WorldWideScience

Sample records for vlf emissions observed

  1. World map of ELF/VLF emissions as observed by a low-orbiting satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistical studies were performed of the intensities of the ELF/VLF emissions observed by the low-orbiting satellite AUREOL-3. Data were obtained from filterbanks and the frequency range of observations extends from a few tens of Hz up to 15 kHz. The most important phenomena observed are ELF hiss and VLF hiss. Electric and magnetic components are used. Thus, representation of the waves intensities in geographical coordinates was made at different frequencies. The relative ability of natural waves (whistler, hiss) and man-made waves, such as powerful VLF transmitters or powerline harmonic radiations (PLHR), to precipitate particles in the slot region, is studied. Using geomagnetical representation, it is shown that ELF hiss is maximum between 06 and 20 Magnetic Local Time and in the invariant latitude range 500-700 as usual, but geographic representation indicates that the waves are intensified at the longitudes of VLF transmitters and near the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). The SAA plays a dominant role in the localization of the strongest ELF hiss. Weakest intensities are observed to the east of the SAA. As to the VLF hiss, the maximum intensity is related to regions of enhanced thunderstorm activity, and may be influenced by powerline harmonic radiations (PLHR) over USA. Comparisons with past work, experimental as well as theoretical, are made

  2. New results of structured VLF emissions observed simultaneously at two closely located stations near L ~ 5.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, J.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Fedorenko, Yu. V.; Bespalov, P. A.; Turunen, T.

    2014-09-01

    Simultaneous records of VLF (very low frequencies) emissions have been carried out at two ground-based stations located at similar geomagnetic latitudes near L ~ 5.5 and spaced in the longitude by ~ 400 km, Kannuslehto (KAN) in Finland and Lovozero (LOZ) in Russia, using quite similar VLF receivers with two calibrated orthogonal air-core loop antennas. We found that the general spectral properties of the VLF chorus emissions at these two stations were similar and typically have right-hand polarization. Contrary to VLF chorus, the short-period VLF emissions (periodic emissions, PE) in which separated spectral elements are repeated with the periodicity of 3-4 s were mostly left-hand polarized. Usually, these waves propagated in the north-south direction. We suppose that PEs are generated inside of the plasmasphere by the cyclotron instability under a quasi-linear relaxation of the energetic electron distribution function. However, sometimes PE occurred only at an individual station. We speculated that this could be due to the influence of the local inhomogeneities to the VLF waves during the propagation through the ionospheric trough to the ground. Unusual series of short-duration (10-100 s) bursts of VLF emissions, lasting several hours, were also found in the morning under very quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp ~ 0-1). Generally, these emissions were observed simultaneously at KAN and LOZ showing both right-hand and left-hand polarization, and different arrival directions provided the rather extended ionospheric exit area.

  3. Generation mechanism for VLF chorus emissions observed at a low-latitude ground station

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, A. K.; Rönnmark, K.

    2004-01-01

    A detailed spectral analysis of VLF chorus emissions observed at the low-latitude ground station Gulmarg (geomag. lat., 24° 26' N, geomag. long., 147° 9' E, L=1.28) during the strong magnetic activity on 7-8 March 1986 have been carried out, which shows that each chorus element originates from the upper edge of the underlying hiss band. To explain various temporal and spectral features of these emissions, a possible generation mechanism has been pr...

  4. Features of discrete VLF emissions observed at Gulmarg, India during the magnetic storm of 6–7 March, 1986

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Singh; A K Singh; D Siingh; R P Singh

    2007-12-01

    During the analysis of archived VLF data from Indian low latitude ground stations, some discrete VLF emissions recorded at the low latitude ground station Gulmarg (geomagnetic latitude 24°26?N; geomagnetic longitude 147° 09?E, L = 1.28) during moderate magnetic storm activity ( $K^{?}_{P}} = 32$, $K_P$ index varies from 4 to 6 during the observation period) on 6/7 March, 1986 are presented in this paper. The dynamic spectra of these discrete VLF emissions were observed along with tweeks and its harmonics, which is interesting and complex to explain. In most of the events the harmonic frequency of tweeks correlates with the starting frequency of harmonics of discrete emissions. In order to explain the observed features of discrete VLF emissions, we propose cyclotron resonance interaction between whistler mode wave and energetic electrons of inner radiation belt as possible generation mechanism. An attempt is also made to determine parallel energy, anisotropy and wave growth relevant to the generation process of VLF emissions.

  5. Quasi-periodic VLF emissions observed during daytime at a low latitude Indian ground station Jammu

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K K Singh; J Singh; R P Patel; A K Singh; R P Singh; Rejesh Singh; P A Ganai

    2009-06-01

    This paper reports quasi-periodic pulsing hiss emissions recorded during daytime in the frequency range of 50 Hz –15 kHz at low latitude station Jammu (geomag.lat.=22° 26?N; =1.17). It is noted that pulsing VLF emissions are a rare phenomena at low latitudes.The various spectrograms of pulsing VLF hiss emissions presented in this paper clearly show band limited spectrums regularly pulsing with almost equal period of the order of few seconds in the frequency range of ?3-8 kHz. Generation and propagation mechanism of these emissions are brie?y discussed.

  6. Auroral pulsations and accompanying VLF emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Tagirov

    Full Text Available Results of simultaneous TV observations of pulsating auroral patches and ELF-VLF-emissions in the morning sector carried out in Sodankylä (Finland on February 15, 1991 are presented. Auroral pulsating activity was typical having pulsating patches with characteristic periods of about 7 s. Narrow-band hiss emissions and chorus elements at intervals of 0.3–0.4 s formed the main ELF-VLF activity in the frequency range 1.0–2.5 kHz at the same time. The analysis of auroral images with time resolution of 0.04 s allowed perfectly separate analysis of spatial and temporal variations in the auroral luminosity. Mutual correspondence between the behaviour of the luminous auroral patches and the appearance of ELF noise type hiss emissions and VLF chorus trains was found in two intervals chosen for analysis. While the hiss emissions were associated with the appearance of luminosity inside a limited area close to the zenith, the structured VLF emissions were accompanied by rapid motion of luminosity inside the area. The spatial dimension of the pulsating area was about 45–50 km and luminosity propagated inside it with velocity of about 10–12 kms. We discuss a new approach to explain the 5–15 s auroral pulsation based on the theory of flowing cyclotron maser and relaxation characteristics of ionosphere.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions · Space plasma physics (wave-particle interactions

  7. VLF emissions from ionospheric/magnetospheric plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. P. Patel; R. P. Singh

    2001-05-01

    VLF emissions such as hiss, chorus, oscillating tones, hiss-triggered chorus and whistler triggered emissions have been observed at low latitude Indian stations. In this paper we present dynamic spectra of these emissions and discuss their various observed features. It is argued that most of the emissions are generated during Doppler shifted cyclotron resonance interaction between the whistler mode wave and counter streaming energetic electrons. Resonance energy of the participating electron and interaction length are evaluated to explain the generation mechanism of some of these emissions observed at Indian stations.

  8. Identification of the source of quasiperiodic VLF emissions using ground-based and Van Allen Probes satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titova, E. E.; Kozelov, B. V.; Demekhov, A. G.; Manninen, J.; Santolik, O.; Kletzing, C. A.; Reeves, G.

    2015-08-01

    We report on simultaneous spacecraft and ground-based observations of quasiperiodic VLF emissions and related energetic-electron dynamics. Quasiperiodic emissions in the frequency range 2-6 kHz were observed during a substorm on 25 January 2013 by Van Allen Probe-A and a ground-based station in the Northern Finland. The spacecraft detected the VLF signals near the geomagnetic equator in the night sector at L = 3.0-4.2 when it was inside the plasmasphere. During the satellite motion toward higher latitudes, the time interval between quasiperiodic elements decreased from 6 min to 3 min. We find one-to-one correspondence between the quasiperiodic elements detected by Van Allen Probe-A and on the ground, which indicates the temporal nature of the observed variation in the time interval between quasiperiodic elements. Multi-component measurements of the wave electric and magnetic fields by the Van Allen Probe-A show that the quasiperiodic emissions were almost circularly right-hand polarized whistler mode waves and had predominantly small (below 30°) wave vector angles with respect to the magnetic field. In the probable source region of these signals (L about 4), we observed synchronous variations of electron distribution function at energies of 10-20 keV and the quasiperiodic elements. In the pause between the quasiperiodic elements pitch angle distribution of these electrons had a maximum near 90°, while they become more isotropic during the development of quasiperiodic elements. The parallel energies of the electrons for which the data suggest direct evidence of the wave-particle interactions is in a reasonable agreement with the estimated cyclotron resonance energy for the observed waves.

  9. Digital spectra of artificially stimulated vlf emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New features of artificially stimulated VLF emissions from the magnetosphere have been discovered by using high resolution digital spectra analysis techniques. Several hundred emissions triggered by three VLF transmitters have been examined. The stimulated emissions initially grow at the frequency of the triggering signal. The NAA-triggered emissions remain at the triggering frequency until the transmitted pulse terminates; Siple and Omega emissions may show the same behavior or may break away prior to termination. The emissions always initially rise above the frequency of the triggering signal; this rise is independent of the final slope of the emissions. Where the rise occurs at the termination of the triggering signal it is usually very repeatable from event to event. Following the initial rise the frequency may often level off several hundred Hz above the triggering signal, forming a short (40-100 ms) plateau that precedes the final rising or falling phase. The bandwidth of the emission, prior to where it breaks away from the triggering signal, may be the minimum measurable (approximately 27 Hz) with the given time resolution (approximately 30 ms), indicating that the emission is practically monochromatic. The emissions characteristically show exponential growth in time with rates that vary from 25 to 250 dB/s. These observations are in good agreement with a theory that attributes the emissions to an interaction between the triggering signal and counter-streaming gyro-resonant electrons. The analysis method employed in these studies is based upon the fast Fourier transform and economically produces detailed spectra with resolutions in time and frequency of approximately 30 ms and 50 Hz, respectively. (Diss. Abstr. Int., B)

  10. Simultaneous observations of quasi-periodic ELF/VLF wave emissions and electron precipitation by DEMETER satellite: A case study.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Pasmanik, D. L.; Demekhov, A. G.; Santolík, Ond?ej; Parrot, M.; Titova, E. E.

    2013-01-01

    Ro?. 118, ?. 7 (2013), s. 4523-4533. ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GAP209/11/2280; GA MŠk LH12231 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : quasi-periodic ELF/VLF emissions in the magnetosphere * wave-particle interactions * demeter spacecraft measurements * whistler-mode waves Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jgra.50179/abstract

  11. Identification of the source of quasiperiodic VLF emissions using ground-based and Van Allen Probes satellite observations.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Titova, E. E.; Kozelov, B. V.; Demekhov, A. G.; Manninen, J.; Santolík, Ond?ej; Kletzing, C. A.; Reeves, G.

    2015-01-01

    Ro?. 42, ?. 15 (2015), s. 6137-6145. ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GAP209/11/2280 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : energetic electrons * quasiperiodic emissions * Van Allen Probes * VLF waves Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 4.456, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015GL064911/full

  12. Statistics of VLF/ELF emissions at subauroral latitudes in Athabasca, Canada and their correspondence to the Van Allen Probes observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez C, C.; Shiokawa, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Keika, K.; Ozaki, M.; Schofield, I.; Connors, M. G.; Kletzing, C.

    2014-12-01

    Using a high-sampling rate (100 kHz) loop antenna installed at subauroral latitudes in Athabasca (ATH), Canada (54.7N, 246.7E, L=4) we have been able to continuously monitor VLF/ELF emissions since September 2012. Several types of VLF/ELF emissions were observed, including chorus, hiss and quasi-periodic emissions. We report statistics of VLF/ELF emissions using a one-year data set from November 1, 2012 until October 31, 2013. Using 10 minute and 24 hour spectra, we selected clearly defined emissions with a minimum intensity of 2.10-5 pT2/Hz and recorded their starting time, duration, frequency range and spectral characteristics. This data set allowed us to calculate their occurrence rate as a function of AE, Dst and other geomagnetic parameters. We found similar occurrence rates on the ground in all cases, showing a peak around 07 MLT (7-10%) and a minimum from 18 to 02 MLT (1-3%), in agreement with previous satellite measurements at the geomagnetic equator. However, occurrence rates on the ground can be 8 times lower than those observed at the equator. This could be caused by the ionosphere preventing some frequencies to go all the way through, but could also suggest an interference in the propagation process between the generation region in the geomagnetic equator and the ground. To investigate this, we compared this data set of VLF/ELF emissions with the observations made by the Van Allen Probes near the equatorial plane. We found 77 conjugate events for which the footprints of either the Van Allen Probes A or B (or both) were within 1000 km of ATH. Using the L2 magnetic field data from the EMFISIS instrument (CDF files available at https://emfisis.physics.uiowa.edu/), we were able to determine that the satellites observed VLF/ELF emissions for at least 54 of those events, suggesting that the spatial extent of the emissions is large. Within these events, we found 8 cases showing similar frequency and spectral features on the ground and on the satellite(s). We report the preliminary conclusions from our analysis of these events.

  13. Polarization analysis of VLF/ELF waves observed at subauroral latitudes during the VLF-CHAIN campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Calderon, Claudia; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Ozaki, Mitsunori; Schofield, Ian; Connors, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Chorus wave emissions are one of the most intense naturally occurring phenomena in the very low (VLF) and extremely low frequency (ELF) ranges. They are believed to be one of the major contributors to acceleration and loss of electrons in the radiation belts. During the VLF Campaign observation with High-resolution Aurora Imaging Network (VLF-CHAIN) from 17 to 25 February 2012, several types of VLF/ELF emissions, including chorus, were observed at subauroral latitudes in Athabasca, Canada. To our knowledge, there has not been any comprehensive study of the physical properties of such emissions at these latitudes. In this study, we calculate spectral and polarization parameters of VLF/ELF waves with high temporal resolution. We found that the polarization angle of several emissions depended on both frequency and time. We suggest that the frequency-dependent events, which usually last several tens of minutes, might be the consequence of the broadening of the ray path that the waves follow from their generation region to the ground. Furthermore, time-dependent events, also lasting tens of minutes, have a polarization angle that changes from negative to positive values (or vice versa) every few minutes. We suggest that this could be due to variations of the wave duct, either near the generation region or along the wave propagation path. Using another ground station in Fort Vermillion, Canada, about 450 km northwest of Athabasca, we tracked the movements of the ionospheric exit point of three chorus emissions observed simultaneously at both stations. Although we found that movement of the ionospheric exit point does not follow a general direction, it is subject to hovering motion, suggesting that the exit point can be affected by small-scale plasma processes.

  14. Similar behaviors of natural ELF/VLF ionospheric emissions and transmitter signals over seismic Adriatic regions

    OpenAIRE

    M. Y. Boudjada; Schwingenschuh, K.; Biernat, H. K.; Berthelier, J.J.; Blecki, J.; Parrot, M.; Stachel, M.; Ö. Aydogar; Stangl, G.; Weingrill, J.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the analysis of ELF/VLF emissions observed by the Instrument Champ Electrique (ICE) experiment onboard the DEMETER micro-satellite. We consider principally selected seismic events reported by Molchanov et al. (2006). These authors studied the VLF signals radiated by ground transmitters and received on board the DEMETER micro-satellite. They revealed a drop of the signals (scattering spot) connected with the occurrence of large earthquakes. In our investigations, we proceed to a s...

  15. Frequency-time behavior of artificially stimulated vlf emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificially stimulated VLF emissions (ASE's) are emissions triggered in the magnetosphere by the whistler mode signals from VLF transmitters. These emissions may be separated into two classes, rising and falling, depending on whether the final value of df/dt is positive or negative. Several hundred ASE's triggered by three transmitters have been analyzed using the fast Fourier transform with a filter spacing of 25 Hz and an effective filter width of about 45 Hz. The study was limited to the initial frequency-time behavior of ASE's. Averages taken over many events reveal that both rising and falling tones show the same initial behavior. The emissions begin at the frequency of the triggering signal. Both tones initially rise in frequency, falling tones reversing slope at a point 25--300 Hz above the triggering signal. The slope of rising tones, particularly those triggered by NAA, often abruptly levels off in this same frequency range; as a result, a short (approximately 40 ms) plateau is formed that precedes the final rising phase. The initial frequency offset commonly observed in individual events appears to result from the frequent coincidence with this plateau of a peak in amplitude. Emissions stimulated by all three transmitters show essentially the same features; this finding indicates that their frequency behavior does not depend strongly on transmitter power. The process appears to be asymmetric in frequency; no evidence of initial growth below the triggering frequency has been found. (U.S.)

  16. Similar behaviors of natural ELF/VLF ionospheric emissions and transmitter signals over seismic Adriatic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Boudjada

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the analysis of ELF/VLF emissions observed by the Instrument Champ Electrique (ICE experiment onboard the DEMETER micro-satellite. We consider principally selected seismic events reported by Molchanov et al. (2006. These authors studied the VLF signals radiated by ground transmitters and received on board the DEMETER micro-satellite. They revealed a drop of the signals (scattering spot connected with the occurrence of large earthquakes. In our investigations, we proceed to a spectral analysis of ICE observations with the aim to find if the natural ionospheric VLF/ELF emissions show, or not, a similar ''drop'' in the intensity as it is the case of the VLF transmitter signal. We combine our results with those of Molchanov et al. (2006, and we discuss the origin of such interesting ionospheric features in the frame of the investigation of the pre-seismic electromagnetic emissions. We show that the geomagnetic activity is a key parameter which could disturb the natural VLF ionospheric emissions, and also the transmitter signal. We find that it is not possible to conclude the presence, or not, of a preseismic effect when the Kp-index is higher than one.

  17. Quasi-periodic ELF/VLF wave emissions in the Earth's magnetosphere: comparison of satellite observations and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Pasmanik

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of a case study of quasi-periodic (QP ELF/VLF hiss emissions detected on board the Freja and Magion 5 satellites. Detailed analysis of available QP events revealed certain specific features of their dynamic spectra, which have not been reported earlier. In particular, we found an event with an increase in the frequency drift rate during the generation of a single element of QP emission, and an event with alteration of QP elements having different frequency drift rates. Another event demonstrates the possible relationship between QP hiss emissions and discrete VLF emissions. Properties of QP events are compared with parameters of energetic electrons and cold plasma, and other available data.

    Possible scenarios for the formation of these emissions are discussed on the basis of self-consistent simulations of the cyclotron instability, employing the information obtained experimentally. It is shown that the generation regime of self-sustained pulsations can explain consistently our data set. We show that our numerical model is capable of explaining the mentioned specific features of the dynamic spectrum of QP emissions. Comparison of the modeling results with experimental data yields an estimate for the parameters not measured directly.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities; energetic particles, precipitating; energetic particles, trapped

  18. Magnetosphere VLF observation by satellite ISIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of the VLF (50 Hz -- 30 kHz) electric field data from the satellite ISIS, the following works carried out in The Radio Research Laboratories are described: deuteron whistler and whistler duct, detection of plasmapause by LHR hiss, and the origin of 5 kHz hiss at low/middle latitudes. The deuteron whistlers are observable distinctly only at low latitude because of gyro-frequency and the frequency resolution of spectral analyzers. Whistler echo occurs when a whistler moves back and forth through a duct along the line of magnetic force, so it is considered that the ISIS satellite crosses the duct. The variation in ion composition around plasmapause obtained through LHR hiss is explainable by the plasamapause position and the magnetic storm effect on the plasamapause. Concerning the narrow band hiss of 5 kHz +- 1.0 kHz frequently observed on the ground at low/middle latitudes, it may occur around plasmapause, propagate through the ionosphere and then to the ground in waveguide mode, or otherwise, it may occur above the ionosphere and then propagate directly to the ground penetrating through the ionosphere. (J.P.N.)

  19. On the frequency modulation of VLF emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Goncharova

    Full Text Available The VLF-wave frequency modulation efficiency as a function of magnetosphere plasma parameters under the weak pitch-angle diffusion regime is studied. The study is based on the VLF growth-rate modulation both in the magnetosphere equatorial plane and after integrating along the magnetic field line. It is shown that for the typical quiet magnetosphere plasma parameters the relative shift of the maximum intensity frequency ??m/?m is approximately equal to relative disturbance of the magnetic field in the magnetosphere equatorial plane, but may exceed it when both electron temperature anisotropy and the parameter ???are small; here ? is the total-to-warm electron content ratio and ?? is the electron parallel beta. It is also shown that relative shift of the maximum intensity frequency ??m/?m after integrating along the field line is not less than 50% from its value at the equatorial plane, which allows the use of the equatorial-plasma-parameter data to estimate the VLF frequency modulation on the ground. The upper cut-off frequency modulation is considered as well. The calculated theoretical sonagrams show that this frequency modulation may be related to the non-dispersive and to the "inverted-V'' structures of QP hiss.

  20. Prediction Capabilities of VLF/LF Emission as the Main Precursor of Earthquake

    CERN Document Server

    Kachakhidze, Manana

    2013-01-01

    Recent satellite and ground-based observations proved that in earthquake preparation period in the seismogenic area we have VLF/LF and ULF electromagnetic emissions. According to the opinion of the authors of the present paper this phenomenon is more universal and reliable than other earthquake indicators. Hypothetically, in case of availability of adequate methodological grounds, in the nearest future, earth VLF/LF electromagnetic emission might be declared as the main precursor of earthquake. In particular, permanent monitoring of frequency spectrum of earth electromagnetic emission generated in the earthquake preparation period might turn out very useful with the view of prediction of large (M 5) inland earthquakes. The present paper offers a scheme of the methodology according to which the reality of the above given hypothesis can be checked up. To prove the prediction capabilities of earth electromagnetic emission we have used avalanche-like unstable model of fault formation and an analogous model of ele...

  1. A parametric study of the numerical simulations of triggered VLF emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nunn

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is concerned with the numerical modelling of VLF emissions triggered in the equatorial region of the Earth's magnetosphere, using a well established 1-D Vlasov Hybrid Simulation (VHS code. Although this code reproduces observed ground based emissions well there is some uncertainty regarding the magnitude of simulation parameters such as saturation wave amplitude, cold plasma density, linear growth rate and simulation bandwidth. Concentrating on emissions triggered by pulses of VLF radio waves from the transmitter at Siple Station, Antarctica (L=4.2, these parameters, as well as triggering pulse length and amplitude, are systematically varied. This parametric study leads to an understanding of the physics of the triggering process and also of how the properties of these emissions, particularly their frequency time profile, depend upon these parameters. The main results are that weak power input tends to generate fallers, intermediate power input gives stable risers and strong growth rates give fallers, hooks or oscillating tones. The main factor determining the frequency sweep rate - of either sign - turns out to be the cold plasma density, lower densities giving larger sweep rates.

  2. VLF observations of ionospheric disturbances in association with TLEs from the EuroSprite-2007 campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NaitAmor, S.; AlAbdoadaim, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Two Very Low Frequency (VLF) AWESOME remote sensing systems located at Algiers, Algeria (36.45°N, 3.28°E) and Sebha, Libya (27.02°N, 14.26°E) monitor VLF signal perturbations for evidence of ionospheric disturbances. During the EuroSprite-2007 campaign a number of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) were captured over the Mediterranean Sea by cameras at Pic du Midi (42.94°N, 0.14°E) and at Centre de Recherches Atmospheriques (CRA) in southwestern France (43.13°N, 0.37°E). The cameras observations are compared to collected VLF AWESOME data. We consider early VLF perturbations observed on 12-13, 17-18 October and 17-18 December, 2007. The data from the two VLF receivers confirm the association between TLEs and early VLF signal perturbations with the perturbations amplitudes dependent on the observation configuration i.e. whether the TLE is near the receiver, near the transmitter, or far from both and the scattering process. The results also reveal that the early VLF perturbations can occur in the absence of a TLE.

  3. Scientific heritage of Ya. I. Likhter, a pioneer of the studies of VLF emission (Devoted to centenary of Ya. Likhter)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, Yu. M.; Larkina, V. I.; Mikhailova, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the most important results, some of which have been previously unknown, of long-term experimental studies of signals and emission in the ELF and VLF ranges carried by Ya.I. Likhter during ground-based and satellite observations. In addition, the possibility of using the research results obtained for the diagnostics of parameters and the state of the near Earth's plasma is shown.

  4. New type of ensemble of quasi-periodic, long-lasting VLF emissions at the auroral zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Manninen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new type of the series of quasi-periodic (QP very low frequency (VLF emissions in frequency range of 1–5 kHz, and not associated with geomagnetic pulsations, has been discovered at auroral latitudes (L = 5.3 during the Finnish VLF campaign (held in December 2011. At least five unusually spectacular events, each with a duration of several hours, have been observed during the night under conditions of quiet geomagnetic activity (Kp = 0–1, although QPs usually occur during the daytime. Contrary to the QP emissions typically occurring during the day, the spectral structure of these QP events represented an extended, complicated sequence of repeated discrete rising VLF signals. Their duration was about 2–3 min each, with the repetition periods ranging from ~1 min to ~10 min. Two such nighttime non-typical events are reported in this paper. The fine structure of the separated QP elements may represent a mixture of the different frequency band signals, which seem to have independent origins. It was found that the periodic signals with lower frequency appear to trigger the strong dispersive upper frequency signals. The temporal dynamics of the spectral structure of the QPs studied were significantly controlled by some disturbances in the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. This finding is very important for future theoretical investigations because the generation mechanism of this new type of QP emissions is not yet understood.

  5. Statistical investigation of the VLF quasi-periodic emissions measured by the DEMETER spacecraft.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hayosh, Mykhaylo; N?mec, F.; Santolík, Ond?ej; Pasmanik, D. L.; Parrot, M.

    EGU, 2013. EGU2013-8852. ISSN 1607-7962. [EGU General Assembly 2013. 07.04.2013-12.04.2013, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : VLF quasi-periodic emissions Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2013/EGU2013-8852.pdf

  6. Simulation of VLF chorus emissions in the magnetosphere and comparison with THEMIS spacecraft data.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Demekhov, A.; Taubenschuss, U.; Santolík, Ond?ej

    Prague : International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2015. IUGG-0723. [Earth and Environmental Sciences for Future Generations. General Assembly of International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics /26./. 22.06.2015-02.07.2015, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : VLF chorus emissions * magnetosphere Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://www.iugg2015prague.com/abstractcd/data/HtmlApp/main.html#

  7. Subionospheric VLF signatures and their association with sprites observed during EuroSprite 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mika, A.; Haldoupis, C.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, VLF observations during EuroSprite-2003 are analyzed in connection with many sprites observed above thunderstorms in central France. The sprites were detected with a sensitive camera from the Observatoire du Pic du Midi in the Pyrenees overlooking storms monitored by the French national lightning detection network. The VLF observations were made in Crete, Greece with a narrowband receiver, and in Nancay, France with a broadband receiver. The storms were in the vicinity of a VLF transmitter (HWV) at Le Blanc, France, whose signal was received on Crete, arriving over a great circle path that cut through the storms to the southeast. The Nancay broadband receiver was located near HWV to the northeast of the transmitter. This setup provided a unique observational set for investigation. The receiver in Crete observed early VLF perturbations in nearly one-to-one association with the sprites, which endorses the findings of earlier work based on EuroSprite-2003 observations from a single storm. While part of the sprite-related VLF perturbations were of the early/fast type, many classified as "early/slow" having onset durations up to similar to 2s and thus suggesting a new mechanism at work which may cause a slow build up of ionization after a sprite. The only elve in the data set was found to associate also with an early/fast VLF perturbation. Moreover, the analysis showed basically no early VLF events to occur in relation to the numerous +/- CG discharges that did not lead to sprites. Bandpass filtering of the broadband VLF signal revealed that only about 5% of the sprites were escorted by early VLF perturbations, possibly due to backscatter. Finally, by using all 131 sprites captured during EuroSprite-2003, the time lags of the sprites to the preceding +/- CG discharges were computed and analyzed. The time-lag distribution had a well defined tail suggesting that at least one third of the sprites observed were lagging the +/- CG discharges by more than 30 up to 300 ms. In addition these "long-delayed" sprites were not accompanied by any radio-sferics during the sprite observation period, in sharp contrast to the short-delayed sprites which were escorted nearly always by enhanced, burst-like, sferic activity. These observations endorse the notion of long delayed sprites reported in past studies, but also show that their occurrence is much more frequent than it was thought before.

  8. VLF observations of ionospheric disturbances in association with TLEs from the EuroSprite-2007 campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NaitAmor, S.; AlAbdoadaim, M. A.; Cohen, M. B.; Cotts, B. R. T.; Soula, S.; Chanrion, Olivier Arnaud; Neubert, Torsten; Abdelatif, T.

    2010-01-01

    Two Very Low Frequency (VLF) AWESOME remote sensing systems located at Algiers, Algeria (36.45°N, 3.28°E) and Sebha, Libya (27.02°N, 14.26°E) monitor VLF signal perturbations for evidence of ionospheric disturbances. During the EuroSprite-2007 campaign a number of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) were captured over the Mediterranean Sea by cameras at Pic du Midi (42.94°N, 0.14°E) and at Centre de Recherches Atmospheriques (CRA) in southwestern France (43.13°N, 0.37°E). The cameras observations a...

  9. VLF observations of ionospheric disturbances in association with TLEs from the EuroSprite?2007 campaign

    OpenAIRE

    NaitAmor, S.; AlAbdoadaim, M. A.; Cohen, M. B.; Cotts, B. R. T.; S. Soula; Chanrion, Olivier Arnaud; Neubert, Torsten; Abdelatif, T.

    2010-01-01

    Two Very Low Frequency (VLF) AWESOME remote sensing systems located at Algiers, Algeria (36.45°N, 3.28°E) and Sebha, Libya (27.02°N, 14.26°E) monitor VLF signal perturbations for evidence of ionospheric disturbances. During the EuroSprite-2007 campaign a number of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) were captured over the Mediterranean Sea by cameras at Pic du Midi (42.94°N, 0.14°E) and at Centre de Recherches Atmosphériques (CRA) in southwestern France (43.13°N, 0.37°E). The cameras observation...

  10. Techniques to determine the quiet day curve for a long period of subionospheric VLF observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell-Moorcock, Kathy; Rodger, Craig J.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Milling, David K.

    2015-05-01

    Very low frequency (VLF) transmissions propagating between the conducting Earth's surface and lower edge of the ionosphere have been used for decades to study the effect of space weather events on the upper atmosphere. The VLF response to these events can only be quantified by comparison of the observed signal to the estimated quiet time or undisturbed signal levels, known as the quiet day curve (QDC). A common QDC calculation approach for periods of investigation of up to several weeks is to use observations made on quiet days close to the days of interest. This approach is invalid when conditions are not quiet around the days of interest. Longer-term QDCs have also been created from specifically identified quiet days within the period and knowledge of propagation characteristics. This approach is time consuming and can be subjective. We present three algorithmic techniques, which are based on either (1) a mean of previous days' observations, (2) principal component analysis, or (3) the fast Fourier transform (FFT), to calculate the QDC for a long-period VLF data set without identification of specific quiet days as a basis. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the techniques at identifying the true QDCs of synthetic data sets created to mimic patterns seen in actual VLF data including responses to space weather events. We find that the most successful technique is to use a smoothing method, developed within the study, on the data set and then use the developed FFT algorithm. This technique is then applied to multiyear data sets of actual VLF observations.

  11. Meteorological effects in the lower ionosphere as based on VLF/LF signal observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rozhnoi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Very low and low frequency (VLF/LF data recorded in the Far Eastern stations Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky (158.92° E, 53.15° N, Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk (142.75° E, 46.95° N and Yuzhno-Kurilsk (145.861° E, 44.03° N are investigated to study the meteorological effects in the lower ionosphere. The results demonstrate the sensitivity of the VLF/LF signals to the variations of atmospheric pressure, humidity, wind velocity and temperature, and the VLF/LF record at the station of Yuzhno-Kurilsk is found to be most sensitive to those variations of atmospheric parameters. The region under consideration is characterized by high winter cyclonic activity in midlatitudes and strong summer and autumn typhoon activity in low latitudes. VLF/LF signal variations during 8 tropical cyclones (TCs with different intensity are considered. Negative nighttime anomalies in the signal amplitude that are most probably caused by TC activity are found for 6 events. Those anomalies are observed during 1–2 days when TCs move inside the sensitivity zones of the subionospheric paths. Perturbations of the VLF signal observed during 2 TCs can be caused by both the TC influence and seismic activity, but no correlation between TC intensity and magnitude of the signal anomalies is found. Spectral analysis of the typhoon-induced disturbed signals revealed the fluctuations with time periods in the range of 7–16 and 15–55 min that corresponds to the range of internal gravity waves periods.

  12. Cluster observations of ELF/VLF signals generated by modulated heating of the lower ionosphere with the HAARP HF transmitter

    OpenAIRE

    Platino, M; U. S. Inan; Bell, T.F.; Pickett, J.; Kennedy, E J; Trotignon, J. G.; J. L. Rauch; Canu, P.

    2004-01-01

    It is now well known that amplitude modulated HF transmissions into the ionosphere can be used to generate ELF/VLF signals using the so-called "electrojet antenna". Although most observations of the generated ELF/VLF signals have been made on the ground, several low and high-altitude satellite observations have also been reported (James et al., 1990). One of the important unknowns in the physics of ELF/VLF wave generation by ionospheric heating is the volume of the magnetosphere ill...

  13. Cluster observations of ELF/VLF signals generated by modulated heating of the lower ionosphere with the HAARP HF transmitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Platino

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available It is now well known that amplitude modulated HF transmissions into the ionosphere can be used to generate ELF/VLF signals using the so-called "electrojet antenna". Although most observations of the generated ELF/VLF signals have been made on the ground, several low and high-altitude satellite observations have also been reported (James et al., 1990. One of the important unknowns in the physics of ELF/VLF wave generation by ionospheric heating is the volume of the magnetosphere illuminated by the ELF/VLF waves. In an attempt to investigate this question further, ground-satellite conjunction experiments have recently been conducted using the four Cluster satellites and the HF heater of the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP facility in Gakona, Alaska. Being located on largely closed field lines at L?4.9, HAARP is currently also being used for ground-to-ground type of ELF/VLF wave-injection experiments, and will be increasingly used for this purpose as it is now being upgraded for higher power operation. In this paper, we describe the HAARP installation and present recent results of the HAARP-Cluster experiments. We give an overview of the detected ELF/VLF signals at Cluster, and a possible explanation of the spectral signature detected, as well as the determination of the location of the point of injection of the HAARP ELF/VLF signals into the magnetosphere using ray tracing.

  14. Statistical investigation of VLF quasiperiodic emissions measured by the DEMETER spacecraft.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hayosh, Mykhaylo; N?mec, F.; Santolík, Ond?ej; Parrot, M.

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 119, ?. 10 (2014), s. 8063-8072. ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GAP209/11/2280; GA MŠk LH12231 Grant ostatní: Rada Programu interní podpory projekt? mezinárodní spolupráce AV ?R M100421206 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : VLF waves in ionosphere * QP emissions * DEMETER spacecraft Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2013JA019731/abstract

  15. The quasi-periodical VLF/ELF emissions detected onboard the DEMETER spacecraft: statistical and theoretical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasmanik, Dmitry; Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Demekhov, Andrei; Santolík, Ond?ej; Nemec, František; Parrot, Michel

    2015-04-01

    We present a statistical study of the quasi-periodic (QP) ELF/VLF emissions measured by the DEMETER spacecraft. Events with modulation period larger than 10 s and frequency bandwidth more than 200 Hz were visually selected among the six year of measurements. Selected QP-emissions events occur mostly at frequencies from about 750 Hz to 2 kHz, but they may be observed at frequencies as low as 500 Hz and as high as 8 kHz. The statistical analysis clearly shows that QP events with larger modulation periods have lower frequency drift and smaller wave amplitude. Intense QP events have higher frequency drifts and larger values of the frequency bandwiths. Numerical simulation of the QP emissions based on the theoretical model of the flow cyclotron maser is performed. Calculations were made for wide range of plasma parameters (i.e. cold plasma density, L-shell, energetic electron flux and etc.) The numerical results are in good agreement with the observed relationship between different parameters of the QP emissions. The comparison between theoretical results and observations allow us to estimate the typical properties of the source of the QP emissions observed by the DEMETER satellite.

  16. Radiation belt precipitation due to man-made VLF transmissions. Satellite observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. In the more than four decades since the discovery of the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts, it has proven difficult to confirm the principal source and loss mechanisms that control radiation belt particles. It has been recognized for some time that the loss of radiation belt electrons in the inner belt beyond L?1.5 is dominated by pitch angle scattering in wave-particle interactions with whistler mode waves, although there has been uncertainty as to the relative importance of different wave types. Relatively recent theoretical calculations have led to the rather surprising conclusion that manmade VLF transmissions may dominate losses in the inner radiation belts. This finding has sparked considerable interest, suggesting practical human control of the radiation belts to protect Earth-orbiting systems from natural and nuclear injections of high energy electrons, generally known as Radiation Belt Remediation (RBR). While strong correlations between drift-loss cone enhancements and transmitter locations have been shown previously, particle enhancements have yet to be tied directly to VLF wave observations. The occurrence frequency of drift loss cone enhancements above transmitters has also previously been unknown. In this paper we combine wave and particle observations from the DEMETER satellite with ground based VLF recordings to examine the significance of the transmitter NWC on the inner radiation belt. Enhancements of drift-loss cone electron fluxes are observed eastward of the transmitter location, with cyclotron resonance taking place on the field line near the VLF transmitter location, followed by the eastward drift of electrons towards the South Atlantic Anomaly. Transmitters located under a nighttime ionosphere are favoured, due to the lower ionospheric absorption. 95% of orbital passes which met these conditions showed evidence of an interaction. A positive correlation exists between transmitter operation and the presence of such enhancements. Typical transmissions cause a ?400-fold increase in 300 keV drift-loss cone electrons. These observations provide conclusive evidence linking drift-loss cone electron flux enhancements and transmitter operation. Numerical magnitudes and occurrence rates experimentally detected here should allow a validation of models for wave and particle dynamics in the radiation belts.

  17. Long-term determination of energetic electron precipitation into the atmosphere from AARDDVARK subionospheric VLF observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Jason J.; Rodger, Craig J.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Thomson, Neil R.; Raita, Tero; Ulich, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    We analyze observations of subionospherically propagating very low frequency (VLF) radio waves to determine outer radiation belt energetic electron precipitation (EEP) flux magnitudes. The radio wave receiver in Sodankylä, Finland (Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory) observes signals from the transmitter with call sign NAA (Cutler, Maine). The receiver is part of the Antarctic-Arctic Radiation-belt Dynamic Deposition VLF Atmospheric Research Konsortia (AARDDVARK). We use a near-continuous data set spanning November 2004 until December 2013 to determine the long time period EEP variations. We determine quiet day curves over the entire period and use these to identify propagation disturbances caused by EEP. Long Wave Propagation Code radio wave propagation modeling is used to estimate the precipitating electron flux magnitudes from the observed amplitude disturbances, allowing for solar cycle changes in the ambient D region and dynamic variations in the EEP energy spectra. Our method performs well during the summer months when the daylit ionosphere is most stable but fails during the winter. From the summer observations, we have obtained 693 days worth of hourly EEP flux magnitudes over the 2004-2013 period. These AARDDVARK-based fluxes agree well with independent satellite precipitation measurements during high-intensity events. However, our method of EEP detection is 10-50 times more sensitive to low flux levels than the satellite measurements. Our EEP variations also show good agreement with the variation in lower band chorus wave powers, providing some confidence that chorus is the primary driver for the outer belt precipitation we are monitoring.

  18. Thunderstorm monitoring with VLF network and super dense meteorological observation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yukihiro; Sato, Mitsuteru

    2015-04-01

    It's not easy to understand the inside structure and developing process of thunderstorm only with existing meteorological instruments since its horizontal extent of the storm cell is sometimes smaller than an order of 10 km while one of the densest ground network in Japan, AMEDAS, consists of sites located every 17 km in average and the resolution of meteorological radar is 1-2 km in general. Even the X-band radar realizes the resolution of 250 m or larger. Here we suggest a thunderstorm monitoring system consisting of the network of VLF radio wave receivers and the super dense meteorological observation system with simple and low cost plate-type sensors that can be used for measurement both of raindrop and vertical electric field change caused by cloud-to-ground lightning discharge, adding to basic equipments for meteorological measurements. The plate-type sensor consists of two aluminum plates with a diameter of 10-20 cm. We carried out an observation campaign in summer of 2013 in the foothills of Mt. Yastugatake, Yamanashi and Nagano prefectures in Japan, installing 6 plate-type sensors at a distance of about 4 km. Horizontal location, height and charge amount of each lightning discharge are estimated successfully based on the information of electric field changes at several observing sites. Moreover, it was found that the thunderstorm has a very narrow structure smaller than 300 m that cannot be measured by any other ways, counting the positive and negative pulses caused by attachment of raindrop to the sensor plate, respectively. We plan to construct a new super dense observation network in the north Kanto region, Japan, where the lightning activity is most prominent in summer Japan and surrounded by our VLF systems developed for detecting sferics from lightning discharge, distributing more than several tens of sensors at every 4 km or shorter, such as an order of 100 m at minimum. This kind of new type network will reveal the unknown fine structures of thunderstorms and open the door for constructing real time alert system of torrential rainfall and lightning stroke especially in the city area.

  19. Unusual attenuation events in the VLF range observed by the DEMETER spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahlava, Jan; Nemec, Frantisek; Parrot, Michel; Rodger, Craig J.; Santolik, Ondrej

    2015-04-01

    Results of a systematic study of unusual attenuation events observed by the DEMETER spacecraft in the VLF range are presented. In the frequency-time spectrograms of wave intensity, these attenuation events consist of several lines with significantly lower intensity. Detailed analysis of the events shows that they are formed by consecutive lightning generated whistlers. These whistlers are attenuated at some specific frequencies which vary continuously during the event, resulting in lines of lower intensity. We inspected all available DEMETER data for the presence of these attenuation events. Altogether, 1580 events have been identified. They occur exclusively during the nighttime. We compare the overall geographic distribution of the total event duration with the geographic distribution of the mean lightning occurrence. It is found that the event locations are closely related to the areas of enhanced lightning activity, but they are shifted by about 30 degrees westward. We present a simple model of a possible event formation based on a basic theory of wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. This model, however, does not explain the observed longitudinal shift. We believe that the shift is due to an azimuthal dependence of the wave attenuation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, which is not considered in the used simplified waveguide theory.

  20. Whistler-triggered emissions observed by ISIS satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Y.; Ondoh, T.

    1989-01-01

    A statistical examination has been conducted of the ducted and nonducted whistler-triggered emissions (WTEs) observed by the ISIS satellites in the 1979-1981 period. Most WTEs are observed with simultaneous lower hybrid resonance in the topside ionosphere. The VLF emissions triggered by ducted whistlers frequently occur at L of 2-3, while those triggered by nonducted whistlers occur in the wider latitudinal regions at L of 2.2-4.3.

  1. Whistler-triggered emissions observed by ISIS satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VLF emissions triggered by whistlers are often observed at middle and high latitudes in the topside ionosphere by ISIS satellites. Most of them are so-called LHR emissions lasting for a few seconds. Latitudinal distributions of the occurrence rate for the whistler-triggered emissions in the topside ionosphere have been obtained by using VLF electric field data received from the ISIS 1 and 2 satellites at Kashima station, Communications Research Laboratory, Japan. These VLF emissions are classified into two groups according to the type of whistlers, i.e., ducted whistlers with a continuous trace over the full frequency range of the spectrum and nonducted whistlers without a complete trace below fLHR. The latitudinal distribution of the occurrence rate for emissions triggered by ducted whistlers is considerably different from that for emissions triggered by nonducted whistlers, especially at high latitudes. The occurrence rate for the emissions by nonducted whistlers is distributed rather randomly in latitude between L = 2.0 and L = 4.2. The occurrence rate for emissions by ducted whistlers increases with latitudes between L = 1.5 and L = 2.9, and it attains a maximum of 0.33 at L = 2.7. It then abruptly drops to 0.1 at L = 3.0, and it remains below 0.1 between L = 3.0 and L = 4.0. The decrease of the occurrence rate for emissions by ducted whistlers at L = 3.0 seems to be caused by the decrease of the radiation belt electron flux near the slot region. These results suggest that the VLF emissions triggered by ducted whistlers in the topside ionosphere are generated by the cyclotron resonant interaction of ducted whistlers with the magnetospheric electrons near the geomagnetic equatorial plane

  2. Relationship between median intensities of electromagnetic emissions in the VLF range and lightning activity.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    N?mec, František; Santolík, Ond?ej; Parrot, M.; Rodger, C. J.

    2010-01-01

    Ro?. 115, - (2010), A08315/1-A08315/10. ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ?R GA205/09/1253; GA ?R GAP205/10/2279; GA MŠk ME09107 Grant ostatní: MŠMT(CZ) MSM0021620860 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : lightning activity * VLF electromagnetic waves * DEMETER satellite Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2010

  3. Assessing global lightning activity with ELF/VLF observations, Schumann resonances and ionospheric potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Global lightning activity is estimated from globally spaced ELF/VLF receivers and used to investigate the dynamics of the global atmospheric electric circuit. ELF/VLF radiation generated by lightning is known to propagate long distances in the Earth ionosphere waveguide, but propagation effects resulting from diurnal ionospheric variations often dominate received amplitudes at a fixed station. Day/night propagation effects thus make meaningful comparison and summation of activity across multiple stations difficult. Exact inversion of the propagation channel is possible only with knowledge of the location of each lightning impulse, a feat unattainable even with current detection networks. In a novel approach, propagation effects are accounted for using established monthly averages of lightning location provided by the Lightning Image Sensor (LIS) and applying known frequency specific attenuation parameters for daytime/nighttime ELF/VLF propagation. The method allows for quantification of daily lightning activity on a global scale using a small number of receiver sites. Obtained curves of daily lightning activity are compared to measurements of atmospheric electric field at mid and polar latitudes and also to lightning activity estimates based on Schumann resonances. For Schumann resonances we utilize a method of field decomposition that separates propagating and standing modes. It is found that in most examined cases daily global lightning activity and the atmospheric electric field are poorly correlated.

  4. Possible Seismic Influence on VLF Wave Intensity: Observations by a Low-Altitude Satellite.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    N?mec, František; Santolík, Ond?ej; Parrot, M.

    Vol. 2. Praha : MATFYZPRESS, Praha, 2008 - (Šafranková, J.; Pavl?, J.), s. 168-171 ISBN 978-80-7378-066-1. [Week of Doctoral Students 2008 /17./. Prague (CZ), 03.06.2008-06.06.2008] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA205/06/1267 Grant ostatní: CNRS/DREI(FR) PICS-3725 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : seismo-electromagnetic effects * VLF electromagnetic waves * DEMETER Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://oberon.troja.mff.cuni.cz/~nemef1am/work/articles/08wds.pdf

  5. Additional attenuation of natural VLF electromagnetic waves observed by the DEMETER spacecraft resulting from preseismic activity.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Píša, David; N?mec, F.; Santolík, Ond?ej; Parrot, M.; Rycroft, M.

    2013-01-01

    Ro?. 118, ?. 8 (2013), s. 5286-5295. ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GAP209/11/2280; GA ?R GA205/09/1253 Grant ostatní: European Community Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013),(XE) 262005; AV ?R(CZ) M100431206. Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : DEMETER * VLF waves * preseismic activity * Earth-ionosphere waveguide Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jgra.50469/abstract

  6. Multiple-Station Observation of Frequency Dependence and Polarization Characteristics of ELF/VLF waves generated via Ionospheric Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxworth, A. S.; Golkowski, M.; Cohen, M.; Moore, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Generation of Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) signals through ionospheric modification has been practiced for many years. Heating the lower ionosphere with high power HF waves allows for modulation of natural current systems. Our experiments were carried out at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. In this experiment, the ionosphere was heated with a vertical amplitude modulating signal and the modulation frequency was changed sequentially within an array of 40 frequencies followed by a frequency ramp. The observed magnetic field amplitude and polarization of the generated ELF/VLF signals were analyzed for multiple sites and as a function of modulation frequency. Our three observation sites: Chistochina, Paxson and Paradise are located within 36km (azimuth 47.7°), 50.2km (azimuth -20°) and 99km (azimuth 80.3°) respectively. We show that the peak amplitudes observed as a function of frequency result from vertical resonance in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and can be used to diagnose the D-region profile. Polarization analysis showed that out of the three sites Paxson shows the highest circularity in the magnetic field polarization, compared to Chistochina and Paradise which show highly linear polarizations. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical simulation model results and it was clear that in both cases, the modulated Hall current dominates the observed signals at Chistochina and Paradise sites and at Paxson there is an equal contribution from Hall and Pedersen currents. The Chistochina site shows the highest magnetic field amplitudes in both experimental and simulation environments. Depending upon the experimental and simulation observations at the three sites, a radiation pattern for the HAARP ionospheric heater can be mapped

  7. Lightning characteristics observed by a VLF/LF lightning detection network (LINET in Brazil, Australia, Africa and Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Höller

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes lightning characteristics as obtained in four sets of lightning measurements during recent field campaigns in different parts of the world from mid-latitudes to the tropics by the novel VLF/LF (very low frequency/low frequency lightning detection network (LINET. The paper gives a general overview on the approach, and a synopsis of the statistical results for the observation periods as a whole and for one special day in each region. The focus is on the characteristics of lightning which can specifically be observed by this system like intra-cloud and cloud-to-ground stroke statistics, vertical distributions of intra-cloud strokes or peak current distributions. Some conclusions regarding lightning produced NOx are also presented as this was one of the aims of the tropical field campaigns TROCCINOX (Tropical Convection, Cirrus and Nitrogen Oxides Experiment and TroCCiBras (Tropical Convection and Cirrus Experiment Brazil in Brazil during January/February 2005, SCOUT-O3 (Stratospheric-Climate Links with Emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere and TWP-ICE (Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment during November/December 2005 and January/February 2006, respectively, in the Darwin area in N-Australia, and of AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses in W-Africa during June–November 2006.

    Regional and temporal characteristics of lightning are found to be dependent on orographic effects (e.g. S-Germany, Brazil, Benin, land-sea breeze circulations (N-Australia and especially the evolution of the monsoons (Benin, N-Australia. Large intra-seasonal variability in lightning occurrence was found for the Australian monsoon between the strong convection during build-up and break phases and the weak wet monsoon phase with only minor lightning activity. Total daily lightning rates can be of comparable intensity in all regions with the heaviest events found in Germany and N-Australia. The frequency of occurrence of such days was by far the largest in N-Australia. In accordance with radar observed storm structures, the intra-cloud stroke mean emission heights were found distinctly different in Germany (8 km as compared to the tropics (up to 12 km in N-Australia. The fraction of intra-cloud strokes (compared to all strokes was found to be relatively high in Brazil and Australia (0.83 and 0.74, respectively as compared to Benin and Germany (0.67 and 0.69, respectively.

    Using stroke peak currents and vertical location information, lightning NOx (LNOx production under defined standard conditions can be compared for the different areas of observation. LNOx production per standard stroke was found to be most efficient for the N-Australian and S-German thunderstorms whereas the yield from Brazilian and W-African strokes was nearly 40% less. On the other hand, the main NO contribution in Brazil was from intra-cloud (IC strokes whereas in Benin it was due to cloud-to-ground (CG components. For the German and Australian strokes both stroke types contributed similar amounts to the total NO outcome.

  8. Lightning characteristics observed by a VLF/LF lightning detection network (LINET in Brazil, Australia, Africa and Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Höller

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes lightning characteristics as obtained in four sets of lightning measurements during recent field campaigns in different parts of the world from mid-latitudes to the tropics by the novel VLF/LF (very low frequency/low frequency lightning detection network (LINET. The paper gives a general overview on the approach, and a synopsis of the statistical results for the observation periods as a whole and for one special day in each region. The focus is on the characteristics of lightning which can specifically be observed by this system like intra-cloud and cloud-to-ground stroke statistics, vertical distributions of intra-cloud strokes or peak current distributions. Some conclusions regarding lightning produced NOx are also presented as this was one of the aims of the tropical field campaigns TROCCINOX (Tropical Convection, Cirrus and Nitrogen Oxides Experiment and TroCCiBras (Tropical Convection and Cirrus Experiment Brazil in Brazil during January/February 2005, SCOUT-O3 (Stratospheric-Climate Links with Emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere and TWP-ICE (Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment during November/December 2005 and January/February 2006, respectively, in the Darwin area in N-Australia, and of AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses in W-Africa during June–November 2006.

