    Palladium foil cathodes were electrochemically loaded with deuterium from alkaline solutions of heavy water in specially designed closed calorimeter cells. Here, one cell is described that showed low levels of constant heat (1-7 mW) and radio frequency (RF) emanations, but the RF was not correlated with the heat production. This cell is compared with Pd90Rh10 alloy cathodes that showed excess energy bursts of 2.4-44.3 kJ. In these cells, RF coincident with the bursts was observed peaking at different frequencies from about 450 kHz and extending into the MHz range. Some of the excess energy production in LENR may be in the MHz RF range, which has no conventional explanation in electrochemistry. (author)

  8. Observations of OI 7774 emission excited by conjugate photoelectrons. [ionosonde data analhysis

    Christensen, A. B.

    1975-01-01

    Observations and computer calculations of O I 7774 A airglow emissions excited by conjugate photoelectrons have been carried out. The observations were made at McDonald Observatory, Texas using a 2 m grille spectrometer from December 1972 to June 1973. The zenithal emission intensity during conjugate photoelectron precipitation was fairly constant at 2-4 R until conjugate sunset, after which it diminished steadily and ceased near a conjugate solar zenith angle of 105 (plus or minus 3) deg. A predawn enhancement in both O I 7774 A and forbidden O I 6300 A was observed to commence near 102 deg. The computations utilize the two-stream technique of Nagy and Banks (1970) to obtain the escaping photoelectron flux and the local excitation rates of the oxygen emissions. Good agreement with the observations is obtained for the dependence of the emission rate on conjugate solar zenith angle.

  9. Chorus, ECH, and Z mode emissions observed at Jupiter and Saturn and possible electron acceleration

    Menietti, J.D.; Y. Y. Shprits; Horne, R. B.; E. E. Woodfield; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we compare and contrast chorus, electron cyclotron harmonics (ECH), and Z mode emissions observed at Jupiter and Saturn and relate them to recent work on electron acceleration at Earth. Intense chorus emissions are observed near the magnetic equator, the likely source region, but the strongest intensities are on either side of the magnetic equator. Chorus intensities at Jupiter are generally about an order of magnitude larger than at Saturn, and the bandwidth of chorus at Jupite...

  10. The observation of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions in the laboratory and in the night airglow

    W. F. J. Evans

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding of an orange spectral feature in OSIRIS/Odin spectra of the night airglow near 87 km has raised interest in the origin of the emission. The feature was positively identified as the chemiluminescent FeO* emission where the iron is of meteoric origin. Since the meteorite source of atomic metals in the mesosphere contains both iron and nickel, with Ni being typically 6 % of Fe, it is expected that faint emissions involving Ni should also be present in the night airglow. The present study summarizes the laboratory observations of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions and includes a search for the NiO* signature in the night airglow. A very faint previously unidentified "continuum" extending longwave of 440 nm has been detected in the night airglow spectra obtained with two space-borne limb viewing instruments. Through a comparison with laboratory spectra this continuum is identified as arising from the NiO* emission. The altitude profile of the new airglow emission has also been measured. The similarity of the altitude profiles of the FeO* and NiO* emissions also suggests the emission is NiO as both can originate from reaction of the metal atoms with mesospheric ozone. The observed NiO* to FeO* ratio exhibits considerable variability; possible causes of this observed variation are briefly discussed.

  11. Spitzer observations of the thermal emission from WASP-43b

    Blecic, Jasmina; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Stevenson, Kevin B; Hardy, Ryan A; Cubillos, Patricio E; Hardin, Matthew; Nymeyer, Sarah; Anderson, David R; Hellier, Coel; Smith, Alexis M S; Cameron, Andrew Collier

    2013-01-01

    WASP-43b (Hellier et al.; Gillon et al.) is one of the closest-orbiting hot Jupiters, with a semimajor axis a = 0.01526 +/- 0.00018 AU and a period of only 0.81 days. However, it orbits one of the coolest stars with a hot Jupiter (K7V, Tstar = 4520 +/- 120 K), giving the planet a modest equilibrium temperature of Teq = 1440 +/- 40 K, assuming zero Bond albedo and uniform planetary energy redistribution. This has resulted in strong signal-to-noise-ratio (S/N) observations and deep eclipses in both Warm Spitzer channels (3.6 and 4.5 microns). The eclipse depths and brightness temperatures from our jointly fit model are 0.346 +/- 0.013% and 1684 +/- 24 K at 3.6 microns and 0.382 +/- 0.015% and 1485 +/- 24 K at 4.5 microns. The eclipse timings improved the estimate of the orbital period, P, by a factor of three (P = 0.81347459 +/- 2.1x10-7 days) compared to Gillon et al. and put an upper limit on the eccentricity (e = 0.007+0.013-0.004). We use our Spitzer eclipse depths with two previously reported ground-based ...

  12. Spitzer observations of the thermal emission from WASP-43b

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Hardy, Ryan A.; Cubillos, Patricio E.; Hardin, Matthew; Bowman, Oliver; Nymeyer, Sarah [Planetary Sciences Group, Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Anderson, David R.; Hellier, Coel; Smith, Alexis M. S. [Astrophysics Group, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Cameron, Andrew Collier, E-mail: jasmina@physics.ucf.edu [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-01

    WASP-43b is one of the closest-orbiting hot Jupiters, with a semimajor axis of a = 0.01526 ± 0.00018 AU and a period of only 0.81 days. However, it orbits one of the coolest stars with a hot Jupiter (T {sub *} = 4520 ± 120 K), giving the planet a modest equilibrium temperature of T {sub eq} = 1440 ± 40 K, assuming zero Bond albedo and uniform planetary energy redistribution. The eclipse depths and brightness temperatures from our jointly fit model are 0.347% ± 0.013% and 1670 ± 23 K at 3.6 μm and 0.382% ± 0.015% and 1514 ± 25 K at 4.5 μm. The eclipse timings improved the estimate of the orbital period, P, by a factor of three (P = 0.81347436 ± 1.4 × 10{sup –7} days) and put an upper limit on the eccentricity (e=0.010{sub −0.007}{sup +0.010}). We use our Spitzer eclipse depths along with four previously reported ground-based photometric observations in the near-infrared to constrain the atmospheric properties of WASP-43b. The data rule out a strong thermal inversion in the dayside atmosphere of WASP-43b. Model atmospheres with no thermal inversions and fiducial oxygen-rich compositions are able to explain all the available data. However, a wide range of metallicities and C/O ratios can explain the data. The data suggest low day-night energy redistribution in the planet, consistent with previous studies, with a nominal upper limit of about 35% for the fraction of energy incident on the dayside that is redistributed to the nightside.

  13. Dark matter line emission constraints from NuSTAR observations of the Bullet Cluster

    Riemer-Sørensen, S.; Wik, D.; Madejski, G.;

    2015-01-01

    Some dark matter candidates, e.g., sterile neutrinos, provide observable signatures in the form of mono-energetic line emission. We present the first search for dark matter line emission in the range in a pointed observation of the Bullet Cluster with NuSTAR. We do not detect any significant line...... emission and instead we derive upper limits (95% CL) on the flux, and interpret these constraints in the context of sterile neutrinos and more generic dark matter candidates. NuSTAR does not have the sensitivity to constrain the recently claimed line detection at , but improves on the constraints...... for energies of 10–25 keV....

  14. Phenomenology of Neptune's radio emissions observed by the Voyager planetary radio astronomy experiment

    Pedersen, B. M.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Aubier, M. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Neptune flyby in 1989 added a new planet to the known number of magnetized planets generating nonthermal radio emissions. We review the Neptunian radio emission morphology as observed by the planetary radio astronomy experiment on board Voyager 2 during a few weeks before and after closest approach. We present the characteristics of the two observed recurrent main components of the Neptunian kilometric radiation, i.e., the 'smooth' and the 'bursty' emissions, and we describe the many specific features of the radio spectrum during closest approach.

  15. Gamma Ray and Very Low Frequency Radio Observations from a Balloon-Borne Platform

    Quinn, C.; Sheldon, A.; Cully, C. M.; Davalos, A.; Osakwe, C.; Galts, D.; Delfin, J.; Duffin, C.; Mansell, J.; Russel, M.; Bootsma, M.; Williams, R.; Patrick, M.; Mazzino, M. L.; Knudsen, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The University of Calgary's Student Organization for Aerospace Research (SOAR) built an instrument to participate in the High Altitude Student Platform (HASP) initiative organized by Louisiana State University and supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office (BPO) and the Louisiana Space Consortium (LaSPACE). The HASP platform will be launched in early September 2015 from Fort Sumner, New Mexico and will reach heights of 36 kilometers with a flight duration of 15 to 20 hours. The instrument, Atmospheric Phenomenon Observer Gamma/VLF Emissions Experiment (APOGEE), measures Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGF) and sferics from lightning strikes with the use of Geiger tubes and a VLF detector. TGFs, which are quick bursts of high energy radiation that can occur alongside lightning, are believed to be the result of Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA). RREA occurs when a large number of relativistic electrons overcome atmospheric frictional forces and accelerate to relativistic velocities which excite secondary electrons that collide with the atmosphere causing bremsstrahlung radiation. Lightning strikes also produce sferics within the Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) bands which can be detected and used to locate the strikes. The goal of APOGEE is to further investigate the link between TGFs and RREA. These phenomena are very difficult to measure together as Bremsstrahlung radiation is easily detected from space but ionospheric reflection facilitates surface detection of sferics. A high altitude balloon provides a unique opportunity to study both phenomena using one instrument because both phenomena can easily be detected from its altitude. APOGEE has been designed and built by undergraduate students at the University of Calgary with faculty assistance and funding, and is equipped with three devices for data collection: a camera to have visual conformation of events, a series of Geiger Tubes to obtain directional gamma readings, and

  16. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    M. Zavala

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies and improvements in fuel quality, among others. Along with these changes, concurrent non-linear changes in photochemical levels and criteria pollutants have been observed, providing a unique opportunity to understand the effects of perturbations of mobile emission levels on the photochemistry in the region using observational and modeling approaches. The observed historical trends of ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO and nitrogen oxides (NOx suggest that ozone production in the MCMA has changed from a low to a high VOC-sensitive regime over a period of 20 years. Comparison of the historical emission trends of CO, NOx and hydrocarbons derived from mobile-source emission studies in the MCMA from 1991 to 2006 with the trends of the concentrations of CO, NOx, and the CO/NOx ratio during peak traffic hours also indicates that fuel-based fleet average emission factors have significantly decreased for CO and VOCs during this period whereas NOx emission factors do not show any strong trend, effectively reducing the ambient VOC/NOx ratio.

    This study presents the results of model analyses on the sensitivity of the observed ozone levels to the estimated historical changes in its precursors. The model sensitivity analyses used a well-validated base case simulation of a high pollution episode in the MCMA with the mathematical Decoupled Direct Method (DDM and the standard Brute Force Method (BFM in the 3-D CAMx chemical transport model. The model reproduces adequately the observed historical trends and current photochemical levels. Comparison of the BFM and the DDM sensitivity techniques indicates that the model yields ozone values that increase linearly with

  17. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    M. Zavala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies and improvements in fuel quality, among others. Along with these changes, concurrent non-linear changes in photochemical levels and criteria pollutants have been observed, providing a unique opportunity to understand the effects of perturbations of mobile emission levels on the photochemistry in the region using observational and modeling approaches. The observed historical trends of ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO and nitrogen oxides (NOx suggest that ozone production in the MCMA has changed from a low to a high VOC-sensitive regime over a period of 20 years. Comparison of the historical emission trends of CO, NOx and hydrocarbons derived from mobile-source emission studies in the MCMA from 1991 to 2006 with the trends of the concentrations of CO, NOx, and the CO/NOx ratio during peak traffic hours also indicates that fuel-based fleet average emission factors have significantly decreased for CO and VOCs during this period whereas NOx emission factors do not show any strong trend, effectively reducing the ambient VOC/NOx ratio.

    This study presents the results of model analyses on the sensitivity of the observed ozone levels to the estimated historical changes in its precursors. The model sensitivity analyses used a well-validated base case simulation of a high pollution episode in the MCMA with the mathematical Decoupled Direct Method (DDM and the standard Brute Force Method (BFM in the 3-D CAMx chemical transport model. The model reproduces adequately the observed historical trends and current photochemical levels. Comparison of the BFM and the DDM sensitivity techniques indicates that the model yields ozone values that increase linearly with

  18. Chandra Observations and Modeling of Geocoronal Charge Exchange X-Ray Emission During Solar Wind Gusts

    Kornbleuth, Marc; Wargelin, Bradford J.; Juda, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-rays are emitted when highly charged solar wind ions such as O7+ collide with neutral gas. The best known examples of this occur around comets, but SWCX emission also arises in the Earth's tenuous outer atmosphere and throughout the heliosphere as neutral H and He from the interstellar medium flows into the solar system. This geocoronal and heliospheric emission comprises much of the soft X-ray background and is seen in every X-ray observation. Geocoronal emission, although usually weaker than heliospheric emission, arises within a few tens of Earth radii and therefore responds much more quickly (on time scales of less than an hour) to changes in solar wind intensity than the widely distributed heliospheric emission.We have studied a dozen Chandra observations when the flux of solar wind protons and O7+ ions was at its highest. These gusts of wind cause correspondingly abrupt changes in geocoronal SWCX X-ray emission,which may or may not be apparent in Chandra data depending on a given observation's line of sight through the magnetosphere. We compare observed changes in the X-ray background with predictions from a fully 3D analysis of SWCX emission based on magnetospheric simulations using the BATS-R-US model.

  19. Solution uniquity of an inverse VLF problem: A case-study of the polar, ground-based, VLF radio signal disturbances caused by the ultra-energetic relativistic electron precipitations and of their southern boundaries

    Remenets, G. F.; Astafiev, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Here we present the results of a case study of the rare, abnormal, qualitatively specific behavior of Aldra (northern Norway) and GBR (UK) VLF transmitter signals (10-16 kHz) received at Kola Peninsula. The abnormal amplitude and the phase disturbances of signals were used as a proxy for ultra-energetic relativistic (solar?) electron precipitation (URE, ∼100 MeV) into the middle polar atmosphere. The disturbances have been observed under quiet or moderately disturbed geomagnetic activity. Based on bearing results, it was established that the abnormal variations of the electric conductivity of ionized middle atmosphere (of a sporadic Ds layer under the regular ionosphere D layer) were characterized by the following: (i) the time function of height h(t) of an effective spherical waveguide between the Earth surface and the sporadic Ds layer shows a minimum value equal to ∼30 km and (ii) the reflection coefficient R(t) of radio wave with a grazing angle of incidence from a virtual boundary with height h(t) has a minimum value equal to ∼0.4. The southern boundaries of the ultra-energetic relativistic electron precipitations have been found as well. They turned out to be not southerly than 61 degree of magnetic latitude and similar to the ones obtained in our previous study of the events for other dates under the similar geophysical conditions although we do not know anything definite about the rigidity and density of the electron fluxes. A used calculation method of analysis is based on a necessary condition that a number n of input data should be greater than a number m of output parameter-functions. We have stated by numerical testing that a decrease of n from 6 to 4 generates a lack of uniqueness of an inverse VLF problem solution for m = 2. It is important for future VLF ground-based monitoring of the URE precipitation events.

  20. Observed decrease in atmospheric mercury explained by global decline in anthropogenic emissions.

    Zhang, Yanxu; Jacob, Daniel J; Horowitz, Hannah M; Chen, Long; Amos, Helen M; Krabbenhoft, David P; Slemr, Franz; St Louis, Vincent L; Sunderland, Elsie M

    2016-01-19

    Observations of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) at sites in North America and Europe show large decreases (∼ 1-2% y(-1)) from 1990 to present. Observations in background northern hemisphere air, including Mauna Loa Observatory (Hawaii) and CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) aircraft flights, show weaker decreases (flat or increasing emissions over that period. However, the inventories have three major flaws: (i) they do not account for the decline in atmospheric release of Hg from commercial products; (ii) they are biased in their estimate of artisanal and small-scale gold mining emissions; and (iii) they do not properly account for the change in Hg(0)/Hg(II) speciation of emissions from coal-fired utilities after implementation of emission controls targeted at SO2 and NOx. We construct an improved global emission inventory for the period 1990 to 2010 accounting for the above factors and find a 20% decrease in total Hg emissions and a 30% decrease in anthropogenic Hg(0) emissions, with much larger decreases in North America and Europe offsetting the effect of increasing emissions in Asia. Implementation of our inventory in a global 3D atmospheric Hg simulation [GEOS-Chem (Goddard Earth Observing System-Chemistry)] coupled to land and ocean reservoirs reproduces the observed large-scale trends in atmospheric Hg(0) concentrations and in Hg(II) wet deposition. The large trends observed in North America and Europe reflect the phase-out of Hg from commercial products as well as the cobenefit from SO2 and NOx emission controls on coal-fired utilities. PMID:26729866

  1. Emissions of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds and Observations of VOC Oxidation at Harvard Forest

    McKinney, K. A.; Pho, T.; Vasta, A.; Lee, B. H.

    2009-12-01

    The contribution of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) to oxidant concentrations and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production in forested environments depends on the emission rates of these compounds. Recent findings have suggested that the emission rates of BVOCs and the range of species emitted could be larger than previously thought. In this study, Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used to obtain fast (terpene oxidation products were also measured. Isoprene is the dominant emitted species, with peak emission rates and midday mixing ratios of ca. 4 mg isoprene m-2 h-1 and ca. 5 ppbv, respectively. Isoprene emission rates are expected to vary with temperature and radiation (PAR) levels, and are compared to standard emission algorithms based on these parameters. Interannual variability in isoprene emission rates is also observed, and contributing factors are explored. In contrast to isoprene, maximum monoterpene concentrations typically were less than 1 ppbv and occurred in the early evening, with a local minimum at midday. Monoterpene fluxes are about an order of magnitude smaller than those of isoprene. The amplitude of the flux diurnal cycle suggests monoterpene emissions at Harvard Forest may exhibit light dependence as well as temperature dependence. Fluxes of oxygenated VOCs, including methanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, and oxygenated terpenes that have rarely been observed previously, are also reported, and the dependence of their emission rates on factors such as time of year, temperature, radiation levels, and meteorological conditions are investigated.

  2. Diffuse radio emission in the Coma cluster and Abell 1367: observations at 430 and 1400 MHz

    Two rich clusters of galaxies, Abell 1656 (the Coma cluster) and Abell 1367, have been mapped at both 430 and 1400 MHz with the 305-m telescope at Arecibo. The contribution to the observed radio emission due to known discrete sources has been calculated by convolving interferometrically determined source lists with observed Arecibo beam patterns, and maps of the diffuse radio emission alone have been constructed. Both clusters contain regions of diffuse radio emission, although the source in Coma is larger and much more luminous than the source in Abell 1367. The linear extent of the diffuse emission and its dependence on frequency have been used to study particle propagation rates and modes of diffusion in the intracluster medium. The possible correlations between the diffuse radio emission and x-ray emission in these clusters have been investigated, and it has been found that the observed x-ray luminosities can be accounted for if the intracluster gas is heated through Coulomb interactions with the relativistic electrons responsible for the diffuse radio emission

  3. VSA Observations of the Anomalous Microwave Emission in the Perseus Region

    Tibbs, Christopher T; Dickinson, Clive; Davies, Rodney D; Davis, Richard J; del Burgo, Carlos; Franzen, Thomas M O; Génova-Santos, Ricardo; Grainge, Keith; Hobson, Michael P; Padilla-Torres, Carmen P; Rebolo, Rafael; Rubiño-Martín, Jóse Alberto; Saunders, Richard D E; Scaife, Anna M M; Scott, Paul F

    2009-01-01

    The dust feature G159.6--18.5 in the Perseus region has previously been observed with the COSMOSOMAS experiment \\citep{Watson:05} on angular scales of $\\approx$ 1$^{\\circ}$, and was found to exhibit anomalous microwave emission. We present new observations of this dust feature, performed with the Very Small Array (VSA) at 33 GHz, to help increase the understanding of the nature of this anomalous emission. On the angular scales observed with the VSA ($\\approx$ 10 -- 40$^{\\prime}$), G159.6--18.5 consists of five distinct components, each of which have been individually analysed. All five of these components are found to exhibit an excess of emission at 33 GHz, and are found to be highly correlated with far-infrared emission. We provide evidence that each of these compact components have anomalous emission that is consistent with electric dipole emission from very small, rapidly rotating dust grains. These components contribute $\\approx$ 10 % to the flux density of the diffuse extended emission detected by COSMO...

  4. Resistivity soundings and VLF profiles for siting groundwater wells in a fractured basement aquifer in the Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    Ammar, A. I.; Kruse, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal shortages of groundwater are common in parts of the Arabian Shield, where complex basement hydrogeology can make siting of water wells difficult. To identify optimal production well locations, six 200-400 m-long Very Low Frequency (VLF) electromagnetic traverses and ten Vertical Electrical Soundings (VESes) were run at the western edge of the Arabian Shield near At-Taif town, Saudi Arabia. Here wadi sediments overlie fractured Precambrian basement, which in turn overlies unfractured basement. The fractured basement forms the water supply aquifer. Both VLF and VES data indicate significant lateral heterogeneity in the electrical conductivity of both wadi and basement deposits over lengths scales as small as ∼100 m. VES results correlate closely with data from two wells in the study area. The change in resistivity at the wadi-to-fractured basement contact is relatively subtle, but the transition from low resistivity fractured basement to high resistivity unfractured basement is well resolved. Inferred wadi thicknesses range from 0 to 14 m; the electrically conductive fractured basement extends from wadi down to 12-32 m depth. VES data indicate the fractured basement aquifer thickens progressively to the south in this area. A production well, sited on the basis of the VES analysis, successfully yielded 70m3/day. The relationship between VLF and VES data is complex, suggesting that the terrain is heterogeneous on the scale of the different effective sampling volumes of the two methods, and/or that fracture azimuth is locally heterogeneous. Overall resistivities in this study are similar to those observed at other locations in Saudi Arabia, suggesting these methods may be widely applicable for siting of groundwater wells in the complex basement of the Arabian Shield.

  5. Patterns in atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols in China: emission estimates and observed concentrations

    H. Cui

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available China is experiencing severe carbonaceous aerosol pollution driven mainly by large emissions resulting from intensive use of solid fuels. To gain a better understanding of the levels and trends of carbonaceous aerosol emissions and the resulting ambient concentrations at the national scale, we update an emission inventory of anthropogenic organic carbon (OC and elemental carbon (EC and employ existing observational studies to analyze characteristics of these aerosols including temporal, spatial, and size distributions, and the levels and shares of secondary organic carbon (SOC in total OC. We further use ground observations to test the levels and inter-annual trends of the calculated national and provincial emissions of carbonaceous aerosols, and propose possible improvements in emission estimation for the future. The national OC emissions are estimated to have increased 29% from 2000 (2127 Gg to 2012 (2749 Gg and EC by 37% (from 1356 to 1857 Gg. The residential, industrial, and transportation sectors contributed an estimated 76 ± 2, 19 ± 2 and 5 ± 1% of the total emissions of OC, respectively, and 52 ± 3, 32 ± 2 and 16 ± 2% of EC. Updated emission factors based on the most recent local field measurements, particularly for biofuel stoves, lead to considerably lower emissions of OC compared to previous inventories. Compiling observational data across the country, higher concentrations of OC and EC are found in northern and inland cities, while larger OC/EC and SOC/OC ratios are found in southern cities, due to the joint effects of primary emissions and meteorology. Higher SOC/OC ratios are estimated at rural and remote sites compared to urban ones, attributed to more emissions of OC from biofuel use, more biogenic emissions of volatile organic compound (VOC precursors to SOC, and/or transport of aged aerosols. For most sites, higher concentrations of OC, EC, and SOC are observed in colder seasons, while SOC/OC is reduced, particularly at

  6. Electric and VLF-MT survey of Tegatayama tunnel; Tegatayama tunnel no denki tansa oyobi VLF tansa

    Nishitani, T. [Akita University, Akita (Japan). Mining College

    1997-05-27

    To survey the structure at the depth between 20 and 30 m, field tests were conducted by means of vertical electric and VFL-MT (magnetotelluric) survey. Tegatayama tunnel has a total length of 276 m, width of 7.5 m, and height of 4.7 m, and the depth from the surface is about 28 m near the top of mountain. Near the tunnel, the thickness of surface soil is about 60 cm, which consists of clay soil including soft mudstone gravel. It was found that terrace deposit is distributed up to the depth of 8 m, and that mudstone is distributed below the depth of 8 m. Weighted four-electrode method was adopted for the vertical electrical survey. Measurements were conducted at the immediately above the tunnel, 10 m apart from the center of tunnel in the right and left, and 20 m apart from the center in the east. For the VLF-MT method, component of frequency 22.2 kHz was used. As a result of the tests, it was difficult to illustrate the existence of tunnel from the vertical electrical survey only at one point. Feature of the tunnel could be well illustrated by means of the VLF-MT method. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Relative changes in CO emissions over megacities based on observations from space

    Pommier, Matthieu; McLinden, Chris A.; Deeter, Merritt

    2013-07-01

    Urban areas are large sources of several air pollutants, with carbon monoxide (CO) among the largest. Yet measurement from space of their CO emissions remains elusive due to its long lifetime. Here we introduce a new method of estimating relative changes in CO emissions over megacities. A new multichannel Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) CO data product, offering improved sensitivity to the boundary layer, is used to estimate this relative change over eight megacities: Moscow, Paris, Mexico, Tehran, Baghdad, Los Angeles, Sao Paulo, and Delhi. By combining MOPITT observations with wind information from a meteorological reanalysis, changes in the CO upwind-downwind difference are used as a proxy for changes in emissions. Most locations show a clear reduction in CO emission between 2000-2003 and 2004-2008, reaching -43% over Tehran and -47% over Baghdad. There is a contrasted agreement between these results and the MACCity and Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research v4.2 inventories.

  8. The INFREP European VLF/LF Radio Monitoring Network - Present Status and Preliminary Results of the Romanian Monitoring System

    Moldovan, I. A.; Moldovan, A.; Biagi, P. F.; Placinta, A. O.; Maggipinto, T.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the Romanian VLF / LF monitoring system consisting in a radio receiver - made by Elettronika S.R.L. (Italy) and provided by the Bari University - and the infrastructure that is necessary to record and transmit the collected data. This system is a part of the international initiative INFREP. Through this initiative, originated in Italy, VLF / LF radio receivers are deployed in different locations in Europe. Each one is monitoring up to ten different transmissions of radio stations across the continent. Information on electromagnetic fields' intensities created by transmitters at each receiving site and gathered from this network are indicating the quality of the propagation along the paths between the receivers and transmitters. Studying the ionosphere influences on the electromagnetic waves' propagation along a certain path is a method to put into evidence possible modifications of ionosphere lower structure and composition as earthquakes' precursor. The VLF / LF receiver installed in Romania was put into operation in February 2009 and has proved its utility in the case of Abruzzo earthquake that occurred on 6th of April 2009 (Mw = 6.3). Since then, the receiver was relocated from Bucharest to the Black-Sea shore (Dobrogea Seismologic Observatory). Changing the receiving site produced unsatisfactory monitoring data, characterized by large fluctuations of the received signals' intensities. Trying to understand this behavior has led to the conclusion that the electric component of the electromagnetic field was possibly influenced by the local atmospheric conditions (as aerosols' concentrations could be). Starting from this observation we have run some tests which have indicated that a loop-type antenna is more appropriate than a vertical antenna, especially for highly electric-field polluted environments. Very good results were obtained with this new configuration, even in the site located at the Black-Sea shore. Future improvements of the receiver

  9. Conjugate observations of quasi-periodic emissions by Cluster and DEMETER spacecraft

    Němec, F; Santolík, O; Parrot, M.; Pickett, J. S.; Hayosh, M.; N. Cornilleau-Wehrlin

    2013-01-01

    Quasi-periodic (QP) emissions are electromagnetic emissions at frequencies of about 0.5-4 kHz that are characterized by a periodic time modulation of the wave intensity. Typical periods of this modulation are on the order of minutes. We present a case study of a large-scale long-lasting QP event observed simultaneously on board the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) and the Cluster spacecraft. The measurements by the Wide-Band Data instrument...

  10. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    M. Zavala; W. Lei; M. J. Molina; L. T. Molina

    2009-01-01

    The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies and improvements in fuel quality, among others. Along with these changes, concurrent non-linear changes in photochemical levels and criteria pollutants have been observed, providing a unique opportunity to understand the effects of perturbations of mobile ...

  11. Tropospheric methanol observations from space: retrieval evaluation and constraints on the seasonality of biogenic emissions

    Wells, K. C.; Millet, D. B.; Hu, L.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Xiao, Y.; Shephard, M. W.; Clerbaux, C. L.; Clarisse, L.; Coheur, P.-F.; Apel, E. C.; de Gouw, J.; Warneke, C.; Singh, H. B.; Goldstein, A. H.; Sive, B. C.

    2012-07-01

    Methanol retrievals from nadir-viewing space-based sensors offer powerful new information for quantifying methanol emissions on a global scale. Here we apply an ensemble of aircraft observations over North America to evaluate new methanol measurements from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Aura satellite, and combine the TES data with observations from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the MetOp-A satellite to investigate the seasonality of methanol emissions from northern midlatitude ecosystems. Using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as an intercomparison platform, we find that the TES retrieval performs well when the degrees of freedom for signal (DOFS) are above 0.5, in which case the model:TES regressions are generally consistent with the model:aircraft comparisons. Including retrievals with DOFS below 0.5 degrades the comparisons, as these are excessively influenced by the a priori. The comparisons suggest DOFS >0.5 as a minimum threshold for interpreting retrievals of trace gases with a weak tropospheric signal. We analyze one full year of satellite observations and find that GEOS-Chem, driven with MEGANv2.1 biogenic emissions, underestimates observed methanol concentrations throughout the midlatitudes in springtime, with the timing of the seasonal peak in model emissions 1-2 months too late. We attribute this discrepancy to an underestimate of emissions from new leaves in MEGAN, and apply the satellite data to better quantify the seasonal change in methanol emissions for midlatitude ecosystems. The derived parameters (relative emission factors of 11.0, 0.26, 0.12 and 3.0 for new, growing, mature, and old leaves, respectively, plus a leaf area index activity factor of 0.5 for expanding canopies with leaf area index methanol concentrations in midlatitudes on the basis of both the IASI and TES measurements.

  12. Tropospheric methanol observations from space: retrieval evaluation and constraints on the seasonality of biogenic emissions

    K. C. Wells

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Methanol retrievals from nadir-viewing space-based sensors offer powerful new information for quantifying methanol emissions on a global scale. Here we apply an ensemble of aircraft observations over North America to evaluate new methanol measurements from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES on the Aura satellite, and combine the TES data with observations from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI on the MetOp-A satellite to investigate the seasonality of methanol emissions from northern midlatitude ecosystems. Using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as an intercomparison platform, we find that the TES retrieval performs well when the degrees of freedom for signal (DOFS are above 0.5, in which case the model : TES regressions are generally consistent with the model : aircraft comparisons. Including retrievals with DOFS below 0.5 degrades the comparisons, as these are excessively influenced by the a priori. The comparisons suggest DOFS > 0.5 as a minimum threshold for interpreting retrievals of trace gases with a weak tropospheric signal. We analyze one full year of satellite observations and find that GEOS-Chem, driven with MEGANv2.1 biogenic emissions, underestimates observed methanol concentrations throughout the midlatitudes in springtime, with the timing of the seasonal peak in model emissions 1–2 months too late. We attribute this discrepancy to an underestimate of emissions from new leaves in MEGAN, and apply the satellite data to better quantify the seasonal change in methanol emissions for midlatitude ecosystems. The derived parameters (relative emission factors of 11.0, 1.0, 0.05 and 8.6 for new, growing, mature, and old leaves, respectively, plus a leaf area index activity factor of 0.75 for expanding canopies with leaf area index < 2.0 provide a more realistic simulation of seasonal methanol concentrations in midlatitudes on the basis of IASI, TES, and ground-based measurements.

  13. Tropospheric methanol observations from space: retrieval evaluation and constraints on the seasonality of biogenic emissions

    K. C. Wells

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Methanol retrievals from nadir-viewing space-based sensors offer powerful new information for quantifying methanol emissions on a global scale. Here we apply an ensemble of aircraft observations over North America to evaluate new methanol measurements from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES on the Aura satellite, and combine the TES data with observations from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI on the MetOp-A satellite to investigate the seasonality of methanol emissions from northern midlatitude ecosystems. Using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as an intercomparison platform, we find that the TES retrieval performs well when the degrees of freedom for signal (DOFS are above 0.5, in which case the model:TES regressions are generally consistent with the model:aircraft comparisons. Including retrievals with DOFS below 0.5 degrades the comparisons, as these are excessively influenced by the a priori. The comparisons suggest DOFS >0.5 as a minimum threshold for interpreting retrievals of trace gases with a weak tropospheric signal. We analyze one full year of satellite observations and find that GEOS-Chem, driven with MEGANv2.1 biogenic emissions, underestimates observed methanol concentrations throughout the midlatitudes in springtime, with the timing of the seasonal peak in model emissions 1–2 months too late. We attribute this discrepancy to an underestimate of emissions from new leaves in MEGAN, and apply the satellite data to better quantify the seasonal change in methanol emissions for midlatitude ecosystems. The derived parameters (relative emission factors of 11.0, 0.26, 0.12 and 3.0 for new, growing, mature, and old leaves, respectively, plus a leaf area index activity factor of 0.5 for expanding canopies with leaf area index <1.2 provide a more realistic simulation of seasonal methanol concentrations in midlatitudes on the basis of both the IASI and TES measurements.

  14. On the emissivity of wire-grid polarizers for astronomical observations at mm-wavelengths

    Schillaci, Alessandro; Alessandro, Giuseppe D'; de Bernardis, Paolo; Masi, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    We have measured, using a custom setup, the emissivity of metallic wire-grids, suitable for polarimeters and interferometers at mm and far infrared wavelengths. We find that the effective emissivity of these devices is of the order of a few %, depending on fabrication technology and aging. We discuss their use in astronomical instruments, with special attention to Martin Puplett Interferometers in low-background applications, like astronomical observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background.

  15. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF TWO GAMMA-RAY EMISSION COMPONENTS FROM THE QUIESCENT SUN

    We report the detection of high-energy γ-rays from the quiescent Sun with the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope (Fermi) during the first 18 months of the mission. These observations correspond to the recent period of low solar activity when the emission induced by cosmic rays (CRs) is brightest. For the first time, the high statistical significance of the observations allows clear separation of the two components: the point-like emission from the solar disk due to CR cascades in the solar atmosphere and extended emission from the inverse Compton (IC) scattering of CR electrons on solar photons in the heliosphere. The observed integral flux (≥100 MeV) from the solar disk is (4.6 ± 0.2[statistical error]+1.0-0.8[systematic error]) x 10-7 cm-2 s-1, which is ∼7 times higher than predicted by the 'nominal' model of Seckel et al. In contrast, the observed integral flux (≥100 MeV) of the extended emission from a region of 20 deg. radius centered on the Sun, but excluding the disk itself, (6.8 ± 0.7[stat.]+0.5-0.4[syst.]) x 10-7 cm-2 s-1, along with the observed spectrum and the angular profile, is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions for the IC emission.

  16. Nonlinear VLF Wave Physics in the Radiation Belts

    Crabtree, C. E.; Tejero, E. M.; Ganguli, G.; Mithaiwala, M.; Rudakov, L.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kletzing, C.

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic VLF waves, such as whistler mode waves, both control the lifetime of trapped electrons in the radiation belts by pitch-angle scattering and are responsible for the energization of electrons during storms. Traditional approaches to understanding the influence of waves on trapped electrons have assumed that the wave characteristics (frequency spectrum, wave-normal angle distribution, etc.) were both stationary in time and amplitude independent from event to event. In situ data from modern satellite missions, such as the Van Allen probes, are showing that this assumption may not be justified. In addition, recent theoretical results [Crabtree et al. 2012] show that the threshold for nonlinear wave scattering can often be met by naturally occurring VLF waves in the magnetosphere, with wave magnetic fields of the order of 50-100 pT inside the plasmapause. Nonlinear wave scattering (Nonlinear Landau Damping) is an amplitude dependent mechanism that can strongly alter VLF wave propagation [Ganguli et al. 2010], primarily by altering the direction of propagation. Laboratory results have confirmed the dramatic change in propagation direction when the pump wave has sufficient amplitude to exceed the nonlinear threshold [Tejero et al. 2014]. Nonlinear scattering can alter the macroscopic dynamics of waves in the radiation belts leading to the formation of a long-lasting wave-cavity [Crabtree et al. 2012] and, when amplification is present, a multi-pass amplifier [Ganguli et al., 2012]. Such nonlinear wave effects can dramatically reduce electron lifetimes. Nonlinear wave dynamics such as these occur when there are more than one wave present, such a condition necessarily violates the assumption of traditional wave-normal analysis [Santolik et al., 2003] which rely on the plane wave assumption. To investigate nonlinear wave dynamics using modern in situ data we apply the maximum entropy method [Skilling and Bryan, 1984] to solve for the wave distribution function

  17. Multiwavelength Observations of GRB 110731A: GeV Emission from Onset to Afterglow

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Greiner, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sanchez, D. A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Gruber, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M.; Connaughton, V.; Foley, S.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pelassa, V.; Preece, R.; Rau, A.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kann, D. A.; Filgas, R.; Klose, S.; Krühler, T.; Fukui, A.; Sako, T.; Tristram, P. J.; Oates, S. R.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Littlejohns, O.

    2013-02-01

    We report on the multiwavelength observations of the bright, long gamma-ray burst GRB 110731A, by the Fermi and Swift observatories, and by the MOA and GROND optical telescopes. The analysis of the prompt phase reveals that GRB 110731A shares many features with bright Large Area Telescope bursts observed by Fermi during the first three years on-orbit: a light curve with short time variability across the whole energy range during the prompt phase, delayed onset of the emission above 100 MeV, extra power-law component and temporally extended high-energy emission. In addition, this is the first GRB for which simultaneous GeV, X-ray, and optical data are available over multiple epochs beginning just after the trigger time and extending for more than 800 s, allowing temporal and spectral analysis in different epochs that favor emission from the forward shock in a wind-type medium. The observed temporally extended GeV emission is most likely part of the high-energy end of the afterglow emission. Both the single-zone pair transparency constraint for the prompt signal and the spectral and temporal analysis of the forward-shock afterglow emission independently lead to an estimate of the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet Γ ~ 500-550.

  18. Earth observations for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation in developing countries

    DeFries, R. [Department of Geography and Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Achard, F. [Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Joint Research Centre of the European Commission 21020 Ispra, VA (Italy); Brown, S. [Winrock International, Ecosystem Services Unit 1621 N. Kent Street, Suite 1200, Arlington, VA 22207 (United States); Herold, M. [Department of Geography, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Loebdergraben 32, 07743 Jena (Germany); Murdiyarso, D. [Center for International Forestry Research, P.O. Box 6596, JKPWB, Jakarta 10065 (Indonesia); Schlamadinger, B. [Joanneum Research, Elisabethstrasse 5, 8010 Graz (Austria); De Souza, C. Jr [Instituto Homem e Meio Ambiente da Amazonia, Imazon, Caixa Postal 5101, Belem, PA 66613-397 (Brazil)

    2007-06-15

    In response to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process investigating the technical issues surrounding the ability to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from deforestation in developing countries, this paper reviews technical capabilities for monitoring deforestation and estimating emissions. Implementation of policies to reduce emissions from deforestation require effective deforestation monitoring systems that are reproducible, provide consistent results, meet standards for mapping accuracy, and can be implemented at the national level. Remotely sensed data supported by ground observations are key to effective monitoring. Capacity in developing countries for deforestation monitoring is well-advanced in a few countries and is a feasible goal in most others. Data sources exist to determine base periods in the 1990s as historical reference points. Forest degradation (e.g. from high impact logging and fragmentation) also contribute to greenhouse gas emissions but it is more technically challenging to measure than deforestation. Data on carbon stocks, which are needed to estimate emissions, cannot currently be observed directly over large areas with remote sensing. Guidelines for carbon accounting from deforestation exist and are available in approved Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports and can be applied at national scales in the absence of forest inventory or other data. Key constraints for implementing programs to monitor greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation are international commitment of resources to increase capacity, coordination of observations to ensure pan-tropical coverage, access to free or low-cost data, and standard and consensual protocols for data interpretation and analysis.

  19. Earth observations for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation in developing countries

    In response to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process investigating the technical issues surrounding the ability to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from deforestation in developing countries, this paper reviews technical capabilities for monitoring deforestation and estimating emissions. Implementation of policies to reduce emissions from deforestation require effective deforestation monitoring systems that are reproducible, provide consistent results, meet standards for mapping accuracy, and can be implemented at the national level. Remotely sensed data supported by ground observations are key to effective monitoring. Capacity in developing countries for deforestation monitoring is well-advanced in a few countries and is a feasible goal in most others. Data sources exist to determine base periods in the 1990s as historical reference points. Forest degradation (e.g. from high impact logging and fragmentation) also contribute to greenhouse gas emissions but it is more technically challenging to measure than deforestation. Data on carbon stocks, which are needed to estimate emissions, cannot currently be observed directly over large areas with remote sensing. Guidelines for carbon accounting from deforestation exist and are available in approved Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports and can be applied at national scales in the absence of forest inventory or other data. Key constraints for implementing programs to monitor greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation are international commitment of resources to increase capacity, coordination of observations to ensure pan-tropical coverage, access to free or low-cost data, and standard and consensual protocols for data interpretation and analysis

  20. CAN A LONG NANOFLARE STORM EXPLAIN THE OBSERVED EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ACTIVE REGION CORES?

    All theories that attempt to explain the heating of the high-temperature plasma observed in the solar corona are based on short bursts of energy. The intensities and velocities measured in the cores of quiescent active regions, however, can be steady over many hours of observation. One heating scenario that has been proposed to reconcile such observations with impulsive heating models is the 'long nanoflare storm', where short-duration heating events occur infrequently on many sub-resolution strands; the emission of the strands is then averaged together to explain the observed steady structures. In this Letter, we examine the emission measure distribution predicted for such a long nanoflare storm by modeling an arcade of strands in an active region core. Comparisons of the computed emission measure distributions with recent observations indicate that the long nanoflare storm scenario implies greater than five times more 1 MK emission than is actually observed for all plausible combinations of loop lengths, heating rates, and abundances. We conjecture that if the plasma had 'super coronal' abundances, the model may be able to match the observations at low temperatures.

  1. Estimating Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) emissions in China using atmospheric observations and inverse modeling

    Fang, X.; Thompson, R.; Saito, T.; Yokouchi, Y.; Li, S.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Park, S.; Graziosi, F.; Stohl, A.

    2013-12-01

    With a global warming potential of around 22800 over a 100-year time horizon, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is one of the greenhouse gases regulated under the Kyoto Protocol. Global SF6 emissions have been increasing since circa the year 2000. The reason for this increase has been inferred to be due to rapidly increasing emissions in developing countries that are not obligated to report their annual emissions to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, notably China. In this study, SF6 emissions during the period 2006-2012 for China and other East Asian countries were determined using in-situ atmospheric measurements and inverse modeling. We performed various inversion sensitivity tests, which show the largest uncertainties in the a posteriori Chinese emissions are associated with the a priori emissions used and their uncertainty, the station network, as well as the meteorological input data. The overall relative uncertainty of the a posteriori emissions in China is estimated to be 17% in 2008. Based on sensitivity tests, we employed the optimal parameters in our inversion setup and performed yearly inversions for the study period. Inversion results show that the total a posteriori SF6 emissions from China increased from 1420 × 245 Mg/yr in 2006 to 2741 × 472 Mg/yr in 2009 and stabilized thereafter. The rapid increase in emissions reflected a fast increase in SF6 consumption in China, a result also found in bottom-up estimates. The a posteriori emission map shows high emissions concentrated in populated parts of China. During the period 2006-2012, emissions in northwestern and northern China peaked around the year 2009, while emissions in eastern, central and northeastern China grew gradually during almost the whole period. Fluctuating emissions are observed for southwestern China. These regional differences should be caused by changes of provincial SF6 usage and by shifts of usage among different sectors. Fig. 1. Footprint emission sensitivity

  2. Coronal O VI emission observed with UVCS/SOHO during solar flares: Comparison with soft X-ray observations

    Mancuso, S.; Giordano, S.; Raymond, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we derive the O VI 1032 Å luminosity profiles of 58 flares, during their impulsive phase, based on off-limb measurements by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) aboard the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The O VI luminosities from the transition region plasma (here defined as the region with temperatures 5.0 ≤ log T (K) ≤ 6.0) were inferred from the analysis of the resonantly scattered radiation of the O VI coronal ions. The temperature of maximum ionization for O VI is log Tmax (K) = 5.47. By comparison with simultaneous soft X-ray measurements, we investigate the likely source (chromospheric evaporation, footpoint emission, or heated prominence ejecta) for the transition region emission observed during the impulsive phase. In our study, we find evidence of the main characteristics predicted by the evaporation scenario. Specifically, most O VI flares precede the X-ray peaks typically by several minutes with a mean of 3.2 ± 0.1 min, and clear correlations are found between the soft X-ray and transition region luminosities following power laws with indices ~ 0.7 ± 0.3. Overall, the results are consistent with transition region emission originating from chromospheric evaporation; the thermal X-ray emission peaks after the emission from the evaporation flow as the loops fill with hot plasma. Finally, we were able to infer flow speeds in the range ~20-100 km s-1 for one-third of the events, 14 of which showed speeds between 60 and 80 km s-1. These values are compatible with those found through direct spectroscopic observations at transition region temperatures by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode.