    Regional and temporal characteristics of lightning are found to be dependent on orographic effects (e.g. S-Germany, Brazil, Benin, land-sea breeze circulations (N-Australia and especially the evolution of the monsoons (Benin, N-Australia. Large intra-seasonal variability in lightning occurrence was found for the Australian monsoon between the strong convection during build-up and break phases and the weak active monsoon phase with only minor lightning activity. Total daily lightning stroke rates can be of comparable intensity in all regions with the heaviest events found in Germany and N-Australia. The frequency of occurrence of such days was by far the largest in N-Australia. In accordance with radar observed storm structures, the intra-cloud stroke mean emission heights were found distinctly different in Germany (8 km as compared to the tropics (up to 12 km in N-Australia. The fraction of intra-cloud strokes (compared to all strokes was found to be relatively high in Brazil and Australia (0.83 and 0.82, respectively as compared to Benin and Germany (0.64 and 0.69, respectively.

    Using stroke peak currents and vertical location information, lightning NOx (LNOx production under defined standard conditions can be compared for the different areas of observation. LNOx production per standard stroke was found to be most efficient for the N-Australian and S-German thunderstorms whereas the yield from Brazilian and W-African strokes was nearly 40% less. On the other hand, the main NO contribution in Brazil was from intra-cloud (IC strokes whereas in Benin it was due to cloud-to-ground (CG components. For the German and Australian strokes both stroke types contributed similar amounts to the total NO outcome.

  9. Hiss emissions during quiet and disturbed periods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D K Singh; R P Singh

    2002-10-01

    The characteristic features of VLF hiss emissions during quiet and disturbed conditions observed at ground stations and on-board satellites are summarized. The increased intensity of the hiss emissions during magnetic storm period is explained by considering the enhanced ?ux of energetic electrons during magnetic storm period. The generation and propagation mechanism of VLF hiss are also brie?y discussed.

  10. Characteristics of VLF atmospherics near the resonance frequency of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide 1.6–2.3 kHz by observations in the auroral region

    OpenAIRE

    Manninen, J.; Turunen, T.; A. P. Nickolaenko; E. E. Titova; A. A. Ostapenko; Raita, T.

    2010-01-01

    Recordings of ELF-VLF waves with the right-hand (RH) and the left-hand (LH) circular polarization were made in Northern Finland. Analysis showed a difference between the RH and LH polarized waves. A pronounced maximum of the wave amplitude was observed at the first critical frequency of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide (the first transverse resonance) around 1.6–2.3 kHz. The wave had the circular LH polarization at this maximum. To interpret observations, we computed the characteristics of the ...

  11. Longitudinal drift of substorm electrons as the reason of impulsive precipitation events and VLF emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lubchich

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Using the data from satellite CRRES and three geostationary LANL spacecraft, the propagation of an electron cloud from midnight to the evening sector is investigated. An electron cloud was injected during a weak isolated substorm that developed on a quiet geomagnetic background. It is found that within the local time sector from 03:00 until at least 08:00 MLT, the propagation of electrons at perpendicular pitch-angles is well described by a simple model of drift in the dipole magnetic field. The flux levels in the field-aligned electrons increase simultaneously with the flux at perpendicular pitch angles, which is attributed to the pitch angle diffusion by the whistler mode. This pitch-angle diffusion leads to precipitation of electrons from a drifting cloud and an increase in the ionospheric electron density, simultaneously observed above Tromsø, Norway, by the EISCAT UHF radar in the morning sector (04:40–05:25 MLT. The precipitation develops as quasi-periodic pulses with a period of about 100 s. We discuss the models of pulsating precipitation due to the whistler cyclotron instability and show that our observations can be explained by such a model.

  12. ELF/VLF signatures of sprite-producing lightning discharges observed during the 2005 EuroSprite campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenberg, E.; Price, C.

    2009-01-01

    During the summer of 2005, transient luminous events were optically imaged from the French Pyrénées as part of the EuroSprite campaign. Simultaneously, extremely low frequency (ELF: 3–3000 Hz) and broadband very low frequency (VLF: 3–30 kHz) data were recorded continuously at two separate receivers in Israel, located about 3300 km from the area of the parent lightning discharges responsible for the generation of sprites. Additionally, narrowband VLF data were collected in Crete, at about 2300 km away from the region of sprites. The motivation for the present study was to identify the signature of the sprite-producing lightning discharges in the ELF and VLF electromagnetic frequency bands, to qualify and compare their parameters, and to study the influence of the thunderstorm-activated region on its overlaying ionosphere. For the 15 sprites analyzed, their causative positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) discharges had peak current intensities between +8 and +130 kA whereas their charge moment changes (CMC) ranged from 500 to 3500 C km. Furthermore, the peak current reported by the Météorage lightning network are well correlated with the amplitudes of the VLF bursts, while showing poor correlation with the CMCs which were estimated using ELF methods. Additionally, more than one +CG was associated with six of the sprites, implying that lightning discharges that produce sprites can sometimes have multiple ground connections separated in time and space. Finally, for a significant number of events (33%) an ELF transient was not associated with sprite occurrence, suggesting that long continuing current of tens of ms may not always be a necessary condition for sprite production, a finding which influences the estimation of the global sprite rate based on Schumann resonance (SR) measurements.

  13. ELF/VLF signatures of sprite-producing lightning discharges observed during the 2005 EuroSprite campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. During the summer of 2005, transient luminous events were optically imaged from the French Pyrenees as part of the EuroSprite campaign. Simultaneously, ELF (Extremely Low Frequency: 3-3000Hz) and broadband VLF (Very Low Frequency: 3-30 kHz) data were recorded continuously at two separate receivers in Israel, located about 3300 km from the area of the parent lightning discharges responsible for the generation of sprites. Additionally, narrowband VLF data were collected in Crete, at about 2300 km away from the region of sprites. The motivation for the present study was to identify the signature of the sprite-producing lightning discharges in the ELF and VLF electromagnetic frequency bands, to qualify and compare their parameters, and to study the influence of the thunderstorm activated region on its overlaying ionosphere. For the 15 sprites analyzed, their causative positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) discharges had peak current intensities between +8 and +130 kA whereas their charge moment changes (CMC) ranged from 500 to 3500 C · km. Furthermore, the peak current reported by the Meteorage lightning network are well correlated with the amplitudes of the VLF bursts, while showing poor correlation with the CMCs which were estimated using ELF methods. Additionally, more than one +CG was associated with 6 of the sprites, implying that lightning discharges that produce sprites can sometimes have multiple ground connections separated in time and space. Finally, for a significant number of events (33%) an ELF transient was not associated with sprite occurrence, suggesting that long continuing current of tens of msec may not always be a necessary condition for sprite production, a finding which influences the estimation of the global sprite rate based on Schumann Resonance (SR) measurements.

  14. Ionospheric turbulence from ground-based and satellite VLF/LF transmitter signal observations for the Simushir earthquake (November 15, 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Francesco Biagi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Signals from very low frequency (VLF/ low frequency (LF transmitters recorded on the ground station at Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and on board the French DEMETER satellite were analyzed for the Simushir earthquake (M 8.3; November 15, 2006. The period of analysis was from October 1, 2006, to January 31, 2007. The ground and satellite data were processed by a method based on the difference between the real signal at night-time and the model signal. The model for the ground observations was the monthly averaged signal amplitudes and phases, as calculated for the quiet days of every month. For the satellite data, a two-dimensional model of the signal distribution over the selected area was constructed. Preseismic effects were found several days before the earthquake, in both the ground and satellite observations.

     

  15. Characteristics of VLF atmospherics near the resonance frequency of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide 1.6–2.3 kHz by observations in the auroral region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Manninen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recordings of ELF-VLF waves with the right-hand (RH and the left-hand (LH circular polarization were made in Northern Finland. Analysis showed a difference between the RH and LH polarized waves. A pronounced maximum of the wave amplitude was observed at the first critical frequency of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide (the first transverse resonance around 1.6–2.3 kHz. The wave had the circular LH polarization at this maximum. To interpret observations, we computed the characteristics of the waveguide modes by using the full wave solution in the night model of the ionosphere. Computations show that the spectral maximum at the first transverse resonance frequency arises from a small absorption of the LH polarized radio wave in the magnetized ionosphere plasma, forming the upper boundary of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide.

  16. Observations of whistler-type echoes on signals of a ground VLF transmitter on board the Interkosmos-19 satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whistler-type echoes were received on board the Interkosmos 19 satellite with signals at frequencies between 10.2 and 13.6 kHz from a VLF transmitter of the Omega navigation system located in the auroral zone (66.4 deg N, 13.2 deg E, L 5). The echoes occur predominately in periods of low geomagnetic activity the occurrence region in the outer ionosphere has the dimension of about 1000 km, and its position is about L 2.5 and L 4.4. The delay of the echo signal is practically the same during one satellite pass, but its values for different satellite revolutions lie between 2.5 and 3.5 s. The experimental results are consistent with the theory of nonlinear ducting assuming quasi-ducting of whistler waves in the equatorial region due to interaction with ion cyclotron waves that permanently exist in this region

  17. A generation mechanism for discrete very low frequency emissions observed at Varanasi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Singh; S B Singh; R P Singh

    2005-12-01

    A new type of discrete VLF emissions recorded at the low-latitude ground station Varanasi (geomag. lat. $14^{\\circ}55'$ N, geomag. long. 154°E; $L = 1.07$) during the strong magnetic activity on 29–30 April 1990 have been reported. A generation mechanism for various temporal and spectral features of discrete VLF emissions recorded at Varanasi is presented on the basis of cyclotron resonance interaction between whistler mode wave and energetic electrons ejected by substorm electric fields. An attempt is also made to determine parallel energy and wave growth relevant to the generation process of discrete VLF emissions. Finally, our results are discussed with other published works.

  18. VLF wave intensity in the plasmasphere due to tropospheric lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, J. J.; Starks, M. J.

    2013-07-01

    climatology of VLF (very low frequency) wave intensity from lightning in the plasmasphere is constructed. Starting from Optical Transient Detector/Lightning Imaging Sensor (OTD/LIS) lightning data representing 1995-2005, a climatology of strikes is assembled with 1° × 1° latitude-longitude spatial resolution, averaged into 2 h bins for each month of the year. Assuming a linear relationship between optical flash rate and VLF power flux, and that the VLF amplitude drops off as one over distance, a proxy for VLF power is developed. A typical lightning spectrum is applied and the values are scaled by appropriate transionospheric absorptions for each time and place. These values are mapped along geomagnetic field lines in order to compare them to E-field spectral densities measured by the DEMETER satellite between 2005 and 2009. An overview of the DEMETER survey mode data is presented which leads to the best scaling of the lightning VLF climatology in LEO (low earth orbit). The resulting data set represents a monthly, 2-hour, solar minimum climatology of VLF wave intensity from lightning in LEO. Finally, the E-field spectral densities are converted to Poynting flux, mapped to the plasmasphere, and converted to B-field spectral densities. Good overall agreement is found with previous observations and estimates. This new climatology is expected to have a significant impact on calculations of pitch-angle diffusion for relativistic electrons in the inner radiation belt.

  19. Multi Station Frequency Response and Polarization of ELF/VLF Signals Generated via Ionospheric Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxworth, Ashanthi; Golkowski, Mark; University of Colorado Denver Team

    2013-10-01

    ELF/VLF wave generation via HF modulated ionospheric heating has been practiced for many years as a unique way to generate waves in the ELF/VLF band (3 Hz - 30 kHz). This paper presents experimental results and associated theoretical modeling from work performed at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. An experiment was designed to investigate the modulation frequency dependence of the generated ELF/VLF signal amplitudes and polarization at multiple sites at distances of 37 km, 50 km and 99 km from the facility. While no difference is observed for X mode versus O mode modulation of the heating wave, it is found that ELF/VLF amplitude and polarization as a function of modulated ELF/VLF frequency is different for each site. An ionospheric heating code is used to determine the primary current sources leading to the observations.

  20. Optimizing an ELF/VLF Phased Array at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaru, S.; Moore, R. C.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study is to maximize the amplitude of 1-5 kHz ELF/VLF waves generated by ionospheric HF heating and measured at a ground-based ELF/VLF receiver. The optimization makes use of experimental observations performed during ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) Observatory in Gakona, Alaska. During these experiments, the amplitude, phase, and propagation delay of the ELF/VLF waves were carefully measured. The HF beam was aimed at 15 degrees zenith angle in 8 different azimuthal directions, equally spaced in a circle, while broadcasting a 3.25 MHz (X-mode) signal that was amplitude modulated (square wave) with a linear frequency-time chirp between 1 and 5 kHz. The experimental observations are used to provide reference amplitudes, phases, and propagation delays for ELF/VLF waves generated at these specific locations. The presented optimization accounts for the trade-off between duty cycle, heated area, and the distributed nature of the source region in order to construct a "most efficient" phased array. The amplitudes and phases generated by modulated heating at each location are combined in post-processing to find an optimal combination of duty cycle, heating location, and heating order.

  1. On remote sensing of transient luminous events' parent lightning discharges by ELF/VLF wave measurements on board a satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefeuvre, F.; Marshall, R.; PinçOn, J. L.; Inan, U. S.; Lagoutte, D.; Parrot, M.; Berthelier, J. J.

    2009-09-01

    First recordings of satellite ELF/VLF waveform data associated with transient luminous event (TLE) observations are reported from the summer 2005 campaign coordinated by Stanford University and Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l'Environnement et de l'Espace (LPCE). TLEs are optically observed from the U.S. Langmuir Laboratory, while ELF/VLF waveform data are simultaneously recorded on board the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales microsatellite DEMETER and on the ground at Langmuir. Analyses of ELF/VLF measurements associated with sprite events observed on 28 July 2005 and 3 August 2005 are presented. Conditions to trace back the wave emissions from the satellite to the source region of the parent lightning discharge are discussed. The main results concern: (1) the identification from a low Earth orbit satellite of the 0+ whistler signatures of the TLE causative lightning; (2) the identification of the propagation characteristics of proton whistlers triggered by the 0+ whistlers of the causative lightning, and the potential use of those characteristics; (3) recognition of the difficulty to observe sprite-produced ELF bursts in the presence of proton-whistlers; (4) the use of geographical displays of the average power received by the DEMETER electric field antennas over the U.S. Navy transmitter North West Cape (NWC) located in Western Australia to evaluate VLF transmission cones which explain the presence (28 July events) or the absence (3 August events) of propagation links between sferics observed at ground and 0+ whistlers observed on DEMETER; and (5) owing to electron-collisions, an optimum transfer of energy from the atmosphere to the ionosphere for waves with k vectors antiparallel, or quasi-antiparallel, to Earth's magnetic field direction.

  2. Three-dimensional modelling of VLF data

    OpenAIRE

    Beamish, David

    1998-01-01

    The VLF technique is being increasingly applied to environmental and hydrogeological problems with a growing requirement for quantitative interpretation. One of the main difficulties with the VLF method stems from the directional polarisation of the transmitted field. To clarify VLF data interpretation when subsurface targets are complex and three dimensional, a modelling study was undertaken at VLF frequencies. A main concern is the interpretation of target strike directions when the transmi...

  3. Anomalies Observed in VLF and LF Radio Signals on the Occasion of the Western Turkey Earthquake (Mw = 5.7) on May 19, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Pier Francesco Biagi; Flavia Righetti; Tommaso Maggipinto; Luigi Schiavulli; Teresa Ligonzo; Anita Ermini; Iren Adelina Moldovan; Adrian Septimiu Moldovan; Hugo Gonçalves Silva; Mourad Bezzeghoud; Michael E. Contadakis; Dimitrios N. Arabelos; Thomas D. Xenos; Aydin Buyuksarac

    2012-01-01

    VLF radio signals lie in the 10 - 60 kHz frequency band. These radio signals are used for worldwide navigation support, time signals and for military purposes. They are propagated in the earth-ionosphere wave-guide mode along great circle propagation paths. So, their propaga-tion is strongly affected by the ionosphere conditions. LF signals lie in 150 - 300 kHz frequency band. They are used for long way broadcasting by the few (this type of broadcasting is going into disuse) transmitters loca...

  4. Time-of-arrival analysis applied to ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. C.; Fujimaru, S.

    2012-12-01

    Time-of-arrival (TOA) analysis is applied to observations performed during ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) HF transmitter in Gakona, Alaska. In 2012, a variety of ELF/VLF wave generation techniques were employed to identify the dominant source altitude for each case. Observations were performed for beat-wave modulation, AM modulation, STF modulation, ICD modulation, and cubic frequency modulation, among others. For each of these cases, we identify the dominant ELF/VLF source altitude and compare the experimental results with theoretical HF heating predictions.

  5. Effects of mass density enhancements on VLF transmitter signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Lammer, Helmut; Al-Haddad, Eimad; Leitzinger, Martin; Krauss, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    We study the variation of the electric field measurements recorded by DEMETER micro-satellite above specific very low frequency (VLF) transmitters. The investigated period starts from August 2004 to December 2010. The VLF signals are combined with the mass density measurements recorded, in the same time interval, by GRACE and CHAMP satellites. Particular enhancements of the mass densities were observed at polar and sub-polar regions by both satellites. Those mass density enhancements are found to propagate from the northern or southern hemisphere to the equator region. We attempt in this study to analyse the VLF signal variations in the time interval where the mass density enhancements are recorded. Such disturbances of the atmosphere can probably affect the Earth's ionosphere. The VLF signal may be attenuated and then not detected by DEMETER. We find that it is the case at some specific occasions. Nevertheless we show that several parameters have to be taken into consideration: (a) the origin of the mass density enhancement in the polar region (e.g. solar particles), (b) its phase speed from the pole to the equator and (c) the satellite (CHAMP, DEMETER, GRACE) local time.

  6. Rocket experiment on spontaneously and artificially stimulated VLF plasma waves in the ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ active experiments on the nonlinear wave-wave and wave-particle interactions in the ionospheric plasma were performed by a Japanese sounding rocket K-9M-41. Both spontaneously and artificially stimulated plasma waves in the VLF range were observed. When a large amplitude electron plasma wave was transmitted from the rocket, parametrically excited ion acoustic waves were observed in addition to natural emissions such as whistlers, LHR emissions, and hisslike emissions. It was also found that 'risers' were triggered by the LHR emissions, which seem to be very similar to a phenomenon of the so-called ASE (artificially stimulated emissions). When a slow electron beam with energy lower than 3 eV was ejected from the rocket, a new type of periodic U-shaped discrete emission was observed which was excited through a wave-particle interaction. The frequency of these emissions is lower than the LHR frequency and decreases as the beam energy is increased. Spectrograms of the observed plasma are presented, and some are analyzed theoretically. (auth)

  7. Observation of very low frequency emissions at Indian Antarctic station, Maitri

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R P Patel; R P Singh; Ashok K Singh; A K Gwal; D Hamar

    2003-10-01

    Recently, we have succeeded in recording VLF emissions at the Indian Antarctic station, Maitri (geom. lat. $62^{\\circ}$S, geom. long. 57.23°E, $L =4.5$) using a T-type antenna, pre/main ampli?ers and digital audio tape recorder. VLF hiss in the frequency ranges 11–13 kHz and 13–14.5 kHz and some riser-type emissions in the frequency range 3–5 kHz and magnetospheric lines at about 6.2, 8.0 and 9.2 kHz are reported for the ?rst time. The generation and propagation mechanism of these emissions are discussed brie?y.

  8. Pollution Markets with Imperfectly Observed Emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Montero, Juan-Pablo

    2004-01-01

    I study the advantages of pollution permit markets over traditional standard regulations when the regulator has incomplete information on firms’ emissions and costs of production and abatement (e.g., air pollution in large cities). Because the regulator only observes each firm’s abatement technology but neither its emissions nor its output, there are cases in which standards can lead to lower emissions and, hence, welfare dominate permits. If permits are optimally combined with standards, in ...

  9. Two-dimensional, regularised inversion of VLF data

    OpenAIRE

    Beamish, David

    1994-01-01

    Very low frequency electromagnetic (EM) methods using VLF transmitters have found many applications in subsurface geophysical investigations. Surface measurements involving both the vertical component of the magnetic field (VLF-EM or VLF-Z) and of the apparent resistivity (VLF-R) are increasingly common. Although extensive VLF data sets have been successfully used for mapping purposes, modelling and interpretation techniques which asess the third (i.e. depth) dimension appear limited. Giv...

  10. Simultaneous observations of quasi-periodic (QP) VLF wave emissions and related ULF fluctuations of the geomagnetic field.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Santolík, O.; Parrot, M.; N?mec, F.

    Pa?íž : COSPAR, 2014. C0.4-37-14. [COSPAR Scientific Assembly /40th/. 02.08.2014-10.08.2014, in Moscow, Russia, Moskva] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E1176H

  11. Whistler propagation in ionospheric density ducts: Simulations and DEMETER observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodroffe, J. R.; Streltsov, A. V.; Vartanyan, A.; Milikh, G. M.

    2013-11-01

    On 16 October 2009, the Detection of Electromagnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) satellite observed VLF whistler wave activity coincident with an ionospheric heating experiment conducted at HAARP. At the same time, density measurements by DEMETER indicate the presence of multiple field-aligned enhancements. Using an electron MHD model, we show that the distribution of VLF power observed by DEMETER is consistent with the propagation of whistlers from the heating region inside the observed density enhancements. We also discuss other interesting features of this event, including coupling of the lower hybrid and whistler modes, whistler trapping in artificial density ducts, and the interference of whistlers waves from two adjacent ducts.

  12. Can the Nanoflare Model Reproduce Observed Emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulu-Moore, Fana M.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Warren, Harry P.

    2011-01-01

    All theories that attempt to explain the high temperatures observed in the solar corona are based on short bursts of energy release. The intensities and velocities measured in the core of an active, however, can be steady over many hours of observation. One heating scenario that has been proposed to reconcile such observations with models is the "long nanoflare storm," where short duration heating events occur infrequently on many sub-resolutions strands. In this Letter, we examine the emission measure distribution predicted for such a heating scenario by modeling an arcade of strands in an active region core. Comparisons of the computed emission measure distributions with recent observations indicate that that the long nanoflare storm scenario implies much more 1 MK emission than is actually observed for all plausible combinations of loop lengths, heating rates, and abundances. We conjecture that if the plasma had super coronal abundances, the model may be able to match the observations at low temperatures.

  13. Unexpected Very Low Frequency (VLF) Radio Events Recorded by the Ionospheric Satellite DEMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrot, M.; Berthelier, J. J.; Blecki, J.; Brochot, J. Y.; Hobara, Y.; Lagoutte, D.; Lebreton, J. P.; N?mec, F.; Onishi, T.; Pinçon, J. L.; Píša, D.; Santolík, O.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Slominska, E.

    2015-05-01

    DEMETER was a low Earth orbiting microsatellite in operation between July 2004 and December 2010. Its scientific objective was the study of ionospheric perturbations in relation to seismic activity and man-made activities. Its payload was designed to measure electromagnetic waves over a large frequency range as well as ionospheric plasma parameters (electron and ion densities, fluxes of energetic charged particles). This paper will show both expected and unusual events recorded by the satellite when it was in operation. These latter events have been selected from the DEMETER database because they are rare or even have never been observed before, because they have a very high intensity, or because they are related to abnormalities of the experiments under particular plasma conditions. Some events are related to man-made radio waves emitted by VLF ground-based transmitters or power line harmonic radiation. Natural waves, such as atypical quasi-periodic emissions or uncommon whistlers, are also shown.

  14. Summary on JIKIKEN observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JIKIKEN (EXOS-B) was successfully launched on Sept. 16, 1978 into an orbit with initial apogee of 30,056 km and perigee of 227 km, with an inclination -31.10. This orbit is suitable for the investigation of the wave-particle interaction process in the plasmasphere and the magnetosphere near the plasmapause. An analog data transmission system is used and the fine structure of the dynamic spectrum in a frequency range from 10 kHz to 3 MHz has been obtained, as well as the wide band spectrum from several 100 Hz to 10 kHz. the important wave phenomena observed by the current observations of JIKIKEN are: i) Auroral (Earth) kilometric radio waves; ii) Upper hybrid mode emissions; iii) (n + 1/2)f sub(c) emissions; iv) Principal phenomena of the VLF frequency range such as, whistlers, chorus, and hiss; v) Pure tone emissions in the VLF range; vi) Artificially stimulated plasma waves and observation of plasma parameters; vii) Planetary radio waves; viii) Solar type III outbursts. As a preliminary approach to verifying the wave particle interaction processes, investigations of the energy spectra have also been made for the UHR mode plasma wave and pure tone emission in the ELF and VLF ranges. Very long duration UHR resonance was triggered by a 500 ?sec pulse in the stimulated plasma wave experiment. The resonance persists for up to 125 msec even in the VLF range (below 30 kHz) and the electron cyclotron resonances are stimulated in very high harmonics number n, sometimes to a maximum of n = 20. Using these resonance frequencies, the plasmapause electron density distributions are obtained. The injection of an electron beam from the spacecraft generates stimulated electrostatic waves and also results in turbulent heating of the surrounding plasma. Bursts of energetic particles of keV energies are frequently encountered outside the plasmapause. (author)

  15. 100 Days of ELF/VLF Generation via HF Heating with HAARP (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M.; Golkowski, M.

    2013-12-01

    ELF/VLF radio waves are difficult to generate with conventional antennas. Ionospheric HF heating facilities generate ELF/VLF waves via modulated heating of the lower ionosphere. HF heating of the ionosphere changes the lower ionospheric conductivity, which in the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet, creates an antenna in the sky when heating is modulated at ELF/VLF frequencies. We present a summary of nearly 100 days of ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the 3.6 MW HAARP facility near Gakona, Alaska, and provide a baseline reference of ELF/VLF generation capabilities with HF heating. Between February 2007 and August 2008, HAARP was operated on close to 100 days for ELF/VLF wave generation experiments, at a variety of ELF/VLF frequencies, seasons and times of day. We present comprehensive statistics of generated ELF/VLF magnetic fields observed at a nearby site, in the 500-3500 Hz band. Transmissions with a specific HF beam configuration (3.25 MHz, vertical beam, amplitude modulation) are isolated so the data comparison is self-consistent, across nearly 5 million individual measurements of either a tone or a piece of a frequency-time ramp. There is a minimum in the average generation close to local midnight. It is found that generation during local nighttime is on average weaker, but more highly variable, with a small number of very strong generation periods. Signal amplitudes from day to day may vary by as much as 20-30 dB. Generation strengthens by ~5 dB during the first ~30 minutes of transmission, which may be a signature of slow electron density changes from sustained HF heating. Theoretical calculations are made to relate the amplitude observed to the power injected into the waveguide and reaching 250 km. The median power generated by HAARP and injected into the waveguide is ~0.05-0.1 W in this base-line configuration (vertical beam, 3.25 MHz, amplitude modulation), but may have generated hundreds of Watts for brief durations. Several efficiency improvements have improved the ELF/VLF wave generation efficiency further.

  16. ELF/VLF wave disturbances detected by the DEMETER satellite over the HAARP transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titova, Elena; Demekhov, Andrei; Parrot, Michel; Mogilevsky, Mikhail; Mochalov, Alexey; Pashin, Anatoly

    We report observations of electromagnetic the ELF/VLF wave disturbances by the DEMETER satellite (670 km altitude) overflying the HAARP heating facility (62.39(°) N, 145.15(°) W, L = 4.9). The HAARP HF transmitter operated at the maximum available power of 3.6 MW, O-mode polarization, and the beam directed towards the magnetic zenith. ELF/VLF waves caused by the HAARP heating are detected by the DEMETER satellite when the HF radio wave frequency was close to the critical frequency (foF2) of the ionospheric F2 layer but below it. ELF/VLF wave disturbances observed above the HAARP transmitter were detected by electrical antennas in an area with characteristic size 10 (2) km. We analyze amplitude and polarization spectra of the ELF disturbances and compare them with the characteristics of natural ELF hiss above HAARP. The VLF wave disturbances in the topside ionosphere above the HAARP transmitter were detected in the frequency ranges 8-17 kHz and 15-18 kHz which are close to the lower hybrid resonance frequency f _LHR in the heating region and its second harmonic (2f _LHR), respectively. In the case where the HAARP HF power was modulated, the detected VLF waves were also modulated with the same frequency whereas in the ELF frequency range the modulation period of the HAARP power was not observed. Possible mechanisms of generation of the ELF/VLF disturbances produced by the HAARP transmitter in the topside ionosphere are discussed.

  17. Observations of Diffuse Ultraviolet Emission from Draco

    CERN Document Server

    Sujatha, N V; Suresh, Rahul; Henry, Richard Conn; Bianchi, Luciana

    2010-01-01

    We have studied small scale (2 arcmin) spatial variation of the diffuse UV radiation using a set of 11 GALEX deep observations in the constellation of Draco. We find a good correlation between the observed UV background and the IR 100 micron flux, indicating that the dominant contributor of the diffuse background in the field is the scattered starlight from the interstellar dust grains. We also find strong evidence of additional emission in the FUV band which is absent in the NUV band. This is most likely due to Lyman band emission from molecular hydrogen in a ridge of dust running through the field and to line emissions from species such as C IV (1550 A) and Si II (1533 A) in the rest of the field. A strong correlation exists between the FUV/NUV ratio and the FUV intensity in the excess emission regions in the FUV band irrespective of the optical depth of the region. The optical depth increases more rapidly in the UV than the IR and we find that the UV/IR ratio drops off exponentially with increasing IR due ...

  18. Conditions of Observation of Whistler Emissions in Space

    OpenAIRE

    Krafft, C.; Lundin, R.; Matthieussent, G.

    1995-01-01

    The peculiarities of whistler wave fields spontaneously radiated by electron beams artificially injected into the Earth's ionosphere are discussed. The conditions of registration of the whistler wave packets by a remote on board VLF receiver have been analyzed ; they depend on mutual disposition of the electron gun and the VLF receiver as well as on the pitch angle of the injected electrons. It is shown that the internal frequency width of the whistler signal, connected with the ray represent...

  19. Lightning and radar observations of hurricane Rita landfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Bradley G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Suszcynsky, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hamlin, Timothy E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jeffery, C A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Kyle C [TEXAS TECH U.; Orville, R E [TEXAS A& M

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) owns and operates an array of Very-Low Frequency (VLF) sensors that measure the Radio-Frequency (RF) waveforms emitted by Cloud-to-Ground (CG) and InCloud (IC) lightning. This array, the Los Alamos Sferic Array (LASA), has approximately 15 sensors concentrated in the Great Plains and Florida, which detect electric field changes in a bandwidth from 200 Hz to 500 kHz (Smith et al., 2002). Recently, LANL has begun development of a new dual-band RF sensor array that includes the Very-High Frequency (VHF) band as well as the VLF. Whereas VLF lightning emissions can be used to deduce physical parameters such as lightning type and peak current, VHF emissions can be used to perform precise 3d mapping of individual radiation sources, which can number in the thousands for a typical CG flash. These new dual-band sensors will be used to monitor lightning activity in hurricanes in an effort to better predict intensification cycles. Although the new LANL dual-band array is not yet operational, we have begun initial work utilizing both VLF and VHF lightning data to monitor hurricane evolution. In this paper, we present the temporal evolution of Rita's landfall using VLF and VHF lightning data, and also WSR-88D radar. At landfall, Rita's northern eyewall experienced strong updrafts and significant lightning activity that appear to mark a transition between oceanic hurricane dynamics and continental thunderstorm dynamics. In section 2, we give a brief overview of Hurricane Rita, including its development as a hurricane and its lightning history. In the following section, we present WSR-88D data of Rita's landfall, including reflectivity images and temporal variation. In section 4, we present both VHF and VLF lightning data, overplotted on radar reflectivity images. Finally, we discuss our observations, including a comparison to previous studies and a brief conclusion.

  20. Strong Magnetic Field Fluctuations within Filamentary Auroral Density Cavities Interpreted as VLF Saucer Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, D. L.; Kabirzadeh, R.; Burchill, J. K.; Pfaff, Robert F.; Wallis, D. D.; Bounds, S. R.; Clemmons, J. H.; Pincon, J.-L.

    2012-01-01

    The Geoelectrodynamics and Electro-Optical Detection of Electron and SuprathermalIon Currents (GEODESIC) sounding rocket encountered more than 100 filamentary densitycavities associated with enhanced plasma waves at ELF (3 kHz) and VLF (310 kHz)frequencies and at altitudes of 800990 km during an auroral substorm. These cavities weresimilar in size (20 m diameter in most cases) to so-called lower-hybrid cavities (LHCs)observed by previous sounding rockets and satellites; however, in contrast, many of theGEODESIC cavities exhibited up to tenfold enhancements in magnetic wave powerthroughout the VLF band. GEODESIC also observed enhancements of ELF and VLFelectric fields both parallel and perpendicular to the geomagnetic field B0 within cavities,though the VLF E field increases were often not as large proportionally as seen in themagnetic fields. This behavior is opposite to that predicted by previously published theoriesof LHCs based on passive scattering of externally incident auroral hiss. We argue thatthe GEODESIC cavities are active wave generation sites capable of radiating VLF wavesinto the surrounding plasma and producing VLF saucers, with energy supplied by cold,upward flowing electron beams composing the auroral return current. This interpretation issupported by the observation that the most intense waves, both inside and outside cavities,occurred in regions where energetic electron precipitation was largely inhibited orabsent altogether. We suggest that the wave-enhanced cavities encountered by GEODESICwere qualitatively different from those observed by earlier spacecraft because of thefortuitous timing of the GEODESIC launch, which placed the payload at apogee within asubstorm-related return current during its most intense phase, lasting only a few minutes.

  1. Excitation of VLF quasi-electrostatic oscillations in the ionospheric plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lundin

    Full Text Available A numerical solution of the dispersion equation for electromagnetic waves in a hot magnetized collisionless plasma has shown that, in a current-free ionospheric plasma, the distortion of the electron distribution function reproducing the downward flow of a thermal electron component and the compensating upward flow of the suprathermal electrons, which are responsible for the resulting heat flux, can destabilize quasi-electrostatic ion sound waves. The numerical analysis, performed with ion densities and electron temperature taken from the data recorded by the Interkosmos-24 (IK-24, Aktivny satellite, is compared with a VLF spectrum registered at the same time on board. This spectrum shows a wide frequency band emission below the local ion plasma frequency. The direction of the electron heat flux inherent to the assumed model of VLF emission generation is discussed

  2. Excitation of whistler mode signals via injection of polarized VLF waves with the Siple transmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whistler mode waves of various polarizations were transmitted by the Siple Station, Antarctica, VLF transmitter and received near the geomagnetic conjugate point at Lake Mistissini, Quebec. Crossed 21-km horizontal dipole antennas on top of the 2-km-thick ice sheet were used to transmit 2- to 4-kHz waves alternately with right-hand circular, left-hand circular, and linear polarizations. Excitation of a multiplicity of magnetospheric propagation paths and the received signal strength were observed to depend on the transmitter antenna polarization. Where whistler mode growth and emission triggering occurred, saturated peak values of received signals were independent of antenna polarization and initial injected power levels, in agreement with previous findings. Propagation paths of ducted Siple signals observed at Lake Mistissini were identified with propagation paths deduced from natural whistlers, from which the L shell values and equatorial number densities for the paths were calculated. A combination of L shell data and models of antenna coupling into the whistler mode may aid in the location of ducts. Dynamics Explorer I satellite recordings of unducted Siple signals showed trends similar to the ground data on ducted signals. The observations are discussed in the context of a simplified model of the coupling from the Siple antenna into the ionosphere, which provides reasonable agreement with observations. 14 refs

  3. Cassini CIRS Observations of Iapetus' Thermal Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. R.; Pearl, J. C.; Segura, M.

    2005-01-01

    Cassini s Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS, [1]) mapped Iapetus thermal emission from 7 to approx.300 microns during the spacecraft s December 31st 2004 flyby of the satellite. Short-wavelength spectra were obtained with the CIRS "FP3" (10 - 17 micron) and "FP4" (7 - 10 micron) detector arrays, each consisting of 1 x 10 pixels with a spatial resolution of 0.29 milliradians, while longer wavelength observations used the "FP1" detector, with a single-aperture detector with 4 milliradian diameter. The detectors are scanned across the target to build up an image cube with two spatial dimensions and one spectral dimension. CIRS daytime observations covered the dark terrain of Cassini Regio, except for high northern latitudes which were occupied by bright terrain, while nighttime observations covered a mixture of bright and dark terrain. The 120,000 km flyby distance provided a maximum spatial resolution of 35 km in the FP3 and FP4 detectors, and 500 km in the FP1 detector.

  4. 100 days of ELF/VLF generation via HF heating with HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. B.; Go?kowski, M.

    2013-10-01

    Extremely low frequency/very low frequency (ELF/VLF) radio waves are difficult to generate with conventional antennas. Ionospheric high frequency (HF) heating facilities generate ELF/VLF waves via modulated heating of the lower ionosphere. HF heating of the ionosphere changes the lower ionospheric conductivity, which in the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet creates an antenna in the sky when heating is modulated at ELF/VLF frequencies. We present a summary of nearly 100 days of ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the 3.6 MW High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility near Gakona, Alaska, at a variety of ELF/VLF frequencies, seasons, and times of day. We present comprehensive statistics of generated ELF/VLF magnetic fields observed at a nearby site, in the 500-3500 Hz band. Transmissions with a specific HF beam configuration (3.25 MHz, vertical beam, amplitude modulation) are isolated so the data comparison is self-consistent, across nearly 5 million individual measurements of either a tone or a piece of a frequency-time ramp. There is a minimum in the average generation close to local midnight. It is found that generation during local nighttime is on average weaker but more highly variable, with a small number of very strong generation periods. Signal amplitudes from day to day may vary by as much as 20-30 dB. Generation strengthens by ˜5 dB during the first ˜30 min of transmission, which may be a signature of slow electron density changes from sustained HF heating. Theoretical calculations are made to relate the amplitude observed to the power injected into the waveguide and reaching 250 km. The median power generated by HAARP and injected into the waveguide is ˜0.05-0.1 W in this baseline configuration (vertical beam, 3.25 MHz, amplitude modulation) but may have generated hundreds of watts for brief durations. Several efficiency improvements have improved the ELF/VLF wave generation efficiency further.

  5. Study of Ionospheric Perturbations in D-Layer Using Awesome VLF Receiver Data at Tashkent Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmedov, Bobomurat

    2012-07-01

    One VLF receiver and two SuperSID receivers were provided to Uzbekistan IHY cite by Stanford University and are operating in Tashkent, under the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). The results obtained at Tashkent IHY station are applied to earthquake electromagnetic precursors, lightning, and solar flares and to ionospheric disturbances originating from gamma ray flares of Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters connected with evolution of strongly magnetized neutron stars believed as magnetars. Regular monitoring of the D-layer of ionosphere over Central Asia territory has been performed on the permanent basis. Few Solar flare events are observed during February in 2010-2011 years and the analysis showed that there is simultaneous correlation between the times of change of amplitude of the waves and the Solar flares. Features of the lightning discharge generated by radio atmospherics are studied and its effectiveness in D-region ionosphere diagnostics is explained. Assuming that earthquakes (EQs) can be preceded by the electromagnetic signals in the VLF bands detectable from ground-based measurements we have studied VLF amplitude anomalies related to the earthquakes occurred in 2009-2010 years with magnitude more than 5 on the path way from the VLF transmitters to the Tashkent station. For analysing narrowband data we have used the Nighttime Fluctuation (NF) method paying attention to the data obtained during the local nighttime (18:00 LT-06:00 LT). The amplitude data are analysed only for the reason that perturbations are identified more clearly in the amplitude data than in phase data. The mean nighttime amplitude (or trend) and normalized trend are found to increase significantly before the EQ with the same tendency as the NF and normalized NF. The obtained results have revealed a fine agreement with VLF amplitude anomalies observed in Tashkent VLF station during the strong earthquakes occurred on the path way from the transmitters to the receiver. Some of the initial results obtained from the preliminary analysis are presented to show the probing potentiality of VLF waves in ionosphere studies.

  6. New Observations of UV Emissions from Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Melissa; Sparks, William

    2009-01-01

    The recent top prioritization of the Europa Jupiter System Mission for the next outer solar system flagship mission is refocusing attention on Europa and the other Galilean satellites and their contextual environments in the Jupiter system. Surface sputtering by magnetospheric plasma generates a tenuous atmosphere for Europa, dominated by 02 gas. This tenuous gas is in turn excited by plasma electrons, producing ultraviolet and visible emissions. Two sets of imaging observations have been published to date, UV images from the Hubble Space Telescope, and visible eclipse images from Cassini. Three additional sets of HST UV observations were acquired in February 2007, April 2007 and June 2009. The signal to noise ratio in these data are not high, however, given the paucity of data and its increasing importance in terms of planning for EJSM, we have attempted to extract as much new information as possible from these data. This talk will summarize our analysis to date, and discuss them in terms of existing models, which attempt to explain the image morphology either in terms of the underlying source production and loss processes, or in terms of the plasma interaction with the exosphere.

  7. On the altitude of the ELF/VLF source region generated during “beat-wave” HF heating experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. C.; Fujimaru, S.; Cohen, M.; Go?kowski, M.; McCarrick, M. J.

    2012-09-01

    Modulated high frequency (HF, 3-10 MHz) heating of the ionosphere in the presence of the auroral electrojet currents is an effective method for generating extremely low frequency (ELF, 3-3000 Hz) and very low frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) radio waves. The amplitudes of ELF/VLF waves generated in this manner depend sensitively on the auroral electrojet current strength, which varies with time. In an effort to improve the reliability of ELF/VLF wave generation by ionospheric heating, recent experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Gakona, Alaska, have focused on methods that are independent of the strength of the auroral electrojet currents. One such potential method is so-called “beat-wave” ELF/VLF generation. Recent experimental observations have been presented to suggest that in the absence of a significant D-region ionosphere (˜60-100 km altitude), an ELF/VLF source region can be created within the F-region ionosphere (˜150-250 km altitude). In this paper, we use a time-of-arrival analysis technique to provide direct experimental evidence that the beat-wave source region is located in the D-region ionosphere, and possibly the lower E-region ionosphere (˜100-120 km altitude), even when ionospheric diagnostics indicate a very weak D-layer. These results have a tremendous impact on the interpretation of recent experimental observations.

  8. Evaluating NOx Emissions Using Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, G. J.; Kim, S.; Brioude, J.; McKeen, S. A.; Trainer, M.; Heckel, A.; Hilboll, A.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Gleason, J. F.; Boersma, K. F.; Hsie, E.; Lee, S.; Angevine, W. M.; Granier, C.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric NO2 columns retrieved from satellites can provide a useful top-down assessment of bottom-up NOx emissions inventories. We present three case studies of an approach to evaluate NOx emissions at a sector level by comparing satellite retrievals to regional chemical-transport model calculations of NO2 columns. In the first example, the atmospheric impact of implementing NOx controls at eastern US power plants is demonstrated. In the second study, we use NOx monitors at western US power plants to calibrate our satellite-model comparisons. We then apply our approach to evaluate bottom-up estimates of NOx emissions from western US cities. In the third example, we validate our satellite-model approach using in-situ aircraft measurements and assess NOx emissions from power plants, cities, industrial facilities, and ports in eastern Texas. We conclude with some general insights on the usefulness of this approach and suggestions for future areas of research.

  9. Power line emission 50/60 Hz and Schumann resonances observed by microsatellite Chibis-M in the Earth's ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudkin, Denys; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Dudkin, Fedir; Pronenko, Vira; Klimov, Stanislav

    2015-04-01

    The overhead power lines are the sources of intense wideband electromagnetic (EM) emission, especially in ELF-VLF range, because of significant length (up to a few thousand kilometers) and strong 50/60 Hz currents with noticeable distortion. The radiation efficiency of the power line emission (PLE) increases with the harmonic order, so they are well observed by ground-based EM sensors. However their observations by low orbiting satellites (LEO) are very rare, particularly at basic harmonic 50/60 Hz, because of the ionospheric plasma opacity in ELF band. The Schumann resonance (SR) is the narrow-band EM noise that occurs due to the global thunderstorm activity in the Earth-ionosphere cavity. The first five eigenmodes of the SR are 7.8, 14.3, 20.8, 27.3 and 33.8 Hz and, thus, SR harmonics are also strongly absorbed by the Earth ionosphere. The published numerical simulations show that the penetration depth of such an ELF emission into the Earth's ionosphere is limited to 50-70 km for electric field and 120-240 km for magnetic field. From this follows, that PLE and SR can hardly ever be detected by LEO satellites, i.e. above the F-layer of ionosphere. In spite of this fact, these emissions were recently observed with use of the electric field antennas placed on the satellites C/NOFS (USA) and Chibis-M (Russia). Microsatellite Chibis-M was launched on January 24, 2012, at 23:18:30 UTC from the cargo ship "Progress M-13M" to circular orbit with altitude ~500 km and inclination ~52° . Chibis-M mass is about 40 kg where one third is a scientific instrumentation. The dimensions of the microsatellite case are 0.26x0.26x0.54 m with the outside mounted solar panels, service and scientific instrumentation. The main scientific objective of Chibis-M is the theoretical model verification for the atmospheric gamma-ray bursts. It requires the study of the accompanying EM processes such as the plasma waves produced by the lightning discharges in the VLF band. Chibis-M decayed on 15 October 2014. The Chibis-M electric sensor has a small 0.42 m tip-to-tip base and was developed in Lviv Centre of Institute for Space Research, Ukraine. The sensor provides the measurement of one electric field component, which is perpendicular to the orbital plane, in the frequency range of 0.1-40,000 Hz with the noise spectral density 0.8-0.04 (?V/m)/Hz0.5 (in the band 1-100 Hz the noise is 0.2-0.04 (?V/m)/Hz0.5). We present the space distribution of the observed PLE and SR harmonics in the latitude range ±52o and connection of the PLE sources with the high-voltage overhead power lines. The electric field data have been analyzed for all Chibis-M operating time (~ 2.5 years). The fact of PLE and SR detection by LEO satellites C/NOFS and Chibis-M suggests that the model of the transionospheric ELF EM field propagation should be refined.

  10. Studies of VLF radio waves for sudden ionospheric disturbances (SID) in Kashmir region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is recognized that the ionosphere may be sensitive to seismic effects, and the detection of ionospheric perturbations associated with seismicity would be useful for short term prediction of seismic events. To observe this effect, Indian Centre for Space Physics has installed an antenna and receiver system at Kashmir University to monitor the variation of the VLF signal transmitted from VTX. We present the preliminary results from this station.

  11. Observational constraints on biogenic VOC emission model estimates (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, A. B.

    2013-12-01

    Chemistry and transport models require accurate estimates of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions in order to simulate the atmospheric constituents controlling air quality and climate, such as ozone and particles, and so the uncertainties associated with BVOC estimates may be limiting the development of effective air quality and climate management strategies. BVOC emission models include driving variables and algorithms that span scales from the leaf level to entire landscapes. While considerable effort has been made to improve BVOC emission models in the past decades, there have been relatively few attempts to quantify the uncertainties associated with these estimates or to rigorously assess emission modeling approaches. This presentation will summarize the availability of observations that can be used to constrain BVOC emission models including flux measurements (leaf enclosure, above canopy tower, and aircraft platforms) and ambient concentrations of BVOC and their products. Results from studies targeting specific BVOC emission processes (e.g., the response of isoprene emission to drought and the response of monoterpene emissions to bark beetle attack) will be shown and the application of these observations for BVOC model evaluation will be discussed. In addition, the results from multi-scale BVOC emission studies (leaf enclosure, whole canopy flux tower, regional aircraft eddy covariance) will be presented and a approach for incorporating these observations into a community model testbed will be described and used to evaluate regional BVOC emission models.

  12. Fast Emission Estimates in China Constrained by Satellite Observations (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijling, B.; van der A, R.

    2013-12-01

    Emission inventories of air pollutants are crucial information for policy makers and form important input data for air quality models. Unfortunately, bottom-up emission inventories, compiled from large quantities of statistical data, are easily outdated for an emerging economy such as China, where rapid economic growth changes emissions accordingly. Alternatively, top-down emission estimates from satellite observations of air constituents have important advantages of being spatial consistent, having high temporal resolution, and enabling emission updates shortly after the satellite data become available. Constraining emissions from concentration measurements is, however, computationally challenging. Within the GlobEmission project of the European Space Agency (ESA) a new algorithm has been developed, specifically designed for fast daily emission estimates of short-lived atmospheric species on a mesoscopic scale (0.25 × 0.25 degree) from satellite observations of column concentrations. The algorithm needs only one forward model run from a chemical transport model to calculate the sensitivity of concentration to emission, using trajectory analysis to account for transport away from the source. By using a Kalman filter in the inverse step, optimal use of the a priori knowledge and the newly observed data is made. We apply the algorithm for NOx emission estimates in East China, using the CHIMERE model together with tropospheric NO2 column retrievals of the OMI and GOME-2 satellite instruments. The observations are used to construct a monthly emission time series, which reveal important emission trends such as the emission reduction measures during the Beijing Olympic Games, and the impact and recovery from the global economic crisis. The algorithm is also able to detect emerging sources (e.g. new power plants) and improve emission information for areas where proxy data are not or badly known (e.g. shipping emissions). The new emission estimates result in a better agreement between observations and simulations of air pollutant concentrations, facilitating improved air quality forecasts. The EU project MarcoPolo will combine these emission estimates from space with statistical information on e.g. land use, population density and traffic to construct a new up-to-date emission inventory for China.

  13. The Terminator Time in subionospheric VLF/LF diurnal variation as recorded by the Romanian VLF/LF radio monitoring system related to earthquake occurrence and volcano erruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, I. A.; Moldovan, A. S.; Biagi, P. F.; Ionescu, C.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Boudjada, M. Y.

    2012-04-01

    The Romanian VLF/LF monitoring system consisting in a radio receiver and the infrastructure that is necessary to record and transmit the collected data is part of the European international network named INFREP. Information on electromagnetic fields' intensities created by transmitters at a receiving site are indicating the quality of the propagation along the paths between the receivers and transmitters. Studying the ionosphere's influences on the electromagnetic waves' propagation along a certain path is a method to put into evidence possible modifications of its lower structure and composition as earthquakes' precursors. The VLF/LF receiver installed in Romania was put into operation in February 2009 and has already 3 years of testing, functioning and proving its utility in the forecast of some earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. Simultaneously we monitor, in the same site with the VLF/LF receiver, the vertical atmospheric electric field and different other meteorological parameters as: temperature, pressure or rainfall. The global magnetic conditions are emphasized with the help of Daily Geomagnetic Index Kp. At a basic level, the adopted analysis consists in a simple statistical evaluation of the signals by comparing the instantaneous values to the trend of the signal. In this paper we pay attention to the terminator times in subionospheric VLF/LF diurnal variation, which are defined as the times of minimum in amplitude (or phase) around sunrise and sunset. These terminator times are found to shift significantly just around the earthquake. In the case of Kobe earthquake, there were found significant shifts in both morning and evening terminator times and these authors interpreted the shift in terminator time in terms of the lowering of lower ionosphere by using the full-wave mode theory. A LabVIEW application which accesses the VLF/LF receiver through internet was developed. This program opens the receiver's web-page and automatically retrieves the list of data files to synchronize the user-side data with the receiver's data. Missing zipped files are also automatically downloaded. The application appends daily files into monthly and anual files and performs 3D colour-coded maps with graphic representations of VLF and LF signals' intensities versus the minute-of-the-day and the day-of-the-month, facilitating a near real-time observation of VLF and LF electromagnetic waves' propagation. This type of representation, highlights the modification of the terminator time versus the length of the solar-day, improves the user's capability to detect possible propagation anomalies due to ionosphere conditions and allows a quick visual inspection of unexpected behaviors of transmission channels at different frequencies and paths. A very special result, was observed on the recordings made on the propagation path to Iceland (NRK, 37.5kHz). Recordings are made once a minute, for a period of 303 days. Icelandic channel propagation anomalies present in the range of 40-90 days are considered to be precursory phenomena associated with Eyjafjallajokull - Iceland, volcanic eruption occurred in April-May 2010.

  14. Observation of Polarised Microwave Emission from Cosmic Ray Air Showers

    OpenAIRE

    Smida, R.; Werner, F; Engel, R.; Arteaga-Velazquez, J. C.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Bluemer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I.M.; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F.; Di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first direct measurement of the basic features of microwave radio emission from extensive air showers. Using a trigger provided by the KASCADE-Grande air shower array, the signals of the microwave antennas of the CROME (Cosmic-Ray Observation via Microwave Emission) experiment have been read out and searched for signatures of radio emission by high-energy air showers. Microwave signals have been detected for more than 30 showers with energies above $3\\times1...

  15. Cold plasma diagnostics using satellite measurements of VLF signals from ground transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.; Anderson, R. R.

    1977-01-01

    A diagnostic technique to obtain the cold-plasma density profile in the magnetosphere is introduced. This method uses satellite measurements of group delay and pulse duration of VLF signals from ground transmitters in conjunction with a detailed ray-tracing analysis. An iterative method is involved which starts with an approximate density profile, computes the ray paths for that profile, and then compares the properties of the rays that reach the satellite location with the actual satellite measurements. The density profile is then modified to account for any discrepancies between the two results. The same process is repeated with the new profile until one has reasonable agreement between the data and ray-tracing results. This method is applied to the case of an Imp 6 pass, where strong signals from the Siple VLF transmitter were observed for over 25 min. Good agreement is found between the results of the proposed technique and the well-known ground whistler techniques of cold-plasma diagnostics. The results also serve to illustrate the wide diversity of propagation paths from ground transmitters to high-altitude satellites during VLF wave-injection experiments.

  16. Statistical analysis of VLF radio emissions triggered by power line harmonic radiation and observed by the low-altitude satellite DEMETER.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Parrot, M.; N?mec, F.; Santolík, Ond?ej

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 119, ?. 7 (2014), s. 5744-5754. ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ?R GAP205/10/2279; GA MŠk LH12231 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : man-made waves * ionosphere Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JA020139/abstract

  17. Observations and modelling of pulsed radio emission from CU Virginis

    CERN Document Server

    Lo, K K; Hobbs, G; Murphy, T; Gaensler, B M; Melrose, D; Ravi, V; Manchester, R M; Keith, M J

    2012-01-01

    We present 13 cm and 20 cm radio observations of the magnetic chemically peculiar star CU Virginis taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We detect two circularly polarised radio pulses every rotation period which confirm previous detections. In the first pulse, the lower frequency emission arrives before the higher frequency emission and the ordering reverses in the second pulse. In order to explain the frequency dependence of the time between the two pulses, we construct a geometric model of the magnetosphere of CU Virginis, and consider various emission angles relative to the magnetic field lines. A simple electron cyclotron maser emission model, in which the emission is perpendicular to the magnetic field lines, is not consistent with our data. A model in which the emission is refracted through cold plasma in the magnetosphere is shown to have the correct pulse arrival time frequency dependence.

  18. Observation of Polarised Microwave Emission from Cosmic Ray Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Smida, R; Engel, R; Arteaga-Velazquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hoerandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kroemer, O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Mathys, S; Melissas, M; Morello, C; Neunteufel, P; Oehlschlaeger, J; Palmieri, N; Pekala, J; Pierog, T; Rautenberg, J; Rebel, H; Riegel, M; Roth, M; Salamida, F; Schieler, H; Schoo, S; Schroeder, F G; Sima, O; Stasielak, J; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Unger, M; Weber, M; Weindl, A; Wilczynski, H; Will, M; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first direct measurement of the basic features of microwave radio emission from extensive air showers. Using a trigger provided by the KASCADE-Grande air shower array, the signals of the microwave antennas of the CROME (Cosmic-Ray Observation via Microwave Emission) experiment have been read out and searched for signatures of radio emission by high-energy air showers. Microwave signals have been detected for more than 30 showers with energies above $3\\times10^{16}$\\,eV. The observations presented in this Letter are consistent with a mainly forward-beamed, coherent and polarised emission process in the GHz frequency range. An isotropic, unpolarised radiation is disfavoured as the dominant emission model. The measurements show that microwave radiation offers a new means of studying air showers at very high energy.

  19. Energetic electron precipitation and VLF phase disturbances at middle latitudes following the magnetic storm of December 6, 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enhanced fluxes of electrons precipitating over middle latitudes (L approx. 3--4) were detected by the polar-orbiting satellite 1971-089A following a period of magnetic activity starting on December 16, 1971. The electron fluxes measured in 256 differential channels between 130 and 2800 keV have been coordinated with phase observations of VLF radio waves propagating in the earth-ionosphere waveguide. The VLF paths in question, NLK (near Seattle, Washington) and GBR (at Rugby, England) to APL (near Washington, D. C.), cover approx. =1200 in longitude and range from L approx. 2.5 to L approx. 4.0 in invariant latitude. These paths showed marked daytime and nighttime phase advances from 1650 UT on December 17 (in excess of 10 ?s during maximum disturbance). The phase values did not return to prestorm levels before December 22--23. The unusual presence of these daytime VLF disturbances is offered as evidence for the widespread precipitation at low L shell vales of nearly relativistic electrons (E/sub e/> approx.200 keV) which would be required to penetrate below approx.70-km altitude to affect the daytime VLF transmissions. Wave guide mode calculations using D region electron density profiles deduced from the satellite particle data predict phase advances which agree reasonably well with the observed values. It is concluded that the observed long-lived VLF phase disturbances can be explained by excess D region ionization caused by energetic electrons precipitating from the earth's radiation belt following their injection deep into the magnetosphere during the magnetic storm

  20. Spatial observations of dust emission in NGC 7027

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NGC 7027 was mapped in each of five spectral bands between 8.7 and 23 ?m with a spatial resolution of 3.5 arcsec. Two new scientific results are presented: (1) Analysis of the observations shows that the dust in NGC 7027 contains two spatially distinct components, one of which is associated with and links the unidentified emission features at 8.6 and 11.3 ?m; the second component may be graphite. (2) High-quality observations indicate that thermal emission by dust in NGC 7027 is spatially coextensive with emission by ionized hydrogen over a broad spectral range in the midinfrared (approx.8--28 ?m). No significant emission above the approx.1% level was found outside the region of ionized hydrogen in any spectral band observed. The intensity distribution of the observed infrared emission was successfully modeled by emission from within the walls of a hollow cylinder, similar to the model for 5-GHz radio emission proposed by Scott [Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 161, 35P (1973)

  1. Evaluating China's black carbon emissions using surface observations: sensitivity to observation representativeness and transport model error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Wang, X.; Hao, J.; Kondo, Y.; Irwin, M.; Munger, J. W.; Zhao, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric measurements of BC concentrations at representative locations provide invaluable independent datasets to evaluate bottom-up BC emissions, particularly when used in conjunction with chemical transport models. A few studies have evaluated China's BC emission inventory using surface observations, but their 'top-down' estimates of Chinese BC emissions vary greatly. This study examines the sensitivity of 'top-down' quantification of Chinese BC emissions to the choice of observational data and to transport model errors associated with grid resolution, wet deposition, and transport. Using hourly measurements of BC obtained with optical methods at two rural sites in China (Miyun and Chongming), we performed a detailed analysis of the model-observation comparison to filter out those observations not representative of regional emissions or heavily influenced by the model's transport errors instead of by emissions. The observed BC to CO correlation and its variation with precipitation were used to evaluate the model's wet deposition process and to quantify the wet deposition bias on BC emission estimate. By comparing top-down BC emission estimate derived from carefully-selected hourly observations with that from mere monthly-mean observations, we provided the error estimate for top-down emissions due to observation representativeness and model error. After better quantifying these errors, we evaluated China's bottom-up BC inventory of Zhang et al. [2009] by region and found that this inventory underestimated BC emissions from Center China, North China Plain and Yangtze River Delta region while overestimated emissions from Northeast China and Center South China. Our top-down estimate of BC emissions over China as a whole is 20%-40% higher than the bottom-up inventory.

  2. Unexpected very low frequency (VLF) radio events recorded by the ionospheric satellite DEMETER.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Parrot, M.; Berthelier, J. J.; Blecki, J.; Brochot, J. Y.; Hobara, Y.; Lagoutte, D.; Lebreton, J. P.; N?mec, F.; Onishi, T.; Pincon, J. L.; Píša, David; Santolík, Ond?ej; Sauvaud, J. A.; Slominska, E.

    2015-01-01

    Ro?. 36, ?. 3 (2015), s. 483-511. ISSN 0169-3298 R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GA14-31899S; GA MŠk LH12231 Grant ostatní: Rada Programu interní podpory projekt? mezinárodní spolupráce AV ?R(CZ) M100421206 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : ionosphere * natural and man-made VLF radio emissions * anomalies Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.447, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10712-015-9315-5

  3. Semi-annual oscillation (SAO) of the nighttime ionospheric D-region as detected through ground-based VLF receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, I.; Price, C. G.; Rodger, C. J.

    2015-11-01

    Earth's middle and upper atmosphere exhibits several dominant large scale oscillations in many measured parameters. One of these oscillations is the semi-annual oscillation (SAO). The SAO can be detected in the ionospheric total electron content (TEC), the ionospheric transition height, the wind regime in the mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT), and in the MLT temperatures. In addition, as we report for the first time in this study, the SAO is among the most dominant oscillations in nighttime very low frequencies (VLF) narrow-band subionospheric measurements. As VLF signals are reflected off the ionospheric D-region (at altitudes of ~65 and ~85 km, during the day and night, respectively), this implies that the upper part of the D-region is experiencing this oscillation as well, through changes in the dominating electron or ion densities, or by changes in the electron collision frequency, recombination rates, and attachment rates, all of which could be driven by oscillatory MLT temperature changes. We conclude that the main source of the SAO in the nighttime D-region is due to NOx molecules transport from the lower levels of the thermosphere, resulting in enhanced ionization and the creation of free electrons in the nighttime D-region, thus modulating the SAO signature in VLF NB measurements. While the cause for the observed SAO is still a subject of debate, this oscillation should be taken into account when modeling the D-region in general and VLF wave propagation in particular.

  4. Observations of gamma-ray emission in solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the observations of gamma-ray emission made from the OSO-7 satellite in connection with two solar flares in early August 1972. The details of the measurements and a preliminary interpretation of some of the observed features are given. (U.S.)

  5. Upper Limits on O VI Emission from Voyager Observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jayant Murthy

    2002-03-01

    We have examined 426 Voyager fields distributed across the sky for O VI ( 1032/1038 Å) emission from the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium. No such emission was detected in any of our observed fields. Our most constraining limit was a 90% confidence upper limit of 2600 photons cm-2 sr-1 s-1 on the doublet emission in the direction (l, b) = (117.3, 50.6). Combining this with an absorption line measurement in nearly the same direction allows us to place an upper limit of 0.01 cm-3 on the electron density of the hot gas in this direction. We have placed 90% confidence upper limits of less than or equal to 10,000 photons cm-2 sr-1 s-1 on the O VI emission in 16 of our 426 observations.

  6. Observations of Anomalous Microwave Emission from HII regions

    CERN Document Server

    Dickinson, Clive

    2013-01-01

    In this brief review, I give a summary of the observations of Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) from HII regions. AME has been detected in, or in the vicinity of, HII regions. Given the difficulties in measuring accurate SEDs over a wide range of frequencies and in complex environments, many of these detections require more data to confirm them as emitting significant AME. The contribution from optically thick free-free emission from UCHII regions may be also be significant in some cases. The AME emissivity, defined as the ratio of the AME brightness to the 100 micron brightness, is comparable to the value observed in high-latitude diffuse cirrus in some regions, but is significantly lower in others. However, this value is dependent on the dust temperature. More data, both at high frequencies (>5 GHz) and high resolution (~1 arcmin or better) is required to disentangle the emission processes in such complex regions.

  7. Egret observations of the extragalactic gamma-ray emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sreekumar, P.; Bertsch, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    The all-sky survey in high-energy gamma rays (E > 30 MeV) carried out by EGRET aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory provides a unique opportunity to examine in detail the diffuse gamma-ray emission. The observed diffuse emission has a Galactic component arising from cosmic-ray interactions with the local interstellar gas and radiation, as well as an almost uniformly distributed component that is generally believed to originate outside the Galaxy. Through a careful study and removal of the Galactic diffuse emission, the flux, spectrum, and uniformity of the extragalactic emission are deduced. The analysis indicates that the extragalactic emission is well described by a power-law photon spectrum with an index of -(2.10 +/- 0.03) in the 30 MeV to 100 GeV energy range. No large-scale spatial anisotropy or changes in the energy spectrum are observed in the deduced extragalactic emission. The most likely explanation for the origin of this extragalactic high-energy gamma-ray emission is that it arises primarily from unresolved gamma-ray-emitting blazars.

  8. SCIAMACHY formaldehyde observations: constraint for isoprene emission estimates over Europe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dufour

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde (HCHO is an important intermediate compound in the degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs in the troposphere. Sources of HCHO are largely dominated by its secondary production from VOC oxidation, methane and isoprene being the main precursors in unpolluted areas. As a result of the moderate lifetime of HCHO, its spatial distribution is determined by reactive hydrocarbon emissions. We focus here on Europe and investigate the influence of the different emissions on HCHO tropospheric columns with the CHIMERE chemical transport model in order to interpret the comparisons between SCIAMACHY and simulated HCHO columns. Europe was never specifically studied before for these purposes using satellite observations. The bias between measurements and model is less than 20% on average. The differences are discussed according to the errors on the model and the observations and remaining discrepancies are attributed to a misrepresentation of biogenic emissions. This study requires the characterisation of: (1 the model errors and performances concerning formaldehyde. The errors on the HCHO columns, mainly related to chemistry and mixed emission types, are evaluated to 2×1015 molecule/cm2 and the model performances evaluated using surface measurements are satisfactory (~13%; (2 the observation errors that define the needs in spatial and temporal averaging for meaningful comparisons. Using SCIAMACHY observations as constraint for biogenic isoprene emissions in an inverse modelling scheme reduces their uncertainties by about a factor of two in region of intense emissions. The retrieved correction factors for the isoprene emissions range from a factor of 0.15 (North Africa to a factor of 2 (Poland, the United Kingdom depending on the regions.

  9. Normal development of the fruitfly Drosophila in VLF magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attempts to substantiate irreversible actions of a variety of magnetic fields on the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, have been successful and unsuccessful in about equal numbers. The most conspicuous mutagenic effects apparently induced by pulsed HF-fields failed to appear under continuous electromagnetic irradiation. This seems to correlate the observed damage with the VLF-components of the pulsed fields. The present investigation is motivated by the occurence of these components both in the atmosphere and in the vicinity of electrical appliances. A strain of normally viable wild type males and subnormally viable Attached-X y w females was used in which the yield and the sex ratio of the progeny indicate, respectively, the extent of developmental damage and of sex-linked recessive lethal mutation induced by the exposure to detrimental conditions. Evaluation of 73,800 flies from subsequent generations of a control group and two test groups raised in steady, or rotating, homogeneous 9.6 kHz magnetic fields of about 2.5 G did not reveal any developmental or hereditar load in the test groups. (orig.)

  10. VLF effects in the outer ionosphere from the underground nuclear explosion of 24 October 1990 on the New Land island (Interkosmos-24 satellite data)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results on numerical treatment of the VLF auroral hiss and whistling atmospherics, registered at the height approximately 900 km on board of the Interkosmos-24 satellite over the New Land island 17 minutes after the underground nuclear explosion are presented. As the result of powerful acoustic effect there took place sharp increase (? 20 db) in the VLF hiss within the narrow range of invariant latitudes including the excitation source. Simultaneously decrease in the low frequency of the noise spectrum cut-off, coinciding with the frequency of the low hybrid resonance was observed

  11. Synoptic observations of Jupiter's radio emissions: average statistical properties observed by voyager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of Jupiter's low-frequency radio emission collected over one-month intervals before and after each Voyager encounter have been analyzed to provide a synoptic view of the average statistical properties of the emissions. Compilations of occurrence probability, average power flux density, and average sense of circular polarization are presented as a function of central meridian longitude, phase of Io, and frequency. The results are compared with ground-based observations. The necessary geometrical conditions and preferred polarization sense for Io-related decametric emission observed by Voyager from above both the dayside and nightside hemispheres are found to be essentially the same as those observed in earth-based studies. On the other hand, there is a clear local time dependence in the Io-dependent decametric emission. The emission is prevalent at longitudes >2000 when observed from over the dayside hemisphere but is dominant at longitudes >2000 when observed from over the postmidnight sector. Decametric emission, which comprises the dynamic spectral lesser arcs near 10 MHz, displays a distinct, bimodal polarization pattern that is predominantly in the left-hand sense at longitudes below 1500 and in the right-hand sense at longitudes above 1500. The central meridian longitude distributions of occurrence probability and average flux density at hectometric wavelengths appear to depend significantly on both the observer's latitude and local time. Io appears to have an influence on average flux density of the emission down to below 2 MHz. The average power flux density sectrum of Jupiter's emission has a broad peak near 9 MHz. Intergration of the average spectrum over all frequencies and all longitudes gives a total radiated power for an equivalent isotropic source of 4 x 1011 W

  12. On the numerical modelling of VLF chorus dynamical spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nunn

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the use of a one-dimensional Vlasov Hybrid Simulation (VHS computer code to simulate the dynamical spectra (i.e. frequency versus time spectrograms of ELF/VLF chorus signals (from ~a fraction to ~10 kHz. Recently excellent measurements of chorus have been made in the source region close to the geomagnetic equator aboard the four spacecraft Cluster mission. Using Cluster data for wave amplitude, which is up to 300 pT, local gyrofrequency, cold plasma density, and L-shell, observed chorus signals are reproduced with remarkable fidelity and, in particular, sweep rates in the range 1–10 kHz result as observed. Further, we find that the sweep rate is a falling function of increasing cold plasma density, again in accord with observations. Finally, we have satisfactorily simulated the rather rare falling frequency elements of chorus which are sometimes observed aboard Cluster in the generation region. For both rising and falling chorus we have presented detailed structural analyses of the generation regions. The main contributor to the frequency sweep rate is primarily the establishment of wave number/frequency gradients across the generation region by the out of phase component of the resonant particle current. The secondary contributor is the shortening of the wavelength of resonant particle current relative to that of the wave field. In view of the close agreement between observation and simulation, we conclude that nonlinear electron cyclotron resonance is indeed the mechanism underlying the generation of chorus signals just outside the plasmasphere.

  13. Role of the plasmapause in dictating the ground accessibility of ELF/VLF chorus

    OpenAIRE

    Golden, D.I.; Spasojevic, M.; Foust, F.R.; Lehtinen, N.G.; Meredith, Nigel P.; U. S. Inan

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the manner in which the plasmapause is responsible for dictating which magnetospheric source regions of ELF/VLF chorus are able to propagate to and be received by midlatitude stations on the ground. First, we explore the effects of plasmapause extent on ground?based observations of chorus via a 3 month study of ground?based measurements of chorus at Palmer Station, Antarctica (L = 2.4, 50°S geomagnetic latitude), and data on the plasmapause extent from the IMAGE EUV instru...

  14. Observing the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Atteia, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) were first detected thanks to their prompt emission, which was the only information available for decades. In 2010, while the high-energy prompt emission remains the main tool for the detection and the first localization of GRB sources, our understanding of this crucial phase of GRBs has made great progress. We discuss some recent advances in this field, like the occasional detection of the prompt emission at all wavelengths, from optical to GeV; the existence of sub-luminous GRBs; the attempts to standardize GRBs; and the possible detection of polarization in two very bright GRBs. Despite these advances, tantalizing observational and theoretical challenges still exist, concerning the detection of the faintest GRBs, the panchromatic observation of GRBs from their very beginning, the origin of the prompt emission, or the understanding of the physics at work during this phase. Significant progress on this last topic is expected with SVOM thanks to the observation of dozens of GRBs from o...

  15. Optical emission spectroscopy observations of fast pulsed capillary discharge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present time resolved optical emission spectroscopic (OES) observations of a low energy, pulsed capillary discharage (PCD). The optical emission from the capillary plasma and plasma jets emitted from the capillary volume was recorded with with a SpectraPro 275 spectrograph, fitted with a MCP gated OMA system, with 15 ns time resolution. The discharge was operated with different gases, including argon, nitrogen, hydrogen and methane, in a repetitive pulsed discharge mode at 10-50 Hz, with, 10-12 kV pulses applied at the cathode side. The time evolution of the electron density was measured using Stark broadening of the H? line. Several features of the capillary plasma dynamics, such as ionization growth, wall effects and plasma jet evolution, are inferred from the time evolution of the optical emission.

  16. VHE emission from extragalactic sources: open issues from MWL observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cherenkov telescopes observations together with Fermi/LAT survey and multi-wavelength (MWL) simultaneous coverage are posing new challenges to the description of extreme sources, such as BL Lacs, flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), and radiogalaxies. We will review some of these new results threatening the conventional emission models. Among them: the difficulties of the usual description with single-zone SSC models of the SED of BL Lacs objects, when simultaneous very-high energy (VHE) and MWL observations are taken into account; the constraints on the location of the gamma-ray emission region as revealed by the MAGIC observations of the FSRQ PKS 1222+21; the firm VHE detection of somewhat unexpected sources such as the radiogalaxy IC 310 in the Perseus cluster of galaxies. We will also consider the interplay between intrinsic emission models and the interaction of gamma-rays with the extragalactic background light and intergalactic magnetic fields. These issues will be tackled in the framework of the results of MWL observations led by the MAGIC Cherenkov telescopes system

  17. Deep 1.4-GHz observations of diffuse polarized emission

    CERN Document Server

    Carretti, E; Reich, W; Reich, P; Fürst, E; Bernardi, G; Cortiglioni, S; Sbarra, C

    2006-01-01

    Polarized diffuse emission observations at 1.4-GHz in a high Galactic latitude area of the northern Celestial hemisphere are presented. The 3.2 X 3.2 deg^2 field, centred at RA = 10h 58m, Dec = +42deg 18' (B1950), has Galactic coordinates l~172deg, b~+63deg and is located in the region selected as northern target of the BaR-SPOrt experiment. Observations have been performed with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope. We find that the angular power spectra of the E- and B-modes have slopes of beta_E = -1.79 +/- 0.13 and beta_B = -1.74 +/- 0.12, respectively. Because of the very high Galactic latitude and the smooth emission, a weak Faraday rotation action is expected, which allows both a fair extrapolation to Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization (CMBP) frequencies and an estimate of the contamination by Galactic synchrotron emission. We extrapolate the E-mode spectrum up to 32-GHz and confirm the possibility to safely detect the CMBP E-mode signal in the Ka band found in another low emission region (Carretti et a...

  18. High resolution observations of pellet emission on TFTR (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution, rapidly sampled measurements of the light emission from injected impurity pellets have recently been carried out on TFTR. Both wide and narrow views of the pellet light have been accomplished with a tightly collimated fanned array of fiber-optically coupled photomultipliers. Deep (?100%), high frequency (40--90 kHz) modulation of the pellet emission has been observed in both neutral beam and rf heated discharges with as little as ?1.5 MW of heating. This finding is consistent with recent work carried out on ASDEXb with the exception that this modulation phenomenon is seen not only with hydrogenic pellets but also with lithium and boron pellets. This observation seems to point to an instability associated with the plasma surrounding the pellet rather than an instability which depends upon the atomic physics of the pellet

  19. Sub-ionospheric VLF signal anomaly due to geomagnetic storms: a statistical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuta, K.; Hobara, Y.; Pal, S.; Balikhin, M.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate quantitatively the effect of geomagnetic storms on the sub-ionospheric VLF/LF (Very Low Frequency/Low Frequency) propagations for different latitudes based on 2-year nighttime data from Japanese VLF/LF observation network. Three statistical parameters such as average signal amplitude, variability of the signal amplitude, and nighttime fluctuation were calculated daily for 2 years for 16-21 independent VLF/LF transmitter-receiver propagation paths consisting of three transmitters and seven receiving stations. These propagation paths are suitable to simultaneously study high-latitude, low-mid-latitude and mid-latitude D/E-region ionospheric properties. We found that these three statistical parameters indicate significant anomalies exceeding at least 2 times of their standard deviation from the mean value during the geomagnetic storm time period in the high-latitude paths with an occurrence rate of anomaly between 40 and 50 % presumably due to the auroral energetic electron precipitation. The mid-latitude and low-mid-latitude paths have a smaller influence from the geomagnetic activity because of a lower occurrence rate of anomalies even during the geomagnetically active time period (from 20 to 30 %). The anomalies except geomagnetic storm periods may be caused by atmospheric and/or lithospheric origins. The statistical occurrence rates of ionospheric anomalies for different latitudinal paths during geomagnetic storm and non-storm time periods are basic and important information not only to identify the space weather effects toward the lower ionosphere depending on the latitudes but also to separate various external physical causes of lower ionospheric disturbances.

  20. Plasma waves observed by the IRM and UKS spacecraft during the AMPTE solar wind lithium releases - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeusler, B.; Woolliscroft, L. J.; Anderson, R. R.; Gurnett, D. A.; Holzworth, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    The wave measurements from the Ion Release Module and the United Kingdom Satellite in the diamagnetic cavity, the transition region, and the upstream region are examined. Solar wind conditions during the releases on September 11 and 20, 1984 are described. The quasi-static electric field, wideband, high-frequency waves, and medium and VLF waves observations are analyzed. The data reveal that extremely low levels of wave activity are observed in the boundary between the diamagnetic cavity and external magnetic field, medium and VLF waves in the ion acoustic electrostatic cyclotron harmonic modes are detected in the transition region from the diamagnetic cavity to the solar wind, and decay in the magnetic field strength and density, and an increase in the quasi-static electric field is seen in the upstream edge of the transition region. The emissions observed are related to the different phases of the Li cloud development and different spatial regimes of the Li plasma-solar wind interaction.

  1. Observations of O VI Emission from the Diffuse Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Shelton, R L; Murphy, E M; Andersson, B G; Blair, W P; Dixon, W V; Edelstein, J D; Fullerton, A W; Gry, C; Howk, J C; Jenkins, E B; Linsky, J L; Moos, H W; Oegerle, W R; Oey, M S; Roth, K C; Sahnow, D J; Sankrit, R; Savage, B D; Sembach, K R; Shull, J M; Siegmund, O H W; Vidal-Madjar, A; Welsh, B Y; York, D G

    2001-01-01

    We report the first Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) measurements of diffuse O VI (lambda,lambda 1032,1038) emission from the general diffuse interstellar medium outside of supernova remnants or superbubbles. We observed a 30arcsec x 30arcsec region of the sky centered at l = 315 and b = -41. From the observed intensities (2930+/-290(random)+/-410(systematic) and 1790+/-260(random)+/-250(systematic) photons/cm/cm/s/sr in the 1032 and 1038 Angstrom emission lines, respectively), derived equations, and assumptions about the source location, we calculate the intrinsic intensity, electron density, thermal pressure, and emitting depth. The intensities are too large for the emission to originate solely in the Local Bubble. Thus, we conclude that the Galactic thick disk and lower halo also contribute. High velocity clouds are ruled out because there are none near the pointing direction. The calculated emitting depth is small, indicating that the O VI-bearing gas fills a small volume. The observations ca...

  2. Deep 1.4-GHz observations of diffuse polarized emission

    OpenAIRE

    Carretti, E.; Poppi, S.; Reich, W.; Reich, P.; Fuerst, E.; Bernardi, G.; Cortiglioni, S.; Sbarra, C.(INFN Sezione di Bologna; Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Bologna, Bologna, Italy)

    2005-01-01

    Polarized diffuse emission observations at 1.4-GHz in a high Galactic latitude area of the northern Celestial hemisphere are presented. The 3.2 X 3.2 deg^2 field, centred at RA = 10h 58m, Dec = +42deg 18' (B1950), has Galactic coordinates l~172deg, b~+63deg and is located in the region selected as northern target of the BaR-SPOrt experiment. Observations have been performed with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope. We find that the angular power spectra of the E- and B-modes have...

  3. Observation of microwave emission from extensive air showers with CROME

    OpenAIRE

    Wilczy?ski H.; Werner F.; Weber M; Unger M.; Stasielak J.; Schieler H.; Salamida F.; Riegel M.; Roth M.; Rautenberg J.; Pekala J.; Neunteufel P.; Mathys S.; Ludwig M; Krömer O.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the measurement of microwave radio signals from air showers with the CROME (Cosmic Ray Observation via Microwave Emission) experiment. CROME is located in the center of the KASCADE-Grande air shower array. The radio signals of the CROME antennas are stored for each high-energy trigger from the KASCADE-Grande array and matched o?ine with the KASCADE-Grande data. After almost one year of data taking microwave signals have been observed for more than ten air showers.

  4. Observation of microwave emission from extensive air showers with CROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilczy?ski H.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on the measurement of microwave radio signals from air showers with the CROME (Cosmic Ray Observation via Microwave Emission experiment. CROME is located in the center of the KASCADE-Grande air shower array. The radio signals of the CROME antennas are stored for each high-energy trigger from the KASCADE-Grande array and matched o?ine with the KASCADE-Grande data. After almost one year of data taking microwave signals have been observed for more than ten air showers.

  5. Numerical modelling of VLF radio wave propagation through earth-ionosphere waveguide and its application to sudden ionospheric disturbances

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Sujay

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, we theoretically predict the normal characteristics of Very Low Frequency (3~30 kHz) radio wave propagation through Earth-ionosphere waveguide corresponding to normal behavior of the D-region ionosphere. We took the VLF narrow band data from the receivers of Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP) to validate our models. Detection of sudden ionospheric disturbances (SIDs) are common to all the measurements. We apply our theoretical models to infer the D-region characteristics and to reproduce the observed VLF signal behavior corresponding to such SIDs. We develop a code based on ray theory to simulate the diurnal behavior of VLF signals over short propagation paths (2000~3000 km). The diurnal variation from this code are comparable to the variation obtained from a more general Long Wave Propagation Capability (LWPC) code which is based on mode theory approach. We simulate the observational results obtained during the Total Solar Eclipse of July 22, 2009 in India. We also report and simulate a h...

  6. Adjoint inversion modeling of Asian dust emission using lidar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yumimoto

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A four-dimensional variational (4D-Var data assimilation system for a regional dust model (RAMS/CFORS-4DVAR; RC4 is applied to an adjoint inversion of a heavy dust event over eastern Asia during 20 March–4 April 2007. The vertical profiles of the dust extinction coefficients derived from NIES Lidar network are directly assimilated, with validation using observation data. Two experiments assess impacts of observation site selection: Experiment A uses five Japanese observation sites located downwind of dust source regions; Experiment B uses these and two other sites near source regions. Assimilation improves the modeled dust extinction coefficients. Experiment A and Experiment B assimilation results are mutually consistent, indicating that observations of Experiment A distributed over Japan can provide comprehensive information related to dust emission inversion. Time series data of dust AOT calculated using modeled and Lidar dust extinction coefficients improve the model results. At Seoul, Matsue, and Toyama, assimilation reduces the root mean square differences of dust AOT by 35–40%. However, at Beijing and Tsukuba, the RMS differences degrade because of fewer observations during the heavy dust event. Vertical profiles of the dust layer observed by CALIPSO are compared with assimilation results. The dense dust layer was trapped at potential temperatures (? of 280–300 K and was higher toward the north; the model reproduces those characteristics well. Latitudinal distributions of modeled dust AOT along the CALIPSO orbit paths agree well with those of CALIPSO dust AOT, OMI AI, and MODIS coarse-mode AOT, capturing the latitude at which AOTs and AI have high values. Assimilation results show increased dust emissions over the Gobi Desert and Mongolia; especially for 29–30 March, emission flux is about 10 times greater. Strong dust uplift fluxes over the Gobi Desert and Mongolia cause the heavy dust event. Total optimized dust emissions are 57.9 Tg (Experiment A; 57.8% larger than before assimilation and 56.3 Tg (Experiment B; 53.4% larger.

  7. Inversion of airborne tensor VLF data using integral equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamm, Jochen; Pedersen, Laust B.

    2014-08-01

    The Geological Survey of Sweden has been collecting airborne tensor very low frequency data (VLF) over several decades, covering large parts of the country. The data has been an invaluable source of information for identifying conductive structures that can among other things be related to water-filled fault zones, wet sediments that fill valleys or ore mineralizations. Because the method only uses two differently polarized plane waves of very similar frequency, vertical resolution is low and interpretation is in most cases limited to maps that are directly derived from the data. Occasionally, 2-D inversion is carried out along selected profiles. In this paper, we present for the first time a 3-D inversion for tensor VLF data in order to further increase the usefulness of the data set. The inversion is performed using a non-linear conjugate gradient scheme (Polak-Ribière) with an inexact line-search. The gradient is obtained by an algebraic adjoint method that requires one additional forward calculation involving the adjoint system matrix. The forward modelling is based on integral equations with an analytic formulation of the half-space Green's tensor. It avoids typically required Hankel transforms and is particularly amenable to singularity removal prior to the numerical integration over the volume elements. The system is solved iteratively, thus avoiding construction and storage of the dense system matrix. By using fast 3-D Fourier transforms on nested grids, subsequently farther away interactions are represented with less detail and therefore with less computational effort, enabling us to bridge the gap between the relatively short wavelengths of the fields (tens of metres) and the large model dimensions (several square kilometres). We find that the approximation of the fields can be off by several per cent, yet the transfer functions in the air are practically unaffected. We verify our code using synthetic calculations from well-established 2-D methods, and trade modelling accuracy off against computational effort in order to keep the inversion feasible in both respects. Our compromise is to limit the permissible resistivity to not fall below 100 ?m to maintain computational domains as large as 10 × 10 km2 and computation times on the order of a few hours on standard PCs. We investigate the effect of possible local violations of these limits. Even though the conductivity magnitude can then not be recovered correctly, we do not observe any structural artefacts related to this in our tests. We invert a data set from northern Sweden, where we find an excellent agreement of known geological features, such as contacts or fault zones, with elongated conductive structures, while high resistivity is encountered in probably less disturbed geology, often related to topographic highs, which have survived predominantly glacial erosion processes. As expected from synthetic studies, the resolution is laterally high, but vertically limited down to the top of conductive structures.

  8. Effect of solar flares flux on the propagation and modal composition of VLF signal in the lower ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouderba, Yasmina; Nait Amor, Samir; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-04-01

    The VLF radio waves propagating in the Earth-Ionosphere waveguide are sensitive to the ionospheric disturbances due to X rays solar flux. In order to understand the VLF signal response to the solar flares, the LWPC code is used to simulate the signal perturbation parameters (amplitude and phase) at fixed solar zenith angle. In this work, we used the NRK-Algiers signal data and the study was done for different flares classes. The results show that the perturbed parameters increase with the increasing solar flares flux. This increases is due to the growth of the electron density resulting from the changes of the Wait's parameters. However, the behavior of the perturbation parameters as function of distance shows different forms of signal perturbations. It was also observed that the null points move towards the transmitter location when the flare flux increases which is related to the modal composition of the propagating signal. Effectively, for a given mode, the plot of the attenuation coefficient as function of the flare flux shows a decreases when the flux increases which is more significant for high modes. Thus, the solar flares effect is to amplify the VLF signal by reducing the attenuation coefficient.

  9. Fermi Observations of ?-Ray Emission from the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwoo, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hays, E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Poon, H.; Porter, T. A.; Prokhorov, D.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Rochester, L. S.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D. A.; Sbarra, C.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Share, G. H.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, ?.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.

    2012-10-01

    We report on the detection of high-energy ?-ray emission from the Moon during the first 24 months of observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). This emission comes from particle cascades produced by cosmic-ray (CR) nuclei and electrons interacting with the lunar surface. The differential spectrum of the Moon is soft and can be described as a log-parabolic function with an effective cutoff at 2-3 GeV, while the average integral flux measured with the LAT from the beginning of observations in 2008 August to the end of 2010 August is F(>100\\ MeV) =(1.04+/- 0.01\\,{[statistical\\ error]}+/- 0.1\\,{[systematic\\ error]})\\times 10^{-6} cm-2 s-1. This flux is about a factor 2-3 higher than that observed between 1991 and 1994 by the EGRET experiment on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, F(>100 MeV) ? 5 × 10-7 cm-2 s-1, when solar activity was relatively high. The higher ?-ray flux measured by Fermi is consistent with the deep solar minimum conditions during the first 24 months of the mission, which reduced effects of heliospheric modulation, and thus increased the heliospheric flux of Galactic CRs. A detailed comparison of the light curve with McMurdo Neutron Monitor rates suggests a correlation of the trends. The Moon and the Sun are so far the only known bright emitters of ?-rays with fast celestial motion. Their paths across the sky are projected onto the Galactic center and high Galactic latitudes as well as onto other areas crowded with high-energy ?-ray sources. Analysis of the lunar and solar emission may thus be important for studies of weak and transient sources near the ecliptic.

  10. The south America VLF NETwork (SAVNET): Development, installation status, first results

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    J. P., Raulin; P., Correia de Matos David; R., Hadano; A. C. V., Saraiva; E., Correia; P., Kaufmann.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta la red South America VLF Networks (SAVNET) que es una nueva instalación de observación en frecuencias muy bajas. SAVNET se instaló recientemente en diversas localidades en América LAtina (Brasil, Perú y Argentina) Consiste en una red de siete receptores cuyo principal objetivo científico [...] es monitorear la actividad solar en escalas temporales cortas (minutos/horas) y extensas (años). Otros objetivos incluyen una mejor comprensión de la estructura espacial de la anomalía Magnética del Atlántico sur, el estudio de fenómenos atmosféricos y la búsqueda sistemática de efectos sismico-electromágneticos genuinos. Abstract in english The South America VLF Network, a new observing facility at Very Low Frequencies is presented. It has been recently installed at different locations in Latin America (in Brazil, Peru and Argentina). It consists of a network of seven Very Low Frequency tracking receivers with the main scientific objec [...] tive of monitoring the solar activity on short (minutes to hours) and long (years) time scales. Other objectives include a better understanding of the spatial structure of the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly, the study of atmospheric phenomena and the search for genuine seismic-electromagnetic effects.

  11. The South America VLF Network - SAVNET: Achievements, Latest Results and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raulin, J.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we present recent results obtained by the South America VLF Network (SAVNET). The use of the VLF technique by tracking subionospheric propagation anomalies appears as a very promising tool to study various aspects of Space Weather disturbances. On long timescales it is possible to indirectly monitor the solar Lyman-alpha radiation along the solar cycles. Short time phenomena like solar explosive events can be observed with 100% probability, even for the small intensity events. The effect of high-energy precipitating solar particles can be tracked in the low ionosphere. The same technique is also relevant to study the ionospheric perturbations caused by geomagnetic storms on typical timescales of a day to few days. Extra solar and terrestrial high-energy phenomena are naturally detected in the very sensitive low ionospheric plasma, as Gamma-ray bursts and Soft Gamma-ray repeaters. Finally, the remote sensing of the low ionosphere is also used to search for seismic-electromagnetic effects prior to Earthquakes. At the present time, SAVNET is composed of nine (9) tracking receiver stations in Brazil, Peru, Argentina and Mexico. In this presentation we will describe our future plans for expanding the array. Eastern Europe, Ecuador and Asia are good host candidates to participate in these forthcoming activities. The array expansion is necessary to improve the probability detection of very high-energy remote phenomena, and to demonstrate that these processes of great astrophysical importance can be easily detected using a cheap and simple technique.

  12. Modeling of very low frequency (VLF radio wave signal profile due to solar flares using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation coupled with ionospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Palit

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray photons emitted during solar flares cause ionization in the lower ionosphere (~60 to 100 km in excess of what is expected to occur due to a quiet sun. Very low frequency (VLF radio wave signals reflected from the D-region of the ionosphere are affected by this excess ionization. In this paper, we reproduce the deviation in VLF signal strength during solar flares by numerical modeling. We use GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code to compute the rate of ionization due to a M-class flare and a X-class flare. The output of the simulation is then used in a simplified ionospheric chemistry model to calculate the time variation of electron density at different altitudes in the D-region of the ionosphere. The resulting electron density variation profile is then self-consistently used in the LWPC code to obtain the time variation of the change in VLF signal. We did the modeling of the VLF signal along the NWC (Australia to IERC/ICSP (India propagation path and compared the results with observations. The agreement is found to be very satisfactory.

  13. Modeling of the Very Low Frequency (VLF radio wave signal profile due to solar flares using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation coupled with ionospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Palit

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available X-ray photons emitted during solar flares cause ionization in the lower ionosphere (~ 60 to 100 km in excess of what is expected from a quiet sun. Very Low Frequency (VLF radio wave signals reflected from the D region are affected by this excess ionization. In this paper, we reproduce the deviation in VLF signal strength during solar flares by numerical modeling. We use GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code to compute the rate of ionization due to a M-class and a X-class flare. The output of the simulation is then used in a simplified ionospheric chemistry model to calculate the time variation of electron density at different altitudes in the lower ionosphere. The resulting electron density variation profile is then self-consistently used in the LWPC code to obtain the time variation of the VLF signal change. We did the modeling of the VLF signal along the NWC (Australia to IERC/ICSP (India propagation path and compared the results with observations. The agreement is found to be very satisfactory.

  14. A generation mechanism for chorus emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Y. Trakhtengerts

    Full Text Available A chorus generation mechanism is discussed, which is based on interrelation of ELF/VLF noise-like and discrete emissions under the cyclotron wave-particle interactions. A natural ELF/VLF noise radiation is excited by the cyclotron instability mechanism in ducts with enhanced cold plasma density or at the plasmapause. This process is accompanied by a step-like deformation of the energetic electron distribution function in the velocity space, which is situated at the boundary between resonant and nonresonant particles. The step leads to the strong phase correlation of interacting particles and waves and to a new backward wave oscillator (BWO regime of wave generation, when an absolute cyclotron instability arises at the central cross section of the geomagnetic trap, in the form of a succession of discrete signals with growing frequency inside each element. The dynamical spectrum of a separate element is formed similar to triggered ELF/VLF emission, when the strong wavelet starts from the equatorial plane. The comparison is given of the model developed using some satellite and ground-based data. In particular, the appearance of separate groups of chorus signals with a duration 2-10 s can be connected with the preliminary stage of the step formation. BWO regime gives a succession period smaller than the bounce period of energetic electrons between the magnetic mirrors and can explain the observed intervals between chorus elements.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (Energetic particles · trapped. Space plasma physics (wave-particle interactions; waves and instabilities

  15. Detection of karst structures using airborne EM and VLF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through the combined use of multi-frequency helicopter electromagnetic and VLF data, it is possible to detect and delineate a wide variety of karst structures and possibly to assess their interconnectedness. Multi-frequency EM Can detect karst features if some element of the structure is conductive. This conductive aspect may derive from thick, moist soils in the depression commonly associated with a doline, from conductive fluids in the cavity, or from conductive sediments in the cavity if these occupy a significant portion of it. Multiple loop configurations may also increase the likelihood of detecting karst features. Preliminary evidence indicates total field VLF measurements may be able to detect interconnected karst pathways, so long as the pathways are water or sediment filled. Neither technique can effectively detect dry, resistive air-filled cavities

  16. Geothermal evolution of an intruded dike in the rift zone of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii from VLF and self-potential measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Paul M.

    2015-09-01

    Self-potential (SP) and VLF measurements were made in 1973, 1975, 1995, 1997 and 2012 across a basaltic dike that intruded into the Koae fault zone of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii in May 1973. The SP anomaly remained strong throughout. In 2012 it was at about 60% of the strength it had in 1973. In contrast, the VLF anomaly, though diminished, was still observable in 1995/1997, but by 2012 it had disappeared. A hydrothermal dike model, with parameters calibrated by modeling the solidification of Kilauea Iki lava lake, is used to calculate temperatures and conductivity variation. Following Jaeger's (1957) method, we find that the time in years for a dike of width W (m) to solidify is 0.0075W2. Thus, a 1 m dike solidifies within the first few days, and after 39 years is only tens of degrees above ambient. Given the orders of magnitude difference between the conductivities of wet and dry basalt, we infer, that after solidification, the VLF anomalies were caused by induction in a localized veil of wet, hot basalt enveloping the dike, that was generated initially by condensation of steam, and subsequently by condensation of evaporated water as temperatures reduced. The conductivity anomaly persisted until the mid-nineties. By 2012, temperatures and condensation were too small for a VLF signal. The persistent SP anomaly is attributed to localized fluid disruption, with evaporation mainly at the water table and in the vadose zone. Streaming potentials are associated with evaporative circulation in the vadose zone. Next to the dike a positive potential is generated by upward flow of moisture-laden air, with a smaller negative potential on its flanks from downward infiltrating rainwater. The analysis indicates that the combination of SP and VLF measurements can characterize the evolving geothermal regime of intrusions above the water table.

  17. Modeling Atmospheric Emission for CMB Ground-based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errard, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Baccigalupi, C.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Cukierman, A.; Delabrouille, J.; Dobbs, M.; Ducout, A.; Elleflot, T.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Feeney, S.; Gilbert, A.; Goeckner-Wald, N.; Halverson, N. W.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Hill, C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Inoue, Y.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jeong, O.; Katayama, N.; Kaufman, J.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Leon, D.; Linder, E.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Miller, N. J.; Myers, M. J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Okamura, T.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Poletti, D.; Puglisi, G.; Rebeiz, G.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Rotermund, K. M.; Schenck, D. E.; Sherwin, B. D.; Siritanasak, P.; Smecher, G.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Tajima, O.; Takakura, S.; Tikhomirov, A.; Tomaru, T.; Whitehorn, N.; Wilson, B.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.

    2015-08-01

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3D-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive a new analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using an original numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the polarbear-i project first season data set. We derive a new 1.0% upper limit on the linear polarization fraction of atmospheric emission. We also compare our results to previous studies and weather station measurements. The proposed model can be used for realistic simulations of future ground-based CMB observations.

  18. Satellite observations indicate substantial spatiotemporal variability in biomass burning NOx emission factors for South America

    OpenAIRE

    Castellanos, P; Boersma, K. F.; Van Der Werf, G. R.

    2014-01-01

    Biomass burning is an important contributor to global total emissions of NOx (NO+NO2). Generally bottom-up fire emissions models calculate NOx emissions by multiplying fuel consumption estimates with static biome-specific emission factors, defined in units of grams of NO per kilogram of dry matter consumed. Emission factors are a significant source of uncertainty in bottom-up fire emissions modeling because relatively few observations are available to characterize the large ...

  19. Observations of Microwave Continuum Emission from Air Shower Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Gorham, P W; Varner, G S; Beatty, J J; Connolly, A; Chen, P; Conde, M E; Gai, W; Hast, C; Hebert, C L; Miki, C; Konecny, R; Kowalski, J; Ng, J; Power, J G; Reil, K; Saltzberg, D; Stokes, B T; Walz, D

    2007-01-01

    We investigate a possible new technique for microwave measurements of ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) extensive air showers which relies on detection of expected continuum radiation in the microwave range, caused by free-electron collisions with neutrals in the tenuous plasma left after the passage of the shower. We performed an initial experiment at the AWA (Argonne Wakefield Accelerator) laboratory in 2003 and measured broadband microwave emission from air ionized via high energy electrons and photons. A follow-up experiment at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) in summer of 2004 confirmed the major features of the previous AWA observations with better precision and made additional measurements relevant to the calorimetric capabilities of the method. Prompted by these results we built a prototype detector using satellite television technology, and have made measurements indicating possible detection of cosmic ray extensive air showers. The method, if confirmed by experiments now in progress, cou...

  20. Large storms: Airglow and related measurements. VLF observations, volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The data presented show the typical values and range of ionospheric and magnetospheric characteristics, as viewed from 1400 km with the ISIS 2 instruments. The definition of each data set depends partly on geophysical parameters and partly on satellite operating mode. Preceding the data set is a description of the organizational parameters and a review of the objectives and general characteristics of the data set. The data are shown as a selection from 12 different data formats. Each data set has a different selection of formats, but uniformity of a given format selection is preserved throughout each data set. Each data set consists of a selected number of passes, each comprising a format combination that is most appropriae for the particular data set. Description of ISIS 2 instruments are provided.

  1. Source location of chorus emissions observed by Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Parrot

    Full Text Available One of the objectives of the Cluster mission is to study sources of various electromagnetic waves using the four satellites. This paper describes the methods we have applied to data recorded from the STAFF spectrum analyser. This instrument provides the cross spectral matrix of three magnetic and two electric field components. This spectral matrix is analysed to determine, for each satellite, the direction of the wave normal relative to the Earth’s magnetic field as a function of frequency and of time. Due to the Cluster orbit, chorus emissions are often observed close to perigee, and the data analysis determines the direction of these waves. Three events observed during different levels of magnetic activity are reported. It is shown that the component of the Poynting vector parallel to the magnetic field changes its sense when the satellites cross the magnetic equator, which indicates that the chorus waves propagate away from the equator. Detailed analysis indicates that the source is located in close vicinity of the plane of the geomagnetic equator.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities; storms and substorms; Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities

  2. Emission Patterns of Solar Type III Radio Bursts: Stereoscopic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of solar type III radio bursts obtained by the STEREO A, B, and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies from different vantage points in the ecliptic plane are used to determine their directivity. The heliolongitudes of the sources of these bursts, estimated at different frequencies by assuming that they are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere, and the heliolongitudes of the spacecraft are used to estimate the viewing angle, which is the angle between the direction of the magnetic field at the source and the line connecting the source to the spacecraft. The normalized peak intensities at each spacecraft Rj = Ij /[Sigma]Ij (the subscript j corresponds to the spacecraft STEREO A, B, and WIND), which are defined as the directivity factors are determined using the time profiles of the type III bursts. It is shown that the distribution of the viewing angles divides the type III bursts into: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field with angular width of approximately 2 deg and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone with angular width spanning from [approx] -100 deg to approximately 100 deg. The plots of the directivity factors versus the viewing angles of the sources from all three spacecraft indicate that the type III emissions are very intense along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source, and steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. The comparison of these emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relatively weaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  3. Observations of Coastal IO Emissions on the Southern Hemisphere and Emission Potential of Different Seaweed Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbanski, Martin; Schmitt, Stefan; Frieß, Udo; Pöhler, Denis; Johnston, Paul; Kreher, Karin; Robinson, Andrew D.; Thomas, Alan; Harris, Neil R. P.; Platt, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    At coastal sites reactive iodine species emitted by seaweed in the intertidal zone during low tide are known to have an important influence on the atmospheric chemistry. However, many underlying mechanisms are presently not understood. Also coastal studies were focused on a few locations on the northern hemisphere and their predominant seaweed species laminaria digitata and ascophyllum nodosum. Therefore the spatial emission and extent of the areas where halogen chemistry is of importance needs to be much better quantified. Especially in the mid latitudes of the southern hemisphere RHS measurements are very sparse. Here we report the first observations of coastal iodine monoxide (IO) in the southern hemisphere during the HALMA/MAORI campaign which was carried out in February to March 2013 on the east coast of New Zealand's South Island at Shag Point located north of Dunedin. To detect IO we used a mobile Open Light Path Cavity Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS) instrument and a stationary Long Path (LP)-DOAS Instrument, which was furthermore used to measure BrO, O3 and I2. The measurement path was positioned over the water and mainly measured air masses that only passes over submerged seaweed forests. With the CE-DOAS placed close to exposed seaweed patches (mainly Macrocystis Pyrifera) we were able to observe high IO mixing ratios of up to 50 ppt (2ppt detection limit). However, the LP-DOAS did not detect IO above the detection limit of 0.7 ppt. This is consistent with previous observations which found that seaweed only emits halogens when exposed to air. To further investigate the emission potential of the seaweed species we setup a Teflon chamber around the CE-DOAS and measured the emissions of five different species for several hours. Additionally the air in the chamber was probed by a compact gas chromatograph (?DIRAC) for measurements of halocarbons and a TEI Ozone monitor. We found very high IO mixing ratios of up to 500 ppt for four seaweed species which correlated with high levels of halocarbons (CH3I, CH2Br2, CH2BrI and CH2BrCl up to 100ppt, CHBr3 up to 600ppt). These results, the similarities and differences in the emission behavior and implications for atmospheric chemistry are discussed.

  4. Analysis and Modeling of Jovian Radio Emissions Observed by Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menietti, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    Our studies of Jovian radio emission have resulted in the publication of five papers in refereed journals, with three additional papers in progress. The topics of these papers include the study of narrow-band kilometric radio emission; the apparent control of radio emission by Callisto; quasi-periodic radio emission; hectometric attenuation lanes and their relationship to Io volcanic activity; and modeling of HOM attenuation lanes using ray tracing. A further study of the control of radio emission by Jovian satellites is currently in progress. Abstracts of each of these papers are contained in the Appendix. A list of the publication titles are also included.

  5. Reconciling reported and unreported HFC emissions with atmospheric observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, Mark F; Rigby, Matthew; Ganesan, Anita L; Manning, Alistair J; Prinn, Ronald G; O'Doherty, Simon; Mühle, Jens; Harth, Christina M; Salameh, Peter K; Arnold, Tim; Weiss, Ray F; Saito, Takuya; Yokouchi, Yoko; Krummel, Paul B; Steele, L Paul; Fraser, Paul J; Li, Shanlan; Park, Sunyoung; Reimann, Stefan; Vollmer, Martin K; Lunder, Chris; Hermansen, Ove; Schmidbauer, Norbert; Maione, Michela; Arduini, Jgor; Young, Dickon; Simmonds, Peter G

    2015-05-12

    We infer global and regional emissions of five of the most abundant hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) using atmospheric measurements from the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment and the National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan, networks. We find that the total CO2-equivalent emissions of the five HFCs from countries that are required to provide detailed, annual reports to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) increased from 198 (175-221) Tg-CO2-eq ? y(-1) in 2007 to 275 (246-304) Tg-CO2-eq ? y(-1) in 2012. These global warming potential-weighted aggregated emissions agree well with those reported to the UNFCCC throughout this period and indicate that the gap between reported emissions and global HFC emissions derived from atmospheric trends is almost entirely due to emissions from nonreporting countries. However, our measurement-based estimates of individual HFC species suggest that emissions, from reporting countries, of the most abundant HFC, HFC-134a, were only 79% (63-95%) of the UNFCCC inventory total, while other HFC emissions were significantly greater than the reported values. These results suggest that there are inaccuracies in the reporting methods for individual HFCs, which appear to cancel when aggregated together. PMID:25918401

  6. On the numerical modelling of VLF chorus dynamical spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Nunn, D.; O. Santolik; M. Rycroft; V. Trakhtengerts

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the use of a one-dimensional Vlasov Hybrid Simulation (VHS) computer code to simulate the dynamical spectra (i.e. frequency versus time spectrograms) of ELF/VLF chorus signals (from ~a fraction to ~10 kHz). Recently excellent measurements of chorus have been made in the source region close to the geomagnetic equator aboard the four spacecraft Cluster mission. Using Cluster data for wave amplitude, which is up to 300 pT, local gyrofrequency, cold plasma density, ...