  3. Constraining Methane Emissions from Natural Gas Production in Northeastern Pennsylvania Using Aircraft Observations and Mesoscale Modeling

    Barkley, Z.; Davis, K.; Lauvaux, T.; Miles, N.; Richardson, S.; Martins, D. K.; Deng, A.; Cao, Y.; Sweeney, C.; Karion, A.; Smith, M. L.; Kort, E. A.; Schwietzke, S.

    2015-12-01

    Leaks in natural gas infrastructure release methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, into the atmosphere. The estimated fugitive emission rate associated with the production phase varies greatly between studies, hindering our understanding of the natural gas energy efficiency. This study presents a new application of inverse methodology for estimating regional fugitive emission rates from natural gas production. Methane observations across the Marcellus region in northeastern Pennsylvania were obtained during a three week flight campaign in May 2015 performed by a team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Global Monitoring Division and the University of Michigan. In addition to these data, CH4 observations were obtained from automobile campaigns during various periods from 2013-2015. An inventory of CH4 emissions was then created for various sources in Pennsylvania, including coalmines, enteric fermentation, industry, waste management, and unconventional and conventional wells. As a first-guess emission rate for natural gas activity, a leakage rate equal to 2% of the natural gas production was emitted at the locations of unconventional wells across PA. These emission rates were coupled to the Weather Research and Forecasting model with the chemistry module (WRF-Chem) and atmospheric CH4 concentration fields at 1km resolution were generated. Projected atmospheric enhancements from WRF-Chem were compared to observations, and the emission rate from unconventional wells was adjusted to minimize errors between observations and simulation. We show that the modeled CH4 plume structures match observed plumes downwind of unconventional wells, providing confidence in the methodology. In all cases, the fugitive emission rate was found to be lower than our first guess. In this initial emission configuration, each well has been assigned the same fugitive emission rate, which can potentially impair our ability to match the observed spatial variability

  4. The properties of ULF/VLF signals generated by the SURA facility without ionospheric currents modulation

    Kotik, D. S.; Raybov, A. V.; Ermakova, E. N.

    2012-12-01

    During the last three years the comprehensive study of ionospheric generation of the artificial signals in ULF/VLF band was carried out at SURA facility. This research was stimulated by successive HAARP experiments on detection the low frequency signals genreated due the action of the ponderomotive forces. Two experimental campaigns under different ionospheric, geomagnetic and facility operation mode conditions was undertaken every year from 2010 to 2012. Here we are summarizing the main features of the artificial ULF/VLF signals observed in vicinity the SURA site. The signals in the 2-20 Hz band were observed in the small area around the facility with the radius approximately 15 km. It was not signal detection at the 30 km distance. The maximum of the amplitude was detected in the nearest receiving point about 3 km away from the transmitting array. The amplitude increased about 3 times when the beam was inclined on16 degrees to the south so the footprint of the geomagnetic field line comes close to the point of observation. The ULF signals increased slightly when the SURA operating frequency overlaps the critical foF2 frequency. As a rule the daytime signals are smaller then nighttime one. No any correlation was observed with geomagnetic disturbances. The time delay of the ionospheric ULF signals measured by phase method was estimated as 300-400 ms. Polarization of the ULF signals has a pronounced elliptical character. Sometimes it was linear. The part of measurements in June 2012 was coincide with magnetic storm (June 16-18, Kp=6). It was observed broadening of the signal line at frequencies of 11 and 17 Hz up to 0.2 Hz at the recovery stage of the storm at June 18 (see the figure). This fact can be interpreted as the result of the signal interaction with the radiation belt protons appeared over there during the storm time. In 2012 campaigns it was firstly observed at SURA signals on frequencies of several kilohertz at nightime which could not be explained by

  5. OBSERVATIONS OF FAR-ULTRAVIOLET DIFFUSE EMISSION FROM THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    We report the first observations of far-ultraviolet (FUV: 1000-1150 Å) diffuse radiation from the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) using observations from the Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. The strength of FUV diffuse surface brightness in the SMC ranges from the detection limit of 2000 photons cm–2 s–1 sr–1 Å–1 to a maximum of 3 × 105 photons cm–2 s–1 sr–1 Å–1 at 1004 Å. The contribution of diffuse emission to the total radiation field was found to be 34% at 1004 Å to 44% at 1117 Å with a maximum observed uncertainty of 30%. There is a striking difference between the FUV diffuse fraction from the SMC and the Large Magellanic Cloud with the SMC fraction being higher probably because of the higher dust albedo. The FUV diffuse emission correlates with Hα emission in the H II regions of the SMC.

  6. Observation of solar high energy gamma and X-ray emission and solar energetic particles

    Struminsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    We considered 18 solar flares observed between June 2010 and July 2012, in which high energy >100 MeV {\\gamma}-emission was registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard FermiGRO. We examined for these {\\gamma}-events soft X-ray observations by GOES, hard X-ray observations by the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the SPectrometer aboard INTEGRAL (ACS SPI) and the Gamma-Ray burst Monitor (GBM) aboard FermiGRO. Hard X-ray and {\\pi}0-decay {\\gamma}-ray emissions are used as tracers of electron and proton acceleration, respectively. Bursts of hard X-ray were observed by ACS SPI during impulsive phase of 13 events. Bursts of hard X-ray >100 keV were not found during time intervals, when prolonged hard {\\gamma}-emission was registered by LAT/FermiGRO. Those events showing prolonged high-energy gamma-ray emission not accompanied by >100 keV hard X-ray emission are interpreted as an indication of either different acceleration processes for protons and electrons or as the presence of a proton population accelerated du...

  7. Solar flares detected by the new narrowband VLF receiver at SANAE IV

    Stephen Meyer

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A narrowband receiver was installed at the SANAE IV base in Antarctica to monitor specific very low frequency (VLF radio signals from transmitters around the world. VLF waves propagating through the Earth–Ionosphere Waveguide are excellent probes of the varying properties of the lower region of the ionosphere. This paper describes the set-up of the narrowband system and demonstrates its capabilities with data from a set of solar flares on 08 February and 12 February 2010.

  8. The impact of PMSE and NLC particles on VLF propagation

    D. Nunn

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available PMSE or Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes are a well-known phenomenon in the summer northern polar regions, in which anomalous VHF/UHF radar echoes are returned from heights ~85km. Noctilucent clouds and electron density biteouts are two phenomena that sometimes occur together with PMSE. Electron density biteouts are electron density depletion layers of up to 90%, which may be several kms thick. Using the NOSC Modefndr code based on Wait's modal theory for subionospheric propagation, we calculate the shifts in received VLF amplitude and phase that occur as a result of electron density biteouts. The code assumes a homogeneous background ionosphere and a homogeneous biteout layer along the Great Circle Path (GCP corridor, for transmitter receiver path lengths in the range of 500–6000km.

    For profiles during the 10h about midnight and under quiet geomagnetic conditions, where the electron density at 85km would normally be less than 500el/cc, it was found that received signal perturbations were significant, of the order of 1–4dB and 5–40° of phase. Perturbation amplitudes increase roughly as the square root of frequency. At short range perturbations are rather erratic, but more consistent at large ranges, readily interpretable in terms of the shifts in excitation factor, attenuation factor and v/c ratios for Wait's modes. Under these conditions such shifts should be detectable by a well constituted experiment involving multiple paths and multiple frequencies in the north polar region in summer. It is anticipated that VLF propagation could be a valuable diagnostic for biteout/PMSE when electron density at 85km is under 500el/cc, under which circumstances PMSE are not directly detectable by VHF/UHF radars.

    Key words. Electromagnetism (wave propagation – Ionosphere (polar ionosphere – Radioscience (ionospheric propagation

  9. A study of the behavior of the terminator time shifts using multiple VLF propagation paths during the Pakistan earthquake (M = 7.2) of 18 January 2011

    Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    On 18 January 2011, at 20:23 UTC, an earthquake of magnitude 7.2 occurred in south-western Pakistan (latitude 28.73(°) N, longitude 63.93(°) E) at a depth of 68 km. We present the results of the analysis of very low frequency (VLF) radio signals, received at three stations located in India. We analyze the VLF signals around this earthquake day and look for possible precursory effects of this earthquake. For our analysis, we use four different VLF propagation paths. These propagation paths are DHO-IERC (Sitapur), VTX-Pune, VTX-ICSP (Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata) and NWC-IERC. We observed significant shifts of the “sunrise terminator time” (SRT) for DHO-IERC and VTX-Pune paths. For DHO-IERC path, the SRT of the VLF signals shifted towards night time three days before the earthquake day, and in the case of VTX-Pune path it shifted towards night time just one day before the earthquake day. For VTX-Kolkata path, the shift of SRT is four days before the earthquake day, but here the shift is not so strong, somewhere between 2sigma and 3sigma lines. For the other two paths, namely, DHO-IERC and VTX-Pune, the terminator time shifts crossed the 3sigma line. We found no significant shifts of SRT for NWC-IERC propagation path. Higher deviation in the VTX-Pune path as compared to VTX-ICSP path could be due to the proximity of the former to the epicenter. Similarly, DHO-IERC path is over the epicenter while NWC-IERC path is totally away from the epicenter. This could be the reason why the effect in DHO-IERC path is stronger than that in NWC-IERC path.

  10. Optical emission and mass spectra observations during hydrogen combustion in atmospheric pressure microwave plasma

    We experimentally investigated hydrogen combustion by atmospheric pressure plasma generated by a 2.45 GHz microwave discharge. Small amounts of hydrogen and oxygen were mixed in the operational argon gas during discharge. To clarify the details of combustion, optical emission was measured. The constituents of combustion-processed gases were observed by a quadruple mass spectrometer. The degree of hydrogen oxidation, the so-called conversion rate, increased with input microwave power. The maximum hydrogen conversion rate was greater than 80% under these experimental conditions. During discharge, an optical emission peak due to OH radicals was observed. (author)

  11. The observable effects of a photospheric component on GRB's and XRF's prompt emission spectrum

    Peér, A; Rees, Martin J; Pe'er, Asaf; M\\'esz\\'aros, Peter; Rees, Martin J.

    2005-01-01

    A thermal radiative component is likely to accompany the first stages of the prompt emission of Gamma-ray bursts (GRB's) and X-ray flashes (XRF's). We analyze the effect of such a component on the observable spectrum, assuming that the observable effects are due to a dissipation process occurring below or near the thermal photosphere. We consider both the internal shock model and a 'slow heating' model as possible dissipation mechanisms. For comparable energy densities in the thermal and the leptonic component, the dominant emission mechanism is Compton scattering. This leads to a nearly flat energy spectrum (\

  12. Observationally constraining gravitational wave emission from short gamma-ray burst remnants

    Lasky, Paul D.; Glampedakis, Kostas

    2016-05-01

    Observations of short gamma-ray bursts indicate ongoing energy injection following the prompt emission, with the most likely candidate being the birth of a rapidly rotating, highly magnetized neutron star. We utilize X-ray observations of the burst remnant to constrain properties of the nascent neutron star, including its magnetic field-induced ellipticity and the saturation amplitude of various oscillation modes. Moreover, we derive strict upper limits on the gravitational wave emission from these objects by looking only at the X-ray light curve, showing the burst remnants are unlikely to be detected in the near future using ground-based gravitational wave interferometers, such as Advanced LIGO.

  13. Observation of the O I ultraviolet intercombination emissions in the terrestrial dayglow

    Spectroscopic observations have been made of the terrestrial ultraviolet dayglow (850-1,850 angstrom) using newly developed instrumentation in a sounding rocket payload. The atmospheric conditions and viewing geometry were such as to suppress nitrogen emissions relative to those from atomic oxygen. This permitted the identification and measurement of the weak O I 1,173-angstrom (3s' 3D0 - 2p41D) intercombination multiplet and the 1,641-angstrom (3s 3S0 - 2p41D) line as well as the strong 989-angstrom and 1,304-angstrom emissions. The 1,173-angstrom emission rate increase at lower altitudes, while the 989-angstrom emission, from the same upper level, decreased at lower altitudes. This behavior is consistent with the radiative entrapment model of Meier (1982) and the laboratory value of the 1,173-angstrom/989-angstrom branching ratio of 1.5 x 10-4 (Morrison, 1985). The 1,641-angstrom/1,304-angstrom emission ratio is also consistent with a radiative entrapment model and a branching ratio near 5.0 x 10-6. Lack of detection of the 1,484-angstrom (3s' 3D10 - 2p41S0) intercombination line allows an upper limit to be placed on the 1,484-angstrom branching ratio, confirming that emission in this line is less significant in depleting the 3s' 3D0 term than is 1,173-angstrom emission

  14. The evolution of Stanford University's ELF/VLF broadband data archive

    Inan, U. S.; Golden, D. I.; Spasojevic, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Stanford VLF group has been recording broadband ELF/VLF data since its inception in the 1960's. Beginning with analog tape recordings with spoken-word timestamps, we emerged into the digital age in the year 2000 with digital recordings onto compact discs, with a timing accuracy of 50 ns. The CD archival medium from 2000 was followed soon after with recordings onto DVDs and currently, external USB hard drives. Our standard broadband data are recorded on two channels, at two bytes/sample, with a sampling rate of 100 kilosamples/second; this generates up to 35 GB/day at each recording site. Over time, we have come to operate over three dozen recording sites around the world, though most record at a rate lower than the maximum. Combined, we estimate that we generate somewhat over 50 TB/year of data, a number which has been steadily increasing over the years. In this paper, we briefly discuss our legacy recording media, and how they were rendered obsolete by more advanced technologies. More importantly, we discuss our recent transition from DVDs to external USB hard drives. This decision was primarily motivated by reliability, as we've found that many of our DVDs have become unreadable only a few years after their recording. The steadily-declining cost-per-gigabyte of external USB hard drives, as well as their incredible efficiency advantages over DVDs, made switching even more appealing. Finally, we discuss how advanced processing can be achieved using a recently-acquired data server. For some of our recording sites, such as Palmer Station (L = 2.4, Λ = -50°) and South Pole Station (Λ = -74°), we have nearly two solar cycles of data. Using a data server, it is possible to perform extremely long-term automated processing on these stations, e.g., to determine how the occurrence rate of magnetospheric emissions, or the density of the lower ionosphere, is affected by the solar cycle. This manner of automated processing would not be possible if the data were stored

  15. Substorm-related VLF chorus events: local-time dependence and relationship to newly-injected clouds of drifting energetic electrons

    VLF chorus is a naturally occurring, electromagnetic wave phenomenon that is generated in the earth's magnetosphere during interactions between VLF waves and energetic electrons. The macrostructure of a 9-day period of VLF ground station data, recorded at two Antarctic stations, Halley Bay and Siple, has been studied using compressed time-scale spectrograms. A magnetically quiet period was chosen for analysis, within which isolated substorms occurred. It has been found that chorus frequently occurs in events, the most characteristic feature of which is an initial rise in the upper cut-off frequency of the chorus band. The events are typically observed in the midnight to 16:00 MLT sector. They are correlated with disturbances of about 100 to 750 gammas in the AE magnetic activity index, or substorms, and with energetic electron flux enhancements measured by ATS 6 at geosynchronous orbit. In addition, parameters scaled from the upper and lower cut-off frequency variations of the events have a local-time dependence. During substorms, satellites consistently encounter clouds of energetic electrons that have been injected into the nightside outer radiation zone. It is believed that the time-developing characteristics, and local-time dependencies of the chorus events are a reflection of the time-developing characteristics of clouds of energetic electrons that have recently been injected during substorms. Two interpretations of the chorus events have been investigated based on this theory

  16. Effect of D.C. testing water tree deteriorated cable and a preliminary evaluation of V.L.F. as alternate

    This paper reports that according to the experience of some power utilities, the application of industry recommended high voltage d.c. field tests on 5-35 kV extruded dielectric cables, containing water trees, sometimes causes further deterioration of the insulation. Tests conducted on laboratory aged 15 kV ethylene propylene rubber (EP) and 15 and 28 kV crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) insulated cables indicate that d.c. proof tests in accordance with AEIC specifications an IEEE test guides without flashover do not appear to cause further deterioration. Depending on the degree of cable aging and the level of test voltage, when flashovers take place, damage may be inflicted to XLPE cables. No damage was observed on aged EP cable, at the same test levels. Because of the aforementioned power utility experience, some users have requested an alternate field proof test. Tests conducted on new XLPE and EP cables indicate that damage to the insulation structure can be detected using VLF (0.1 Hz) voltage at approximately one-third the d.c. voltage level. Field tests conducted on severely tree deteriorated 15 kV polyethylene (PE) cable using AEIC recommended d.c. voltage level of about five times operating voltage level caused cable failure; VLF voltage levels up to two times operating voltage did not. VLF voltage appears to be a suitable alternate to d.c. voltage for field proof testing

  17. Validation of the Swiss methane emission inventory by atmospheric observations and inverse modelling

    Henne, Stephan; Brunner, Dominik; Oney, Brian; Leuenberger, Markus; Eugster, Werner; Bamberger, Ines; Meinhardt, Frank; Steinbacher, Martin; Emmenegger, Lukas

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric inverse modelling has the potential to provide observation-based estimates of greenhouse gas emissions at the country scale, thereby allowing for an independent validation of national emission inventories. Here, we present a regional-scale inverse modelling study to quantify the emissions of methane (CH4) from Switzerland, making use of the newly established CarboCount-CH measurement network and a high-resolution Lagrangian transport model. In our reference inversion, prior emissions were taken from the "bottom-up" Swiss Greenhouse Gas Inventory (SGHGI) as published by the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment in 2014 for the year 2012. Overall we estimate national CH4 emissions to be 196 ± 18 Gg yr-1 for the year 2013 (1σ uncertainty). This result is in close agreement with the recently revised SGHGI estimate of 206 ± 33 Gg yr-1 as reported in 2015 for the year 2012. Results from sensitivity inversions using alternative prior emissions, uncertainty covariance settings, large-scale background mole fractions, two different inverse algorithms (Bayesian and extended Kalman filter), and two different transport models confirm the robustness and independent character of our estimate. According to the latest SGHGI estimate the main CH4 source categories in Switzerland are agriculture (78 %), waste handling (15 %) and natural gas distribution and combustion (6 %). The spatial distribution and seasonal variability of our posterior emissions suggest an overestimation of agricultural CH4 emissions by 10 to 20 % in the most recent SGHGI, which is likely due to an overestimation of emissions from manure handling. Urban areas do not appear as emission hotspots in our posterior results, suggesting that leakages from natural gas distribution are only a minor source of CH4 in Switzerland. This is consistent with rather low emissions of 8.4 Gg yr-1 reported by the SGHGI but inconsistent with the much higher value of 32 Gg yr-1 implied by the EDGARv4.2 inventory for

  18. Observed effects of soil organic matter content on the microwave emissivity of soils

    In order to determine the significance of organic matter content on the microwave emissivity of soils when estimating soil moisture, a series of field experiments were conducted in which 1.4 GHz microwave emissivity data were collected over test plots of sandy loam soil with different organic matter levels (1.8%, 4.0%, and 6.1%) for a range of soil moisture values. Analyses of the observed data showed only minor variation in microwave emissivity due to a change in organic matter content at a given moisture level for soils with similar texture and structure. Predictions of microwave emissivity made using a dielectric model for aggregated soils exhibited the same trends and type of response as the measured data when adjusted values for the input parameters were utilized

  19. In Situ Observation of Dark Current Emission in a High Gradient rf Photocathode Gun

    Shao, Jiahang; Shi, Jiaru; Antipov, Sergey P.; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Gai, Wei; Ha, Gwanghui; Jing, Chunguang; Wang, Faya; Wisniewski, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Undesirable electron field emission (also known as dark current) in high gradient rf photocathode guns deteriorates the quality of the photoemission current and limits the operational gradient. To improve the understanding of dark current emission, a high-resolution (˜100 μ m ) dark current imaging experiment has been performed in an L -band photocathode gun operating at ˜100 MV /m of surface gradient. Scattered strong emission areas with high current have been observed on the cathode. The field enhancement factor β of selected regions on the cathode has been measured. The postexaminations with scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry reveal the origins of ˜75 % strong emission areas overlap with the spots where rf breakdown has occurred.

  20. Estimation of Swiss methane emissions by near surface observations and inverse modeling

    Henne, Stephan; Brian, Oney; Leuenberger, Markus; Bamberger, Ines; Eugster, Werner; Steinbacher, Martin; Meinhardt, Frank; Brunner, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    On a global scale methane (CH4) is the second most important long-lived greenhouse gas. It is released from both natural and anthropogenic processes and its atmospheric burden has more than doubled since preindustrial times. Current CH4 emission estimates are associated with comparatively large uncertainties both globally and regionally. For example, the Swiss national greenhouse gas inventory assigns an uncertainty of 18% to the country total anthropogenic CH4 emissions as compared to only 3% for anthropogenic CO2 emissions. In Switzerland, CH4 is thought to be mainly released by agricultural activities (ruminants and manure management >80%), while natural emissions from wetlands and wild animals represent a minor source (~3 %). The country total and especially the spatial distribution of CH4 emission within Switzerland strongly differs between the national and different European scale inventories. To validate the 'bottom-up' Swiss CH4 emission estimate and to reduce its uncertainty both in total and spatially, 'top-down' methods combining atmospheric CH4 observations and regional scale transport simulations can be used. Here, we analyse continuous, near surface observations of CH4 concentrations as collected within the newly established CarboCountCH measurement network (http://www.carbocount.ch). The network consists of 4 sites situated on the Swiss Plateau, comprising a tall tower site (217 m), two elevated (mountaintop) sites and a small tower site (32 m) in flat terrain. In addition, continuous CH4 observations from the nearby high-altitude site Jungfraujoch (Alps) and the mountaintop site Schauinsland (Germany) were used. Two inversion frameworks were applied to the CH4 observations in combination with source sensitivities (footprints) calculated with the regional scale version of the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART. One inversion system was based on a Bayesian framework, while the other utilized an extended Kalman filter approach. The transport

  1. Estimating European volatile organic compound emissions using satellite observations of formaldehyde from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    G. Curci

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Emission of non-methane Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs to the atmosphere stems from biogenic and human activities, and their estimation is difficult because of the many and not fully understood processes involved. In order to narrow down the uncertainty related to VOC emissions, which negatively reflects on our ability to simulate the atmospheric composition, we exploit satellite observations of formaldehyde (HCHO, an ubiquitous oxidation product of most VOCs, focusing on Europe. HCHO column observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI reveal a marked seasonal cycle with a summer maximum and winter minimum. In summer, the oxidation of methane and other long-lived VOCs supply a slowly varying background HCHO column, while HCHO variability is dominated by most reactive VOC, primarily biogenic isoprene followed in importance by biogenic terpenes and anthropogenic VOCs. The chemistry-transport model CHIMERE qualitatively reproduces the temporal and spatial features of the observed HCHO column, but display regional biases which are attributed mainly to incorrect biogenic VOC emissions, calculated with the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosol from Nature (MEGAN algorithm. These "bottom-up" or a-priori emissions are corrected through a Bayesian inversion of the OMI HCHO observations. Resulting "top-down" or a-posteriori isoprene emissions are lower than "bottom-up" by 40% over the Balkans and by 20% over Southern Germany, and higher by 20% over Iberian Peninsula, Greece and Italy. The inversion is shown to be robust against assumptions on the a-priori and the inversion parameters. We conclude that OMI satellite observations of HCHO can provide a quantitative "top-down" constraint on the European "bottom-up" VOC inventories.

  2. On the statistical correlation between the ionospheric perturbations as detected by subionospheric VLF/LF propagation anomalies and earthquakes

    Y. Kasahara

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Relatively long-period (4 years data on different propagation paths by means of Japanese-Pacific VLF/LF network observation, are used to obtain further statistical significance on the correlation of ionospheric perturbations as revealed by VLF/LF propagation anomalies with earthquakes. Earthquakes with magnitude greater than 6.0, taken place only within the fifth Fresnel zone of each great-circle path are selected for the correlation study. It is finally found based on the superimposed epoch analysis that the nighttime trend (average amplitude exhibits a significant decrease exceeding 2σ (σ: standard deviation several days before the earthquake and the nighttime fluctuation exceeds the corresponding 2σ again several days before the earthquake when the earthquake depth is smaller than 30 km (shallow earthquakes. However, when we treat all earthquakes including deep earthquakes, the trend shows a significant decrease (just approaching 2σ line, and the nighttime fluctuation shows a less significant broad enhancement before the EQ.

  3. Worldwide biogenic soil NOx emissions inferred from OMI NO2 observations

    G. C. M. Vinken

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic NOx emissions from soils are a large natural source with substantial uncertainties in global bottom-up estimates (ranging from 4 to 27 Tg N yr−1. We reduce this range in emission estimates, and present a top-down soil NOx emission inventory for 2005 based on retrieved tropospheric NO2 columns from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI. We used a state-of-science soil NOx emission inventory (Hudman et al., 2012 as a priori in the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model to identify 11 regions where tropospheric NO2 columns are dominated by soil NOx emissions. Strong correlations between soil NOx emissions and simulated NO2 columns indicated that spatial patterns in simulated NO2 columns in these regions indeed reflect the underlying soil NOx emissions. Subsequently, we used a mass-balance approach to constrain emissions for these 11 regions on all major continents using OMI observed and GEOS-Chem simulated tropospheric NO2 columns. We found that responses of simulated NO2 columns to changing NOx emissions were suppressed over low NOx regions, and accounted for these non-linearities in our inversion approach. In general, our approach suggests that emissions need to be increased in most regions. Our OMI top-down soil NOx inventory amounts to 10.0 Tg N for 2005 when only constraining the 11 regions, and 12.9 Tg N when extrapolating the constraints globally. Substantial regional differences exist (ranging from −40% to +90%, and globally our top-down inventory is 4–35% higher than the GEOS-Chem a priori (9.6 Tg N yr−1. We evaluated NO2 concentrations simulated with our new OMI top-down inventory against surface NO2 measurements from monitoring stations in Africa, the USA, and Europe. Although this comparison is complicated by several factors, we find an encouraging improved agreement when using the OMI top-down inventory compared to using the a priori inventory. To our knowledge, this study provides, for the first time, specific constraints

  4. PANCHROMATIC OBSERVATIONS OF THE TEXTBOOK GRB 110205A: CONSTRAINING PHYSICAL MECHANISMS OF PROMPT EMISSION AND AFTERGLOW

    We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long-duration (T90 ∼ 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z = 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb, and BOOTES telescopes when the gamma-ray burst (GRB) was still radiating in the γ-ray band, with optical light curve showing correlation with γ-ray data. Nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray, to γ-ray (1 eV to 5 MeV), which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution during the prompt emission phase. In particular, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Shortly after prompt emission (∼1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise (α ∼ 5.5) was observed, which we interpret as the reverse shock (RS) emission. It is the first time that the rising phase of an RS component has been closely observed. The full optical and X-ray afterglow light curves can be interpreted within the standard reverse shock (RS) + forward shock (FS) model. In general, the high-quality prompt and afterglow data allow us to apply the standard fireball model to extract valuable information, including the radiation mechanism (synchrotron), radius of prompt emission (RGRB ∼ 3 × 1013 cm), initial Lorentz factor of the outflow (Γ0 ∼ 250), the composition of the ejecta (mildly magnetized), the collimation angle, and the total energy budget.

  5. Examining Long-Term Trends in Mobile Source Related Pollutants through Analysis of Emissions, Observations and Model Simulations

    Anthropogenic emissions from a variety of sectors including mobile sources have decreased substantially over the past decades despite continued growth in population and economic activity. In this study, we analyze 1990-2010 trends in emission inventories, ambient observations and...

  6. Observation of the Emission Spectra of an Atmospheric Pressure Radio-frequency Plasma Jet

    2005-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using radio-frequency (13.56 MHz)power has been developed to produce homogeneous glow discharge at low temperature. With optical emission spectroscopy, we observed the excited species (atomic helium, atomic oxygen and metastable oxygen) generated in this APPJ and their dependence on gas composition ratio and RF power. O and O2(b1∑g+) are found in the effluent outside the jet by measuring the emission spectra of effluent perpendicular to the jet. An interesting phenomenon is found that there is an abnormal increase of O emission intensity (777.4 nm) between 10 mm and 40 mm away from the nozzle. This observation result is very helpful in practical operation.

  7. Biomass burning emissions estimated with a global fire assimilation system based on observed fire radiative power

    J. W. Kaiser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Global Fire Assimilation System (GFASv1.0 calculates biomass burning emissions by assimilating Fire Radiative Power (FRP observations from the MODIS instruments onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites. It corrects for gaps in the observations, which are mostly due to cloud cover, and filters spurious FRP observations of volcanoes, gas flares and other industrial activity. The combustion rate is subsequently calculated with land cover-specific conversion factors. Emission factors for 40 gas-phase and aerosol trace species have been compiled from a literature survey. The corresponding daily emissions have been calculated on a global 0.5° × 0.5° grid from 2003 to the present. General consistency with the Global Fire Emission Database version 3.1 (GFED3.1 within its accuracy is achieved while maintaining the advantages of an FRP-based approach: GFASv1.0 makes use of the quantitative information on the combustion rate that is contained in the FRP observations, and it detects fires in real time at high spatial and temporal resolution. GFASv1.0 indicates omission errors in GFED3.1 due to undetected small fires. It also exhibits slightly longer fire seasons in South America and North Africa and a slightly shorter fire season in Southeast Asia. GFASv1.0 has already been used for atmospheric reactive gas simulations in an independent study, which found good agreement with atmospheric observations. We have performed simulations of the atmospheric aerosol distribution with and without the assimilation of MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD. They indicate that the emissions of particulate matter need to be boosted by a factor of 2–4 to reproduce the global distribution of organic matter and black carbon. This discrepancy is also evident in the comparison of previously published top-down and bottom-up estimates. For the time being, a global enhancement of the particulate matter emissions by 3.4 is recommended. Validation with independent AOD and PM10

  8. The efficiency and sensitivity analysis of observations for atmospheric transport model with emissions

    Wu, Xueran; Elbern, Hendrik; Jacob, Birgit

    2015-04-01

    Air quality and climate change are influenced by the fluxes of green house gases, reactive emissions and aerosols in the atmosphere. But observations of the chemical states in the atmosphere typically have low temporal and spatial density. Therefore, many works are introduced to spatio-temporal data assimilation methods in atmospheric chemistry in recent years. There is no doubt that the optimization of the initial state is always of great importance for the improvement of predictive skill. However, specified to the chemistry transport model with high dependence on the emissions in the troposphere, the optimization of the initial state is no longer the only issue. The lack of the ability to observe and estimate surface emission fluxes and important inner atmospheric fluxes with necessary accuracy is a major roadblock of hampering the progress in predictive skills of the atmospheric transport model. However, in many cases, the better estimations for both the initial state and emission rates are not always obtained with certain observational network configurations via various popular data assimilation methods, such as the ensemble Kalman filter and smoother and 4D-variation. It leads to the waste of resource by optimizing the improper parameters or brings the inaccuracy of the optimization by unsuitable weight between the initial state and emission rates. Hence, in order to make a scientific and quantitative decision about which parameters to be optimized and how to balance them before any data assimilation procedure, we establish the dynamic model for emission rates with the constraint of diurnal profile shape and extend the state vector of atmospheric transport model so that the emission rates are included. Then, a theoretical approach, based on Kalman filter and smoother and their ensemble cases, to evaluate the potential improvement is introduced. By singular value decomposition, the efficiency of observations to optimize initial state and emission rates of the

  9. Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using observations from the TES satellite sensor

    K. C. Wells

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We employ new global space-based measurements of atmospheric methanol from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES with the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to quantify terrestrial emissions of methanol to the atmosphere. Biogenic methanol emissions in the model are based on MEGANv2.1 emission algorithms, using MODIS leaf area and GEOS-5 assimilated meteorological fields. We first carry out a pseudo observation test to validate the overall approach, and find that the TES sampling density is sufficient to accurately quantify regional- to continental-scale methanol emissions using this method. A global inversion of two years of TES data yields an optimized annual global surface flux of 117 Tg yr−1 (including biogenic, pyrogenic, and anthropogenic sources, an increase of 56% from the a priori global flux of 75 Tg yr−1. Global terrestrial methanol emissions are thus approximately 25% those of isoprene (~540 Tg yr−1, and are comparable to the combined emissions of all anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (~100–200 Tg yr−1. Our a posteriori terrestrial methanol source leads to a strong improvement of the simulation relative to an ensemble of airborne observations, and corroborates two other recent top-down estimates (114–120 Tg yr−1 derived using in-situ and space-based measurements. The TES data imply a relatively modest revision of model emissions over most of the tropics, but a significant upward revision in midlatitudes, particularly over Europe and North America. We interpret the inversion results in terms of specific source types using the methanol:CO correlations measured by TES, and find that biogenic emissions are overestimated relative to biomass burning and anthropogenic emissions in central Africa and southeastern China, while they are underestimated in regions such as Brazil and the US. Based on our optimized emissions, methanol accounts for >25% of the photochemical source of CO and HCHO over many

  10. Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using observations from the TES satellite sensor

    Wells, K. C.; Millet, D. B.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Shephard, M. W.; Henze, D. K.; Bousserez, N.; Apel, E. C.; de Gouw, J.; Warneke, C.; Singh, H. B.

    2014-03-01

    We employ new global space-based measurements of atmospheric methanol from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) with the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to quantify terrestrial emissions of methanol to the atmosphere. Biogenic methanol emissions in the model are based on version 2.1 of the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGANv2.1), using leaf area data from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and GEOS-5 assimilated meteorological fields. We first carry out a pseudo observation test to validate the overall approach, and find that the TES sampling density is sufficient to accurately quantify regional- to continental-scale methanol emissions using this method. A global inversion of two years of TES data yields an optimized annual global surface flux of 122 Tg yr-1 (including biogenic, pyrogenic, and anthropogenic sources), an increase of 60% from the a priori global flux of 76 Tg yr-1. Global terrestrial methanol emissions are thus nearly 25% those of isoprene (~540 Tg yr-1), and are comparable to the combined emissions of all anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (~100-200 Tg yr-1). Our a posteriori terrestrial methanol source leads to a strong improvement of the simulation relative to an ensemble of airborne observations, and corroborates two other recent top-down estimates (114-120 Tg yr-1) derived using in situ and space-based measurements. Inversions testing the sensitivity of optimized fluxes to model errors in OH, dry deposition, and oceanic uptake of methanol, as well as to the assumed a priori constraint, lead to global fluxes ranging from 118 to 126 Tg yr-1. The TES data imply a relatively modest revision of model emissions over most of the tropics, but a significant upward revision in midlatitudes, particularly over Europe and North America. We interpret the inversion results in terms of specific source types using the methanol : CO correlations measured by TES, and find that

  11. Multiwavelength Observations of AGN Jets: Untangling the Coupled Problems of Emission Mechanism and Jet Structure

    Perlman, Eric S.; Avachat, Sayali S.; Clautice, Devon; Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen; Cara, Mihai

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of X-ray and optical emission from large numbers of AGN jets is one of the key legacies of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope. Several dozen optical and X-ray emitting jets are now known, most of which are seen in both bands as well as in the radio, where they were first discovered. Jets carry prodigious amounts of energy and mass out from the nuclear regions out to tens to hundreds of kiloparsecs distant from the central black hole, depositing it into the host galaxy and cluster. Interpreting their multiwavelength emissions has not been easy: while in most jets, the optical and radio emission in many objects is believed to emerge via the synchrotron process, due to its characteristic spectral shape and high radio polarization, the X-ray emission has been a tougher nut to crack. In less powerful, FR I jets, such as M87, the X-ray emission is believed to be synchrotron emission from the highest energy electrons, requiring in situ particle acceleration due to the short radiative lifetimes of the particles. However, in FR II and quasar jets, a variety of emission mechanisms are possible. Until the last few years, the leading interpretation had been inverse-Comptonization of Cosmic Microwave Background photons (the IC/CMB mechanism). This requires the jet to be relativistic out to hundreds of kiloparsecs from the nucleus, and requires an electron spectrum that extends to very low Lorentz factors. However, that now appears less likely, due to observed high optical polarizations in jets where the optical and X-ray emission appears to lie on the same spectral component, as well as limits derived from Fermi observations in the GeV gamma-rays. It now appears more likely that the X-rays must arise as synchrotron emission from a second, high energy electron population. With this revelation, we must tackle anew the coupling between jet structure and emission mechanisms. Multiwavelength imaging and polarimetry can give us clues to the

  12. Constraining atmospheric ammonia emissions through new observations with an open-path, laser-based sensor

    Sun, Kang

    As the third most abundant nitrogen species in the atmosphere, ammonia (NH3) is a key component of the global nitrogen cycle. Since the industrial revolution, humans have more than doubled the emissions of NH3 to the atmosphere by industrial nitrogen fixation, revolutionizing agricultural practices, and burning fossil fuels. NH3 is a major precursor to fine particulate matter (PM2.5), which has adverse impacts on air quality and human health. The direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcings currently constitute the largest uncertainties for future climate change predictions. Gas and particle phase NH3 eventually deposits back to the Earth's surface as reactive nitrogen, leading to the exceedance of ecosystem critical loads and perturbation of ecosystem productivity. Large uncertainties still remain in estimating the magnitude and spatiotemporal patterns of NH3 emissions from all sources and over a range of scales. These uncertainties in emissions also propagate to the deposition of reactive nitrogen. To improve our understanding of NH3 emissions, observational constraints are needed from local to global scales. The first part of this thesis is to provide quality-controlled, reliable NH3 measurements in the field using an open-path, quantum cascade laser-based NH3 sensor. As the second and third part of my research, NH3 emissions were quantified from a cattle feedlot using eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements, and the similarities between NH3 turbulent fluxes and those of other scalars (temperature, water vapor, and CO2) were investigated. The fourth part involves applying a mobile laboratory equipped with the open-path NH3 sensor and other important chemical/meteorological measurements to quantify fleet-integrated NH3 emissions from on-road vehicles. In the fifth part, the on-road measurements were extended to multiple major urban areas in both the US and China in the context of five observation campaigns. The results significantly improved current urban NH3

  13. Observations of the 145.5 micron [O I] emission line in the Orion Nebula

    We have obtained a first set of observations of the [O I] 3P0 -3P1 (145.5 μm) transition. We observed the line both in a 1' x 1' beam centered on the Trapezium and in a 7' x 7' beam encompassing most of the Orion Nebula. We also have constructed a wide-beam (7' x 7') map of the region which shows that most of the emission is confined to the central regions of the nebula. These observations may be compared with reported measurement of the 3P1-3P2 (63.2 μm) transition in Orion and are consistent with optically thin emission in the 145.5 μm line and self-absorbed 63.2 μm emission lines. We discuss mechanisms for the excitation of neutral oxygen and conclude that much of the observed emission originates in the thin, radio recombination line-emitting C II/H I envelope bordering on the H II region

  14. Topographic Effects on the Surface Emissivity of a Mountainous Area Observed by a Spaceborne Microwave Radiometer

    Pulvirenti, Luca; Pierdicca, Nazzareno; Marzano, Frank S.

    2008-01-01

    A simulation study to understand the influence of topography on the surface emissivity observed by a satellite microwave radiometer is carried out. We analyze the effects due to changes in observation angle, including the rotation of the polarization plane. A mountainous area in the Alps (Northern Italy) is considered and the information on the relief extracted from a digital elevation model is exploited. The numerical simulation refers to a radiometric image, acquired by a conically-scanning radiometer similar to AMSR-E, i.e., flying at 705 km of altitude with an observation angle of 55°. To single out the impact on surface emissivity, scattering of the radiation due to the atmosphere or neighboring elevated surfaces is not considered. C and X bands, for which atmospheric effects are negligible, and Ka band are analyzed. The results indicate that the changes in the local observation angle tend to lower the apparent emissivity of a radiometric pixel with respect to the corresponding flat surface characteristics. The effect of the rotation of the polarization plane enlarges (vertical polarization), or attenuates (horizontal polarization) this decrease. By doing some simplifying assumptions for the radiometer antenna, the conclusion is that the microwave emissivity at vertical polarization is underestimated, whilst the opposite occurs for horizontal polarization, except for Ka band, for which both under- and overprediction may occur. A quantification of the differences with respect to a flat soil and an approximate evaluation of their impact on soil moisture retrieval are yielded.

  15. The observable effects of a photospheric component on GRB's and XRF's prompt emission spectrum

    Pe'er, Asaf; Mészáros, Peter; Rees, Martin J.

    2005-01-01

    A thermal radiative component is likely to accompany the first stages of the prompt emission of Gamma-ray bursts (GRB's) and X-ray flashes (XRF's). We analyze the effect of such a component on the observable spectrum, assuming that the observable effects are due to a dissipation process occurring below or near the thermal photosphere. We consider both the internal shock model and a 'slow heating' model as possible dissipation mechanisms. For comparable energy densities in the thermal and the ...

  16. The observation of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions in the laboratory and in the night airglow

    A. L. Broadfoot

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding of an orange spectral feature in OSIRIS/Odin spectra of the night airglow near 85 km has raised interest in the origin of the emission. The feature was positively identified as the chemiluminescent FeO* emission where the iron is of meteoric origin. Since the meteorite source of atomic metals in the mesosphere contains both iron and nickel, with Ni being typically 6% of Fe, it is expected that faint emissions involving Ni should also be present in the night airglow. The present study summarizes the laboratory observations of chemiluminescent NiO* emissions and includes a search for the NiO* signature in the night airglow. A faint previously unidentified "continuum" extending longwave of 440 nm has been identified in night airglow spectra obtained with two space-borne limb viewing instruments and through a comparison with laboratory spectra this continuum is identified as arising from the NiO* emission. The FeO* and NiO* emissions both originate from a reaction of the metal atoms with mesospheric ozone and so support the presence of NiO* in the night airglow.

  17. Hard X-ray emissions from Cassiopeia A observed by INTEGRAL

    Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cassiopeia A (Cas A) as the nearby young remnant of a core-collapse supernova is the best candidate for astrophysical studies in supernova explosion and its environment. We studied hard X-ray emissions from Cas A using the ten-year data of INTEGRAL observations, and first detected non-thermal continuum emission from the source up to 220 keV. The $^{44}$Ti line emissions at 68 and 78 keV are confirmed by our observations with a mean flux of $\\sim (2.2\\pm 0.4)\\times 10^{-5}$ ph cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$, corresponding to a $^{44}$Ti yield in Cas A of $(1.3\\pm 0.4)\\times 10^{-4}$ \\ms. The continuum emission from 3 -- 500 keV can be fitted with a thermal bremsstrahlung of $kT\\sim 0.79\\pm 0.08$ keV plus a power-law model of $\\Gamma \\sim 3.13\\pm 0.03$. The non-thermal emission from Cas A is well fitted with a power-law model without a cutoff up to 220 keV. This radiation characteristic is inconsistent with the diffusive shock acceleration models with the remnant shock velocity of only 5000km s$^{-1}$. The central compact ...

  18. Space-based observations of fire NOx emission coefficients: a global biome-scale comparison

    A. K. Mebust

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning represents both a significant and highly variable source of NOx to the atmosphere. This variability stems from both the episodic nature of fires, and from fire conditions such as the modified combustion efficiency of the fire, the nitrogen content of the fuel and possibly other factors that have not been identified or evaluated by comparison with observations. Satellite instruments offer an opportunity to observe emissions from wildfires, providing a large suite of measurements which allow us to study mean behavior and variability on the regional scale in a statistically rigorous manner. Here we use space-based measurements of fire radiative power from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer in combination with NO2 tropospheric column densities from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument to measure mean emission coefficients (ECs in g NO MJ−1 from fires for global biomes, and across a wide range of smaller-scale ecoregions, defined as spatially-distinct clusters of fires with similar fuel type. Mean ECs for all biomes fall between 0.250–0.362 g NO MJ−1, a range that is smaller than found in previous studies of biome-scale emission factors. The majority of ecoregion ECs fall within or near this range, implying that under most conditions, mean fire emissions per unit energy are similar between different regions regardless of fuel type or spatial variability. In contrast to these similarities, we find that about 24% of individual ecoregion ECs deviate significantly (p x emissions.

  19. VLF signal modulations during the total solar eclipse of 22nd July, 2009: model using D region ion chemistry and LWPC

    Chakraborty, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Palit, Sourav; Ray, Suman

    2016-07-01

    One of the major sources of ionospheric perturbations is variations in solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation flux. Solar eclipse is a phenomenon which is capable of producing significant effects on the physical and chemical properties of the ionospheric plasma. During a solar eclipse, the solar radiation flux reduces considerably for a limited period of time over specific locations on the Earth. This induces certain changes within the ionosphere or more precisely, in the D-region which can be studied with the observation of Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio signal modulations. The parameters which mainly govern the ion-chemistry, such as the recombination coefficients are poorly known till date. Solar eclipse provides us with an excellent opportunity to study these parameters as its time of occurrence is known beforehand and thus we can equip ourselves accordingly. In the present study we considered the Total Solar Eclipse (TSE) that occurred on 22nd July, 2009 within the Indian subcontinent. Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP) conducted a week long campaign during the eclipse and data were recorded from dozens of places within India and abroad. Both positive and negative changes in VLF signal amplitude were observed. In this paper, data for a propagation path between Indian Navy VLF transmitter named VTX3 and a pair of receivers in India, namely Malda and Kolkata are used. We start with calculating the obscuration function for these two places to find the variations in ionization flux within the period of the eclipse. After this, we incorporated the D region ion chemistry model to find the equilibrium ion density over the region and employ the LWPC code to find the VLF signal amplitude. We varied the values of recombination coefficients to achieve desired accuracy in our results. In doing so, we achieved two goals: First, we have been able to reproduce the trend of variation in VLF signal amplitude (both positive and negative) at both the receiving locations

  20. The long-wavelength thermal emission of the Pluto-Charon system from Herschel observations. Evidence for emissivity effects

    Lellouch, E.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Fornasier, S.; Lim, T.; Stansberry, J.; Vilenius, E.; Kiss, Cs.; Müller, T.; Marton, G.; Protopapa, S.; Panuzzo, P.; Moreno, R.

    2016-04-01

    Thermal observations of the Pluto-Charon system acquired by the Herschel Space Observatory in February 2012 are presented. They consist of photometric measurements with the PACS and SPIRE instruments (nine visits to the Pluto system each), covering six wavelengths from 70 to 500 μm altogether. The thermal light curve of Pluto-Charon is observed in all filters, albeit more marginally at 160 and especially 500 μm. Putting these data into the context of older ISO, Spitzer and ground-based observations indicates that the brightness temperature (TB) of the system (rescaled to a common heliocentric distance) drastically decreases with increasing wavelength, from ~53 K at 20 μm to ~35 K at 500 μm, and perhaps ever less at longer wavelengths. Considering a variety of diurnal and/or seasonal thermophysical models, we show that TB values of 35 K are lower than any expected temperature for the dayside surface or subsurface of Pluto and Charon, implying a low surface emissivity. Based on multiterrain modeling, we infer a spectral emissivity that decreases steadily from 1 at 20-25 μm to ~0.7 at 500 μm. This kind of behavior is usually not observed in asteroids (when proper allowance is made for subsurface sounding), but is found in several icy surfaces of the solar system. We tentatively identify that a combination of a strong dielectric constant and a considerable surface material transparency (typical penetration depth ~1 cm) is responsible for the effect. Our results have implications for the interpretation of the temperature measurements by REX/New Horizons at 4.2 cm wavelength. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  1. Observation of delayed electron emission in a two-phase liquid xenon detector

    Results of the experimental study of electron emission from liquid xenon via electroluminescence of the gas phase are presented. We report on observation of a peculiar kind of delayed electroluminescent signal following initial electroluminescence caused by ionizing particles. We also present the results of a study of spontaneous single electron emission following cosmic muon signals. It was found that the rate of spontaneous single electron signals strongly depends on the time passed since the initial electroluminescence happened. The analysis of experimental data showed that both spontaneous single electron signals and delayed electroluminescent signals are associated with ionization electrons which are trapped by the potential barrier at the interface

  2. Dust emissivity in the Submm/Mm: SCUBA and SIMBA observations of Barnard 68

    Bianchi, S.; Goncalves, J; Albrecht, M.; Caselli, P.; Chini, R.; Galli, D.; Walmsley, M

    2003-01-01

    We have observed the dark cloud Barnard 68 with SCUBA at 850 um and with SIMBA at 1.2 mm. The submillimetre and millimetre dust emission correlate well with the extinction map of Alves, Lada and Lada (2001).The A_V/850um correlation is clearly not linear and suggests lower temperatures for the dust in the inner core of the cloud. Assuming a model for the temperature gradient, we derive the cloud-averaged dust emissivities (normalised to the V-Band extinction efficiency) at 850 um and 1.2 mm. ...

  3. Helium Emissions Observed in Ground-Based Spectra of Solar Prominences

    Ramelli, Renzo; Stellmacher, Goetz; Wiehr, Eberhard; Bianda, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The only prominent line of singly ionized helium in the visible spectral range, helium-II 4686 A, is observed together with the helium-I 5015 A singlet and the helium-I 4471 A triplet line in solar prominences. The sodium emission, NaD2, is used as a tracer for helium-II emissions which are sufficiently bright to exceed the noise level near 10^-6 of the disk-center intensity. The so selected prominences are characterized by small non-thermal line broadening and almost absent velocity shifts, ...

  4. Global oceanic emission of ammonia: Constraints from seawater and atmospheric observations

    Paulot, F.; Jacob, D. J.; Johnson, M. T.; Bell, T. G.; Baker, A. R.; Keene, W. C.; Lima, I. D.; Doney, S. C.; Stock, C. A.

    2015-08-01

    Current global inventories of ammonia emissions identify the ocean as the largest natural source. This source depends on seawater pH, temperature, and the concentration of total seawater ammonia (NHx(sw)), which reflects a balance between remineralization of organic matter, uptake by plankton, and nitrification. Here we compare [NHx(sw)] from two global ocean biogeochemical models (BEC and COBALT) against extensive ocean observations. Simulated [NHx(sw)] are generally biased high. Improved simulation can be achieved in COBALT by increasing the plankton affinity for NHx within observed ranges. The resulting global ocean emissions is 2.5 TgN a-1, much lower than current literature values (7-23 TgN a-1), including the widely used Global Emissions InitiAtive (GEIA) inventory (8 TgN a-1). Such a weak ocean source implies that continental sources contribute more than half of atmospheric NHx over most of the ocean in the Northern Hemisphere. Ammonia emitted from oceanic sources is insufficient to neutralize sulfate aerosol acidity, consistent with observations. There is evidence over the Equatorial Pacific for a missing source of atmospheric ammonia that could be due to photolysis of marine organic nitrogen at the ocean surface or in the atmosphere. Accommodating this possible missing source yields a global ocean emission of ammonia in the range 2-5 TgN a-1, comparable in magnitude to other natural sources from open fires and soils.

  5. P-MaNGA Galaxies: Emission Lines Properties - Gas Ionisation and Chemical Abundances from Prototype Observations

    Belfiore, F; Bundy, K; Thomas, D; Maraston, C; Wilkinson, D; Sánchez, S F; Bershady, M; Blanc, G A; Bothwell, M; Cales, S L; Coccato, L; Drory, N; Emsellem, E; Fu, H; Gelfand, J; Law, D; Masters, K; Parejko, J; Tremonti, C; Wake, D; Weijmans, A; Yan, R; Xiao, T; Zhang, K; Zheng, T; Bizyaev, D; Kinemuchi, K; Oravetz, D; Simmons, A

    2014-01-01

    MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) is a SDSS-IV survey that will obtain spatially resolved spectroscopy from 3600 \\AA\\ to 10300 \\AA\\ for a representative sample of over 10000 nearby galaxies. In this paper we present the analysis of nebular emission line properties using observations of 14 galaxies obtained with P-MaNGA, a prototype of the MaNGA instrument. By using spatially resolved diagnostic diagrams we find extended star formation in galaxies that are centrally dominated by Seyfert/LINER-like emission, illustrating that galaxy characterisations based on single fibre spectra are necessarily incomplete. We observe extended (up to $\\rm 1 R_{e}$) LINER-like emission in the central regions of three galaxies. We make use of the $\\rm EW(H \\alpha)$ to argue that the observed emission is consistent with ionisation from hot evolved stars. Using stellar population indices we conclude that galactic regions which are ionised by a Seyfert/LINER-like radiation field are also devoid of recent st...

  6. Efficiency and Sensitivity Analysis of Observation Networks for Atmospheric Inverse Modelling with Emissions

    Wu, Xueran; Jacob, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The controllability of advection-diffusion systems, subject to uncertain initial values and emission rates, is estimated, given sparse and error affected observations of prognostic state variables. In predictive geophysical model systems, like atmospheric chemistry simulations, different parameter families influence the temporal evolution of the system.This renders initial-value-only optimisation by traditional data assimilation methods as insufficient. In this paper, a quantitative assessment method on validation of measurement configurations to optimize initial values and emission rates, and how to balance them, is introduced. In this theoretical approach, Kalman filter and smoother and their ensemble based versions are combined with a singular value decomposition, to evaluate the potential improvement associated with specific observational network configurations. Further, with the same singular vector analysis for the efficiency of observations, their sensitivity to model control can be identified by deter...

  7. Observational Characteristics of Radio Emission Related to Multi-polar Magnetic Configuration

    Min Wang; Rui-Xiang Xie; Chun Xu; Shuo-Biao Shi; Yi-Hua Yan

    2005-01-01

    We present a large complex radio burst and its associated fast time structures observed on 2001 April 10 in the frequency range of 0.65-7.6 GHz. The NoRH radio image observation shows very complex radio source structures which include preexisting, newly emerging, submerging/cancelling polarities and a biposuggests that the radio burst is generated from a very complicated loop structure.According to the spectral and image observations, we assume that the beginning connection structure. A composite of radio continuum and fast time structures is contained in this flare. The various fast radio emission phenomena include normal and reverse drifting type Ⅲ bursts, and slowly drifting and no-drift structures.ture, which is an important source of the various types of fast time structures.The two-loop reconnection model can lead simultaneously to electron acceleration and corona heating. We have also analyzed the behaviors of coronal magnetic polarities and the emission processes of different types radio emission qualitatively.Interactions of a bipolar or multi-polar loop are consistent with our observational results. Our observations favor the magnetic reconnection configurations of the lar).

  8. Non-thermal emission from high-energy binaries through interferometric radio observations

    Marcote, B

    2016-01-01

    High-mass binary systems involve extreme environments that produce non-thermal emission from radio to gamma rays. Only three types of these systems are known to emit persistent gamma-ray emission: colliding-wind binaries, high-mass X-ray binaries and gamma-ray binaries. This thesis is focused on the radio emission of high-mass binary systems through interferometric observations, and we have explored several of these sources with low- and high-frequency radio observations, and very high-resolution VLBI ones. We have studied two gamma-ray binaries, LS 5039 and LS I +61 303, at low frequencies. We have obtained their light-curves and spectra, and we have determined the physical properties of their radio emitting regions. We have also studied the gamma-ray binary HESS J0632+057 through VLBI observations. A new colliding wind binary, HD 93129A, has been discovered through VLBI and optical observations. Finally, we have conducted radio observations of two sources that were candidates to be gamma-ray binaries.

  9. Nine years of global hydrocarbon emissions based on source inversion of OMI formaldehyde observations

    Bauwens, Maite; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Müller, Jean-François; De Smedt, Isabelle; Van Roozendael, Michel; van der Werf, Guido R.; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Sindelarova, Katerina; Guenther, Alex

    2016-08-01

    As formaldehyde (HCHO) is a high-yield product in the oxidation of most volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by fires, vegetation, and anthropogenic activities, satellite observations of HCHO are well-suited to inform us on the spatial and temporal variability of the underlying VOC sources. The long record of space-based HCHO column observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is used to infer emission flux estimates from pyrogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on the global scale over 2005-2013. This is realized through the method of source inverse modeling, which consists in the optimization of emissions in a chemistry-transport model (CTM) in order to minimize the discrepancy between the observed and modeled HCHO columns. The top-down fluxes are derived in the global CTM IMAGESv2 by an iterative minimization algorithm based on the full adjoint of IMAGESv2, starting from a priori emission estimates provided by the newly released GFED4s (Global Fire Emission Database, version 4s) inventory for fires, and by the MEGAN-MOHYCAN inventory for isoprene emissions. The top-down fluxes are compared to two independent inventories for fire (GFAS and FINNv1.5) and isoprene emissions (MEGAN-MACC and GUESS-ES). The inversion indicates a moderate decrease (ca. 20 %) in the average annual global fire and isoprene emissions, from 2028 Tg C in the a priori to 1653 Tg C for burned biomass, and from 343 to 272 Tg for isoprene fluxes. Those estimates are acknowledged to depend on the accuracy of formaldehyde data, as well as on the assumed fire emission factors and the oxidation mechanisms leading to HCHO production. Strongly decreased top-down fire fluxes (30-50 %) are inferred in the peak fire season in Africa and during years with strong a priori fluxes associated with forest fires in Amazonia (in 2005, 2007, and 2010), bushfires in Australia (in 2006 and 2011), and peat burning in Indonesia (in 2006 and 2009), whereas generally increased fluxes

  10. Partial Effects on VLF Data due to a Solar Flare During 2010 Annular Solar Eclipse

    Maji, Surya K.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Mondal, Sushanta K.

    2010-10-01

    The VLF radio waves propagate through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. Irregularities caused by excesses or deficient soft X-rays which sustain the ionosphere changes the waveguide properties and hence the signals are modified. We report the results of our monitoring of the NWC transmitter from Khukurdaha (~80 km away from Kolkata) during the partial solar eclipse (75%) of 15th January, 2010. The receiving station and the transmitter were on two opposite sides of the annular eclipse belt. We got clear depression in the data during the period of partial eclipse. There was also a solar flare (spot no. 1040) on that day during the time the eclipse was near maximum. The flare started from B, reaching maximum to C1.3 (as observed by GOES 14 satellite). We saw the partial effect of this flare since a part of the active region was blocked by the moon. To our knowledge this is the first such incident where the solar flare was observed through lunar occultation.

  11. Constraints on ship NOx emissions in Europe using OMI NO2 observations

    Vinken, G. C. M.; Boersma, K. F.

    2012-04-01

    About 90% of world trade is transported by oceangoing ships, and seaborne trade has been shown to have increased by about 5% per year in the past decade. Global ship traffic is currently not regulated under international treaties (e.g. Kyoto protocol) and ships are still allowed to burn low-grade bunker fuel. As a result, ships emit large quantities of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2), important precursors for ozone (O3) and particulate matter formation. Previous studies indicated that the global NOx emissions from shipping are in the range 3.0-10.4 Tg N per year (15-30% of total global NOx emissions). Because most ships sail within 400 km of the coast, it is important to understand the contribution of ship emissions to atmospheric composition in the densely populated coastal regions. Chemistry Transport Models (CTMs), in combination with emission inventories, are used to simulate atmospheric concentrations of air pollutants to assess the impact of ship emissions. However, these bottom-up inventories, based on extrapolation of a few engine measurements and strong assumptions, suffer from large uncertainties. In this study we provide top-down constraints on ship NOx emissions in Europe using satellite observations of NO2 columns. We use the nested version of the GEOS-Chem model (0.5°-0.667°) to simulate tropospheric NO2 columns over Europe for the years 2005-2006, using our plume-in-grid treatment of ship NOx emissions. We improve the NO2 retrievals from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI v2.0) by replacing the coarse a priori (TM4) vertical NO2 profiles (2°-3°) with the high-resolution GEOS-Chem profiles. This ensures consistency between the retrievals and model simulations. GEOS-Chem simulations of tropospheric NO2 columns show remarkable quantitative agreement with the observed OMI columns over Europe (R2=0.89, RMS difference < 0.2-1015 molec. cm-2), providing confidence in the ability of the model to simulate NO2 pollution over the European mainland. We

  12. Chandra Observations of Extended X-ray Emission in Arp 220

    McDowell, J C; Lamb, S A; Shaked, S; Hearn, N C; Colina, L; Mundell, C; Borne, K; Baker, A C; Arribas, S

    2003-01-01

    We resolve the extended X-ray emission from the prototypical ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp 220. Extended, faint edge-brightened, soft X-ray lobes outside the optical galaxy are observed to a distance of 10 to 15 kpc on each side of the nuclear region. Bright plumes inside the optical isophotes coincide with the optical line emission and extend 11 kpc from end to end across the nucleus. The data for the plumes cannot be fit by a single temperature plasma, and display a range of temperatures from 0.2 to 1 keV. The plumes emerge from bright, diffuse circumnuclear emission in the inner 3 kpc centered on the Halpha peak, which is displaced from the radio nuclei. There is a close morphological correspondence between the Halpha and soft X-ray emission on all spatial scales. We interpret the plumes as a starburst-driven superwind, and discuss two interpretations of the emission from the lobes in the context of simulations of the merger dynamics of Arp 220.

  13. NOx lifetimes and emissions of cities and power plants in polluted background estimated by satellite observations

    Liu, Fei; Beirle, Steffen; Zhang, Qiang; Dörner, Steffen; He, Kebin; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    We present a new method to quantify NOx emissions and corresponding atmospheric lifetimes from OMI NO2 observations together with ECMWF wind fields without further model input for sources located in a polluted background. NO2 patterns under calm wind conditions are used as proxy for the spatial patterns of NOx emissions, and the effective atmospheric NOx lifetime is determined from the change of spatial patterns measured at larger wind speeds. Emissions are subsequently derived from the NO2 mass above the background, integrated around the source of interest. Lifetimes and emissions are estimated for 17 power plants and 53 cities located in non-mountainous regions across China and the USA. The derived lifetimes for the ozone season (May-September) are 3.8 ± 1.0 h (mean ± standard deviation) with a range of 1.8 to 7.5 h. The derived NOx emissions show generally good agreement with bottom-up inventories for power plants and cities. Regional inventory shows better agreement with top-down estimates for Chinese cities compared to global inventory, most likely due to different downscaling approaches adopted in the two inventories.

  14. Observations of artificial and natural optical emissions at the HAARP facility

    T. Pedersen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Extensive optical observations have been carried out at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP ionospheric heating facility since it began operations in 1999. A number of modern optical diagnostic instruments are hosted at remote sites as well as the main transmitter facility, which has recently been expanded from the initial 960 kW prototype configuration to its full 3.6 MW design capability. Upgrades to optical diagnostics have allowed a number of interesting new observations to be made at the 960 kW power level since 2004. Systematic beam-swinging experiments generating quantifiable levels of optical emission at various regions in the sky for the first time clearly show that emission intensity is very sensitive to distance from the magnetic zenith, and drops off rapidly at about 15° zenith angle in directions other than magnetic south. High temporal resolution measurements of emissions in the 557.7 nm green line at start-up and in short transmitter pulses demonstrate that localized irregularities are preferentially excited in the initial seconds of heating, with evolution into a more homogenous spot occurring over a period of about 1 min. High-quality emission altitude profiles at both 630.0 and 557.7 nm have recently been isolated from side-looking data, spanning an altitude extent of over 200 km, which has allowed determination of the effective lifetime of O (1D over an unprecedented altitude range. An innovative automated remote imager network utilizing low-cost mirror optics has been designed and deployed to make such measurements routinely. Observations of natural optical emissions at the site have revealed the common presence of highly structured but faint co-rotating subauroral precipitation that acts to suppress excitation of artificial F region optical emissions in areas of active precipitation. The observed spatial modulation of artificial optical emissions by structured precipitation is consistent

  15. Herschel HIFI observations of O2 toward Orion: special conditions for shock enhanced emission

    We report observations of molecular oxygen (O2) rotational transitions at 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz toward Orion Peak A. The O2 lines at 487 GHz and 774 GHz are detected at velocities of 10-12 km s–1 with line widths ∼3 km s–1; however, the transition at 1121 GHz is not detected. The observed line characteristics, combined with the results of earlier observations, suggest that the region responsible for the O2 emission is ≅9'' (6 × 1016 cm) in size, and is located close to the H 2 Peak 1 position (where vibrationally excited H2 emission peaks), and not at Peak A, 23'' away. The peak O2 column density is ≅1.1 × 1018 cm–2. The line velocity is close to that of the 621 GHz water maser emission found in this portion of the Orion Molecular Cloud, and having a shock with velocity vector lying nearly in the plane of the sky is consistent with producing maximum maser gain along the line of sight. The enhanced O2 abundance compared to that generally found in dense interstellar clouds can be explained by passage of a low-velocity C shock through a clump with preshock density 2 × 104 cm–3, if a reasonable flux of UV radiation is present. The postshock O2 can explain the emission from the source if its line-of-sight dimension is ≅10 times larger than its size on the plane of the sky. The special geometry and conditions required may explain why O2 emission has not been detected in the cores of other massive star-forming molecular clouds.

  16. Herschel HIFI Observations of O2 toward Orion: Special Conditions for Shock Enhanced Emission

    Chen, Jo-Hsin; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Viti, Serena; Snell, Ronald; Lis, Dariusz C.; Benz, Arnold; Bergin, Edwin; Black, John; Caselli, Paola; Encrenaz, Pierre; Falgarone, Edith; Goicoechea, Javier R.; Hjalmarson, Åke; Hollenbach, David; Kaufman, Michael; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Pagani, Laurent; van der Tak, Floris; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Yıldız, Umut A.

    2014-10-01

    We report observations of molecular oxygen (O2) rotational transitions at 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz toward Orion Peak A. The O2 lines at 487 GHz and 774 GHz are detected at velocities of 10-12 km s-1 with line widths ~3 km s-1 however, the transition at 1121 GHz is not detected. The observed line characteristics, combined with the results of earlier observations, suggest that the region responsible for the O2 emission is sime9'' (6 × 1016 cm) in size, and is located close to the H 2 Peak 1 position (where vibrationally excited H2 emission peaks), and not at Peak A, 23'' away. The peak O2 column density is sime1.1 × 1018 cm-2. The line velocity is close to that of the 621 GHz water maser emission found in this portion of the Orion Molecular Cloud, and having a shock with velocity vector lying nearly in the plane of the sky is consistent with producing maximum maser gain along the line of sight. The enhanced O2 abundance compared to that generally found in dense interstellar clouds can be explained by passage of a low-velocity C shock through a clump with preshock density 2 × 104 cm-3, if a reasonable flux of UV radiation is present. The postshock O2 can explain the emission from the source if its line-of-sight dimension is sime10 times larger than its size on the plane of the sky. The special geometry and conditions required may explain why O2 emission has not been detected in the cores of other massive star-forming molecular clouds.

  17. Herschel HIFI observations of O{sub 2} toward Orion: special conditions for shock enhanced emission

    Chen, Jo-Hsin; Goldsmith, Paul F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Viti, Serena [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Snell, Ronald [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, LGRT-B 619E, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Lis, Dariusz C. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benz, Arnold [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Bergin, Edwin [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Black, John; Hjalmarson, Åke [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Caselli, Paola [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Encrenaz, Pierre; Falgarone, Edith [LRA/LERMA, CNRS, UMR8112, Observatoire de Paris and École Normale Supérieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Goicoechea, Javier R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), E-28049, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Hollenbach, David [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Kaufman, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San José State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Melnick, Gary [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 66, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Neufeld, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Pagani, Laurent [LERMA and UMR8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de l' Observatoire, F-75014, Paris (France); and others

    2014-10-01

    We report observations of molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) rotational transitions at 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz toward Orion Peak A. The O{sub 2} lines at 487 GHz and 774 GHz are detected at velocities of 10-12 km s{sup –1} with line widths ∼3 km s{sup –1}; however, the transition at 1121 GHz is not detected. The observed line characteristics, combined with the results of earlier observations, suggest that the region responsible for the O{sub 2} emission is ≅9'' (6 × 10{sup 16} cm) in size, and is located close to the H {sub 2} Peak 1 position (where vibrationally excited H{sub 2} emission peaks), and not at Peak A, 23'' away. The peak O{sub 2} column density is ≅1.1 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2}. The line velocity is close to that of the 621 GHz water maser emission found in this portion of the Orion Molecular Cloud, and having a shock with velocity vector lying nearly in the plane of the sky is consistent with producing maximum maser gain along the line of sight. The enhanced O{sub 2} abundance compared to that generally found in dense interstellar clouds can be explained by passage of a low-velocity C shock through a clump with preshock density 2 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, if a reasonable flux of UV radiation is present. The postshock O{sub 2} can explain the emission from the source if its line-of-sight dimension is ≅10 times larger than its size on the plane of the sky. The special geometry and conditions required may explain why O{sub 2} emission has not been detected in the cores of other massive star-forming molecular clouds.

  18. HST/ACS Observations of Europa's Atmospheric UV Emission at Eastern Elongation

    Saur, Joachim; Roth, Lorenz; Nimmo, Francis; Strobel, Darrell F; Retherford, Kurt D; McGrath, Melissa A; Schilling, Nico; Gérard, Jean-Claude; Grodent, Denis

    2011-01-01

    We report results of a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) campaign with the Advanced Camera for Surveys to observe Europa at eastern elongation, i.e. Europa's leading side, on 2008 June 29. With five consecutive HST orbits, we constrain Europa's atmospheric \\ion{O}{1} 1304 \\A and \\ion{O}{1} 1356 \\A emissions using the prism PR130L. The total emissions of both oxygen multiplets range between 132 $\\pm$ 14 and 226 $\\pm$ 14 Rayleigh. An additional systematic error with values on the same order as the statistical errors may be due to uncertainties in modelling the reflected light from Europa's surface. The total emission also shows a clear dependence of Europa's position with respect to Jupiter's magnetospheric plasma sheet. We derive a lower limit for the O$_2$ column density of 6 $\\times$ 10$^{18}$ m$^{-2}$. Previous observations of Europa's atmosphere with STIS in 1999 of Europa's trailing side show an enigmatic surplus of radiation on the anti-Jovian side within the disk of Europa. With emission from a radially symm...

  19. Simultaneous optical/gamma-ray observations of GRB 121217's prompt emission

    Elliott, J; Schmidl, S; Greiner, J; Gruber, D; Oates, S; Kobayashi, S; Zhang, B; Cummings, J R; Filgas, R; Gehrels, N; Grupe, D; Kann, D A; Klose, S; Krühler, T; Guelbenzu, A Nicuesa; Rau, A; Rossi, A; Siegel, M; Schady, P; Sudilovsky, V; Tanga, M; Varela, K

    2013-01-01

    Since the advent of the Swift satellite it has been possible to obtain precise localisations of GRB positions of sub-arcsec accuracy within seconds, facilitating ground-based robotic telescopes to automatically slew to the target within seconds. This has yielded a plethora of observational data for the afterglow phase of the GRB, but the quantity of data (<2 keV) covering the initial prompt emission still remains small. Only in a handful of cases has it been possible obtain simultaneous coverage of the prompt emission in a multi-wavelength regime (gamma-ray to optical), as a result of: observing the field by chance prior to the GRB (e.g. 080319B/naked-eye burst), long-prompt emission (e.g., 080928, 110205A) or triggered on a pre-cursor (e.g., 041219A, 050820A, 061121). This small selection of bursts have shown both correlated and uncorrelated gamma-ray and optical light curve behaviour, and the multi-wavelength emission mechanism remains far from resolved (i.e. single population synchrotron self-Component,...

  20. Lightning as an embryonic source of VLF hiss

    Data from the DE 1 satellite show that lightning-generated whistlers often trigger hiss emissions that endure for up to 10- to 20-s periods. The data consist of the measured electric and magnetic fields in the frequency range of 1.5 kHz to 6.0 kHz, during 22 DE 1 passes during the period December 28, 1986 to January 18, 1987. The whistler-triggered hiss emissions were observed on 16 of the passes, and they generally exhibited the following characteristics: (1) emission spectra were wide band (1-2 kHz) and rather structureless, (2) well-defined and sustained fading patterns were observed at twice the spin frequency over 10- to 20-s periods, (3) the spin fading characteristics of the triggered hiss bursts were similar to those reported for background plasmaspheric hiss, indicating a large wave normal angle with respect to the ambient magnetic field. The results indicate that lightning-generated whistlers may be an important embryonic source for magnetospheric hiss and that whistlers and emissions triggered by them often constitute the dominant wave activity in the ∼ 1.5- to 6-kHz range on L shells of 3.5 to 5 in the afternoon sector during geomagnetically quiet periods. Through cyclotron and Landau resonant scattering, it is likely that these lightning-generated waves play a dominant role in the loss of ∼0.5- to 50-keV electrons trapped on these field lines in the afternoon sector. Through anisotropic proton instability, these waves can also interact with ring current protons in the range of several tens of keV leading to a loss mechanism for ring current protons

  1. The long-wavelength thermal emission of the Pluto-Charon system from Herschel observations. Evidence for emissivity effects

    Lellouch, E; Fornasier, S; Lim, T; Stansberry, J; Vilenius, E; Kiss, Cs; Müller, T; Marton, G; Protopapa, S; Panuzzo, P; Moreno, R

    2016-01-01

    Thermal observations of the Pluto-Charon system acquired by the Herschel Space Observatory in February 2012 are presented. They consist of photometric measurements with the PACS and SPIRE instruments (nine visits to the Pluto system each), covering six wavelengths from 70 to 500 $\\mu$m altogether. The thermal light curve of Pluto-Charon is observed in all filters, albeit more marginally at 160 and especially 500 $\\mu$m. Putting these data into the context of older ISO, Spitzer and ground-based observations indicates that the brightness temperature (T$_B$) of the system (rescaled to a common heliocentric distance) drastically decreases with increasing wavelength, from $\\sim$53 K at 20 $\\mu$m to $\\sim$35 K at 500 $\\mu$m, and perhaps ever less at longer wavelengths. Considering a variety of diurnal and/or seasonal thermophysical models, we show that T$_B$ values of 35 K are lower than any expected temperature for the dayside surface or subsurface of Pluto and Charon, implying a low surface emissivity. Based on m...

  2. What would dense atmospheric observation networks bring to the quantification of city CO2 emissions?

    Wu, Lin; Broquet, Grégoire; Ciais, Philippe; Bellassen, Valentin; Vogel, Felix; Chevallier, Frédéric; Xueref-Remy, Irène; Wang, Yilong

    2016-06-01

    Cities currently covering only a very small portion ( market- or policy-based mitigation actions. Here we analyze the potential of a monitoring tool that could support the development of such procedures at the city scale. It is based on an atmospheric inversion method that exploits inventory data and continuous atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements from a network of stations within and around cities to estimate city CO2 emissions. This monitoring tool is configured for the quantification of the total and sectoral CO2 emissions in the Paris metropolitan area (˜ 12 million inhabitants and 11.4 TgC emitted in 2010) during the month of January 2011. Its performances are evaluated in terms of uncertainty reduction based on observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs). They are analyzed as a function of the number of sampling sites (measuring at 25 m a.g.l.) and as a function of the network design. The instruments presently used to measure CO2 concentrations at research stations are expensive (typically ˜ EUR 50 k per sensor), which has limited the few current pilot city networks to around 10 sites. Larger theoretical networks are studied here to assess the potential benefit of hypothetical operational lower-cost sensors. The setup of our inversion system is based on a number of diagnostics and assumptions from previous city-scale inversion experiences with real data. We find that, given our assumptions underlying the configuration of the OSSEs, with 10 stations only the uncertainty for the total city CO2 emission during 1 month is significantly reduced by the inversion by ˜ 42 %. It can be further reduced by extending the network, e.g., from 10 to 70 stations, which is promising for MRV applications in the Paris metropolitan area. With 70 stations, the uncertainties in the inverted emissions are reduced significantly over those obtained using 10 stations: by 32 % for commercial and residential buildings, by 33 % for road transport, by 18 % for the production

  3. Observations of the Prompt Gamma-Ray Emission of GRB 070125

    Bellm, Eric C; Pal'shin, Valentin; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Bandstra, Mark E; Boggs, Steven E; Hong, Soojing; Kodaka, Natsuki; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Mitrofanov, I G; Nakagawa, Yujin E; Ohno, Masanori; Onda, Kaori; Sanin, A B; Sugita, Satoshi; Tashiro, Makoto; Tretyakov, V I; Urata, Yuji; Wigger, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    The long, bright gamma-ray burst GRB 070125 was localized by the Interplanetary Network. We present light curves of the prompt gamma-ray emission as observed by Konus-WIND, RHESSI, Suzaku-WAM, and Swift-BAT. We detail the results of joint spectral fits with Konus and RHESSI data. The burst shows moderate hard-to-soft evolution in its multi-peaked emission over a period of about one minute. The total burst fluence as observed by Konus is $1.75 \\times 10^{-4}$ erg/cm$^2$ (20 keV-10 MeV). Using the spectroscopic redshift z = 1.547, we find that the burst is consistent with the Amati $E_{peak,i}-E_{iso}$ and the Ghirlanda $E_{peak,i}-E_\\gamma$ correlations.

  4. Synchrotron emission in GRBs observed by Fermi: Its limitations and the role of the photosphere

    Iyyani, S; Burgess, J M; Pe'er, A; egué, D B\\'

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that the prompt emission in gamma-ray bursts consists of several components giving rise to the observed spectral shape. Here we examine a sample of the 8 brightest, single pulsed {\\it Fermi} bursts whose spectra are modelled by using synchrotron emission as one of the components. Five of these bursts require an additional photospheric component (blackbody). In particular, we investigate the inferred properties of the jet and the physical requirements set by the observed components for these five bursts, in the context of a baryonic dominated outflow, motivated by the strong photospheric component. We find similar jet properties for all five bursts: the bulk Lorentz factor decreases monotonously over the pulses and lies between 1000 and 100. This evolution is robust and can neither be explained by a varying radiative efficiency nor a varying magnetisation of the jet assuming the photosphere radius is above the coasting radius. Such a behaviour challenges several dissipation mechanisms, e....

  5. An explanation for experimental observations of harmonic cyclotron emission induced by fast ions

    An explanation, supported by numerical simulations and analytical theory, is given for the harmonic cyclotron emission induced by fast ions in tokamak plasmas - particular, for the emission observed at low harmonics in deuterium-deuterium md deuterium-tritium experiments in the Joint European Tokamak. We show that the first proton harmonic is one of the highest spectral peaks whereas the first alpha is weak. We also compare the relative spectral amplitudes of different harmonics. Our results axe consistent with the experimental observations. The simulations verify that the instabilities are caused by a weak relativistic mass effect. Simulation that a nonuniform magnetic field leads to no appreciable change in the growth and saturation amplitude of the waves

  6. Estimates of surface methane emissions over Europe using observed surface concentrations and the FLEXPART trajectory model

    Weaver, C. J.; Kiemle, C.; Kawa, S. R.; Aalto, T.; Necki, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Arduini, J.; Apadula, F.; Berkhout, H.; Hatakka, J.; O'Doherty, S.

    2013-12-01

    We use surface methane observations from nine European ground stations, and the FLEXPART Lagrangian transport model to obtain surface methane emissions for 2010. Our inversion shows the strongest emissions from the Netherlands and the coal mines in Upper Silesia Poland. This is qualitatively consistent with the EDGAR surface flux inventory. We also report significant surface fluxes from wetlands in southern Finland during July and August and reduced wetland fluxes later in the year. Our simulated methane surface concentration captures at least half of the daily variability in the observations, suggesting that the transport model is correctly simulating the regional transport pathways over Europe. We also use our trajectory model to determine whether future space-based remote sensing instruments (MERLIN) will be able to detect both natural and anthropogenic changes in the surface flux strengths.

  7. observations of hot molecular gas emission from embedded low-mass protostars

    Visser, R.; Kristensen, L. E.; Bruderer, S.;

    2012-01-01

    the observations quantitatively, to investigate the origin of the emission, and to use the lines as probes of the various heating mechanisms. Methods. The model consists of a spherical envelope with a power-law density structure and a bipolar outflow cavity. Three heating mechanisms are considered: passive heating......Aims. Young stars interact vigorously with their surroundings, as evident from the highly rotationally excited CO (up to Eu/k = 4000 K) and H2O emission (up to 600 K) detected by the Herschel Space Observatory in embedded low-mass protostars. Our aim is to construct a model that reproduces...... by the protostellar luminosity, ultraviolet irradiation of the outflow cavity walls, and small-scale C-type shocks along the cavity walls. Most of the model parameters are constrained from independent observations; the two remaining free parameters considered here are the protostellar UV luminosity and the shock...

  8. Sensitivity of wetland methane emissions to model assumptions: application and model testing against site observations

    L. Meng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane emissions from natural wetlands and rice paddies constitute a large proportion of atmospheric methane, but the magnitude and year-to-year variation of these methane sources are still unpredictable. Here we describe and evaluate the integration of a methane biogeochemical model (CLM4Me; Riley et al., 2011 into the Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4CN in order to better explain spatial and temporal variations in methane emissions. We test new functions for soil pH and redox potential that impact microbial methane production in soils. We also constrain aerenchyma in plants in always-inundated areas in order to better represent wetland vegetation. Satellite inundated fraction is explicitly prescribed in the model, because there are large differences between simulated fractional inundation and satellite observations, and thus we do not use CLM4-simulated hydrology to predict inundated areas. A rice paddy module is also incorporated into the model, where the fraction of land used for rice production is explicitly prescribed. The model is evaluated at the site level with vegetation cover and water table prescribed from measurements. Explicit site level evaluations of simulated methane emissions are quite different than evaluating the grid-cell averaged emissions against available measurements. Using a baseline set of parameter values, our model-estimated average global wetland emissions for the period 1993–2004 were 256 Tg CH4 yr−1 (including the soil sink and rice paddy emissions in the year 2000 were 42 Tg CH4 yr−1. Tropical wetlands contributed 201 Tg CH4 yr−1, or 78% of the global wetland flux. Northern latitude (>50 N systems contributed 12 Tg CH4 yr−1. However, sensitivity studies show a large range (150–346 Tg CH4 yr−1 in predicted global methane emissions (excluding emissions from rice paddies. The large range is

  9. Simulated VLF-fields as a risk factor of thrombosis

    Jacobi, E.; Richter, O.; Krüskemper, Gertrud

    1981-06-01

    VLF (Very Low Frequencies)-fields are damped electromagnetic waves of atmospheric origin (sferics). Sferics were artificially produced within a steel-built chamber; blood was drawn and platelet adhesiveness, platelet cyclic AMP and coagulation factors were measured in human volunteers placed within the chamber. Following frequency of the impulses of 10 Hz and a field strength of 400 mV/m increased platelet adhesiveness and decreased platelet cyclic AMP. Medication of the anti-platelet drugs were not effective at all, but the pretreatment of dipyridamole 75 mg combined with acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg blocked the sferics induced increment in platelet adhesiveness. Psychologically labile volunteers exhibited more marked effects of sferics upon platelet adhesiveness. Simulation of stressors upon platelets showed the same effect. The increase in platelet adhesiveness induced by all kind of stressors is not a risk factor of thrombosis in itself. Only if the vessel walls are damaged, e.g. by atherosclerotic plaques, or if the blood flow is reduced, e.g. by heart failure, then the increased platelet adhesiveness will cause thrombosis.

  10. The European VLF/LF Radio Network: the current status

    Biagi, Pier Francesco; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Schiavulli, Luigi; Ligonzo, Teresa; Colella, Roberto; Ermini, Anita; Martinelli, Giovanni; Palangio, Paolo; Moldovan, Iren; Silva, Hugo; Contadakis, Michael; Frantzis, Xenophon; Katzis, Konstantinos; Buyuksarac, Aydin; D'Amico, Sebastiano

    2014-05-01

    Since 2009 a network of VLF (20-60 kHz) and LF (150-300 kHz) radio receivers has been put into operation in Europe in order to study earthquakes precursors. At the moment the network consists of eleven receivers four of which are located in Italy, two in Greece and one in Portugal, Romania, Malta, Cyprus and Turkey. The data (sampling rate of 1min) are downloaded automatically at the end of each day and they are stored in the server located at the Department of Physics of the University of Bari (Italy), that is the central node of the network. Still, in some case, problems of connection exist. The different trends are open and visible on the web site: http://beta.fisica.uniba.it/infrep/Hom.aspx. The data files can be downloaded by the same web site but they are protected by username and password. Among the different methods of data analysis the Wavelet spectra appear to be the most sensitive ones. The software able to apply this technique on the radio data automatically at the end of each day has been planned and realized. At the moment it operates on four signals collected by one of the Italian receivers; if an anomaly stands up and it is over a fixed threshold a warning advise appears. In the web site, this activity is protected by a specific username and password.

  11. Impact of emission controls on air quality in Beijing during APEC 2014: lidar ceilometer observations

    Tang, G; Zhu, X.; Hu, B.; Xin, J.; Wang, L.; Münkel, C.; G. Mao; Wang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of emission reductions during the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit provides a valuable opportunity to study air pollution in Beijing. From 15 October to 30 November 2014, the height of the atmospheric mixing layer and the vertical attenuated backscattering coefficient profiles were observed online using a~lidar ceilometer. Compared with fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and aeros...

  12. Dust emission mechanisms in the central Sahara: new insights from remote field observations

    Allen, C.; Washington, R.; Engelstaedter, S.

    2013-12-01

    North Africa is the world's largest source of mineral aerosol (dust). The Fennec Project, an international consortium led by the University of Oxford, is the first project to systematically instrument the remote central Sahara Desert. These observations have, among others, provided new insights into the atmospheric mechanisms of dust emission. Bordj Badji Mokhtar, in south-west Algeria, is within kilometres of the centre of the global mean summer dust maximum. The site, operated by Fennec partners ONM Algerie, has been heavily instrumented since summer 2011. During the Intensive Observation Period (IOP) in June 2011, four main emission mechanisms were observed and documented: cold pool outflows, low level jets (LLJs), monsoon surges and dry convective plumes. Establishing the relative importance of dust emission mechanisms has been a long-standing research goal. A detailed partitioning exercise of dust events during the IOP shows that 45% of the dust over BBM was generated by local emission in cold pool outflows, 14% by LLJs and only 2% by dry convective plumes. 27% of the dust was advected to the site rather than locally emitted and 12% of the dust was residual or ';background' dust. The work shows the primacy of cold pool outflows for dust emission in the region and also the important contribution of dust advection. In accordance with long-held ideas, the cube of wind speed is strongly correlated with dust emission. Surprisingly however, particles in long-range advection (>500km) were found to be larger than locally emitted dust. Although a clear LLJ wind structure is evident in the mean diurnal cycle during the IOP (12m/s peak winds at 935hPa between 04-05h), LLJs are only responsible for a relatively small amount of dust emission. There is significant daily variability in LLJ strength; the strongest winds are produced by a relatively small number of events. The position and strength of the Saharan Heat Low is strongly associated with the development (or

  13. The physical principles of the combined ELF/VLF method for single-station global location of lightning

    Mushtak, V.; Price, C.; Williams, E.

    Single -station electromagnetic methods for global lightning location are based on specific features of ELF wave propagation. First, ELF waves propagate with an extremely low attenuation not exceeding 1.5 dB/Mm up to 100 Hz. For this reason, the propagation has a resonant character (the Schumann resonance phenomena) imparting a unique pattern to the spectrum of a lightning waveform depending on the parent lightning's location relative to the given observer. The wave impedance technique realized by Kemp and Jones (1971) and widely adopted afterwards eliminates any need for the frequency dependence of the spectral density of the source's current moment for the location purpose. At the same time, an adequate single-mode propagation model can be applied for recovering this dependence and providing additional information about the source. As the only shortcoming of ELF location procedure, considerable error in estimates of the arrival directions of lightning waveforms was revealed by means of the satellite (OTD) identification of parent lightning events. These azimuthal deviations result in global location accuracies of 1-2 Mm (Boccippio et al, 1998) hardly acceptable in many geophysical problems. Price et al. (2002) found similar azimuthal errors in the ELF technique by means of the ground-truth (NLDN) identification of sprite-producing thunderstorms in Colorado when observing atmospherics in the Negev Desert, Israel. The location accuracy had been essentially improved - to better than 0.2 Mm on this 11 Mm path - by combining ELF distance estimates with VLF direction finding. Theoretical considerations show that this improvement is to be explained by a distinction between the ELF and VLF refraction effects at the day-night boundary of the Earth- ionosphere waveguide. While the difference between the day-time and night-time values of the phase velocity in the ELF range reaches 15%, it does not exceed 1% in the VLF range, with a corresponding diminishment of azimuthal

  14. The "APEC Blue" phenomenon: Regional emission control effects observed from space

    Huang, Kan; Zhang, Xingying; Lin, Yanfen

    2015-10-01

    Observations from space were used to evaluate the effect of emission control measures on the changes of air pollutants in Beijing and its surroundings during the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Summit held in Beijing. Compared to the past three years (2011-2013), NO2 tropospheric vertical column densities in 2014 were found to exhibit almost across-the-board significant reductions over the North China Plain, suggesting the effectiveness of the national policy on NOx emission reduction during China's 12th "Five-Year-Plan". During the APEC period (Nov. 3-11), AOD and AAOD were found reduced the most in Beijing, followed by Hebei province. Stringent emission control measures implemented in Beijing and the regional joint control over the surroundings especially in Hebei were responsible for the good air quality and so-called "APEC Blue". However, air quality plummeted during the post-APEC period (Nov. 12-30), which was largely related to the lifting of local and regional joint emission control measures. By applying a spatial correlation analysis method, the potential emission source regions impacting air quality of Beijing included widespread areas in Hebei, Shandong, Shanxi, and Tianjin in the past three years (2011-2013). While during the study period in 2014, areas impacting Beijing evidently shrank and were limited within Hebei, suggesting evident effects of intense emission perturbations on lowering the extent of regional transport. This study indicates short-term measures did fix the air pollution problems in China but a permanent solution is still a tremendous challenge.