  7. Fast emission estimates in China and South Africa constrained by satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijling, Bas; van der A, Ronald

    2013-04-01

    Emission inventories of air pollutants are crucial information for policy makers and form important input data for air quality models. Unfortunately, bottom-up emission inventories, compiled from large quantities of statistical data, are easily outdated for emerging economies such as China and South Africa, where rapid economic growth change emissions accordingly. Alternatively, top-down emission estimates from satellite observations of air constituents have important advantages of being spatial consistent, having high temporal resolution, and enabling emission updates shortly after the satellite data become available. However, constraining emissions from observations of concentrations is computationally challenging. Within the GlobEmission project (part of the Data User Element programme of ESA) a new algorithm has been developed, specifically designed for fast daily emission estimates of short-lived atmospheric species on a mesoscopic scale (0.25 × 0.25 degree) from satellite observations of column concentrations. The algorithm needs only one forward model run from a chemical transport model to calculate the sensitivity of concentration to emission, using trajectory analysis to account for transport away from the source. By using a Kalman filter in the inverse step, optimal use of the a priori knowledge and the newly observed data is made. We apply the algorithm for NOx emission estimates in East China and South Africa, using the CHIMERE chemical transport model together with tropospheric NO2 column retrievals of the OMI and GOME-2 satellite instruments. The observations are used to construct a monthly emission time series, which reveal important emission trends such as the emission reduction measures during the Beijing Olympic Games, and the impact and recovery from the global economic crisis. The algorithm is also able to detect emerging sources (e.g. new power plants) and improve emission information for areas where proxy data are not or badly known (e.g. shipping emissions). The new emission inventories result in a better agreement between observations and simulations of air pollutant concentrations, facilitating improved air quality forecasts.

  8. Can the envisaged reductions of fossil fuel CO2 emissions be detected by atmospheric observations?

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Ingeborg; Rödenbeck, Christian

    2007-01-01

    The lower troposphere is an excellent receptacle, which integrates anthropogenic greenhouse gases emissions over large areas. Therefore, atmospheric concentration observations over populated regions would provide the ultimate proof if sustained emissions changes have occurred. The most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO2), also shows large natural concentration variations, which need to be disentangled from anthropogenic signals to assess changes in associated emission...

  9. Motorcycles, mopeds: polluting emissions and energy consumption. Initial observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbusse, St.

    2001-05-01

    The present French fleet of two-wheel vehicles is very heterogeneous (2- and 4-stroke engines with cubic capacity from 50 cm{sup 3} to 1300 cm{sup 3} and automatic or manual transmissions) and generally lacking in any anti-pollution system, which leads to high emission levels of carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons. Mopeds have high emission levels compared to those of 4-wheel vehicles, which have decreased markedly since 1970. The following chart of limit values confirms that the gap between these two vehicle categories in polluting emissions has increased in just a few years. The implementation of more restrictive regulations about pollution emissions was delayed for a long time because of cumulative technological delays in comparison to private vehicles. But in the end a European directive differentiating two kinds of two-wheel vehicles: mopeds and motorcycles was voted in 1997 (no. 97/24). There are two stages (in 1999 and 2002 respectively) for lowering emissions levels for mopeds (engine size smaller than 50 cm{sup 3}). For motorcycles a single stage was set for 1999, with a second stage still under consideration. Given the high stakes in terms of decreased pollution emission rom the necessary technological leap for the shift from outmoded carburetor engines to more refined technology (injection + post-treatment) under ADEME's guidance, the issue of exhaust-pollution reduction of two-wheel vehicles was included in both the PRIMEQUAL programme, 'Automobile Pollution Emissions' and the PREDIT call for proposals, 'Cycle Fuel Engine Pollution Reduction' in 1999. Several projects of varying technical natures (evaluations of existing engines and technological studies of new solutions in engines and exhaust pollution reduction) have been implemented in partnership with specialist research laboratories (such as the IFP) and manufacturers and outfitters in the sector (Sagem, Arvin Exhaust, Peugeot Motorcycles). Moreover, as the principle for automobile air-conditioning had been retained, ADEME initiated a campaign for evaluating exhaust emissions and consumption by two-wheel vehicles in laboratory tests. This campaign makes it possible to obtain a 'photo' of present two-wheel emissions and consumption and to better gauge the stakes associated to the evolution of this category of vehicle. The goal of this present document is to establish the state of the art of what actually exists concerning the fleet and the levels of pollutant emissions through the findings of this testing campaign. (author)

  10. Diffuse X-ray Emission from the Carina Nebula Observed with Suzaku

    OpenAIRE

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; team, the Suzaku Eta Carinae; team, the Carinae D-1

    2007-01-01

    A number of giant HII regions are associated with soft diffuse X-ray emission. Among these, the Carina nebula possesses the brightest soft diffuse emission. The required plasma temperature and thermal energy can be produced by collisions or termination of fast winds from main-sequence or embedded young O stars, but the extended emission is often observed from regions apart from massive stellar clusters. The origin of the X-ray emission is unknown. The XIS CCD camera onboar...

  11. Detection of exomoons through observation of radio emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyola, J. P.; Satyal, S.; Musielak, Z. E., E-mail: joaquin.noyola@mavs.uta.edu, E-mail: ssatyal@uta.edu, E-mail: zmusielak@uta.edu [The Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    In the Jupiter-Io system, the moon's motion produces currents along the field lines that connect it to Jupiter's polar regions. The currents generate and modulate radio emissions along their paths via the electron-cyclotron maser instability. Based on this process, we suggest that such modulation of planetary radio emissions may reveal the presence of exomoons around giant planets in exoplanetary systems. A model explaining the modulation mechanism in the Jupiter-Io system is extrapolated and used to define criteria for exomoon detectability. A cautiously optimistic scenario of the possible detection of such exomoons around Epsilon Eridani b and Gliese 876 b is provided.

  12. Methane emissions from Alaska in 2012 from CARVE airborne observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Rachel Y-W; Miller, Charles E; Dinardo, Steven J; Karion, Anna; Sweeney, Colm; Daube, Bruce C; Henderson, John M; Mountain, Marikate E; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Miller, John B; Bruhwiler, Lori M P; Wofsy, Steven C

    2014-11-25

    We determined methane (CH4) emissions from Alaska using airborne measurements from the Carbon Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE). Atmospheric sampling was conducted between May and September 2012 and analyzed using a customized version of the polar weather research and forecast model linked to a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (stochastic time-inverted Lagrangian transport model). We estimated growing season CH4 fluxes of 8 ± 2 mg CH4?m(-2)?d(-1) averaged over all of Alaska, corresponding to fluxes from wetlands of 56(-13)(+22) mg CH4?m(-2)?d(-1) if we assumed that wetlands are the only source from the land surface (all uncertainties are 95% confidence intervals from a bootstrapping analysis). Fluxes roughly doubled from May to July, then decreased gradually in August and September. Integrated emissions totaled 2.1 ± 0.5 Tg CH4 for Alaska from May to September 2012, close to the average (2.3; a range of 0.7 to 6 Tg CH4) predicted by various land surface models and inversion analyses for the growing season. Methane emissions from boreal Alaska were larger than from the North Slope; the monthly regional flux estimates showed no evidence of enhanced emissions during early spring or late fall, although these bursts may be more localized in time and space than can be detected by our analysis. These results provide an important baseline to which future studies can be compared. PMID:25385648

  13. Satellite observations indicate substantial spatiotemporal variability in biomass burning NOx emission factors for South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Castellanos

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning is an important contributor to global total emissions of NOx (NO + NO2. Generally bottom-up fire emissions models calculate NOx emissions by multiplying fuel consumption estimates with static biome specific emission factors, defined in units of grams of NO per kilogram of dry matter consumed. Emission factors are a significant source of uncertainty in bottom-up fire emissions modeling because relatively few observations are available to characterize the large spatial and temporal variability of burning conditions. In this paper we use NO2 tropospheric column observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI from the year 2005 over South America to calculate monthly NOx emission factors for four fire types: deforestation, savanna/grassland, woodland, and agricultural waste burning. In general, the spatial trends in NOx emission factors calculated in this work are consistent with emission factors derived from in situ measurements from the region, but are more variable than published biome specific global average emission factors widely used in bottom up fire emissions inventories such as the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED v3. Satellite based NOx emission factors also indicate substantial temporal variability in burning conditions. Overall, we found that deforestation fires have the lowest NOx emission factors, on average 30 % lower than the emission factors used in GFED v3. Agricultural fire NOx emission factors were the highest, on average a factor of 2 higher than GFED v3 values. For savanna, woodland, and deforestation fires early dry season NOx emission factors were a factor of ~1.5–2.0 higher than late dry season emission factors. A minimum in the NOx emission factor seasonal cycle for deforestation fires occurred in August, the time period of severe drought in South America in 2005. Our results support the hypothesis that prolonged dry spells may lead to an increase in the contribution of smoldering combustion from large diameter fuels to total fire emissions, which would lower the overall modified combustion efficiency (MCE and NOx emission factor, and offset the higher combustion efficiency of dryer fine fuels. We evaluated the OMI derived NOx emission factors with SCIAMACHY NO2 tropospheric column observations and found improved model performance in regions dominated by fire emissions.

  14. The properties of ULF/VLF signals generated by the SURA facility without ionospheric currents modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotik, D. S.; Raybov, A. V.; Ermakova, E. N.

    2012-12-01

    During the last three years the comprehensive study of ionospheric generation of the artificial signals in ULF/VLF band was carried out at SURA facility. This research was stimulated by successive HAARP experiments on detection the low frequency signals genreated due the action of the ponderomotive forces. Two experimental campaigns under different ionospheric, geomagnetic and facility operation mode conditions was undertaken every year from 2010 to 2012. Here we are summarizing the main features of the artificial ULF/VLF signals observed in vicinity the SURA site. The signals in the 2-20 Hz band were observed in the small area around the facility with the radius approximately 15 km. It was not signal detection at the 30 km distance. The maximum of the amplitude was detected in the nearest receiving point about 3 km away from the transmitting array. The amplitude increased about 3 times when the beam was inclined on16 degrees to the south so the footprint of the geomagnetic field line comes close to the point of observation. The ULF signals increased slightly when the SURA operating frequency overlaps the critical foF2 frequency. As a rule the daytime signals are smaller then nighttime one. No any correlation was observed with geomagnetic disturbances. The time delay of the ionospheric ULF signals measured by phase method was estimated as 300-400 ms. Polarization of the ULF signals has a pronounced elliptical character. Sometimes it was linear. The part of measurements in June 2012 was coincide with magnetic storm (June 16-18, Kp=6). It was observed broadening of the signal line at frequencies of 11 and 17 Hz up to 0.2 Hz at the recovery stage of the storm at June 18 (see the figure). This fact can be interpreted as the result of the signal interaction with the radiation belt protons appeared over there during the storm time. In 2012 campaigns it was firstly observed at SURA signals on frequencies of several kilohertz at nightime which could not be explained by traditional mechanism of ionospheric current modulation. Also this signals displayed unusual behavior during the magnetic storm deceasing in the amplitude. The work was supported by RFBR grants 11-02-00419, 11-02-97104 and RF Ministry of education and science by state contract 16.518.11.7066.;

  15. A study of the behavior of the terminator time shifts using multiple VLF propagation paths during the Pakistan earthquake (M = 7.2 of 18 January 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ray

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available On 18 January 2011, at 20:23 UTC, an earthquake of magnitude 7.2 occurred in southwestern Pakistan (latitude 28°44' N, longitude 63°56' E at a depth of 68 km. We present the results of the analysis of very low frequency (VLF radio signals, received at three stations located in India. We analyze the VLF signals around this earthquake day and look for possible precursory effects of this earthquake. For our analysis, we use four different VLF propagation paths. These propagation paths are DHO–IERC (Sitapur, VTX–Pune, VTX–ICSP (Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata and NWC–IERC. We observed significant shifts of the "sunrise terminator time" (SRT for DHO–IERC and VTX–Pune paths. For DHO–IERC path, the SRT of the VLF signals shifted towards nighttime three days before the earthquake day, and in the case of VTX–Pune path it shifted towards nighttime just one day before the earthquake day. For VTX–Kolkata path, the shift of SRT is four days before the earthquake day, but here the shift is not so strong, somewhere between 2? and 3? lines. For the other two paths, namely, DHO–IERC and VTX–Pune, the terminator time shifts crossed the 3? line. We found no significant shifts of SRT for NWC–IERC propagation path. Higher deviation in the VTX–Pune path as compared to VTX–ICSP path could be due to the proximity of the former to the epicenter. Similarly, DHO–IERC path is over the epicenter while NWC–IERC path is totally away from the epicenter. This could be the reason why the effect in DHO–IERC path is stronger than that in NWC–IERC path.

  16. Substorm-related VLF chorus events: local-time dependence and relationship to newly-injected clouds of drifting energetic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VLF chorus is a naturally occurring, electromagnetic wave phenomenon that is generated in the earth's magnetosphere during interactions between VLF waves and energetic electrons. The macrostructure of a 9-day period of VLF ground station data, recorded at two Antarctic stations, Halley Bay and Siple, has been studied using compressed time-scale spectrograms. A magnetically quiet period was chosen for analysis, within which isolated substorms occurred. It has been found that chorus frequently occurs in events, the most characteristic feature of which is an initial rise in the upper cut-off frequency of the chorus band. The events are typically observed in the midnight to 16:00 MLT sector. They are correlated with disturbances of about 100 to 750 gammas in the AE magnetic activity index, or substorms, and with energetic electron flux enhancements measured by ATS 6 at geosynchronous orbit. In addition, parameters scaled from the upper and lower cut-off frequency variations of the events have a local-time dependence. During substorms, satellites consistently encounter clouds of energetic electrons that have been injected into the nightside outer radiation zone. It is believed that the time-developing characteristics, and local-time dependencies of the chorus events are a reflection of the time-developing characteristics of clouds of energetic electrons that have recently been injected during substorms. Two interpretations of the chorus events have been investigated based on this theory

  17. Observation of increases in emission from modern vehicles over time in Hong Kong using remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study on-road gaseous emissions of vehicles are investigated using remote sensing measurements collected over three different periods. The results show that a high percentage of gaseous pollutants were emitted from a small percentage of vehicles. Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) vehicles generally have higher gaseous emissions compared to other vehicles, particularly among higher-emitting vehicles. Vehicles with high vehicle specific power (VSP) tend to have lower CO and HC emissions while petrol and LPG vehicles tend to have higher NO emissions when engine load is high. It can be observed that gaseous emission factors of petrol and LPG vehicles increase greatly within 2 years of being introduced to the vehicle fleet, suggesting that engine and catalyst performance deteriorate rapidly. It can be observed that LPG vehicles have higher levels of gaseous emissions than petrol vehicles, suggesting that proper maintenance of LPG vehicles is essential in reducing gaseous emissions from vehicles. - Highlights: ? Emissions collected in 3 different periods to examine changes in emission over time. ? LPG vehicles generally emit more gaseous pollutants compared to other vehicles. ? Large increase in emissions from modern petrol/LPG vehicles after 2 years' operation. ? CO and NO emissions of modern diesel vehicles are similar to those of older vehicles. - Remote sensing measurements show large increases in gaseous emissions from vehicles in Hong Kong after 2 years of operation, indicating that engine and catalyst performance deteriorate rapidly.

  18. Solar flares detected by the new narrowband VLF receiver at SANAE IV

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Hanna, Dahlgren; Torbjörn, Sundberg; Andrew B., Collier; Etienne, Koen; Stephen, Meyer.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A narrowband receiver was installed at the SANAE IV base in Antarctica to monitor specific very low frequency (VLF) radio signals from transmitters around the world. VLF waves propagating through the Earth-Ionosphere Waveguide are excellent probes of the varying properties of the lower region of the [...] ionosphere. This paper describes the set-up of the narrowband system and demonstrates its capabilities with data from a set of solar flares on 08 February and 12 February 2010.

  19. Phosphorus Emissions from Fish Farms : Observed and Predicted Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Torbjörn

    2001-01-01

    During the last decades, fish farming has been a rapidly increasing industry in many European and North American countries. Sweden has a large potential for aquaculture, but there is also a strong concern about the effects on the environment that an increased aquaculture production may cause. This thesis focuses on the eutrophication effects of fish farming in lakes and in coastal areas of the Baltic Sea. Possible eutrophication effects related to marine fish farm emissions were found in smal...

  20. VLF-MT survey and geoelectrical soundings in Kaminokuni town, Hokkaido; Hokkaido Kaminokuni chiiki ni okeru denki tansa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, H.; Utsugi, M.; Nagumo, H.; Sasatani, T.; Nishida, Y. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1996-03-25

    For the quantitative analysis of the seismography, observed at Kaminokuni Town and affected by the properties of sub-surface structures, covering the group of aftershocks of the 1993 Hokkaido-Nansei-Oki earthquake, the VLF-MT method and electric soundings were carried out for assessing the geological structure so as to collect basic datas. VLF-MT soundings were conducted at 37 spots, and electric soundings at 9 spots using the Schlumberger electrode arrangement. For the analysis of the structure, a primary horizontal multi-layer structure was presumed, and the direct method using the linear filter technique was applied. The obtained results were compiled, disclosing what is stated below. It was learned that the quaternary system had a run in the direction of the Amano-gawa river, and that a basin structure extending NNW-SSE with the deepest location near the shore line was found. On the other hand, although the new tertiary system was but partially analyzed, yet horizontally curved basin structures were estimated to exist in Tate, Esashi, and Oanzaigawa layers, all positioned in the upper part of the new tertiary system. 11 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Electromagnetic emissions detected in the topside ionosphere related to the human activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothkaehl, H.; Parrot, M.

    2005-05-01

    The Earth ionosphere undergoes various man-made influences. The electromagnetic emissions in the topside ionosphere have been investigated ever since first satellites were located on the orbits. Despite the fact that the analysis of properties of Earth electromagnetic environment has had a long history, the topics related to the electromagnetic pollutions are still not sufficiently reported. The development of new telecommunication technologies and the increased level of electromagnetic noises from VLF to microwave frequency range in the Earth environment should focus our investigations on that problem. The RF measurements can be used to diagnose the different electron plasma waves, the local electron densities as well as the maximum F2 layer electron densities. The HF diagnostics performed on the low orbiting satellite detected the enhancement of radiation, particularly over the Euro-Asia region. Thus over the Euro-Asia area enhancements of background radiation were detected in the whole frequency band, which is connected with natural plasma radiation, and for frequencies greater than the plasma frequency at maximum F2 layer, triggered by artificial ground-based origin noises. Electromagnetic waves permanently pumped to the ionosphere by the system of broadcasting stations can disturb the nearest space environment. The observed broadband emissions are a superposition of natural plasma emissions and man-made noises. The aim of this paper is to discuss the morphological properties and origins of the observed HF and VLF wave activity generated by human activity, detected at the low orbiting satellite CORONAS- I and AUREOL-3.

  2. On the effectiveness of the vlf-em method For ground water prospecting in the Basement terrains, Sinai, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Shendi, El-Arabi Hendi [??????? ???? ????

    1997-01-01

    The VLF-EM method is proved to be an effective, fast and inexpensive tool for ground water prospecting in the basement terrains of Southern Sinai. The resistive shallow alluvial deposits increase the penetration depth of the received VLF waves to as deep as 40 meters which is very reasonable to detect the water bearing alluvium in the studied areas. The measured horizontal and vertical components of the resultant VLF-EM field were used to calculate the apparent resistivities of the conductive...

  3. Turbulence of electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves observed by Ogo 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya, H.

    1972-01-01

    Analysis of VLF emissions that have been observed near 3/2, 5/2, and 7/2 f sub H by Ogo 5 in the magnetosphere (f sub H is the electron cyclotron frequency) in the light of the mechanism used for the diffuse plasma resonance f sub Dn observed by Alouette 2 and Isis 1. The VLF emission is considered to be generated by nonlinear coupling mechanisms in certain portions of the observation as the f sub Dn is enhanced by its association with nonlinear wave-particle interaction of the electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic wave, including the instability due to the nonlinear inverse Landau damping mechanism in the turbulence. The difference between the two observations is in the excitation mechanism of the turbulence; the turbulence in the plasma trough detected by Ogo 5 is due to natural origins, whereas the ionospheric topside sounder makes the plasma wave turbulence artificially by submitting strong stimulation pulses. Electron density values in the plasma trough are deduced by applying the f sub Dn-f sub N/f sub H relationship obtained from the Alouette 2 experiment as well as by applying the condition for the wave-particle nonlinear interactions. The electron density values reveal good agreement with the ion density values observed simultaneously by the highly sensitive ion mass spectrometer.

  4. Regional nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia observed from space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mijling

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to changing economic activity, emissions of air pollutants in East Asia change rapidly in space and time. Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides derived from satellite observations provide valuable insight in the evolution of anthropogenic activity on a regional scale. We present the first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emissions of short-lived atmospheric constituents on a~mesoscopic scale (~ 0.25° × 0.25°. The algorithm is used to construct a monthly NOx emission time series for 2007–2011 from tropospheric NO2 observations of GOME-2 for East Chinese provinces and surrounding countries. The new emission estimates correspond well with the bottom-up inventory of EDGAR v4.2, but are smaller than the inventories of INTEX-B and MEIC. They reveal a strong positive trend during 2007–2011 for almost all Chinese provinces, related to the country's economic development. We find a 41% increment of NOx emissions in East China during this period, which shows the need to update emission inventories in this region on a regular basis. Negative emission trends are found in Japan and South Korea, which can be attributed to a combined effect of local environmental policy and global economic crises. Analysis of seasonal variation distinguishes between regions with dominant anthropogenic or biogenic emissions. For regions with a mixed anthropogenic and biogenic signature, the opposite seasonality can be used for an estimation of the separate emission contributions. Finally, the non-local concentration/emission relationships calculated by the algorithm are used to quantify the direct effect of regional NOx emissions on tropospheric NO2 concentrations outside the region. For regions such as North Korea and Beijing province, a substantial part of the tropospheric NO2 originates from emissions elsewhere.

  5. Regional nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia observed from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijling, B.; van der A, R. J.; Zhang, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Due to changing economic activity, emissions of air pollutants in East Asia are changing rapidly in space and time. Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides derived from satellite observations provide valuable insight into the evolution of anthropogenic activity on a regional scale. We present the first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emissions of short-lived atmospheric constituents on a mesoscopic scale (~ 0.25° × 0.25°). The algorithm is used to construct a monthly NOx emission time series for the period 2007-2011 from tropospheric NO2 observations of GOME-2 for East Chinese provinces and surrounding countries. The new emission estimates correspond well with the bottom-up inventory of EDGAR v4.2, but are smaller than the inventories of INTEX-B and MEIC. They reveal a strong positive trend during 2007-2011 for almost all Chinese provinces, related to the country's economic development. We find a 41% increment of NOx emissions in East China during this period, which shows the need to update emission inventories in this region on a regular basis. Negative emission trends are found in Japan and South Korea, which can be attributed to a combined effect of local environmental policy and global economic crises. Analysis of seasonal variation distinguishes between regions with dominant anthropogenic or biogenic emissions. For regions with a mixed anthropogenic and biogenic signature, the opposite seasonality can be used for an estimation of the separate emission contributions. Finally, the non-local concentration/emission relationships calculated by the algorithm are used to quantify the direct effect of regional NOx emissions on tropospheric NO2 concentrations outside the region. For regions such as North Korea and the Beijing municipality, a substantial part of the tropospheric NO2 originates from emissions elsewhere.

  6. Adjoint inversion modeling of Asian dust emission using lidar observations

    OpenAIRE

    K. Yumimoto; Uno, I; Sugimoto, N; Shimizu, A.; Liu, Z.; Winker, D. M.

    2008-01-01

    A four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation system for a regional dust model (RAMS/CFORS-4DVAR; RC4) is applied to an adjoint inversion of a heavy dust event over eastern Asia during 20 March–4 April 2007. The vertical profiles of the dust extinction coefficients derived from NIES Lidar network are directly assimilated, with validation using observation data. Two experiments assess impacts of observation site selection: Experiment A uses five Japanese observation sites...

  7. The impact of PMSE and NLC particles on VLF propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nunn

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available PMSE or Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes are a well-known phenomenon in the summer northern polar regions, in which anomalous VHF/UHF radar echoes are returned from heights ~85km. Noctilucent clouds and electron density biteouts are two phenomena that sometimes occur together with PMSE. Electron density biteouts are electron density depletion layers of up to 90%, which may be several kms thick. Using the NOSC Modefndr code based on Wait's modal theory for subionospheric propagation, we calculate the shifts in received VLF amplitude and phase that occur as a result of electron density biteouts. The code assumes a homogeneous background ionosphere and a homogeneous biteout layer along the Great Circle Path (GCP corridor, for transmitter receiver path lengths in the range of 500–6000km.

    For profiles during the 10h about midnight and under quiet geomagnetic conditions, where the electron density at 85km would normally be less than 500el/cc, it was found that received signal perturbations were significant, of the order of 1–4dB and 5–40° of phase. Perturbation amplitudes increase roughly as the square root of frequency. At short range perturbations are rather erratic, but more consistent at large ranges, readily interpretable in terms of the shifts in excitation factor, attenuation factor and v/c ratios for Wait's modes. Under these conditions such shifts should be detectable by a well constituted experiment involving multiple paths and multiple frequencies in the north polar region in summer. It is anticipated that VLF propagation could be a valuable diagnostic for biteout/PMSE when electron density at 85km is under 500el/cc, under which circumstances PMSE are not directly detectable by VHF/UHF radars.

    Key words. Electromagnetism (wave propagation – Ionosphere (polar ionosphere – Radioscience (ionospheric propagation

  8. Laser excitation of clusters: observables from electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We give a brief review of the theoretical description of photo-electron spectra (PES) and photo-angular distributions (PAD) and discuss a few selected, typical results. The description is based on time-dependent density-functional theory at the level of the local-density approximation augmented by a self-interaction correction which is crucial for a quantitative assessment of emission processes. Coordinate-space grids are used together with absorbing boundary conditions. We discuss the basic features and trends of PES and PAD for two typical test cases, the clusters Na8 and C60.

  9. Sawtooth-like X-ray emission observed in EBIT

    OpenAIRE

    Radtke, R; Biedermann, C; Bachmann, P

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of a mixture of highly charged Ar and Ba ions was measured in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) by recording the characteristic X-ray emission from trapped ions. A special feature in the spectra are sawtooth-like intensity variations caused by a periodic collapse of the ion inventory in the trap. The effect requires favorable conditions to become present and is very sensitive to the trapping conditions. Analysis of the measurements is based on a time-dependent calculation of the ...

  10. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    OpenAIRE

    M. Zavala; Lei, W; Molina, M.J.; Molina, L.T.

    2008-01-01

    The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies and improvements in fuel quality, among others. Along with these changes, concurrent non-linear changes in photochemical levels and criteria pollutants have been observed, providing a unique opportunity to understand the effects of perturbations of mobile emission levels on...

  11. The National Emissions Inventory Significantly Overestimates NOx Emissions: Analysis of CMAQ and in situ observations from DISCOVER-AQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. C.; Dickerson, R. R.; Loughner, C.

    2013-12-01

    NOx and CO not only adversely impact human health, but they, along with associated VOCs, are also important precursors for O3 formation. While ambient NOx and CO concentrations have decreased dramatically over the past 10-20 years, O3 has remained a more recalcitrant problem, particularly in the Baltimore/Washington region. Reduction of O3 production requires that emissions inventories, such as the National Emissions Inventory (NEI), accurately capture total emissions of CO and NOx while also correctly apportioning them among different sectors. Previous evaluations of the NEI paint different pictures of its accuracy, with assertions that it overestimates either one or both of CO and NOx from anywhere between 25 percent to a factor of 2. These conflicting claims warrant further investigation. In this study, measurements of NOx and CO taken aboard the NOAA P3B airplane during the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ field campaign were used to determine the NOx/CO emissions ratio at 6 locations in the Washington/Baltimore region. An average molar emissions ratio of 12.8 × 1.2 CO/NOx was found by calculating the change in CO over the change in NOx from vertical concentration profiles in the planetary boundary layer. Ratios showed little variation with location. Observed values were approximately a factor of 1.35 - 1.75 times greater than that predicted by the annual, countywide emissions ratio from the 2008 NEI. When compared to a temporalized, gridded version of the inventory processed by SMOKE, ratio observations were greater than that predicted by inventories by up to a factor of 2. Comparison of the in situ measurements and remotely sensed observations from MOPITT of CO to the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model agree within 10-35 percent, with the model higher on average. Measurements of NOy by two separate analytical techniques, on the other hand, show that CMAQ consistently and significantly overestimates NOy concentrations. Combined with the CO observations, this indicates that the NEI overestimates NOx emissions by approximately a factor of 2. Comparison of the temporalized NEI to continuous monitoring of NOx emissions from point sources shows that, on average, agreement between observations and the NEI were within 5 percent. In a region where the NEI estimates on-road emissions can account for 50-75 percent of total NOx, the most likely source of error in the NOx inventory is in the on-road sector. Assumptions about the lifetime and efficacy of catalytic converters in the MOVES model should be investigated as a possible source of this error.

  12. Cassini VIMS observations of H3+ emission on the nightside of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallard, Tom S.; Melin, Henrik; Miller, Steve; Badman, Sarah V.; Baines, Kevin H.; Brown, Robert H.; Blake, James S. D.; O'Donoghue, James; Johnson, Rosie E.; Bools, Bethany; Pilkington, Nathan M.; East, Oliver T. L.; Fletcher, Mark

    2015-08-01

    We present the first detailed analysis of H3+ nightside emission from Jupiter, using Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) data from the Cassini flyby in 2000-2001, producing the first Jovian maps of nightside H3+ emission, temperature, and column density. Using these, we identify and characterize regions of H3+ nightside emission, compared against past observations of H3+ emission on the dayside. We focus our investigation on the region previously described as "mid-to-low latitude emission," the source for which has been controversial. We find that the brightest of this emission is generated at Jovigraphic latitudes similar to the most equatorward extent of the main auroral emission but concentrated at longitudes eastward of this emission. The emission is produced by enhanced H3+ density, with temperatures dropping away in this region. This emission has a loose association with the predicted location of diffuse aurora produced by pitch angle scattering in the north, but not in the south. This emission also lays in the path of subrotating winds flowing from the aurora, suggesting a transport origin. Some differences are seen between dayside and nightside subauroral emissions, with dayside emission extending more equatorward, perhaps caused by the lack of sunlight ionization on the nightside, and unmeasured changes in temperature. Ionospheric temperatures are hotter in the polar region (~1100-1500 K), dropping away toward the equator (as low as 750 K), broadly similar to values on the dayside, highlighting the dominance of auroral effects in the polar region. No equatorial emission is observed, suggesting that very little particle precipitation occurs away from the polar regions.

  13. The challenge of estimating regional trace gas emissions from atmospheric observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Alistair J

    2011-05-28

    This paper discusses some of the major issues that surround estimating regional emissions of trace gases from atmospheric observations through inversion modelling. Inversion methods use modelled knowledge of how emissions dilute in the atmosphere as they travel from their source to an observation point, together with the observations, to calculate a grid of emissions. The problem is one of minimizing the mismatch between a modelled and observed time series of concentration. There are many methods of comparing time series, some involving a priori knowledge others without. The location, terrain and height of the observation station can also be very significant in determining how well a model can represent the dilution from emission source to receptor. The inversion solution (emission map) will assign some of the sources incorrectly for a variety of reasons, e.g. local sources, intermittent releases, errors in the modelled transport or observation, and the choice of the spatial and temporal resolution of the emission map. The reasons for uncertainty in the modelled emissions are discussed along with suggestions as to how some of these can be minimized. Using multiple stations to further constrain the inversion should reduce the uncertainty; however, care is needed if the potential improvements are to be realized. PMID:21502168

  14. Inverse modeling of European CH4 emissions: sensitivity to the observational network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, M. G.; Bergamaschi, P.; Krol, M.; Meirink, J. F.; Dentener, F.

    2010-02-01

    Inverse modeling is widely employed to provide "top-down" emission estimates using atmospheric measurements. Here, we analyze the dependence of derived CH4 emissions on the sampling frequency and density of the observational surface network, using the TM5-4DVAR inverse modeling system and synthetic observations. This sensitivity study focuses on Europe. The synthetic observations are created by TM5 forward model simulations. The inversions of these synthetic observations are performed using virtually no knowledge on the a priori spatial and temporal distribution of emissions, i.e. the emissions are derived mainly from the atmospheric signal detected by the measurement network. Using the European network of stations for which continuous or weekly flask measurements are available for 2001, the synthetic experiments can retrieve the "true" annual total emissions for single countries such as France within 20%, and for all North West European countries together within ~5%. However, larger deviations are obtained for South and East European countries due to the scarcity of stations in the measurement network. Upgrading flask sites to stations with continuous measurements leads to an improvement for central Europe in emission estimates. For realistic emission estimates over the whole European domain, however, a major extension of the number of stations in the existing network is required. We demonstrate the potential of an extended network of a total of ~60 European stations to provide realistic emission estimates over the whole European domain.

  15. Observations of predicted cooperative shifts in optically pumped stimulated emissions in Xe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a recent study Garrett showed that stimulated emissions can be suppressed and shifted under the influence of a wave-mixing interference [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 4059 (1993)]. We observe the predicted pressure-dependent frequency shifts in optically pumped stimulated emissions from Xe

  16. Using the results of acoustic emission observations to study the structural characteristics of a solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, V. T.; Ryvkin, D. G.

    2015-09-01

    A quantitative physical model is proposed to describe acoustic emission processes. A technique is developed to reconstruct the structural characteristics of a material from its amplitude-frequency spectrum. Based on the obtained results, the experimental data are quantitatively interpreted using observations of acoustic emission signals during the destruction of a concrete sample.

  17. Coronal emission line profile observations at total solar eclipses. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution spectra of the coronal emission line Fe XIV at 530.3 nm obtained at the 30 May 1965 total solar eclipse are analyzed and interpreted. Deconvolution techniques that preserve the line intensity vs wavelength profile shape are developed to obtain further resolution improvement. The west limb coronal enhancement is determined to have temperatures less than 3 MK and turbulent velocities of approximately 25 kms-1 decreasing with altitude. Temperature gradients provide evidence for marginal solar wind flow from this enhancement. Above the quiet photosphere in the southwest quadrant the comparison of line and continuum intensities and consideration of line width suggest to us the coronal region is filled with inhomogeneous plasma, dense enough in localized regions to maintain collisional excitation. Solar wind flow from this region obtains when turbulent velocities are assumed to contribute to the line broadening. This region is identified as a coronal hole and it is suggested that coronal material is heated by the quiet photosphere below. (Auth.)

  18. Chorus, ECH, and Z mode emissions observed at Jupiter and Saturn and possible electron acceleration

    OpenAIRE

    Menietti, J. D.; Y. Y. Shprits; Horne, R. B.; E. E. Woodfield; G. B. Hospodarsky; Gurnett, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we compare and contrast chorus, electron cyclotron harmonics (ECH), and Z mode emissions observed at Jupiter and Saturn and relate them to recent work on electron acceleration at Earth. Intense chorus emissions are observed near the magnetic equator, the likely source region, but the strongest intensities are on either side of the magnetic equator. Chorus intensities at Jupiter are generally about an order of magnitude larger than at Saturn, and the bandwidth of chorus at Jupite...

  19. Radio and gamma-ray emissions from pulsars: possible observational tests

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, G. J .; Lee, K.J.; Wang, H. G.; Xu, R. X.; Zhang, B.

    2007-01-01

    Many models for the pulsar radio and $\\gamma$-ray emissions have been developed. The tests for these models using observational data are very important. Tests for the pulsar radio emission models using frequency-altitude relation are presented in this paper. In the radio band, the mean pulse profiles evolve with observing frequencies. There are various styles of pulsar profile - frequency evolutions (which we call as "beam evolution" figure), e.g. some pulsars show that mean...

  20. Top-down estimate of China's black carbon emissions using surface observations: Sensitivity to observation representativeness and transport model error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Wang, Yuxuan; Hao, Jiming; Kondo, Yutaka; Irwin, Martin; Munger, J. William; Zhao, Yongjing

    2013-06-01

    This study examines the sensitivity of "top-down" quantification of Chinese black carbon (BC) emissions to the temporal resolution of surface observations and to the transport model error associated with the grid resolution and wet deposition. At two rural sites (Miyun in North China Plain and Chongming in Yangtze River Delta), the model-inferred emission bias based on hourly BC observations can differ by up to 41% from that based on monthly mean observations. This difference relates to the intrinsic inability of the grid-based model in simulating high pollution plumes, which often exert a larger influence on the arithmetic mean of observations at monthly time steps. Adopting the variation of BC to carbon monoxide correlation slope with precipitation as a suitable measure to evaluate the model's wet deposition, we found that wet removal of BC in the model was too weak, due in part to the model's underestimation of large precipitation events. After filtering out the observations during high pollution plumes and large precipitation events for which the transport model error should not be translated into the emission error, the inferred emission bias changed from -11% (without filtering) to -2% (with filtering) at the Miyun site, and from -22% to +1% at the Chongming site. Using surface BC observations from three more rural sites (located in Northeast, Central, and Central South China, respectively) as constraints, our top-down estimate of total BC emissions over China was 1.80 ± 0.65 Tg/yr in 2006, 0.5% lower than the bottom-up inventory of Zhang et al. (2009) but with smaller uncertainty.

  1. Seasonal Variation of Methane Emissions in California's Urban and Rural Regions Using Multi-site Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S.; Hsu, Y.; Andrews, A. E.; Bianco, L.; Newman, S.; Cui, X.; Bagley, J.; Graven, H. D.; Salameh, P.; Sloop, C.; LaFranchi, B.; Michelsen, H. A.; Bambha, R.; Weiss, R. F.; Keeling, R. F.; Fischer, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    California's commitment (Assembly Bill 32) to reduce total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020 requires quantification of current GHG emissions. We present seasonal variation of California's total CH4 emissions for summer 2013 - spring 2014, using data from a dozen sites covering urban and rural areas of California that include South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB), Central Valley, and San Francisco Bay Area. We apply a Bayesian inverse model to estimate CH4 emissions from discrete regions of California and source sectors by combining atmospheric measurements, upstream background, updated high-resolution prior emission maps developed for California, and predicted atmospheric transport from WRF-STILT. We quantify site-specific model-measurement uncertainties due to transport using simulated and observed meteorology, background estimated from oceanic and aircraft observations, and the prior emissions. In particular, we evaluate predicted transport variables in WRF with networks of surface and upper air observations. Preliminary inversion results during summer of 2013 suggest that state total CH4 emissions are 1.2 - 1.7 times higher than the current CARB inventory. Here, we extend and improve upon earlier analyses to provide a full seasonal cycle of CH4 emissions across all major urban and rural regions in California.

  2. Observations and predictions of EUV emission from classical novae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical modeling of novae in outburst predicts that they should be active emitters of radiation both in the EUV and soft X-ray wavelengths twice during the outburst. The first time is very early in the outburst when only an all sky survey can detect them. This period lasts only a few hours. They again become bright EUV and soft X-ray emitters late in the outburst when the remnant object becomes very hot and is still luminous. The predictions imply both that a nova can remain very hot for months to years and that the peak temperature at this time strongly depends upon the mass of the white dwarf. It is important to observe novae at these late times because a measurement of both the flux and temperature can provide information about the mass of the white dwarf, the tun-off time scale, and the energy budget of the outburst. We review the existing observations of novae in late stages of their outburst and present some newly obtained data for GQ Mus 1983. We then provide results of new hydrodynamic simulations of novae in outburst and compare the predictions to the observations. 43 refs., 6 figs

  3. Long-term inverse modeling of Chinese CO emission from satellite observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumimoto, Keiya; Uno, Itsushi; Itahashi, Syuichi

    2014-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) emissions in China in 2005-2010 were estimated by inversion, using the Green's function method from vertical CO profiles derived from MOPITT Version 5 satellite data and a tagged CO simulation, and validated with independent in situ observations from the World Data Centre for Greenhouse Gases. Modeling with a posteriori emission successfully reproduced CO outflow from the continent to the East China Sea, Sea of Japan, and Japanese islands during winter and spring, and compensated for underestimates in central and eastern China in summer. A posteriori emissions showed large seasonal variations in which December and March emissions were on average 23% larger than August emissions, consistent with other studies. Estimated Chinese CO emissions were 184.4, 173.1, 184.6, 158.4, 157.4, and 157.3 Tg/year for 2005-2010, respectively. The decrease after 2007 is partly attributed to Chinese socioeconomic conditions and improved combustion efficiency. PMID:25113428

  4. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zavala

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies and improvements in fuel quality, among others. Along with these changes, concurrent non-linear changes in photochemical levels and criteria pollutants have been observed, providing a unique opportunity to understand the effects of perturbations of mobile emission levels on the photochemistry in the region using observational and modeling approaches. The observed historical trends of ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO and nitrogen oxides (NOx suggest that ozone production in the MCMA has changed from a low to a high VOC-sensitive regime over a period of 20 years. Comparison of the historical emission trends of CO, NOx and hydrocarbons derived from mobile-source emission studies in the MCMA from 1991 to 2006 with the trends of the concentrations of CO, NOx, and the CO/NOx ratio during peak traffic hours also indicates that fuel-based fleet average emission factors have significantly decreased for CO and VOCs during this period whereas NOx emission factors do not show any strong trend, effectively reducing the ambient VOC/NOx ratio.

    This study presents the results of model analyses on the sensitivity of the observed ozone levels to the estimated historical changes in its precursors. The model sensitivity analyses used a well-validated base case simulation of a high pollution episode in the MCMA with the mathematical Decoupled Direct Method (DDM and the standard Brute Force Method (BFM in the 3-D CAMx chemical transport model. The model reproduces adequately the observed historical trends and current photochemical levels. Comparison of the BFM and the DDM sensitivity techniques indicates that the model yields ozone values that increase linearly with NOx emission reductions and decrease linearly with VOC emission reductions only up to 30% from the base case. We further performed emissions perturbations from the gasoline fleet, diesel fleet, all mobile (gasoline plus diesel and all emission sources (anthropogenic plus biogenic. The results suggest that although large ozone reductions obtained in the past were from changes in emissions from gasoline vehicles, currently significant benefits could be achieved with additional emission control policies directed to regulation of VOC emissions from diesel and area sources that are high emitters of alkenes, aromatics and aldehydes.

  5. Modeled and observed ozone sensitivity to mobile-source emissions in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zavala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The emission characteristics of mobile sources in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA have changed significantly over the past few decades in response to emission control policies, advancements in vehicle technologies and improvements in fuel quality, among others. Along with these changes, concurrent non-linear changes in photochemical levels and criteria pollutants have been observed, providing a unique opportunity to understand the effects of perturbations of mobile emission levels on the photochemistry in the region using observational and modeling approaches. The observed historical trends of ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO and nitrogen oxides (NOx suggest that ozone production in the MCMA has changed from a low to a high VOC-sensitive regime over a period of 20 years. Comparison of the historical emission trends of CO, NOx and hydrocarbons derived from mobile-source emission studies in the MCMA from 1991 to 2006 with the trends of the concentrations of CO, NOx, and the CO/NOx ratio during peak traffic hours also indicates that fuel-based fleet average emission factors have significantly decreased for CO and VOCs during this period whereas NOx emission factors do not show any strong trend, effectively reducing the ambient VOC/NOx ratio.

    This study presents the results of model analyses on the sensitivity of the observed ozone levels to the estimated historical changes in its precursors. The model sensitivity analyses used a well-validated base case simulation of a high pollution episode in the MCMA with the mathematical Decoupled Direct Method (DDM and the standard Brute Force Method (BFM in the 3-D CAMx chemical transport model. The model reproduces adequately the observed historical trends and current photochemical levels. Comparison of the BFM and the DDM sensitivity techniques indicates that the model yields ozone values that increase linearly with NOx emission reductions and decrease linearly with VOC emission reductions only up to 30% from the base case. We further performed emissions perturbations from the gasoline fleet, diesel fleet, all mobile (gasoline plus diesel and all emission sources (anthropogenic plus biogenic. The results suggest that although large ozone reductions obtained in the past were from changes in emissions from gasoline vehicles, currently significant benefits could be achieved with additional emission control policies directed to regulation of VOC emissions from diesel and area sources that are high emitters of alkenes, aromatics and aldehydes.

  6. CARMA observations of Galactic cold cores: searching for spinning dust emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbs, C. T.; Paladini, R.; Cleary, K.; Muchovej, S. J. C.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Stevenson, M. A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Ysard, N.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rumsey, C.; Villadsen, J.

    2015-11-01

    We present the first search for spinning dust emission from a sample of 34 Galactic cold cores, performed using the CARMA interferometer. For each of our cores, we use photometric data from the Herschel Space Observatory to constrain bar{N}H, bar{T}d, bar{n}H, and bar{G}0. By computing the mass of the cores and comparing it to the Bonnor-Ebert mass, we determined that 29 of the 34 cores are gravitationally unstable and undergoing collapse. In fact, we found that six cores are associated with at least one young stellar object, suggestive of their protostellar nature. By investigating the physical conditions within each core, we can shed light on the cm emission revealed (or not) by our CARMA observations. Indeed, we find that only three of our cores have any significant detectable cm emission. Using a spinning dust model, we predict the expected level of spinning dust emission in each core and find that for all 34 cores, the predicted level of emission is larger than the observed cm emission constrained by the CARMA observations. Moreover, even in the cores for which we do detect cm emission, we cannot, at this stage, discriminate between free-free emission from young stellar objects and spinning dust emission. We emphasize that although the CARMA observations described in this analysis place important constraints on the presence of spinning dust in cold, dense environments, the source sample targeted by these observations is not statistically representative of the entire population of Galactic cores.

  7. Hydrogen line and continuum emission in young stellar objects. II - Theoretical results and observational constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Costa, Jose L.; Kwan, John

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical results for H I emission from YSOs are compared with available observations. IR line and radio continuum properties have been gathered for 29 objects that include a number of T Tau stars, several emission-line stars with IR excesses, and many heavily obscured luminous YSOs. The present excitation model can account for the observed Brackett line and radio continuum fluxes of YSOs with luminosities of 20-100,000 solar luminosities. It is argued that the observed Br-alpha line and 6-cm free-free continuum emissions are best explained in terms of a core-halo structure. The small core (ranging from r less than about 30 AU for a 10,000-solar luminosity YSO to r less than about 0.2 AU for a 10-solar luminosity YSO) is responsible for generating the strong IR line fluxes, while the surrounding diffuse halo dominates the 6-cm emission.

  8. Neutron emission observed from spent thermal reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scoping experiment to characterize the neutron field generated from a Light Water Reactor spent fuel assembly has been successfully completed. Solid State Track Recorder (SSTR) neutron dosimeters have been exposed at the surface of a spent fuel assembly from a Pressurized Water Reactor. Acceptable track densities were obtained. From these SSTR neutron dosimetry observations, an absolute neutron flux of roughly 8000 n/(cm2.sec) was obtained at the surface of the spent fuel assembly three years after discharge. The deduced neutron energy spectrum, with a mean neutron energy of roughly 1.3 MeV, is intimately dependent upon the actinide content of the spent fuel. Hence, the results of this preliminary experiment have demonstrated that, with suitable calibration, SSTR neutron dosimetry can be successfully applied for non-destructive spent fuel actinide assay and for characterization of the radiation environment associated with spent reactor fuel assemblies

  9. Observation of radio frequency emissions from electrochemical loading experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palladium foil cathodes were electrochemically loaded with deuterium from alkaline solutions of heavy water in specially designed closed calorimeter cells. Here, one cell is described that showed low levels of constant heat (1-7 mW) and radio frequency (RF) emanations, but the RF was not correlated with the heat production. This cell is compared with Pd90Rh10 alloy cathodes that showed excess energy bursts of 2.4-44.3 kJ. In these cells, RF coincident with the bursts was observed peaking at different frequencies from about 450 kHz and extending into the MHz range. Some of the excess energy production in LENR may be in the MHz RF range, which has no conventional explanation in electrochemistry. (author)

  10. Satellite observations indicate substantial spatiotemporal variability in biomass burning NOx emission factors for South America

    OpenAIRE

    Castellanos, P; Boersma, K. F.; Van Der Werf, G. R.

    2013-01-01

    Biomass burning is an important contributor to global total emissions of NOx (NO + NO2). Generally bottom-up fire emissions models calculate NOx emissions by multiplying fuel consumption estimates with static biome specific emission factors, defined in units of grams of NO per kilogram of dry matter consumed. Emission factors are a significant source of uncertainty in bottom-up fire emissions modeling because relatively few observations are available to characterize the large spatial and temp...

  11. Quasi-static ELF and VLF electric fields in the region of the main ionospheric trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, A.; Lehmann, H.-R.; Johanning, D.; Mikhailov, Iu.; Klimov, S.; Savin, S.

    1980-08-01

    The distribution of lower hybrid resonance noise and of quasi-static electric fields in the main middle-latitude trough of electron density is considered. It is shown that, as a rule, lower hybrid resonance noise occurs in the trough and that the lower cutoff frequency of the noise correlates well with electron density. Quasi-static electric fields having an average field intensity of 10-20 millivolts/m and more are registered in the bottom of the trough. The picture obtained turns out to be sufficiently regular. Observations of the trough made by the Intercosmos 10 satellite at 24-hour intervals confirm not only the similarity of the trough structure but also the similarity of the structure of the electromagnetic fields registered in the region of the trough. On the basis of the experimental data, hypotheses concerning the nature of the mechanism that ensures the correlation between the lower hybrid resonance noise and the electron density are discussed. These include noise excitation by epithermal proton fluxes and the reflection of VLF waves in the region of the trough.

  12. Diffuse radio emission in the Coma cluster and Abell 1367: observations at 430 and 1400 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two rich clusters of galaxies, Abell 1656 (the Coma cluster) and Abell 1367, have been mapped at both 430 and 1400 MHz with the 305-m telescope at Arecibo. The contribution to the observed radio emission due to known discrete sources has been calculated by convolving interferometrically determined source lists with observed Arecibo beam patterns, and maps of the diffuse radio emission alone have been constructed. Both clusters contain regions of diffuse radio emission, although the source in Coma is larger and much more luminous than the source in Abell 1367. The linear extent of the diffuse emission and its dependence on frequency have been used to study particle propagation rates and modes of diffusion in the intracluster medium. The possible correlations between the diffuse radio emission and x-ray emission in these clusters have been investigated, and it has been found that the observed x-ray luminosities can be accounted for if the intracluster gas is heated through Coulomb interactions with the relativistic electrons responsible for the diffuse radio emission

  13. VSA Observations of the Anomalous Microwave Emission in the Perseus Region

    CERN Document Server

    Tibbs, Christopher T; Dickinson, Clive; Davies, Rodney D; Davis, Richard J; del Burgo, Carlos; Franzen, Thomas M O; Génova-Santos, Ricardo; Grainge, Keith; Hobson, Michael P; Padilla-Torres, Carmen P; Rebolo, Rafael; Rubiño-Martín, Jóse Alberto; Saunders, Richard D E; Scaife, Anna M M; Scott, Paul F

    2009-01-01

    The dust feature G159.6--18.5 in the Perseus region has previously been observed with the COSMOSOMAS experiment \\citep{Watson:05} on angular scales of $\\approx$ 1$^{\\circ}$, and was found to exhibit anomalous microwave emission. We present new observations of this dust feature, performed with the Very Small Array (VSA) at 33 GHz, to help increase the understanding of the nature of this anomalous emission. On the angular scales observed with the VSA ($\\approx$ 10 -- 40$^{\\prime}$), G159.6--18.5 consists of five distinct components, each of which have been individually analysed. All five of these components are found to exhibit an excess of emission at 33 GHz, and are found to be highly correlated with far-infrared emission. We provide evidence that each of these compact components have anomalous emission that is consistent with electric dipole emission from very small, rapidly rotating dust grains. These components contribute $\\approx$ 10 % to the flux density of the diffuse extended emission detected by COSMO...