  15. Topographic Effects on the Surface Emissivity of a Mountainous Area Observed by a Spaceborne Microwave Radiometer

    Frank S. Marzano

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A simulation study to understand the influence of topography on the surfaceemissivity observed by a satellite microwave radiometer is carried out. We analyze theeffects due to changes in observation angle, including the rotation of the polarization plane.A mountainous area in the Alps (Northern Italy is considered and the information on therelief extracted from a digital elevation model is exploited. The numerical simulation refersto a radiometric image, acquired by a conically-scanning radiometer similar to AMSR-E,i.e., flying at 705 km of altitude with an observation angle of 55°. To single out the impacton surface emissivity, scattering of the radiation due to the atmosphere or neighboringelevated surfaces is not considered. C and X bands, for which atmospheric effects arenegligible, and Ka band are analyzed. The results indicate that the changes in the localobservation angle tend to lower the apparent emissivity of a radiometric pixel with respectto the corresponding flat surface characteristics. The effect of the rotation of thepolarization plane enlarges (vertical polarization, or attenuates (horizontal polarizationthis decrease. By doing some simplifying assumptions for the radiometer antenna, theconclusion is that the microwave emissivity at vertical polarization is underestimated,whilst the opposite occurs for horizontal polarization, except for Ka band, for which bothunder- and overprediction may occur. A quantification of the differences with respect to aflat soil and an approximate evaluation of their impact on soil moisture retrieval areyielded.

  16. Herschel HIFI observations of O$_2$ toward Orion: special conditions for shock enhanced emission

    Chen, Jo-Hsin; Viti, Serena; Snell, Ronald; Lis, Dariusz C; Benz, Arnold; Bergin, Edwin; Black, John; Caselli, Paola; Encrenaz, Pierre; Falgarone, Edith; Goicoechea, Javier R; Hjalmarson, Ake; Hollenbach, David; Kaufman, Michael; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Pagani, Laurent; van der Tak, Floris; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Yildiz, Umut A

    2014-01-01

    We report observations of molecular oxygen (O$_2$) rotational transitions at 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz toward Orion Peak A. The O2 lines at 487 GHz and 774 GHz are detected at velocities of 10-12 km/s with line widths 3 km/s; however, the transition at 1121 GHz is not detected. The observed line characteristics, combined with the results of earlier observations, suggest that the region responsible for the O$_2$ emission is 9" (6e16 cm) in size, and is located close to the H2 Peak 1position (where vibrationally-excited H$_2$ emission peaks), and not at Peak A, 23" away. The peak O2 column density is 1.1e18/cm2. The line velocity is close to that of 621 GHz water maser emission found in this portion of the Orion Molecular Cloud, and having a shock with velocity vector lying nearly in the plane of the sky is consistent with producing maximum maser gain along the line-of-sight. The enhanced O$_2$ abundance compared to that generally found in dense interstellar clouds can be explained by passage of a low-velo...

  17. Groundbased Observations of Io [OI]6300 A Emission During the Galileo 124, 125, and Cassini Encounters

    Oliversen, R. J.; Morgenthaler, J. P.; Scherb, F.; Woodward, R. C.; Smyth, W. H.; Lupie, O. L.

    2003-01-01

    For the past 12 years, we have conducted a synoptic study of [OI] 6300 A emission from Io using the high-resolution (R 120,000) stellar spectrograph at the National Solar Observatory McMath-Pierce telescope. We showed in a recent paper that this emission allows us to use Io as a localized probe of the three-dimensional plasma torus structure. We report on selected recent spectroscopic observations of Io [OI] 6300 A emission obtained during the Galileo I24 (1999-Oct-11) and I25 (1999-Nov-26) encounters with Io and the Cassini Jupiter encounter (closest approach 2000-Dec-30). The exposure time for each spectrum was 15 minutes, with a 5.2 x 5.2 aperture centered on Io. We obtained over 100 spectra for the I24 encounter during 1999 October 9-13, over 100 spectra for the I25 encounter during 1999 November 24-30, and for the Cassini Jupiter flyby almost 600 spectra from 2000 December to 2001 January 21. We use our database of observations to track long- and short-term variations in torus structure. We compare our results to Galileo, Cassini, HST, and other groundbased contemporaneous observations to gain insight into torus variability and structure.

  18. Development of a L-band ocean emissivity electromagnetic model using observations from the Aquarius Radiometer

    Hejazin, Y.; Jones, W.; El-Nimri, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D ocean salinity measurement mission was launched into polar orbit during the summer of 2011. The prime sensor is an L-band radiometer/scatterometer developed jointly by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This paper deals with the development of an ocean emissivity model using AQ radiometer brightness temperature (Tb) observations. This model calculates the ocean surface emissivity as a function of ocean salinity, sea surface temperature, surface wind speed and direction. One unique aspect of this model is that it calculates ocean emissivity over wide ranges of Earth incidence angles (EIAs) from nadir to > 60°and ocean wind speeds from 0 m/s to > 70 m/s. This physical electromagnetic model with empirical coefficients follows the form of Stogryn [1967] that treats the ocean as a mixture of foam and clean rough water. The CFRSL ocean surface emissivity (ɛocean) is modeled as a linear sum of foam (ɛfoam) and foam-free seawater (ɛrough) emissivities, according to ɛocean = FF * ɛfoam + (1 - FF) * ɛrough (1) where FF is the fractional area coverage by foam. The foam emissivity is modeled as ɛfoam = Q(freq, U10, EIA) (2) where Q( ) is the empirical dependence of foam emissivity on radiometer frequency, the 10-m neutral stability wind speed and EIA according to El-Nimri [2010]. Following Stogryn, the foam-free seawater emissivity (ɛrough) is modeled ɛrough = ɛsmooth +Δɛexcess (3) where ɛsmooth = (1 - Γ) is the smooth surface emissivity, Γ is the Fresnel power reflection coefficient, and Δɛexcess is the wind-induced excess emissivity, given by Δɛexcess = G(freq, U10, WDir, EIA) (4) Where G( ) is the empirical signature of foam-free rough ocean, which depends upon the surface wind speed and wind direction. This function is determined empirically from measured AQ radiometer Tb's associated with surface wind vector from collocated NOAA GDAS numerical weather model. Ocean emissivity calculations are compared

  19. Observation of enhanced field emission properties of Au/TiO2 nanocomposite

    Patil, Girish P.; Bagal, Vivekanand S.; Suryawanshi, Sachin R.; Late, Dattatray J.; More, Mahendra A.; Chavan, Padmakar G.

    2016-05-01

    Simple and low-cost method of thermal annealing was used to decorate Gold (Au) nanoparticles on aligned TiO2 nanotubes. The aligned TiO2 nanotubes were decorated by Au nanoparticles with an average diameter of 9, 18 and 28 nm (aligned TiO2 nanotubes referred as specimen A and TiO2 nanotubes decorated by Au nanoparticles with average diameter of 9, 18 and 28 nm are referred as specimen B, C and D, respectively). The detailed characterization such as structural, morphological and elemental analysis of TiO2 and Au/TiO2 nanocomposite have been carried out using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, the meticulous comparative field emission characteristics of the aligned TiO2 nanotubes and Au/TiO2 nanocomposite have been performed. The turn-on field defined for the current density of 10 μA/cm2 has been found to be 3.9, 2.8, 3.2 and 3.7 V/μm for specimen A, B, C and D, respectively. The observed low turn-on field of specimen B has been found to be superior than the other semiconducting nanocomposites reported in the literature. The emission current stability over a period of 3 h is found to be better for all the specimens. To the best of our knowledge, a systematic field emission study of Au/TiO2 nanocomposite has not been explored. The observed superior field emission study of Au/TiO2 nanocomposite indicates their possible use in micro/nanoelectronic devices.

  20. First Observation of Planet-Induced X-ray Emission: The System HD 179949

    Saar, S. H.; Cuntz, M.; Kashyap, V. L.; Hall, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first observation of planet-induced stellar X-ray activity, identified for the HD 179949 system, using Chandra / ACIS-S. The HD 179949 system consists of a close-in giant planet orbiting an F9V star. Previous ground-based observations already showed enhancements in Ca II K in phase with the planetary orbit. We find an ~30% increase in the X-ray flux over quiescent levels coincident with the phase of the Ca II enhancements. There is also a trend for the emission to be hotter at ...

  1. The benefits of China's efforts on gaseous pollutant control indicated by the bottom-up emissions and satellite observation

    Xia, Y.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of national policies of air pollution control, the emissions of SO2, NOX, CO and CO2 in China are estimated with a bottom-up method from 2000 to 2014, and vertical column densities (VCD) from satellite observation are used to evaluate the inter-annual trends and spatial distribution of emissions and the temporal and spatial patterns of ambient levels of gaseous pollutants across the country. In particular, an additional emission case named STD case, which combines the most recent issued emission standards for specific industrial sources, is developed for 2012-2014. The inter-annual trends in emissions and VCDs match well except for SO2, and the revised emissions in STD case improve the comparison, implying the benefits of emission control for most recent years. Satellite retrieval error, underestimation of emission reduction and improved atmospheric oxidization caused the differences between emissions and VCDs trend of SO2. Coal-fired power plants play key roles in SO2 and NOX emission reduction. As suggested by VCD and emission inventory, the control of CO in 11th five year plan (FYP) period was more effective than that in the 12th FYP period, while the SO2 appeared opposite. As the new control target added in 12th FYP, NOX emissions have been clearly decreased 4.3 Mt from 2011 to 2014, in contrast to the fast growth before 2011. The inter-annual trends in NO2 VCDs has the poorest correlation with vehicle ownership (R=0.796), due to the staged emission standard of vehicles. In developed regions, transportation has become the main pollutants emission source and we prove this by comparing VCDs of NO2 to VCDs of SO2. Moreover, air quality in mega cities has been evaluated based on satellite observation and emissions, and results indicate that Beijing suffered heavily from the emissions from Hebei and Tianjin, while the local emissions tend to dominate in Shanghai.

  2. FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GRB 090217A

    The Fermi observatory is advancing our knowledge of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) through pioneering observations at high energies, covering more than seven decades in energy with the two on-board detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Here, we report on the observation of the long GRB 090217A which triggered the GBM and has been detected by the LAT with a significance greater than 9σ. We present the GBM and LAT observations and on-ground analyses, including the time-resolved spectra and the study of the temporal profile from 8 keV up to ∼1 GeV. All spectra are well reproduced by a Band model. We compare these observations to the first two LAT-detected, long bursts GRB 080825C and GRB 080916C. These bursts were found to have time-dependent spectra and exhibited a delayed onset of the high-energy emission, which are not observed in the case of GRB 090217A. We discuss some theoretical implications for the high-energy emission of GRBs.

  3. Fluorescent H_2 Emission Lines from the Reflection Nebula NGC 7023 Observed with IGRINS

    Le, Huynh Anh N; Kaplan, Kyle F; Mace, Gregory N; Lee, Sungho; Pavel, Michael D; Jeong, Ueejeong; Oh, Heeyoung; Lee, Hye-In; Chun, Moo-Young; Yuk, In-Soo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Hwang, Narae; Kim, Kang-Min; Park, Chan; Oh, Jae Sok; Yu, Young S; Park, Byeong-Gon; Minh, Young Chol; Jaffe, Daniel T

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed the temperature, velocity and density of H_2 gas in NGC 7023 with a high-resolution near-infrared spectrum of the northwestern filament of the reflection nebula. By observing NGC 7023 in the H and K bands at R ~ 45,000 with the Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrograph (IGRINS), we detected 70 H_2 emission lines within the 1" x 15" slit. The diagnostic ratios of 2-1 S(1)/1-0 S(1) are 0.39-0.54. In addition, the estimated ortho-to-para ratios (OPR) are 1.57-1.62, indicating that the H_2 transitions in the observed regions are mostly from UV fluorescence. Gradients in the temperature, velocity, and OPR of the observed areas imply motion of the photodissociation region (PDR) relative to the molecular cloud. In addition, we derive the column density of H_2 from the observed emission lines and compare these results with PDR models in the literature covering a range of densities and incident UV field intensities. The notable difference between PDR model predictions and the observed data, in high rota...

  4. A climatology of dust emission events from northern Africa using long-term surface observations

    Cowie, S. M.; Knippertz, P.; Marsham, J. H.

    2014-08-01

    Long-term (1984-2012) surface observations from 70 stations in the Sahara and Sahel are used to explore the diurnal, seasonal and geographical variations in dust emission events and thresholds. The frequency of dust emission (FDE) is calculated using the present weather codes of SYNOP reports. Thresholds are estimated as the wind speed for which there is a 50% probability of dust emission and are then used to calculate strong wind frequency (SWF) and dust uplift potential (DUP), where the latter is an estimate of the dust-generating power of winds. Stations are grouped into six coherent geographical areas for more in-depth analysis. FDE is highest at stations in Sudan and overall peaks in spring north of 23° N. South of this, where stations are directly influenced by the summer monsoon, the annual cycle in FDE is more variable. Thresholds are highest in northern Algeria, lowest in the latitude band 16-21° N and have greatest seasonal variations in the Sahel. Spatial variability in thresholds partly explain spatial variability in frequency of dust emission events on an annual basis. However, seasonal variations in thresholds for the six grouped areas are not the main control on seasonal variations in FDE. This is demonstrated by highly correlated seasonal cycles of FDE and SWF which are not significantly changed by using a fixed, or seasonally varying, threshold. The likely meteorological mechanisms generating these patterns such as low-level jets and haboobs are discussed.

  5. Electromagnetic emissions and fine structures observed near main ionospheric trough during geomagnetic storms and their interactions

    Przepiórka, Dorota; Marek, Michał; Matyjasiak, Barbara; Rothkaehl, Hanna

    2016-04-01

    Geomagnetic conditions triggered by the solar activity affect the ionosphere, its fine and global structures. Very intense magnetic storms substantially change the plasma density, concentration and circulation. Especially sensitive region is located near auroral oval, where most energy is deposited during geomagnetic storms. In this region and just below it, where the main ionospheric trough is located, we observe enhanced electromagnetic emissions in different frequency ranges. In particular the AKR-like (Auroral Kilometric Radiation) emissions are seen at frequencies of the order of hundreds of kHz in the ionosphere, just below the auroral oval. Analyzing spectrograms from DEMETER mission and comparing them with electron density measurements from DEMETER, we found that AKR-like emissions are seen near poleward wall of the main ionospheric trough, during geomagnetic storms. Main ionospheric trough is known as a turbulent region which properties change as the geomagnetic storm evolves. This work is an attempt to determine how the presence of the different emissions affect main ionospheric trough parameters such as location, width and depth. Data used in this study come from DEMETER and RELEC missions. This work was partly supported by NCN grant Rezonans 2012/07/B/ST9/04414.

  6. Using Swift observations of prompt and afterglow emission to classify GRBs

    O'Brien, P T

    2007-01-01

    We present an analysis of early BAT and XRT data for 107 gamma--ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Swift satellite. We use these data to examine the behaviour of the X-ray light curve and propose a classification scheme for GRBs based on this behaviour. As found for previous smaller samples, the earliest X-ray light curve can be well described by an exponential which relaxes into a power law, often with flares superimposed. The later emission is well fit using a similar functional form and we find that these two functions provide a good description of the entire X-ray light curve. For the prompt emission, the transition time between the exponential and the power law gives a well-defined timescale, T_p, for the burst duration. We use T_p, the spectral index of the prompt emission, beta_p, and the prompt power law decay index, alpha_p to define four classes of burst: short, slow, fast and soft. Bursts with slowly declining emission have spectral and temporal properties similar to the short bursts despite having ...

  7. Survey observations of emission-line stars in the Orion region

    Survey observations were conducted for H alpha-emission stars in the Orion region using the Kiso Schmidt telescope and partly the CTIO Curtis Schmidt telescope. In the area of about 25 square degrees, a total of 236 H alpha-emission objects, mostly supposed to be T Tau type stars, have been detected among which 155 are new ones including 6 non-stellar objects. Celestial coordinates and V-magnitude are measured for the detected objects. Eye estimation of the H alpha-emission intensity is also made at three epochs in a time span of about two years, where notable variation of H alpha intensity was found in 68 out of 236 objects. Besides a remarkable concentration along the northern dark cloud complex, a loose concentration is noticed near the Orion Belt region, fairly well coinciding with the distribution of the Orion OBIb association members. A comparison with the Av-map is also made to see the relationship between the distribution of emission-line objects and that of interstellar dust

  8. Observations and numerical studies of gamma-ray emission in colliding-wind binaries

    Massive stars in binary systems have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy gamma rays. The emission is thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide, thereby producing accelerated particles which subsequently emit gamma rays.This scenario is supported by observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope presented in this thesis. To address the underlying emission mechanisms in a quantitative way, numerical simulations that incorporate hydrodynamics, the acceleration of charged particles as well as the subsequent gamma-ray emission were found to be needed.This thesis presents the analysis of a high-energy gamma-ray source and its identification with the particle-accelerating colliding-wind binary system Eta Carinae. In order to go beyond the present understanding of such objects, this work provides detailed description of a new 3D-hydrodynamical model, which incorporates the line-driven acceleration of the winds, gravity, orbital motion and the radiative cooling of the shocked plasma, as well as the diffusive shock acceleration of charged particles in the wind collision region. In a subsequent step we simulate and study the resulting gamma-ray emission via relativistic bremsstrahlung, anisotropic inverse Compton radiation and neutral pion decay. (author)

  9. Modeling infrared thermal emissions on Mars during dust storm of MY28: PFS/MEX observation

    Haider, Syed A.; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Giuranna, Marco; Kuroda, Takeshi; Jethwa, Masoom P.

    2016-07-01

    We have analysed thermal emission spectra obtained from Planetary Fourier Spectrometer (PFS) onboard Mars Express (MEX) for Martian Year (MY) 28 in presence and absence of dust storm at low latitude. A radiative transfer model for dusty atmosphere of Mars is developed to estimate the thermal emission spectra at latitude range 0-10oS, 10-20oS and 20-30oS. These calculations are made at Ls=240o, 280o, 300o, and 320o between wave numbers 250-1400 cm-1. We have also retrieved brightness temperatures from thermal emission spectra by inverting the Planck function. The model reproduces the observed features at wave numbers 600-750 cm-1 and 900-1200 cm-1 due to absorptions by CO2 and dust respectively. In presence of dust storm thermal emission spectra and brightness temperature are reduced by a factor of ~ 2 between wave numbers 900-1200 cm-1. The altitude profiles of dust concentration are also estimated for different aerosol particles of sizes 0.2 to 3 micron. The best fit to the PFS measurements is obtained in presence of aerosol particle of size 0.2 micron.

  10. Results of VLF campaigns in Summer, Winter and during Solar Eclipse in Indian Subcontinent and Beyond

    VLF propagation effects are generally understood in terms of the earth-ionosphere waveguide. However, details of the theory are still incomplete. Particularly important are the newly emerging fields of VLF Astronomy where the ionosphere is treated as a giant detector for extraterrestrial energetic phenomena and the subject of lithosphere-ionosphere coupling where the the disturbances of this giant detector is influenced by terrestrial events, especially earthquakes and other seismic activities. We review the activities of our group in these fields. In particular, we concentrate on the results of the VLF campaigns we conducted using over a dozen receiving stations in Summer, in Winter and during the Total Solar eclipse in July, 2009. We also discuss briefly the results we obtained in Antarctica and their implications.

  11. Gamma-ray emission in dissipative pulsar magnetospheres: from theory to Fermi observations

    We compute the patterns of γ-ray emission due to curvature radiation in dissipative pulsar magnetospheres. Our ultimate goal is to construct macrophysical models that are able to reproduce the observed γ-ray light curve phenomenology recently published in the Second Fermi Pulsar Catalog. We apply specific forms of Ohm's law on the open field lines using a broad range for the macroscopic conductivity values that result in solutions ranging, from near-vacuum to near-force-free. Using these solutions, we generate model γ-ray light curves by calculating realistic trajectories and Lorentz factors of radiating particles under the influence of both the accelerating electric fields and curvature radiation reaction. We further constrain our models using the observed dependence of the phase lags between the radio and γ-ray emission on the γ-ray peak separation. We perform a statistical comparison of our model radio-lag versus peak-separation diagram and the one obtained for the Fermi standard pulsars. We find that for models of uniform conductivity over the entire open magnetic field line region, agreement with observations favors higher values of this parameter. We find, however, significant improvement in fitting the data with models that employ a hybrid form of conductivity, specifically, infinite conductivity interior to the light cylinder and high but finite conductivity on the outside. In these models the γ-ray emission is produced in regions near the equatorial current sheet but modulated by the local physical properties. These models have radio lags near the observed values and statistically best reproduce the observed light curve phenomenology. Additionally, they also produce GeV photon cut-off energies.

  12. Emission ratios of anthropogenic volatile organic compounds in northern mid-latitude megacities: Observations versus emission inventories in Los Angeles and Paris

    Borbon, Agnes; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Grand, N.; Chevaillier, S.; Colomb, A.; Dolgorouky, C.; Gros, V.; Lopez, M.; Sarda-Esteve, R.; Holloway, J.; Stutz, J.; Petetin, H.; McKeen, S.; Beekmann, M.; Warneke, C.; Parrish, D. D.; Gouw, J. A.

    2013-02-01

    Ground-based and airborne volatile organic compound (VOC) measurements in Los Angeles, California, and Paris, France, during the Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) and Megacities: Emissions, Urban, Regional and Global Atmospheric Pollution and Climate Effects, and Integrated Tools for Assessment and Mitigation (MEGAPOLI) campaigns, respectively, are used to examine the spatial variability of the composition of anthropogenic VOC urban emissions and to evaluate regional emission inventories. Two independent methods that take into account the effect of chemistry were used to determine the emission ratios of anthropogenic VOCs (including anthropogenic isoprene and oxygenated VOCs) over carbon monoxide (CO) and acetylene. Emission ratios from both methods agree within ±20%, showing the reliability of our approach. Emission ratios for alkenes, alkanes, and benzene are fairly similar between Los Angeles and Paris, whereas the emission ratios for C7-C9 aromatics in Paris are higher than in Los Angeles and other French and European Union urban areas by a factor of 2-3. The results suggest that the emissions of gasoline-powered vehicles still dominate the hydrocarbon distribution in northern mid-latitude urban areas, which disagrees with emission inventories. However, regional characteristics like the gasoline composition could affect the composition of hydrocarbon emissions. The observed emission ratios show large discrepancies by a factor of 2-4 (alkanes and oxygenated VOC) with the ones derived from four reference emission databases. A bias in CO emissions was also evident for both megacities. Nevertheless, the difference between measurements and inventory in terms of the overall OH reactivity is, in general, lower than 40%, and the potential to form secondary organic aerosols (SOA) agrees within 30% when considering volatile organic emissions as the main SOA precursors.

  13. DEMETER observations of bursty MF emissions and their relation to ground-level auroral MF burst

    Broughton, M. C.; LaBelle, J.; Parrot, M.

    2014-12-01

    A survey of medium frequency (MF) electric field data from selected orbits of the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquakes (DEMETER) spacecraft reveals 68 examples of a new type of bursty MF emissions occurring at high latitudes associated with auroral phenomena. These resemble auroral MF burst, a natural radio emission observed at ground level near local substorm onsets. Similar to MF burst, the bursty MF waves observed by DEMETER have broadband, impulsive frequency structure covering 1.5-3.0 MHz, amplitudes of 50-100 μV/m, an overall occurrence rate of ˜0.76% with higher occurrence during active times, and strong correlation with auroral hiss. The magnetic local time distribution of the MF waves observed by DEMETER shows peak occurrence rate near 18 MLT, somewhat earlier than the equivalent peak in the occurrence rate of ground level MF burst, though propagation effects and differences in the latitudes sampled by the two techniques may explain this discrepancy. Analysis of solar wind and SuperMAG data suggests that while the bursty MF waves observed by DEMETER are associated with enhanced auroral activity, their coincidence with substorm onset may not be as exact as that of ground level MF burst. One conjunction occurs in which MF burst is observed at Churchill, Manitoba, within 8 min of MF emissions detected by DEMETER on field lines approximately 1000 km southeast of Churchill. These observations may plausibly be associated with the same auroral event detected by ground level magnetometers at several Canadian observatories. Although it is uncertain, the balance of the evidence suggests that the bursty MF waves observed with DEMETER are the same phenomenon as the ground level MF burst. Hence, theories of MF burst generation in the ionosphere, such as beam-generated Langmuir waves excited over a range of altitudes or strong Langmuir turbulence generating a range of frequencies within a narrow altitude range, need to be revisited to

  14. Evolution of magnetotelluric, total magnetic field, and VLF field parameters in Central Italy: relations to local seismic activity

    T. Ernst

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetotelluric data were collected at Collemeluccio (41.72°N, 14.37°E in Central Italy from summer 1991 to spring 1998. Analyzed by means of tensor decomposition on the geoelectric potential and robust estimation on the geomagnetic field, this set of data allowed the investigation of the electric properties at different time-periods. The variation of some indicators, related to the phenomenon of electromagnetic induction, is presented here in its time evolution and compared to local and regional seismic activity. Tectonomagnetic field observations from absolute magnetic field level in Central Italy were also made on data simultaneously recorded at four magnetometer stations, using L'Aquila Geomagnetic Observatory as a reference for differentiation. Recent results gathered from a system of two VLF search coil wide-band antennas, installed in the L'Aquila Observatory, are also discussed in relation to local seismic activity.

  15. Study of the NWC electrons belt observed on DEMETER Satellite

    Li, Xinqiao; Wang, Ping; Wang, Huanyu; Lu, Hong; Zhang, Xuemin; Huang, Jianping; Shi, Feng; Yu, Xiaoxia; Xu, Yanbing; Meng, Xiangcheng; Wang, Hui; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Parrot, M

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the data from 2007 to 2008, which is observed by IDP onboard DEMETER satellite, during ten months of NWC working and seven months of NWC shutdown. The characteristic of the space instantaneous electron belts, which come from the influence of the VLF transmitted by NWC, is studied comprehensively. The main distribution region of the NWC electron belts and the flux change are given. We also studied the distribution characteristic of the average energy spectrum in different magnetic shell at the height of DEMETER orbit and the difference of the average energy spectrum of the electrons in the drift loss-cone between day and night. As a result, the powerful power of NWC transmitter and the 19.8 kHz narrow bandwidth VLF emission not only created a momentary electrons enhancement region, which strides 180 degree in them longitude direction and from 1.6 to 1.9 in L value, with the rise of the electrons flux reaching to 3 orders of magnitude mostly, but also induced the enhancement or loss of electrons in ...

  16. The zonal structure of tropical O3 and CO as observed by the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer in November 2004 – Part 1: Inverse modeling of CO emissions

    D. B. A. Jones; K. W. Bowman; Logan, J. A.; Heald, C. L.; Liu, J; Luo, M.; Worden, J.; Drummond, J.

    2009-01-01

    We conduct an inverse modeling analysis of measurements of atmospheric CO from the TES and MOPITT satellite instruments using the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model to quantify emissions of CO in the tropics in November 2004. We also assess the consistency of the information provided by TES and MOPITT on surface emissions of CO. We focus on the tropics in November 2004, during the biomass burning season, because TES observations of CO and O3 and MOPITT observations of...

  17. HST WFC3 Early Release Science: Emission-Line Galaxies from IR Grism Observations

    Straughn, A N; Kuemmel, M; Walsh, J R; Cohen, S H; Gardner, J P; Windhorst, R A; O'Connell, R W; Pirzkal, N; Meurer, G; McCarthy, P J; Hathi, N P; Malhotra, S; Rhoads, J; Balick, B; Bond, H E; Calzetti, D; Disney, M J; Dopita, M A; Frogel, J A; Hall, D N B; Holtzman, J A; Kimble, R A; Luppino, G; Paresce, F; Saha, A; Silk, J I; Trauger, J T; Walker, A R; Whitmore, B C; Young, E T

    2010-01-01

    We present grism spectra of emission--line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6--1.6 microns from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L (0.6--0.95 micron) grism data in GOODS--South, extending the wavelength covereage well past the G800L red cutoff. The ERS grism field was observed at a depth of 2 orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which are presented here. ELGs are studied via the \\Ha, \\OIII, and \\OII\\ emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2$\\cle$z$\\cle$1.6, 1.2$\\cle$z$\\cle$2.4 and 2.0$\\cle$z$\\cle$3.6 respectively in the G102 (0.8--1.1 microns; R$\\sim$210) and G141 (1.1--1.6 microns; R$\\sim$130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., \\SII\\ and \\SIII\\ lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star--formation rates, and grism s...

  18. Observation of phase transitions in hydrogenated Yttrium films via normalized infrared emissivity

    Hattrick-Simpers, Jason R., E-mail: jhsimper@nist.go [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Wang Ke [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Cao Lei [Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Chiu Chun [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Heilweil, Edwin [Physics Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Downing, Robert Gregory [Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Bendersky, Leonid A. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2010-02-04

    The direct observation of a sequence of phase transitions during hydrogenation of Y thin films has been realized through the use of in situ isothermal infrared emissivity measurements. The formation of different phases, alpha-Y(H), YH{sub 2} and YH{sub 3}, has been identified based on the observation of changes in the slope of the normalized IR emissivity vs. time curve during hydrogen loading. The presence of alpha-Y(H), YH{sub 2} and YH{sub 3} was confirmed by ex situ X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and prompt gamma activation analysis. Transmission electron microscopy further demonstrated epitaxial orientation relationships between the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate, Ti buffer layer, the as-deposited Y film, as well as its hydrides. These results clearly demonstrate the power of IR emissivity imaging to monitor, in real time, the formation of hydride phases of both metallic and insulating character near the surface of a thin-film sample.

  19. Observational study of generation conditions of substorm-associated low-frequency AKR emissions

    A. Olsson

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available It has lately been shown that low-frequency bursts of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR are nearly exclusively associated with substorm expansion phases. Here we study low-frequency AKR using Polar PWI and Interball POLRAD instruments to constrain its possible generation mechanisms. We find that there are more low-frequency AKR emission events during wintertime and equinoxes than during summertime. The dot-AKR emission radial distance range coincides well with the region where the deepest density cavities are seen statistically during Kp>2. We suggest that the dot-AKR emissions originate in the deepest density cavities during substorm onsets. The mechanism for generating dot-AKR is possibly strong Alfvén waves entering the cavity from the magnetosphere and changing their character to more inertial, which causes the Alfvén wave associated parallel electric field to increase. This field may locally accelerate electrons inside the cavity enough to produce low-frequency AKR emission. We use Interball IESP low-frequency wave data to verify that in about half of the cases the dot-AKR is accompanied by low-frequency wave activity containing a magnetic component, i.e. probably inertial Alfvén waves. Because of the observational geometry, this result is consistent with the idea that inertial Alfvén waves might always be present in the source region when dot-AKR is generated. The paper illustrates once more the importance of radio emissions as a powerful remote diagnostic tool of auroral processes, which is not only relevant for the Earth's magnetosphere but may be relevant in the future in studying extrasolar planets.

  20. HF beam parameters in ELF/VLF wave generation via modulated heating of the ionosphere

    İnan, Umran Savaş; Cohen, M. B. ; Golkowski, M. ; Lehtinen, N. G. ; McCarrick, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    ELF/VLF (0.3–30 kHz) wave generation is achievable via modulated HF (3–30 MHz) heating of the lower ionosphere in the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet. Using the 3.6 MW High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility near Gakona, AK, we investigate the effect of HF frequency and beam size on the generated ELF/VLF amplitudes, as a function of modulation frequency, and find that generation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide generally decr...

  1. Extended lateral heating of the nighttime ionosphere by ground-based VLF transmitters

    İnan, Umran Savaş; Graf, K. L.; Spasojevic, M.; Marshall, R. A.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Foust, F. R.

    2013-01-01

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SPACE PHYSICS, VOL. 118, 7783–7797, doi:10.1002/2013JA019337, 2013 Extended lateral heating of the nighttime ionosphere by ground-based VLF transmitters K. L. Graf,1 M. Spasojevic,1 R. A. Marshall,2 N. G. Lehtinen,1 F. R. Foust,1 and U. S. Inan1,3 Received 16 August 2013; revised 9 October 2013; accepted 11 November 2013; published 3 December 2013. [1] The effects of ground-based very low frequency (VLF) transmitters on the lower ionospher...

  2. VLF/LF Radio Sounding of Ionospheric Perturbations Associated with Earthquakes

    Masashi Hayakawa

    2007-01-01

    It is recently recognized that the ionosphere is very sensitive to seismic effects, and the detection of ionospheric perturbations associated with earthquakes, seems to be very promising for short-term earthquake prediction. We have proposed a possible use of VLF/LF (very low frequency (3-30 kHz) /low frequency (30-300 kHz)) radio sounding of the seismo-ionospheric perturbations. A brief history of the use of subionospheric VLF/LF propagation for the short-term earthquake prediction is given,...

  3. Search for extended gamma ray emission in Markarian 421 using VERITAS observations

    ,

    2014-01-01

    Very high energy (VHE: >100 GeV) gamma rays coming from AGN can pair-produce on the intergalactic background light generating an electromagnetic cascade. If the Intergalactic Magnetic Field (IGMF) is sufficiently strong, this cascade may result in an extended isotropic emission of photons around the source, or halo. Using VERITAS observations of the blazar Markarian 421, we search for extended emission by comparing the source angular distribution (${\\theta}^2$) from a quiescent period with one coming from a flare period, which can be considered as halo-free. ${\\chi}^2$ test showed no significant statistical differences between the samples, suggesting that the effect is either non-existent or too weak to be detected. We calculated upper limits for the extended flux considering different angle ranges, the most stringent being <8% of the Crab Nebulae flux (C.U), in the range $0\\deg \\leq {\\theta} \\leq 0.1\\deg$ .

  4. Energetic Neutral Atom Emissions From Venus: VEX Observations and Theoretical Modeling

    Fok, M.-C.; Galli, A.; Tanaka, T.; Moore, T. E.; Wurz, P.; Holmstrom, M.

    2007-01-01

    Venus has almost no intrinsic magnetic field to shield itself from its surrounding environment. The solar wind thus directly interacts with the planetary ionosphere and atmosphere. One of the by-products of this close encounter is the production of energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions. Theoretical studies have shown that significant amount of ENAs are emanated from the planet. The launch of the Venus Express (VEX) in 2005 provided the first light ever of the Venus ENA emissions. The observed ENA flux level and structure are in pretty good agreement with the theoretical studies. In this paper, we present VEX ENA data and the comparison with numerical simulations. We seek to understand the solar wind interaction with the planet and the impacts on its atmospheres.

  5. In situ Observation of Dark Current Emission in a High Gradient RF Photocathode Gun

    Shao, Jiahang; Baryshev, Sergey V; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Gai, Wei; Ha, Gwanghui; Jing, Chunguang; Shi, Jiaru; Wang, Faya; Wisniewski, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Undesirable electron field emission (a.k.a. dark current) in high gradient RF photocathode guns deteriorates the quality of photoemission current and limits the operational gradient. To improve the understanding of dark current emission, a high-resolution (~100 um) dark current imaging experiment has been performed in an L-band photocathode gun operating at ~100 MV/m of surface gradient. Dark current from the cathode has been observed to be dominated by several separated strong emitters. The field enhancement factor, beta, of selected regions on the cathode has been measured. The post scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and white light interferometer (WLI) surface examinations reveal the origins of ~75% strong emitters overlap with the spots where rf breakdown have occurred.

  6. In-situ stressing of rock: Observation of infrared emission prior to failure

    Dahlgren, R.; Freund, F. T.; Momayez, M.; Bleier, T. E.; Dunson, C.; Joggerst, P.; Jones, K.; Wang, S.

    2009-12-01

    non-thermal IR emission is observed within minutes of the rock failure.

  7. Sensitivity of wetland methane emissions to model assumptions: application and model testing against site observations

    L. Meng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Methane emissions from natural wetlands and rice paddies constitute a large proportion of atmospheric methane, but the magnitude and year-to-year variation of these methane sources is still unpredictable. Here we describe and evaluate the integration of a methane biogeochemical model (CLM4Me; Riley et al., 2011 into the Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4CN in order to better explain spatial and temporal variations in methane emissions. We test new functions for soil pH and redox potential that impact microbial methane production in soils. We also constrain aerenchyma in plants in always-inundated areas in order to better represent wetland vegetation. Satellite inundated fraction is explicitly prescribed in the model because there are large differences between simulated fractional inundation and satellite observations. A rice paddy module is also incorporated into the model, where the fraction of land used for rice production is explicitly prescribed. The model is evaluated at the site level with vegetation cover and water table prescribed from measurements. Explicit site level evaluations of simulated methane emissions are quite different than evaluating the grid cell averaged emissions against available measurements. Using a baseline set of parameter values, our model-estimated average global wetland emissions for the period 1993–2004 were 256 Tg CH4 yr−1, and rice paddy emissions in the year 2000 were 42 Tg CH4 yr−1. Tropical wetlands contributed 201 Tg CH4 yr−1, or 78 % of the global wetland flux. Northern latitude (>50 N systems contributed 12 Tg CH4 yr−1. We expect this latter number may be an underestimate due to the low high-latitude inundated area captured by satellites and unrealistically low high-latitude productivity and soil carbon predicted by CLM4. Sensitivity analysis showed a large range (150–346 Tg CH4 yr−1 in

  8. Isoprene emissions in Africa inferred from OMI observations of formaldehyde columns

    E. A. Marais

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We use 2005–2009 satellite observations of formaldehyde (HCHO columns from OMI to infer biogenic isoprene emissions at monthly 1 × 1° resolution over the African continent. Our work includes new approaches to remove biomass burning influences using OMI absorbing aerosol optical depth data (to account for transport of fire plumes and anthropogenic influences using AATSR satellite data for persistent small-flame fires (gas flaring. The resulting biogenic HCHO columns (ΩHCHO follow closely the distribution of vegetation patterns in Africa. We infer isoprene emission (EISOP from the local sensitivity S=ΔΩHCHOEISOP derived with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model using two alternate isoprene oxidation mechanisms, and verify the validity of this approach using AMMA aircraft observations over West Africa and a longitudinal transect across central Africa. Displacement error (smearing is diagnosed by anomalously high values of S and the corresponding data are removed. We find significant sensitivity of S to NOx under low-NOx conditions that we fit to a linear function of tropospheric column NO2 from OMI. We estimate a 40% error in our inferred isoprene emissions under high-NOx conditions and 40–90% under low-NOx conditions. Comparison to the state-of-science MEGAN inventory indicates a large overestimate of central African rainforest emissions in that inventory.

  9. Atmospheric methane observed from space over the Asian monsoon: implications for emission from Asian rice paddies

    Hayashida, S.; Yoshizaki, S.; Frankenberg, C.; Yan, X.

    2010-12-01

    More than 40% of anthropogenic emissions of methane, the second most important greenhouse gas, is estimated to be from agricultural sources, including rice cultivation. Unfortunately, the strength of individual sources of methane remains uncertain, despite the importance of its effect in global warming. Here we focus on the Asian monsoon region to improve our understanding of methane emission from rice paddy fields. This region contains about 90% of the world’s rice fields. We analyze the temporal and spatial distribution of atmospheric methane concentrations observed from space and compare it with ground-based measurements and bottom-up emission inventory data coupled with rice field maps. Recently, Frankenberg et al. [2008] derived an updated version of methane concentration from the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY: SCIA hereafter) instrument onboard ENVISAT. This showed a clear signature of methane enhancement over the Asian monsoon. As SCIA retrievals include all involve column densities, we carefully examined potential biases and variability due to the gradient of methane concentration over source regions by comparing these data with ground-based measurements at 53 stations of the WDCGG network. After evaluating the bias and variability of methane concentration over the source regions, we examined selected areas where rice paddies were highly concentrated, and the methane emission inventories were estimated to be large. The sampled areas were North and South India, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Thailand, South China, and the Sichuan Basin. All of these are known to be major rice cultivation areas. The time series of monthly mean SCIA retrievals were compared with the emission inventory data for rice cultivation archived in the GISS dataset and Yan et al. [2009], as well as with precipitation data (Huffman et al., 1997). The phase of seasonal variation of SCIA retrievals corresponded closely to those of emission

  10. Observations of nonmethane organic compounds during ARCTAS − Part 1: Biomass burning emissions and plume enhancements

    A. Wisthaler

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Mixing ratios of a large number of nonmethane organic compounds (NMOCs were observed by the Trace Organic Gas Analyzer (TOGA on board the NASA DC-8 as part of the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS field campaign. Many of these NMOCs were observed concurrently by one or both of two other NMOC measurement techniques on board the DC-8: proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS and whole air canister sampling (WAS. A comparison of these measurements to the data from TOGA indicates good agreement for the majority of co-measured NMOCs. The ARCTAS study, which included both spring and summer deployments, provided opportunities to sample a large number of biomass burning (BB plumes with origins in Asia, California and central Canada, ranging from very recent emissions to plumes aged one week or more. For this analysis, BB smoke interceptions were grouped by flight, source region and, in some cases, time of day, generating 40 identified BB plumes for analysis. Normalized excess mixing ratios (NEMRs to CO were determined for each of the 40 plumes for up to 19 different NMOCs or NMOC groups. Although the majority of observed NEMRs for individual NMOCs or NMOC groups were in agreement with previously-reported values, the observed NEMRs to CO for ethanol, a rarely quantified gas-phase trace gas, ranged from values similar to those previously reported, to up to an order of magnitude greater. Notably, though variable between plumes, observed NEMRs of individual light alkanes are highly correlated within BB emissions, independent of estimated plume ages. BB emissions of oxygenated NMOC were also found to be often well-correlated. Using the NCAR Master Mechanism chemical box model initialized with concentrations based on two observed scenarios, fresh Canadian BB and fresh Californian BB, decreases are predicted for the low molecular weight carbonyls (i.e. formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone and

  11. Subpacket structures in EMIC rising tone emissions observed by the THEMIS probes

    Nakamura, Satoko; Omura, Yoshiharu; Shoji, Masafumi; Nosé, Masahito; Summers, Danny; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2015-09-01

    We report subpacket structures found in electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) rising tone emissions observed by the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) probes. We investigate three typical cases in detail. The first case shows a continuous single rising tone with four obvious subpackets, and the second case is characterized by a patchy emission with multiple subpackets triggered in a broadband frequency. The third case looks like a smooth rising tone without any obvious subpacket in the fast Fourier transform spectrum, while its amplitude contains small peaks with increasing frequencies. The degree of polarization of each subpacket is generally higher than 0.8 with a left-handed polarization, and the wave direction of the subpackets is typically field aligned. We show that the time evolution of the observed frequency and amplitude can be reproduced consistently by nonlinear growth theory. We also compare the observed time span of each subpacket structure with the theoretical trapping time for second-order cyclotron resonance. They are consistent, indicating that an individual subpacket is generated through a nonlinear wave growth process which excites an element in accordance with the theoretically predicted optimum amplitude.

  12. The Binary Black Hole Model for Mrk 231 Cannot Explain the Observed Emission Lines

    Leighly, Karen M; Gallagher, Sarah C; Lucy, Adrian B

    2016-01-01

    Mrk 231 is a nearby quasar with an unusually red continuum, generally explained as heavy reddening by dust (e.g., Leighly et al. 2014). Yan et al. 2015 proposed that Mrk 231 is a milli-parsec black-hole binary with little intrinsic reddening. The large-mass black hole experiences advection-dominated accretion, emitting little continuum, while the accretion disk of the small-mass black hole emits as an ordinary quasar, dominating the observed weak UV continuum and contributing all of the photoionizing flux. We demonstrate that this model is untenable for four reasons. (1) To produce the observed near-infrared emission lines, the equivalent widths would have to be ~100 times larger than typical values with respect to the photoionizing continuum, a situation that seems energetically unlikely. (2) We use the photoionization code Cloudy to demonstrate it is not possible to produce the HeI* emission line intensity for the observed HeI*/Pbeta flux ratios, even if the line-emitting gas intersects all of the photoioni...

  13. SMA Observations of the Extended CO(6-5) Emission in the Starburst Galaxy NGC253

    Krips, Melanie; Peck, Alison; Sakamoto, Kazushi; Neri, Roberto; Gurwell, Mark; Petitpas, Glen; Zhao, Jun-Hui

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of the $^{12}$CO(6-5) line and 686GHz continuum emission in NGC253 with the Submillimeter Array at an angular resolution of ~4arcsec. The $^{12}$CO(6-5) emission is clearly detected along the disk and follows the distribution of the lower $^{12}$CO line transitions with little variations of the line ratios in it. A large-velocity gradient analysis suggests a two-temperature model of the molecular gas in the disk, likely dominated by a combination of low-velocity shocks and the disk wide PDRs. Only marginal $^{12}$CO(6-5) emission is detected in the vicinity of the expanding shells at the eastern and western edges of the disk. While the eastern shell contains gas even warmer (T$_{\\rm kin}$>300~K) than the hot gas component (T$_{\\rm kin}$=300K) of the disk, the western shell is surrounded by gas much cooler (T$_{\\rm kin}$=60K) than the eastern shell but somewhat hotter than the cold gas component of the disk (for similar H$_2$ and CO column densities), indicative of different (or differe...

  14. Correcting atmospheric effects in thermal ground observations for hyperspectral emissivity estimation

    Timmermans, Joris; Buitrago, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of Land surface temperature is of crucial importance in energy balance studies and environmental modeling. Accurate retrieval of land surface temperature (LST) demands detailed knowledge of the land surface emissivity. Measured radiation by remote sensing sensors to land surface temperature can only be performed using a-priori knowledge of the emissivity. Uncertainties in the retrieval of this emissivity can cause huge errors in LST estimations. The retrieval of emissivity (and LST) is per definition an underdetermined inversion, as only one observation is made while two variables are to be estimated. Several researches have therefore been performed on measuring emissivity, such as the normalized emissivity method, the temperature-emissivity separation (TES) using the minimum and maximum difference of emissivity and the use of vegetation indices. In each of these approaches atmospherically corrected radiance measurements by remote sensing sensors are correlated to ground measurements. Usually these ground measurements are performed with the ground equivalent of the remote sensing sensors; the CIMEL 312-2 has the same spectral bands as ASTER. This way parameterizations acquired this way are only usable for specific sensors and need to be redone for newer sensors. Recently hyperspectral thermal radiometers, such as the MIDAC, have been developed that can solve this problem. By using hyperspectral observations of emissivity, together with sensor simulators, ground measurements of different satellite sensor can be simulated. This facilitates the production of validation data for the different TES algorithms. However before such measurements can be performed extra steps of processing need to be performed. Atmospheric correction becomes more important in hyperspectral observations than for broadband observations, as energy levels measured per band is lower. As such the atmosphere has a relative larger contribution if bandwidths become smaller. The goal of this

  15. Mobile Laboratory Observations of Methane Emissions in the Barnett Shale Region.

    Yacovitch, Tara I; Herndon, Scott C; Pétron, Gabrielle; Kofler, Jonathan; Lyon, David; Zahniser, Mark S; Kolb, Charles E

    2015-07-01

    Results of mobile ground-based atmospheric measurements conducted during the Barnett Shale Coordinated Campaign in spring and fall of 2013 are presented. Methane and ethane are continuously measured downwind of facilities such as natural gas processing plants, compressor stations, and production well pads. Gaussian dispersion simulations of these methane plumes, using an iterative forward plume dispersion algorithm, are used to estimate both the source location and the emission magnitude. The distribution of emitters is peaked in the 0-5 kg/h range, with a significant tail. The ethane/methane molar enhancement ratio for this same distribution is investigated, showing a peak at ∼1.5% and a broad distribution between ∼4% and ∼17%. The regional distributions of source emissions and ethane/methane enhancement ratios are examined: the largest methane emissions appear between Fort Worth and Dallas, while the highest ethane/methane enhancement ratios occur for plumes observed in the northwestern potion of the region. Individual facilities, focusing on large emitters, are further analyzed by constraining the source location. PMID:25751617

  16. Evaluation of a plot-scale methane emission model using eddy covariance observations and footprint modelling

    A. Budishchev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Most plot-scale methane emission models – of which many have been developed in the recent past – are validated using data collected with the closed-chamber technique. This method, however, suffers from a low spatial representativeness and a poor temporal resolution. Also, during a chamber-flux measurement the air within a chamber is separated from the ambient atmosphere, which negates the influence of wind on emissions. Additionally, some methane models are validated by upscaling fluxes based on the area-weighted averages of modelled fluxes, and by comparing those to the eddy covariance (EC flux. This technique is rather inaccurate, as the area of upscaling might be different from the EC tower footprint, therefore introducing significant mismatch. In this study, we present an approach to validate plot-scale methane models with EC observations using the footprint-weighted average method. Our results show that the fluxes obtained by the footprint-weighted average method are of the same magnitude as the EC flux. More importantly, the temporal dynamics of the EC flux on a daily timescale are also captured (r2 = 0.7. In contrast, using the area-weighted average method yielded a low (r2 = 0.14 correlation with the EC measurements. This shows that the footprint-weighted average method is preferable when validating methane emission models with EC fluxes for areas with a heterogeneous and irregular vegetation pattern.

  17. Investigation of VLF and HF waves showing seismo-ionospheric anomalies induced by the 29 September 2009 Samoa earthquake (Mw=8.1

    M. Parrot

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In Samoa Islands, a powerful earthquake took place at 17:48:10.99 UTC (06:48:10.99 LT on 29 September 2009 with a magnitude Mw=8.1. Using ICE (Instrument Champ Electrique and IMSC (Instrument Magnetic Search Coil experiments onboard the DEMETER (Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions satellite we have surveyed possible variations in electromagnetic signals transmitted by the ground-based VLF transmitter NPM in Hawaii and in HF plasma waves close to the Samoa earthquake during the seismic activity. The indices Dst and Kp were used to distinguish pre-earthquake anomalies from the other anomalies related to the geomagnetic activities. In a previous study we have shown that anomalies in IAP (plasma analyzer and ISL (Langmuir probe experiments onboard the DEMETER and also TEC (Total Electron Content data appear 1 to 5 days before the Samoa earthquake. In this paper we show that the anomalies in the VLF transmitter signal and in the HF range appear with the same time scale. The lack of significant geomagnetic activities indicates that these anomalous behaviors could be regarded as seismo-ionospheric precursors. It is also shown that comparative analysis is more effective in seismo-ionospheric studies.

  18. Dust emissions of organic soils observed in the field and laboratory

    Zobeck, T. M.; Baddock, M. C.; Guo, Z.; Van Pelt, R.; Acosta-Martinez, V.; Tatarko, J.

    2011-12-01

    . In the laboratory wind tunnel, samples with the same ratio of erodible to non-erodible aggregates as the field soils were abraded and dust emissions were observed with the same sampling system as used in the field wind tunnel. In the dust generator, 5 gm samples < 8 mm diameter of each organic soil were rotated in a 50 cm long tube and the dust generated was observed with the GRIMM during a 20 minute run. Comparisons of the field dust emission rates with the laboratory results will be presented.

  19. The efficiency of the human observer for lesion detection and localization in emission tomography.

    Liu, Bin; Zhou, Lili; Kulkarni, Santosh; Gindi, Gene

    2009-05-01

    For the medically relevant task of joint detection and localization of a signal (lesion) in an emission computed tomographic (ECT) image, it is of interest to measure the efficiency, defined as the relative task performance of a human observer versus that of an ideal observer. Efficiency studies can be used in system optimization, improving postprocessing (e.g., reconstruction) algorithms, deriving human-emulating model observers and computer-aided detection methods. Calculation of ideal observer performance for ECT is highly computationally complex. We can, however, compute ideal observer performance exactly using a simplified 'filtered-noise' model of ECT. This model results in images whose correlation structure, due to quantum noise, background variability and regularization, is similar to that of real ECT reconstructed images. A two-alternative forced choice test is used to obtain the performance of the human observers. We compare the efficiency of our joint detection-localization task with that of a corresponding signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection task. For the joint task, efficiency is low when the search tolerance is stringent. Efficiency for the joint task rises with signal intensity but is flat for the SKE task. For both tasks, efficiency peaks at a mid-range level of regularization corresponding to a particular noise-resolution tradeoff. PMID:19351977

  20. Quantifying the Seasonal and Interannual Variability of North American Isoprene Emissions Using Satellite Observations of the Formaldehyde Column

    Palmer, Paul I.; Abbot, Dorian S.; Fu, Tzung-May; Jacob, Daniel J.; Chance, Kelly V.; Kurosu, Thomas Paul; GUENTHER, ALEX; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Stanton, Jenny C.; Pilling, Michael J.; Pressley, Shelley N.; Lamb, Brian; Sumner, Anna Louise

    2006-01-01

    Quantifying isoprene emissions using satellite observations of the formaldehyde (HCHO) columns is subject to errors involving the column retrieval and the assumed relationship between HCHO columns and isoprene emissions, taken here from the GEOS-CHEM chemical transport model. Here we use a 6-year (1996–2001) HCHO column data set from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite instrument to (1) quantify these errors, (2) evaluate GOME-derived isoprene emissions with in situ flux m...

  1. Parametric Excitation of Very Low Frequency (VLF) Electromagnetic Whistler Waves by Transformation of Lower Oblique Resonance Waves on Density Perturbations in the Vicinity of a Loop VLF Antenna

    Kim, T.; Sotnikov, V.; Main, D.; Mishin, E.; Gershenzon, N.

    2015-11-01

    Concept of a parametric antenna in the ionospheric plasma is analyzed. Such antennas are capable of exciting electromagnetic radiation fields, specifically the creation of whistler waves generated at the very low frequency (VLF) range, which are also capable of propagating large distances away from the source region. The mechanism of whistler wave generation is considered a parametric interaction of quasi-electrostatic low oblique resonance (LOR) oscillations excited by conventional loop antenna. The transformation of LOR waves on quasi-neutral density perturbations generated by a dipole antenna gives rise to electromagnetic whistler waves on combination frequencies. In this approach extended plasma volume around a loop antenna represents a parametric antenna. Simulation to demonstrate excitation and spatial structure of VLF waves excited by a loop antenna using a PIC code LSP will be presented as well. Possible applications including the wave-particle interactions to mitigate performance anomalies of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites, active space experiments, communication via VLF waves, and modification experiments in the ionosphere will be discussed.

  2. Improving global fire carbon emissions estimates by combining moderate resolution burned area and active fire observations

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; Giglio, L.; Rogers, B. M.; van der Werf, G.

    2011-12-01

    In several important biomes, including croplands and tropical forests, many small fires exist that have sizes that are well below the detection limit for the current generation of burned area products derived from moderate resolution spectroradiometers. These fires likely have important effects on greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions and regional air quality. Here we developed an approach for combining 1km thermal anomalies (active fires; MOD14A2) and 500m burned area observations (MCD64A1) to estimate the prevalence of these fires and their likely contribution to burned area and carbon emissions. We first estimated active fires within and outside of 500m burn scars in 0.5 degree grid cells during 2001-2010 for which MCD64A1 burned area observations were available. For these two sets of active fires we then examined mean fire radiative power (FRP) and changes in enhanced vegetation index (EVI) derived from 16-day intervals immediately before and after each active fire observation. To estimate the burned area associated with sub-500m fires, we first applied burned area to active fire ratios derived solely from within burned area perimeters to active fires outside of burn perimeters. In a second step, we further modified our sub-500m burned area estimates using EVI changes from active fires outside and within of burned areas (after subtracting EVI changes derived from control regions). We found that in northern and southern Africa savanna regions and in Central and South America dry forest regions, the number of active fires outside of MCD64A1 burned areas increased considerably towards the end of the fire season. EVI changes for active fires outside of burn perimeters were, on average, considerably smaller than EVI changes associated with active fires inside burn scars, providing evidence for burn scars that were substantially smaller than the 25 ha area of a single 500m pixel. FRP estimates also were lower for active fires outside of burn perimeters. In our

  3. Observing and modelling F-region ionospheric dynamics using the OII 7320A emission

    Limb-scan observations of Doppler line profiles from the (OII) lambda 7320A emission at F-Region altitudes, made with the Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) on the Dynamics Explorer-2 (DE-2) spacecraft, were analyzed to provide measurements of the meridional component of the ion convection velocity along the instrument line-of-sight. The DE-2 results presented demonstrate the first spaceborne use of the remote-sensing Doppler technique for measurements of ionospheric convection. The FPI meridional ion drift measurements were compared with nearly simultaneous in situ ion drift measurements from the Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) on DE-2. Once allowance is made for the temporal lag between the in situ and remote measurements, the results from the two techniques are found to be in good agreement, within specified experimental errors, giving confidence in the FPI measurements. The spaceborne interferometric technique has future utility for 2-dimensional imaging of polar ionospheric convection. Results from a simulated space-based observing platform, based on the DE-2 technique and an extension of a 7320A aeronomical model, are presented to demonstrate that a large fraction of the entire polar ionospheric convection pattern can be monitored from space during approximately 16-minute polar passes of a suitably-instrumented satellite. In the simulation, the polar-orbiting satellite's FPI system views the 7320A emission at various tangent point altitudes at +/- 45 deg and +/- 135 deg to the satellite velocity vector. By adjusting the horizon scan angle, several swaths of vectors at different horizontal spacing from the satellite can be recovered. Doppler line profiles from the (OII) 7320A emission at F-Region altitudes, made with the FPI at Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland, were analyzed to provide ion drift vectors and temperatures

  4. Photoelectron spectroscopy of hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes: Nucleobase excited state decay observed via delayed electron emission

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ∼1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl62− dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl62− ⋅ thymine and PtCl62− ⋅ adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN)42− ⋅ nucleobase complexes [A. Sen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 11626 (2015)]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl62− ⋅ nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN)42− ⋅ nucleobase complexes, is attributed to one-photon excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a time scale long enough to allow autodetachment

  5. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Hexachloroplatinate-Nucleobase Complexes: Nucleobase Excited State Decay Observed via Delayed Electron Emission

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M.; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue B.; Dessent, Caroline

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ~1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl6 2- dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl6 2-∙thymine and PtCl6 2-∙adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN)4 2-∙nucleobase complexes [Sen et al, J. Phys. Chem. B, 119, 11626, 2015]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl6 2-∙nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN)4 2-∙nucleobase complexes, is attributed to onephoton excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a timescale long enough to allow autodetachment.

  6. Fermi Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from GRB 080916C

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gamma-ray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. The known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass. (authors)

  7. Supermassive binary black holes - possible observational effects in the x-ray emission

    Jovanović Predrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we discuss the possible observational effects in the X-ray emission from two relativistic accretion disks in a supermassive binary black hole system. For that purpose we developed a model and performed numerical simulations of the X-ray radiation from a relativistic accretion disk around a supermassive black hole, based on the ray-tracing method in the Kerr metric, and applied it to the case of the close binary supermassive black holes. Our results indicate that the broad Fe Kα line is a powerful tool for detecting such systems and studying their properties. The most favorable candidates for observational studies are the supermassive binary black holes in the galactic mergers during the phase when the orbital velocities of their components are very large and exceed several thousand kms -1. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176003: Gravitation and the Large Scale Structure of the Universe i br. 176001: Astrophysical Spectroscopy of Extragalactic Objects

  8. Soft X-ray observation of the prompt emission of GRB 100418A

    Imatani, Ritsuko; Tomida, Hiroshi; Nakahira, Satoshi; Kimura, Masashi; Sakamoto, Takanori; Arimoto, Makoto; Morooka, Yoshitaka; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    We have observed the prompt emission of GRB 100418A from its beginning captured by the MAXI SSC (0.7-7 keV) on board the International Space Station followed by the Swift XRT (0.3-10 keV) observation. The light curve can be fitted by a combination of a power-law component and an exponential component (the decay constant is 31.6 ± 1.6 s). The X-ray spectrum is well expressed by the Band function with Ep ≤ 8.3 keV. This is the brightest gamma-ray burst showing a very low value of Ep. It satisfies the Yonetoku relation (Ep-Lp). It is also consistent with the Amati relation (Ep-Eiso) within a 2.5σ level.

  9. Fermi Observations of high-energy gamma-ray emissions from GRB 080916C

    Abdo, A A; Arimoto, M; Asano, K; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Band, D L; Barbiellini, Guido; Baring, Matthew G; Bastieri, Denis; Battelino, M; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellardi, F; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, Elliott D; Bogaert, G; Bogart, J R; Bonamente, E; Bonnell, J; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Briggs, M S; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, Thompson H; Burrows, David N; Busetto, Giovanni; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Ceccanti, M; Cecchi, C; Celotti, Annalisa; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C.C.Teddy; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Cominsky, Lynn R; Connaughton, V; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; DeKlotz, M; Dermer, C D; De Angelis, Alessandro; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dingus, B L; do Couto e Silva, Eduardo; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Evans, P A; Fabiani, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Finke, Justin D; Fishman, G; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, Thomas Lynn; Godfrey, Gary L; Goldstein, A; Granot, J; Greiner, J; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M H; Grove, J.Eric; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Haller, G; Hanabata, Y; Harding, Alice K; Hayashida, M; Hays, Elizabeth A; Hernando Morata, J A; Hoover, A; Hughes, R E; Johannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kavelaars, A; Kawai, N; Kelly, H; Kennea, J; Kerr, M; Kippen, R M; Knodlseder, J; Kocevski, D; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kouveliotou, C; Kuehn, Frederick Gabriel Ivar; Kuss, Michael; Lande, J; Landriu, D; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lavalley, C; Lee, B; Lee, S H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lichti, G G; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, Pasquale; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marangelli, B; Mazziotta, M N; McBreen, Sheila; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meegan, C; Miszaros, P; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Minuti, M; Mirizzi, N; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, Igor Vladimirovich; Murgia, Simona; Nakamori, T; Nelson, D; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okumura, Akira; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paciesas, W S; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Perri, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Petrosian, Vahe; Pinchera, M; Piron, F; Porter, Troy A; Preece, R; Rainr, S; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rando, R; Rapposelli, E; Razzano, M; Razzaque, Soebur; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, Thierry; Reyes, Luis C; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Parkinson, P.M.Saz; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Segal, K N; Sgro, C; Shimokawabe, T; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stamatikos, M; Starck, Jean-Luc; Stecker, Floyd William; Steinle, H; Stephens, T E; Strickman, M S; Suson, Daniel J; Tagliaferri, G.; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Tenze, A; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, Diego F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Turri, M; Tuvi, S; Usher, T L; van der Horst, A J; Vigiani, L; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; von Kienlin, A; Waite, A P; Williams, D A; Wilson-Hodge, C; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wu, X F; Yamazaki, R; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gammaray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. The known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass.

  10. Soft X-ray Observation of the Prompt Emission of GRB100418A

    Imatani, Ritsuko; Nakahira, Satoshi; Kimura, Masashi; Sakamoto, Takanori; Arimoto, Makoto; Morooka, Yoshitaka; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We have observed the prompt emission of GRB100418A, from its beginning by the MAXI/SSC (0.7-7 keV) on board the International Space Station followed by the Swift/XRT (0.3-10 keV) observation. The light curve can be fitted by a combination of a power law component and an exponential component (decay constant is $31.6\\pm 1.6$). The X-ray spectrum is well expressed by the Band function with $E_{\\rm p}\\leq$8.3 keV. This is the brightest GRB showing a very low value of $E_{\\rm p}$. It is also consistent with the Yonetoku-relation ($E_{\\rm p}$-$L_{\\rm p}$) while it is not clear with the Amati-relation ($E_{\\rm p}$-$E_{\\rm iso}$).

  11. Development of ground-based ELF/VLF receiver system in Wuhan and its first results

    Chen, Yanping; Yang, Guobin; Ni, Binbin; Zhao, Zhengyu; Gu, Xudong; Zhou, Chen; Wang, Feng

    2016-05-01

    A new digital low-frequency receiver system has been developed at Wuhan University for sensitive reception of low-latitude broadband Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves originating from either natural or artificial sources. These low-frequency radio waves are useful for ionospheric remote sensing, geospace environment monitoring, and submarine communications. This paper presents the principle and architecture of the system framework, including magnetic loop antenna design, low-noise analog front-end and digital receiver with data sampling and transmission. A new structure is adopted in the analog front end to provide high common-mode rejection and to reduce interference. On basis of field programmable gate array (FPGA) device and Universal Serial Bus (USB) architecture, the digital receiver is developed along with time keeping and synchronization module. The validity and feasibility of the self-developed ground-based ELF/VLF receiver system is evaluated by first results of experimental data that show the temporal variation of broadband ELF/VLF wave spectral intensity in Wuhan (30.54 °N, 114.37 °E). In addition to the acquisition of VLF transmitter signals at various frequencies, tweek atmospherics are also clearly captured to occur at multiple modes up to n = 6.

  12. Comparative Analysis of VLF Signal Variation along Trajectory Induced by X-ray Solar Flares

    Kolarski, A.; Grubor, D.

    2015-12-01

    Comparative qualitative analysis of amplitude and phase delay variations was carried out along the trajectory of GQD/22.1 kHz and NAA/24.0 kHz VLF signal traces, propagating from Skelton (UK) and Maine (USA) toward Belgrade, induced by four isolated solar X-ray flare events occurred during the period from September 2005 to December 2006. For monitoring, recording and for storage of VLF data at the Institute of Physics in Belgrade, Serbia, the AbsPAL system was used. For modeling purposes of propagating conditions along GQD and NAA signal propagation paths, LWPCv21 program code was used. Occurred solar flare events induced lower ionosphere electron density height profile changes, causing perturbations in VLF wave propagation within Earth-ionosphere waveguides. As analyzed VLF signals characterize by different propagation parameters along trajectories from their transmitters to the Belgrade receiver site, their propagation is affected in different ways for different solar flare events and also for the same solar flare events.

  13. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research.

    Lampert, M; Anda, G; Czopf, A; Erdei, G; Guszejnov, D; Kovácsik, Á; Pokol, G I; Réfy, D; Nam, Y U; Zoletnik, S

    2015-07-01

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera's measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties. PMID:26233377

  14. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties

  15. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    Lampert, M. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Czopf, A.; Erdei, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, BME IOP, Budapest (Hungary); Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I. [BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Nam, Y. U. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  16. RESIK observations of He-like Ar X-ray line emission in solar flares

    Sylwester, J; Phillips, K J H

    2008-01-01

    The Ar XVII X-ray line group principally due to transitions 1s2 - 1s2l (l=s, p) near 4 Anstroms was observed in numerous flares by the RESIK bent crystal spectrometer aboard CORONAS-F between 2001 and 2003. The three line features include the Ar XVII w (resonance line), a blend of x and y (intercombination lines), and z (forbidden line), all of which are blended with Ar XVI dielectronic satellites. The ratio G, equal to [I(x+y) + I(z)]/I(w), varies with electron temperature Te mostly because of unresolved dielectronic satellites. With temperatures estimated from GOES X-ray emission, the observed G ratios agree fairly well with those calculated from CHIANTI and other data. With a two-component emission measure, better agreement is achieved. Some S XV and S XVI lines blend with the Ar lines, the effect of which occurs at temperatures greater than 8MK, allowing the S/Ar abundance ratio to be determined. This is found to agree with coronal values. A nonthermal contribution is indicated for some spectra in the rep...

  17. Mars atmosphere studies with the SPICAM IR emission phase function observations

    Trokhimovskiy, Alexander; Fedorova, Anna; Montmessin, Franck; Korablev, Oleg; Bertaux, Jean-Loup

    Emission Phase Function (EPF) observations is a powerful tool for characterization of atmosphere and surface. EPF sequence provides the extensive coverage of scattering angles above the targeted surface location which allow to separate the surface and aerosol scattering, study a vertical distribution of minor species and aerosol properties. SPICAM IR instrument on Mars Express mission provides continuous atmospheric observations in near IR (1-1.7 mu) in nadir and limb starting from 2004. For the first years of SPICAM operation only a very limited number of EPFs was performed. But from the mid 2013 (Ls=225, MY31) SPICAM EPF observations become rather regular. Based on the multiple-scattering radiative transfer model SHDOM, we analyze equivalent depths of carbon dioxide (1,43 mu) and water vapour (1,38 mu) absorption bands and their dependence on airmass during observation sequence to get aerosol optical depths and properties. The derived seasonal dust opacities from near IR can be used to retrieve the size distribution from comparison with simultaneous results of other instruments in different spectral ranges. Moreover, the EPF observations of water vapour band allow to access poorly known H2O vertical distribution for different season and locations.

  18. Observations and modeling of forward and reflected chorus waves captured by THEMIS

    O. Agapitov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Discrete ELF/VLF chorus emissions are the most intense electromagnetic plasma waves observed in the radiation belts of the Earth's magnetosphere. Chorus emissions, whistler-mode wave packets propagating roughly along magnetic field lines from a well-localized source in the vicinity of the magnetic equator to polar regions, can be reflected at low altitudes. After reflection, wave packets can return to the equatorial plane region. Understanding of whistler wave propagation and reflection is critical to a correct description of wave-particle interaction in the radiation belts. We focus on properties of reflected chorus emissions observed by the THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions During Substorms spacecraft Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM and Electric Field Instrument (EFI at ELF/VLF frequencies up to 4 kHz at L≥8. We determine the direction of the Poynting flux and wave vector distribution for forward and reflected chorus waves. Although both types of chorus waves were detected near the magnetic equator and have similar, discrete structure and rising tones, reflected waves are attenuated by a factor of 10–30 and have 10% higher frequency than concurrently-observed forward waves. Modeling of wave propagation and reflection using geometrical optics ray-tracing allowed us to determine the chorus source region location and explain observed propagation characteristics. We find that reflected wave attenuation at a certain spatial region is caused by divergence of the ray paths of these non-ducted emissions, and that the frequency shift is caused by generation of the reflected waves at lower L-shells where the local equatorial gyrofrequency is larger.

  19. SEVEN-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE (WMAP ) OBSERVATIONS: GALACTIC FOREGROUND EMISSION

    We present updated estimates of Galactic foreground emission using seven years of WMAP data. Using the power spectrum of differences between multi-frequency template-cleaned maps, we find no evidence for foreground contamination outside of the updated (KQ85y7) foreground mask. We place a 15 μK upper bound on rms foreground contamination in the cleaned maps used for cosmological analysis. Further, the cleaning process requires only three power-law foregrounds outside of the mask. We find no evidence for polarized foregrounds beyond those from soft (steep-spectrum) synchrotron and thermal dust emission; in particular we find no indication in the polarization data of an extra 'haze' of hard synchrotron emission from energetic electrons near the Galactic center. We provide an updated map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the internal linear combination method, updated foreground masks, and updates to point source catalogs using two different techniques. With additional years of data, we now detect 471 point sources using a five-band technique and 417 sources using a three-band CMB-free technique. In total there are 62 newly detected point sources, a 12% increase over the five-year release. Also new are tests of the Markov chain Monte Carlo foreground fitting procedure against systematics in the time-stream data, and tests against the observed beam asymmetry. Within a few degrees of the Galactic plane, the behavior in total intensity of low-frequency foregrounds is complicated and not completely understood. WMAP data show a rapidly steepening spectrum from 20 to 40 GHz, which may be due to emission from spinning dust grains, steepening synchrotron, or other effects. Comparisons are made to a 1 deg 408 MHz map (Haslam et al.) and the 11 deg ARCADE 2 data (Singal et al.). We find that spinning dust or steepening synchrotron models fit the combination of WMAP and 408 MHz data equally well. ARCADE data appear inconsistent with the steepening synchrotron model

  20. Satellite observations indicate substantial spatiotemporal variability in biomass burning NOx emission factors for South America

    Castellanos, P.; Boersma, K.F.; Werf, van de G.R.

    2014-01-01

    Biomass burning is an important contributor to global total emissions of NOx (NO+NO2). Generally bottom-up fire emissions models calculate NOx emissions by multiplying fuel consumption estimates with static biome-specific emission factors, defined in units of grams of NO per kilogram of dry matter c

  1. The Annual Cycle of Water Vapor on Mars as Observed by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    Smith, Michael D.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Spectra taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) have been used to monitor the latitude, longitude, and seasonal dependence of water vapor for over one full Martian year (March 1999-March 2001). A maximum in water vapor abundance is observed at high latitudes during mid-summer in both hemispheres, reaching a maximum value of approximately 100 pr-micrometer in the north and approximately 50 pr-micrometer in the south. Low water vapor abundance (water vapor. The latitudinal and seasonal dependence of the decay of the northern summer water vapor maximum implies cross-equatorial transport of water to the southern hemisphere, while there is little or no corresponding transport during the decay of the southern hemisphere summer maximum. The latitude-longitude dependence of annually-averaged water vapor (corrected for topography) has a significant positive correlation with albedo and significant negative correlations with thermal inertia and surface pressure. Comparison of TES results with those retrieved from the Viking Orbiter Mars Atmospheric Water Detectors (MAWD) experiments shows some similar features, but also many significant differences. The southern hemisphere maximum observed by TES was not observed by MAWD and the large latitudinal gradient in annually-averaged water vapor observed by MAWD does not appear in the TES results.

  2. Location accuracy of VLF World-Wide Lightning Location (WWLL network: Post-algorithm upgrade

    C. J. Rodger

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available An experimental VLF World-Wide Lightning Location (WWLL network has been developed through collaborations with research institutions across the globe. The aim of the WWLL is to provide global real-time locations of lightning discharges, with >50% CG flash detection efficiency and mean location accuracy of <10km. While these goals are essentially arbitrary, they do define a point where the WWLL network development can be judged a success, providing a breakpoint for a more stable operational mode. The current network includes 18 stations which cover much of the globe. As part of the initial testing phase of the WWLL the network operated in a simple mode, sending the station trigger times into a central processing point rather than making use of the sferic Time of Group Arrival (TOGA. In this paper the location accuracy of the post-TOGA algorithm WWLL network (after 1 August 2003 is characterised, providing estimates of the globally varying location accuracy for this network configuration which range over 1.9-19km, with the global median being 2.9km, and the global mean 3.4km. The introduction of the TOGA algorithm has significantly improved the location accuracies.

    The detection efficiency of the WWLL is also considered. In the selected region the WWLL detected ~13% of the total lightning, suggesting a ~26% CG detection efficiency and a ~10% IC detection efficiency. Based on a comparison between all WWLL good lightning locations in February-April 2004, and the activity levels expected from satellite observations we estimate that the WWLL is currently detecting ~2% of the global total lightning, providing good locations for ~5% of global CG activity. The existing WWLL network is capable of providing real-time positions of global thunderstorm locations in its current form.

  3. The development of the International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors (INFREP) by designing new analysing software and by setting up new recording locations of radio VLF/LF signals in Romania

    Moldovan, Iren-Adelina; Petruta Constantin, Angela; Emilian Toader, Victorin; Toma-Danila, Dragos; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Dolea, Paul; Septimiu Moldovan, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    Based on scientific evidences supporting the causality between earthquake preparatory stages, space weather and solar activity and different types of electromagnetic (EM) disturbances together with the benefit of having full access at ground and space based EM data, INFREP proposes a complex and cross correlated investigation of phenomena that occur in the coupled system Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionsophere in order to identify possible causes responsible for anomalous effects observed in the propagation characteristics of radio waves, especially at low (LF) and very low frequency (VLF). INFREP, a network of VLF (20-60 kHz) and LF (150-300 kHz) radio receivers, was put into operation in Europe in 2009, having as principal goal, the study of disturbances produced by the earthquakes on the propagation properties of these signals. The Romanian NIEP VLF / LF monitoring system consisting in a radio receiver -made by Elettronika S.R.L. (Italy) and provided by the Bari University- and the infrastructure that is necessary to record and transmit the collected data, is a part of the international initiative INFREP. The NIEP VLF / LF receiver installed in Romania was put into operation in February 2009 in Bucharest and relocated to the Black-Sea shore (Dobruja Seismologic Observatory) in December 2009. The first development of the Romanian EM monitoring system was needed because after changing the receiving site from Bucharest to Eforie we obtained unsatisfactory monitoring data, characterized by large fluctuations of the received signals' intensities. Trying to understand this behavior has led to the conclusion that the electric component of the electromagnetic field was possibly influenced by the local conditions. Starting from this observation we have run some tests and changed the vertical antenna with a loop-type antenna that is more appropriate in highly electric-field polluted environments. Since the amount of recorded data is huge, for streamlining the research process

  4. Quantifying the Seasonal and Interannual Variability of North American Isoprene Emissions Using Satellite Observations of the Formaldehyde Column

    Palmer, Paul I.; Abbot, Dorian S.; Fu, Tzung-May; Jacob, Daniel J.; Chance, Kelly; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Guenther, Alex; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Stanton, Jenny C.; Pilling, Michael J.; Pressley, Shelley N.; Lamb, Brian; Sumner, Anne Louise

    2006-01-01

    Quantifying isoprene emissions using satellite observations of the formaldehyde (HCHO) columns is subject to errors involving the column retrieval and the assumed relationship between HCHO columns and isoprene emissions, taken here from the GEOS-CHEM chemical transport model. Here we use a 6-year (1996-2001) HCHO column data set from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite instrument to (1) quantify these errors, (2) evaluate GOME-derived isoprene emissions with in situ flux measurements and a process-based emission inventory (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature, MEGAN), and (3) investigate the factors driving the seasonal and interannual variability of North American isoprene emissions. The error in the GOME HCHO column retrieval is estimated to be 40%. We use the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) to quantify the time-dependent HCHO production from isoprene, alpha- and beta-pinenes, and methylbutenol and show that only emissions of isoprene are detectable by GOME. The time-dependent HCHO yield from isoprene oxidation calculated by MCM is 20-30% larger than in GEOS-CHEM. GOME-derived isoprene fluxes track the observed seasonal variation of in situ measurements at a Michigan forest site with a -30% bias. The seasonal variation of North American isoprene emissions during 2001 inferred from GOME is similar to MEGAN, with GOME emissions typically 25% higher (lower) at the beginning (end) of the growing season. GOME and MEGAN both show a maximum over the southeastern United States, but they differ in the precise location. The observed interannual variability of this maximum is 20-30%, depending on month. The MEGAN isoprene emission dependence on surface air temperature explains 75% of the month-to-month variability in GOME-derived isoprene emissions over the southeastern United States during May-September 1996-2001.

  5. Modeling the thermal emission from asteroid 3 Juno using ALMA observations and the KRC thermal model

    Titus, Timothy N.; Li, Jian-Yang; Moullet, Arielle; Sykes, Mark V.

    2015-11-01

    Asteroid 3 Juno (hereafter referred to as Juno), discovered 1 September 1804, is the 11th largest asteroid in the Main Asteroid Belt (MAB). Containing approximately 1% of the mass in the MAB [1], Juno is the second largest S-type [2].As part of the observations acquired from Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) [3], 10 reconstructed images at ~60km/pixel resolution were acquired of Juno [4] that showed significant deviations from the Standard Thermal Model (STM) [5]. These deviations could be a result of surface topography, albedo variations, emissivity variations, thermal inertia variations, or any combination.The KRC thermal model [6, 7], which has been extensively used for Mars [e.g. 8, 9] and has been applied to Vesta [10] and Ceres [11], will be used to compare model thermal emission to that observed by ALMA at a wavelength of 1.33 mm [4]. The 10 images, acquired over a four hour period, captured ~55% of Juno’s 7.21 hour rotation. Variations in temperature as a function of local time will be used to constrain the source of the thermal emission deviations from the STM.This work is supported by the NASA Solar System Observations Program.References:[1] Pitjeva, E. V. (2005) Solar System Research 39(3), 176. [2] Baer, J. and S. R. Chesley (2008) Celestial Mechanics and Dynamical Astronomy, 100, 27-42. [3] Wootten A. et al. (2015) IAU General Assembly, Meeting #29, #2237199 [4] arXiv:1503.02650 [astro-ph.EP] doi: 10.1088/2041-8205/808/1/L2 [5] Lebofsky, L.A. eta al. (1986) Icarus, 68, 239-251. [6] Kieffer, H. H., et al. (1977) J. Geophys. Res., 82, 4249-4291. [7] Kieffer, Hugh H., (2013) Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, Volume 118, Issue 3, pp. 451-470 [8] Titus, T. N., H. H. Kieffer, and P. N. Christensen (2003) Science, 299, 1048-1051. [9] Fergason, R. L. et al. (2012) Space Sci. Rev, 170, 739-773, doi:10.1007/s11214-012-9891-3. [10] Titus, T. N. et al. (2012) 43rd LPSC, held March 19-23, 2012 at The Woodlands, Texas. LPI Contribution No

  6. New Maser Emission from Nonmetastable Ammonia in NGC 7538. II. Green Bank Telescope Observations Including Water Masers

    Hoffman, Ian M

    2011-01-01

    We present new maser emission from ^{14}NH_3 (9,6) in NGC 7538. Our observations include the known spectral features near v_LSR = -60 km/s and -57 km/s and several more features extending to -46 km/s. In three epochs of observation spanning two months we do not detect any variability in the ammonia masers, in contrast to the >10-fold variability observed in other ^{14}NH_3 (9,6) masers in the Galaxy over comparable timescales. We also present observations of water masers in all three epochs for which emission is observed over the velocity range -105 km/s < v_LSR < -4 km/s, including the highest velocity water emission yet observed from NGC 7538. Of the remarkable number of maser species in IRS 1, H_2O and, now, ^{14}NH_3 are the only masers known to exhibit emission outside of the velocity range -62 km/s < v_LSR < -51 km/s. However, we find no significant intensity or velocity correlations between the water emission and ammonia emission. We also present a non-detection in the most sensitive search...

  7. Observation of a physical matrix effect during cold vapour generation measurement of mercury in emissions samples

    Highlights: • A matrix effect for CV-AFS measurement of mercury in emissions samples is reported. • This results from the different efficiencies of liberation of reduced mercury. • There is a good correlation between solution density and the size of the effect. • Several methods to overcome the bias are presented and discussed. - Abstract: The observation of a physical matrix effect during the cold vapour generation–atomic fluorescence measurement of mercury in emissions samples is reported. The effect is as a result of the different efficiencies of liberation of reduced mercury from solution as the matrix of the solution under test varies. The result of this is that peak area to peak height ratios decease as matrix concentration increases, passing through a minimum, before the ratio then increases as matrix concentration further increases. In the test matrices examined – acidified potassium dichromate and sodium chloride solutions – the possible biases caused by differences between the calibration standard matrix and the test sample matrix were as large as 2.8% (relative) representing peak area to peak height ratios for calibration standards and matrix samples of 45 and 43.75, respectively. For the system considered there is a good correlation between the density of the matrix and point of optimum liberation of dissolved mercury for both matrix types. Several methods employing matrix matching and mathematical correction to overcome the bias are presented and their relative merits discussed; the most promising being the use of peak area, rather than peak height, for quantification

  8. Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Galactic Foreground Emission

    Gold, B; Weiland, J L; Hill, R S; Kogut, A; Bennett, C L; Hinshaw, G; Dunkley, J; Halpern, M; Jarosik, N; Komatsu, E; Larson, D; Limon, M; Meyer, S S; Nolta, M R; Page, L; Smith, K M; Spergel, D N; Tucker, G S; Wollack, E; Wright, E L

    2010-01-01

    [Abridged] We present updated estimates of Galactic foreground emission using seven years of WMAP data. Using the power spectrum of differences between multi-frequency template-cleaned maps, we find no evidence for foreground contamination outside of the updated (KQ85y7) foreground mask. We place a 15 microKelvin upper bound on rms foreground contamination in the cleaned maps used for cosmological analysis. We find no indication in the polarization data of an extra "haze" of hard synchrotron emission from energetic electrons near the Galactic center. We provide an updated map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the internal linear combination (ILC) method, updated foreground masks, and updates to point source catalogs with 62 newly detected sources. Also new are tests of the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) foreground fitting procedure against systematics in the time-stream data, and tests against the observed beam asymmetry. Within a few degrees of the Galactic plane, WMAP total intensity data show...

  9. Observed spectral energy distribution of the thermal emission from the dayside of WASP-46b

    Chen, Guo; Wang, Hongchi; Nikolov, Nikolay; Seemann, Ulf; Henning, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We aim to construct a spectral energy distribution (SED) for the emission from the dayside atmosphere of the hot Jupiter WASP-46b and to investigate its energy budget. We observed a secondary eclipse of WASP-46b simultaneously in the g'r'i'z'JHK bands using the GROND instrument on the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope. Eclipse depths of the acquired light curves were derived to infer the brightness temperatures at multibands that cover the SED peak. We report the first detection of the thermal emission from the dayside of WASP-46b in the K band at 4.2-sigma level and tentative detections in the H (2.5-sigma) and J (2.3-sigma) bands, with flux ratios of 0.253 +0.063/-0.060%, 0.194 +/- 0.078%, and 0.129 +/- 0.055%, respectively. The derived brightness temperatures (2306 +177/-187K, 2462 +245/-302K, and 2453 +198/-258K, respectively) are consistent with an isothermal temperature profile of 2386K, which is significantly higher than the dayside-averaged equilibrium temperature, indicative of very poor heat redistribution eff...

  10. Derivation of an observation-based map of North African dust emission

    Evan, Amato T.; Fiedler, Stephanie; Zhao, Chun; Menut, Laurent; Schepanski, Kerstin; Flamant, C.; Doherty, Owen

    2015-03-01

    Changes in the emission, transport and deposition of aeolian dust have profound effects on regional climate, so that characterizing the lifecycle of dust in observations and improving the representation of dust in global climate models is necessary. A fundamental aspect of characterizing the dust cycle is quantifying surface dust fluxes, yet no spatially explicit estimates of this flux exist for the World’s major source regions. Here we present a novel technique for creating a map of the annual mean emitted dust flux for North Africa based on retrievals of dust storm frequency from the Meteosat Second Generation Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and the relationship between dust storm frequency and emitted mass flux derived from the output of five models that simulate dust. Our results suggest that 64 (±16)% of all dust emitted from North Africa is from the Bodélé depression, and that 13 (±3)% of the North African dust flux is from a depression lying in the lee of the Aïr and Hoggar Mountains, making this area the second most important region of emission within North Africa.

  11. Observing Infrared Emission Lines of Neutron-Capture Species in Planetary Nebulae: New Detections with IGRINS

    Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Sterling, N. C.; Kaplan, Kyle F.; Bautista, Manuel A.

    2015-08-01

    As the former envelopes of evolved stars, planetary nebulae (PNe) present an opportunity to study slow neutron-capture reactions (the “s-process”) during the AGB. Such studies differ from those of AGB stars in two ways. First, PNe represent the end point of self-enrichment and dredge-up in the star and most of its mass return to the ISM, enabling us to infer the nucleosynthetic yield of a specific element. Second, some s-process products are observable in PNe but difficult or impossible to observe in cool stars. These include some species with nuclear charge Z in the 30’s for which the major synthesis sites are uncertain. Optical emission lines of trans-iron species have been observed in some PNe, but are faint and can suffer from blending with lines of more abundant elements (Péquignot & Baluteau 1994, A&A, 283, 593; Sharpee et al. 2007, ApJ, 659, 1265). Observing infrared transitions from low energy states has proven to be a fruitful alternate approach. We used K-band lines of Se (Z=34) and Kr (Z=36) to study the demographics of their abundances in a large sample of Milky Way PNe (Dinerstein 2001, ApJ, 550, L223; Sterling & Dinerstein 2008, ApJ, 174, 158; Sterling, Porter, & Dinerstein 2015, submitted). An L-band emission line of Zn identified by Dinerstein & Geballe (2001, ApJ, 562, 515) and further observed by Smith, Zijlstra, & Dinerstein 2014 (MNRAS, 441, 3161), can be used as a tracer of the Fe-group, enabling determinations of the key stellar population diagnostic ratio [alpha/Fe] in PNe (see poster by Dinerstein et al., Focus Meeting 4). Using IGRINS, a high spectral resolution H and K band spectrometer (Park & Jaffe et al. 2014, Proc SPIE, 9147), we have discovered several new lines not previously reported in any astronomical object. Our detection of an H-band line of Rb (Z=37) confirms previous claims of optical Rb detections and indicates enrichment by a factor of ~4 in the PN NGC 7027 (Sterling, Dinerstein, Kaplan, & Bautista, in preparation

  12. Impact of emission controls on air quality in Beijing during APEC 2014: lidar ceilometer observations

    Tang, G.; Zhu, X.; Hu, B.; Xin, J.; Wang, L.; Münkel, C.; Mao, G.; Wang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    The implementation of emission reductions during the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit provides a valuable opportunity to study air pollution in Beijing. From 15 October to 30 November 2014, the height of the atmospheric mixing layer and the vertical attenuated backscattering coefficient profiles were observed online using a~lidar ceilometer. Compared with fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) data, the attenuated backscattering coefficients measured by the lidar ceilometer were strongly correlated with the PM2.5 concentration and AOD (correlation coefficients of 0.89 and 0.86, respectively). This result demonstrated the reliability of the vertical distribution of particles measured by the lidar ceilometer. By classifying different degrees of air pollution based on visibility, we found that during the transition period of air pollution, which was affected by transport of southerly flows in the mixing layer, the attenuated backscattering coefficient from 0 to 1500 m was enhanced by approximately 1.4 Mm-1 sr-1 (140 %). During the polluted period, the attenuated backscattering coefficient from 0 to 300 m suddenly increased, and the coefficient near the surface peaked (approximately 14 Mm-1 sr-1); however, the attenuated backscattering coefficient from 300 to 900 m decreased gradually, and the average value from 0 to 1500 m decreased by 0.5 Mm-1sr-1 (20 %). The height of the mixing layer gradually decreased, and the ratio of CO / SO2 gradually increased, which indicate that the polluted period was dominated by local contribution. Due to the emission reductions during APEC (DAPEC), the concentration of PM2.5 decreased by 59.2 and 58.9 % and visibility improved by 70.2 and 56.0 % compared to before (BAPEC) and after APEC (AAPEC), respectively. The contribution of regional transport in DAPEC decreased by approximately 36 and 25 %, and the local contribution decreased by approximately 48 and 54 % compared to BAPEC and AAPEC

  13. Observations of the Quadrantid meteor shower from 2008 to 2012: orbits and emission spectra

    Madiedo, José M; Trigo-Rodríguez, Josep M; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J; Pujols, Pep; Pastor, Sensi; Reyes, José A de los; Rodríguez, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The activity of the Quadrantids in January during several years (2008, 2010, 2011 and 2012) has been investigated in the framework of the SPanish Meteor Network (SPMN). For this purpose, an array of high-sensitivity CCD video devices and CCD all-sky cameras have been used to obtain multi-station observations of these meteors. These allowed us to obtain precise radiant and orbital information about this meteoroid stream. This paper presents a large set of orbital data (namely, 85 orbits) of Quadrantid meteoroids. Most meteors produced by these particles were recorded during the activity peak of this shower. Besides, we discuss four Quadrantid emission spectra. The tensile strength of Quadrantid meteoroids has been also obtained.