  14. White-light continuum emission from solar flare and plages: observations and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlicki, Arkadiusz; Awasthi, Arun Kumar; Heinzel, Petr

    2015-08-01

    Observations of flares in optical continuum emission are very rare. Therefore, the analysis of such observations is very useful and may contribute to our understanding of the flaring chromosphere. We study the white-light continuum emission observed during the X6.9 flare observed on August 09, 2011. This emission comes not only from the flare ribbons but also form the nearby plage area observed within the active region. The main aim of this work is to disentangle the flare and plage emission and to understand the physical mechanisms responsible for the production of white-light continuum.There are two main mechanisms which can be responsible for the optical continuum emission of the solar atmosphere: enhanced photospheric H- continuum due to the temperature increase below the temperature minimum region, or hydrogen recombination continua (Balmer, Paschen) formed in solar chromosphere. In our work we analyse the physical conditions in solar active atmosphere in order to obtain the contribution from these two mechanisms to the whole continuum emission of the flare and plage.We analyzed the spatial, spectral and temporal evolution study of the flare and plage parameters by analyzing multi-wavelength observations obtained from ground and space based solar observatories. We study the morphological correlation of the white-light continuum emission observed with different instruments. Moreover, we also explore the non-thermal electron beam properties by forward fitting the observed X-ray spectra.The unique opportunity of an intense X6.9 flare occurrence close to the limb enabled us to explore the origin of white-light continuum with better visibility. The analysis of multi-wavelength data revealed the origin of this emission from the foot-points of the loops. Spatial association of HXR foot-points synthesized from RHESSI observations confirmed this finding. In addition, we found a good temporal correlation of hard (>30 keV) X-ray with the white-light emission. However, some active region areas which produce the continuum emission correspond rather to plages than to the flare kernels.

  15. Observational support for dust grain emission by electrostatic forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silen, Johan; Hilchenbach, Martin; Hornung, Klaus; Merouane, Sihane; Schulz, Rita

    2015-04-01

    Dust collected close to the comet 67P by the COSIMA instrument, indicates that fluffy grains up to sizes of several 100 um are lifted off the comet surface and transported to the instrument substrate several tens of kilometers away. The temperature of the surface and the detected gas densities are too low to properly explain lifting grains from the cometary surface. We investigate grain dynamics using electrostatic forces. Comet surface lighting conditions create small scale multi pole electric fields by photons. These fields create forces on both charged and neutral dust grains and may serve as "active regions". The forces acting on the grain, scale as D3 with grain size and therefore large grains are proportionally simpler to elevate, provided the mass is not increasing at the same rate. The fluffy structure of the grains seem to fulfill this requirement. The limiting factor of this mechanism is set by the tensile strength of the grains. If the electrostatic force created exceeds the tensile strength, the grain will disintegrate through Coulomb explosion. The mechanism would favor lifting large fluffy grains off the surface because they have a capability of most easily creating mobile charges which interact in a favorable manner with the multi pole fields. Because of the conglomerate nature of the grains, a splitting of a grain may trigger a Coulomb explosion setting free the bulk dust distribution of small grains detected. The measured elongated impacts also suggest that disintegration is taking place close to the spacecraft. This would also be supported by the proposed model as the space craft charging represents a small scale field anomaly where grain splitting could become enhanced. The observed grains seem to fulfill all requirements of this tentative model.

  16. Spitzer observations of the thermal emission from WASP-43b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WASP-43b is one of the closest-orbiting hot Jupiters, with a semimajor axis of a = 0.01526 ± 0.00018 AU and a period of only 0.81 days. However, it orbits one of the coolest stars with a hot Jupiter (T * = 4520 ± 120 K), giving the planet a modest equilibrium temperature of T eq = 1440 ± 40 K, assuming zero Bond albedo and uniform planetary energy redistribution. The eclipse depths and brightness temperatures from our jointly fit model are 0.347% ± 0.013% and 1670 ± 23 K at 3.6 ?m and 0.382% ± 0.015% and 1514 ± 25 K at 4.5 ?m. The eclipse timings improved the estimate of the orbital period, P, by a factor of three (P = 0.81347436 ± 1.4 × 10–7 days) and put an upper limit on the eccentricity (e=0.010?0.007+0.010). We use our Spitzer eclipse depths along with four previously reported ground-based photometric observations in the near-infrared to constrain the atmospheric properties of WASP-43b. The data rule out a strong thermal inversion in the dayside atmosphere of WASP-43b. Model atmospheres with no thermal inversions and fiducial oxygen-rich compositions are able to explain all the available data. However, a wide range of metallicities and C/O ratios can explain the data. The data suggest low day-night energy redistribution in the planet, consistent with previous studies, with a nominal upper limit of about 35% for the fraction of energy incident on the dayside that is redistributed to the nightside.

  17. Spitzer observations of the thermal emission from WASP-43b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Hardy, Ryan A.; Cubillos, Patricio E.; Hardin, Matthew; Bowman, Oliver; Nymeyer, Sarah [Planetary Sciences Group, Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Anderson, David R.; Hellier, Coel; Smith, Alexis M. S. [Astrophysics Group, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Cameron, Andrew Collier, E-mail: jasmina@physics.ucf.edu [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-01

    WASP-43b is one of the closest-orbiting hot Jupiters, with a semimajor axis of a = 0.01526 ± 0.00018 AU and a period of only 0.81 days. However, it orbits one of the coolest stars with a hot Jupiter (T {sub *} = 4520 ± 120 K), giving the planet a modest equilibrium temperature of T {sub eq} = 1440 ± 40 K, assuming zero Bond albedo and uniform planetary energy redistribution. The eclipse depths and brightness temperatures from our jointly fit model are 0.347% ± 0.013% and 1670 ± 23 K at 3.6 ?m and 0.382% ± 0.015% and 1514 ± 25 K at 4.5 ?m. The eclipse timings improved the estimate of the orbital period, P, by a factor of three (P = 0.81347436 ± 1.4 × 10{sup –7} days) and put an upper limit on the eccentricity (e=0.010{sub ?0.007}{sup +0.010}). We use our Spitzer eclipse depths along with four previously reported ground-based photometric observations in the near-infrared to constrain the atmospheric properties of WASP-43b. The data rule out a strong thermal inversion in the dayside atmosphere of WASP-43b. Model atmospheres with no thermal inversions and fiducial oxygen-rich compositions are able to explain all the available data. However, a wide range of metallicities and C/O ratios can explain the data. The data suggest low day-night energy redistribution in the planet, consistent with previous studies, with a nominal upper limit of about 35% for the fraction of energy incident on the dayside that is redistributed to the nightside.

  18. Patterns in atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols in China: emission estimates and observed concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Cui

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available China is experiencing severe carbonaceous aerosol pollution driven mainly by large emissions resulting from intensive use of solid fuels. To gain a better understanding of the levels and trends of carbonaceous aerosol emissions and the resulting ambient concentrations at the national scale, we update an emission inventory of anthropogenic organic carbon (OC and elemental carbon (EC and employ existing observational studies to analyze characteristics of these aerosols including temporal, spatial, and size distributions, and the levels and shares of secondary organic carbon (SOC in total OC. We further use ground observations to test the levels and inter-annual trends of the calculated national and provincial emissions of carbonaceous aerosols, and propose possible improvements in emission estimation for the future. The national OC emissions are estimated to have increased 29% from 2000 (2127 Gg to 2012 (2749 Gg and EC by 37% (from 1356 to 1857 Gg. The residential, industrial, and transportation sectors contributed an estimated 76 ± 2, 19 ± 2 and 5 ± 1% of the total emissions of OC, respectively, and 52 ± 3, 32 ± 2 and 16 ± 2% of EC. Updated emission factors based on the most recent local field measurements, particularly for biofuel stoves, lead to considerably lower emissions of OC compared to previous inventories. Compiling observational data across the country, higher concentrations of OC and EC are found in northern and inland cities, while larger OC/EC and SOC/OC ratios are found in southern cities, due to the joint effects of primary emissions and meteorology. Higher SOC/OC ratios are estimated at rural and remote sites compared to urban ones, attributed to more emissions of OC from biofuel use, more biogenic emissions of volatile organic compound (VOC precursors to SOC, and/or transport of aged aerosols. For most sites, higher concentrations of OC, EC, and SOC are observed in colder seasons, while SOC/OC is reduced, particularly at rural and remote sites, attributed partly to weaker atmospheric oxidation and SOC formation compared to summer. Enhanced SOC formation from oxidization and anthropogenic activities like biomass combustion is judged to have crucial effects on severe haze events characterized by high particle concentrations. Several observational studies indicate an increasing trend in ambient OC/EC (but not in OC or EC individually from 2000 to 2010, confirming increased atmospheric oxidation of OC across the country. Combining the results of emission estimation and observations, the improvement over prior emission inventories is indicated by inter-annual comparisons and correlation analysis. It is also indicated, however, that the estimated growth in emissions might be faster than observed growth, and that some sources with high primary OC/EC like burning of biomass are still underestimated. Further studies to determine changing emission factors over time in the residential sector and to compare to other measurements such as satellite observations are thus suggested to improve understanding of the levels and trends of primary carbonaceous aerosol emissions in China.

  19. Simulated VLF-fields as a risk factor of thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, E.; Richter, O.; Krüskemper, Gertrud

    1981-06-01

    VLF (Very Low Frequencies)-fields are damped electromagnetic waves of atmospheric origin (sferics). Sferics were artificially produced within a steel-built chamber; blood was drawn and platelet adhesiveness, platelet cyclic AMP and coagulation factors were measured in human volunteers placed within the chamber. Following frequency of the impulses of 10 Hz and a field strength of 400 mV/m increased platelet adhesiveness and decreased platelet cyclic AMP. Medication of the anti-platelet drugs were not effective at all, but the pretreatment of dipyridamole 75 mg combined with acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg blocked the sferics induced increment in platelet adhesiveness. Psychologically labile volunteers exhibited more marked effects of sferics upon platelet adhesiveness. Simulation of stressors upon platelets showed the same effect. The increase in platelet adhesiveness induced by all kind of stressors is not a risk factor of thrombosis in itself. Only if the vessel walls are damaged, e.g. by atherosclerotic plaques, or if the blood flow is reduced, e.g. by heart failure, then the increased platelet adhesiveness will cause thrombosis.

  20. The European VLF/LF Radio Network: the current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Pier Francesco; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Schiavulli, Luigi; Ligonzo, Teresa; Colella, Roberto; Ermini, Anita; Martinelli, Giovanni; Palangio, Paolo; Moldovan, Iren; Silva, Hugo; Contadakis, Michael; Frantzis, Xenophon; Katzis, Konstantinos; Buyuksarac, Aydin; D'Amico, Sebastiano

    2014-05-01

    Since 2009 a network of VLF (20-60 kHz) and LF (150-300 kHz) radio receivers has been put into operation in Europe in order to study earthquakes precursors. At the moment the network consists of eleven receivers four of which are located in Italy, two in Greece and one in Portugal, Romania, Malta, Cyprus and Turkey. The data (sampling rate of 1min) are downloaded automatically at the end of each day and they are stored in the server located at the Department of Physics of the University of Bari (Italy), that is the central node of the network. Still, in some case, problems of connection exist. The different trends are open and visible on the web site: http://beta.fisica.uniba.it/infrep/Hom.aspx. The data files can be downloaded by the same web site but they are protected by username and password. Among the different methods of data analysis the Wavelet spectra appear to be the most sensitive ones. The software able to apply this technique on the radio data automatically at the end of each day has been planned and realized. At the moment it operates on four signals collected by one of the Italian receivers; if an anomaly stands up and it is over a fixed threshold a warning advise appears. In the web site, this activity is protected by a specific username and password.

  1. A Semi-Automatic, Remote-Controlled Video Observation System for Transient Luminous Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Thomas Højgaard; Neubert, Torsten; Laursen, Steen; Rasmussen, Ib Lundgaard; Soula, Serge

    2003-01-01

    In support for global ELF/VLF observations, HF measurements in France, and conjugate photometry/VLF observations in South Africa, we developed and operated a semi-automatic, remotely controlled video system for the observation of middle-atmospheric transient luminous events (TLEs). Installed at the Pic du Midi Observatory in Southern France, the system was operational during the period from July 18 to September 15, 2003. The video system, based two low-light, non-intensified CCD video cameras, w...

  2. Observations of the microwave emission of Venus from 1.3 to 3.6 cm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account is given of the methodology as well as the results of coordinated Venus emission observations conducted at four wavelengths between 1.35 and 3.6 cm; the results are compared with other observations and with calculated mission spectra, with a view to suggestions that the microwave spectrum of Venus could be sensitive to the subcloud abundance of such constituents as SO2 and gaseous H2SO4. The observed emission spectrum is consistent with an average subcloud abundance of gaseous H2SO4 in equatorial and midlatitude regions of about 5 ppm. An upper limit is established for the subcloud SO2 abundance. 19 refs

  3. Patterns in atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols in China: emission estimates and observed concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, H.; Mao, P.; Zhao, Y.; Nielsen, C. P.; Zhang, J.

    2015-08-01

    China is experiencing severe carbonaceous aerosol pollution driven mainly by large emissions resulting from intensive use of solid fuels. To gain a better understanding of the levels and trends of carbonaceous aerosol emissions and the resulting ambient concentrations at the national scale, we update an emission inventory of anthropogenic organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) and employ existing observational studies to analyze characteristics of these aerosols including temporal, spatial, and size distributions, and the levels and shares of secondary organic carbon (SOC) in total OC. We further use ground observations to test the levels and inter-annual trends of the calculated national and provincial emissions of carbonaceous aerosols, and propose possible improvements in emission estimation for the future. The national OC emissions are estimated to have increased 29 % from 2000 (2127 Gg) to 2012 (2749 Gg) and EC by 37 % (from 1356 to 1857 Gg). The residential, industrial, and transportation sectors contributed an estimated 74-78, 17-21, and 4-6 % of the total emissions of OC, respectively, and 49-55, 30-34, and 14-18 % of EC. Updated emission factors (EFs) based on the most recent local field measurements, particularly for biofuel stoves, led to considerably lower emissions of OC compared to previous inventories. Compiling observational data across the country, higher concentrations of OC and EC are found in northern and inland cities, while higher OC / EC ratios are found in southern sites, due to the joint effects of primary emissions and meteorology. Higher OC / EC ratios are estimated at rural and remote sites compared to urban ones, attributed to more emissions of OC from biofuel use, more biogenic emissions of volatile organic compound (VOC) precursors to SOC, and/or transport of aged aerosols. For most sites, higher concentrations of OC, EC, and SOC are observed in colder seasons, while SOC / OC is reduced, particularly at rural and remote sites, attributed partly to weaker atmospheric oxidation and SOC formation compared to summer. Enhanced SOC formation from oxidization and anthropogenic activities like biomass combustion is judged to have crucial effects on severe haze events characterized by high particle concentrations. Several observational studies indicate an increasing trend in ambient OC / EC (but not in OC or EC individually) from 2000 to 2010, confirming increased atmospheric oxidation of OC across the country. Combining the results of emission estimation and observations, the improvement over prior emission inventories is indicated by inter-annual comparisons and correlation analysis. It is also indicated, however, that the estimated growth in emissions might be faster than observed growth, and that some sources with high primary OC / EC, such as burning of biomass, are still underestimated. Further studies to determine changing EFs over time in the residential sector and to compare to other measurements, such as satellite observations, are thus suggested to improve understanding of the levels and trends of primary carbonaceous aerosol emissions in China.

  4. Panchromatic Observations of the Textbook GRB 110205A: Constraining Physical Mechanisms of Prompt Emission and Afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, W.; Shen, R. F.; Sakamoto, T.; Beardmore, A. P.; De Pasquale, M.; Wu, X. F.; Gorosabel, J.; Urata, Y.; Sugita, S.; Zhang, B.; Pozanenko, A.; Nissinen, M.; Sahu, D. K.; Im, M.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Andreev, M.; Klunko, E.; Volnova, A.; Akerlof, C. W.; Anto, P.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Breeveld, A.; Carsenty, U.; Gehrels, N.; Sonbas, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long duration (T(sub 90) approx. 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z = 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb and BOOTES telescopes when the GRB was still radiating in the gamma-ray band. Thanks to its long duration, nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray to gamma-ray (1 eV - 5 MeV), which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution across 6 orders of magnitude in energy during the prompt emission phase. In particular, by fitting the time resolved prompt spectra, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard GRB synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Although the prompt optical emission is brighter than the extrapolation of the best fit X/ -ray spectra, it traces the -ray light curve shape, suggesting a relation to the prompt high energy emission. The synchrotron + synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) scenario is disfavored by the data, but the models invoking a pair of internal shocks or having two emission regions can interpret the data well. Shortly after prompt emission (approx. 1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise ( alpha approx. 5.5) was observed which we interpret as the emission from the reverse shock. It is the first time that the rising phase of a reverse shock component has been closely observed.

  5. Tropospheric methanol observations from space: retrieval evaluation and constraints on the seasonality of biogenic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, K. C.; Millet, D. B.; Hu, L.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Xiao, Y.; Shephard, M. W.; Clerbaux, C. L.; Clarisse, L.; Coheur, P.-F.; Apel, E. C.; de Gouw, J.; Warneke, C.; Singh, H. B.; Goldstein, A. H.; Sive, B. C.

    2012-07-01

    Methanol retrievals from nadir-viewing space-based sensors offer powerful new information for quantifying methanol emissions on a global scale. Here we apply an ensemble of aircraft observations over North America to evaluate new methanol measurements from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Aura satellite, and combine the TES data with observations from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the MetOp-A satellite to investigate the seasonality of methanol emissions from northern midlatitude ecosystems. Using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as an intercomparison platform, we find that the TES retrieval performs well when the degrees of freedom for signal (DOFS) are above 0.5, in which case the model:TES regressions are generally consistent with the model:aircraft comparisons. Including retrievals with DOFS below 0.5 degrades the comparisons, as these are excessively influenced by the a priori. The comparisons suggest DOFS >0.5 as a minimum threshold for interpreting retrievals of trace gases with a weak tropospheric signal. We analyze one full year of satellite observations and find that GEOS-Chem, driven with MEGANv2.1 biogenic emissions, underestimates observed methanol concentrations throughout the midlatitudes in springtime, with the timing of the seasonal peak in model emissions 1-2 months too late. We attribute this discrepancy to an underestimate of emissions from new leaves in MEGAN, and apply the satellite data to better quantify the seasonal change in methanol emissions for midlatitude ecosystems. The derived parameters (relative emission factors of 11.0, 0.26, 0.12 and 3.0 for new, growing, mature, and old leaves, respectively, plus a leaf area index activity factor of 0.5 for expanding canopies with leaf area index <1.2) provide a more realistic simulation of seasonal methanol concentrations in midlatitudes on the basis of both the IASI and TES measurements.

  6. Tropospheric methanol observations from space: retrieval evaluation and constraints on the seasonality of biogenic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Wells

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Methanol retrievals from nadir-viewing space-based sensors offer powerful new information for quantifying methanol emissions on a global scale. Here we apply an ensemble of aircraft observations over North America to evaluate new methanol measurements from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES on the Aura satellite, and combine the TES data with observations from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI on the MetOp-A satellite to investigate the seasonality of methanol emissions from northern midlatitude ecosystems. Using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as an intercomparison platform, we find that the TES retrieval performs well when the degrees of freedom for signal (DOFS are above 0.5, in which case the model:TES regressions are generally consistent with the model:aircraft comparisons. Including retrievals with DOFS below 0.5 degrades the comparisons, as these are excessively influenced by the a priori. The comparisons suggest DOFS >0.5 as a minimum threshold for interpreting retrievals of trace gases with a weak tropospheric signal. We analyze one full year of satellite observations and find that GEOS-Chem, driven with MEGANv2.1 biogenic emissions, underestimates observed methanol concentrations throughout the midlatitudes in springtime, with the timing of the seasonal peak in model emissions 1–2 months too late. We attribute this discrepancy to an underestimate of emissions from new leaves in MEGAN, and apply the satellite data to better quantify the seasonal change in methanol emissions for midlatitude ecosystems. The derived parameters (relative emission factors of 11.0, 0.26, 0.12 and 3.0 for new, growing, mature, and old leaves, respectively, plus a leaf area index activity factor of 0.5 for expanding canopies with leaf area index <1.2 provide a more realistic simulation of seasonal methanol concentrations in midlatitudes on the basis of both the IASI and TES measurements.

  7. Tropospheric methanol observations from space: retrieval evaluation and constraints on the seasonality of biogenic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Wells

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Methanol retrievals from nadir-viewing space-based sensors offer powerful new information for quantifying methanol emissions on a global scale. Here we apply an ensemble of aircraft observations over North America to evaluate new methanol measurements from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES on the Aura satellite, and combine the TES data with observations from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI on the MetOp-A satellite to investigate the seasonality of methanol emissions from northern midlatitude ecosystems. Using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model as an intercomparison platform, we find that the TES retrieval performs well when the degrees of freedom for signal (DOFS are above 0.5, in which case the model : TES regressions are generally consistent with the model : aircraft comparisons. Including retrievals with DOFS below 0.5 degrades the comparisons, as these are excessively influenced by the a priori. The comparisons suggest DOFS > 0.5 as a minimum threshold for interpreting retrievals of trace gases with a weak tropospheric signal. We analyze one full year of satellite observations and find that GEOS-Chem, driven with MEGANv2.1 biogenic emissions, underestimates observed methanol concentrations throughout the midlatitudes in springtime, with the timing of the seasonal peak in model emissions 1–2 months too late. We attribute this discrepancy to an underestimate of emissions from new leaves in MEGAN, and apply the satellite data to better quantify the seasonal change in methanol emissions for midlatitude ecosystems. The derived parameters (relative emission factors of 11.0, 1.0, 0.05 and 8.6 for new, growing, mature, and old leaves, respectively, plus a leaf area index activity factor of 0.75 for expanding canopies with leaf area index < 2.0 provide a more realistic simulation of seasonal methanol concentrations in midlatitudes on the basis of IASI, TES, and ground-based measurements.

  8. Observation of emission from chaotic lasing modes in deformed microspheres displacement by the stable orbit modes

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, S; Chang, R K; Stone, A D; Chang, Seongsik; Noeckel, Jens U.; Chang, Richard K.

    2000-01-01

    By combining detailed imaging measurements at different tilt angles with simulations of ray emission from prolate deformed lasing micro-droplets, we conclude that the probability density for the lasing modes in a three-dimensional dielectric microcavity must reside in the chaotic region of the ray phase space. In particular, maximum emission from such chaotic lasing modes is not from tangent rays emerging from the highest curvature part of the rim. The laser emission is observed and calculated to be non-tangent and displaced from the highest curvature due to the presence of stable orbits. In this Letter we present the first experimental evidence for this phenomenon of ``dynamical eclipsing''.

  9. Earth observations for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeFries, R. [Department of Geography and Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Achard, F. [Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Joint Research Centre of the European Commission 21020 Ispra, VA (Italy); Brown, S. [Winrock International, Ecosystem Services Unit 1621 N. Kent Street, Suite 1200, Arlington, VA 22207 (United States); Herold, M. [Department of Geography, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Loebdergraben 32, 07743 Jena (Germany); Murdiyarso, D. [Center for International Forestry Research, P.O. Box 6596, JKPWB, Jakarta 10065 (Indonesia); Schlamadinger, B. [Joanneum Research, Elisabethstrasse 5, 8010 Graz (Austria); De Souza, C. Jr [Instituto Homem e Meio Ambiente da Amazonia, Imazon, Caixa Postal 5101, Belem, PA 66613-397 (Brazil)

    2007-06-15

    In response to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process investigating the technical issues surrounding the ability to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from deforestation in developing countries, this paper reviews technical capabilities for monitoring deforestation and estimating emissions. Implementation of policies to reduce emissions from deforestation require effective deforestation monitoring systems that are reproducible, provide consistent results, meet standards for mapping accuracy, and can be implemented at the national level. Remotely sensed data supported by ground observations are key to effective monitoring. Capacity in developing countries for deforestation monitoring is well-advanced in a few countries and is a feasible goal in most others. Data sources exist to determine base periods in the 1990s as historical reference points. Forest degradation (e.g. from high impact logging and fragmentation) also contribute to greenhouse gas emissions but it is more technically challenging to measure than deforestation. Data on carbon stocks, which are needed to estimate emissions, cannot currently be observed directly over large areas with remote sensing. Guidelines for carbon accounting from deforestation exist and are available in approved Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports and can be applied at national scales in the absence of forest inventory or other data. Key constraints for implementing programs to monitor greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation are international commitment of resources to increase capacity, coordination of observations to ensure pan-tropical coverage, access to free or low-cost data, and standard and consensual protocols for data interpretation and analysis.

  10. Earth observations for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process investigating the technical issues surrounding the ability to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from deforestation in developing countries, this paper reviews technical capabilities for monitoring deforestation and estimating emissions. Implementation of policies to reduce emissions from deforestation require effective deforestation monitoring systems that are reproducible, provide consistent results, meet standards for mapping accuracy, and can be implemented at the national level. Remotely sensed data supported by ground observations are key to effective monitoring. Capacity in developing countries for deforestation monitoring is well-advanced in a few countries and is a feasible goal in most others. Data sources exist to determine base periods in the 1990s as historical reference points. Forest degradation (e.g. from high impact logging and fragmentation) also contribute to greenhouse gas emissions but it is more technically challenging to measure than deforestation. Data on carbon stocks, which are needed to estimate emissions, cannot currently be observed directly over large areas with remote sensing. Guidelines for carbon accounting from deforestation exist and are available in approved Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports and can be applied at national scales in the absence of forest inventory or other data. Key constraints for implementing programs to monitor greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation are international commitment of resources to increase capacity, coordination of observations to ensure pan-tropical coverage, access to free or low-cost data, and standard and consensual protocols for data interpretation and analysis

  11. Observations and interpretation of the infrared emission from supernova SN1987A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infrared spectrophotometric observations of SN1987A from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory are presented for the wavelength range 1.5 to 12.5 microns for five epochs at about 60, 260, 415, 615, and 777 days after the explosion. These data are combined with the ultraviolet, optical, infrared (UVOIR) measurements from ESO/CTIO and SAAO in order to characterize the continuum by three components: a photospheric contribution, free-free radiation, and the infrared emission from dust characterized by greybody radiation. Line flux measurements from the continuum substracted spectra are given, including the Brackett, Pfund, and Humphreys series of hydrogen and neutral and singly-ionized nickel and argon from the core ejecta. Carbon monoxide and silicon monoxide vibration bands are identified in the spectra. A simple analysis of the hydrogen line and free-free emission is presented. Dust radiative equilibrium calculations are performed. At 415 days, excess infrared emission, not accountable by circumstellar dust, was observed. At 615 and 777 days, this new component dominated the infrared continuum and is evidence for dust condensation in the ejecta of SN1987A. The shape of the infrared emission from newly formed dust is well characterized by the Planck curve, i.e., by a greybody, and therefore the grains which formed in the ejecta are either large or their emission arises from optically thick clumps. The radiative equilibrium temperature of the observed greybody emission indicates that the dust is in the metal-rich volume of the ejected core

  12. AMI OBSERVATIONS OF THE ANOMALOUS MICROWAVE EMISSION IN THE PERSEUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present observations of the known anomalous microwave emission region, G159.6–18.5, in the Perseus molecular cloud at 16 GHz performed with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Small Array. These are the highest angular resolution observations of G159.6–18.5 at microwave wavelengths. By combining these microwave data with infrared observations between 5.8 and 160 ?m from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we investigate the existence of a microwave-infrared correlation on angular scales of ?2'. We find that the overall correlation appears to increase toward shorter infrared wavelengths, which is consistent with the microwave emission being produced by electric dipole radiation from small, spinning dust grains. We also find that the microwave-infrared correlation peaks at 24 ?m (6.7?), suggesting that the microwave emission is originating from a population of stochastically heated small interstellar dust grains rather than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  13. AMI Observations of the Anomalous Microwave Emission in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbs, C. T.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Dickinson, C.; Paladini, R.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Watson, R. A.

    2013-05-01

    We present observations of the known anomalous microwave emission region, G159.6-18.5, in the Perseus molecular cloud at 16 GHz performed with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Small Array. These are the highest angular resolution observations of G159.6-18.5 at microwave wavelengths. By combining these microwave data with infrared observations between 5.8 and 160 ?m from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we investigate the existence of a microwave-infrared correlation on angular scales of ~2'. We find that the overall correlation appears to increase toward shorter infrared wavelengths, which is consistent with the microwave emission being produced by electric dipole radiation from small, spinning dust grains. We also find that the microwave-infrared correlation peaks at 24 ?m (6.7?), suggesting that the microwave emission is originating from a population of stochastically heated small interstellar dust grains rather than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  14. Observation of solar high energy gamma and X-ray emission and solar energetic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Struminsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    We considered 18 solar flares observed between June 2010 and July 2012, in which high energy >100 MeV {\\gamma}-emission was registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard FermiGRO. We examined for these {\\gamma}-events soft X-ray observations by GOES, hard X-ray observations by the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the SPectrometer aboard INTEGRAL (ACS SPI) and the Gamma-Ray burst Monitor (GBM) aboard FermiGRO. Hard X-ray and {\\pi}0-decay {\\gamma}-ray emissions are used as tracers of electron and proton acceleration, respectively. Bursts of hard X-ray were observed by ACS SPI during impulsive phase of 13 events. Bursts of hard X-ray >100 keV were not found during time intervals, when prolonged hard {\\gamma}-emission was registered by LAT/FermiGRO. Those events showing prolonged high-energy gamma-ray emission not accompanied by >100 keV hard X-ray emission are interpreted as an indication of either different acceleration processes for protons and electrons or as the presence of a proton population accelerated du...

  15. Comparison of seasonal variation between anthropogenic and natural emission inventory and Satellite observation in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, G.; Lalitaporn, P.

    2012-12-01

    Since the economic growth of the countries in Southeast Asia is significantly rapid, the emission of air pollutant from the anthropogenic activity, such as industry, power generation and transportation is rapidly increasing. Moreover, biomass burning due to unsuitable agricultural management, deforestation and expansion of farmland are discharging large amount of pollutants, such as Carbon monoxide, volatile organic compound and particulate matter. Especially, the particulate matter from biomass burning causes the serious haze pollution in surrounding area in Southeast Asia. Furthermore, the biomass fuel used for cooking at residential sector discharges harmful pollutants including a particulate matter, and causes the adverse health impact to people on indoor and outdoor. In this study, we evaluated the spatial distribution and the seasonal variation of emission inventory for Southeast Asia region by comparing with satellite observation data in order to improve the accuracy of the impact assessment of air pollution by regional atmospheric chemistry transport model (WRF and CMAQ). As an emission inventory data, we used our original regional emission inventory for Southeast Asia region developed from detail transportation and industry data sets as well as a several existing emission inventories. As satellite observation data, the vertical column density of NO2, Particulate matter and Carbon monoxide obtained by various satellite, such as GOME, GOME2, SCIAMACY, OMI and so on. As a result of comparisons between satellite observation and emission inventories from 1996 to 2011, in the case of anthropogenic emission, seasonal variation was comparatively well in agreement with the seasonal variation of satellite data. However, the uncertainty of the seasonal variation was large on several large cities. In the case of emission from biomass burning, the seasonal variation was clear, but inter-annual variation was also large due to large scale climate condition.

  16. Recent developments in Fire Emission Monitoring in MACC-II using Fire Radiative Power Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Johannes W.; Andela, Niels; Heil, Angelika; Paugam, Ronan; Schultz, Martin G.; van der Werf, Guido R.; Wooster, Martin J.; Remy, Samuel

    2013-04-01

    We will present the latest developments of the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS), which has been implemented by the MACC-II project in order to provide accurate fire biomass burning emission estimates for the real time and retrospective Copernicus/GMES atmospheric monitoring and forecasting services. Accurate fire emissions have been shown to be a crucial input for air quality forecasts even when satellite-based atmospheric observations are being assimilated. On the other hand, comparisons of the simulated smoke plumes and atmospheric observations provide information on the accuracy of the bottom-up fire emission estimates. The emission estimates of GFAS are generally consistent with those of the GFED inventory, but they are available with 1-day temporal resoution and in real time. There are also a few small systematic differences between the emission estimates of the two inventories. The general consistency is achieved by assimilating Fire Radiative Power (FRP) observations from the MODIS instruments, and by a conversion of the daily FRP to dry matter combustion rate that depends on the fire type. Emission rates for forty smoke constituents are subsequently calculated from the dry matter combustion rate. The emisson estimates have been validated against atmospheric observations of aerosol optical depth, carbon monoxide, ozone, nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde using the atmospheric models of MACC. The GFAS data are currently produced with resolutions of 1 day and 0.1 deg, and a time lag of seven hours. They cover the period since January 2003 and are publicly available. In the future, the inclusion of FRP products from the geostationary satellites Meteosat-9, GOES-East, and GOES-West will lead to a finer temporal resolution as well as to an improved accuracy of the daily emission estimates. Estimates of smoke injection height will also become available

  17. Optical emission and mass spectra observations during hydrogen combustion in atmospheric pressure microwave plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We experimentally investigated hydrogen combustion by atmospheric pressure plasma generated by a 2.45 GHz microwave discharge. Small amounts of hydrogen and oxygen were mixed in the operational argon gas during discharge. To clarify the details of combustion, optical emission was measured. The constituents of combustion-processed gases were observed by a quadruple mass spectrometer. The degree of hydrogen oxidation, the so-called conversion rate, increased with input microwave power. The maximum hydrogen conversion rate was greater than 80% under these experimental conditions. During discharge, an optical emission peak due to OH radicals was observed. (author)

  18. Observationally constraining gravitational wave emission from short gamma-ray burst remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Lasky, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Observations of short gamma-ray bursts indicate ongoing energy injection following the prompt emission, with the most likely candidate being the birth of a rapidly rotating, highly magnetised neutron star. We utilise X-ray observations of the burst remnant to constrain properties of the nascent neutron star, including its magnetic field-induced ellipticity and the saturation amplitude of various oscillation modes. Moreover, we derive strict upper limits on the gravitational wave emission from these objects by looking only at the X-ray light curve, showing the burst remnants are unlikely to be detected in the near future using ground-based gravitational wave interferometers such as Advanced LIGO.

  19. Disturbances of the VLF/LF radio signal reception at Dobrogea Seismological Observatory due to local abnormal electric activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Iren-Adelina; Toader, Victorin; Dolea, Paul; Biagi, Pier Francesco

    2015-04-01

    The National Institute for Earth Physics, as part of the INFREP initiative, has monitored radio waves emitted by 10 transmitters all over Europe in relation with seismicity in the last 5 years. In Romania a radio receiving system is located in only one site (Dobrogea Seismological Observatory) situated in Eforie Nord, in the Eastern part of Romania. The electro-magnetic field monitored both at the ground and (sub) ionospheric level, in different frequency ranges (VLF/LF) is considered to be promising for earthquake forecasting. Because the abnormal behavior of the VLF/LF recordings that could not be correlated with the tectonic activity of the seismogenic zones crossed by the radio paths, we decided to monitor other two parameters, at the receiving site: the vertical component of the atmospheric electric field, which indicates variations of electrical properties of the near-ground air (Boltek electric field mill), and the atmospheric local conditions (WS-3600 weather station). The zone is also surveyed by seismic devices (seismometers, accelerometers and infrasonic equipment) and GPS/GNSS base stations to emphasize the local tectonic conditions. We obtained in such way a multiple-parameter monitoring system that increases the confidence in observational data and decreases uncertainties regarding the accuracy of the data recorded until now. As we are exploring different parameters we have obtained some conclusions regarding the correlation of the anomalies with their possible causes. The final expectation of the monitoring system regard the chance to take a snapshot of the geophysical medium before, during and after a significant earthquake occurrence and to reveal if there was or wasn't a noticeable trace of the preparatory stage of it. This work was partially supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, Programe for research- Space Technology and Avanced Research - STAR, project number 84/2013, and by the NUCLEU project, PN 09 30/2009.

  20. Sea ice effective microwave emissivities from satellite passive microwave and infrared observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, J. C.

    1983-09-01

    Microwave sea ice emissivities are investigated on a global scale by using near-simultaneous images from the temperature-humidity infrared radiometer (THIR) and the dual-polarization scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR), both onboard the Nimbus 7 satellite. The emissivities in several study areas in the Arctic region are observed to be approximately constant during a 9-month period within the fall, winter, and spring months for both first-year and multiyear ice, with a standard deviation of about 3%. During the onset of summer, when the snow cover starts to melt, emissivity increases of about 30% are observed at 37 GHz for multiyear ice, with the effect decreasing to less than 5% at the 6.6-GHz channels. Multichannel cluster analysis over very large study areas during winter shows considerable variability in emissivities of well-defined clusters of consolidated ice at 37 GHz and about one third as much at 18 GHz. Some nonlinearities in the functional relationship of the emissivities in the consolidated ice regions between first-year and multiyear ice are also evident, especially when data from one frequency is plotted against that of another. However, the cluster analysis technique separates the various emissivity data points into distinct clusters corresponding to radiometrically different ice types. If the variability within each cluster is quantified and taken into account by using multispectral analysis, in addition to improving the capability of classifying ice by age, information about ice thickness and surface characteristics might also be obtainable.

  1. Ten years of satellite observations reveal highly variable sulphur dioxide emissions at Anatahan Volcano, Mariana Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Brendan; Popp, Christoph; Andrews, Benjamin; Cottrell, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    Satellite remote sensing enables continuous multiyear observations of volcanic activity in remote settings. Anatahan (Mariana Islands) is a remote volcano in the western North Pacific. Available ground-based measurements of sulphur dioxide (SO2) gas emissions at Anatahan place it among thelargest volcanic SO2 sources worldwide. These ground-based measurements, however, are restricted to eruptive intervals. Anatahan's activity since 2003 has been dominated temporally by prolonged periods of quiescence. Using 10 years of satellite observations from OMI, AIRS, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2, we report highly variable SO2 emissions within and between eruptive and quiescent intervals at Anatahan. We find close correspondence between levels of activity reported at the volcano and levels of SO2 emissions detected from space. Eruptive SO2 emission rates have a mean value of ˜6400 t d-1, but frequently are in excess of 20,000 t d-1. Conversely, SO2 emissions during quiescent intervals are below the detection limit of space-based sensors and therefore are not likely to exceed ˜300 t d-1. We show that while Anatahan occupies a quiescent state for 85% of the past 10 years, only ˜15% of total SO2 emissions over this interval occur during quiescence, with the remaining ˜85% released in short duration but intense syn-eruptive degassing. We propose that the integration of multiyear satellite data sets and activity histories are a powerful complement to targeted ground-based campaign measurements in better describing the long-term degassing behavior of remote volcanoes.

  2. Sea ice effective microwave emissivities from satellite passive microwave and infrared observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comiso, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Near-simultaneous images from the temperature-humidity IR radiometer and dual-polarization scanning multichannel microwave radiometer of the Nimbus 7 satellite are used to investigate microwave sea ice emissivities on a global scale. Emissivities in several Arctic region study areas are found to be approximately constant during a nine-month pereiod covering the fall, winter and spring months, in the cases of both first-year and multiyear ice. During the onset of summer, emissivity increases of about 30 percent are observed at 37 GHz in multiyear ice. A multichannel cluster analysis over very large study areas during winter indicates considerable variability in emissivities of consolidated ice clusters at 37 GHz, and only 1/3 as much variability at 18 GHz. If the variability within each cluster is quantified and taken into account by means of multispectral analysis, data on ice thickness and surface characteristics may also be obtained.

  3. Estimation of Swiss methane emissions by near surface observations and inverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henne, Stephan; Brian, Oney; Leuenberger, Markus; Bamberger, Ines; Eugster, Werner; Steinbacher, Martin; Meinhardt, Frank; Brunner, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    On a global scale methane (CH4) is the second most important long-lived greenhouse gas. It is released from both natural and anthropogenic processes and its atmospheric burden has more than doubled since preindustrial times. Current CH4 emission estimates are associated with comparatively large uncertainties both globally and regionally. For example, the Swiss national greenhouse gas inventory assigns an uncertainty of 18% to the country total anthropogenic CH4 emissions as compared to only 3% for anthropogenic CO2 emissions. In Switzerland, CH4 is thought to be mainly released by agricultural activities (ruminants and manure management >80%), while natural emissions from wetlands and wild animals represent a minor source (~3 %). The country total and especially the spatial distribution of CH4 emission within Switzerland strongly differs between the national and different European scale inventories. To validate the 'bottom-up' Swiss CH4 emission estimate and to reduce its uncertainty both in total and spatially, 'top-down' methods combining atmospheric CH4 observations and regional scale transport simulations can be used. Here, we analyse continuous, near surface observations of CH4 concentrations as collected within the newly established CarboCountCH measurement network (http://www.carbocount.ch). The network consists of 4 sites situated on the Swiss Plateau, comprising a tall tower site (217 m), two elevated (mountaintop) sites and a small tower site (32 m) in flat terrain. In addition, continuous CH4 observations from the nearby high-altitude site Jungfraujoch (Alps) and the mountaintop site Schauinsland (Germany) were used. Two inversion frameworks were applied to the CH4 observations in combination with source sensitivities (footprints) calculated with the regional scale version of the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART. One inversion system was based on a Bayesian framework, while the other utilized an extended Kalman filter approach. The transport model was driven by analysis fields from the non-hydrostatic numerical weather predication model COSMO at horizontal resolutions of up to 7 km x 7 km. As a result spatially resolved, annual mean CH4 fluxes for Switzerland were obtained. In general total Swiss CH4 emission remained close to the 'bottom-up' estimates, while considerable shifts in the regional distribution of the emissions were obtained. Reductions in CH4 emissions, as compared to the prior estimates, were established in regions with large emissions from ruminants, while increases resulted in the Western part of the Swiss Plateau, which is dominated by mixture of large water bodies and crop and vegetable farming. Sensitivity inversions were applied to assess the overall robustness and the uncertainty of the inversion system.

  4. Multiwavelength observations of GRB 110731A: GeV emission from onset to afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    We report on the multiwavelength observations of the bright, long gamma-ray burst \\GRB, by the \\Fermi and \\Swift observatories, and by the MOA and GROND optical telescopes. The analysis of the prompt phase reveals that \\GRB shares many features with bright Large Area Telescope bursts observed by \\Fermi during the first 3 years on-orbit: a light curve with short time variability across the whole energy range during the prompt phase, delayed onset of the emission above 100 MeV, extra power law component and temporally extended high-energy emission. In addition, this the first GRB for which simultaneous GeV, X-ray, and optical data are available over multiple epochs beginning just after the trigger time and extending for more than 800 s, allowing temporal and spectral analysis in different epochs that favor emission from the forward shock in a wind-type medium. The observed temporally extended GeV emission is most likely part of the high-energy end of the afterglow emission. Both the single-zone pair transparenc...

  5. Long Wavelength Observations of Thermal Emission from Pluto and Charon with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Bryan J.; Gurwell, Mark; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Moullet, Arielle; Moreno, Raphael; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Biver, Nicolas; Fouchet, Thierry; Lis, Darek; Stern, Alan; Young, Leslie; Young, Eliot; Weaver, Hal; Boissier, Jeremie; Stansberry, John

    2015-11-01

    Long wavelength observations of Pluto can determine atmospheric temperatures, abundances, and vertical distributions for those molecules that have transitions at these wavelengths. In addition, observations of both Pluto and Charon can elucidate their surface and subsurface temperatures and surface compositions (and distribution, with enough resolution). We have used the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to observe the CO and HCN in the atmosphere of Pluto, and to observe thermal emission from the two bodies, where the resolution is enough to separate them (but not enough to resolve each individually). We report here on the thermal emission observations, and separately at this meeting on the CO [1] and HCN [2] observations. We observed the Pluto/Charon system with ALMA on June 12 and 13, 2015, at a wavelength of ~0.86 mm. Both days provide separate observations of the thermal emission from Pluto and Charon. We find a preliminary value of the brightness temperature of the two bodies of 35 K and 46 K with variation of less than 1 K between the two days and SNR of > 300 for Pluto and > 100 for Charon. This is similar to previous observations of the separate thermal emission of the two bodies with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) [3] and Very Large Array (VLA) [4]. We will discuss the implications of these measured brightness temperatures and the apparent lack of significant variation between the two days (longitudes).[1] Gurwell et al., this meeting. [2] Lellouch et al., this meeting. [3] Gurwell & Butler, BAAS 37, 2005. [4] Butler et al. BAAS 43, 2010.

  6. Reduction of black carbon aerosols in Tokyo: Comparison of real-time observations with emission estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Y.; Ram, K.; Takegawa, N.; Sahu, L.; Morino, Y.; Liu, X.; Ohara, T.

    2012-07-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols alter the radiation budget both directly (by absorbing solar visible radiation) and indirectly (by acting as cloud condensation nuclei) and cause adverse health effects. The absorbing efficiency and direct radiative effect of BC strongly depend on its mass concentration (MBC) and type of emission source. In the present study, we report measurements of MBC at the Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), located at the center of the urban boundary of Tokyo, using an EC-OC analyzer from 2003 to 2005 and a filter-based Continuous Soot Monitoring System (COSMOS) during 2007-2010. The results indicate that MBC have decreased significantly from 2.6 ?g m-3 to 0.5 ?g m-3 (˜80% reduction) between 2003 and 2010. Vehicular emissions are the dominant source of BC in Tokyo, and the observed reduction in MBC is mainly attributed to the stringent regulations of particulate matter exhaust from vehicles imposed by the Japanese government. In addition, this observation is also supported from emission estimates using diurnal-weekly variations of MBC in Tokyo and explains the observed reduction to within about 20%. This is the first clear evidence of a significant reduction in BC emissions in Tokyo and shows that measures taken to reduce BC emissions from traffic sources have a strong effect on air quality in a mega-city and also reduce the climate impact of traffic emissions. We highlight the importance of long-term and reliable measurements in detecting BC trends and for the validation and regulation of emission control measures in mega-cities.

  7. PANCHROMATIC OBSERVATIONS OF THE TEXTBOOK GRB 110205A: CONSTRAINING PHYSICAL MECHANISMS OF PROMPT EMISSION AND AFTERGLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, W. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Shen, R. F. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada); Sakamoto, T. [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (CRESST), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Beardmore, A. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); De Pasquale, M. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury Road, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Wu, X. F.; Zhang, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Gorosabel, J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA-CSIC), 18008 Granada (Spain); Urata, Y. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan (China); Sugita, S. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Pozanenko, A. [Space Research Institute (IKI), 84/32 Profsoyuznaya St., Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Nissinen, M. [Taurus Hill Observatory, Haerkaemaeentie 88, 79480 Kangaslampi (Finland); Sahu, D. K. [CREST, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India); Im, M. [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe, Department of Physics and Astronomy, FPRD, Seoul National University, Shillim-dong, San 56-1, Kwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ukwatta, T. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Andreev, M. [Terskol Branch of Institute of Astronomy of RAS, Kabardino-Balkaria Republic 361605 (Russian Federation); Klunko, E., E-mail: zwk@umich.edu, E-mail: rfshen@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Lermontov St., 126a, Irkutsk 664033 (Russian Federation); and others

    2012-06-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long-duration (T{sub 90} {approx} 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z = 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb, and BOOTES telescopes when the gamma-ray burst (GRB) was still radiating in the {gamma}-ray band, with optical light curve showing correlation with {gamma}-ray data. Nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray, to {gamma}-ray (1 eV to 5 MeV), which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution during the prompt emission phase. In particular, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Shortly after prompt emission ({approx}1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise ({alpha} {approx} 5.5) was observed, which we interpret as the reverse shock (RS) emission. It is the first time that the rising phase of an RS component has been closely observed. The full optical and X-ray afterglow light curves can be interpreted within the standard reverse shock (RS) + forward shock (FS) model. In general, the high-quality prompt and afterglow data allow us to apply the standard fireball model to extract valuable information, including the radiation mechanism (synchrotron), radius of prompt emission (R{sub GRB} {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm), initial Lorentz factor of the outflow ({Gamma}{sub 0} {approx} 250), the composition of the ejecta (mildly magnetized), the collimation angle, and the total energy budget.

  8. Modelling of X-ray emission supernova remnants observed by the European satellite XMM-Newton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with the X-ray emission of supernova remnants (SNRs) observed by the European satellite XMM-Newton. In SNRs, the matter heated to millions of degrees shines brightly in X-rays. This emission depends on the hydrodynamical evolution of the SNR, on the chemical composition of the ejected matter and on the ambient medium. Moreover, the blast-wave is considered to be the prime site of the production and the acceleration of cosmic-rays in our Galaxy. XMM-Newton is one of the first to allow the investigation of these different aspects thanks to its spatially-resolved spectroscopy and its very good sensitivity. l first studied Kepler's SNR (SN 1604) whose X-ray emission is dominated by the ejecta. Its observation has allowed to obtain information on the nucleosynthesis products, on their spatial distribution and on the temperature structure in the shocked ejecta. This gives strong constraints on the physics of the explosion and on the progenitor's type. l have shown also that the X-ray emission at the shock is likely to be non-thermal. Then, l studied the SNR G347.3-0.5 whose X-ray emission is entirely due to the synchrotron radiation of relativistic (TeV) electrons accelerated at the shock. From five pointing, l made a full mapping of the X-ray emission characteristics (brightness, absorption and spectral index) at small scale. Combined to radio observations, these results have indicated a clear interaction between the SNR and molecular clouds located at 1 kpc and not at 6 kpc as previously estimated. Lastly, in the framework of a self-similar hydrodynamical model coupled with non-linear particle acceleration, l have obtained the synchrotron emission profile in SNRs, including the adiabatic and radiative losses of the accelerated electrons. (author)

  9. Worldwide biogenic soil NOx emissions inferred from OMI NO2 observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. M. Vinken

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic NOx emissions from soils are a large natural source with substantial uncertainties in global bottom-up estimates (ranging from 4 to 15 Tg N yr?1. We reduce this range in emission estimates, and present a top-down soil NOx emission inventory for 2005 based on retrieved tropospheric NO2 columns from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI. We use a state-of-science soil NOx emission inventory (Hudman et al., 2012 as a priori in the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model to identify 11 regions where tropospheric NO2 columns are dominated by soil NOx emissions. Strong correlations between soil NOx emissions and simulated NO2 columns indicate that spatial patterns in simulated NO2 columns in these regions indeed reflect the underlying soil NOx emissions. Subsequently, we use a mass-balance approach to constrain emissions for these 11 regions on all major continents using OMI observed and GEOS-Chem simulated tropospheric NO2 columns. We find that responses of simulated NO2 columns to changing NOx emissions are suppressed over low NOx regions, and account for these non-linearities in our inversion approach. In general, our approach suggests that emissions need to be increased in most regions. Our OMI top-down soil NOx inventory amounts to 10.0 Tg N for 2005 when only constraining the 11 regions, and 12.9 Tg N when extrapolating the constraints globally. Substantial regional differences exist (ranging from ?40% to +90%, and globally our top-down inventory is 4–35% higher than the GEOS-Chem a priori (9.6 Tg N yr?1. We evaluate NO2 concentrations simulated with our new OMI top-down inventory against surface NO2 measurements from monitoring stations in Africa, the USA and Europe. Although this comparison is complicated by several factors, we find an encouraging improved agreement when using the OMI top-down inventory compared to using the a priori inventory. To our knowledge, this study provides, for the first time, specific constraints on soil NOx emissions on all major continents using OMI NO2 columns. Our results rule out the low end of reported soil NOx emission estimates, and suggest that global emissions are most likely around 12.9 ± 3.9 Tg N yr?1.

  10. Worldwide biogenic soil NOx emissions inferred from OMI NO2 observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. M. Vinken

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic NOx emissions from soils are a large natural source with substantial uncertainties in global bottom-up estimates (ranging from 4 to 27 Tg N yr?1. We reduce this range in emission estimates, and present a top-down soil NOx emission inventory for 2005 based on retrieved tropospheric NO2 columns from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI. We used a state-of-science soil NOx emission inventory (Hudman et al., 2012 as a priori in the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model to identify 11 regions where tropospheric NO2 columns are dominated by soil NOx emissions. Strong correlations between soil NOx emissions and simulated NO2 columns indicated that spatial patterns in simulated NO2 columns in these regions indeed reflect the underlying soil NOx emissions. Subsequently, we used a mass-balance approach to constrain emissions for these 11 regions on all major continents using OMI observed and GEOS-Chem simulated tropospheric NO2 columns. We found that responses of simulated NO2 columns to changing NOx emissions were suppressed over low NOx regions, and accounted for these non-linearities in our inversion approach. In general, our approach suggests that emissions need to be increased in most regions. Our OMI top-down soil NOx inventory amounts to 10.0 Tg N for 2005 when only constraining the 11 regions, and 12.9 Tg N when extrapolating the constraints globally. Substantial regional differences exist (ranging from ?40% to +90%, and globally our top-down inventory is 4–35% higher than the GEOS-Chem a priori (9.6 Tg N yr?1. We evaluated NO2 concentrations simulated with our new OMI top-down inventory against surface NO2 measurements from monitoring stations in Africa, the USA, and Europe. Although this comparison is complicated by several factors, we find an encouraging improved agreement when using the OMI top-down inventory compared to using the a priori inventory. To our knowledge, this study provides, for the first time, specific constraints on soil NOx emissions on all major continents using OMI NO2 columns. Our results rule out the high end of reported soil NOx emission estimates, and suggest that global emissions are most likely around 10–13 Tg N yr?1.