  14. Observing and modelling f-region ionospheric dynamics using the (OII) 7320a emission. Doctoral thesis

    Carr, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    Limb-scan observations of Doppler line profiles from the (OII) lambda 7320A emission at F-Region altitudes, made with the Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) on the Dynamics Explorer-2 (DE-2) spacecraft, have been analyzed to provide measurements of the meridional component of the ion convection velocity along the instrument line-of-sight. The DE-2 results presented here demonstrate the first spaceborne use of the remote-sensing Doppler techniques for measurements of ionospheric convection. The FPI meridional ion drift measurements have been compared with nearly simultaneous in situ ion drift measurements from the Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA) on DE 2. Once allowance is made for the temporal lag between the in situ and remote measurements, the results from the two techniques are found to be in good agreement, within specified experimental errors, giving confidence in the FPI measurements.

  15. Probing geomagnetic storm-driven magnetosphere-ionosphere dynamics in D-region ionosphere using VLF signal propagation characteristics

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Ogunmodimu, Olugbenga

    2016-07-01

    When propagating in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, the amplitude and phase of VLF/LF radio signals are sensitive to changes in the electrical conductivity of the lower ionosphere. This characteristic makes it useful in studying sudden ionospheric disturbances, especially those related to prompt X-ray flux output from solar flares and gamma ray bursts (GRBs). However, strong geomagnetic disturbances and/or storm conditions are known to produce large and global ionospheric disturbances, which can significantly affect VLF radio propagation in the D region ionosphere. Diurnal VLF signature may also convey other important information, especially those related to geomagnetic disturbance/storm induced ionospheric changes. In this paper, using the data of three propagation paths (at latitudes 40-54º), we analyze in detail the trend of anomalies of VLF diurnal signal under varying solar and geomagnetic space environmental conditions to identify possible geomagnetic footprints on the D region ionosphere.

  16. Occasional large emissions of nitrous oxide and methane observed in stormwater biofiltration systems

    Grover, Samantha P.P., E-mail: samantha.grover@monash.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Cohan, Amanda, E-mail: acoh5@student.monash.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Chan, Hon Sen, E-mail: hon.sen.chan@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Livesley, Stephen J., E-mail: sjlive@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Resource Management and Geography, The University of Melbourne, Richmond, Victoria, 3121 (Australia); Beringer, Jason, E-mail: jason.beringer@monash.edu [School of Geography and Environmental Science, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Monash Water for Liveability, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Daly, Edoardo, E-mail: edoardo.daly@monash.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Monash Water for Liveability, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia)

    2013-11-01

    inflow events, which were not seen in other urban systems. CO{sub 2} fluxes increased with soil temperature in both cells, and in the cell without the saturated zone CO{sub 2} fluxes decreased as soil moisture increased. Other studies of CO{sub 2} fluxes from urban soils have found both similar and larger CO{sub 2} emissions than those measured in the biofilter. The results of this study suggest that the greenhouse gas footprint of stormwater treatment warrant consideration in the planning and implementation of engineered green infrastructures. - Highlights: ► First study of greenhouse gas fluxes from a stormwater biofilter. ► Observed occasional large emissions of nitrous oxide and methane. ► Biofilter designs with and without a saturated zone were net sinks for methane. ► Carbon dioxide emissions were four times less than those from lawns.

  17. Occasional large emissions of nitrous oxide and methane observed in stormwater biofiltration systems

    fluxes decreased as soil moisture increased. Other studies of CO2 fluxes from urban soils have found both similar and larger CO2 emissions than those measured in the biofilter. The results of this study suggest that the greenhouse gas footprint of stormwater treatment warrant consideration in the planning and implementation of engineered green infrastructures. - Highlights: ► First study of greenhouse gas fluxes from a stormwater biofilter. ► Observed occasional large emissions of nitrous oxide and methane. ► Biofilter designs with and without a saturated zone were net sinks for methane. ► Carbon dioxide emissions were four times less than those from lawns

  18. Estimate of carbonyl sulfide tropical oceanic surface fluxes using Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer observations

    Kuai, Le; Worden, John R.; Campbell, J. Elliott; Kulawik, Susan S.; Li, King-Fai; Lee, Meemong; Weidner, Richard J.; Montzka, Stephen A.; Moore, Fred L.; Berry, Joe A.; Baker, Ian; Denning, A. Scott; Bian, Huisheng; Bowman, Kevin W.; Liu, Junjie; Yung, Yuk L.

    2015-10-01

    Quantifying the carbonyl sulfide (OCS) land/ocean fluxes contributes to the understanding of both the sulfur and carbon cycles. The primary sources and sinks of OCS are very likely in a steady state because there is no significant observed trend or interannual variability in atmospheric OCS measurements. However, the magnitude and spatial distribution of the dominant ocean source are highly uncertain due to the lack of observations. In particular, estimates of the oceanic fluxes range from approximately 280 Gg S yr-1 to greater than 800 Gg S yr-1, with the larger flux needed to balance a similarly sized terrestrial sink that is inferred from NOAA continental sites. Here we estimate summer tropical oceanic fluxes of OCS in 2006 using a linear flux inversion algorithm and new OCS data acquired by the Aura Tropospheric Emissions Spectrometer (TES). Modeled OCS concentrations based on these updated fluxes are consistent with HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations during 4th airborne campaign and improve significantly over the a priori model concentrations. The TES tropical ocean estimate of 70 ± 16 Gg S in June, when extrapolated over the whole year (about 840 ± 192 Gg S yr-1 ), supports the hypothesis proposed by Berry et al. (2013) that the ocean flux is in the higher range of approximately 800 Gg S yr-1.

  19. Microwave Continuum Emission and Dense Gas Tracers in NGC 3627: Combining Jansky VLA and ALMA Observations

    Murphy, Eric J; Leroy, Adam K; Momjian, Emmanuel; Condon, James J; Helou, George; Meier, David S; Ott, Jürgen; Schinnerer, Eva; Turner, Jean L

    2015-01-01

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) Ka band (33 GHz) and Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Band 3 (94.5 GHz) continuum images covering the nucleus and two extranuclear star-forming regions within the nearby galaxy NGC 3627 (M 66), observed as part of the Star Formation in Radio Survey (SFRS). Both images achieve an angular resolution of $\\lesssim$2\\arcsec, allowing us to map the radio spectral indices and estimate thermal radio fractions at a linear resolution of $\\lesssim$90 pc at the distance of NGC 3627. The thermal fraction at 33 GHz reaches unity at and around the peaks of each HII region; we additionally observed the spectral index between 33 and 94.5 GHz to become both increasingly negative and positive away from the peaks of the HII regions, indicating an increase of non-thermal extended emission from diffusing cosmic-ray electrons and the possible presence of cold dust, respectively. While the ALMA observations were optimized for collecting continuum data, they also detected line emi...

  20. Estimation of NOx emissions from Delhi using Car MAX-DOAS observations and comparison with OMI satellite data

    R. P. Singh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the first Multi-Axis-(MAX- DOAS observations in India performed during April 2010 and January 2011 in Delhi and nearby regions. The MAX-DOAS instrument was mounted on a car roof, which allowed us to perform measurements along individual driving routes. From car MAX-DOAS observations along closed circles around Delhi, together with information on wind speed and direction, the NOx emissions from the greater Delhi area were determined: our estimate of 4.4 × 1025 molecules s−1 is found to be slightly lower than the corresponding emission estimates using the EDGAR emission inventory and substantially smaller compared to a recent study by Gurjar et al. (2004. We also determined NOx emissions from Delhi using OMI satellite observations on the same days. These emissions are slightly smaller than those from the car MAX-DOAS measurements. Finally the car MAX-DOAS observations were also used for the validation of simultaneous OMI satellite measurements of the tropospheric NO2 VCD and found a good agreement of the spatial patterns. Concerning the absolute values, OMI data are, on average, higher than the car MAX-DOAS observations close to strong emission sources, and vice versa over less polluted regions. Our results indicate that OMI NO2 VCDs are biased low over strongly polluted regions, probably caused by inadequate a-priori profiles used in the OMI satellite retrieval.

  1. Recent Observations and Modeling of Narrowband Stimulated Electromagnetic Emissions SEEs at HAARP and EISCAT

    Scales, W.; Mahmoudian, A.; Fu, H.; Bordikar, M. R.; Samimi, A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Briczinski, S. J., Jr.; Kosch, M. J.; Senior, A.; Isham, B.

    2014-12-01

    There has been significant interest in so-called narrowband Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission SEE over the past several years due to recent discoveries at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program HAARP facility near Gakone, Alaska. Narrowband SEE (NSEE) has been defined as spectral features in the SEE spectrum typically within 1 kHz of the transmitter (or pump) frequency. SEE is due to nonlinear processes leading to re-radiation at frequencies other than the pump wave frequency during heating the ionospheric plasma with high power HF radio waves. Although NSEE exhibits a richly complex structure, it has now been shown after a substantial number of observations at HAARP, that NSEE can be grouped into two basic classes. The first are those spectral features, associated with Stimulated Brillouin Scatter SBS, which typically occur when the pump frequency is not close to electron gyro-harmonic frequencies. Typically, these spectral features are within roughly 50 Hz of the pump wave frequency where it is to be noted that the O+ ion gyro-frequency is roughly 50 Hz. The second class of spectral features corresponds to the case when the pump wave frequency is typically within roughly 10 kHz of electron gyro-harmonic frequencies. In this case, spectral features ordered by harmonics of ion gyro-frequencies are typically observed, and termed Stimulated Ion Bernstein Scatter SIBS. This presentation will first provide an overview of the recent NSEE experimental observations at HAARP. Both Stimulated Brillouin Scatter SBS and Stimulated Ion Bernstein Scatter SIBS observations will be discussed as well as their relationship to each other. Possible theoretical formulation in terms of parametric decay instabilities and computational modeling will be provided. Possible applications of NSEE will be pointed out including triggering diagnostics for artificial ionization layer formation, proton precipitation event diagnostics, electron temperature measurements in the heated

  2. Photoelectron spectroscopy of hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes: Nucleobase excited state decay observed via delayed electron emission

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M.; Dessent, Caroline E. H., E-mail: caroline.dessent@york.ac.uk, E-mail: xuebin.wang@pnnl.gov [Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin, E-mail: caroline.dessent@york.ac.uk, E-mail: xuebin.wang@pnnl.gov [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MS K8-88, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2015-11-14

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ∼1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ thymine and PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase complexes [A. Sen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 11626 (2015)]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN){sub 4}{sup 2−} ⋅ nucleobase complexes, is attributed to one-photon excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a “dynamic tag” which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a time scale long enough to

  3. Radio-wave emission due to hypervelocity impacts and its correlation with optical observations

    Takano, T.; Maki, K.; Yamori, A.

    This paper describes the most interesting phenomena of radio-wave emission due to hypervelocity impacts. A projectile of polycarbonate with 1.1 g weight was accelerated by a rail gun to 3.8 km/sec, and hit two targets which are a 2 mm thick aluminum plate upstream and a 45 mm diameter aluminum column downstream, respectively. The projectile first breaks wires to give a triggering signal to a data recorder, then penetrates the aluminum plate, and finally hit the column, The emitted radio-waves propagate through the chamber window, and are received by antennas at each frequency band. The receivers in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands consist of a low noise amplifier, a mixer, a local oscillator and an IF amplifier , respectively. The receiver in 1 MHz-band is a simple RF amplifier. The outputs of all receivers are fed to a data recorder which is actually a high-speed digital oscilloscope with a large amount of memory. The radio-waves were successfully recorded in 22 GHz-band with 500 MHz bandwidth, in 2 GHz-band with 300 MHz bandwidth, and in 1MHz-band. The waveforms in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands coincide well each other, and are composed of two groups of sharp impulses with a separation of about 20 micro seconds. The width of an impulse is less than 2 n sec. which is the resolution limit of the data recorder. We carried out optical observations using an ultra-high speed camera simultaneously through another window of the chamber. The time interval between scenes is 2 micro sec. We can see a faint light of the projectile before the first impact to the plate, and then a brilliant gas exploding backward from the plate and forward to the column. After hitting the column target, the brilliant gas flows to the chamber wall and is reflected back to make a mixture with dark gas in the chamber. Excellent correlation between radio-wave emission and the observed optical phenomena was obtained in the experiment. It is easily conceived that the radio-waves consist of quite a wide frequency

  4. CO2 non-LTE limb emissions in Mars' atmosphere as observed by OMEGA/Mars Express

    Piccialli, A.; López-Valverde, M. A.; Määttänen, A.; González-Galindo, F.; Audouard, J.; Altieri, F.; Forget, F.; Drossart, P.; Gondet, B.; Bibring, J. P.

    2016-06-01

    We report on daytime limb observations of Mars upper atmosphere acquired by the OMEGA instrument on board the European spacecraft Mars Express. The strong emission observed at 4.3 μm is interpreted as due to CO2 fluorescence of solar radiation and is detected at a tangent altitude in between 60 and 110 km. The main value of OMEGA observations is that they provide simultaneously spectral information and good spatial sampling of the CO2 emission. In this study we analyzed 98 dayside limb observations spanning over more than 3 Martian years, with a very good latitudinal and longitudinal coverage. Thanks to the precise altitude sounding capabilities of OMEGA, we extracted vertical profiles of the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) emission at each wavelength and we studied their dependence on several geophysical parameters, such as the solar illumination and the tangent altitude. The dependence of the non-LTE emission on solar zenith angle and altitude follows a similar behavior to that predicted by the non-LTE model. According to our non-LTE model, the tangent altitude of the peak of the CO2 emission varies with the thermal structure, but the pressure level where the peak of the emission is found remains constant at ˜0.03 ± 0.01 Pa, . This non-LTE model prediction has been corroborated by comparing SPICAM and OMEGA observations. We have shown that the seasonal variations of the altitude of constant pressure levels in SPICAM stellar occultation retrievals correlate well with the variations of the OMEGA peak emission altitudes, although the exact pressure level cannot be defined with the spectroscopy for the investigation of the characteristics of the atmosphere of Venus (SPICAM) nighttime data. Thus, observed changes in the altitude of the peak emission provide us information on the altitude of the 0.03 Pa pressure level. Since the pressure at a given altitude is dictated by the thermal structure below, the tangent altitude of the peak emission represents

  5. Observational constraints on upper tropospheric NOx emissions, lifetime, and oxidative products

    Nault, Benjamin Albert

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx ≡ NO + NO2) regulate tropospheric ozone (O3) production rates. In the upper troposphere (~8 -- 15 km above ground level), where O3 is an important greenhouse gas, there are few detailed measurements of NOx and its oxidation products. As a result, the chemical reactions that involve NO x are poorly characterized under the low temperature conditions in this region of the atmosphere. For the reactions that have been studied under these conditions (e.g., daytime nitric acid, or HNO3, and pernitric acid, or HO2NO2, production), the results from various experiments indicate a 20 -- 50% disagreement for the rate constants, and the other important NOx oxidation reactions (production of acyl peroxy nitrate, like PAN and PPN, and alkyl and multifunctional nitrates) have not been well characterized for the conditions characteristic of the upper troposphere. Besides the poorly understood NOx oxidation rates, recent calculations have indicated there is an important upper tropospheric NOx oxidation product (methyl peroxy nitrate, or CH3O2NO2) that has not been measured in the atmosphere. These uncertainties in the products and oxidation rate constants affect the characterization of the input of NO x from lightning. In this dissertation, I report observations obtained during two airborne field campaigns, the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3, May -- June, 2012) and the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, August -- September, 2013) experiments, and use these observations to investigate the reaction products and rate constants for the oxidation of NOx to less reactive reservoirs. The observations focused on fresh lightning emissions in deep convective outflow, and the subsequent chemical aging of the outflow downwind. First, I present the first ambient observations of CH3O 2NO2, and recommendations on how to measure upper tropospheric in situ NO2 with minimal interferences from

  6. Inhibition of type III radio emissions due to the interaction between two electron beams: Observations and simulations

    Briand, C; Henri, P.; Hoang, S

    2014-01-01

    We report the peculiar interaction of two type III bursts observed in the solar wind. As electronbeams propagating on the same magnetic field lines cross, a spectacular depletion of the type III radioemission is observed. We combine observations from the WAVES experiment on board the STEREO missiontogether with kinetic plasma simulations to study the extinction of type III radio emission resulting fromthe interaction between two electron beams. The remote observations enable to follow the ele...

  7. The Supernova Blast Wave and the Molecular Cloud: an Observational Study of Molecular Shock Emission.

    Richter, Matthew Joseph

    1995-01-01

    Shock waves in molecular clouds heat, compress, accelerate, and chemically alter the gas they encounter. Despite their crucial role in determining the physical state of the dense interstellar medium and despite their making possible direct observations of H_2, molecular shocks are still poorly understood, as evidenced by the many discrepancies between theory and observations. In my dissertation, I use the supernova remnant IC 443 as a laboratory to test our understanding of shock -excited H_2 emission. By examining roughly 20 separate 2-4 μm Ha transitions, I find the non-uniform temperature structure essentially reproduces that found in Orion Peak 1, and so is consistent with the partially dissociating J-shock model presented by Brand and collaborators. Subsequent mid-infrared observations of the pure rotational S(2) transition at 12 mu m strengthens these conclusions. Velocity resolved line profiles of the strong 1-0 S(1) transition uncover a relationship between the remnant's large-scale geometry and the line profile's full-width at 10% intensity, centroid, and shape. The relationship contradicts any model requiring local bow geometries to explain broad H_2 line widths. Comparing the 1-0 S(1) data with similar observations of the 2-1 S(1) line, I demonstrate that the excitation temperature in the shocked gas depends primarily on position, not velocity. Taken together, the identical velocity extent of the 1-0 S(1) and the 2-1 S(1) lines and their upper state energy separation of E/k ~ 6000 K proves the H_2 -emitting gas reaches its full velocity dispersion prior to cooling below roughly 1500 K. Finally, I compare, with similar spatial and spectral resolution, H_2 and HCO^+ J = 1 - 0 and find evidence for temperature gradients as a result of both preshock density inhomogeneities and postshock cooling.

  8. Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) Observations of Dust Opacity During Aerobraking and Science Phasing

    Smith, Michael D.; Pearl, John C.; Conrath, Barney J.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) arrived at Mars in September 1997 near Mars southern spring equinox and has now provided monitoring of conditions in the Mars atmosphere for more than half a Mars year. The large majority of the spectra taken by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) are in a nadir geometry (downward looking mode) where Mars is observed through the atmosphere. Most of these contain the distinct spectral signature of atmospheric dust. For these nadir-geometry spectra we retrieve column-integrated infrared aerosol (dust) opacities. TES observations during the aerobraking and science-phasing portions of the MGS mission cover the seasonal range L(sub s)=184 deg - 28 deg. Excellent spatial coverage was obtained in the southern hemisphere. Northern hemisphere coverage is generally limited to narrow strips taken during the periapsis pass but is still very valuable. At the beginning of the mission the 9-(micron)meter dust opacity at midsouthern latitudes was low (0.15-0.25). As the season advanced through southern spring and into summer, TES observed several regional dust storms (including the Noachis dust storm of November 1997) where peak 9-(micron)meter dust opacities approached or exceeded unity, as well as numerous smaller local storms. Both large and small dust storms exhibited significant changes in both spatial coverage and intensity over a timescale of a day. Throughout southern spring and summer the region at the edge of the retreating southern seasonal polar ice cap was observed to be consistently more dusty than other latitudes.

  9. Constraints on ship NOx emissions in Europe using GEOS-Chem and OMI satellite NO2 observations

    G. C. M. Vinken

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a top-down ship NOx emission inventory for the Baltic Sea, North Sea, Bay of Biscay and Mediterranean Sea, based on satellite observed tropospheric NO2 columns of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI for 2005–2006. We improved the representation of ship emissions in the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model, and compared simulated NO2 columns to consistent satellite observations. Relative differences between simulated and observed NO2 columns have been used to constrain ship emissions in four European seas (Baltic Sea, North Sea, Bay of Biscay and Mediterranean Sea. The constrained ship tracks account for 39% of total top-down European ship NOx emissions, which amounts to 0.96 Tg N for 2005, and 1.0 Tg N for 2006 (11–15% lower than the bottom-up EMEP ship emission inventory. Our results indicate that EMEP emissions in the Mediterranean Sea are too high (by 60% and misplaced by up to 150 km, which can have important consequences for local air quality simulations. In the North Sea, our top-down emissions amount to 0.05 Tg N for 2005 (35% lower than EMEP. Increased top-down emissions were found for the Baltic Sea and Bay of Biscay, with emission totals of 0.05 Tg N (131% higher than EMEP and 0.08 Tg N for 2005 (128% higher than EMEP, respectively. Our study explicitly accounts for the (non-linear sensitivity of satellite retrievals to changes in the a priori NO2 profiles. Although the effect of this sensitivity might be minor for small emission increments, our findings stress the need for consistent information in satellite retrieval and model, as satellite observations are never fully independent of model information (i.e. assumptions on vertical NO2 profiles. Our study provides for the first time a space-based top-down ship NOx emission inventory, and can serve as a framework for future studies to constrain ship emissions using satellite NO2 observations in other seas.

  10. Observation of ion cyclotron emission owing to DD fusion product H ions in JT-60U

    High-frequency fluctuations in the ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) are excited in magnetically confined plasmas because of the distortion of velocity distribution. In deuterium plasma experiments in JT-60U, ion cyclotron emission (ICE) detected as magnetic fluctuations is observed using ICRF antennas as pickup loops. The toroidal wave-numbers can be estimated using the phase differences between the signals from antenna elements arrayed in the toroidal direction. In this manuscript, ICE due to fusion product (FP) H ions, ICE(H), which is identified separately from the second-harmonic ICE caused by D ions, is newly reported. ICE is considered to result from spontaneous excitation of magnetosonic waves associated with FP high-energy ions. ICE caused by 3He ions and T ions has already been identified and confirmed to have finite toroidal wave-numbers. In contrast, ICE caused by ions originating in neutral beam injection has no toroidal wave-numbers. It is suggested that the appearance of ICE(H) depends strongly on the plasma density, and weak magnetic shear operation is one of the possible conditions for the observation of ICE(H). (author)

  11. New radio observations of anomalous microwave emission in the HII region RCW175

    Battistelli, E S; Cruciani, A; de Bernardis, P; Genova-Santos, R; Masi, S; Naldi, A; Paladini, R; Piacentini, F; Tibbs, C T; Verstraete, L; Ysard, N

    2015-01-01

    We have observed the HII region RCW175 with the 64m Parkes telescope at 8.4GHz and 13.5GHz in total intensity, and at 21.5GHz in both total intensity and polarization. High angular resolution, high sensitivity, and polarization capability enable us to perform a detailed study of the different constituents of the HII region. For the first time, we resolve three distinct regions at microwave frequencies, two of which are part of the same annular diffuse structure. Our observations enable us to confirm the presence of anomalous microwave emission (AME) from RCW175. Fitting the integrated flux density across the entire region with the currently available spinning dust models, using physically motivated assumptions, indicates the presence of at least two spinning dust components: a warm component with a relatively large hydrogen number density n_H=26.3/cm^3 and a cold component with a hydrogen number density of n_H=150/cm^3. The present study is an example highlighting the potential of using high angular-resolutio...

  12. Observations of 6 - 200 {\\mu}m emission of the Ophiuchus cloud LDN 1688

    Rawlings, M G; Lehtinen, K; Mattila, K; Lemke, D

    2012-01-01

    We examine two positions, ON1 and ON2, within the Ophiuchus cloud LDN 1688 using observations made with the ISOPHOT instrument aboard the ISO satellite. The data include mid-IR spectra (~6-12{\\mu}m) and several photometric bands up to 200{\\mu}m. The data probe the emission from molecular PAH-type species, transiently-heated Very Small Grains (VSGs), and large classical dust grains. We compare the observations to earlier studies, especially those carried out towards an isolated translucent cloud in Chamaeleon (Paper I). The spectra towards the two LDN 1688 positions are very similar to each other, in spite of position ON1 having a larger column density and probably being subjected to a stronger radiation field. The ratios of the mid-IR features are similar to those found in other diffuse and translucent clouds. Compared to paper I, the 7.7/11.3{\\mu}m band ratios are lower, ~2.0, at both LDN 1688 positions. A continuum is detected in the ~10{\\mu}m region. This is stronger towards the position ON1 but still lowe...

  13. Ionospheric perturbations associated with two huge earthquakes in Japan, using principal component analysis for multiple subionospheric VLF/LF propagation paths

    Maria Solovieva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The presence of ionospheric perturbations in possible association with two huge earthquakes (Noto-hanto peninsula and Niigata-chuetu-oki earthquakes in 2007 was studied on the basis of a conventional statistical study for a particular propagation path from the JJI transmitter in Miyazaki, Kyushu, to Moshiri in Hokkaido. This is based on automatic routine-based signal processing, in which the trend as the average nighttime amplitude is significantly decreased, with almost simultaneous significant enhancement in the night-time fluctuation as the night-time integration of negative fluctuation from the average. It is, however, shown that this routine-based signal analysis sometime suffers from artificial (or man-made effects. Thus, in this study, we propose an additional use of principal component analysis (PCA for simultaneous observation of a few VLF/LF propagation paths. With the application of this PCA method to multi-path data, the artificial effects can be reasonably removed, and also only the geophysical effects associated with earthquakes are detected, by focusing mainly on the third principal component. The satisfactory separation of the principal components is made possible by pre-analysis of the VLF data (extraction from the raw data of the average over a whole year. This PCA method enables us to identify the seismogenic effects in association with earthquakes with smaller magnitudes, down to M 5.5 or M 5.0.

     

  14. Observation of angular effects on thermal infrared emissivity derived with the MODTES algorithm and MODIS data

    García-Santos, Vicente; Niclòs, Raquel; Coll, César; Valor, Enric; Caselles, Vicente

    2015-04-01

    The MOD21 Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity (LST&E) product will be included in forthcoming MODIS Collection 6. Surface temperature and emissivities for thermal infrared (TIR) bands 29 (8.55 μm), 31 (11 μm) and 32 (12 μm) will be retrieved using the ASTER TES method adapted to MODIS at-sensor spectral radiances, previously corrected with the Water Vapor Scaling method (MODTES algorithm). LSE of most natural surfaces changes with soil moisture content, type of surface cover, surface roughness or sensor viewing geometry. The present study addresses the observation of anisotropy effects on LSE of bare soils using MODIS data and a processor simulator of the MOD21 product, since it is not available yet. Two highly homogeneous and quasi-invariant desert sites were selected to carry out the present study. The first one is the White Sands National Monument, located in Tularosa Valley (South-central New Mexico, USA), which is a dune system desert at 1216 m above sea level, with an area of 704 km2 and a maximum dune height of 10 m. The grain size is considered fine sand and the major mineralogy component is gypsum. The second site selected was the Great Sands National Park, located in the San Luis Valley (Colorado, USA). Great Sands is also a sand dune system desert, created from quartz and volcanic fragments derived from Santa Fe and Alamosa formations. The major mineral is quartz, with minor traces of potassium and feldspar. The grain size of the sand is medium to coarse according to the X-Ray Diffraction measurements. Great Sands covers an area of 104 km2 at 2560 m above sea level and the maximum dune height is 230 m. The obtained LSEs and their dependence on azimuth and zenith viewing angles were analyzed, based on series of MODIS scenes from 2010 to 2013. MODTES nadir and off-nadir LSEs showed a good agreement with laboratory emissivity measurements. Results show that band 29 LSE decreases with the zenithal angle up to 0.041 from its nadir value, while LSEs for

  15. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE WFC3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE: EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES FROM INFRARED GRISM OBSERVATIONS

    We present grism spectra of emission-line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6 to 1.6 μm from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope. These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L 0.6-0.95 μm grism data in GOODS-South from the PEARS program, extending the wavelength coverage well past the G800L red cutoff. The Early Release Science (ERS) grism field was observed at a depth of two orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which is presented here. ELGs are studied via the Hα, [O III], and [O II] emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2 ∼B(F098M) ≅ 25 mag. Seventeen GOODS-South galaxies that previously only had photometric redshifts now have new grism-spectroscopic redshifts, in some cases with large corrections to the photometric redshifts (Δz ≅ 0.3-0.5). Additionally, one galaxy had no previously measured redshift but now has a secure grism-spectroscopic redshift, for a total of 18 new GOODS-South spectroscopic redshifts. The faintest source in our sample has a magnitude mAB(F098M)= 26.9 mag. The ERS grism data also reflect the expected trend of lower specific star formation rates for the highest mass galaxies in the sample as a function of redshift, consistent with downsizing and discovered previously from large surveys. These results demonstrate the remarkable efficiency and capability of the WFC3 NIR grisms for measuring galaxy properties to faint magnitudes and redshifts to z ∼> 2.

  16. A flare observed in coronal, transition region, and helium I 10830 Å emissions

    Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda [Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Qiu, Jiong [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States); Judge, Philip G. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    On 2012 June 17, we observed the evolution of a C-class flare associated with the eruption of a filament near a large sunspot in the active region NOAA 11504. We obtained high spatial resolution filtergrams using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory in broadband TiO at 706 nm (bandpass: 10 Å) and He I 10830 Å narrow band (bandpass: 0.5 Å, centered 0.25 Å to the blue). We analyze the spatio-temporal behavior of the He I 10830 Å data, which were obtained over a 90''×90'' field of view with a cadence of 10 s. We also analyze simultaneous data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, and data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and GOES spacecrafts. Non-thermal effects are ignored in this analysis. Several quantitative aspects of the data, as well as models derived using the '0D' enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops model code, indicate that the triplet states of the 10830 Å multiplet are populated by photoionization of chromospheric plasma followed by radiative recombination. Surprisingly, the He II 304 Å line is reasonably well matched by standard emission measure calculations, along with the C IV emission which dominates the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly 1600 Å channel during flares. This work lends support to some of our previous work combining X-ray, EUV, and UV data of flares to build models of energy transport from corona to chromosphere.

  17. Statistical correlation of low-altitude ENA emissions with geomagnetic activity from IMAGE/MENA observations

    Mackler, D. A.; Jahn, J.-M.; Perez, J. D.; Pollock, C. J.; Valek, P. W.

    2016-03-01

    Plasma sheet particles transported Earthward during times of active magnetospheric convection can interact with exospheric/thermospheric neutrals through charge exchange. The resulting Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) are free to leave the influence of the magnetosphere and can be remotely detected. ENAs associated with low-altitude (300-800 km) ion precipitation in the high-latitude atmosphere/ionosphere are termed low-altitude emissions (LAEs). Remotely observed LAEs are highly nonisotropic in velocity space such that the pitch angle distribution at the time of charge exchange is near 90°. The Geomagnetic Emission Cone of LAEs can be mapped spatially, showing where proton energy is deposited during times of varying geomagnetic activity. In this study we present a statistical look at the correlation between LAE flux (intensity and location) and geomagnetic activity. The LAE data are from the MENA imager on the IMAGE satellite over the declining phase of solar cycle 23 (2000-2005). The SYM-H, AE, and Kp indices are used to describe geomagnetic activity. The goal of the study is to evaluate properties of LAEs in ENA images and determine if those images can be used to infer properties of ion precipitation. Results indicate a general positive correlation to LAE flux for all three indices, with the SYM-H showing the greatest sensitivity. The magnetic local time distribution of LAEs is centered about midnight and spreads with increasing activity. The invariant latitude for all indices has a slightly negative correlation. The combined results indicate LAE behavior similar to that of ion precipitation.

  18. Assessment of Models of Galactic Thermal Dust Emission Using COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE Observations

    Odegard, N; Chuss, D T; Miller, N J

    2016-01-01

    Accurate modeling of the spectrum of thermal dust emission at millimeter wavelengths is important for improving the accuracy of foreground subtraction for CMB measurements, for improving the accuracy with which the contributions of different foreground emission components can be determined, and for improving our understanding of dust composition and dust physics. We fit four models of dust emission to high Galactic latitude COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE observations from 3 millimeters to 100 microns and compare the quality of the fits. We consider the two-level systems model because it provides a physically motivated explanation for the observed long wavelength flattening of the dust spectrum and the anticorrelation between emissivity index and dust temperature. We consider the model of Finkbeiner, Davis, and Schlegel because it has been widely used for CMB studies, and the generalized version of this model recently applied to Planck data by Meisner and Finkbeiner. For comparison we have also fit a phenomenologic...

  19. Observation of CH4 and other Non-CO2 Green House Gas Emissions from California

    Fischer, Marc L.; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Riley, William J.; Andrews, Arlyn C.

    2009-01-09

    In 2006, California passed the landmark assembly bill AB-32 to reduce California's emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to global climate change. AB-32 commits California to reduce total GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, a reduction of 25 percent from current levels. To verify that GHG emission reductions are actually taking place, it will be necessary to measure emissions. We describe atmospheric inverse model estimates of GHG emissions obtained from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project. In collaboration with NOAA, we are measuring the dominant long-lived GHGs at two tall-towers in central California. Here, we present estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions obtained by statistical comparison of measured and predicted atmospheric mixing ratios. The predicted mixing ratios are calculated using spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and surface footprints, that provide a proportional relationship between the surface emissions and the mixing ratio signal at tower locations. The footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. Integral to the inverse estimates, we perform a quantitative analysis of errors in atmospheric transport and other factors to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated emissions. Regressions of modeled and measured mixing ratios suggest that total CH{sub 4} emissions are within 25% of the inventory estimates. A Bayesian source sector analysis obtains posterior scaling factors for CH{sub 4} emissions, indicating that emissions from several of the sources (e.g., landfills, natural gas use, petroleum production, crops, and wetlands) are roughly consistent with inventory estimates, but livestock emissions are significantly higher than the inventory. A Bayesian 'region' analysis is used to identify spatial variations in CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions within California

  20. Estimating methane and nitrous oxide emissions in California using multi-tower observations and hierarchical Bayesian inversion

    Jeong, S.; Hsu, Y.; Newman, S.; Zhang, J.; Andrews, A. E.; Bianco, L.; Bagley, J.; Cui, X.; Graven, H. D.; Kim, J.; Salameh, P.; LaFranchi, B. W.; Priest, C.; Campos-Pineda, M.; Novakovskaia, E.; Sloop, C.; Michelsen, H. A.; Bambha, R.; Weiss, R. F.; Keeling, R. F.; Fischer, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of annual state total methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from California using atmospheric observations from thirteen sites (six sites for N2O) in California during June 2013 - May 2014. A hierarchical Bayesian inversion (HBI) method is used to estimate CH4 and N2O emissions for spatial regions (0.3 degree pixels) by comparing measured mixing ratios with transport model (WRF-STILT) predictions. Using the multi-site measurements across California, the HBI analysis constrains a significant portion of expected emissions for both CH4 and N2O in the Central Valley and southern California. Based on the HBI analysis, we estimate a likely range of the state's annual CH4 emissions is 2.4 - 2.7 Tg CH4/yr (at 68% confidence), which is 1.4 - 1.6 times the total estimated by the California Air Resources Board (CARB). Similarly, we estimate the state's annual N2O emissions to be 77 - 95 Gg N2O/yr (at 68% confidence), which are 1.6 - 2.0 times CARB's state total. These results suggest that the combined total of CH4 and N2O emissions from the HBI analysis would comprise 18 - 21% of state total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, higher than 12% estimated in the current state inventory. Additionally, we expand previous evaluations of possible systematic bias in annual emission estimates due to transport model error by comparing measured and predicted carbon monoxide (CO) for four of the sites. These results highlight the need for multiple independent methods to estimate non-CO2 GHG emissions, and offer insight into opportunities for non-CO2 GHG emission mitigation efforts towards achieving California's GHG emission goals.

  1. Observation of modulated spontaneous emission of Rhodamine 6G in low refractive index contrast 1D-periodic gelatin film

    2010-01-01

    The modulation of the spontaneous emission of Rhodamine 6G has been observed in one-dimensional periodic dielectric structure of dichromated gelatin film with refractive index contrast as low as 0.01. The spontaneous emission is enhanced at the band edges and inhibits in the band gap, which agree well with the theoretical analysis on the redistribution of the fractional local density of optical states.

  2. Eddy covariance observations of methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Towards more accurate estimates from ecosystems

    About 30% of the increased greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are related to land use changes and agricultural activities. In order to select effective measures, knowledge is required about GHG emissions from these ecosystems and how these emissions are influenced by management and meteorological conditions. Accurate emission values are therefore needed for all three GHGs to compile the full GHG balance. However, the current annual estimates of CH4 and N2O emissions from ecosystems have significant uncertainties, even larger than 50%. The present study showed that an advanced technique, micrometeorological eddy covariance flux technique, could obtain more accurate estimates with uncertainties even smaller than 10%. The current regional and global trace gas flux estimates of CH4 and N2O are possibly seriously underestimated due to incorrect measurement procedures. Accurate measurements of both gases are really important since they could even contribute for more than two-third to the total GHG emission. For example: the total GHG emission of a dairy farm site was estimated at 16.103 kg ha-1 yr-1 in CO2-equivalents from which 25% and 45% was contributed by CH4 and N2O, respectively. About 60% of the CH4 emission was emitted by ditches and their bordering edges. These emissions are not yet included in the national inventory reports. We recommend including these emissions in coming reports.

  3. Mapping water seepage from Lake Nasser, Egypt, using the VLF-EM method: a case study

    Khalil, Mohamed A.; Santos, Fernando A. Monteiro; Moustafa, Sameh M.; Saad, Usama M.

    2009-06-01

    In order to map the spatial distribution of water seepage from the Nasser Lake to its adjacent shallow Nubian sandstone aquifer, a geophysical survey was carried out at a seismically active area called Khor El Ramlah-west that contains the Khor El Ramlah regional fault. The survey comprised nine, roughly E-W, very-low-frequency electromagnetics (VLF-EM) traverse profiles and three N-S longitudinal profiles. Qualitative interpretation of the VLF-EM data was carried out using Fraser and Karous-Hjelt filters. Quantitative interpretation of the data was done with a 2D code that performs the inversion of the tipper data. The resulted 2D inversion models revealed low resistivity zones that were interpreted as correlated (1) to sandstone formation saturated with water from seepage and (2) to a NW-SE fault that may represent a preferential path for the water flow from the lake to the onshore aquifer.

  4. Recent Observations and Modeling of Narrowband Stimulated Electromagnetic Emissions SEEs at the HAARP Facility

    Scales, Wayne; Bernhardt, Paul; McCarrick, Michael; Briczinski, Stanley; Mahmoudian, Alireza; Fu, Haiyang; Ranade Bordikar, Maitrayee; Samimi, Alireza

    There has been significant interest in so-called narrowband Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission SEE over the past several years due to recent discoveries at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program HAARP facility near Gakone, Alaska. Narrowband SEE (NSEE) has been defined as spectral features in the SEE spectrum typically within 1 kHz of the transmitter (or pump) frequency. SEE is due to nonlinear processes leading to re-radiation at frequencies other than the pump wave frequency during heating the ionospheric plasma with high power HF radio waves. Although NSEE exhibits a richly complex structure, it has now been shown after a substantial number of observations at HAARP, that NSEE can be grouped into two basic classes. The first are those spectral features, associated with Stimulated Brillouin Scatter SBS, which typically occur when the pump frequency is not close to electron gyro-harmonic frequencies. Typically, these spectral features are within roughly 50 Hz of the pump wave frequency where it is to be noted that the O+ ion gyro-frequency is roughly 50 Hz. The second class of spectral features corresponds to the case when the pump wave frequency is typically within roughly 10 kHz of electron gyro-harmonic frequencies. In this case, spectral features ordered by harmonics of ion gyro-frequencies are typically observed, and termed Stimulated Ion Bernstein Scatter SIBS. There is also important parametric behavior on both classes of NSEE depending on the pump wave parameters including the field strength, antenna beam angle, and electron gyro-harmonic number. This presentation will first provide an overview of the recent NSEE experimental observations at HAARP. Both Stimulated Brillouin Scatter SBS and Stimulated Ion Bernstein Scatter SIBS observations will be discussed as well as their relationship to each other. Possible theoretical formulation in terms of parametric decay instabilities will be provided. Computer simulation model results will be presented

  5. NUV/Blue spectral observations of sprites in the 320-460 nm region: ${\\mathrm N_2}$ (2PG) Emissions

    Heavner, M J; Siefring, C; Sentman, D D; Moudry, D R; Wescott, E M; Bucsela, E J

    2010-01-01

    A near-ultraviolet (NUV) spectrograph (320-460 nm) was flown on the EXL98 aircraft sprite observation campaign during July 1998. In this wavelength range video rate (60 fields/sec) spectrographic observations found the NUV/blue emissions to be predominantly N2 (2PG). The negligible level of N2+ (1NG) present in the spectrum is confirmed by observations of a co-aligned, narrowly filtered 427.8 nm imager and is in agreement with previous ground-based filtered photometer observations. The synthetic spectral fit to the observations indicates a characteristic energy of ~1.8 eV, in agreement with our other NUV observations.

  6. Observation of the O I ultraviolet intercombination emissions in the terrestrial dayglow

    Bowers, C. W.; Feldman, P. D.; Tennyson, P. D.; Kane, M.

    1987-01-01

    The first measurement of the 1173-A O I intercombination line in emission in the terrestrial dayglow was performed using the EUV-FUV spectrometer designed to be flown with the Astro-1 observatory. The atmospheric conditions and viewing geometry were such as to suppress nitrogen emission relative to those from atomic oxygen, permitting the identification and measurement of the weak O I 1173-A intercombination multiplet and the 1641-A line as well as the strong 989-A and 1304-A emissions. At lower altitudes, the 1173-A emission rate increased while the 989-A emission, from the same upper level, decreased. This behavior is consistent with the radiative entrapment model of Meier (1982) and the laboratory value of the 1173-A/989-A branching ratio measured by Morrison (1985). The 1641-A/1304-A emission ratio is also consistent with a radiative entrapment model.

  7. Location accuracy of VLF World-Wide Lightning Location (WWLL) network: Post-algorithm upgrade

    Rodger, C. J.; Brundell, J. B.; Dowden, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental VLF World-Wide Lightning Location (WWLL) network has been developed through collaborations with research institutions across the globe. The aim of the WWLL is to provide global real-time locations of lightning discharges, with >50% CG flash detection efficiency and mean location accuracy of <10km. While these goals are essentially arbitrary, they do define a point where the WWLL network development can be judged a success, providing a breakpoint for a more stable...

  8. Origin of the ring-shaped emission pattern observed from the field emission of ZnO nanowire: role of adsorbates and electron initial velocity

    A ring-shaped pattern was observed in the field emission from ZnO nanowires. These ring patterns are different from those previously reported from metallic or carbon nanotube emitters, which occur under high current density. The influences of the applied field and anode to emitter distance on the ring-shaped pattern have been investigated. On the basis of the experiment results, an edge emission model induced by the field desorption has been proposed. Furthermore, it is found that an initial velocity is essential to obtain the desired pattern size. The initial velocity of emitting electron is estimated by using field induced hot electron emission model. Simulation results from the model are consistent with the experimental results. (paper)

  9. Observational cosmology with the PLANCK satellite: modelling of the polarized Galactic emissions

    This thesis is dedicated to the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies measurement and to the characterisation of the foreground Galactic emissions. This work is in the framework of the Planck satellite data analysis preparation. First, this thesis give a description of the Big Bang model and of the CMB physics. Then, we present the Archeops, WMAP and PLANCK experiments and their data analysis. Part two is devoted to the description of the diffuse Galactic synchrotron, free-free and thermal dust emissions and to the study of those emissions in the Galactic plane. Using comparison between our simulations and the WMAP, Archeops and IRIS data we are able to provide partial maps of the spatial variations of the dust grain temperature and of the spectral index of the synchrotron and thermal dust emissions. Third part is dedicated to the study of the two main polarized Galactic emissions: synchrotron and thermal dust emissions. We evaluate effective models based on template maps. We also build physical model based on physics for these emissions that is to say shape of the Galactic magnetic field and matter density in our Galaxy. Using maps and Galactic profiles, we compare our simulations of these emissions to the Archeops and WMAP data. Thanks to that we are able to provide for the first time a coherent model of the synchrotron and thermal dust emissions. Then we propose a method to improved the constraints on our model using the PLANCK data. Finally the last part focuses on the angular power spectra of the polarized Galactic emissions. We estimate the contamination due to these foreground emissions on the CMB signal. In addition we propose a method to minimize the contamination of the CMB PLANCK data by the thermal dust emission using masks. (author)

  10. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from behind-the-limb solar flares

    Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Petrosian, Vahe'; Liu, Wei; da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Allafort, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Fermi-LAT >30 MeV observations have increased the number of detected solar flares by almost a factor of 10 with respect to previous space observations. These sample both the impulsive and long duration phases of GOES M and X class flares. Of particular interest is the recent detections of three solar flares whose position behind the limb was confirmed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. While gamma-ray emission up to tens of MeV resulting from proton interactions has been detected before from occulted solar flares, the significance of these particular events lies in the fact that these are the first detections of >100 MeV gamma-ray emission from footpoint-occulted flares. We will present the Fermi-LAT, RHESSI and STEREO observations of these flares and discuss the various emission scenarios for these sources and implications for the particle acceleration mechanisms.

  11. Estimating SO2 emissions from a large point source using 10 year OMI SO2 observations: Afsin Elbistan Power Plant

    Kaynak Tezel, Burcak; Firatli, Ertug

    2016-04-01

    SO2 pollution has still been a problem for parts of Turkey, especially regions with large scale coal power plants. In this study, 10 year Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) SO2 observations are used for estimating SO2 emissions from large point sources in Turkey. We aim to estimate SO2 emissions from coal power plants where no online monitoring is available and improve the emissions given in current emission inventories with these top-down estimates. High-resolution yearly averaged maps are created on a domain over large point sources by oversampling SO2 columns for each grid for the years 2005-2014. This method reduced the noise and resulted in a better signal from large point sources and it was used for coal power plants in U.S and India, previously. The SO2 signal over selected power plants are observed with this method, and the spatiotemporal changes of SO2 signal are analyzed. With the assumption that OMI SO2 observations are correlating with emissions, long-term OMI SO2 observation averages can be used to estimate emission levels of significant point sources. Two-dimensional Gaussian function is used for explaining the relationships between OMI SO2 observations and emissions. Afsin Elbistan Power Plant, which is the largest capacity coal power plant in Turkey, is investigated in detail as a case study. The satellite scans within 50 km of the power plant are selected and averaged over a 2 x 2 km2 gridded domain by smoothing method for 2005-2014. The yearly averages of OMI SO2 are calculated to investigate the magnitude and the impact area of the SO2 emissions of the power plant. A significant increase in OMI SO2 observations over Afsin Elbistan from 2005 to 2009 was observed (over 2 times) possibly due to the capacity increase from 1715 to 2795 MW in 2006. Comparison between the yearly gross electricity production of the plant and OMI SO2 observations indicated consistency until 2009, but OMI SO2 observations indicated a rapid increase while gross electricity

  12. Source attribution using FLEXPART and carbon monoxide emission inventories for the IAGOS In-situ Observation database

    Fontaine, Alain; Sauvage, Bastien; Pétetin, Hervé; Auby, Antoine; Boulanger, Damien; Thouret, Valerie

    2016-04-01

    Since 1994, the IAGOS program (In-Service Aircraft for a Global Observing System http://www.iagos.org) and its predecessor MOZAIC has produced in-situ measurements of the atmospheric composition during more than 46000 commercial aircraft flights. In order to help analyzing these observations and further understanding the processes driving their evolution, we developed a modelling tool SOFT-IO quantifying their source/receptor link. We improved the methodology used by Stohl et al. (2003), based on the FLEXPART plume dispersion model, to simulate the contributions of anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions from the ECCAD database (http://eccad.aeris-data.fr) to the measured carbon monoxide mixing ratio along each IAGOS flight. Thanks to automated processes, contributions are simulated for the last 20 days before observation, separating individual contributions from the different source regions. The main goal is to supply add-value products to the IAGOS database showing pollutants geographical origin and emission type. Using this information, it may be possible to link trends in the atmospheric composition to changes in the transport pathways and to the evolution of emissions. This tool could be used for statistical validation as well as for inter-comparisons of emission inventories using large amounts of data, as Lagrangian models are able to bring the global scale emissions down to a smaller scale, where they can be directly compared to the in-situ observations from the IAGOS database.

  13. VLF-R studies in the Agora of Magnesia archaeological site, Aydin, Turkey

    Very low frequency wave-resistivity (VLF-R) method has been widely used for near surface and archaeological prospection over the last two decades. Shallow buried structures that show resistivity variation with respect to a surrounding medium could be determined with VLF-R. It is also a particularly rapid and cost-effective technique for collecting data on large-scale exploration. VLF-R studies were carried out in the Agora of Magnesia archaeological site (Aydın, Turkey) in order to determine the location and depth of ruins of the temple of Zeus. After performing theoretical studies to test the inversion algorithm, apparent resistivity and phase data were collected with three different frequencies and a laterally constrained two-layer inversion process was applied to each station. In addition to the inversion of all profiles for each frequency, all lines were stacked within a precise resistivity interval to obtain a 3D view of the structure. An excavation site is recommended after achieving the location of the temple. (paper)

  14. Airborne Observations of Mercury Emissions from the Chicago/Gary Urban/Industrial Area during the 2013 NOMADSS Campaign

    Gratz, L.; Ambrose, J. L., II; Jaffe, D. A.; Knote, C. J.; Jaegle, L.; Selin, N. E.; Campos, T. L.; Flocke, F. M.; Reeves, J. M.; Stechman, D. M.; Stell, M. H.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D.; Tyndall, G. S.; Mauldin, L.; Cantrell, C. A.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Blake, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric emissions from the Chicago/Gary urban/industrial area significantly enhance ambient mercury (Hg) concentrations and lead to increased levels of atmospheric mercury deposition within the Lake Michigan Basin (Gratz et al., 2013a; Gratz et al., 2013b; Landis and Keeler, 2002; Landis et al., 2002; Vette et al., 2002). In this study we use airborne observations of total atmospheric Hg (THg) collected over Lake Michigan during summer 2013 as part of the Nitrogen, Oxidants, Mercury, and Aerosol Distributions, Sources, and Sinks (NOMADSS) field campaign to quantify the outflow of total atmospheric Hg from the Chicago/Gary urban/industrial area. We use concurrent airborne measurements of THg, carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) to calculate measured enhancement ratios (ER) and thus characterize Chicago/Gary emissions. We determine the observed THg/CO ER in outflow from Chicago/Gary to be 2.11x10-7 mol mol-1, which is comparable to values reported in the literature for other major U.S. urban/industrial areas (Radke et al., 2007; Talbot et al., 2008; Weiss-Penzias et al., 2013). We also employ the FLEXPART Lagrangian transport and dispersion model to simulate air mass transport during plume encounters. We convolve the emissions of each species from the 2011 U.S. EPA National Emissions Inventory (NEI) with the FLEXPART-modeled air mass transport to compare our observations to inventoried emission ratios (EmR). We find that the inventoried THg/CO EmRs are biased low by -63% to -67% compared to the observed ERs for the Chicago/Gary area. This suggests that there are many small emission sources that are not fully accounted for within the inventory, and/or that the re-emission of legacy Hg is a significant source of THg to the atmosphere in this region.

  15. Global Partitioning of NOx Sources Using Satellite Observations: Relative Roles of Fossil Fuel Combustion, Biomass Burning and Soil Emissions

    Jaegle, Lyatt; Steinberger, Linda; Martin, Randall V.; Chance, Kelly

    2005-01-01

    This document contains the following abstract for the paper "Global partitioning of NOx sources using satellite observations: Relative roles of fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning and soil emissions." Satellite observations have been used to provide important new information about emissions of nitrogen oxides. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are significant in atmospheric chemistry, having a role in ozone air pollution, acid deposition and climate change. We know that human activities have led to a three- to six-fold increase in NOx emissions since pre-industrial times, and that there are three main surface sources of NOx: fuel combustion, large-scale fires, and microbial soil processes. How each of these sources contributes to the total NOx emissions is subject to some doubt, however. The problem is that current NOx emission inventories rely on bottom-up approaches, compiling large quantities of statistical information from diverse sources such as fuel and land use, agricultural data, and estimates of burned areas. This results in inherently large uncertainties. To overcome this, Lyatt Jaegle and colleagues from the University of Washington, USA, used new satellite observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) instrument. As the spatial and seasonal distribution of each of the sources of NOx can be clearly mapped from space, the team could provide independent topdown constraints on the individual strengths of NOx sources, and thus help resolve discrepancies in existing inventories. Jaegle's analysis of the satellite observations, presented at the recent Faraday Discussion on "Atmospheric Chemistry", shows that fuel combustion dominates emissions at northern mid-latitudes, while fires are a significant source in the Tropics. Additionally, she discovered a larger than expected role for soil emissions, especially over agricultural regions with heavy fertilizer use. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  16. Observations of free-free and anomalous microwave emission from LDN 1622 with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope

    Harper, S. E.; Dickinson, C.; Cleary, K.

    2015-11-01

    LDN 1622 has previously been identified as a possible strong source of dust-correlated anomalous microwave emission (AME). Previous observations were limited by resolution meaning that the radio emission could not be compared with current generation high-resolution infrared data from Herschel, Spitzer or Wide-field Infrared Sky Explorer. This paper presents arcminute resolution mapping observations of LDN 1622 at 4.85 and 13.7 GHz using the 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. The 4.85 GHz map reveals a corona of free-free emission enclosing LDN 1622 that traces the photodissociation region of the cloud. The brightest peaks of the 4.85 GHz map are found to be within ≈10 per cent agreement with the expected free-free predicted by Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas H α data of LDN 1622. At 13.7 GHz, the AME flux density was found to be 7.0 ± 1.4 mJy and evidence is presented for a rising spectrum between 13.7 and 31 GHz. The spinning dust model of AME is found to naturally account for the flux seen at 13.7 GHz. Correlations between the diffuse 13.7 GHz emission and the diffuse mid-infrared emission are used to further demonstrate that the emission originating from LDN 1622 at 13.7 GHz is described by the spinning dust model.

  17. Recent decreases in observed atmospheric concentrations of SO 2 in the Netherlands in line with emission reductions

    Velders, Guus J. M.; Snijder, André; Hoogerbrugge, Ronald

    2011-10-01

    Concentrations of sulphur dioxide (SO 2) have been decreasing in the Netherlands since the beginning of the 1980s, as a result of national and international emission control measures. Since 2007, concentrations observed at the Rotterdam port and industrial areas have shown a large decrease that is in line with recent emission control measures. The average annual SO 2 concentration in 2010 was about 50% below 2000-2006 levels. This drop in concentration level corresponds with recent decreases in emissions of SO 2 from Dutch refineries and international sea shipping, on top of the gradual decreases in emissions from sources outside the Netherlands. The reduction in the emissions from refineries was initiated by a ceiling on the total amount of emissions from this sector, effective since 2010. Emission reductions from sea shipping result from two types of regulations to reduce the sulphur content in marine fuel, by 2010; regulation by the International Maritime Organization for sea ships on the North Sea, and by the EU directive for ships at berth in ports.

  18. Free-free and H42alpha emission from the dusty starburst within NGC 4945 as observed by ALMA

    Bendo, G J; D'Cruze, M J; Dickinson, C; Fuller, G A; Karim, A

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of the 85.69 GHz continuum emission and H42alpha line emission from the central 30 arcsec within NGC 4945. Both sources of emission originate from nearly identical structures that can be modelled as exponential discs with a scale length of ~2.1 arcsec (or ~40 pc). An analysis of the spectral energy distribution based on combining these data with archival data imply that 84% +/- 10% of the 85.69 GHz continuum emission originates from free-free emission. The electron temperature is 5400 +/- 600 K, which is comparable to what has been measured near the centre of the Milky Way Galaxy. The star formation rate (SFR) based on the H42alpha and 85.69 GHz free-free emission (and using a distance of 3.8 Mpc) is 4.35 +/- 0.25 M/yr. This is consistent with the SFR from the total infrared flux and with previous measurements based on recombination line emission, and it is within a factor of ~2 of SFRs derived from radio data. The Spitzer Space Telescope 24 micron data and Wide-field Infrared Survey E...

  19. HST-COS Observations of Hydrogen, Helium, Carbon and Nitrogen Emission from the SN 1987A Reverse Shock

    France, Kevin; Penton, Steven V; Kirshner, Robert P; Challis, Peter; Laming, J Martin; Bouchet, Patrice; Chevalier, Roger; Fransson, Claes; Garnavich, Peter M; Heng, Kevin; Larsson, Josefin; Lawrence, Stephen; Lundqvist, Peter; Panagia, Nino; Pun, Chun S J; Smith, Nathan; Sollerman, Jesper; Sonneborn, George; Sugerman, Ben; Wheeler, J Craig

    2011-01-01

    We present the most sensitive ultraviolet observations of Supernova 1987A to date. Imaging spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph shows many narrow (dv \\sim 300 km/s) emission lines from the circumstellar ring, broad (dv \\sim 10 -- 20 x 10^3 km/s) emission lines from the reverse shock, and ultraviolet continuum emission. The high signal-to-noise (> 40 per resolution element) broad LyA emission is excited by soft X-ray and EUV heating of mostly neutral gas in the circumstellar ring and outer supernova debris. The ultraviolet continuum at \\lambda > 1350A can be explained by HI 2-photon emission from the same region. We confirm our earlier, tentative detection of NV \\lambda 1240 emission from the reverse shock and we present the first detections of broad HeII \\lambda1640, CIV \\lambda1550, and NIV] \\lambda1486 emission lines from the reverse shock. The helium abundance in the high-velocity material is He/H = 0.14 +/- 0.06. The NV/H-alpha line ratio requires partial ion-electron e...

  20. Characteristic properties of Nu whistlers as inferred from observations and numerical modelling

    Shklyar, D.; Chum, J.; Jirícek, F.

    2004-10-01

    The properties of Nu whistlers are discussed in the light of observations by the MAGION 5 satellite, and of numerically simulated spectrograms of lightning-induced VLF emissions. The method of simulation is described in full. With the information from this numerical modelling, we distinguish the characteristics of the spectrograms that depend on the site of the lightning strokes from those that are determined mainly by the position of the satellite. Also, we identify the region in the magnetosphere where Nu whistlers are observed most often, and the geomagnetic conditions favouring their appearance. The relation between magnetospherically reflected (MR) whistlers and Nu whistlers is demonstrated by the gradual transformation of MR whistlers into Nu whistlers as the satellite moves from the high-altitude equatorial region to lower altitudes and higher latitudes. The magnetospheric reflection of nonducted whistler-mode waves, which is of decisive importance in the formation of Nu whistlers, is discussed in detail.

  1. Estimating Amazonian methane emissions through 4D-Var inverse modelling with satellite observations from GOSAT and IASI

    Wilson, C. J.; Chipperfield, M.; Gloor, M.; McNorton, J.; Miller, J. B.; Gatti, L. V.; Siddans, R.; Bloom, A. A.; Basso, L. S.; Boesch, H.; Parker, R.; Monks, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Methane (CH4) is emitted from a range of anthropogenic and natural sources, and since the industrial revolution its mean atmospheric concentration has climbed dramatically. CH4 produces a relatively high radiative forcing effect upon the Earth's climate, and its atmospheric lifetime of approximately 10 years makes it an appealing target for the mitigation of climate change. However, the spatial and temporal variation of CH4 emissions are not well understood, though in recent years a number of top-down and bottom-up studies have attempted to construct improved emission budgets. However, some top-down studies suffer from poor observational coverage near the Amazon basin, particularly in the planetary boundary layer. Since emissions from this region, coming mainly from wetland and burning sources, are thought to be relatively high, additional observations in this region would greatly help to constrain the geographical distribution of the global CH4 emission budget. To this end, regular flask measurements of CH4 and other trace gases have been taken during flights over four Amazonian sites since 2010, as part of the AMAZONICA project. The GOSAT has been used to retrieve global column-average CH4 concentrations since mid-2009, whilst IASI, on-board Metop-A, has also been measuring atmospheric CH4 concentrations since its launch in 2006. We present an assessment of Amazonian methane emissions for 2010 and 2011 using the TOMCAT Chemical Transport Model and the new variational inverse model, INVICAT. These models are used to attribute methane variations at each Amazon site to a source type and region, to assess the ability of our current CH4 flux estimates to reproduce these observations and to produce improved posterior emission estimates through assimilation of atmospheric observations. This study represents the first use of the INVICAT scheme to constrain emissions of any atmospheric trace gas. Whilst there is generally good agreement between the model and the

  2. Analysis of Midlatitude Auroral Emissions Observed During the Impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter

    Bauske, Rainer; Combi, Michael R.; Clarke, John T.

    1999-01-01

    During the impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 fragment K on Jupiter observers detected aurora-like emissions near the impact region as well as in the other hemisphere at approximately magnetic conjugate positions equatorward of aurorae latitudes. A number of generation mechanisms were suggested, but investigations of their significance have been hampered by a lack of knowledge about the jovian internal magnetic field, the exact timing, and the geometry of the impact and emission sites. We use the VIP 4 model of the internal magnetic field, high-time-resolution calculations of the fragment K trajectory, and images from the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 with advanced processing to reanalyze the relationship between these emissions. The impact location is enclosed to the north and south by two regions of enhanced far-ultraviolet emissions reaching a maximum distance of 18,000 km south of the impact site roughly along the line of the incoming fragment's trajectory. The southern region can be further divided into two subregions, which partly overlap with magnetic projections of two brighter emission regions observed in the northern hemisphere close to the line of footprints of Amalthea. The area of the southern region approximates the area of these projections. No enhanced emissions are found conjugate to the impact site and the northward emission region. The magnetic projections suggest that the Gossamer ring scattered particles coming from the region southward of the impact site and prevented precipitation from the northward region into the northern hemisphere. Particle acceleration by upward accelerating shocks seems feasible to explain the geometry of the southern and northern hemispheric emission regions if we assume that a part of the plume bounced twice and provided enough energy at its second bounce to also generate shock waves.

  3. Aging in autonomic control by multifractal studies of cardiac interbeat intervals in the VLF band

    The heart rate responds dynamically to various intrinsic and environmental stimuli. The autonomic nervous system is said to play a major role in this response. Multifractal analysis offers a novel method to assess the response of cardiac interbeat intervals. Twenty-four hour ECG recordings of RR interbeat intervals (of 48 elderly volunteers (age 65–94), 40 middle-aged persons (age 45–53) and 36 young adults (age 18–26)) were investigated to study the effect of aging on autonomic regulation during normal activity in healthy adults. Heart RR-interval variability in the very low frequency (VLF) band (32–420 RR intervals) was evaluated by multifractal tools. The nocturnal and diurnal signals of 6 h duration were studied separately. For each signal, the analysis was performed twice: for a given signal and for the integrated signal. A multifractal spectrum was quantified by the hmax value at which a multifractal spectrum attained its maximum, width of a spectrum, Hurst exponent, extreme events hleft and distance between the maxima of a signal and its integrated counterpart. The following seven characteristics are suggested as quantifying the age-related decrease in the autonomic function ('int' refers to the integrated signal): (a) hsleepmax − hmaxwake > 0.05 for a signal; (b) hintmax > 1.15 for wake; (c) hintmax − hmax > 0.85 for sleep; (d) Hurstwake − Hurstsleep < 0.01; (e) widthwake > 0.07; (f) widthint < 0.30 for sleep; (g) hintleft > 0.75. Eighty-one percent of elderly people had at least four of these properties, and ninety-two percent of young people had three or less. This shows that the multifractal approach offers a concise and reliable index of healthy aging for each individual. Additionally, the applied method yielded insights into dynamical changes in the autonomic regulation due to the circadian cycle and aging. Our observations support the hypothesis that imbalance in the autonomic control due to healthy aging could be related to

  4. Fermi large area telescope observations of the cosmic-ray induced γ-ray emission of the Earth's atmosphere

    We report on measurements of the cosmic-ray induced γ-ray emission of Earth's atmosphere by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The Large Area Telescope has observed the Earth during its commissioning phase and with a dedicated Earth limb following observation in September 2008. These measurements yielded ∼6.4x106 photons with energies >100 MeV and ∼250 hours total live time for the highest quality data selection. This allows the study of the spatial and spectral distributions of these photons with unprecedented detail. The spectrum of the emission--often referred to as Earth albedo gamma-ray emission--has a power-law shape up to 500 GeV with spectral index Γ=2.79±0.06.

  5. Observation of visible emission from the molecular helium ion in the afterglow of a dense helium Z-pinch plasma

    The authors present the results of axial and radial time resolved visible emission spectroscopy from the afterglow of a dense helium Z-pinch. These results show that the visible emissions in the pinch afterglow are dominated by line emissions from molecular helium and He II. Axial spectroscopy measurements show the occurrence of several absorption bands which cannot be identified as molecular or atomic helium nor impurities from the discharge chamber materials. The authors believe that these absorption bands are attributable to the molecular helium ion which is present in the discharge. The molecular ion has been observed by others in low pressure and temperature helium discharges directly by means of mass spectrometry and indirectly by the presence of helium atoms in the 2/sup 3/S state, (the He 2/sup 3/S state is believed to result from molecular helium ion recombination). However, the molecular helium ion has not previously been observed spectroscopically

  6. Inverse Modeling of Texas NOx Emissions Using Space-Based and Ground-Based NO2 Observations

    Tang, Wei; Cohan, D.; Lamsal, L. N.; Xiao, X.; Zhou, W.

    2013-01-01

    Inverse modeling of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions using satellite-based NO2 observations has become more prevalent in recent years, but has rarely been applied to regulatory modeling at regional scales. In this study, OMI satellite observations of NO2 column densities are used to conduct inverse modeling of NOx emission inventories for two Texas State Implementation Plan (SIP) modeling episodes. Addition of lightning, aircraft, and soil NOx emissions to the regulatory inventory narrowed but did not close the gap between modeled and satellite observed NO2 over rural regions. Satellitebased top-down emission inventories are created with the regional Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx) using two techniques: the direct scaling method and discrete Kalman filter (DKF) with Decoupled Direct Method (DDM) sensitivity analysis. The simulations with satellite-inverted inventories are compared to the modeling results using the a priori inventory as well as an inventory created by a ground-level NO2 based DKF inversion. The DKF inversions yield conflicting results: the satellite based inversion scales up the a priori NOx emissions in most regions by factors of 1.02 to 1.84, leading to 3-55% increase in modeled NO2 column densities and 1-7 ppb increase in ground 8 h ozone concentrations, while the ground-based inversion indicates the a priori NOx emissions should be scaled by factors of 0.34 to 0.57 in each region. However, none of the inversions improve the model performance in simulating aircraft-observed NO2 or ground-level ozone (O3) concentrations.

  7. Stress triggering and stress memory observed from acoustic emission records in a salt mine

    Becker, D.; Cailleau, B.; Dahm, T.; Shapiro, S.; Kaiser, D.

    2010-08-01

    Some of the most interesting questions in geosciences are whether results from laboratory experiments can be applied to processes in the earth crust and whether in situ studies with high spatio-temporal resolution can bridge the gap between laboratory work and seismology. In this study, acoustic emission (AE) activity caused by stress changes due to the backfilling of a cavity in an abandoned salt mine is studied to answer questions regarding (1) the dependence of AE event rates, event distribution and b-value on the stress state, (2) the stress memory effect of rock (Kaiser effect), (3) the possibility to detect significant changes in the system like the initiation of macrocracks and (4) the possibility to estimate future activity from previous AE records. The large number of events studied (>3 × 105) allows a spatial resolution of the order of 1 m and a temporal one on the order of 1 hr. Stress changes are created due to the thermal expansion and contraction of the rock mass in response to the temperature changes caused by the backfilling. A roughly 20 × 50 × 50 m section of the mining complex just above the backfilled cavity is well covered by a network of 24 piezo-electric receivers and poses an optimal volume for the study. Results of a 2-D finite element thermoelastic stress model are in agreement with the spatio-temporal AE event distribution. In addition to the initial upward migration of the AE event front, which correlates with the calculated stress field, the rock salt exhibits a pronounced Kaiser effect for the first few thermal loading cycles throughout the whole study region. The deviation from the Kaiser effect during later loading cycles seems to be caused by the initiation of a planar macroscopic crack, which is subsequently reactivated. AE activity tends to concentrate along this macrocrack. Calculated b-values decrease before and increase after the supposed initiation of the macrocrack supporting this explanation. In intact rock volumes not

  8. Observation and analysis of self-amplified spontaneous emission at the APS low-energy undulator test line

    Arnold, N D; Banks, G; Bechtold, R; Beczek, K; Benson, C; Berg, S; Berg, W; Biedron, S G; Biggs, J A; Boerste, K; Borland, M; Bosek, M; Brzowski, W R; Budz, J; Carwardine, J A; Castro, P; Chae, Y C; Christensen, S; Clark, C; Conde, M; Crosbie, E A; Decker, G A; Dejus, Roger J; Deleon, H; Den Hartog, P K; Deriy, B N; Dohan, D; Dombrowski, P; Donkers, D; Doose, C L; Dortwegt, R J; Edwards, G A; Eidelman, Y; Erdmann, M J; Error, J J; Ferry, R; Flood, R; Forrestal, J; Freund, H; Friedsam, H; Gagliano, J; Gai, W; Galayda, J N; Gerig, R; Gilmore, R L; Gluskin, E; Goeppner, G A; Goetzen, J; Gold, C; Grelick, A E; Hahne, M W; Hanuska, S; Harkay, K C; Harris, G; Hillman, A L; Hogrefe, R; Hoyt, J; Huang, Z; Jagger, J M; Jansma, W G; Jaski, M; Jones, S J; Keane, R T; Kelly, A L; Keyser, C; Kim, K J; Kim, S H; Kirshenbaum, M; Klick, J H; Knoerzer, K; Knott, M; Koldenhoven, R J; Labuda, S; Laird, R; Lang, J; Lenkszus, F R; Lessner, E S; Lewellen, J W; Li, Y; Lill, R M; Lumpkin, Alex H; Makarov, O A; Markovich, G M; McDowell, M; McDowell, W P; McNamara, P E; Meier, T; Meyer, D; Michalek, W; Milton, S V; Moe, H; Moog, E; Morrison, L; Nassiri, A; Noonan, J R; Otto, R; Pace, J; Pasky, S J; Penicka, J M; Pietryla, A F; Pile, G; Pitts, C; Power, J; Powers, T; Putnam, C C; Puttkammer, A J; Reigle, D; Reigle, L; Ronzhin, D; Rotela, E R; Russell, E F; Sajaev, Vadim; Sarkar, S; Scapino, J C; Schröder, K; Seglem, R A; Sereno, N S; Sharma, S K; Sidarous, J F; Singh, O; Smith, T L; Soliday, R; Sprau, G A; Stein, S J; Stejskal, B; Svirtun, V; Teng, L C; Theres, E; Thompson, K; Tieman, B J; Torres, J A; Trakhtenberg, E; Travish, G; Trento, G F; Vacca, J; Vasserman, I B; Vinokurov, N A; Walters, D R; Wang, J; Wang, X J; Warren, J; Wesling, S; Weyer, D L; Wiemerslage, G; Wilhelmi, K; Wright, R; Wyncott, D; Xu, S; Yang, B X; Yoder, W; Zabel, R B

    2001-01-01

    Exponential growth of self-amplified spontaneous emission at 530 nm was first experimentally observed at the Advanced Photon Source low-energy undulator test line in December 1999. Since then, further detailed measurements and analysis of the results have been made. Here, we present the measurements and compare these with calculations based on measured electron beam properties and theoretical expectations.

  9. Possibilities for observations with the infrared space observatory of emission from shock-heated dust in SNRs

    The possibilities for observing infrared emission from shock-heated dust in SNRs with the future Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) are illustrated with calculations of the ISOPHOT-P and ISOPHOT-C flux densities and integration times for radiation from six selected SNRs in eight wavelength bands between 4 μm and 180 μm

  10. Global inventory of nitrogen oxide emissions constrained by space-based observations of NO2 columns

    Martin, Randall V.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Chance, Kelly; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Palmer, Paul I.; Evans, Mathew J.

    2003-09-01

    We use tropospheric NO2 columns from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite instrument to derive top-down constraints on emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx ≡ NO + NO2), and combine these with a priori information from a bottom-up emission inventory (with error weighting) to achieve an optimized a posteriori estimate of the global distribution of surface NOx emissions. Our GOME NO2 retrieval improves on previous work by accounting for scattering and absorption of radiation by aerosols; the effect on the air mass factor (AMF) ranges from +10 to -40% depending on the region. Our AMF also includes local information on relative vertical profiles (shape factors) of NO2 from a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-CHEM); assumption of a globally uniform shape factor, as in most previous retrievals, would introduce regional biases of up to 40% over industrial regions and a factor of 2 over remote regions. We derive a top-down NOx emission inventory from the GOME data by using the local GEOS-CHEM relationship between NO2 columns and NOx emissions. The resulting NOx emissions for industrial regions are aseasonal, despite large seasonal variation in NO2 columns, providing confidence in the method. Top-down errors in monthly NOx emissions are comparable with bottom-up errors over source regions. Annual global a posteriori errors are half of a priori errors. Our global a posteriori estimate for annual land surface NOx emissions (37.7 Tg N yr-1) agrees closely with the GEIA-based a priori (36.4) and with the EDGAR 3.0 bottom-up inventory (36.6), but there are significant regional differences. A posteriori NOx emissions are higher by 50-100% in the Po Valley, Tehran, and Riyadh urban areas, and by 25-35% in Japan and South Africa. Biomass burning emissions from India, central Africa, and Brazil are lower by up to 50%; soil NOx emissions are appreciably higher in the western United States, the Sahel, and southern Europe.

  11. TAURUS observations of the emission-line velocity field of Centaurus A (NGC 5128)

    Using TAURUS - an Imaging Fabry Perot system in conjunction with the IPCS on the AAT, the authors have studied the velocity field of the Hα emission line at a spatial resolution of 1.7'' over the dark lane structure of Centaurus A. The derived velocity field is quite symmetrical and strongly suggests that the emission line material is orbiting the elliptical component, as a warped disc. (orig.)

  12. The origin of emission and absorption features in Ton S180 Chandra observations

    Różańska, A.; Czerny, B.; Siemiginowska, A.; Dumont, A. -M.; Kawaguchi, T.

    2003-01-01

    We present new interpretation of Ton S180 spectrum obtained by {\\it Chandra} Spectrometer (Low Energy Transmission Grating). Several narrow absorption lines and a few emission disk lines have been successfully fitted to the data. We have not found any significant edges accompanying line emission. We propose the interpretation of narrow lines consistent with the paper recently written by Krolik (2002), where warm absorber is strongly inhomogeneous. Such situation is possible in so called multi...

  13. A comparative study of measured amplitude and phase perturbations of VLF and LF radio signals induced by solar flares

    Šulić D.M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Very Low Frequency (VLF and Low Frequency (LF signal perturbations were examined to study ionospheric disturbances induced by solar X-ray flares in order to understand processes involved in propagation of VLF/LF radio signals over short paths and to estimate specific characteristics of each short path. The receiver at the Belgrade station is constantly monitoring the amplitude and phase of a coherent and subionospherically propagating LF signal operated in Sicily NSC at 45.90 kHz, and a VLF signal operated in Isola di Tavolara ICV at 20.27 kHz, with the great circle distances of 953 km and 976 km, respectively. A significant number of similarities between these short paths is a direct result of both transmitters and the receiver’s geographic location. The main difference is in transmitter frequencies. From July 2008 to February 2014 there were about 200 events that were chosen for further examination. All selected examples showed that the amplitude and phase of VLF and LF signals were perturbed by solar X-ray flares occurrence. This six-year period covers both minimum and maximum of solar activity. Simultaneous measurement of amplitude and phase of the VLF/LF signals during a solar flare occurrence was applied to evaluate the electron density profile versus altitude, to carry out the function of time over the middle Europe. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176002 i br. III4402

  14. Estimation of NOx emissions from Delhi using Car MAX-DOAS observations and comparison with OMI satellite data

    R. Shaiganfar; Beirle, S.; Sharma, M.; Chauhan, A; Singh, R P; Wagner, T

    2011-01-01

    We present the first Multi-Axis-(MAX-) DOAS observations in India performed during April 2010 and January 2011 in Delhi and nearby regions. The MAX-DOAS instrument was mounted on a car roof, which allowed us to perform measurements along individual driving routes. From car MAX-DOAS observations along closed circles around Delhi, together with information on wind speed and direction, the NOx emissions from the greater Delhi area were determined: our estimate of 4.4 × 10...

  15. First Observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission in a Free-Electron Laser at 109 nm Wavelength

    Andruszków, J; Ayvazyan, V T; Baboi, N I; Bakker, R; Balakin, V; Barni, D; Bazhan, A; Bernard, M; Bosotti, A; Bourdon, J C; Brefeld, W; Brinkmann, R; Bühler, S; Carneiro, J P; Castellano, M G; Castro, P; Catani, L; Chel, S; Cho, Y; Choroba, S; Colby, E R; Decking, W; Den Hartog, P; Desmons, M; Dohlus, M; Edwards, D; Edwards, H T; Faatz, B; Feldhaus, J; Ferrario, M; Fitch, M J; Flöttmann, K; Fouaidy, M; Gamp, A; Garvey, Terence; Geitz, M A; Gluskin, E S; Gretchko, V; Hahn, U; Hartung, W H; Hubert, D; Hüning, M; Ischebek, R; Jablonka, M; Joly, J M; Juillard, M; Junquera, T; Jurkiewicz, P; Kabel, A C; Kahl, J; Kaiser, H; Kamps, T; Katelev, V V; Kirchgessner, J L; Körfer, M; Kravchuk, L V; Kreps, G; Krzywinski, J; Lokajczyk, T; Lange, R; Leblond, B; Leenen, M; Lesrel, J; Liepe, M; Liero, A; Limberg, T; Lorenz, R; Lu, H H; Lu, F H; Magne, C; Maslov, M A; Materlik, G; Matheisen, A; Menzel, J; Michelato, P; Möller, W D; Mosnier, A; Müller, U C; Napoly, O; Novokhatskii, A V; Omeich, M; Padamsee, H; Pagani, C; Peters, F; Petersen, B; Pierini, P; Pflüger, J; Piot, P; Phung Ngoc, B; Plucinski, L; Proch, D; Rehlich, K; Reiche, S; Reschke, D; Reyzl, I; Rosenzweig, J; Rossbach, J; Roth, S; Saldin, E L; Sandner, W; Sanok, Z; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, G; Schmüser, P; Schneider, J R; Schneidmiller, E A; Schreiber, H J; Schreiber, S; Schütt, P; Sekutowicz, J; Serafini, L; Sertore, D; Setzer, S; Simrock, S; Sonntag, B F; Sparr, B; Stephan, F; Sytchev, V V; Tazzari, S; Tazzioli, F; Tigner, Maury; Timm, M; Tonutti, M; Trakhtenberg, E; Treusch, R; Trines, D; Verzilov, V A; Vielitz, T; Vogel, V; Von Walter, G; Wanzenberg, R; Weiland, T; Weise, H; Weisend, J G; Wendt, M; Werner, M; White, M M; Will, I; Wolff, S; Yurkov, M V; Zapfe, K; Zhogolev, P; Zhou, F

    2000-01-01

    We present the first observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) in a free-electron laser (FEL) in the Vacuum Ultraviolet regime at 109 nm wavelength (11 eV). The observed free-electron laser gain (approx. 3000) and the radiation characteristics, such as dependency on bunch charge, angular distribution, spectral width and intensity fluctuations all corroborate the existing models for SASE FELs.

  16. Fermi-LAT Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission Toward the Galactic Center

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has provided the most detailed view to date of the emission towards the Galactic centre (GC) in high-energy gamma-rays. This paper describes the analysis of data taken during the first 62 months of the mission in the energy range 1-100 GeV from a $15^\\circ \\times 15^\\circ$ region about the direction of the GC, and implications for the interstellar emissions produced by cosmic ray (CR) particles interacting with the gas and radiation fields in the inner Galaxy and for the point sources detected. Specialised interstellar emission models (IEMs) are constructed that enable separation of the gamma-ray emission from the inner $\\sim 1$ kpc about the GC from the fore- and background emission from the Galaxy. Based on these models, the interstellar emission from CR electrons interacting with the interstellar radiation field via the inverse Compton (IC) process and CR nuclei inelastically scattering off the gas producing gamma-rays via $\\pi^0$ decays from the inner $\\sim 1$ kpc is d...

  17. H2 emission as a tracer of molecular hydrogen: Large-scale observations of Orion

    Luhman, M. L.; Jaffe, D. T.; Keller, L. D.; Pak, Soojong

    1994-01-01

    We have detected extremely extended (greater than 1.5 deg, or 12 pc) near-infrared H2 line emission from the Orion A molecular cloud. We have mapped emission in the 1.601 micrometer(s) upsilon = 6 - 4 Q(1) and 2.121 micrometer(s) upsilon = 1 - 0 S(1) lines of H2 along a approx. 2 deg R.A. cut and from a 6' x 6' region near theta(sup 1) Ori C. The surface brightness of the extended H2 line emission is 10(exp -6) to 10(exp -5) ergs/s/sq. cm/sr. Based on the distribution and relative strengths of the H2 lines, we conclude that UV fluorescene is most likely the dominant H2 emission mechanism in the outer parts of the Orion cloud. Shock-heated gas does not make a major contribution to the H2 emission in this region. The fluorescent component of the total H2 upsilon = 1 - 0 S(1) luminosity from Orion is 30-40 solar luminosity. Molecular hydrogen excited by UV radiation from nearby OB stars contributes 98%-99% of the global H2 line emission from the Orion molecular cloud, even though this cloud has a powerful shock-excited H2 source in its core. The ability to detect large-scale H2 directly opens up new possibilities for the study of molecular clouds.

  18. Chandra & XMM-Newton Observations of NGC5253. Analysis of the X-ray Emission from a Dwarf Starburst Galaxy

    Summers, L K; Strickland, D K; Heckman, T M; Summers, Lesley K.; Stevens, Ian R.; Strickland, David K.; Heckman, Timothy M.

    2004-01-01

    We present Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray data of NGC5253, a local starbursting dwarf elliptical galaxy, in the early stages of a starburst episode. Contributions to the X-ray emission come from discrete point sources and extended diffuse emission, in the form of what appear to be multiple superbubbles, and smaller bubbles probably associated with individual star clusters. Chandra detects 17 sources within the optical extent of NGC5253 down to a completeness level corresponding to a luminosity of 1.5E37 erg/s.The slope of the point source X-ray luminosity function is -0.54, similar to that of other nearby dwarf starburst galaxies. Several different types of source are detected within the galaxy, including X-ray binaries and the emission associated with star-clusters. Comparison of the diffuse X-ray emission with the observed Halpha emission shows similarities in their extent. The best spectral fit to the diffuse emission is obtained with an absorbed, two temperature model giving temperatures for the two gas com...

  19. Atmospheric observation-based global SF6 emissions – comparison of top-down and bottom-up estimates

    D. E. Worthy

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Emissions of sulphur hexafluoride (SF6, one of the strongest greenhouse gases on a per molecule basis, are targeted to be collectively reduced under the Kyoto Protocol. Because of its long atmospheric lifetime (≈3000 years, the accumulation of SF6 in the atmosphere is a direct measure of its global emissions. Examination of our extended data set of globally distributed high-precision SF6 observations shows an increase in SF6 abundance from near zero in the 1970s to a global mean of 6.7 ppt by the end of 2008. In-depth evaluation of our long-term data records shows that the global source of SF6 decreased after 1995, most likely due to SF6 emission reductions in industrialised countries, but increased again after 1998. By subtracting those emissions reported by Annex I countries to the United Nations Framework Convention of Climatic Change (UNFCCC from our observation-inferred SF6 source leaves a surprisingly large gap of more than 70–80% of non-reported SF6 emissions in the last decade.

  20. Evaluation of Biogenic and Fire Emissions in a Global Chemistry Model with NOMADSS, DC3 and SEAC4RS observations

    Emmons, L. K.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Park, M.; Kaser, L.; Apel, E. C.; Guenther, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous measurements of compounds produced by biogenic and fire emissions were made during several recent field campaigns in the southeast United States, providing a unique data set for emissions and chemical model evaluation. The NCAR Community Atmosphere Model with Chemistry (CAM-chem) is coupled to the Community Land Model (CLM), which includes the biogenic emissions model MEGAN-v2.1, allowing for online calculation of emissions from vegetation for 150 compounds. Simulations of CAM-chem for summers 2012 and 2013 are evaluated with the aircraft and ground-based observations from DC3, NOMADSS and SEAC4RS. Comparison of directly emitted biogenic species, such as isoprene, terpenes, methanol and acetone, are used to evaluate the MEGAN emissions. Evaluation of oxidation products, including methyl vinyl ketone (MVK), methacrolein, formaldehyde, and other oxygenated VOCs are used to test the model chemistry mechanism. In addition, several biomass burning inventories are used in the model, including FINN, QFED, and FLAMBE, and are compared for their impact on atmospheric composition and ozone production, and evaluated with the aircraft observations.

  1. Development of a United States-Mexico Emissions Inventory for the Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational (BRAVO) Study.

    Kuhns, Hampden; Knipping, Eladio M; Vukovich, Jeffrey M

    2005-05-01

    The Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational (BRAVO) Study was commissioned to investigate the sources of haze at Big Bend National Park in southwest Texas. The modeling domain of the BRAVO Study includes most of the continental United States and Mexico. The BRAVO emissions inventory was constructed from the 1999 National Emission Inventory for the United States, modified to include finer-resolution data for Texas and 13 U.S. states in close proximity. The first regional-scale Mexican emissions inventory designed for air-quality modeling applications was developed for 10 northern Mexican states, the Tula Industrial Park in the state of Hidalgo, and the Popocatépetl volcano in the state of Puebla. Emissions data were compiled from numerous sources, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission (now Texas Commission on Environmental Quality), the Eastern Research Group, the Minerals Management Service, the Instituto Nacional de Ecología, and the Instituto Nacional de Estadistica Geografía y Informática. The inventory includes emissions for CO, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ammonia, particulate matter (PM) gridded emissions fields for use with the Regional Modeling System for Aerosols and Deposition (REMSAD) and the Community Multiscale Air Quality model modified with the Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization and Dissolution (CMAQ-MADRID). The compilation of the inventory, supporting model input data, and issues encountered during the development of the inventory are documented. A comparison of the BRAVO emissions inventory for Mexico with other emerging Mexican emission inventories illustrates their uncertainty. PMID:15991676

  2. Dust aerosol emission over the Sahara during summertime from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observations

    Todd, Martin C.; Cavazos-Guerra, Carolina

    2016-03-01

    Dust aerosols are an important component of the climate system and a challenge to incorporate into weather and climate models. Information on the location and magnitude of dust emission remains a key information gap to inform model development. Inadequate surface observations ensure that satellite data remain the primary source of this information over extensive and remote desert regions. Here, we develop estimates of the relative magnitude of active dust emission over the Sahara desert based on data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). Utilising the unique vertical profile of aerosol characteristics provided by CALIOP our algorithm identifies emission from aerosol extinction and lidar backscatter in the near surface layers. From the long-term CALIOP archive of day and night-time orbits over 2006-13 we construct coarse resolution maps of a new dust emission index (DEI) for the Sahara desert during the peak summer dust season (June to September). The spatial structure of DEI indicates highest emission over a broad zone focused on the border regions of Southern Algeria, Northern Mali and northwest Niger, displaced substantially (∼7°) to the east of the mean maximum in satellite-derived aerosol optical depth. In this region night-time emission exceeds that during the day. The DEI maps substantially corroborate recently derived dust source frequency count maps based on back-tracking plumes in high temporal resolution SEVIRI imagery. As such, a convergence of evidence from multiple satellite data sources using independent methods provides an increasingly robust picture of Saharan dust emission sources. Various caveats are considered. As such, quantitative estimates of dust emission may require a synergistic combined multi-sensor analysis.