  11. The efficiency and sensitivity analysis of observations for atmospheric transport model with emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xueran; Elbern, Hendrik; Jacob, Birgit

    2015-04-01

    Air quality and climate change are influenced by the fluxes of green house gases, reactive emissions and aerosols in the atmosphere. But observations of the chemical states in the atmosphere typically have low temporal and spatial density. Therefore, many works are introduced to spatio-temporal data assimilation methods in atmospheric chemistry in recent years. There is no doubt that the optimization of the initial state is always of great importance for the improvement of predictive skill. However, specified to the chemistry transport model with high dependence on the emissions in the troposphere, the optimization of the initial state is no longer the only issue. The lack of the ability to observe and estimate surface emission fluxes and important inner atmospheric fluxes with necessary accuracy is a major roadblock of hampering the progress in predictive skills of the atmospheric transport model. However, in many cases, the better estimations for both the initial state and emission rates are not always obtained with certain observational network configurations via various popular data assimilation methods, such as the ensemble Kalman filter and smoother and 4D-variation. It leads to the waste of resource by optimizing the improper parameters or brings the inaccuracy of the optimization by unsuitable weight between the initial state and emission rates. Hence, in order to make a scientific and quantitative decision about which parameters to be optimized and how to balance them before any data assimilation procedure, we establish the dynamic model for emission rates with the constraint of diurnal profile shape and extend the state vector of atmospheric transport model so that the emission rates are included. Then, a theoretical approach, based on Kalman filter and smoother and their ensemble cases, to evaluate the potential improvement is introduced. By singular value decomposition, the efficiency of observations to optimize initial state and emission rates of the extended atmospheric transport model can be easily determined. Further, with the same singular vector analysis of the efficiency of observations, the sensitivity of observations can be identified by determining the directions of maximum perturbation. Finally, a 3D advection-diffusion toy model is presented to test the approach.

  12. Using Lunar Observations to Assess Terra MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Chen, Hongda

    2010-01-01

    MODIS collects data in both the reflected solar and thermal emissive regions using 36 spectral bands. The center wavelengths of these bands cover the3.7 to 14.24 micron region. In addition to using its on-board calibrators (OBC), which include a full aperture solar diffuser (SD) and a blackbody (BB), lunar observations have been scheduled on a regular basis to support both Terra and Aqua MODIS on-orbit calibration and characterization. This paper provides an overview of MODIS lunar observations and their applications for the reflective solar bands (RSB) and thermal emissive bands (TEB) with an emphasis on potential calibration improvements of MODIS band 21 at 3.96 microns. This spectral band has detectors set with low gains to enable fire detection. Methodologies are proposed and examined on the use of lunar observations for the band 21 calibration. Also presented in this paper are preliminary results derived from Terra MODIS lunar observations and remaining challenging issues.

  13. Anomalously strong vertical magnetic fields from distant ELF/VLF sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Israel; Price, Colin; Galanti, Eli; Shuval, Abraham

    2015-07-01

    There are many sources of very low frequency (VLF—3-30 kHz) and extremely low frequency (ELF—3-3000 Hz) radiation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide (e.g., lightning and ELF/VLF communication transmitters). At distances of thousands of kilometers from these sources, the vertical component of the ELF/VLF AC magnetic fields is expected to be very weak and several orders of magnitude lower than the horizontal magnetic components. However, measurements in Israel show a relatively strong vertical magnetic component in both the ELF and VLF bands, at the same order of magnitude as the horizontal components. Our measurements suggest that the real Earth-ionosphere waveguide might often be very different from the theoretical waveguide used in model calculations. In addition, our results imply that using only the horizontal components for direction finding or the absolute magnetic field strength may result in errors, since often a significant fraction of the magnetic field energy hides in the vertical component.

  14. Characteristics of severe thunderstorms studied with the aid of VLF atmospherics over North–East India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Guha; Trisanu Banik; Barin Kumar De; Rakesh Roy; Abhijit Choudhury

    2013-08-01

    Electromagnetic waves from lightning activity, commonly known as atmospherics or sferics serve as an effective tool for studying the lower ionosphere as well as thunderstorm activity. It is also useful for locating lightning strokes regionally and globally. In this paper, we present the analysis of the Integrated Field Intensity of Sferics (IFIS) at six discrete VLF frequencies for 30 lightning-associated overhead thunderstorms in Tripura, within the period from August 2009 to October 2010. An ingeniously developed well calibrated GPS locked software VLF receiver, located at the Department of Physics, Tripura University (23.5°N, 91.25°E), is used for the present study. Two distinct types of variations of IFIS, (i) single peak and (ii) dual peak are found characterizing each thunderstorm and their occurrence show nearly inverse character. The spectral character of IFIS rise rate, fall rate and rate of enhancement for each type is studied searching for suitable frequencies in the VLF range to forecast a thunderstorm. It is concluded that VLF sferics from 3–10 kHz are the most effective in terms nowcasting an incoming thunderstorm well before 3–4 hours of its peak occurrence, when there may not be any visual indication of the thunderstorm.

  15. Emission inventory evaluation using observations of regional atmospheric background stations of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xingqin; Sun, Zhaobin; Lin, Weili; Jin, Min; Li, Nan

    2013-03-01

    Any accurate simulation of regional air quality by numerical models entails accurate and up-to-date emissions data for that region. The INTEX-B2006 (I06), one of the newest emission inventories recently popularly used in China and East Asia, has been assessed using the Community Multiscale Air Quality model and observations from regional atmospheric background stations of China. Comparisons of the model results with the observations for the species SO2, NO2, O3 and CO from the three regional atmospheric background stations of Shangdianzi, Longfengshan and Linan show that the model can basically capture the temporal characteristics of observations such as the monthly, seasonal and diurnal variance trends. Compared to the other three species, the simulated CO values were grossly underestimated by about two-third or one-half of the observed values, related to the uncertainty in CO emissions. Compared to the other two stations, Shangdianzi had poorer simulations, especially for SO2 and CO, which partly resulted from the site location close to local emission sources from the Beijing area; and the regional inventory used was not capable of capturing the influencing factors of strong regional sources on stations. Generally, the fact that summer gave poor simulation, especially for SO2 and O3, might partly relate to poor simulations of meteorological fields such as temperature and wind. PMID:23923427

  16. Observations of correlations between nuclear, acoustic and electromagnetic emissions during palladium electrolytic saturation with deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of palladium electrolytic saturation with deuterium two events were observed with a 'rigid' time correlation between nuclear, acoustic and electromagnetic emission pulses, which confirmated the relationship between processes of crack formation and low-temperature nuclear fusion predicted by the 'accelerating' model

  17. Resonant behavior observed in electron field emission from acid functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Lyth, SM; SILVA, SRP

    2009-01-01

    Acid functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube ink was deposited onto carbon fiber fabric via dip coating. Repeatable staircaselike current-field curves were observed in the field emission data. These atypical curves are attributed to resonant tunneling through localized surface states in a quantum well structure, which arises due to the presence of the surface carboxylic functional group.

  18. Spicule emission profiles observed in \\ion{He}{i} 10830 \\AA

    OpenAIRE

    Nuño, B. Sánchez-Andrade; Centeno, R.; Puschmann, K. G.; Bueno, J. Trujillo; Rodríguez, J. Blanco; Kneer, F.

    2007-01-01

    Off-the-limb observations with high spatial and spectral resolution will help us understand the physical properties of spicules in the solar chromosphere Spectropolarimetric observations of spicules in the \\ion{He}{i} 10830 \\AA\\ multiplet were obtained with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter on the German Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife, Spain). The analysis shows the variation of the off-limb emission profiles as a function of the distance to t...

  19. Seasonality in fire emission factors using satellite observations of CO and NO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, P.; Boersma, K. F.; van der Werf, G.

    2012-12-01

    Burning of vegetation for deforestation, agriculture, land management, and other purposes releases large amounts of trace gases and aerosols into the atmosphere, clearly visible in satellite data records. While burned area and active fire observations in combination with biogeochemical models can provide constraints on the timing, spatial extent, and total fuel consumed by fires, further calculation of trace gas emissions from fires requires partitioning of total fuel consumed into different trace gases using emission factors. In the current formulation of Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED), emissions factors vary by biome but do not vary in time. This is because only a few direct measurements of these emissions factors exist, and of those none encompass a full fire season. In this work, we take advantage of the long data records of CO and NO2 tropospheric columns from the MOPITT and OMI satellites, respectively, to better characterize the seasonal variability of these trace gas emissions from fires. Field measurements have shown that the emissions factors of CO and NO2 are inversely related and are dependent on fuel characteristics and ambient conditions. We analyze a 6-year monthly climatology (2005-2010) of CO to NO2 ratios over important fire regions: central Amazonia, northern Australia, equatorial Africa, and southern Africa. We use the TM5 chemical transport model to separate the fire emissions signal from background variability and the contributions from lightning NOx and anthropogenic emissions. We find that in general the CO:NO2 ratio decreases over the course of the fire season and is correlated with the minimum in rainfall, possibly indicating an increase in flaming combustion, and an increase (decrease) in NOx (CO) emissions factors as fuel beds become dryer. We also analyze trends in fire-isolated NO2 and CO concentrations and find indications of increasing emissions from fires in northern Africa. These results can be used as large-scale indicators of fire characteristics. They have the potential to constrain trace gas emission variability and therefore atmospheric trace gas budgets.

  20. Application of Self Adaptive Unsupervised Neural Networks for Processing of VLF-LF signals to detect Seismic-Ionospheric Precursor Phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeberis, C.; Xenos, T. D.; Hadjileontiadis, L.; Contadakis, M. E.; Arabelos, D.

    2012-04-01

    This paper investigates the development and application of artificial neural networks (ANN) based on Predictive Modular Neural Networks (PREMONNs) to provide a self adaptive unsupervised method for detecting disturbances that can be attributed to seismic-ionospheric precursor phenomena using VLF radio signals. As such, the neural network is applied to bring forth and adaptively discriminate different characteristics in the received signals, in real time, in order to provide data segments of interest that can be correlated to subsequent seismic phenomena. PREMONNs have been developed for time series prediction and through that for source switching detection in a time series; they are constituted by two modules. The first tier is a module consisting of a dynamic array of neural networks following the data stream in order to predict the next value of a time series whereas the second is a decision one utilizing a Bayes probability equation to decide on source switching. That module is responsible for electing and appropriately training the closest fitting NN or switching to a new NN if a source switch is apparent. For the purpose of this paper, VLF signals transmitted by a number of European VLF transmitters are monitored for over a year in Thessaloniki (40.69N 22.78E) and the data from December 2010 to December 2011 are used. The received signals are sampled and stored for off line processing. The receiver was developed by Elettronika Srl, and is part of the International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors (INFREP). Signals received from the 20.27KHz ICV station in Tavolara, Italy (Lat 40.923,Lon. 9.731) were used. The received VLF signal was normalized and then processed using the Empirical Mode Decomposition Method (EMD). The resulting data are used to train the unsupervised ANN and the performance of the developed network is then evaluated. The efficacy of different layouts of the PREMONN is evaluated and the application of a self-organizing classifier is then discussed. It classifies disturbances and provides the basis of a preliminary system for the analysis and objective correlation of the perceived disturbances. Therefore, it may be concluded that an automated system based on the PREMONN paired with an unsupervised classifier may provide a real-time method for correlating seismic activity with the observed disturbances.

  1. Diffuse X-ray Emission from the Carina Nebula Observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    A number of giant HII regions are associated with soft diffuse X-ray emission. Among these, the Carina nebula possesses the brightest soft diffuse emission. The required plasma temperature and thermal energy can be produced by collisions or termination of fast winds from main-sequence or embedded young O stars, but the extended emission is often observed from regions apart from massive stellar clusters. The origin of the X-ray emission is unknown. The XIS CCD camera onboard Suzaku has the best spectral resolution for extended soft sources so far, and is therefore capable of measuring key emission lines in the soft band. Suzaku observed the core and the eastern side of the Carina nebula (Car-D1) in 2005 Aug and 2006 June, respectively. Spectra of the south part of the core and Car-D1 similarly showed strong L-shell lines of iron ions and K-shell lines of silicon ions, while in the north of the core these lines were much weaker. Fitting the spectra with an absorbed thin-thermal plasma model showed kT~0.2, 0.6 k...

  2. Space-based observations of fire NOx emission coefficients: a global biome-scale comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Mebust

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning represents both a significant and highly variable source of NOx to the atmosphere. This variability stems from both the episodic nature of fires, and from fire conditions such as the modified combustion efficiency of the fire, the nitrogen content of the fuel and possibly other factors that have not been identified or evaluated by comparison with observations. Satellite instruments offer an opportunity to observe emissions from wildfires, providing a large suite of measurements which allow us to study mean behavior and variability on the regional scale in a statistically rigorous manner. Here we use space-based measurements of fire radiative power from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer in combination with NO2 tropospheric column densities from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument to measure mean emission coefficients (ECs in g NO MJ?1 from fires for global biomes, and across a wide range of smaller-scale ecoregions, defined as spatially-distinct clusters of fires with similar fuel type. Mean ECs for all biomes fall between 0.250–0.362 g NO MJ?1, a range that is smaller than found in previous studies of biome-scale emission factors. The majority of ecoregion ECs fall within or near this range, implying that under most conditions, mean fire emissions per unit energy are similar between different regions regardless of fuel type or spatial variability. In contrast to these similarities, we find that about 24% of individual ecoregion ECs deviate significantly (p x emissions.

  3. HST/ACS Observations of Europa's Atmospheric UV Emission at Eastern Elongation

    OpenAIRE

    Saur, Joachim; Feldman, Paul D.; Roth, Lorenz; Nimmo, Francis; Strobel, Darrell F.; Retherford, Kurt D.; McGrath, Melissa A.; Schilling, Nico; Gérard, Jean-Claude; Grodent, Denis

    2011-01-01

    We report results of a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) campaign with the Advanced Camera for Surveys to observe Europa at eastern elongation, i.e. Europa's leading side, on 2008 June 29. With five consecutive HST orbits, we constrain Europa's atmospheric \\ion{O}{1} 1304 \\A and \\ion{O}{1} 1356 \\A emissions using the prism PR130L. The total emissions of both oxygen multiplets range between 132 $\\pm$ 14 and 226 $\\pm$ 14 Rayleigh. An additional systematic error with values on the s...

  4. observations of hot molecular gas emission from embedded low-mass protostars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, R.; Kristensen, L. E.; Bruderer, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Herczeg, G. J.; Brinch, C.; Doty, S. D.; Harsono, D.; Wolfire, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. Young stars interact vigorously with their surroundings, as evident from the highly rotationally excited CO (up to Eu/k = 4000 K) and H2O emission (up to 600 K) detected by the Herschel Space Observatory in embedded low-mass protostars. Our aim is to construct a model that reproduces the observations quantitatively, to investigate the origin of the emission, and to use the lines as probes of the various heating mechanisms. Methods. The model consists of a spherical envelope with a power-la...

  5. Helium Emissions Observed in Ground-Based Spectra of Solar Prominences

    OpenAIRE

    Ramelli, Renzo; Stellmacher, Goetz; Wiehr, Eberhard; Bianda, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The only prominent line of singly ionized helium in the visible spectral range, helium-II 4686 A, is observed together with the helium-I 5015 A singlet and the helium-I 4471 A triplet line in solar prominences. The sodium emission, NaD2, is used as a tracer for helium-II emissions which are sufficiently bright to exceed the noise level near 10^-6 of the disk-center intensity. The so selected prominences are characterized by small non-thermal line broadening and almost absent...

  6. Global oceanic emission of ammonia: Constraints from seawater and atmospheric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulot, F.; Jacob, D. J.; Johnson, M. T.; Bell, T. G.; Baker, A. R.; Keene, W. C.; Lima, I. D.; Doney, S. C.; Stock, C. A.

    2015-08-01

    Current global inventories of ammonia emissions identify the ocean as the largest natural source. This source depends on seawater pH, temperature, and the concentration of total seawater ammonia (NHx(sw)), which reflects a balance between remineralization of organic matter, uptake by plankton, and nitrification. Here we compare [NHx(sw)] from two global ocean biogeochemical models (BEC and COBALT) against extensive ocean observations. Simulated [NHx(sw)] are generally biased high. Improved simulation can be achieved in COBALT by increasing the plankton affinity for NHx within observed ranges. The resulting global ocean emissions is 2.5 TgN a-1, much lower than current literature values (7-23 TgN a-1), including the widely used Global Emissions InitiAtive (GEIA) inventory (8 TgN a-1). Such a weak ocean source implies that continental sources contribute more than half of atmospheric NHx over most of the ocean in the Northern Hemisphere. Ammonia emitted from oceanic sources is insufficient to neutralize sulfate aerosol acidity, consistent with observations. There is evidence over the Equatorial Pacific for a missing source of atmospheric ammonia that could be due to photolysis of marine organic nitrogen at the ocean surface or in the atmosphere. Accommodating this possible missing source yields a global ocean emission of ammonia in the range 2-5 TgN a-1, comparable in magnitude to other natural sources from open fires and soils.

  7. P-MaNGA Galaxies: Emission Lines Properties - Gas Ionisation and Chemical Abundances from Prototype Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Belfiore, F; Bundy, K; Thomas, D; Maraston, C; Wilkinson, D; Sánchez, S F; Bershady, M; Blanc, G A; Bothwell, M; Cales, S L; Coccato, L; Drory, N; Emsellem, E; Fu, H; Gelfand, J; Law, D; Masters, K; Parejko, J; Tremonti, C; Wake, D; Weijmans, A; Yan, R; Xiao, T; Zhang, K; Zheng, T; Bizyaev, D; Kinemuchi, K; Oravetz, D; Simmons, A

    2014-01-01

    MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) is a SDSS-IV survey that will obtain spatially resolved spectroscopy from 3600 \\AA\\ to 10300 \\AA\\ for a representative sample of over 10000 nearby galaxies. In this paper we present the analysis of nebular emission line properties using observations of 14 galaxies obtained with P-MaNGA, a prototype of the MaNGA instrument. By using spatially resolved diagnostic diagrams we find extended star formation in galaxies that are centrally dominated by Seyfert/LINER-like emission, illustrating that galaxy characterisations based on single fibre spectra are necessarily incomplete. We observe extended (up to $\\rm 1 R_{e}$) LINER-like emission in the central regions of three galaxies. We make use of the $\\rm EW(H \\alpha)$ to argue that the observed emission is consistent with ionisation from hot evolved stars. Using stellar population indices we conclude that galactic regions which are ionised by a Seyfert/LINER-like radiation field are also devoid of recent st...

  8. Efficiency and Sensitivity Analysis of Observation Networks for Atmospheric Inverse Modelling with Emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xueran; Jacob, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The controllability of advection-diffusion systems, subject to uncertain initial values and emission rates, is estimated, given sparse and error affected observations of prognostic state variables. In predictive geophysical model systems, like atmospheric chemistry simulations, different parameter families influence the temporal evolution of the system.This renders initial-value-only optimisation by traditional data assimilation methods as insufficient. In this paper, a quantitative assessment method on validation of measurement configurations to optimize initial values and emission rates, and how to balance them, is introduced. In this theoretical approach, Kalman filter and smoother and their ensemble based versions are combined with a singular value decomposition, to evaluate the potential improvement associated with specific observational network configurations. Further, with the same singular vector analysis for the efficiency of observations, their sensitivity to model control can be identified by deter...

  9. The Impact of Return-Current Losses on the Observed Emissions from Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2011-01-01

    Electrons accelerated in solar flares are expected to drive a co-spatial return current in the ambient plasma when they escape the acceleration region. This return current maintains plasma neutrality and the stability of the beam of streaming electrons. The electric field that drives this return current also decelerates the energetic electrons in the beam. The corresponding energy loss experienced by the accelerated electrons can affect the observed properties of the X-ray and radio emissions from flares and the evolution of the thermal flare plasma. I will discuss the properties of the flare emissions expected in a classical, steady-state model. As part of this discussion, I will examine Gordon Emslie's 1980 conjecture that return-current losses result in a maximum brightness for the hard X-ray emission from flares.

  10. Dark matter line emission constraints from NuSTAR observations of the Bullet Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Riemer-Sørensen, S; Madejski, G; Molendi, S; Gastaldello, F; Harrison, F A; Craig, W W; Hailey, C J; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Stern, D; Zhang, W W; Hornstrup, A

    2015-01-01

    Line emission from dark matter is well motivated for some candidates e.g. sterile neutrinos. We present the first search for dark matter line emission in the 3-80keV range in a pointed observation of the Bullet Cluster with NuSTAR. We do not detect any significant line emission and instead we derive upper limits (95% CL) on the flux, and interpret these constraints in the context of sterile neutrinos and more generic dark matter candidates. NuSTAR does not have the sensitivity to constrain the recently claimed line detection at 3.5keV, but improves on the constraints for energies of 10-25keV.

  11. Building and the analysis of two radio antennas (SSRT) in vlf zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbouti, Marjan; Khakian Ghomi, Mehdi; Salmanpour Paeen Afrakati, Mohammad Reza; Riahi, Jahad; Ghanbari, Keyvan; Moradi Khanghahi, Abolfazl; Nahavandi, Behzad

    This design is a joint project between telecommunication and astrophysics subjects carried out for the first time in Iran. In this article, we engage in building of two looped antennas (SSRT) that the first type of it is a SSRT (octagonal looped antenna) with an outer filter system of 80 cm diameter, cable thickness of 0.55 mm, inductance 38.24 MH and capacitor’s capacitance of 919 pf. The software of Spectrum lab and SSRT Robot2 were used for software section and to store the related information. While second antenna type is a SSRT (two interconnected square type loop antennas) with inner filter system in the form of two interconnected squares with beveled corners such that the number of windings for outer square are (larger) 60 rounds, while for inner square (smaller) 95 rounds. The CATIA software was used to design the antenna structure and “Protel Dxp’’ software has been used to design its circuit. A program has been designed with C# language for receiving section and processing of data. Considering the closeness of Turkey transmitter to the city of Tehran (test location), the designed SSRTs are responsible for receiving the frequency of 26.7 kHz while TBB (Bafa, Turkey) is considered the frequency producing source for it. In the continuation of project, we started to store our receiving data from SSRTs following the calibration, average taking as well as noise elimination that was produced due to different factors such as the noises caused by electrical equipment and the everyday activities of telecommunication devices. In this stage, we were observing our receiving coincidences with all SSRTs as well as the Goes satellite. Afterwards, we dealt with the analysis of solar flares, sunrise-sunset effects and electrical disturbances. Then, in a separate project, the received data secured from 8 different VLF receivers were studied and examined, by means of Mr. Loudet receiver located in France, for the years of 2010, 2011 and 2012 and we attained the interesting results in this regard. The first result is that the time difference between SRT (time of rise end across ionosphere) and the sunrise as well as the SST (time of set beginning in ionosphere) and the sunset in the geographical location of signal encounter from ionosphere during summer is more as compared to winter season. And the second result is that we could measure a height of ionosphere by means of some calculations; during this period the signal had the maximum absorption. This is called the effective annihilation height and this effective annihilation height was secured for 8 VLF receivers. The results indicated that the effective annihilation height during autumn and winter seasons is higher and more than spring and summer seasons

  12. Probing the origin of VHE emission from M 87 with MWL observations in 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large majority of extragalactic very high energy (VHE; E >100 GeV) sources belongs to the class of active galactic nuclei (AGN), in particular the BL Lac sub-class. AGNs are characterized by an extremely bright and compact emission region, powered by a super-massive black hole (SMBH) and an accretion disk, and relativistic outflows (jets) detected all across the electro-magnetic spectrum. In BL Lac sources the jet axis is oriented close to the line of sight, giving rise to a relativistic boosting of the emission. In radio galaxies, on the other hand, the jet makes a larger angle to the line of sight allowing to resolve the central core and the jet in great details. The giant radio galaxy M 87 with its proximity (16 Mpc) and its very massive black hole ((3-6)x109MSun) provides a unique laboratory to investigate VHE emission in such objects and thereby probe particle acceleration to relativistic energies near SMBH and in jets. M 87 has been established as a VHE emitter since 2005. The VHE emission displays strong variability on time-scales as short as a day. It has been subject of a large joint VHE and multi-wavelength (MWL) monitoring campaign in 2008, where a rise in the 43 GHz VLBA radio emission of the innermost region (core) was found to coincide with a flaring activity at VHE. This had been interpreted as a strong indication that the VHE emission is produced in the direct vicinity of the SMBH black hole. In 2010 again a flare at VHE was detected triggering further MWL observations with the VLBA, Chandra, and other instruments. At the same time M 87 was also observed with the Fermi/LAT telescope at GeV energies and the European VLBI Network (EVN). In this contribution preliminary results from the campaign will be presented.

  13. Improved model of isoprene emissions in Africa using OMI satellite observations of formaldehyde: implications for oxidants and particulate matter

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Marais; Jacob, D J; Guenther, A.; Chance, K; Kurosu, T. P.; Murphy, J G; Reeves, C. E.; Pye, H. O. T.

    2014-01-01

    We use a 2005–2009 record of isoprene emissions over Africa derived from OMI satellite observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) to better understand the factors controlling isoprene emission on the scale of the continent and evaluate the impact of isoprene emissions on atmospheric composition in Africa. OMI-derived isoprene emissions show large seasonality over savannas driven by temperature and leaf area index (LAI), and much weaker seasonality over equatorial f...

  14. Observations of artificial and natural optical emissions at the HAARP facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pedersen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Extensive optical observations have been carried out at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP ionospheric heating facility since it began operations in 1999. A number of modern optical diagnostic instruments are hosted at remote sites as well as the main transmitter facility, which has recently been expanded from the initial 960 kW prototype configuration to its full 3.6 MW design capability. Upgrades to optical diagnostics have allowed a number of interesting new observations to be made at the 960 kW power level since 2004. Systematic beam-swinging experiments generating quantifiable levels of optical emission at various regions in the sky for the first time clearly show that emission intensity is very sensitive to distance from the magnetic zenith, and drops off rapidly at about 15° zenith angle in directions other than magnetic south. High temporal resolution measurements of emissions in the 557.7 nm green line at start-up and in short transmitter pulses demonstrate that localized irregularities are preferentially excited in the initial seconds of heating, with evolution into a more homogenous spot occurring over a period of about 1 min. High-quality emission altitude profiles at both 630.0 and 557.7 nm have recently been isolated from side-looking data, spanning an altitude extent of over 200 km, which has allowed determination of the effective lifetime of O (1D over an unprecedented altitude range. An innovative automated remote imager network utilizing low-cost mirror optics has been designed and deployed to make such measurements routinely. Observations of natural optical emissions at the site have revealed the common presence of highly structured but faint co-rotating subauroral precipitation that acts to suppress excitation of artificial F region optical emissions in areas of active precipitation. The observed spatial modulation of artificial optical emissions by structured precipitation is consistent with localized absorption of HF waves in the ionospheric D layer enhanced by the energetic particle precipitation.

  15. Atmospheric observations of carbon monoxide and fossil fuel CO2 emissions from East Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turnbull, Jocelyn C.; Tans, Pieter P.

    2011-01-01

    Flask samples from two sites in East Asia, Tae-Ahn Peninsula, Korea (TAP), and Shangdianzi, China (SDZ), were measured for trace gases including CO2, CO and fossil fuel CO2(CO(2)ff, derived from Delta(CO2)-C-14 observations). The five-year TAP record shows high CO(2)ff when local air comes from the Korean Peninsula. Most samples, however, reflect air masses from Northeastern China with lower CO(2)ff. Our small set of SDZ samples from winter 2009/2010 have strongly elevated CO(2)ff. Biospheric CO2 contributes substantially to total CO2 variability at both sites, even in winter when non-fossil CO2 sources (including photosynthesis, respiration, biomass burning and biofuel use) contribute 20-30% of the total CO2 enhancement. Carbon monoxide (CO) correlates strongly with CO(2)ff. The SDZ and TAP far-field (China influenced) samples have CO: CO(2)ff ratios (R-CO:CO2ff) of 47 +/- 2 and 44 +/- 3 ppb/ppm respectively, consistent with recent bottom-up inventory estimates and other observational studies. Locally influenced TAP samples fall into two distinct data sets, ascribed to air sourced from South Korea and North Korea. The South Korea samples have low R-CO:CO2ff of 13 +/- 3 ppb/ppm, slightly higher than bottom-up inventories, but consistent with emission ratios for other developed nations. We compare our CO(2)ff observations with modeled CO(2)ff using the FLEXPART Lagrangian particle dispersion model convolved with a bottom-up CO(2)ff emission inventories. The modeled annual mean CO(2)ff mole fractions are consistent with our observations when the model inventory includes the reported 63% increase in Chinese emissions from 2004 to 2010, whereas a model version which holds Chinese emissions flat is unable to replicate the observations.

  16. Panchromatic observations of the textbook GRB 110205A: constraining physical mechanisms of prompt emission and afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, W; Sakamoto, T; Beardmore, A P; Pasquale, M; Wu, X F; Gorosabel, J; Urata, Y; Sugita, S; Zhang, B; Pozanenko, A; Nissinen, M; Sahu, D K; Im, M; Ukwatta, T N; Andreev, M; Klunko, E; Volnova, A; Akerlof, C W; Anto, P; Barthelmy, S D; Breeveld, A; Carsenty, U; Castillo-Carri'on, S; Castro-Tirado, A J; Chester, M M; Chuang, C J; Cunniffe, R; Postigo, A; Duffard, R; Flewelling, H; Gehrels, N; Guver, T; Guziy, S; Hentunen, V P; Huang, K Y; Jelínek, M; Koch, T S; Kub'anek, P; Kuin, P; McKay, T A; Mottola, S; Oates, S R; O'Brien, P; Page, M J; Pandey, S B; Pulgar, C; Rujopakarn, W; Rykoff, E; Salmi, T; S'anchez-Ramírez, R; Schaefer, B E; Sergeev, A; Sonbas, E; Sota, A; Tello, J C; Yamaoka, K; Yost, S A; Yuan, F

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long duration (T90 ~ 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z= 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb and BOOTES telescopes when the GRB was still radiating in the gamma-ray band. Nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray to gamma-ray, which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution across 6 orders of magnitude in energy during the prompt emission phase. By fitting the time resolved prompt spectra, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard GRB synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Although the prompt optical emission is brighter than the extrapolation of the best fit X/gamma-ray spectra, it traces the gamma-ray light curve shape, suggesting a relation to the prompt high energy emission. The synchrotron + SSC scenario is disfavored by the data, but the models i...

  17. Herschel HIFI observations of O2 toward Orion: special conditions for shock enhanced emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report observations of molecular oxygen (O2) rotational transitions at 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz toward Orion Peak A. The O2 lines at 487 GHz and 774 GHz are detected at velocities of 10-12 km s–1 with line widths ?3 km s–1; however, the transition at 1121 GHz is not detected. The observed line characteristics, combined with the results of earlier observations, suggest that the region responsible for the O2 emission is ?9'' (6 × 1016 cm) in size, and is located close to the H 2 Peak 1 position (where vibrationally excited H2 emission peaks), and not at Peak A, 23'' away. The peak O2 column density is ?1.1 × 1018 cm–2. The line velocity is close to that of the 621 GHz water maser emission found in this portion of the Orion Molecular Cloud, and having a shock with velocity vector lying nearly in the plane of the sky is consistent with producing maximum maser gain along the line of sight. The enhanced O2 abundance compared to that generally found in dense interstellar clouds can be explained by passage of a low-velocity C shock through a clump with preshock density 2 × 104 cm–3, if a reasonable flux of UV radiation is present. The postshock O2 can explain the emission from the source if its line-of-sight dimension is ?10 times larger than its size on the plane of the sky. The special geometry and conditions required may explain why O2 emission has not been detected in the cores of other massive star-forming molecular clouds.

  18. Herschel HIFI observations of O{sub 2} toward Orion: special conditions for shock enhanced emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jo-Hsin; Goldsmith, Paul F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Viti, Serena [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Snell, Ronald [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, LGRT-B 619E, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Lis, Dariusz C. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benz, Arnold [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Bergin, Edwin [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Black, John; Hjalmarson, Åke [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Caselli, Paola [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Encrenaz, Pierre; Falgarone, Edith [LRA/LERMA, CNRS, UMR8112, Observatoire de Paris and École Normale Supérieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Goicoechea, Javier R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), E-28049, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Hollenbach, David [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Kaufman, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San José State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Melnick, Gary [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 66, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Neufeld, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Pagani, Laurent [LERMA and UMR8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de l' Observatoire, F-75014, Paris (France); and others

    2014-10-01

    We report observations of molecular oxygen (O{sub 2}) rotational transitions at 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz toward Orion Peak A. The O{sub 2} lines at 487 GHz and 774 GHz are detected at velocities of 10-12 km s{sup –1} with line widths ?3 km s{sup –1}; however, the transition at 1121 GHz is not detected. The observed line characteristics, combined with the results of earlier observations, suggest that the region responsible for the O{sub 2} emission is ?9'' (6 × 10{sup 16} cm) in size, and is located close to the H {sub 2} Peak 1 position (where vibrationally excited H{sub 2} emission peaks), and not at Peak A, 23'' away. The peak O{sub 2} column density is ?1.1 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2}. The line velocity is close to that of the 621 GHz water maser emission found in this portion of the Orion Molecular Cloud, and having a shock with velocity vector lying nearly in the plane of the sky is consistent with producing maximum maser gain along the line of sight. The enhanced O{sub 2} abundance compared to that generally found in dense interstellar clouds can be explained by passage of a low-velocity C shock through a clump with preshock density 2 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, if a reasonable flux of UV radiation is present. The postshock O{sub 2} can explain the emission from the source if its line-of-sight dimension is ?10 times larger than its size on the plane of the sky. The special geometry and conditions required may explain why O{sub 2} emission has not been detected in the cores of other massive star-forming molecular clouds.

  19. HST/ACS Observations of Europa's Atmospheric UV Emission at Eastern Elongation

    CERN Document Server

    Saur, Joachim; Roth, Lorenz; Nimmo, Francis; Strobel, Darrell F; Retherford, Kurt D; McGrath, Melissa A; Schilling, Nico; Gérard, Jean-Claude; Grodent, Denis

    2011-01-01

    We report results of a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) campaign with the Advanced Camera for Surveys to observe Europa at eastern elongation, i.e. Europa's leading side, on 2008 June 29. With five consecutive HST orbits, we constrain Europa's atmospheric \\ion{O}{1} 1304 \\A and \\ion{O}{1} 1356 \\A emissions using the prism PR130L. The total emissions of both oxygen multiplets range between 132 $\\pm$ 14 and 226 $\\pm$ 14 Rayleigh. An additional systematic error with values on the same order as the statistical errors may be due to uncertainties in modelling the reflected light from Europa's surface. The total emission also shows a clear dependence of Europa's position with respect to Jupiter's magnetospheric plasma sheet. We derive a lower limit for the O$_2$ column density of 6 $\\times$ 10$^{18}$ m$^{-2}$. Previous observations of Europa's atmosphere with STIS in 1999 of Europa's trailing side show an enigmatic surplus of radiation on the anti-Jovian side within the disk of Europa. With emission from a radially symm...

  20. Simultaneous optical/gamma-ray observations of GRB 121217's prompt emission

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, J; Schmidl, S; Greiner, J; Gruber, D; Oates, S; Kobayashi, S; Zhang, B; Cummings, J R; Filgas, R; Gehrels, N; Grupe, D; Kann, D A; Klose, S; Krühler, T; Guelbenzu, A Nicuesa; Rau, A; Rossi, A; Siegel, M; Schady, P; Sudilovsky, V; Tanga, M; Varela, K

    2013-01-01

    Since the advent of the Swift satellite it has been possible to obtain precise localisations of GRB positions of sub-arcsec accuracy within seconds, facilitating ground-based robotic telescopes to automatically slew to the target within seconds. This has yielded a plethora of observational data for the afterglow phase of the GRB, but the quantity of data (<2 keV) covering the initial prompt emission still remains small. Only in a handful of cases has it been possible obtain simultaneous coverage of the prompt emission in a multi-wavelength regime (gamma-ray to optical), as a result of: observing the field by chance prior to the GRB (e.g. 080319B/naked-eye burst), long-prompt emission (e.g., 080928, 110205A) or triggered on a pre-cursor (e.g., 041219A, 050820A, 061121). This small selection of bursts have shown both correlated and uncorrelated gamma-ray and optical light curve behaviour, and the multi-wavelength emission mechanism remains far from resolved (i.e. single population synchrotron self-Component,...

  1. Synchrotron emission in GRBs observed by Fermi: Its limitations and the role of the photosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Iyyani, S; Burgess, J M; Pe'er, A; egué, D B\\'

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that the prompt emission in gamma-ray bursts consists of several components giving rise to the observed spectral shape. Here we examine a sample of the 8 brightest, single pulsed {\\it Fermi} bursts whose spectra are modelled by using synchrotron emission as one of the components. Five of these bursts require an additional photospheric component (blackbody). In particular, we investigate the inferred properties of the jet and the physical requirements set by the observed components for these five bursts, in the context of a baryonic dominated outflow, motivated by the strong photospheric component. We find similar jet properties for all five bursts: the bulk Lorentz factor decreases monotonously over the pulses and lies between 1000 and 100. This evolution is robust and can neither be explained by a varying radiative efficiency nor a varying magnetisation of the jet assuming the photosphere radius is above the coasting radius. Such a behaviour challenges several dissipation mechanisms, e....

  2. Evidence from sub-millimetre observations for thermal dust emission in NGC4151

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelson, R. A.; Gear, W. K. P.; Malkan, M. A.; Robson, E. I.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC4151 using the UKT14 bolometer on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope are reported. A 5 sigma upper limit of 200 mJy in an 11 arcsec aperture is found. Comparison with an earlier measurement at 155 microns indicates that at least half of the 155-micron flux is due to thermal dust emission. The remainder may be from a synchrotron source which becomes self-absorbed at wavelengths of less than 80 microns.

  3. Observation of Amplified Stimulated Terahertz Emission from Optically Pumped Epitaxial Graphene Heterostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Otsuji, Taiichi; Karasawa, Hiromi; Komori, Tsuneyoshi; Watanabe, Takayuki; Fukidome, Hirokazu; Suemitsu, Maki; SATOU, AKIRA; Ryzhii, Victor

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally observe the fast relaxation and relatively slow recombination dynamics of photogenerated electrons/holes in an epitaxial graphene-on-Si heterostructure under pumping with a 1550-nm, 80-fs pulsed fiber laser beam and probing with the corresponding terahertz (THz) beam generated by and synchronized with the pumping laser. The time-resolved electric-field intensity originating from the coherent terahertz photon emission is electro-optically sampled in total-re...

  4. Sensitivity of wetland methane emissions to model assumptions: application and model testing against site observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Meng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane emissions from natural wetlands and rice paddies constitute a large proportion of atmospheric methane, but the magnitude and year-to-year variation of these methane sources are still unpredictable. Here we describe and evaluate the integration of a methane biogeochemical model (CLM4Me; Riley et al., 2011 into the Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4CN in order to better explain spatial and temporal variations in methane emissions. We test new functions for soil pH and redox potential that impact microbial methane production in soils. We also constrain aerenchyma in plants in always-inundated areas in order to better represent wetland vegetation. Satellite inundated fraction is explicitly prescribed in the model, because there are large differences between simulated fractional inundation and satellite observations, and thus we do not use CLM4-simulated hydrology to predict inundated areas. A rice paddy module is also incorporated into the model, where the fraction of land used for rice production is explicitly prescribed. The model is evaluated at the site level with vegetation cover and water table prescribed from measurements. Explicit site level evaluations of simulated methane emissions are quite different than evaluating the grid-cell averaged emissions against available measurements. Using a baseline set of parameter values, our model-estimated average global wetland emissions for the period 1993–2004 were 256 Tg CH4 yr?1 (including the soil sink and rice paddy emissions in the year 2000 were 42 Tg CH4 yr?1. Tropical wetlands contributed 201 Tg CH4 yr?1, or 78% of the global wetland flux. Northern latitude (>50 N systems contributed 12 Tg CH4 yr?1. However, sensitivity studies show a large range (150–346 Tg CH4 yr?1 in predicted global methane emissions (excluding emissions from rice paddies. The large range is sensitive to (1 the amount of methane transported through aerenchyma, (2 soil pH (±100 Tg CH4 yr?1, and (3 redox inhibition (±45 Tg CH4 yr?1. Results are sensitive to biases in the CLMCN and to errors in the satellite inundation fraction. In particular, the high latitude methane emission estimate may be biased low due to both underestimates in the high-latitude inundated area captured by satellites and unrealistically low high-latitude productivity and soil carbon predicted by CLM4.

  5. An Observational Method for Verifying Trends in Urban CO2 Emissions Using Continuous Measurements and High Resolution Meteorology (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofsy, S. C.; McKain, K.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Nehrkorn, T.; Pataki, D. E.; Ehleringer, J.

    2010-12-01

    Nations of the world are attempting to reach international and domestic agreements to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Participants will demonstrate their compliance to such commitments with self-reported emissions estimates based largely on measurements of behavior and generalized conversion factors. Atmospheric observations are the only source of information that will allow reported emissions to be independently and directly verified. Testing of observation-based verification methods is required to establish current capabilities, identify and prioritize areas for improvement, and ensure that policy goals are verifiable. In particular, observations made in major source regions, such as cities, could provide a great deal of information about trends and patterns in anthropogenic emissions with relatively modest investment. This study presents an inaugural effort to estimate carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from a city using atmospheric measurements. We have developed an observation-modeling framework to track changes in urban emissions, which, in addition to the observations, utilizes an atmospheric transport model and a prior emissions estimates. We have conducted a pilot study of the method using an existing longterm dataset of CO2 observations from Salt Lake City, Utah. Model-simulated CO2 concentrations track diurnal and synoptic patterns in observations reasonably well, although areas for improvement are evident. The modeling framework tends to underestimate observed CO2 enhancements, especially at night, which could be due to underestimated emissions and/or to excessive ventilation in the modeled meteorology. Despite some deficiencies, modeled and observed CO2 values are quantitatively and systematically related and application of a scaling factor to previously estimated emissions improves the match between modeled and observed values. This pilot-study presents a generalized, albeit provisional, method for using urban atmospheric greenhouse gas observations to identify trends and anomalies in urban emissions.

  6. Herschel HIFI observations of O$_2$ toward Orion: special conditions for shock enhanced emission

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jo-Hsin; Viti, Serena; Snell, Ronald; Lis, Dariusz C; Benz, Arnold; Bergin, Edwin; Black, John; Caselli, Paola; Encrenaz, Pierre; Falgarone, Edith; Goicoechea, Javier R; Hjalmarson, Ake; Hollenbach, David; Kaufman, Michael; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Pagani, Laurent; van der Tak, Floris; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Yildiz, Umut A

    2014-01-01

    We report observations of molecular oxygen (O$_2$) rotational transitions at 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz toward Orion Peak A. The O2 lines at 487 GHz and 774 GHz are detected at velocities of 10-12 km/s with line widths 3 km/s; however, the transition at 1121 GHz is not detected. The observed line characteristics, combined with the results of earlier observations, suggest that the region responsible for the O$_2$ emission is 9" (6e16 cm) in size, and is located close to the H2 Peak 1position (where vibrationally-excited H$_2$ emission peaks), and not at Peak A, 23" away. The peak O2 column density is 1.1e18/cm2. The line velocity is close to that of 621 GHz water maser emission found in this portion of the Orion Molecular Cloud, and having a shock with velocity vector lying nearly in the plane of the sky is consistent with producing maximum maser gain along the line-of-sight. The enhanced O$_2$ abundance compared to that generally found in dense interstellar clouds can be explained by passage of a low-velo...

  7. (12)CO (3-2) & (1-0) emission line observations of nearby starburst galaxy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, Nicholas; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Sanders, D. B.; Nakai, N.; Young, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    New measurements of the (12)CO (1-0) and (12)CO (3-2) line emission are presented for the nuclei of seven nearby starburst galaxies selected from a complete sample of 21 nearby starburst galaxies for which the nuclear star formation rates are measured to be comparable to the archetype starburst galaxies M82 and NGC 253. The new observations capitalize on the coincidence between the beam size of the 45 m Nobeyama telescope at 115 GHz and that of the 15 m James Clerk Maxwell Telescope at 345 GHz to measure the value of the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio in a 15 sec (less than or equal to 2.5 kpc) diameter region centered on the nuclear starburst. In principle, the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio provides a measure of temperature and optical depth for the (12)CO gas. The error weighted mean value of the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the seven starburst galaxy nuclei is -0.64 +/- 0.06. The (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the starburst galaxy nuclei is significantly higher than the average value measured for molecular gas in the disk of the Galaxy, implying warmer temperatures for the molecular gas in starburst galaxy nuclei. On the other hand, the (12)CO (3-2)/(1-0) emission line ratio measured for the starburst galaxy nuclei is not as high as would be expected if the molecular gas were hot, greater than 20 K, and optically thin, tau much less than 1. The total mass of molecular gas contained within the central 1.2-2.8 kpc diameter region of the starburst galaxy nuclei ranges from 10(exp 8) to 10(exp 9) solar mass. While substantial, the molecular gas mass represents only a small percentage, approximately 9%-16%, of the dynamical mass in the same region.

  8. Field Observations of Increased Isoprene Emissions Under Ozone Fumigation: Implications for Tropospheric Chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, J. P.; Greenberg, J. P.; Harley, P. C.; Guenther, A. B.

    2003-12-01

    Isoprene is the most abundant biogenic hydrocarbon released from vegetation and plays a key role in the chemistry of the lower atmosphere. Isoprene is produced and emitted by many plant species, yet the reason plants produce this seemingly wasteful carbon compound is still in debate in the plant physiology community. It has been proposed that isoprene may protect plant leaves from thermal damage or damage from oxidant exposure by stabilizing cellular and chloroplast membranes or by direct reactions between exogenous isoprene and oxidative species. As part of the Chemical Emission, Loss, Transformation and Interactions within Canopies (CELTIC) study held at Duke Forest during the summer of 2003, we used dynamic cuvette systems to fumigate leaves of sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua) with ozone at partial pressures ranging from 0 to 300 ppbv. During fumigations, the effluent air was monitored using infrared gas analysis, on-line proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and gas chromatography to quantify changes in partial pressure of CO2, water vapor, isoprene and other volatile organics. At fumigations above 100 ppbv ozone, leaf-isoprene emission increased 20-35% compared to pre-fumigation. To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of increased isoprene emission under ozone fumigation. Over the timescale of our measurements (several hours), isoprene emissions, once elevated, did not decrease even after fumigation levels were reduced. The increase in isoprene emission could potentially be due to upregulation of the isoprene synthase gene or simply an increase in the production (or reallocation) of subcellular isoprene precursor species. However, our measurements did not elucidate or eliminate a particular mechanism. If increases in isoprene emission in response to ozone are common among isoprene emitting species, the feedback implications for the atmosphere could be large. Both a mechanistic understanding of the upregulation process and knowledge of the distribution of the response across plant species are needed for future model parameterization.

  9. Observations of 6 - 200 {\\mu}m emission of the Ophiuchus cloud LDN 1688

    OpenAIRE

    Rawlings, M. G.; Juvela, M.; Lehtinen, K; Mattila, K.; Lemke, D

    2012-01-01

    We examine two positions, ON1 and ON2, within the Ophiuchus cloud LDN 1688 using observations made with the ISOPHOT instrument aboard the ISO satellite. The data include mid-IR spectra (~6-12{\\mu}m) and several photometric bands up to 200{\\mu}m. The data probe the emission from molecular PAH-type species, transiently-heated Very Small Grains (VSGs), and large classical dust grains. We compare the observations to earlier studies, especially those carried out towards an isolat...

  10. Hard X-ray emission from Serpens X-1 as observed by INTEGRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Masetti, N; Palazzi, E; Amati, L; Caroli, E; Di Cocco, G; Frontera, F; Orlandini, M

    2004-01-01

    We here report results of an INTEGRAL observation of the X-ray burst and atoll source Ser X-1 performed on May 2003. The object was observed for a total of 400 ks but nearly 8 degrees off-axis due to the amalgamation with an observation of SS 433, the pointing target source. Ser X-1 was detected up to 30 keV with unprecedented positional accuracy for a high-energy emission; a sharp spectral drop is evident beyond this energy. Significant variability is seen in the 20-30 keV light curve. Comparison with previous observations indicates that the source was in its high (banana) state and displayed a soft spectrum during the INTEGRAL pointing. A (non simultaneous) broadband radio-to-gamma-rays broad-band spectral energy distribution for Ser X-1 is also presented for the first time.

  11. Gamma-ray emission in dissipative pulsar magnetospheres: from theory to Fermi observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos [University of Maryland, College Park (UMDCP/CRESST), College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Harding, Alice K.; Kazanas, Demosthenes, E-mail: constantinos.kalapotharakos@nasa.gov [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We compute the patterns of ?-ray emission due to curvature radiation in dissipative pulsar magnetospheres. Our ultimate goal is to construct macrophysical models that are able to reproduce the observed ?-ray light curve phenomenology recently published in the Second Fermi Pulsar Catalog. We apply specific forms of Ohm's law on the open field lines using a broad range for the macroscopic conductivity values that result in solutions ranging, from near-vacuum to near-force-free. Using these solutions, we generate model ?-ray light curves by calculating realistic trajectories and Lorentz factors of radiating particles under the influence of both the accelerating electric fields and curvature radiation reaction. We further constrain our models using the observed dependence of the phase lags between the radio and ?-ray emission on the ?-ray peak separation. We perform a statistical comparison of our model radio-lag versus peak-separation diagram and the one obtained for the Fermi standard pulsars. We find that for models of uniform conductivity over the entire open magnetic field line region, agreement with observations favors higher values of this parameter. We find, however, significant improvement in fitting the data with models that employ a hybrid form of conductivity, specifically, infinite conductivity interior to the light cylinder and high but finite conductivity on the outside. In these models the ?-ray emission is produced in regions near the equatorial current sheet but modulated by the local physical properties. These models have radio lags near the observed values and statistically best reproduce the observed light curve phenomenology. Additionally, they also produce GeV photon cut-off energies.

  12. Fe XXIV emission in solar flares observed with the NRL/ATM XUV slitless spectrograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the Skylab Mission, the NRL slitless spectrograph photographed a number of flares in the 170-600 A region with a spatial resolution approaching 2ins. At flare maximum the 2s 2Ssub(1/2) - 2p 2Psub(1/2,3/2) transitions of Fe XXIV are present and show the location of the (approx.)20 x 106deg plasma with respect to the surface magnetic field and chromospheric (HeII) emissions. Three examples are discussed (two only briefly). In the small, intense disk flare of 1973, August 9 the high temperature region appears at the foot of a low altitude arch. The estimated electron density is 5 x 1011cm-3. In the limb flare of 1974, January 15 the hot X-ray emitting component is at a very low altitude compared to the flare loops. In the impulsive double ribbon flare of 1973, June 15 the Fe XXIV emission is centered over the neutral line, forming a bridge-like structure between magnetic regions of opposite polarity. The estimated electron density is 5 x 1010cm-3. The Fe XXIV emission was visible 8 to 10 min as compared with a calculated cooling time by conduction of only 5 min. The lengthened life of the emission may be associated with the observed 'turbulence', which inhibits the heat conduction, or alternatively, with a slower energy release prolonged beyond the end of the burst phase. (Auth.)

  13. A climatology of dust emission events from northern Africa using long-term surface observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Cowie

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-term (1984–2012 surface observations from 70 stations in the Sahara and Sahel are used to explore the diurnal, seasonal and geographical variations in dust emission events and thresholds. The frequency of dust emission (FDE is calculated using the present weather codes of SYNOP reports. Thresholds are estimated as the wind speed for which there is a 50% probability of dust emission and are then used to calculate strong wind frequency (SWF and dust uplift potential (DUP, where the latter is an estimate of the dust-generating power of winds. Stations are grouped into six coherent geographical areas for more in-depth analysis. FDE is highest at stations in Sudan and overall peaks in spring north of 23° N. South of this, where stations are directly influenced by the summer monsoon, the annual cycle in FDE is more variable. Thresholds are highest in northern Algeria, lowest in the latitude band 16–21° N and have greatest seasonal variations in the Sahel. Spatial variability in thresholds partly explain spatial variability in frequency of dust emission events on an annual basis. However, seasonal variations in thresholds for the six grouped areas are not the main control on seasonal variations in FDE. This is demonstrated by highly correlated seasonal cycles of FDE and SWF which are not significantly changed by using a fixed, or seasonally varying, threshold. The likely meteorological mechanisms generating these patterns such as low-level jets and haboobs are discussed.

  14. FUSE Observations of CO and H2 emission in Comet C/2001 A2 (LINEAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, P. D.; Weaver, H. A.; Burgh, E. B.

    2001-11-01

    We report observations of comet C/2001 A2 (LINEAR) with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer beginning July 12.58 coinciding with a photometric increase of ~1.5 magnitudes. Spectra were obtained in the 905--1180 Å range at 0.3 Å spectral resolution using the 30'' x 30'' aperture. Several new cometary emissions were identified, particularly the (0,0) bands of the CO Birge-Hopfield systems (C-X and B-X) at 1088 and 1151 Å, respectively, O 1 (1D - 1D) at 1152 Å, and three lines of the H2 Lyman system at 1071.6, 1118.6, and 1166.8 Å, pumped by solar Lyman-? fluorescence. Also detected were O 1 multiplets at 989, 1027, and 1040 Å, and several lines of the H 1 Lyman series. The rotational envelopes of the CO bands are resolved and appear to consist of both cold and warm components, the cold component accounting for 80% of the flux and with a rotational temperature of 60 K. The warm component may be indicative of a CO2 source. Both the CO bands and the O 1 ? 1152 emission (an indicator of H2O production) decreased by a factor of two over the 7.5 hr observation. Preliminary estimates of the production rates at the beginning of the observation are Q(CO) = 4 x 1027 molecules s-1 and Q(H2O) = 3 x 1029 molecules s-1 (vectorial model). These values may be uncertain by as much as a factor of two due to uncertainties in the solar flux. No emission is detected from Ar I at 1048 and 1067 Å and He 1 at 584 Å (in second order). We derive Q(Ar) <= 6 x 1025 atoms s-1 (5? upper limit), which implies that Ar/O is more than a factor of ten less than solar. In addition to the features listed above, there are about two dozen other emissions that have not yet been definitively identified, although some appear to be from N 1, C 1, and S 1. We do not detect any emission from O 6, which may constrain models that seek to explain cometary X-ray emission as being produced by charge exchange of solar wind ions with cometary neutrals. This work is based on data obtained for the Guaranteed Time Team by the NASA-CNES-CSA FUSE mission operated by The Johns Hopkins University. Financial support has been provided by NASA contract NAS5-32985.

  15. The ionosphere and the Latin America VLF Network Mexico (LAVNet-Mex) station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgazzi, A.; Lara, A.; Paz, G.; Raulin, J. P.

    2014-08-01

    In order to detect and study the ionospheric response to solar flares (transient high energy solar radiation), we have constructed a radio receiver station at Mexico City, which is part of the “Latin American Very low frequency Network” (LAVNet-Mex). This station extends to the northern hemisphere the so called “South American VLF Network”. LAVNet is able to detect small changes in the amplitude and phase of VLF electromagnetic waves (generated by strong transmitters located all around the world) which are affected by changes of the lowest layer of the ionosphere, where these waves are “reflected”. In this way, LAVNet is an excellent tool to study the dynamics of the lower ionospheric layers. In this work we present a technical description and show the capabilities of the new LAVNet-Mex station. Moreover, as an example of its performance, we present the analysis of the ionospheric effects of two solar flares detected on October 16, 2010 and June 7, 2011.

  16. Observation of Extended VHE Emission from the Supernova Remnant IC 443 with VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    Acciari, V A; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Bautista, M; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Butt, Y; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Celik, O; Cesarini, A; Chow, Y C; Ciupik, L; Cogan, P; Colin, P; Cui, W; Daniel, M K; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Dwarkadas, V V; Ergin, T; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Gall, D; Gibbs, K; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Hays, E; Holder, J; Horan, D; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, Philip; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Kildea, J; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Maier, G; McCann, A; McCutcheon, M; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Smith, A W; Steele, D; Swordy, S P; Theiling, M; Toner, J A; Valcarcel, L; Varlotta, A; Vasilev, V V; Vincent, S; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Wissel, S; Wood, M; Zitzer, B

    2009-01-01

    We present evidence that the very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission coincident with the supernova remnant IC 443 is extended. IC 443 contains one of the best-studied sites of supernova remnant/molecular cloud interaction and the pulsar wind nebula CXOU J061705.3+222127, both of which are important targets for VHE observations. VERITAS observed IC 443 for 37.9 hours during 2007 and detected emission above 300 GeV with an excess of 247 events, resulting in a significance of 8.3 standard deviations (sigma) before trials and 7.5 sigma after trials in a point-source search. The emission is centered at 06 16 51 +22 30 11 (J2000) +- 0.03_stat +- 0.08_sys degrees, with an intrinsic extension of 0.16 +- 0.03_stat +- 0.04_sys degrees. The VHE spectrum is well fit by a power law (dN/dE = N_0 * (E/TeV)^-Gamma) with a photon index of 2.99 +- 0.38_stat +- 0.3_sys and an integral flux above 300 GeV of (4.63 +- 0.90_stat +- 0.93_sys) * 10^-12 cm^-2 s^-1. These results are discussed in the context of existing ...

  17. Time-monitoring Observations of Br$\\gamma$ Emission from Young Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Eisner, J A; Rieke, M J; Flaherty, K M; Stone, Jordan M; Arnold, T J; Cortes, S R; Cox, E; Hawkins, C; Cole, A; Zajac, S; Rudolph, A L

    2014-01-01

    We present multiple epochs of near-IR spectroscopy for a sample of 25 young stars, including T Tauri, Herbig Ae/Be, and FU Ori objects. Using the FSPEC instrument on the Bok 90-inch telescope, we obtained K-band spectra of the BrGamma transition of hydrogen, with a resolution of ~3500. Epochs were taken over a span of >1 year, sampling time-spacings of roughly one day, one month, and one year. The majority of our targets show BrGamma emission, and in some cases these are the first published detections. Time-variability is seen in approximately half of the targets showing BrGamma emission. We compare the observed variability with expectations for rotationally-modulated accretion onto the central stars and time-variable continuum emission or extinction from matter in the inner disk. Our observations are not entirely consistent with models of rotationally-modulated magnetospheric accretion. Further monitoring, over a larger number of epochs, will facilitate more quantitative constraints on variability timescales...

  18. OBSERVATION OF EXTENDED VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT IC 443 WITH VERITAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present evidence that the very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission coincident with the supernova remnant IC 443 is extended. IC 443 contains one of the best studied sites of supernova remnant/molecular cloud interaction and the pulsar wind nebula CXOU J061705.3+222127, both of which are important targets for VHE observations. VERITAS observed IC 443 for 37.9 hr during 2007 and detected emission above 300 GeV with an excess of 247 events, resulting in a significance of 8.3 standard deviations (?) before trials and 7.5? after trials in a point-source search. The emission is centered at 6h16m51s + 22030'11'' (J2000) ±0.003stat ± 0.008sys, with an intrinsic extension of 0.016 ± 0.003stat ± 0.004sys. The VHE spectrum is well fit by a power law (dN/dE = N 0 x (E/TeV)-?) with a photon index of 2.99 ± 0.38stat ± 0.3sys and an integral flux above 300 GeV of (4.63 ± 0.90stat ± 0.93sys) x 10-12 cm-2 s-1. These results are discussed in the context of existing models for gamma-ray production in IC 443.

  19. OT1_rpaladin_1: PACS and SPIRE observations of Galactic anomalous emission sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladini, R.

    2010-07-01

    Despite the increasing evidence that the anomalous emission is a new physical mechanism acting in the diffuse interstellar medium, the nature and distribution of this component remains elusive. The currently most favored models attribute the observed microwave excess to rotating very small dust grains (PAHs and VSGs). Nonetheless, the infrared properties of the sources which, to date, are known to exhibit this type of emission are very poorly known mostly due to the limited angular resolution and frequency coverage of DIRBE and IRAS data. We propose HERSCHEL PACS and SPIRE mapping of three Galactic anomalous emission sources (LDN 1780, LDN 675 and LDN 1111). This data, when combined with ancillary NIR and mid-IR data of comparable angular resolution (mainly from Spitzer), and coupled with available dust models, will allow to set tight constraints on the radiation field in the emitting sources as well as in their immediate surroundings. Such constraints, in turn, will allow to estimate the abundances of PAHs, VSGs and BGs, hence to shed light on the potential link between these dust populations and the observed microwave excess.

  20. Observations and trends of emissions from gas flaring in the Persian Gulf region using OMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, H.; Soltanieh, M.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Gas flaring associated with oil production is common where there is no local market for natural gas (mostly methane) and emits large amount of air pollutants and greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. OMI NO2, SO2 and Aerosol Index (AI) observations from 2005 to 2013 were analyzed, and successfully characterize emissions from major flaring sources in the Persian Gulf region. The SO2/NO2 ratio can distinguish flaring regions with relatively high SO2 component, from urban and industrial areas, where domestic heating, internal combustion of motor vehicles and power generation with a relatively high NO2 component dominate. Concentrations of these gases over facilities for production and export of oil reflect the economic recession of 2008/9 and reduced oil exports due to sanctions imposed in 2012. A nearby site involved primarily in copper smelting show no such trend. These temporal trends are being analyzed to improve emissions estimates.

  1. Cassini and Wind Stereoscopic Observations of Jovian Non-Thermal Radio Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Michael L.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Zarka, P.

    1999-01-01

    During two intervals in 1999, simultaneous observations of Jupiter's decametric and hectometric radio emissions were made with the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument (RPWS) and the radio and plasma wave instrument (WAVES) on the Wind spacecraft in Earth orbit. During January, the Jovian longitude difference between the two spacecraft was about 5 deg, whereas for the August-September Earth flyby of Cassini, the angle ranged from 0 deg to about 2.5 deg. With these separations, the instantaneous widths of the walls of the hollow conical radiation beams of some of the decametric arcs were measured suggesting that the typical width is approximately 2 deg. The conical beams seem to move at Io's revolution rate rather than with Jupiter's rotation rate. Additionally, some of the non-arc emissions have very narrow and quite peculiar beamwidths.

  2. Energetic Neutral Atom Emissions From Venus: VEX Observations and Theoretical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, M.-C.; Galli, A.; Tanaka, T.; Moore, T. E.; Wurz, P.; Holmstrom, M.

    2007-01-01

    Venus has almost no intrinsic magnetic field to shield itself from its surrounding environment. The solar wind thus directly interacts with the planetary ionosphere and atmosphere. One of the by-products of this close encounter is the production of energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions. Theoretical studies have shown that significant amount of ENAs are emanated from the planet. The launch of the Venus Express (VEX) in 2005 provided the first light ever of the Venus ENA emissions. The observed ENA flux level and structure are in pretty good agreement with the theoretical studies. In this paper, we present VEX ENA data and the comparison with numerical simulations. We seek to understand the solar wind interaction with the planet and the impacts on its atmospheres.

  3. Direct observation of electron emission and recombination processes by time domain measurements of charge pumping current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the charge pumping (CP) sequence in detail, the source/drain electron current and the substrate hole current under the CP mode of transistors are simultaneously monitored in the time domain. Peaks are observed in both the electron and hole currents, which are, respectively, attributed to the electron emission from the interface defects and to the recombination with holes. The peak caused by the electron emission is found to consist of two components, strongly suggesting that the present time-domain measurement can enable us to resolve different kinds of interface defects. Investigating the correlation between the number of emitted and recombined electrons reveals that only one of the two components contributes to the CP current for the gate-pulse fall time from 6.25?×?10?4 to 1.25?×?10?2 s

  4. Search for extended gamma ray emission in Markarian 421 using VERITAS observations

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2014-01-01

    Very high energy (VHE: >100 GeV) gamma rays coming from AGN can pair-produce on the intergalactic background light generating an electromagnetic cascade. If the Intergalactic Magnetic Field (IGMF) is sufficiently strong, this cascade may result in an extended isotropic emission of photons around the source, or halo. Using VERITAS observations of the blazar Markarian 421, we search for extended emission by comparing the source angular distribution (${\\theta}^2$) from a quiescent period with one coming from a flare period, which can be considered as halo-free. ${\\chi}^2$ test showed no significant statistical differences between the samples, suggesting that the effect is either non-existent or too weak to be detected. We calculated upper limits for the extended flux considering different angle ranges, the most stringent being <8% of the Crab Nebulae flux (C.U), in the range $0\\deg \\leq {\\theta} \\leq 0.1\\deg$ .

  5. The Very Low Frequency Particle Mapper (VPM) Nanosat for Space Weather and VLF Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett Gies, T.; Meub, J.; Smith, D.; Starks, M. J.; Voss, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Very Low Frequency (VLF) Particle Mapper (VPM) satellite is a 6U nanosatellite designed to augment the Demonstration and Science Experiments (DSX) satellite being flown by the Air Force Research Lab (AFRL). DSX is a larger (~500 kg) mission which plans to study the magnetosphere from medium-earth orbit (MEO). The DSX payload includes the Wave Particle Interaction Experiment (WPIx) designed to study wave particle interactions with 0.1 to 50 kHz VLF transmissions in the complex plasmas trapped in Earth's magnetosphere. In order to compliment this experiment, the VPM spacecraft will fly in low-earth orbit (LEO) to measure the presence and intensity of VLF transmissions from DSX as well as their effects on the local electron population. The data received from VPM can be analyzed in coincidence with that obtained by the DSX WPIx equipment to obtain an unprecedented, simultaneous evaluation of two points in the inner magnetosphere. VPM demonstrates the nanosat architecture as a highly capable experiment platform and introduces its capability to enhance existing missions. This type of flight constellation introduces a low-cost, highly versatile method of analyzing the dynamic space environment.

  6. VLF-R studies in the Agora of Magnesia archaeological site, Aydin, Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very low frequency wave-resistivity (VLF-R) method has been widely used for near surface and archaeological prospection over the last two decades. Shallow buried structures that show resistivity variation with respect to a surrounding medium could be determined with VLF-R. It is also a particularly rapid and cost-effective technique for collecting data on large-scale exploration. VLF-R studies were carried out in the Agora of Magnesia archaeological site (Ayd?n, Turkey) in order to determine the location and depth of ruins of the temple of Zeus. After performing theoretical studies to test the inversion algorithm, apparent resistivity and phase data were collected with three different frequencies and a laterally constrained two-layer inversion process was applied to each station. In addition to the inversion of all profiles for each frequency, all lines were stacked within a precise resistivity interval to obtain a 3D view of the structure. An excavation site is recommended after achieving the location of the temple. (paper)

  7. HST WFC3 Early Release Science: Emission-Line Galaxies from IR Grism Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straughn, A. N.; Kuntschner, H.; Kuemmel, M.; Walsh, J. R.; Cohen, S. H.; Gardner, J. P.; Windhorst, R. A.; O'Connell, R. W.; Pirzkal, N.; Meurer, G.; McCarthy, P. J.; Hathi, N. P.; Malhotra, S.; Rhoads, J.; Balick, B.; Bond, H. E.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, J. A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.; Kimlbe, R. A.; Trauger, J. T.; Young, E. T.

    2010-01-01

    We present grism spectra of emission line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6-1.6 microns from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L (0.6-0.95 micron) grism data in GOODS South, extending the wavelength coverage well past the G800L red cutoff. The ERS grism field was observed at a depth of 2 orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which are presented here. ELGs are studied via the Ha, [O III ], and [OII] emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 1.6, 1.2 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 2.4 and 2.0 less than or equal to z less than or equal to 3.6 respectively in the G102 (0.8-1.1 microns; R approximately 210) and C141 (1.1-1.6 microns; R approximately 130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., [S II] and [S III] lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star formation rates, and grism spectroscopic redshifts are determined for a total of 25 ELGs to M(sub AB)(F098M) approximately 25 mag. The faintest source in our sample with a strong but unidentified emission line--is MAB(F098M)=26.9 mag. We also detect the expected trend of lower specific star formation rates for the highest mass galaxies in the sample, indicative of downsizing and discovered previously from large surveys. These results demonstrate the remarkable efficiency and capability of the WFC3 NIR grisms for measuring galaxy properties to faint magnitudes.

  8. Millimeter molecular line and infrared observations of dense clouds associated with small H? emission regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A search for new sites of ongoing star formation was made using H? emission nebulosity as a guide. The J = 1 ? 0 transition of 12C16O (115 GHz) is used as a temperature probe of the structure of these regions and thus as an indicator of the position of heating sources embedded in these molecular clouds. Of the 60 H? regions surveyed, 30 distinct areas of CO emission enhanced in one or more localized areas have been detected. Several are very strong molecular-emission sources and some appear to be quite simple in structure compared to the giant molecular cloud/HII region complexes most commonly discussed in the literature. A search for high-density cores of these new regions was made using three transitions of H2CO. The column density of the 13CO (110 GHz) isotopic species was used as a rough guide for the formaldehyde survey. Compact high-density cores were found in the six best candidates, with H2 densities estimated to be greater than 104 to 105 cm-3. At least five of the six high-density regions found in the formaldehyde survey contain embedded infrared sources. These sources were found by mapping at 2.2?. For two of the new molecular clouds, S140 and S255, sufficient data are available to assess the relative importance of various heat inputs to the clouds. Each cloud contains only one embedded source and two external stars. The gas kinetic temperature contour maps, obtained from detailed 12C16O observations, are then used to predict the dust cooling flux through far-infrared radiation and gas cooling through 12C16O radiation. The predicted far-infrared emission greatly exceeds the cooling by molecular lnes. This far-infrared flux should be observable

  9. Sensitivity of wetland methane emissions to model assumptions: application and model testing against site observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Meng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Methane emissions from natural wetlands and rice paddies constitute a large proportion of atmospheric methane, but the magnitude and year-to-year variation of these methane sources is still unpredictable. Here we describe and evaluate the integration of a methane biogeochemical model (CLM4Me; Riley et al., 2011 into the Community Land Model 4.0 (CLM4CN in order to better explain spatial and temporal variations in methane emissions. We test new functions for soil pH and redox potential that impact microbial methane production in soils. We also constrain aerenchyma in plants in always-inundated areas in order to better represent wetland vegetation. Satellite inundated fraction is explicitly prescribed in the model because there are large differences between simulated fractional inundation and satellite observations. A rice paddy module is also incorporated into the model, where the fraction of land used for rice production is explicitly prescribed. The model is evaluated at the site level with vegetation cover and water table prescribed from measurements. Explicit site level evaluations of simulated methane emissions are quite different than evaluating the grid cell averaged emissions against available measurements. Using a baseline set of parameter values, our model-estimated average global wetland emissions for the period 1993–2004 were 256 Tg CH4 yr?1, and rice paddy emissions in the year 2000 were 42 Tg CH4 yr?1. Tropical wetlands contributed 201 Tg CH4 yr?1, or 78 % of the global wetland flux. Northern latitude (>50 N systems contributed 12 Tg CH4 yr?1. We expect this latter number may be an underestimate due to the low high-latitude inundated area captured by satellites and unrealistically low high-latitude productivity and soil carbon predicted by CLM4. Sensitivity analysis showed a large range (150–346 Tg CH4 yr?1 in predicted global methane emissions. The large range was sensitive to: (1 the amount of methane transported through aerenchyma, (2 soil pH (± 100 Tg CH4 yr?1, and (3 redox inhibition (± 45 Tg CH4 yr?1.

  10. Global SF6 emission estimates inferred from atmospheric observations - a test case for Kyoto reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, I.; Naegler, T.

    2009-04-01

    Sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) is one of the strongest greenhouse gases per molecule in the atmosphere. SF6 emissions are also one of the six greenhouse gases targeted for reduction under the Kyoto Protocol. Here we present a long-term data set of globally distributed high-precision atmospheric SF6 observations which show an increase in mixing ratios from near zero in the 1970s to a global mean value of 6.3 ppt by the end of 2007. Because of its long atmospheric lifetime of around 3000 years, the accumulation of SF6 in the atmosphere is a direct measure of its global emissions: Analysis of our long-term data records implies a decrease of global SF6 sources after 1995, most likely due to emission reductions in industrialised countries. However, after 1998 the global SF6 source increases again, which is probably due to enhanced emissions from transition economies such as in China and India. Moreover, observed north-south concentration differences in SF6 suggest that emissions calculated from statistical (bottom-up) information and reported by Annex II parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) may be too low by up to 50%. This clearly shows the importance and need for atmospheric (top-down) validation of Kyoto reporting which is only feasible with a dense world-wide observational network for greenhouse and other trace gases. Other members of the Global SF6 Trends Team: R. Heinz (1), D. Osusko (1), E. Cuevas (2), A. Engel (3), J. Ilmberger (1), R.L. Langenfelds (4), B. Neininger (5), C.v. Rohden (1), L.P. Steele (4), A. Varlagin (6), R. Weller (7), D.E. Worthy (8), S.A. Zimov (9) (1) Institut für Umweltphysik, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, (2) Centro de Investigación Atmosférica de Izaña, Instituto Nacional de Meteorología (INM), 38071 Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain, (3) Institut für Atmosphäre und Umwelt, J.W. Goethe Universität Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt/Main, Germany, (4) Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research / CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research (CMAR), Aspendale, Victoria 3195, Australia, (5) MetAir AG, 6313 Menzingen, Switzerland, (6) Svertsov Institute for Evolutionary and Ecological Problems (IPEE), 117071 Moscow, Russia, (7) Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, 27568 Bremerhaven, Germany, (8) Environment Canada, Climate Research Division / CCMR, Toronto, ON M3H 5T4, Canada, (9) Cherskii, Republic of Sakha (Yakutia), Russia

  11. Observation of gamma-ray emission from the galaxy M87 above 250 GeV with VERITAS

    OpenAIRE

    Acciari, V. A.; Beilicke, M.; Blaylock, G.; Bradbury, S. M.; J.H. Buckley; Bugaev, V.; Butt, Y.; O Celik; Cesarini, A; L. Ciupik; Cogan, P.; COLIN, P; Cui, W; Daniel, M K; Duke, C

    2008-01-01

    The multiwavelength observation of the nearby radio galaxy M87 provides a unique opportunity to study in detail processes occurring in active galactic nuclei from radio waves to TeV gamma-rays. Here we report the detection of gamma-ray emission above 250 GeV from M87 in spring 2007 with the VERITAS atmospheric Cerenkov telescope array and discuss its correlation with the X-ray emission. The gamma-ray emission is m...

  12. Quantifying the Seasonal and Interannual Variability of North American Isoprene Emissions Using Satellite Observations of the Formaldehyde Column

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Paul I.; Abbot, Dorian S.; Fu, Tzung-May; Jacob, Daniel J.; Chance, Kelly V.; Kurosu, Thomas Paul; Guenther, Alex; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Stanton, Jenny C.; Pilling, Michael J.; Pressley, Shelley N.; Lamb, Brian; Sumner, Anna Louise

    2006-01-01

    Quantifying isoprene emissions using satellite observations of the formaldehyde (HCHO) columns is subject to errors involving the column retrieval and the assumed relationship between HCHO columns and isoprene emissions, taken here from the GEOS-CHEM chemical transport model. Here we use a 6-year (1996–2001) HCHO column data set from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite instrument to (1) quantify these errors, (2) evaluate GOME-derived isoprene emissions with in situ flux m...

  13. Soft X-ray emission observation during magnetic reconnection in spherical tokamak merging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burst of bremsstrahlung soft X-ray emission was observed during spherical tokamak merging process in the University of Tokyo Spherical Tokamak (UTST) experiment. The soft X-ray signal waveform coincided well with the enhancement of the reconnection electric field and its intensity showed nearly linear dependency on the strength of the toroidal magnetic field. These results suggest that the electrons near the X point are effectively accelerated in the toroidal direction by the parallel electric field during plasma merging in the presence of the strong toroidal magnetic field. (author)

  14. A framework of field observations and spatial data for understanding dust emissions in the Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantine, J.; Reynolds, R. L.; Chavez, P.; Bogle, R.; Clow, G.; Fulton, R.; Reheis, M.; Urban, F.; Wallace, C.; Yount, J.

    2007-12-01

    Modeling dust events at landscape to regional scales requires field observations of dust-source characteristics, mapping of source types by remote sensing, and wind fields representing the conditions that mobilize dust from the surface. A conceptual framework has been built for understanding dust-source types and their dynamics in the Mojave Desert. Observations of dust events in the Mojave indicate five general source types: 1) Sparsely vegetated surfaces that are vulnerable during periods of drought; 2) wet playas where a near-surface groundwater table generates "fluffy" (very soft sediment) conditions; 3) transitional playas where groundwater extraction has lowered the water table, and playa surface composition produces sediments that are vulnerable to erosion; 4) ephemeral flood deposits; and 5) anthropogenic sources where off-road vehicles, military training exercises, and dirt roads create a disturbed surface. Some sources are perennial and others are strongly influenced (sometimes in opposite ways) by precipitation cycles. A multi-year study of precipitation, vegetation, winds, and saltation at several plots in the Mojave National Preserve shows that blooms of annual vegetation in wet years can leave biomass that protects the surface for more than a year after the rains. Monitoring of the wet Franklin Lake Playa shows that a shallow ground-water table is associated with more vulnerable conditions for dust emission. Repeat photography of the relations between winds and dustiness at transitional Mesquite Lake Playa shows that dust is mobilized during the spring when winds are greater than about 5 m/s. Satellite images reveal dust emission from ephemeral fluvial systems, such as the Mojave River Sink, at the end of wet spring seasons. Satellite images also document dust emissions from areas of heavy military and off-road vehicle activity. Landsat imagery was used to map perennial vegetation cover for the Mojave Desert, calibrated to 250 field transects. The perennial vegetation map was used in conjunction with a Landsat-derived surface-sheltering map to identify areas vulnerable to dust emissions due to sparse vegetation. A map of playa lakes, derived from USGS 1:100,000 maps, satellite imagery, and field observations establishes the boundaries of wet, transitional, and dry playas. Wind fields generated from a regional climate model show that intense winds in vulnerable regions are associated with contemporaneous dust plumes observed from geostationary satellites during the major dust storms of January 5, 2007 and March 27, 2007. Through systematic collection of data from the scale of field plots to satellite images, a framework for the modeling of dust generation for a geographically complex and temporally dynamic region like the Mojave Desert is being created.

  15. Infrared observations of a mid-L dwarf with strong H$\\alpha$ emission

    CERN Document Server

    Riaz, B; Riaz, Basmah; Gizis, John E.

    2006-01-01

    We present {\\it Spitzer}/IRAC observations of the L5 dwarf, 2MASSI J1315309-264951 (2M1315). This ultracool dwarf is known to display strong emission in the H$\\alpha$ line. The SED for this object does not show any IR excess, that would indicate the presence of an accretion disk. Although the IRAC colors for 2M1315 are consistent with other L dwarfs, they seem to be redder by $\\sim$0.1 mag compared to the other L5 dwarfs, and more like the late-type L dwarfs. The existing six epochs of spectroscopy suggest that the emission in H$\\alpha$ is not persistent, but shows long-term variability between a flare value of $\\sim$100 $\\AA$ and a quiescent value of $\\sim$25 $\\AA$. Chromospheric activity seems to be the most likely cause, which is also indicated by the detection of Na I D lines in emission (Fuhrmeister et al.). We have measured a proper motion of 0.79$\\arcsec\\pm$ 0.06$\\arcsec$/yr, that corresponds to a tangential velocity of $\\sim$81 km/s, at a distance of $\\sim$22 pc. The high $V_{tan}$ for this object sug...

  16. The use of stereoscopic satellite observation in the determination of the emissivity of cirrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szejwach, G.; Sletten, T. N.; Hasler, A. F.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of determining cirrus 'emissivity' from combined stereoscopic and infrared satellite observations in conjunction with radiosounding data is investigated for a particular case study. Simultaneous visible images obtained during SESAME-1979 from two geosynchronous GOES meteorological satellites were processed on the NASA Goddard interactive system (AOIPS) and were used to determine the stereo cloud top height Z sub C as described by Hasler (1981). Iso-contours of radiances were outlined on the corresponding infrared image. Total brightness temperature T sub B and ground surface brightness temperature T sub S were inferred from the radiances. The special SESAME network of radiosoundings was used to determine the cloud top temperature T sub CLD at the level defined by Z sub C. The 'effective cirrus emissivity' NE where N is the fractional cirrus cloudiness and E is the emissivity in a GOES infrared picture element of about 10 km x 10 km is then computed from T sub B, T sub S and T sub CLD.

  17. Mobile Laboratory Observations of Methane Emissions in the Barnett Shale Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacovitch, Tara I; Herndon, Scott C; Pétron, Gabrielle; Kofler, Jonathan; Lyon, David; Zahniser, Mark S; Kolb, Charles E

    2015-07-01

    Results of mobile ground-based atmospheric measurements conducted during the Barnett Shale Coordinated Campaign in spring and fall of 2013 are presented. Methane and ethane are continuously measured downwind of facilities such as natural gas processing plants, compressor stations, and production well pads. Gaussian dispersion simulations of these methane plumes, using an iterative forward plume dispersion algorithm, are used to estimate both the source location and the emission magnitude. The distribution of emitters is peaked in the 0-5 kg/h range, with a significant tail. The ethane/methane molar enhancement ratio for this same distribution is investigated, showing a peak at ?1.5% and a broad distribution between ?4% and ?17%. The regional distributions of source emissions and ethane/methane enhancement ratios are examined: the largest methane emissions appear between Fort Worth and Dallas, while the highest ethane/methane enhancement ratios occur for plumes observed in the northwestern potion of the region. Individual facilities, focusing on large emitters, are further analyzed by constraining the source location. PMID:25751617

  18. Observation of field-induced electron emission in porous polycrystalline silicon nano-structured diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field-induced electron emission properties of porous poly-silicon nano-structured (PNS) diodes were investigated as a function of anodizing conditions, including morphological analysis, various kinds of top electrode thickness and the measuring substrate temperature. Also, the vacuum packaging process was performed by the normal glass frit method. The PNS layer was formed on heavily-dope n-type Si substrate. Non-doped poly-silicon layer was grown by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) to a thickness of 2mm. Subsequently, the poly-silicon layer was anodized in a mixed solution HF (50 wt%): ethanol(99.8 wt%) = 1:1 as a function of anodizing condition. After anodizing, the PNS layer was thermally oxidized for 1 hr at 900 .deg. C. Subsequently, the top electrode was deposited as a function of Au thickness using E-beam evaporator and, in order to establish ohmic contact, thermally evaporated Al was deposited on the back side of a Si substrate. The prepared PNS diode was packaged using the normal vacuum sealing method. After the vacuum sealing process, the PNS diode was mounted on the PC measurement table. When a positive bias was applied to the top electrode, the electron emission was observed, which was caused by field-induced electron emission through the top metal

  19. ?-ray emission from the Perseus cluster of galaxies observed with the MAGIC telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, P.; Eisenacher, D.; Hildebrand, D.; Lombardi, S.; Lindfors, E.; Paneque, D.; Partini, S.; Prada, F.; Sitarek, J.; Zandanel, F.; MAGIC Collaboration; Dauser, T.; Kadler, M.; Krauss, F.; Kataoka, J.; Pfrommer, C.; Pinzke, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Wilbert, S.; Wilms, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Perseus cluster of galaxies is a nearby cool-core cluster with an intra-clustermedium (ICM) characterized by very high central densities. The observation of the Perseus cluster with the MAGIC telescopes, during 85 h from 2009 to 2011, resulted in the discovery of 2 point-like sources at very high energy (>100 GeV, VHE) coinciding with the central radio galaxy NGC1275 and the radio galaxy IC310. The ?-ray properties of these 2 sources are presented, taking into account contemporaneous Fermi-LAT as well as multi-wavelength data. Flux variability and spectral energy distribution shapes indicate that the VHE ?-rays do not originate from large-scale interaction of the radio galaxies with ICM but more likely from the active nuclei of these two galaxies. They could be both misaligned version of BL Lac objects, the most common TeV AGN. Our results provide vital clues to understand emission mechanisms of such misaligned objects, and how they may be related to the beamed emission seen in BL Lacs. No evidence of large-scale VHE ?-ray emission from hadronic cosmic ray (CR) interactions with the ICM has been found. The flux upper limit above 1 TeV reaches the signal expected by some theoretical models, constraining the cluster CR physics. In the framework of the hadronicmodel of the radiomini-halos, this limit implies aminimal magnetic field ranging from 4-9?G for the central cluster region.

  20. Evaluation of a plot-scale methane emission model using eddy covariance observations and footprint modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Budishchev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Most plot-scale methane emission models – of which many have been developed in the recent past – are validated using data collected with the closed-chamber technique. This method, however, suffers from a low spatial representativeness and a poor temporal resolution. Also, during a chamber-flux measurement the air within a chamber is separated from the ambient atmosphere, which negates the influence of wind on emissions. Additionally, some methane models are validated by upscaling fluxes based on the area-weighted averages of modelled fluxes, and by comparing those to the eddy covariance (EC flux. This technique is rather inaccurate, as the area of upscaling might be different from the EC tower footprint, therefore introducing significant mismatch. In this study, we present an approach to validate plot-scale methane models with EC observations using the footprint-weighted average method. Our results show that the fluxes obtained by the footprint-weighted average method are of the same magnitude as the EC flux. More importantly, the temporal dynamics of the EC flux on a daily timescale are also captured (r2 = 0.7. In contrast, using the area-weighted average method yielded a low (r2 = 0.14 correlation with the EC measurements. This shows that the footprint-weighted average method is preferable when validating methane emission models with EC fluxes for areas with a heterogeneous and irregular vegetation pattern.

  1. Novel Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission Observations with Artificial Airglow Using RF Excitation with HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briczinski, S. J., Jr.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Michell, R.; Hampton, D. L.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    High power HF radio waves interacting with the ionosphere provide aeronomers with a unique space-based laboratory capability. The High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) in Gakona, Alaksa is the world's largest heating facility, producing effective radiated powers in the gigawatt range. Experiments performed at HAARP have allowed researchers to study many non-linear effects of wave-plasma interactions. Stimulated Electromagnetic Emissions (SEE) are of interest to the ionospheric community for its diagnostic purposes. Typical SEE experiments at HAARP have focused on characterizing the parametric decay of the electromagnetic pump wave into several different wave modes such as upper and lower hybrid, ion acoustic, ion-Bernstein and electron-Bernstein. Recent HAARP experiments have used both conventional and novel techniques to excite ionospheric disturbances at gyroharmonic frequencies. Stable layers of artificial ionization have been generated using a "twisted beam" pattern with the heating array. Compared to pencil beam techniques, these layers are long-lived and produce their own unique SEE patterns. The "downshifted mass" or DSM has shown to be a strong indicator of artificial ionization generation. Additionally, several other previously uncharacterized SEE features have been observed. These emissions are under study to be linked with other heating phenomena such as enhanced optical emissions, ion and plasma line generation, HF radar backscatter and enhanced electron acceleration.

  2. Low Frequency Propagation and Observed Intensity Pattern of Jovian Radio Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecacheux, A.

    Low frequency radio emissions from Jupiter have been extensively observed by sev- eral spacecraft (Voyager, Ulysses, Galileo and, more recently, Cassini), but some of their basic properties (exact location, radiation pattern) are still in discussion or just inferred. The whole set of observations were carried out within a few degrees from the Jovian equatorial plane (with the only exception of Ulysses in its outbound trajectory). As a consequence, radio sources were usually observed after propagation through the Io plasma torus, whose maximum critical frequency (about 0.5 MHz) is comparable in magnitude to the frequency range of HOM (hectometric) and DAM (decametric) components. One can expect several kinds of propagation effects: at small scales, in- cluding diffractive scintillation linked to turbulence properties of the medium, and at large scales, due to refraction by the Io torus, which optically acts as a diverging lens. The aim of this presentation is to examine the latter kind of effects and, in particu- lar, to quantitatively assess the spatial distribution of intensity from a small radiating source at Jupiter, when observed far from the planet through the Io plasma torus. A specific ray tracing calculation in dispersive inhomogeneous plasma was developped for this purpose, allowing the computation of both ray trace and ray intensity along its path. The method permits the determination of spatial directions from where one can observe intensity reduction (shadow zone) as well as intensity amplification (focusing and caustics) of radiation from a point source. While highly depending on the accu- racy of the used Io torus electron density model, the performed calculations show that substantial intensity drops and rises are to be expected in the lower frequency range up to several MHz. This may provide an alternative explanation for the absorption band recently described in the literature as a permanent feature of the HOM emission.

  3. A comparative study of measured amplitude and phase perturbations of VLF and LF radio signals induced by solar flares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šuli? D.M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Very Low Frequency (VLF and Low Frequency (LF signal perturbations were examined to study ionospheric disturbances induced by solar X-ray flares in order to understand processes involved in propagation of VLF/LF radio signals over short paths and to estimate specific characteristics of each short path. The receiver at the Belgrade station is constantly monitoring the amplitude and phase of a coherent and subionospherically propagating LF signal operated in Sicily NSC at 45.90 kHz, and a VLF signal operated in Isola di Tavolara ICV at 20.27 kHz, with the great circle distances of 953 km and 976 km, respectively. A significant number of similarities between these short paths is a direct result of both transmitters and the receiver’s geographic location. The main difference is in transmitter frequencies. From July 2008 to February 2014 there were about 200 events that were chosen for further examination. All selected examples showed that the amplitude and phase of VLF and LF signals were perturbed by solar X-ray flares occurrence. This six-year period covers both minimum and maximum of solar activity. Simultaneous measurement of amplitude and phase of the VLF/LF signals during a solar flare occurrence was applied to evaluate the electron density profile versus altitude, to carry out the function of time over the middle Europe. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176002 i br. III4402

  4. NuSTAR observations of the bullet cluster: constraints on inverse compton emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wik, Daniel R.; Hornstrup, Allan

    2014-01-01

    The search for diffuse non-thermal inverse Compton (IC) emission from galaxy clusters at hard X-ray energies has been undertaken with many instruments, with most detections being either of low significance or controversial. Because all prior telescopes sensitive at E > 10 keV do not focus light and have degree-scale fields of view, their backgrounds are both high and difficult to characterize. The associated uncertainties result in lower sensitivity to IC emission and a greater chance of false detection. In this work, we present 266 ks NuSTAR observations of the Bullet cluster, which is detected in the energy range 3-30 keV. NuSTAR's unprecedented hard X-ray focusing capability largely eliminates confusion between diffuse IC and point sources; however, at the highest energies, the background still dominates and must be well understood. To this end, we have developed a complete background model constructed of physically inspired components constrained by extragalactic survey field observations, the specific parameters of which are derived locally from data in non-source regions of target observations. Applying the background model to the Bullet cluster data, we find that the spectrum is well-but not perfectly-described as an isothermal plasma with kT = 14.2 ± 0.2 keV. To slightly improve the fit, a second temperature component is added, which appears to account for lower temperature emission from the cool core, pushing the primary component to kT ~ 15.3 keV. We see no convincing need to invoke an IC component to describe the spectrum of the Bullet cluster, and instead argue that it is dominated at all energies by emission from purely thermal gas. The conservatively derived 90% upper limit on the IC flux of 1.1 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 (50-100 keV), implying a lower limit on B ? 0.2 ?G, is barely consistent with detected fluxes previously reported. In addition to discussing the possible origin of this discrepancy, we remark on the potential implications of this analysis for the prospects for detecting IC in galaxy clusters in the future.

  5. NuSTAR observations of the bullet cluster: constraints on inverse Compton emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The search for diffuse non-thermal inverse Compton (IC) emission from galaxy clusters at hard X-ray energies has been undertaken with many instruments, with most detections being either of low significance or controversial. Because all prior telescopes sensitive at E > 10 keV do not focus light and have degree-scale fields of view, their backgrounds are both high and difficult to characterize. The associated uncertainties result in lower sensitivity to IC emission and a greater chance of false detection. In this work, we present 266 ks NuSTAR observations of the Bullet cluster, which is detected in the energy range 3-30 keV. NuSTAR's unprecedented hard X-ray focusing capability largely eliminates confusion between diffuse IC and point sources; however, at the highest energies, the background still dominates and must be well understood. To this end, we have developed a complete background model constructed of physically inspired components constrained by extragalactic survey field observations, the specific parameters of which are derived locally from data in non-source regions of target observations. Applying the background model to the Bullet cluster data, we find that the spectrum is well—but not perfectly—described as an isothermal plasma with kT = 14.2 ± 0.2 keV. To slightly improve the fit, a second temperature component is added, which appears to account for lower temperature emission from the cool core, pushing the primary component to kT ? 15.3 keV. We see no convincing need to invoke an IC component to describe the spectrum of the Bullet cluster, and instead argue that it is dominated at all energies by emission from purely thermal gas. The conservatively derived 90% upper limit on the IC flux of 1.1 × 10–12 erg s–1 cm–2 (50-100 keV), implying a lower limit on B ? 0.2 ?G, is barely consistent with detected fluxes previously reported. In addition to discussing the possible origin of this discrepancy, we remark on the potential implications of this analysis for the prospects for detecting IC in galaxy clusters in the future.

  6. AN OBSERVED CORRELATION BETWEEN THERMAL AND NON-THERMAL EMISSION IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have confirmed the existence of thermal and non-thermal components in the prompt photon spectra of some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Through an analysis of six bright Fermi GRBs, we have discovered a correlation between the observed photospheric and non-thermal ?-ray emission components of several GRBs using a physical model that has previously been shown to be a good fit to the Fermi data. From the spectral parameters of these fits we find that the characteristic energies, E p and kT, of these two components are correlated via the relation E p?T ? which varies from GRB to GRB. We present an interpretation in which the value of the index ? indicates whether the jet is dominated by kinetic or magnetic energy. To date, this jet composition parameter has been assumed in the modeling of GRB outflows rather than derived from the data

  7. Soft X-ray observation of the prompt emission of GRB 100418A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imatani, Ritsuko; Tomida, Hiroshi; Nakahira, Satoshi; Kimura, Masashi; Sakamoto, Takanori; Arimoto, Makoto; Morooka, Yoshitaka; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    We have observed the prompt emission of GRB 100418A from its beginning captured by the MAXI SSC (0.7-7 keV) on board the International Space Station followed by the Swift XRT (0.3-10 keV) observation. The light curve can be fitted by a combination of a power-law component and an exponential component (the decay constant is 31.6 ± 1.6 s). The X-ray spectrum is well expressed by the Band function with Ep ? 8.3 keV. This is the brightest gamma-ray burst showing a very low value of Ep. It satisfies the Yonetoku relation (Ep-Lp). It is also consistent with the Amati relation (Ep-Eiso) within a 2.5? level.

  8. AN OBSERVED CORRELATION BETWEEN THERMAL AND NON-THERMAL EMISSION IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Burgess, J.; Preece, Robert D. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Ryde, Felix; Axelsson, Magnus [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Veres, Peter; Mészáros, Peter [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Bhat, P. N.; Pelassa, Veronique [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Pe' er, Asaf [Physics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Iyyani, Shabnam [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Goldstein, Adam [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Baring, Matthew G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Byrne, David; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne [University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Kocevski, Daniel; Omodei, Nicola [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Paciesas, William S., E-mail: jmichaelburgess@gmail.com, E-mail: rob.preece@nasa.gov, E-mail: felix@particle.kth.se, E-mail: veres@gwu.edu, E-mail: npp@astro.psu.edu [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); and others

    2014-04-01

    Recent observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have confirmed the existence of thermal and non-thermal components in the prompt photon spectra of some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Through an analysis of six bright Fermi GRBs, we have discovered a correlation between the observed photospheric and non-thermal ?-ray emission components of several GRBs using a physical model that has previously been shown to be a good fit to the Fermi data. From the spectral parameters of these fits we find that the characteristic energies, E {sub p} and kT, of these two components are correlated via the relation E {sub p}?T {sup ?} which varies from GRB to GRB. We present an interpretation in which the value of the index ? indicates whether the jet is dominated by kinetic or magnetic energy. To date, this jet composition parameter has been assumed in the modeling of GRB outflows rather than derived from the data.

  9. Fermi Observations of high-energy gamma-ray emissions from GRB 080916C

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Arimoto, M; Asano, K; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Band, D L; Barbiellini, Guido; Baring, Matthew G; Bastieri, Denis; Battelino, M; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellardi, F; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, Elliott D; Bogaert, G; Bogart, J R; Bonamente, E; Bonnell, J; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Briggs, M S; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, Thompson H; Burrows, David N; Busetto, Giovanni; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Ceccanti, M; Cecchi, C; Celotti, Annalisa; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C.C.Teddy; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Cominsky, Lynn R; Connaughton, V; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; DeKlotz, M; Dermer, C D; De Angelis, Alessandro; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dingus, B L; do Couto e Silva, Eduardo; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Evans, P A; Fabiani, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Finke, Justin D; Fishman, G; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, Thomas Lynn; Godfrey, Gary L; Goldstein, A; Granot, J; Greiner, J; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M H; Grove, J.Eric; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Haller, G; Hanabata, Y; Harding, Alice K; Hayashida, M; Hays, Elizabeth A; Hernando Morata, J A; Hoover, A; Hughes, R E; Johannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kavelaars, A; Kawai, N; Kelly, H; Kennea, J; Kerr, M; Kippen, R M; Knodlseder, J; Kocevski, D; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kouveliotou, C; Kuehn, Frederick Gabriel Ivar; Kuss, Michael; Lande, J; Landriu, D; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lavalley, C; Lee, B; Lee, S H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lichti, G G; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, Pasquale; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marangelli, B; Mazziotta, M N; McBreen, Sheila; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meegan, C; Miszaros, P; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Minuti, M; Mirizzi, N; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, Igor Vladimirovich; Murgia, Simona; Nakamori, T; Nelson, D; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okumura, Akira; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paciesas, W S; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Perri, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Petrosian, Vahe; Pinchera, M; Piron, F; Porter, Troy A; Preece, R; Rainr, S; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rando, R; Rapposelli, E; Razzano, M; Razzaque, Soebur; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, Thierry; Reyes, Luis C; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Parkinson, P.M.Saz; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Segal, K N; Sgro, C; Shimokawabe, T; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stamatikos, M; Starck, Jean-Luc; Stecker, Floyd William; Steinle, H; Stephens, T E; Strickman, M S; Suson, Daniel J; Tagliaferri, G.; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Tenze, A; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, Diego F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Turri, M; Tuvi, S; Usher, T L; van der Horst, A J; Vigiani, L; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; von Kienlin, A; Waite, A P; Williams, D A; Wilson-Hodge, C; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wu, X F; Yamazaki, R; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M; 10.1126/science.1169101

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gammaray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. The known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass.

  10. Fermi Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from GRB 080916C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gamma-ray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. The known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass. (authors)

  11. Supermassive binary black holes - possible observational effects in the x-ray emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanovi? Predrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we discuss the possible observational effects in the X-ray emission from two relativistic accretion disks in a supermassive binary black hole system. For that purpose we developed a model and performed numerical simulations of the X-ray radiation from a relativistic accretion disk around a supermassive black hole, based on the ray-tracing method in the Kerr metric, and applied it to the case of the close binary supermassive black holes. Our results indicate that the broad Fe K? line is a powerful tool for detecting such systems and studying their properties. The most favorable candidates for observational studies are the supermassive binary black holes in the galactic mergers during the phase when the orbital velocities of their components are very large and exceed several thousand kms -1. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176003: Gravitation and the Large Scale Structure of the Universe i br. 176001: Astrophysical Spectroscopy of Extragalactic Objects

  12. Fermi observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from GRB 080916C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Arimoto, M; Asano, K; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Band, D L; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Battelino, M; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellardi, F; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bogart, J R; Bonamente, E; Bonnell, J; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Briggs, M S; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Burrows, D; Busetto, G; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Ceccanti, M; Cecchi, C; Celotti, A; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Connaughton, V; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; Deklotz, M; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dingus, B L; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Evans, P A; Fabiani, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Finke, J; Fishman, G; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Goldstein, A; Granot, J; Greiner, J; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Haller, G; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hernando Morat, J A; Hoover, A; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kavelaars, A; Kawai, N; Kelly, H; Kennea, J; Kerr, M; Kippen, R M; Knödlseder, J; Kocevski, D; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kouveliotou, C; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Landriu, D; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lavalley, C; Lee, B; Lee, S-H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lichti, G G; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marangelli, B; Mazziotta, M N; McBreen, S; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meegan, C; Mészáros, P; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Minuti, M; Mirizzi, N; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nelson, D; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paciesas, W S; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Perri, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Petrosian, V; Pinchera, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Preece, R; Rainò, S; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rando, R; Rapposelli, E; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Reyes, L C; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Segal, K N; Sgrò, C; Shimokawabe, T; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stamatikos, M; Starck, J-L; Stecker, F W; Steinle, H; Stephens, T E; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tagliaferri, G; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Tenze, A; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Turri, M; Tuvi, S; Usher, T L; van der Horst, A J; Vigiani, L; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; von Kienlin, A; Waite, A P; Williams, D A; Wilson-Hodge, C; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wu, X F; Yamazaki, R; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-03-27

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gammaray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. The known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass. PMID:19228997

  13. Theoretical analysis of conditions for observation of plasma oscillations in semiconductors from pulsed terahertz emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reklaitis, Antanas, E-mail: reklaitis@pfi.lt [Semiconductor Physics Institute, Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, A. Goshtauto 11, Vilnius 01108 (Lithuania)

    2014-08-28

    Oscillations of electron-hole plasma generated by femtosecond optical pulse in freestanding semiconductor are studied using hydrodynamic model and Monte Carlo simulations. The conditions required for the observation of coherent plasma oscillations in THz emission from semiconductor are determined. It is shown that several conditions have to be fulfilled in order to observe coherent plasma oscillations. First, the intensity of the optical pulse must exceed some threshold value. Second, the optical absorption depth must exceed the thickness of the built-in electric field region. Third, the generation of electron-hole pairs with uniform illumination is required, i.e., the laser beam with the flattop intensity profile has to be used. It is found that the duration of the optical pulse does not play a vital role in the development of plasma oscillations.

  14. Photoelectron spectroscopy of hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes: Nucleobase excited state decay observed via delayed electron emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ananya; Matthews, Edward M.; Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin; Dessent, Caroline E. H.

    2015-11-01

    We report low-temperature photoelectron spectra of isolated gas-phase complexes of the hexachloroplatinate dianion bound to the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine. The spectra display well-resolved, distinct peaks that are consistent with complexes where the hexachloroplatinate dianion is largely intact. Adiabatic electron detachment energies for the hexachloroplatinate-nucleobase complexes are measured as 2.26-2.36 eV. The magnitudes of the repulsive Coulomb barriers (RCBs) of the complexes are all ˜1.7 eV, values that are lower than the RCB of the uncomplexed PtCl62- dianion as a result of charge solvation by the nucleobases. In addition to the resolved spectral features, broad featureless bands indicative of delayed electron detachment are observed in the 193 nm photoelectron spectra of the four clusters. The 266 nm spectra of the PtCl62- ? thymine and PtCl62- ? adenine complexes also display very prominent delayed electron emission bands. These results mirror recent results on the related Pt(CN)42- ? nucleobase complexes [A. Sen et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 119, 11626 (2015)]. The observation of delayed electron emission bands in the PtCl62- ? nucleobase spectra obtained in this work, as for the previously studied Pt(CN)42- ? nucleobase complexes, is attributed to one-photon excitation of nucleobase-centred excited states that can effectively couple to the electron detachment continuum, producing strong electron detachment. Moreover, the selective, strong excitation of the delayed emission bands in the 266 nm spectra is linked to fundamental differences in the individual nucleobase photophysics at this excitation energy. This strongly supports our previous suggestion that the dianion within these clusters can be viewed as a "dynamic tag" which has the propensity to emit electrons when the attached nucleobase decays over a time scale long enough to allow autodetachment.

  15. Gamma-Ray Emission in Dissipative Pulsar Magnetospheres: From Theory to Fermi Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2013-01-01

    We compute the patterns of gamma-ray emission due to curvature radiation (CR) in dissipative pulsar magnetospheres. Our ultimate goal was to reveal the macrophysical models that are able to reproduce the observed gamma-ray light-curve phenomenology recently published in the Second Fermi Pulsar Catalog. Assuming Force-Free (FF) conditions for the closed magnetic field lines, on the open field lines we use specific dissipative prescriptions for the current density and a broad range for the conductivity values that result in solutions ranging from near-vacuum to near-FF. Using these dissipative models, we generated model gamma-ray light-curves by calculating realistic trajectories and Lorentz factors of particles, under the influence of both the accelerating electric fields and CR-reaction. In addition to modeling the gamma-ray light-curves we further constrained our models using the observed dependence of the phase-lags between the radio and gamma-ray emission on the gamma-ray peak-separation, one of the multiw...

  16. Virtual Observatory tools and Amateur Radio Observations Supporting Scientific Analysis of Jupiter Radio Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, B.; Hess, S. L. G.; Le Sidaner, P.; Savalle, R.; Erard, S.; Coffre, A.; Thétas, E.; André, N.; Génot, V.; Thieman, J.; Typinski, D.; Sky, J.; Higgins, C.