  3. New observations of VOC emissions and concentrations in, above, and around the Central Valley of California

    Goldstein, A. H.; Fares, S.; Gentner, D. R.; Park, J.; Weber, R.; Ormeno, E.; Holzinger, R.; Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T. R.; Guenther, A. B.; Fischer, M. L.; Harley, R. A.; Karlik, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    Large portions of the Central Valley of California are out of compliance with current state and federal air quality standards for ozone and particulate matter, and the relative importance of biogenic and anthropogenic VOC emissions to their photochemical production in this region remains uncertain. In 2009-2011 multiple measurement campaigns were completed investigating the VOC emission inventory and concentration distributions. In 2009 BVOC emissions from more than 20 species of major agricultural crops in California were measured in a greenhouse using branch enclosures by both PTRMS and in-situ GC. Overall, crops were found to emit low amounts of BVOC compared to the natural forests surrounding the valley. Crops mainly emitted methanol and terpenes, with a broad array of other species emitted at lower levels, and all the measured crops showed negligible emissions of isoprene. Navel oranges were the largest crop BVOC emitters measured so a full year of flux measurements were made in an orange grove near Visalia in 2010 by eddy covariance(EC)-PTRMS with two multi-week periods of concentration measurements by hourly in-situ GC, and one month of high mass resolution flux measurements by EC-PTR-TOF-MS. The dominant BVOC emissions from the orange grove were methanol and terpenes, followed by acetone, acetaldehyde, and a low level of emissions for many other species. In 2011 aircraft eddy covariance measurements of BVOC fluxes were made by EC-PTRMS covering a large area of California as part of the California Airborne Bvoc Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign aimed at improving BVOC emission models on regional scales, mainly profiling BVOC emissions from oak woodlands surrounding the Central Valley. In 2010, hourly in-situ VOC measurements were made via in-situ GC in Bakersfield, CA as part of the CalNex experiment. Additionally, in-situ measurements of fresh motor vehicle exhaust were made in Oakland's Caldecott tunnel. Measurements by

  4. Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations

    Dr. Atul Jain

    2005-04-17

    This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics

  5. Assessment of cardiac single-photon emission computed tomography performance using a scanning linear observer

    Lee, Chih-Jie; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Volokh, Lana [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); GE Healthcare, Haifa 39120 (Israel)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is widely used to detect myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction. It is important to assess and compare different SPECT system designs in order to achieve the highest detectability of cardiac defects. Methods: Whitaker et al.'s study ['Estimating random signal parameters from noisy images with nuisance parameters: linear and scanning-linear methods,' Opt. Express 16(11), 8150-8173 (2008)] on the scanning linear observer (SLO) shows that the SLO can be used to estimate the location and size of signals. One major advantage of the SLO is that it can be used with projection data rather than with reconstruction data. Thus, this observer model assesses the overall hardware performance independent of any reconstruction algorithm. In addition, the computation time of image quality studies is significantly reduced. In this study, three systems based on the design of the GE cadmium zinc telluride-based dedicated cardiac SPECT camera Discovery 530c were assessed. This design, which is officially named the Alcyone Technology: Discovery NM 530c, was commercialized in August, 2009. The three systems, GE27, GE19, and GE13, contain 27, 19, and 13 detectors, respectively. Clinically, a human heart can be virtually segmented into three coronary artery territories: the left-anterior descending artery, left-circumflex artery, and right coronary artery. One of the most important functions of a cardiac SPECT system is to produce images from which a radiologist can accurately predict in which territory the defect exists [http://www.asnc.org/media/PDFs/PPReporting081511.pdf, Guideline from American Society of Nuclear Cardiology]. A good estimation of the extent of the defect from the projection images is also very helpful for determining the seriousness of the myocardial ischemia. In this study, both the location and extent of defects were estimated by the SLO, and the system performance was assessed by

  6. Atmospheric observation-based global SF6 emissions - comparison of top-down and bottom-up estimates

    Levin, Ingeborg; Naegler, Tobias; Heinz, Renate; Osusko, Daniel; Cuevas, Emilio; Engel, Andreas; Ilmberger, Johann; Langenfelds, Ray L.; Neininger, Bruno; Rohden, Christoph von; Steele, L. Paul; Weller, Rolf; Worthy, Douglas E. W; Zimov, Sergej A.

    2010-01-01

    Emissions of sulphur hexafluoride (SF6), one of the strongest greenhouse gases on a per molecule basis, are targeted to be collectively reduced under the Kyoto Protocol. Because of its long atmospheric lifetime (estimated as 800 to 3200 years), the accumulation of SF6 in the atmosphere is a direct measure of its global emissions. Examination of our extended data set of globally distributed high-precision SF6 observations shows an increase in SF6 abundance from near zero in the 1970s to a glob...

  7. High Galactic latitude polarized emission at 1.4 GHz and implications for cosmic microwave background observations

    Carretti, E.; Bernardi, G.; Sault, R. J.; Cortiglioni, S.; Poppi, S.

    2004-01-01

    We analyse the polarized emission at 1.4 GHz in a 3x3 deg^2 area at high Galactic latitude (b ~ -40deg). The region, centred in (RA=5h, Dec=-49deg), was observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array radio-interferometer, whose 3-30 arcmin angular sensitivity range allows the study of scales appropriate for CMB Polarization (CMBP) investigations. The angular behavior of the diffuse emission is analysed through the E- and B-mode power spectra. These follow a power law $C^X_l \\propto l^{\\b...

  8. Growth in NOx emissions from power plants in China: bottom-up estimates and satellite observations

    Y. Lei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Using OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument tropospheric NO2 columns and a nested-grid 3-D global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem, we investigated the growth in NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants and their contributions to the growth in NO2 columns in 2005–2007 in China. We first developed a unit-based power plant NOx emission inventory for 2005–2007 to support this investigation. The total capacities of coal-fired power generation have increased by 48.8% in 2005–2007, with 92.2% of the total capacity additions coming from generator units with size ≥300 MW. The annual NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants were estimated to be 8.11 Tg NO2 for 2005 and 9.58 Tg NO2 for 2007, respectively. The modeled summer average tropospheric NO2 columns were highly correlated (R2 = 0.79–0.82 with OMI measurements over grids dominated by power plant emissions, with only 7–14% low bias, lending support to the high accuracy of the unit-based power plant NOx emission inventory. The ratios of OMI-derived annual and summer average tropospheric NO2 columns between 2007 and 2005 indicated that most of the grids with significant NO2 increases were related to power plant construction activities. OMI had the capability to trace the changes of NOx emissions from individual large power plants in cases where there is less interference from other NOx sources. Scenario runs from GEOS-Chem model suggested that the new power plants contributed 18.5% and 10% to the annual average NO2 columns in 2007 in Inner Mongolia and North China, respectively. The massive new power plant NOx emissions significantly changed the local NO2 profiles, especially in less polluted areas. A sensitivity study found that changes of NO2 shape factors due to including new power plant emissions increased the summer average OMI tropospheric NO2 columns by 3.8–17.2% for six selected locations, indicating that the updated emission information could help to improve the satellite

  9. Growth in NOx emissions from power plants in China: bottom-up estimates and satellite observations

    Y. Lei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Using OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument tropospheric NO2 columns and a nested-grid 3-D global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem, we investigated the growth in NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants and their contributions to the growth in NO2 columns in 2005–2007 in China. We first developed a unit-based power plant NOx emission inventory for 2005–2007 to support this investigation. The total capacities of coal-fired power generation have increased by 48.8% in 2005–2007, with 92.2% of the total capacity additions coming from generator units with size ≥300 MW. The annual NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants were estimated to be 8.11 Tg NO2 for 2005 and 9.58 Tg NO2 for 2007, respectively. The modeled summer average tropospheric NO2 columns were highly correlated (R2 = 0.79–0.82 with OMI measurements over grids dominated by power plant emissions, with only 7–14% low bias, lending support to the high accuracy of the unit-based power plant NOx emission inventory. The ratios of OMI-derived annual and summer average tropospheric NO2 columns between 2007 and 2005 indicated that most of the grids with significant NO2 increases were related to power plant construction activities. OMI had the capability to trace the changes of NOx emissions from individual large power plants in cases where there is less interference from other NOx sources. Scenario runs from GEOS-Chem model suggested that the new power plants contributed 18.5% and 10% to the annual average NO2 columns in 2007 in Inner Mongolia and North China, respectively. The massive new power plant NOx emissions significantly changed the local NO2 profiles, especially in less polluted areas. A sensitivity study found that changes of NO2 shape factors due to including new power plant emissions increased the summer average OMI tropospheric NO2 columns by 3.8–17.2% for six selected locations, indicating that the updated emission information could help to improve the satellite

  10. Pervasive faint Fe XIX emission from a solar active region observed with EUNIS-13: Evidence for nanoflare heating

    Brosius, Jeffrey W. [Catholic University of America at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Daw, Adrian N. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Rabin, D. M., E-mail: Jeffrey.W.Brosius@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Code 670, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We present spatially resolved EUV spectroscopic measurements of pervasive, faint Fe XIX 592.2 Å line emission in an active region observed during the 2013 April 23 flight of the Extreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS-13) sounding rocket instrument. With cooled detectors, high sensitivity, and high spectral resolution, EUNIS-13 resolves the lines of Fe XIX at 592.2 Å (formed at temperature T ≈ 8.9 MK) and Fe XII at 592.6 Å (T ≈ 1.6 MK). The Fe XIX line emission, observed over an area in excess of 4920 arcsec{sup 2} (2.58 × 10{sup 9} km{sup 2}, more than 60% of the active region), provides strong evidence for the nanoflare heating model of the solar corona. No GOES events occurred in the region less than 2 hr before the rocket flight, but a microflare was observed north and east of the region with RHESSI and EUNIS during the flight. The absence of significant upward velocities anywhere in the region, particularly the microflare, indicates that the pervasive Fe XIX emission is not propelled outward from the microflare site, but is most likely attributed to localized heating (not necessarily due to reconnection) consistent with the nanoflare heating model of the solar corona. Assuming ionization equilibrium we estimate Fe XIX/Fe XII emission measure ratios of ∼0.076 just outside the AR core and ∼0.59 in the core.

  11. Pervasive faint Fe XIX emission from a solar active region observed with EUNIS-13: Evidence for nanoflare heating

    We present spatially resolved EUV spectroscopic measurements of pervasive, faint Fe XIX 592.2 Å line emission in an active region observed during the 2013 April 23 flight of the Extreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS-13) sounding rocket instrument. With cooled detectors, high sensitivity, and high spectral resolution, EUNIS-13 resolves the lines of Fe XIX at 592.2 Å (formed at temperature T ≈ 8.9 MK) and Fe XII at 592.6 Å (T ≈ 1.6 MK). The Fe XIX line emission, observed over an area in excess of 4920 arcsec2 (2.58 × 109 km2, more than 60% of the active region), provides strong evidence for the nanoflare heating model of the solar corona. No GOES events occurred in the region less than 2 hr before the rocket flight, but a microflare was observed north and east of the region with RHESSI and EUNIS during the flight. The absence of significant upward velocities anywhere in the region, particularly the microflare, indicates that the pervasive Fe XIX emission is not propelled outward from the microflare site, but is most likely attributed to localized heating (not necessarily due to reconnection) consistent with the nanoflare heating model of the solar corona. Assuming ionization equilibrium we estimate Fe XIX/Fe XII emission measure ratios of ∼0.076 just outside the AR core and ∼0.59 in the core.

  12. Estimation of country-scale methane emissions by airborne and ground-based in situ observations and inverse modeling

    Brunner, D.; Henne, S.; Oney, B. J.; Leuenberger, M.; Hiller, R.; Bamberger, I.; Eugster, W.; Neininger, B.

    2014-12-01

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important long-lived greenhouse gas from both natural and anthropogenic sources. In Switzerland, CH4 sources are dominated by agricultural activities (>80%) while natural emissions from wetlands and wild animals are thought to represent a minor source (~3 %). Except for leakage from the natural gas distribution network, all relevant emissions in Switzerland are associated with microbial processes which, due to their diffuse nature and sensitivity to ambient conditions, are associated with comparatively large uncertainties. The Swiss National Greenhouse Gas Inventory, for example, assigns an uncertainty of 18% to the country total CH4 emissions as compared to only 3% for CO2. To verify the Swiss national CH4 emission estimate and to reduce its uncertainty, "top-down" methods combining atmospheric observations and regional scale transport simulations can be used. Here, we present two independent analyses of the Swiss CH4 emission budget using inverse modeling. The first is based on airborne observations during more than 20 flights of a motor glider conducted in the framework of the MAIOLICA project. The second is based on near surface measurements from the newly established CarboCount CH measurement network (http://www.carbocount.ch). A Bayesian inversion framework is applied to these observations in combination with source sensitivities (footprints) calculated with the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART. To account for the complex terrain and flow in Switzerland, FLEXPART is driven by meteorological fields from the non-hydrostatic numerical weather forecast model COSMO at horizontal resolutions of up to 2 km x 2 km. Due to the critical role of the transport simulations, we first present an analysis of the sensitivity to different model configurations (e.g. resolution, time-averaged winds versus instantaneous fields, ECMWF versus COSMO fields). We then present the inverse modeling results separately for the airborne and the

  13. Vlf/elf radiation patterns of arbitrarily oriented electric and magnetic dipoles in a cold lossless multicomponent magnetoplasma.

    Wang, T. N. C.; Bell, T. F.

    1972-01-01

    With the use of a power integral formulation, a study is made of the vlf/elf radiation patterns of arbitrarily oriented electric and magnetic dipoles in a cold lossless multicomponent magnetoplasma. Expressions for the ray patterns are initially developed that apply for arbitrary values of driving frequency, static magnetic-field strength, plasma density, and composition. These expressions are subsequently specialized to vlf/elf radiation in a plasma modeled on the magnetosphere. A series of representative pattern plots are presented for frequencies between the proton and electron gyrofrequencies. These patterns illustrate the fact that focusing effects that arise from the geometrical properties of the refractive index surface tend to dominate the radiation distribution over the entire range from the electron gyrofrequency to 4.6 times the proton gyrofrequency. It is concluded that focusing effects should be of significant importance in the design of a vlf/elf satellite transmitting system in the magnetosphere.

  14. All-Sky Observational Evidence for An Inverse Correlation Between Dust Temperature and Emissivity Spectral Index

    Liang, Z.; Fixsen, D. J.; Gold, B.

    2012-01-01

    We show that a one-component variable-emissivity-spectral-index model (the free- model) provides more physically motivated estimates of dust temperature at the Galactic polar caps than one- or two-component fixed-emissivity-spectral-index models (fixed- models) for interstellar dust thermal emission at far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths. For the comparison we have fit all-sky one-component dust models with fixed or variable emissivity spectral index to a new and improved version of the 210-channel dust spectra from the COBE-FIRAS, the 100-240 micrometer maps from the COBE-DIRBE and the 94 GHz dust map from the WMAP. The best model, the free-alpha model, is well constrained by data at 60-3000 GHz over 86 per cent of the total sky area. It predicts dust temperature (T(sub dust)) to be 13.7-22.7 (plus or minus 1.3) K, the emissivity spectral index (alpha) to be 1.2-3.1 (plus or minus 0.3) and the optical depth (tau) to range 0.6-46 x 10(exp -5) with a 23 per cent uncertainty. Using these estimates, we present all-sky evidence for an inverse correlation between the emissivity spectral index and dust temperature, which fits the relation alpha = 1/(delta + omega (raised dot) T(sub dust) with delta = -.0.510 plus or minus 0.011 and omega = 0.059 plus or minus 0.001. This best model will be useful to cosmic microwave background experiments for removing foreground dust contamination and it can serve as an all-sky extended-frequency reference for future higher resolution dust models.

  15. First estimates of volume distribution of HF-pump enhanced emissions at 6300 and 5577 Å : a comparison between observations and theory

    Gustavsson, B.; M. Kosch; Wong, A.; Pedersen, T.; Heinselman, C.; Mutiso, C.; Bristow, B.; Hughes, J; Wang, W

    2008-01-01

    We present bi-static observations of radio-wave induced optical emissions at 6300 and 5577 Å from a night-time radio-induced optical emission ionospheric pumping experiment at the HIPAS (Fairbanks) facility in Alaska. The optical observations were made at HIPAS and from HAARP located 285 km south-east. From these observations the altitude distribution of the emissions is estimated with tomography-like methods. These estimates are compared with theoretical m...

  16. Producer observations of the long term effects of acid forming emissions in livestock

    A series of interviews with livestock producers is presented to illustrate the environmental problems caused by sour gas plants in the Pincher Creek area of Alberta. Farmers located in the emission plume from the Shell Waterton plant and Gulf sour gas plants were interviewed and provided anecdotal evidence of adverse impacts of sour gas plant emissions on livestock. Common problems that are noticed in livestock include eye irritation, increased respiratory infections, mineral deficiencies, eye cancer, waterhole water quality deterioration, low calf birth weights, decreased cattle weight gain, and birth defects. Crop losses, lowered grass production, machinery corrosion, and water pollution also occur. 1 fig

  17. Multi-model simulation of CO and HCHO in the Southern Hemisphere: comparison with observations and impact of biogenic emissions

    Zeng, G.; Williams, J. E.; Fisher, J. A.; Emmons, L. K.; Jones, N. B.; Morgenstern, O.; Robinson, J.; Smale, D.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Griffith, D. W. T.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the impact of biogenic emissions on carbon monoxide (CO) and formaldehyde (HCHO) in the Southern Hemisphere (SH), with simulations using two different biogenic emission inventories for isoprene and monoterpenes. Results from four atmospheric chemistry models are compared to continuous long-term ground-based CO and HCHO column measurements at the SH Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) sites, the satellite measurement of tropospheric CO columns from the Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT), and in situ surface CO measurements from across the SH, representing a subset of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Global Monitoring Division (NOAA GMD) network. Simulated mean model CO using the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (v2.1) computed in the frame work of the Land Community Model (CLM-MEGANv2.1) inventory is in better agreement with both column and surface observations than simulations adopting the emission inventory generated from the LPJ-GUESS dynamical vegetation model framework, which markedly underestimate measured column and surface CO at most sites. Differences in biogenic emissions cause large differences in CO in the source regions which propagate to the remote SH. Significant inter-model differences exist in modelled column and surface CO, and secondary production of CO dominates these inter-model differences, due mainly to differences in the models' oxidation schemes for volatile organic compounds, predominantly isoprene oxidation. While biogenic emissions are a significant factor in modelling SH CO, inter-model differences pose an additional challenge to constrain these emissions. Corresponding comparisons of HCHO columns at two SH mid-latitude sites reveal that all models significantly underestimate the observed values by approximately a factor of 2. There is a much smaller impact on HCHO of the significantly different biogenic emissions in remote regions

  18. Features of amplitude and Doppler frequency variation of ELF/VLF waves generated by "beat-wave" HF heating at high latitudes

    Tereshchenko, E. D.; Shumilov, O. I.; Kasatkina, E. A.; Gomonov, A. D.

    2014-07-01

    Observations of extremely low frequency (ELF, 3-3000 Hz) radio waves generated by a "beat-wave" (BW) high frequency (~ 4.04-4.9 MHz) ionospheric heating are presented. ELF waves were registered with the ELF receiver located at Lovozero (68°N, 35°E), 660 km east from the European Incoherent Scatter Tromso heating facility (69.6°N, 19.2°E). Frequency shifts between the generated beat-wave and received ELF waves were detected in all sessions. It is shown that the amplitudes of ELF waves depend on the auroral electrojet current strength. Our results showing a strong dependence of ELF signal intensities on the substorm development seem to support the conclusion that electrojet currents may affect the BW generation of ELF/VLF waves.

  19. Observation of the fine structure for rovibronic spectral lines in visible part of emission spectra of $D_2$

    Lavrov, B P; Zhukov, A S

    2011-01-01

    For the first time the fine structure of rovibronic spectral lines in visible part of emission spectra of $D_2$ molecule has been observed. Observed splitting in visible doublets is about 0.2 cm$^{-1}$ in good accordance with previous observations in the infrared part of the spectrum ($a^3\\Sigma_g^+ \\to c^3\\Pi_u$ electronic transition) by means of FTIR and laser spectroscopy. Relative intensities of the fine structure components are in agreement with our calculations of adiabatic line strengths for Hund's case "b" coupling scheme.

  20. Estimating domestic wood burning emissions in Nordic countries using ambient air observations, receptor and dispersion modelling

    Denby, B.; Karl, M.; Laupsa, H.; Johansson, C.; Pohjola, M.; Karppinen, A.; Kukkonen, J.; Ketzel, M.; Wåhlin, P.

    2009-04-01

    One of the major emission sources of primary PM2.5 in Nordic countries during winter is wood burning from domestic heating. In Norway alone it is estimated that 80% of PM2.5 is emitted through this source. Though direct measurements of wood burning emissions are possible under controlled conditions, emission inventories for domestic heating are difficult to calculate. Emissions vary from stove to stove as well as wood type, wood condition and burning habits. The consumption rate of wood burning is also strongly dependent on meteorological as well as societal conditions. As a result the uncertainty in wood burning emission inventories used in dispersion modelling is considered to be quite high. As an alternative method for estimating the emissions resulting from wood burning for domestic heating this paper combines ambient air measurements, chemical analysis of filter samples, receptor models, dispersion models, and simple inverse modelling methods to infer emission strengths. The methodology is applied in three Nordic cities, notably Oslo (Norway), Helsinki (Finland) and Lycksele (Sweden). In these cities daily filter samples over several months have been collected. The filter samples have been chemically analysed for a range of elemental and specific markers including OC/EC and Levoglucosan. The chemical analysis has been used as input for a range of receptor models, including UNMIX, PMF, PMF-2 and COPREM. From these calculations the source contributions at the measurement sites, with particular emphasis on wood burning, have been estimated. Though the receptor models have a common basis their application method varies, and as a result the number of identifiable sources and their contributions may differ. For the application here the contribution of wood burning was not found to vary significantly, irrespective of the model or user. It was also found that Levoglucosan as a wood burning tracer was essential for the identification of the wood burning sources. Source

  1. Initial LOFAR observations of epoch of reionization windows. II. Diffuse polarized emission in the ELAIS-N1 field

    Jelić, V.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Mevius, M.; Abdalla, F. B.; Asad, K. M. B.; Bernardi, G.; Brentjens, M. A.; Bus, S.; Chapman, E.; Ciardi, B.; Daiboo, S.; Fernandez, E. R.; Ghosh, A.; Harker, G.; Jensen, H.; Kazemi, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Labropoulos, P.; Martinez-Rubi, O.; Mellema, G.; Offringa, A. R.; Pandey, V. N.; Patil, A. H.; Thomas, R. M.; Vedantham, H. K.; Veligatla, V.; Yatawatta, S.; Zaroubi, S.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Avruch, I. M.; Beck, R.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Bregman, J.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.; Brouw, W. N.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Conway, J. E.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; Deller, A.; Dettmar, R.-J.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Engels, D.; Falcke, H.; Fallows, R. A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Gunst, A. W.; Hamaker, J. P.; Hassall, T. E.; Haverkorn, M.; Heald, G.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hoeft, M.; Hörandel, J.; Horneffer, A.; van der Horst, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Maat, P.; Mann, G.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; McKean, J. P.; Munk, H.; Nelles, A.; Norden, M. J.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pietka, G.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Schwarz, D.; Serylak, M.; Smirnov, O.; Steinmetz, M.; Stewart, A.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; ter Veen, S.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, C.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: This study aims to characterise the polarized foreground emission in the ELAIS-N1 field and to address its possible implications for extracting of the cosmological 21 cm signal from the LOw-Frequency ARray - Epoch of Reionization (LOFAR-EoR) data. Methods: We used the high band antennas of LOFAR to image this region and RM-synthesis to unravel structures of polarized emission at high Galactic latitudes. Results: The brightness temperature of the detected Galactic emission is on average ~4 K in polarized intensity and covers the range from -10 to + 13 rad m-2 in Faraday depth. The total polarized intensity and polarization angle show a wide range of morphological features. We have also used the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) at 350 MHz to image the same region. The LOFAR and WSRT images show a similar complex morphology at comparable brightness levels, but their spatial correlation is very low. The fractional polarization at 150 MHz, expressed as a percentage of the total intensity, amounts to ≈1.5%. There is no indication of diffuse emission in total intensity in the interferometric data, in line with results at higher frequencies Conclusions: The wide frequency range, high angular resolution, and high sensitivity make LOFAR an exquisite instrument for studying Galactic polarized emission at a resolution of ~1-2 rad m-2 in Faraday depth. The different polarized patterns observed at 150 MHz and 350 MHz are consistent with different source distributions along the line of sight wring in a variety of Faraday thin regions of emission. The presence of polarized foregrounds is a serious complication for epoch of reionization experiments. To avoid the leakage of polarized emission into total intensity, which can depend on frequency, we need to calibrate the instrumental polarization across the field of view to a small fraction of 1%.

  2. HST-COS Observations on Hydrogen, Helium, Carbon, and Nitrogen Emission from the SN 1987A Reverse Shock

    France, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Penton, Steven V.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Challis, Peter; Laming, J. Martin; Bouchet, Patrice; Chevalier, Roger; Garnavich, Peter M.; Fransson, Claes; Heng, Kevin; Larsson, Josefin; Lawrence, Stephen; Lundqvist, Peter; Panagia, Nino; Pun, Chun S. J.; Smith, Nathan; Sollerman, Jesper; Sonneborn, George; Sugerman, Ben; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2011-01-01

    We present the most sensitive ultraviolet observations of Supernova 1987 A to date. Imaging spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph shows many narrow (Delta v approximates 300 km/s) emission lines from the circumstellar ring, broad Delta v approximates 10-20 x 10(exp 3) km/s) emission lines from the reverse shock, and ultraviolet continuum emission. The high signal-to-noise ratio (>40 per resolution element) broad Ly-alpha emission is excited by soft X-ray and EUV heating of mostly neutral gas in the circumstellar ring and outer supernova debris. The ultraviolet continuum at lambda > 1350 A can be explained by H-I two-photon (2s(exp 2)S(sub 1/2)-l(exp 2)S(sub 1/2)) emission from the same region. We confirm our earlier, tentative detection of N V lambda 1240 emission from the reverse shock and present the first detections of broad He II lambda1640, C IV lambda 1550, and N IV ] lambda1486 emission lines from the reverse shock. The helium abundance in the high-velocity material is He/H = 0.14 +/- 0.06. The N V /H alpha line ratio requires partial ion-electron equilibration (T(sub e)/T(sub p) approximately equal to 0.14-0.35). We find that the N/C abundance ratio in the gas crossing the reverse shock is significantly higher than that in the circumstellar ring, a result that may be attributed to chemical stratification in the outer envelope of the supernova progenitor. The N/C abundance may have been stratified prior to the ring expUlsion, or this result may indicate continued CNO processing in the progenitor subsequent to the expUlsion of the circumstellar ring.

  3. The use of subionospheric VLF/LF propagation for the study of lower ionospheric perturbations associated with earthquakes

    It is recently recognized that the ionosphere is very sensitive to seismic effects, and the detection of ionospheric perturbations associated with earthquakes (EQs), attracts a lot of attention as a very promising candidate for short-term EQ prediction. In this review we propose a possible use of VLF/LF (very low frequency (3-30 kHz)/low frequency (30-300 kHz)) radio sounding of seismo-ionospheric perturbations. We first present the first convincing evidence on the presence of ionospheric perturbations for the disastrous Kobe EQ in 1995. The significant shift in terminator times in the VLF/LF diurnal variation, is successfully interpreted in terms of lowering of the lower ionosphere prior to the EQ, which is the confirmation of seismo-ionospheric perturbations. In order to avoid the overlapping with my own previous reviews [1, 2], we try to present the latest results including the statistical evidence on the correlation between the VLF/LF propagation anomalies (ionospheric perturbations) and EQs (especially with large magnitude and with shallow depth), a case study on the Indonesia Sumatra EQ (wavelike structures in the VLF/LF data), medium-distance (6∼8 Mm) propagation anomalies, the fluctuation spectra of subionospheric VLF/LF data (atmospheric gravity waves effect, the effect of Earth's tides etc.), and the mechanism of lithosphere - atmosphere - ionosphere coupling. Finally, we indicate the present situation of this kind of VLF/LF activities going on in different parts of the globe and we suggest the importance of international collaboration in this seismo-electromagnetics study.

  4. Case studies of quasi-periodic VLF emissions and related ULF fluctuations of the magnetic field

    Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Santolík, Ondřej; Němec, F.; Parrot, M.

    s. l : American Geophysical Union, 2014. [AGU Fall Meeting. 15.12.2014-19.12.2014, San Francisco] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm14/webprogrampreliminary/Paper16132.html

  5. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    Jones, Kevin C.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: Stephen.Avery@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Vander Stappen, François; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien [Ion Beam Applications SA, Louvain-la-Neuve 1348 (Belgium); Bawiec, Christopher R.; Lewin, Peter A. [School of Biomedical Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Sehgal, Chandra M. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  6. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring

  7. Spitzer observations of dust emission from H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Massive stars can alter physical conditions and properties of their ambient interstellar dust grains via radiative heating and shocks. The H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) offer ideal sites to study the stellar energy feedback effects on dust because stars can be resolved, and the galaxy's nearly face-on orientation allows us to unambiguously associate H II regions with their ionizing massive stars. The Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the LMC provides multi-wavelength (3.6-160 μm) photometric data of all H II regions. To investigate the evolution of dust properties around massive stars, we have analyzed spatially resolved IR dust emission from two classical H II regions (N63 and N180) and two simple superbubbles (N70 and N144) in the LMC. We produce photometric spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of numerous small subregions for each region based on its stellar distributions and nebular morphologies. We use DustEM dust emission model fits to characterize the dust properties. Color-color diagrams and model fits are compared with the radiation field (estimated from photometric and spectroscopic surveys). Strong radial variations of SEDs can be seen throughout the regions, reflecting the available radiative heating. Emission from very small grains drastically increases at locations where the radiation field is the highest, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) appear to be destroyed. PAH emission is the strongest in the presence of molecular clouds, provided that the radiation field is low.

  8. Spitzer observations of dust emission from H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Stephens, Ian W. [Now at Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA. (United States); Evans, Jessica Marie; Xue, Rui; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Segura-Cox, Dominique M., E-mail: ianws@bu.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Massive stars can alter physical conditions and properties of their ambient interstellar dust grains via radiative heating and shocks. The H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) offer ideal sites to study the stellar energy feedback effects on dust because stars can be resolved, and the galaxy's nearly face-on orientation allows us to unambiguously associate H II regions with their ionizing massive stars. The Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the LMC provides multi-wavelength (3.6-160 μm) photometric data of all H II regions. To investigate the evolution of dust properties around massive stars, we have analyzed spatially resolved IR dust emission from two classical H II regions (N63 and N180) and two simple superbubbles (N70 and N144) in the LMC. We produce photometric spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of numerous small subregions for each region based on its stellar distributions and nebular morphologies. We use DustEM dust emission model fits to characterize the dust properties. Color-color diagrams and model fits are compared with the radiation field (estimated from photometric and spectroscopic surveys). Strong radial variations of SEDs can be seen throughout the regions, reflecting the available radiative heating. Emission from very small grains drastically increases at locations where the radiation field is the highest, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) appear to be destroyed. PAH emission is the strongest in the presence of molecular clouds, provided that the radiation field is low.

  9. Tracing jet emission at the base of a high-mass YSO. First AMBER/VLTI observations of the Br\\gamma emission in IRAS 13481-6124

    Garatti, A Caratti o; Weigelt, G; Schertl, D; Hofmann, K -H; Kraus, S; Oudmaijer, R D; de Wit, W J; Sanna, A; Lopez, R Garcia; Kreplin, A; Ray, T P

    2016-01-01

    To probe the circumstellar environment of IRAS 13481-6124, a 20 M_sun high-mass young stellar object (HMYSO) with a parsec-scale jet and accretion disc, we investigate the origin of its Br\\gamma-emission line through NIR interferometry. We present the first AMBER/VLTI observations of the Br\\gamma-emitting region in an HMYSO at R~1500. Our AMBER/VLTI observations reveal a spatially and spectrally resolved Br\\gamma-line in emission with a strong P Cygni profile, indicating outflowing matter with a terminal velocity of ~500 km/s. Visibilities, differential phases, and closure phases are detected in our observations within the spectral line and in the adjacent continuum. Both total visibilities (continuum plus line emitting region) and pure-line visibilities indicate that the Br\\gamma-emitting region is more compact (2-4 mas in diameter or ~6-13 au at 3.2 kpc) than the continuum-emitting region (~5.4 mas or ~17 au). The absorption feature is also spatially resolved at the longest baselines (81 and 85 m) and has a...

  10. Modelling the Soft X-Ray and EUV Emission in Classical Novae: EUVE and ROSAT Observations of V1974 Cygni

    Stringfellow, Guy S.; Bowyer, Stuart

    1996-01-01

    We have conducted an extensive analysis of the observability of Classical Novae with the EUVE Lex/B and Al/Ti/C detectors. Predicted count rates have been computed using optically thin, isothermal plasma models for solar and metal-rich compositions, and hot ONeMg white dwarf model atmospheres. We find EUVE to be quite sensitive to both the EUV and soft X-ray emission emitted by the underlying hot white dwarf during novae outbursts, except for the coolest temperatures with very high intervening hydrogen column density. These results are used to interpret the emission detected during the EUVE all-sky survey of Nova Cygni 1992 (approx. = V1974 Cyg), 279-290 days after visual maximum. We find the best fit to the observed emission from V1974 Cyg arises from a hot ONeMg white dwarf with surface temperature approx. 4 x l0(exp 5) K and a mas of approx. 1.2 solar mass, and derive an interstellar hydrogen column density of approx. 3 x 10(exp 21)/sq cm. Virtually all this emission arises from supersoft X-rays rather than the EUV. We also report the detection of V1974 Cyg with the EUVE Deep Survey detector at 549 days after visual maximum. This observation is compatible with the above properties, indicating that the mechanism responsible for the soft X-ray emission, connected with the underlying white dwarf, had not yet entirely turned off. We also present analysis of a ROSAT PSPC observation which is contemporaneous with the EUVE survey observations; this independently confirms the high column density we derived from the EUVE survey observation. Light curves for the EUVE and ROSAT observations are presented. Statistical tests for variability show that all of these observations are indeed highly variable over various time scales. The EUVE survey data shows one day variations, the EUVE DS data show approx. 30 minute fluctuations, while the ROSAT data vary rapidly on time scales of seconds. The EUVE data shows no periodic variability on any time scale. The implications of the

  11. Modeling the magnetospheric X-ray emission from solar wind charge exchange with verification from XMM-Newton observations

    Whittaker, Ian C.; Sembay, Steve; Carter, Jennifer A.; Read, Andrew M.; Milan, Steve E.; Palmroth, Minna

    2016-05-01

    An MHD-based model of terrestrial solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) is created and compared to 19 case study observations in the 0.5-0.7 keV emission band taken from the European Photon Imaging Cameras on board XMM-Newton. This model incorporates the Global Unified Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Simulation-4 MHD code and produces an X-ray emission datacube from O7+ and O8+ emission lines around the Earth using in situ solar wind parameters as the model input. This study details the modeling process and shows that fixing the oxygen abundances to a constant value reduces the variance when comparing to the observations, at the cost of a small accuracy decrease in some cases. Using the ACE oxygen data returns a wide ranging accuracy, providing excellent correlation in a few cases and poor/anticorrelation in others. The sources of error for any user wishing to simulate terrestrial SWCX using an MHD model are described here and include mask position, hydrogen to oxygen ratio in the solar wind, and charge state abundances. A dawn-dusk asymmetry is also found, similar to the results of empirical modeling. Using constant oxygen parameters, magnitudes approximately double that of the observed count rates are returned. A high accuracy is determined between the model and observations when comparing the count rate difference between enhanced SWCX and quiescent periods.

  12. GALEX Observations of CS and OH Emission in Comet 9P/Tempel 1 During Deep Impact

    Feldman, Paul D; Morgenthaler, Jeffrey P; Lisse, Carey M; Weaver, Harold A; A'Hearn, Michael F

    2010-01-01

    GALEX observations of comet 9P/Tempel 1 using the near ultraviolet (NUV) objective grism were made before, during and after the Deep Impact event that occurred on 2005 July 4 at 05:52:03 UT when a 370 kg NASA spacecraft was maneuvered into the path of the comet. The NUV channel provides usable spectral information in a bandpass covering 2000 - 3400 A with a point source spectral resolving power of approximately 100. The primary spectral features in this range include solar continuum scattered from cometary dust and emissions from OH and CS molecular bands centered near 3085 and 2575 A, respectively. In particular, we report the only cometary CS emission detected during this event. The observations allow the evolution of these spectral features to be tracked over the period of the encounter. In general, the NUV emissions observed from Tempel 1 are much fainter than those that have been observed by GALEX from other comets. However, it is possible to derive production rates for the parent molecules of the specie...

  13. SNR changes of VLF radio signals detected onboard the DEMETER satellite and their possible relationship to the Wenchuan earthquake

    HE YuFei; YANG DongMei; CHEN HuaRan; QIAN JiaDong; ZHU Rong; M.Parrot

    2009-01-01

    Here we used the VLF signal data received by the DEMETER satellite,transmitted from various ground VLF transmitters which are located around China,to study the changes in the signal to noise ratio (SNR) before and after the Wenchuan earthquake,which had a magnitude of 8.0.We also found that the SNRs of different frequency signals decreased significantly over the epicenter region before the earthquake,and reverted to their original levels after the earthquake.This phenomenon may be related to the earthquake.

  14. SNR changes of VLF radio signals detected onboard the DEMETER satellite and their possible relationship to the Wenchuan earthquake

    M.; Parrot

    2009-01-01

    Here we used the VLF signal data received by the DEMETER satellite, transmitted from various ground VLF transmitters which are located around China, to study the changes in the signal to noise ratio (SNR) before and after the Wenchuan earthquake, which had a magnitude of 8.0. We also found that the SNRs of different frequency signals decreased significantly over the epicenter region before the earthquake, and reverted to their original levels after the earthquake. This phenomenon may be related to the earthquake.

  15. Correlation of VLF-EM Data with Radiometric Measurements: Implications for Uranium Exploration around Beldih, South Purulia Shear Zone, India

    Saurabh Mittal; Sharma, S P; Arkoprovo Biswas; SenGupta, D

    2014-01-01

    This study is an attempt to correlate VLF-EM data with the radiometric measurements to decipher the subsurface structure and to locate uranium mineralization in the shear zone. The study area is around Beldih mine which is an open cast apatite mine located on the South Purulia Shear Zone. VLF method has been applied to map the structure and the presence of radioactive minerals has been delineated by the detection of high α and γ counts with respect to the background radiations. High radiation...

  16. Evaluating Observational Constraints on N2O Emissions via Information Content Analysis Using GEOS-Chem and its Adjoint

    Wells, K. C.; Millet, D. B.; Bousserez, N.; Henze, D. K.; Chaliyakunnel, S.; Griffis, T. J.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Prinn, R. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Weiss, R. F.; Dutton, G. S.; Elkins, J. W.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Steele, P.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a long-lived greenhouse gas with a global warming potential approximately 300 times that of CO2, and plays a key role in stratospheric ozone depletion. Human perturbation of the nitrogen cycle has led to a rise in atmospheric N2O, but large uncertainties exist in the spatial and temporal distribution of its emissions. Here we employ a 4D-Var inversion framework for N2O based on the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model and its adjoint to derive new constraints on the space-time distribution of global land and ocean N2O fluxes. Based on an ensemble of global surface measurements, we find that emissions are overestimated over Northern Hemisphere land areas and underestimated in the Southern Hemisphere. Assigning these biases to particular land or ocean regions is more difficult given the long lifetime of N2O. To quantitatively evaluate where the current N2O observing network provides local and regional emission constraints, we apply a new, efficient information content analysis technique involving radial basis functions. The technique yields optimal state vector dimensions for N2O source inversions, with model grid cells grouped in space and time according to the resolution that can actually be provided by the network of global observations. We then use these optimal state vectors in an analytical inversion to refine current top-down emission estimates.

  17. Analysis of experimentally validated trans-ionospheric attenuation estimates of VLF signals

    İnan, Umran Savaş; Graf, K. L.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Spasojevic, M.; Cohen,M.B; Marshall, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SPACE PHYSICS, VOL. 118, 1–13, doi:10.1002/jgra.50228, 2013 Analysis of experimentally validated trans-ionospheric attenuation estimates of VLF signals K. L. Graf,1 N. G. Lehtinen,1 M. Spasojevic,1 M. B. Cohen,1 R. A. Marshall,1 and U. S. Inan1,2 Received 7 February 2013; revised 6 March 2013; accepted 12 March 2013. [1] Accurate models of trans-ionospheric propagation are needed to assess the role of Earth-originating very low frequency (...

  18. Intergalactic medium emission observations with the cosmic web imager. II. Discovery of extended, kinematically linked emission around SSA22 Lyα BLOB 2

    The intergalactic medium (IGM) is the dominant reservoir of baryons, delineates the large-scale structure of the universe at low to moderate overdensities, and provides gas from which galaxies form and evolve. Simulations of a cold-dark-matter- (CDM-) dominated universe predict that the IGM is distributed in a cosmic web of filaments and that galaxies should form along and at the intersections of these filaments. While observations of QSO absorption lines and the large-scale distribution of galaxies have confirmed the CDM paradigm, the cosmic web of IGM has never been confirmed by direct imaging. Here we report our observation of the Lyα blob 2 (LAB2) in SSA22 with the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI). This is an integral field spectrograph optimized for low surface brightness, extended emission. With 22 hr of total on- and off-source exposure, CWI has revealed that LAB2 has extended Lyα emission that is organized into azimuthal zones consistent with filaments. We perform numerous tests with simulations and the data to secure the robustness of this result, which relies on data with modest signal-to-noise ratios. We have developed a smoothing algorithm that permits visualization of data cube slices along image or spectral image planes. With both raw and smoothed data cubes we demonstrate that the filaments are kinematically associated with LAB2 and display double-peaked profiles characteristic of optically thick Lyα emission. The flux is 10-20 times brighter than expected for the average emission from the IGM but is consistent with boosted fluorescence from a buried QSO or gravitation cooling radiation. Using simple emission models, we infer a baryon mass in the filaments of at least 1-4 × 1011 M ☉, and the dark halo mass is at least 2 × 1012 M ☉. The spatial-kinematic morphology is more consistent with inflow from the cosmic web than outflow from LAB2, although an outflow feature maybe present at one azimuth. LAB2 and the surrounding gas have significant and

  19. Study of the NWC electrons belt observed on DEMETER Satellite

    Li, Xinqiao; Ma, Yuqian; Ping WANG; Wang, Huanyu; Lu, Hong; Zhang, Xuemin; Huang, Jianping; Shi, Feng; Yu, Xiaoxia; Xu, Yanbing; Meng, Xiangcheng; Wang, Hui; Zhao, Xiaoyun; M. Parrot

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed observation data collected by the Instrument for the Detection of Particles (IDP) on board of DEMETER satellite during the period of total seventeen months in 2007 and 2008. In the meantime, the VLF transmitter located at NWC ground station was shutdown for seven months and working for total ten months. Our analysis, for the first time, revealed in details the transient properties of the space electrons induced by the man-made VLF wave emitted by the transmitter at NWC. First, we ...

  20. Near infrared spectral and polarization imaging observation of coronal emission lines during the 2008 total solar eclipse

    BAO XingMing; WANG XiaoFan; ZHANG ZhiYong; DENG Jian; HU KeLiang; XUAN WeiJia; LIU YangBing; ZHANG HongQi; DENG YuanYong; WANG DongGuang

    2009-01-01

    During the 2008 total solar eclipse, the coronal emission lines were observed by using optical fibre spectrometric and polarization imaging system in near infrared waveband. The profiles of the coronal emission lines Including Fe ⅩⅢ 10747 A, 10798 A and He 1 10830 A were obtained with dispersion of 0.5 A/pix. The intensity of Fe ⅩⅢ 10747 A remained unchanged In the two different coronal regions while the intensity of He I 10830 A varied considerably in the two coronal locations no matter whether the prominence appeared or not. The coronal polarization images were observed at Fe XI 7892 A with a bandpass of 30 A in a series of exposure times.