    2015-10-01

    In the frame of the preparation of the NASA/JUNO and ESA/JUICE (Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer) missions, and the development of a planetary sciences virtual observatory (VO), we are proposing a new set of tools directed to data providers as well as users, in order to ease data sharing and discovery. We will focus on ground based planetary radio observations (thus mainly Jupiter radio emissions), trying for instance to enhance the temporal coverage of jovian decametric emission. The data service we will be using is EPN-TAP, a planetary science data access protocol developed by Europlanet-VESPA (Virtual European Solar and Planetary Access). This protocol is derived from IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) standards. The Jupiter Routine Observations from the Nancay Decameter Array are already shared on the planetary science VO using this protocol. Amateur radio data from the RadioJOVE project is also available. We will first introduce the VO tools and concepts of interest for the planetary radioastronomy community. We will then present the various data formats now used for such data services, as well as their associated metadata. We will finally show various prototypical tools that make use of this shared datasets. A preliminary study based on January-February 2014 data will also be presented

  17. OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE CONTINUUM AND WATER MASER EMISSION IN THE IRAS 19217+1651 REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Esnard, T.; Trinidad, M. A. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo Postal 144, Guanajuato, GTO, Mexico CP 36000 (Mexico); Migenes, V., E-mail: tatiana@iga.cu, E-mail: trinidad@astro.ugto.mx, E-mail: vmigenes@byu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, ESC-N145, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2012-12-20

    We report interferometric observations of the high-mass star-forming region IRAS 19217+1651. We observed the radio continuum (1.3 cm and 3.6 cm) and water maser emission using the Very Large Array (VLA-EVLA) in transition mode (configuration A). Two radio continuum sources were detected at both wavelengths, I19217-A and I19217-B. In addition, 17 maser spots were observed distributed mainly in two groups, M1 and M2, and one isolated maser. This latter could be indicating the relative position of another continuum source which we did not detect. The results indicate that I19217-A appears to be consistent with an ultracompact H II region associated with a zero-age main-sequence B0-type star. Furthermore, the 1.3 cm continuum emission of this source suggests a cometary morphology. In addition, I19217-B appears to be an H II region consisting of at least two stars, which may be contributing to its complex structure. It was also found that the H{sub 2}O masers of the group M1 are apparently associated with the continuum source I19217-A. These are tracing motions which are not gravitationally bound according to their spatial distribution and kinematics. They also seem to be describing outflows in the direction of the elongated cometary region. On the other hand, the second maser group, M2, could be tracing the base of a jet. Finally, infrared data from Spitzer, Midcourse Space Experiment, and IRIS show that IRAS 19217+1651 is embedded inside a large open bubble, like a broken ring, which possibly has affected the morphology of the cometary H II region observed at 1.3 cm.

  18. Observations of Free-Free and Anomalous Microwave Emission from LDN 1622 with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, S E; Dickinson, C.; Cleary, K.

    2015-01-01

    LDN 1622 has previously been identified as a possible strong source of dust-correlated Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME). Previous observations were limited by resolution meaning that the radio emission could not be compared with current generation high-resolution infrared data from Herschel, Spitzer or WISE. This Paper presents arcminute resolution mapping observations of LDN 1622 at 4.85 GHz and 13.7 GHz using the 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. The 4.85 GHz ma...

  19. Fracture induced electromagnetic emissions: extending laboratory findings by observations at the geophysical scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potirakis, Stelios M.; Contoyiannis, Yiannis; Kopanas, John; Kalimeris, Anastasios; Antonopoulos, George; Peratzakis, Athanasios; Eftaxias, Konstantinos; Nomicos, Constantinos

    2014-05-01

    Under natural conditions, it is practically impossible to install an experimental network on the geophysical scale using the same instrumentations as in laboratory experiments for understanding, through the states of stress and strain and their time variation, the laws that govern the friction during the last stages of EQ generation, or to monitor (much less to control) the principal characteristics of a fracture process. Fracture-induced electromagnetic emissions (EME) in a wide range of frequency bands are sensitive to the micro-structural chances. Thus, their study constitutes a nondestructive method for the monitoring of the evolution of damage process at the laboratory scale. It has been suggested that fracture induced MHz-kHz electromagnetic (EM) emissions, which emerge from a few days up to a few hours before the main seismic shock occurrence permit a real time monitoring of the damage process during the last stages of earthquake preparation, as it happens at the laboratory scale. Since the EME are produced both in the case of the laboratory scale fracture and the EQ preparation process (geophysical scale fracture) they should present similar characteristics in these two scales. Therefore, both the laboratory experimenting scientists and the experimental scientists studying the pre-earthquake EME could benefit from each- other's results. Importantly, it is noted that when studying the fracture process by means of laboratory experiments, the fault growth process normally occurs violently in a fraction of a second. However, a major difference between the laboratory and natural processes is the order-of-magnitude differences in scale (in space and time), allowing the possibility of experimental observation at the geophysical scale for a range of physical processes which are not observable at the laboratory scale. Therefore, the study of fracture-induced EME is expected to reveal more information, especially for the last stages of the fracture process, when it is conducted at the geophysical scale. As a characteristic example, we discuss about the case of electromagnetic silence before the global rupture that was first observed in preseismic EME and recently was also observed in the EME measured during laboratory fracture experiments, completely revising the earlier views about the fracture-induced electromagnetic emissions.

  20. Seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Galactic Foreground Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, B.; Odegard, N.; Weiland, J. L.; Hill, R. S.; Kogut, A.; Bennett, C. L.; Hinshaw, G.; Chen, X.; Dunkley, J.; Halpern, M.; Jarosik, N.; Komatsu, E.; Larson, D.; Limon, M.; Meyer, S. S.; Nolta, M. R.; Page, L.; Smith, K. M.; Spergel, D. N.; Tucker, G. S.; Wollack, E.; Wright, E. L.

    2011-02-01

    We present updated estimates of Galactic foreground emission using seven years of WMAP data. Using the power spectrum of differences between multi-frequency template-cleaned maps, we find no evidence for foreground contamination outside of the updated (KQ85y7) foreground mask. We place a 15 ?K upper bound on rms foreground contamination in the cleaned maps used for cosmological analysis. Further, the cleaning process requires only three power-law foregrounds outside of the mask. We find no evidence for polarized foregrounds beyond those from soft (steep-spectrum) synchrotron and thermal dust emission; in particular we find no indication in the polarization data of an extra "haze" of hard synchrotron emission from energetic electrons near the Galactic center. We provide an updated map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the internal linear combination method, updated foreground masks, and updates to point source catalogs using two different techniques. With additional years of data, we now detect 471 point sources using a five-band technique and 417 sources using a three-band CMB-free technique. In total there are 62 newly detected point sources, a 12% increase over the five-year release. Also new are tests of the Markov chain Monte Carlo foreground fitting procedure against systematics in the time-stream data, and tests against the observed beam asymmetry. Within a few degrees of the Galactic plane, the behavior in total intensity of low-frequency foregrounds is complicated and not completely understood. WMAP data show a rapidly steepening spectrum from 20 to 40 GHz, which may be due to emission from spinning dust grains, steepening synchrotron, or other effects. Comparisons are made to a 1 deg 408 MHz map (Haslam et al.) and the 11 deg ARCADE 2 data (Singal et al.). We find that spinning dust or steepening synchrotron models fit the combination of WMAP and 408 MHz data equally well. ARCADE data appear inconsistent with the steepening synchrotron model and consistent with the spinning dust model, though some discrepancies remain regarding the relative strength of spinning dust emission. More high-resolution data in the 10-40 GHz range would shed much light on these issues. WMAP is the result of a partnership between Princeton University and NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Scientific guidance is provided by the WMAP Science Team.

  1. Dark matter line emission constraints from NuSTAR observations of the Bullet Cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riemer-Sørensen, S.; Wik, D.; Madejski, G.; Molendi, S.; Gastaldello, F.; Harrison, F. A.; Craig, W. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.; Hornstrup, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Some dark matter candidates, e.g., sterile neutrinos, provide observable signatures in the form of mono-energetic line emission. We present the first search for dark matter line emission in the range in a pointed observation of the Bullet Cluster with NuSTAR. We do not detect any significant line emission and instead we derive upper limits (95% CL) on the flux, and interpret these constraints in the context of sterile neutrinos and more generic dark matter candidates. NuSTAR does not have the se...

  2. Dark matter line emission constraints from NuSTAR observations of the Bullet Cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riemer-SØrensen, S.; Wik, D.

    2015-01-01

    Some dark matter candidates, e.g., sterile neutrinos, provide observable signatures in the form of mono-energetic line emission. We present the first search for dark matter line emission in the range in a pointed observation of the Bullet Cluster with NuSTAR. We do not detect any significant line emission and instead we derive upper limits (95% CL) on the flux, and interpret these constraints in the context of sterile neutrinos and more generic dark matter candidates. NuSTAR does not have the sensitivity to constrain the recently claimed line detection at , but improves on the constraints for energies of 10–25 keV.

  3. FORTE observations of simultaneous VHF and optical emissions from lightning: Basic phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary observations of simultaneous VHF and optical emissions from lightning as seen by the Fast on-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) spacecraft are presented. VHF/optical waveform pairs are routinely collected both as individual lightning events and as sequences of events associated with cloud-to-ground (CG) and intracloud (IC) flashes. CG pulses can be distinguished from IC pulses on the basis of the properties of the VHF and optical waveforms but mostly on the basis of the associated VHF spectrograms. The VHF spectrograms are very similar to previous ground-based HF and VHF observations of lightning and show signatures associated with return strokes, stepped and dart leaders, attachment processes, and intracloud activity. For a typical IC flash, the FORTE-detected VHF is generally characterized by impulsive broadband bursts of emission, and the associated optical emissions are often highly structured. For a typical initial return stroke, the FORTE-detected VHF is generated by the stepped leader, the attachment process, and the actual return stroke. For a typical subsequent return stroke, the FORTE-detected VHF is mainly generated by dart leader processes. The detected optical signal in both return stroke cases is primarily produced by the in-cloud portion of the discharge and lags the arrival of the corresponding VHF emissions at the satellite by a mean value of 243 ?s. This delay is composed of a transit time delay (mean of 105 ?s) as the return stroke current propagates from the attachment point up into the region of in-cloud activity plus an additional delay due to the scattering of light during its traversal through the clouds. The broadening of the light pulse during its propagation through the clouds is measured and used to infer a mean of this scattering delay of about 138 ?s (41 km additional path length) for CG light. This value for the mean scattering delay is consistent with the Thomason and Krider [1982] model for light propagation through clouds. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union

  4. The Annual Cycle of Water Vapor on Mars as Observed by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael D.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Spectra taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) have been used to monitor the latitude, longitude, and seasonal dependence of water vapor for over one full Martian year (March 1999-March 2001). A maximum in water vapor abundance is observed at high latitudes during mid-summer in both hemispheres, reaching a maximum value of approximately 100 pr-micrometer in the north and approximately 50 pr-micrometer in the south. Low water vapor abundance (water vapor. The latitudinal and seasonal dependence of the decay of the northern summer water vapor maximum implies cross-equatorial transport of water to the southern hemisphere, while there is little or no corresponding transport during the decay of the southern hemisphere summer maximum. The latitude-longitude dependence of annually-averaged water vapor (corrected for topography) has a significant positive correlation with albedo and significant negative correlations with thermal inertia and surface pressure. Comparison of TES results with those retrieved from the Viking Orbiter Mars Atmospheric Water Detectors (MAWD) experiments shows some similar features, but also many significant differences. The southern hemisphere maximum observed by TES was not observed by MAWD and the large latitudinal gradient in annually-averaged water vapor observed by MAWD does not appear in the TES results.

  5. Hectometric and kilometric solar radio emission observed from satellites in August 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type II, III, and continuum solar radio events, as well as intense terrestrial magnetospheric radio emissions, were observed at low frequencies (10 MHz to 30 kHz) by the IMP-6 satellite during the period of high solar activity in August 1972. This review covers briefly the unique direction finding capability of the experiment, as well as a detailed chronology of the low frequency radio events, and, where possible, their association with both groundbased radio observations and solar flares. The attempted observation of solar bursts in the presence of intense magnetospheric noise may, as illustrated, lead to erroneous results in the absence of directional information. The problem of assigning an electron density scale and its influence on determining burst trajectories is reviewed. However, for the disturbed conditions existing during the period in question, it is felt that such trajectories cannot be determined accurately by this method. In conclusion, the capabilities, limitations, and observing programs of present and future satellite experiments are briefly discussed. (Auth.)

  6. A temporal and spatial analysis of cavitation on mechanical heart valves by observing faint light emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiura, Koki; Chinzei, Tsuneo; Abe, Yusuke; Isoyama, Takashi; Saito, Itsuro; Mochizuki, Shuichi; Imachi, Kou

    2004-01-01

    Cavitation on mechanical heart valves (MHVs) could cause the mechanical failure of the occluder. A simple and reliable in vitro test method to evaluate cavitation potential must be developed. The bubble implosion damages the MHV material; thus, observing the behavior of the bubble implosion is essential. According to sonoluminescence, the collapsing cavity emits faint light. Therefore, in this study, the bubble collapse was analyzed both temporally and spatially by observing faint light emission. A photon counting system has been developed using a photomultiplier tube (H7360-01, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan). The highest time resolution of this system is 5 microsec. A quartz optical fiber bundle of 2 mm diameter can be connected to this photomultiplier tube and traversed two-dimensionally over the MHV. The closure of the MHV triggers the photon counter, and the photons through 500 beats are recorded and integrated. A 20 mm Björk-Shiley valve was submerged in a water tank containing 10 L deionized water, and the pressure difference of 120 mm Hg was exerted on the valve at a rate of 60 bpm with a pulse duplicator. Approximately 700 microsec after the valve closure, light emission was detected along the edge of the occluder on the inflow side in the major orifice. Then, approximately 1,000 microsec after the closure, light along the occluder's edge in the minor orifice was recorded as well. Compared with the analysis, using a stroboscope and a high-speed camera, faint light was emitted from the collapsing cavities. In conclusion, sonoluminescnece was successfully observed around the MHV, and the photon counting technique and the traversing mechanism of the optical fiber bundle revealed the temporal and spatial distribution of the cavity collapse on the MHV. PMID:15171483

  7. Recent Large Reduction in Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Chinese Power Plants Observed by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Can; Zhang, Qiang; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Streets, David G.; He, Kebin; Tsay, Si-Chee; Gleason, James F.

    2010-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) aboard NASA's Aura satellite observed substantial increases in total column SO2 and tropospheric column NO2 from 2005 to 2007, over several areas in northern China where large coal-fired power plants were built during this period. The OMI-observed SO2/NO2 ratio is consistent with the SO2/ NO2, emissions estimated from a bottom-up approach. In 2008 over the same areas, OMI detected little change in NO2, suggesting steady electricity output from the power plants. However, dramatic reductions of S0 2 emissions were observed by OMI at the same time. These reductions confirm the effectiveness of the flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) devices in reducing S02 emissions, which likely became operational between 2007 and 2008. This study further demonstrates that the satellite sensors can monitor and characterize anthropogenic emissions from large point sources.

  8. Modeling the thermal emission from asteroid 3 Juno using ALMA observations and the KRC thermal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Timothy N.; Li, Jian-Yang; Moullet, Arielle; Sykes, Mark V.

    2015-11-01

    Asteroid 3 Juno (hereafter referred to as Juno), discovered 1 September 1804, is the 11th largest asteroid in the Main Asteroid Belt (MAB). Containing approximately 1% of the mass in the MAB [1], Juno is the second largest S-type [2].As part of the observations acquired from Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) [3], 10 reconstructed images at ~60km/pixel resolution were acquired of Juno [4] that showed significant deviations from the Standard Thermal Model (STM) [5]. These deviations could be a result of surface topography, albedo variations, emissivity variations, thermal inertia variations, or any combination.The KRC thermal model [6, 7], which has been extensively used for Mars [e.g. 8, 9] and has been applied to Vesta [10] and Ceres [11], will be used to compare model thermal emission to that observed by ALMA at a wavelength of 1.33 mm [4]. The 10 images, acquired over a four hour period, captured ~55% of Juno’s 7.21 hour rotation. Variations in temperature as a function of local time will be used to constrain the source of the thermal emission deviations from the STM.This work is supported by the NASA Solar System Observations Program.References:[1] Pitjeva, E. V. (2005) Solar System Research 39(3), 176. [2] Baer, J. and S. R. Chesley (2008) Celestial Mechanics and Dynamical Astronomy, 100, 27–42. [3] Wootten A. et al. (2015) IAU General Assembly, Meeting #29, #2237199 [4] arXiv:1503.02650 [astro-ph.EP] doi: 10.1088/2041-8205/808/1/L2 [5] Lebofsky, L.A. eta al. (1986) Icarus, 68, 239–251. [6] Kieffer, H. H., et al. (1977) J. Geophys. Res., 82, 4249–4291. [7] Kieffer, Hugh H., (2013) Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, Volume 118, Issue 3, pp. 451-470 [8] Titus, T. N., H. H. Kieffer, and P. N. Christensen (2003) Science, 299, 1048–1051. [9] Fergason, R. L. et al. (2012) Space Sci. Rev, 170, 739–773, doi:10.1007/s11214-012-9891-3. [10] Titus, T. N. et al. (2012) 43rd LPSC, held March 19-23, 2012 at The Woodlands, Texas. LPI Contribution No. 1659, id.2851. [11] Titus, T. N. (2015) Geophysical Research Letters, 42(7), 2130-2136.

  9. XMM-Newton Observations of MBM 12: More Constraints on the Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Bubble Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Smith, Randall K.; Edgar, Richard J.; Kuntz, Kip D.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first analysis of an XMM-Newton observation of the nearby molecular cloud MBM 12. We find that in the direction of MBM 12 the total O VII (0.57 keV) triplet emission is 1.8(+0.5/-0.6) photons/sq cm/s/sr (or Line Units - LU) while for the O VIII (0.65 keV) line emission we find a 3(sigma) upper limit of Newton observations. This comparison provides new constraints on the relative heliospheric and Local Bubble contributions to the local diffuse X-ray background. The heliospheric SWCX model predicts 0.82 LU for O VII, which accounts for approx. 46+/-15% of the observed value, and 0.33 LU for the O VIII line emission consistent with the XMM-Newton observed value. We discuss our results in combination with previous observations of the MBM 12 with CHANDRA and Suzaku.

  10. SOFIA observations of CO(12-11) emission along the L1157 bipolar outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Eislöffel, Jochen; Güsten, Rolf; Wiesemeyer, Helmut; Gusdorf, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    Carbon monoxide is an excellent tracer of the physical conditions of gas in molecular outflows from young stars. To understand the outflow mechanism we need to investigate the origin of the molecular emission and the structure and interaction of the outflowing molecular gas. Deriving the physical parameters of the gas will help us to trace and understand the various gas components in the flow. We observed CO(12-11) line emission at various positions along the L1157 bipolar outflow with GREAT aboard SOFIA. Comparing these new data with CO(2-1), we find basically constant line ratios along the outflow and even at the position of the source. These line ratios lead us to estimates of 10^5 to 10^6 cm^-3 for the gas density and 60 to 100 K for the gas temperature of the outflowing gas. The constrained density and temperature values indicate that we are mostly tracing a low-velocity gas component everywhere along the outflow, which is intermediate between the already known cold gas component, which gets entrained in...

  11. Derivation of an observation-based map of North African dust emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evan, Amato T.; Fiedler, Stephanie; Zhao, Chun; Menut, Laurent; Schepanski, Kerstin; Flamant, Cyrille; Doherty, Owen

    2015-03-01

    Changes in the emission, transport and deposition of aeolian dust have profound effects on regional climate, so that characterizing the lifecycle of dust in observations and improving the representation of dust in global climate models is necessary. A fundamental aspect of characterizing the dust cycle is quantifying surface dust fluxes, yet no spatially explicit estimates of this flux exist for the World's major source regions. Here we present a novel technique for creating a map of the annual mean emitted dust flux for North Africa based on retrievals of dust storm frequency from the Meteosat Second Generation Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and the relationship between dust storm frequency and emitted mass flux derived from the output of five models that simulate dust. Our results suggest that 64 (±16)% of all dust emitted from North Africa is from the Bodélé depression, and that 13 (±3)% of the North African dust flux is from a depression lying in the lee of the Aïr and Hoggar Mountains, making this area the second most important region of emission within North Africa.

  12. Observed spectral energy distribution of the thermal emission from the dayside of WASP-46b

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Guo; Wang, Hongchi; Nikolov, Nikolay; Seemann, Ulf; Henning, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We aim to construct a spectral energy distribution (SED) for the emission from the dayside atmosphere of the hot Jupiter WASP-46b and to investigate its energy budget. We observed a secondary eclipse of WASP-46b simultaneously in the g'r'i'z'JHK bands using the GROND instrument on the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope. Eclipse depths of the acquired light curves were derived to infer the brightness temperatures at multibands that cover the SED peak. We report the first detection of the thermal emission from the dayside of WASP-46b in the K band at 4.2-sigma level and tentative detections in the H (2.5-sigma) and J (2.3-sigma) bands, with flux ratios of 0.253 +0.063/-0.060%, 0.194 +/- 0.078%, and 0.129 +/- 0.055%, respectively. The derived brightness temperatures (2306 +177/-187K, 2462 +245/-302K, and 2453 +198/-258K, respectively) are consistent with an isothermal temperature profile of 2386K, which is significantly higher than the dayside-averaged equilibrium temperature, indicative of very poor heat redistribution eff...

  13. Derivation of an observation-based map of North African dust emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evan, Amato T.; Fiedler, Stephanie; Zhao, Chun; Menut, Laurent; Schepanski, Kerstin; Flamant, C.; Doherty, Owen

    2015-03-01

    Changes in the emission, transport and deposition of aeolian dust have profound effects on regional climate, so that characterizing the lifecycle of dust in observations and improving the representation of dust in global climate models is necessary. A fundamental aspect of characterizing the dust cycle is quantifying surface dust fluxes, yet no spatially explicit estimates of this flux exist for the World’s major source regions. Here we present a novel technique for creating a map of the annual mean emitted dust flux for North Africa based on retrievals of dust storm frequency from the Meteosat Second Generation Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and the relationship between dust storm frequency and emitted mass flux derived from the output of five models that simulate dust. Our results suggest that 64 (±16)% of all dust emitted from North Africa is from the Bodélé depression, and that 13 (±3)% of the North African dust flux is from a depression lying in the lee of the Aïr and Hoggar Mountains, making this area the second most important region of emission within North Africa.

  14. Observation of a physical matrix effect during cold vapour generation measurement of mercury in emissions samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A matrix effect for CV-AFS measurement of mercury in emissions samples is reported. • This results from the different efficiencies of liberation of reduced mercury. • There is a good correlation between solution density and the size of the effect. • Several methods to overcome the bias are presented and discussed. - Abstract: The observation of a physical matrix effect during the cold vapour generation–atomic fluorescence measurement of mercury in emissions samples is reported. The effect is as a result of the different efficiencies of liberation of reduced mercury from solution as the matrix of the solution under test varies. The result of this is that peak area to peak height ratios decease as matrix concentration increases, passing through a minimum, before the ratio then increases as matrix concentration further increases. In the test matrices examined – acidified potassium dichromate and sodium chloride solutions – the possible biases caused by differences between the calibration standard matrix and the test sample matrix were as large as 2.8% (relative) representing peak area to peak height ratios for calibration standards and matrix samples of 45 and 43.75, respectively. For the system considered there is a good correlation between the density of the matrix and point of optimum liberation of dissolved mercury for both matrix types. Several methods employing matrix matching and mathematical correction to overcome the bias are presented and their relative merits discussed; the most promising being the use of peak area, rather than peak height, for quantification

  15. Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Galactic Foreground Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Gold, B; Weiland, J L; Hill, R S; Kogut, A; Bennett, C L; Hinshaw, G; Dunkley, J; Halpern, M; Jarosik, N; Komatsu, E; Larson, D; Limon, M; Meyer, S S; Nolta, M R; Page, L; Smith, K M; Spergel, D N; Tucker, G S; Wollack, E; Wright, E L

    2010-01-01

    [Abridged] We present updated estimates of Galactic foreground emission using seven years of WMAP data. Using the power spectrum of differences between multi-frequency template-cleaned maps, we find no evidence for foreground contamination outside of the updated (KQ85y7) foreground mask. We place a 15 microKelvin upper bound on rms foreground contamination in the cleaned maps used for cosmological analysis. We find no indication in the polarization data of an extra "haze" of hard synchrotron emission from energetic electrons near the Galactic center. We provide an updated map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the internal linear combination (ILC) method, updated foreground masks, and updates to point source catalogs with 62 newly detected sources. Also new are tests of the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) foreground fitting procedure against systematics in the time-stream data, and tests against the observed beam asymmetry. Within a few degrees of the Galactic plane, WMAP total intensity data show...

  16. Observing Infrared Emission Lines of Neutron-Capture Species in Planetary Nebulae: New Detections with IGRINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Sterling, N. C.; Kaplan, Kyle F.; Bautista, Manuel A.

    2015-08-01

    As the former envelopes of evolved stars, planetary nebulae (PNe) present an opportunity to study slow neutron-capture reactions (the “s-process”) during the AGB. Such studies differ from those of AGB stars in two ways. First, PNe represent the end point of self-enrichment and dredge-up in the star and most of its mass return to the ISM, enabling us to infer the nucleosynthetic yield of a specific element. Second, some s-process products are observable in PNe but difficult or impossible to observe in cool stars. These include some species with nuclear charge Z in the 30’s for which the major synthesis sites are uncertain. Optical emission lines of trans-iron species have been observed in some PNe, but are faint and can suffer from blending with lines of more abundant elements (Péquignot & Baluteau 1994, A&A, 283, 593; Sharpee et al. 2007, ApJ, 659, 1265). Observing infrared transitions from low energy states has proven to be a fruitful alternate approach. We used K-band lines of Se (Z=34) and Kr (Z=36) to study the demographics of their abundances in a large sample of Milky Way PNe (Dinerstein 2001, ApJ, 550, L223; Sterling & Dinerstein 2008, ApJ, 174, 158; Sterling, Porter, & Dinerstein 2015, submitted). An L-band emission line of Zn identified by Dinerstein & Geballe (2001, ApJ, 562, 515) and further observed by Smith, Zijlstra, & Dinerstein 2014 (MNRAS, 441, 3161), can be used as a tracer of the Fe-group, enabling determinations of the key stellar population diagnostic ratio [alpha/Fe] in PNe (see poster by Dinerstein et al., Focus Meeting 4). Using IGRINS, a high spectral resolution H and K band spectrometer (Park & Jaffe et al. 2014, Proc SPIE, 9147), we have discovered several new lines not previously reported in any astronomical object. Our detection of an H-band line of Rb (Z=37) confirms previous claims of optical Rb detections and indicates enrichment by a factor of ~4 in the PN NGC 7027 (Sterling, Dinerstein, Kaplan, & Bautista, in preparation). We also detect lines that we tentatively identify as Ge (Z=32) and Cd (Z=48). This work was supported by NSF grants AST 0708429 and 1412928.

  17. Ground-based evidence of latitude-dependent cyclotron absorption of whistler mode signals originating from VLF transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clilverd, Mark A.; Horne, Richard B.

    1996-02-01

    We report the results of the first multisite campaign using VLF Doppler receivers to detect whistler mode signals in the south Atlantic originating from VLF transmitters in the northern hemisphere. The signals at 24 and 21.4 kHz were recorded by a mobile receiver on board the RRS Bransfield during February-March 1993 and an identical system at Faraday, Antartica. The data show that the output power of plasmaspheric ducts varies with latitude, decreasing with increasing L shell between 1.6Schield and Frank [1970] are required to model the experimental data recorded here during nondisturbed geomagnetic conditions.

  18. Observations and modeling of the dust emission from the H2-bright galaxy-wide shock in Stephan's Quintet

    CERN Document Server

    Guillard, P; Cluver, M E; Appleton, P N; Forets, G Pineau des; Ogle, P

    2010-01-01

    Spitzer Space Telescope observations revealed powerful mid-infrared (mid-IR) H2 rotational line emission from the Stephan's Quintet (SQ) X-ray emitting large scale shock associated with a collision between two galaxies. Because H2 forms on dust grains, the presence of H2 is physically linked to the survival of dust, and we expect some dust emission to come from the molecular gas. To test this interpretation, IR observations and dust modeling are used to identify and characterize the thermal dust emission from the shocked molecular gas. The spatial distribution of the IR emission allows us to isolate the faint PAH and dust continuum emission associated with the molecular gas in the SQ shock. We model the spectral energy distribution (SED) of this emission, and fit it to Spitzer observations. Faint PAH and dust continuum emission are detected in the SQ shock, outside star-forming regions. The 12/24um flux ratio in the shock is remarkably close to that of the diffuse Galactic interstellar medium, leading to a Ga...

  19. Satellite observations of peroxyacetyl nitrate from the Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. H. Payne

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a description of the algorithm used to retrieve peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN concentrations from the Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES. We describe the spectral microwindows, error analysis and the utilization of a priori and initial guess information provided by the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. The TES PAN retrievals contain up to one degree of freedom for signal. Estimated single-measurement uncertainties are 30 to 50%. The detection limit for a single TES measurement is dependent on the atmospheric and surface conditions as well as on the instrument noise. For observations where the cloud optical depth is less than 0.5, we find that the TES detection limit for PAN is in the region of 200 to 300 pptv. We show that PAN retrievals over the Northern Hemisphere Pacific in springtime show spatial features that are qualitatively consistent with the expected distribution of PAN in outflow of Asian pollution.

  20. The GROUSE project III: Ks-band observations of the thermal emission from WASP-33b

    CERN Document Server

    de Mooij, E J W; de Kok, R J; Snellen, I A G; Kenworthy, M A; Karjalainen, R; 10.1051/0004-6361/201219434

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, day-side emission from about a dozen hot Jupiters has been detected through ground-based secondary eclipse observations in the near-infrared. These near-infrared observations are vital for determining the energy budgets of hot Jupiters, since they probe the planet's spectral energy distribution near its peak. The aim of this work is to measure the Ks-band secondary eclipse depth of WASP-33b, the first planet discovered to transit an A-type star. This planet receives the highest level of irradiation of all transiting planets discovered to date. Furthermore, its host-star shows pulsations and is classified as a low-amplitude delta-Scuti. As part of our GROUnd-based Secondary Eclipse (GROUSE) project we have obtained observations of two separate secondary eclipses of WASP-33b in the Ks-band using the LIRIS instrument on the William Herschel Telescope (WHT). The telescope was significantly defocused to avoid saturation of the detector for this bright star (K~7.5). To increase the stability and th...

  1. Constrain Carbonyl Sulfide Ocean flux using free tropospheric observations from Aura Tropospheric Emissions Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuai, L.; Worden, J.; Campbell, J.; Kulawik, S. S.; Montzka, S. A.; Liu, J.

    2013-12-01

    We developed a retrieval algorithm for free tropospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS) observations from space above ocean from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). The evaluation of the biases and uncertainties against aircraft profiles from the HIPPO campaign and data from the NOAA Mauna Loa site suggest the OCS retrievals (1) have less than 1.0 degree of freedom for signals (DOFs), (2) are sensitive in the mid-troposphere with a peak sensitivity typically between 300 to 500 hPa, (3) but have much smaller systematic errors from temperature, CO2 and H2O calibrations relative to random errors from measurement noise. Here we estimate the monthly means from TES measurements averaged over multiple years so that random errors are reduced and useful information about OCS seasonal and latitudinal variability can be derived. With this averaging, TES OCS data are found to be consistent (within the calculated uncertainties) with NOAA ground observations and HIPPO aircraft measurements. TES OCS data also captures the seasonal and latitudinal variations observed by these in situ data. This TES OCS monthly data would be useful to constrain ocean flux, understand some tropical ocean contracts (e.g., west-east contrast at Pacific), and estimate tropical ocean fluxes.

  2. Microwave Continuum Emission and Dense Gas Tracers in NGC 3627: Combining Jansky VLA and ALMA Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Eric J; Leroy, Adam K; Momjian, Emmanuel; Condon, James J; Helou, George; Meier, David S; Ott, Jürgen; Schinnerer, Eva; Turner, Jean L

    2015-01-01

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) Ka band (33 GHz) and Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Band 3 (94.5 GHz) continuum images covering the nucleus and two extranuclear star-forming regions within the nearby galaxy NGC 3627 (M 66), observed as part of the Star Formation in Radio Survey (SFRS). Both images achieve an angular resolution of $\\lesssim$2\\arcsec, allowing us to map the radio spectral indices and estimate thermal radio fractions at a linear resolution of $\\lesssim$90 pc at the distance of NGC 3627. The thermal fraction at 33 GHz reaches unity at and around the peaks of each HII region; we additionally observed the spectral index between 33 and 94.5 GHz to become both increasingly negative and positive away from the peaks of the HII regions, indicating an increase of non-thermal extended emission from diffusing cosmic-ray electrons and the possible presence of cold dust, respectively. While the ALMA observations were optimized for collecting continuum data, they also detected line emi...

  3. Inference of fault and fracture systems beneath the Matatlan waste dump basement, a VLF study

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Miguel Ángel, Alatorre-Zamora; José Oscar, Campos-Enríquez; Salvador Isidro, Belmonte-Jiménez; Jaime, Ibarra-Nuño.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Se utilizó la técnica VLF para inferir zonas de fallas o de grandes fracturas que pudiesen servir como conductos para fluidos de desechos contaminantes en el vertedero de Matatlán, en Guadalajara, al oeste de México. Para interpretar los datos se usaron los filtros de Fraser y de Karous-Hjelt. Se in [...] terpretaron perfiles de forma directa empleando el filtro modificado de Karous-Hjelt. Se aplicaron los filtros de Fraser y de Karous-Hjelt conjugados a todos los datos. Los resultados de ambas técnicas muestran similitud en las posiciones y orientaciones de rasgos anómalos que se asocian a zonas de fracturas o de fallas. Se observa una zona de falla en el centro del sitio, que tiene un rumbo NEE-SWW. Otros rasgos importantes inferidos tienen direcciones NW-SE y se observan en la parte occidental del área. El uso conjunto de las técnicas basadas en los filtros de K-H y de Fraser dan resultados como una estructura N-S inferida en el límite occidental del vertedero, así como rasgos anómalos de dirección NW-SE, principalmente en la mitad occidental del sitio. La estructura N-S tiene la misma dirección que el Cañón del Río Grande de Santiago, mientras que los rasgos NW-SE coinciden con las direcciones del rift Tepic-Zacoalco. Hacia el centro del área aparecen otros rasgos con direcciones NE-SW. Todos estos rasgos y sus direcciones coinciden de manera fuerte con la predominancia de grupos de fracturas mostrados en el análisis estadístico de fracturas, y podrían servir como conductos para la migración de lixiviados hacia el Cañón Coyula, al sur, y hacia el Cañón del Río Grande de Santiago, al este del sitio. Un análisis estadístico de direcciones de fracturas mostró 4 direcciones principales N-S (A), N75-80E (B), N60-65W (C) y N25-30W (D), y dos direcciones secundarias que son N45-55E (E) y 90E (F). El patrón primario A coincide con la dirección del Cañón del Río Grande de Santiago, mientras que el patrón secundario F tiene una dirección paralela a la del Cañón Coyula. Abstract in english We used the VLF technique to infer fault or major fracture zones that might serve as path for contaminant waste fluids in the Matatlan dumpsite, in Guadalajara, western Mexico. To interpret the data we used the Fraser, and Karous-Hjelt filters. Profiles were interpreted with 2D direct modeling based [...] on Karous-Hjelt modified filter (K-H). The Fraser and Karous-Hjelt conjugated filter were applied to the entire data. The results of both techniques show similarities in the directions and positions of anomalous features, which are assumed fault or fracture zones. We observed one fault zone at the centre of the site, with a NEE-SWW strike. Other important inferred structures have NW-SE directions at the western part of the site. The cooperative use of both techniques, based on K-H filter and the Fraser filter give results as an N-S inferred structure in the westernmost part of the zone, as well as NW-SE linear anomalies, mainly in the western half of the site. The N-S structure has the same direction as that of Rio Grande de Santiago Canyon. The NW-SE features coincide with the directions of the Tepic-Zacoalco rift. Others NE-SW lineaments are located towards the centre of the area. These facts coincide strongly with the predominance of fracture groups show in the fracture analysis. The inferred structures could serve as conduits for the leachates to migrate towards the Coyula canyon as well as towards the Rio Grande de Santiago Canyon. Statistic analysis of fracture orientations showed N-S (A), N75-80E (B), N60-65W (C), and N25-30W (D) main directions, and N45-55E (E), and 90E (F) secondary directions. Group A coincides with the direction of the Rio Grande de Santiago Canyon, whereas pattern F have the same direction as Coyula Canyon.

  4. Impact of emission controls on air quality in Beijing during APEC 2014: lidar ceilometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, G.; Zhu, X.; Hu, B.; Xin, J.; Wang, L.; Münkel, C.; Mao, G.; Wang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    The implementation of emission reductions during the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit provides a valuable opportunity to study air pollution in Beijing. From 15 October to 30 November 2014, the height of the atmospheric mixing layer and the vertical attenuated backscattering coefficient profiles were observed online using a~lidar ceilometer. Compared with fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) data, the attenuated backscattering coefficients measured by the lidar ceilometer were strongly correlated with the PM2.5 concentration and AOD (correlation coefficients of 0.89 and 0.86, respectively). This result demonstrated the reliability of the vertical distribution of particles measured by the lidar ceilometer. By classifying different degrees of air pollution based on visibility, we found that during the transition period of air pollution, which was affected by transport of southerly flows in the mixing layer, the attenuated backscattering coefficient from 0 to 1500 m was enhanced by approximately 1.4 Mm-1 sr-1 (140 %). During the polluted period, the attenuated backscattering coefficient from 0 to 300 m suddenly increased, and the coefficient near the surface peaked (approximately 14 Mm-1 sr-1); however, the attenuated backscattering coefficient from 300 to 900 m decreased gradually, and the average value from 0 to 1500 m decreased by 0.5 Mm-1sr-1 (20 %). The height of the mixing layer gradually decreased, and the ratio of CO / SO2 gradually increased, which indicate that the polluted period was dominated by local contribution. Due to the emission reductions during APEC (DAPEC), the concentration of PM2.5 decreased by 59.2 and 58.9 % and visibility improved by 70.2 and 56.0 % compared to before (BAPEC) and after APEC (AAPEC), respectively. The contribution of regional transport in DAPEC decreased by approximately 36 and 25 %, and the local contribution decreased by approximately 48 and 54 % compared to BAPEC and AAPEC, respectively. The most effective method of controlling air pollution in the Beijing area is to reduce regional emissions during the transition period and reduce local emissions during the polluted period.

  5. Quantifying urban/industrial emissions of greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases based on atmospheric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Diana Hart

    2000-11-01

    Background and pollution trends and cycles of fourteen trace gases over the Northeastern U.S. are inferred from continuous atmospheric observations at the Harvard Forest research station located in Petersham, Massachusetts. This site receives background `clean' air from the northwest (Canada) and `dirty' polluted air from the southwest (New York City-Washington, D.C. corridor). Mixing ratios of gases regulated by the Montreal Protocol or other policies (CO, PCE, CFC11, CFC12, CFC113, CH 3CCl3, CCl4, and Halon-1211) and of those not subject to restrictions (H2, CH4, CHCl3, TCE, N2O, and SF6) were measured over the three-year period, 1996 to 1998, every 24 minutes by a fully automated gas chromatographic instrument with electron capture detectors. Evidence for polar vortex venting is found consistently in the month of June of the background seasonal cycles. The ratio of CO and PCE enhancements borne on southwesterly winds are in excellent agreement with county-level EPA and sales-based inventories for the New York City-Washington, D.C. region. From this firm footing, we use CO and PCE as reference compounds to determine the urban/industrial source strengths for the other species. A broad historical and geographic study of emissions reveals that the international treaty has by and large been a success. Locally, despite the passing of the 1996 Montreal Protocol ban, only emissions of CFC12 and CH3CCl3 are abating. Though source strengths are waning, the sources are not spent and continued releases to the atmosphere may be expected for some years to come. For CH3CCl3, whose rate of decline is central to our understanding of atmospheric processes, we estimate that absolute concentrations may persist until around the year 2010. The long-term high frequency time series of hydrogen provided here represents the first such data set of its kind. The H2 diurnal cycle is established and explained in terms of its sources and sinks. The ratio of H2 to CO in pollution plumes is found to be a seasonal and unchanged since early automobile exhaust studies of the 1960s, despite the many restrictions placed on car emissions and fuels since that time. Based on this result, a spatial inventory of H2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion is developed at the county level for the entire Northeastern U.S.

  6. Recent Observations and Modeling of Narrowband Stimulated Electromagnetic Emissions SEEs at HAARP and EISCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, W.; Mahmoudian, A.; Fu, H.; Bordikar, M. R.; Samimi, A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Briczinski, S. J., Jr.; Kosch, M. J.; Senior, A.; Isham, B.

    2014-12-01

    There has been significant interest in so-called narrowband Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission SEE over the past several years due to recent discoveries at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program HAARP facility near Gakone, Alaska. Narrowband SEE (NSEE) has been defined as spectral features in the SEE spectrum typically within 1 kHz of the transmitter (or pump) frequency. SEE is due to nonlinear processes leading to re-radiation at frequencies other than the pump wave frequency during heating the ionospheric plasma with high power HF radio waves. Although NSEE exhibits a richly complex structure, it has now been shown after a substantial number of observations at HAARP, that NSEE can be grouped into two basic classes. The first are those spectral features, associated with Stimulated Brillouin Scatter SBS, which typically occur when the pump frequency is not close to electron gyro-harmonic frequencies. Typically, these spectral features are within roughly 50 Hz of the pump wave frequency where it is to be noted that the O+ ion gyro-frequency is roughly 50 Hz. The second class of spectral features corresponds to the case when the pump wave frequency is typically within roughly 10 kHz of electron gyro-harmonic frequencies. In this case, spectral features ordered by harmonics of ion gyro-frequencies are typically observed, and termed Stimulated Ion Bernstein Scatter SIBS. This presentation will first provide an overview of the recent NSEE experimental observations at HAARP. Both Stimulated Brillouin Scatter SBS and Stimulated Ion Bernstein Scatter SIBS observations will be discussed as well as their relationship to each other. Possible theoretical formulation in terms of parametric decay instabilities and computational modeling will be provided. Possible applications of NSEE will be pointed out including triggering diagnostics for artificial ionization layer formation, proton precipitation event diagnostics, electron temperature measurements in the heated volume and detection of heavy ion species. Finally potential for observing such SEE at the European Incoherent Scatter EISCAT facility will be discussed.

  7. 7-year temporal trend of anthropogenic SO2 emissions over China identified from GOME observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, M. F.; Beirle, S.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    Fossil fuels such as coal and oil contain significant amounts of sulfur When burned this sulfur is generally converted to SO2 The GOME observations showed enhancements of SO2 column amounts due to anthropogenic emission sources These enhancements are identified from the regions with extensive burning of coal smelting of metal ores and heavy industrial activities such as from China Eastern USA the Arabian Peninsula Eastern Europe South Africa and particularly Norilsk Russia Also a comparison with GOME observations of anthropogenic NO2 column amounts is presented In this paper we present time series of SO2 SCDs over China We analyzed GOME data for the time period 1996-2002 Time series over the highly industrialized regions Beijing and Shanghai showed a slight increase in the SO2 SCD attributable to the increased use of coal for power generation in China Zhou 2001 Especially during the GOME-period 1996-2001 coal consumption and SO2 time series reflect similar behaviour However Richter et al 2005 calculated a significant increase in the NO2 concentrations over the industrial areas of China for the time period of 1996-2004 Additionally preliminary results of atmospheric SO2 from SCIAMACHY on board EnviSAT-1 since March 2002 instrument with broader spectral and better spatial resolution is presented The better spatial resolution will help to study and localize the impacts of SO2 emissions on a finer spatial scale References Richter A J P Burrows H Nuess C Granier and U Niemeier Increase in tropospheric nitrogen

  8. Occasional large emissions of nitrous oxide and methane observed in stormwater biofiltration systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grover, Samantha P.P., E-mail: samantha.grover@monash.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Cohan, Amanda, E-mail: acoh5@student.monash.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Chan, Hon Sen, E-mail: hon.sen.chan@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Livesley, Stephen J., E-mail: sjlive@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Resource Management and Geography, The University of Melbourne, Richmond, Victoria, 3121 (Australia); Beringer, Jason, E-mail: jason.beringer@monash.edu [School of Geography and Environmental Science, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Monash Water for Liveability, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Daly, Edoardo, E-mail: edoardo.daly@monash.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Monash Water for Liveability, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia)

    2013-11-01

    Designed, green infrastructures are becoming a customary feature of the urban landscape. Sustainable technologies for stormwater management, and biofilters in particular, are increasingly used to reduce stormwater runoff volumes and peaks as well as improve the water quality of runoff discharged into urban water bodies. Although a lot of research has been devoted to these technologies, their effect in terms of greenhouse gas fluxes in urban areas has not been yet investigated. We present the first study aimed at quantifying greenhouse gas fluxes between the soil of stormwater biofilters and the atmosphere. N{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2} were measured periodically over a year in two operational vegetated biofiltration cells at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. One cell had a saturated zone at the bottom, and compost and hardwood mulch added to the sandy loam filter media. The other cell had no saturated zone and was composed of sandy loam. Similar sedges were planted in both cells. The biofilter soil was a small N{sub 2}O source and a sink for CH{sub 4} for most measurement events, with occasional large emissions of both N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} under very wet conditions. Average N{sub 2}O fluxes from the cell with the saturated zone were almost five-fold greater (65.6 ?g N{sub 2}O–N m{sup ?2} h{sup ?1}) than from the other cell (13.7 ?g N{sub 2}O–N m{sup ?2} h{sup ?1}), with peaks up to 1100 ?g N{sub 2}O–N m{sup ?2} h{sup ?1}. These N{sub 2}O fluxes are of similar magnitude to those measured in other urban soils, but with larger peak emissions. The CH{sub 4} sink strength of the cell with the saturated zone (? 3.8 ?g CH{sub 4}–C m{sup ?2} h{sup ?1}) was lower than the other cell (? 18.3 ?g CH{sub 4}–C m{sup ?2} h{sup ?1}). Both cells of the biofilter appeared to take up CH{sub 4} at similar rates to other urban lawn systems; however, the biofilter cells displayed occasional large CH{sub 4} emissions following inflow events, which were not seen in other urban systems. CO{sub 2} fluxes increased with soil temperature in both cells, and in the cell without the saturated zone CO{sub 2} fluxes decreased as soil moisture increased. Other studies of CO{sub 2} fluxes from urban soils have found both similar and larger CO{sub 2} emissions than those measured in the biofilter. The results of this study suggest that the greenhouse gas footprint of stormwater treatment warrant consideration in the planning and implementation of engineered green infrastructures. - Highlights: ? First study of greenhouse gas fluxes from a stormwater biofilter. ? Observed occasional large emissions of nitrous oxide and methane. ? Biofilter designs with and without a saturated zone were net sinks for methane. ? Carbon dioxide emissions were four times less than those from lawns.

  9. Occasional large emissions of nitrous oxide and methane observed in stormwater biofiltration systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Designed, green infrastructures are becoming a customary feature of the urban landscape. Sustainable technologies for stormwater management, and biofilters in particular, are increasingly used to reduce stormwater runoff volumes and peaks as well as improve the water quality of runoff discharged into urban water bodies. Although a lot of research has been devoted to these technologies, their effect in terms of greenhouse gas fluxes in urban areas has not been yet investigated. We present the first study aimed at quantifying greenhouse gas fluxes between the soil of stormwater biofilters and the atmosphere. N2O, CH4, and CO2 were measured periodically over a year in two operational vegetated biofiltration cells at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. One cell had a saturated zone at the bottom, and compost and hardwood mulch added to the sandy loam filter media. The other cell had no saturated zone and was composed of sandy loam. Similar sedges were planted in both cells. The biofilter soil was a small N2O source and a sink for CH4 for most measurement events, with occasional large emissions of both N2O and CH4 under very wet conditions. Average N2O fluxes from the cell with the saturated zone were almost five-fold greater (65.6 ?g N2O–N m?2 h?1) than from the other cell (13.7 ?g N2O–N m?2 h?1), with peaks up to 1100 ?g N2O–N m?2 h?1. These N2O fluxes are of similar magnitude to those measured in other urban soils, but with larger peak emissions. The CH4 sink strength of the cell with the saturated zone (? 3.8 ?g CH4–C m?2 h?1) was lower than the other cell (? 18.3 ?g CH4–C m?2 h?1). Both cells of the biofilter appeared to take up CH4 at similar rates to other urban lawn systems; however, the biofilter cells displayed occasional large CH4 emissions following inflow events, which were not seen in other urban systems. CO2 fluxes increased with soil temperature in both cells, and in the cell without the saturated zone CO2 fluxes decreased as soil moisture increased. Other studies of CO2 fluxes from urban soils have found both similar and larger CO2 emissions than those measured in the biofilter. The results of this study suggest that the greenhouse gas footprint of stormwater treatment warrant consideration in the planning and implementation of engineered green infrastructures. - Highlights: ? First study of greenhouse gas fluxes from a stormwater biofilter. ? Observed occasional large emissions of nitrous oxide and methane. ? Biofilter designs with and without a saturated zone were net sinks for methane. ? Carbon dioxide emissions were four times less than those from lawns

  10. Limb observations of the 12.32 micron solar emission line during the 1991 July total eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Drake; Jennings, Donald E.; Mccabe, George; Noyes, Robert; Wiedemann, Gunter; Espenak, Fred

    1992-01-01

    The limb profile of the Mg I 12.32-micron emission line is determined by occultation in the July 11, 1991 total solar eclipse over Mauna Kea. It is shown that the emission peaks are very close to the 12-micron continuum limb, as predicted by recent theory for this line as a non-LTE photospheric emission. The increase in optical depth for this extreme limb-viewing situation indicates that most of the observed emission arises from above the chromospheric temperature minimum, and it is found that this emission is extended to heights well in excess of the model predictions. The line emission can be observed as high as 2000 km above the 12-micron continuum limb, whereas theory predicts it to remain observable no higher than about 500 km above the continuum limb. The substantial limb extension observed in this line is quantitatively consistent with limb extensions seen in the far-IR continuum, and it is concluded that it is indicative of departures from gravitational hydrostatic equilibrium, or spatial inhomogeneities, in the upper solar atmosphere.

  11. Airborne Ethane Observations over the Barnett and Bakken Shale Formations: Quantification of Ethane Fluxes and Attribution of Methane Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. L.; Kort, E. A.; Karion, A.; Sweeney, C.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    The largest emissions sources of methane, a potent greenhouse gas and the primary component of natural gas, are the fossil fuel sector and microbial processes that occur in agricultural settings, landfills, and wetlands. Attribution of methane to these different source sectors has proven difficult, as evidenced by persistent disagreement between the annual emissions estimated from atmospheric observations (top-down) and from inventories (bottom-up). Given the rapidly changing natural gas infrastructure in North America, and the implications of associated rapid changes in emissions of methane for climate, it is crucial we improve our ability to quantify and understand current and future methane emissions. Here, we present evidence that continuous in-situ airborne observations of ethane, which is a tracer for fossil fuel emissions, are a new and useful tool for attribution of methane emissions to specific source sectors. Additionally, with these new airborne observations we present the first tightly constrained ethane emissions estimates of oil and gas production fields using the well-known mass balance method. The ratios of ethane-to-methane (C2H6:CH4) of specific methane emissions sources were studied over regions of high oil and gas production from the Barnett, TX and Bakken, ND shale plays, using continuous (1Hz frequency) airborne ethane measurements paired with simultaneous methane measurements. Despite the complex mixture of sources in the Barnett region, the methane emissions were well-characterized by distinct C2H6:CH4 relationships indicative of a high-ethane fossil fuel source (e.g., "wet" gas), a low-ethane fossil fuel source (e.g., "dry" gas), and an ethane-free, or microbial source. The defined set of C2H6:CH4 that characterized the emissions input to the atmosphere was used in conjunction with the total ethane and methane fluxes to place bounds on the fraction of methane emissions attributable to each source. Additionally, substantial ethane fluxes from the Barnett and Bakken regions were observed (1% to 10% of estimated national ethane emissions), and emissions of these magnitudes may significantly impact regional atmospheric chemistry and air quality by influencing production of tropospheric ozone.

  12. Experimental estimates of electron density variations at the reflection height of VLF signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the behaviour of the electron concentration at the reflection level of very low frequency (VLF) waves, two years of phase and amplitude records of the 12.9 kHz signals emitted from Omega-Argentina (43.200S; 294.600E) and received at Tucuman (26.900S; 294.700E) have been used. The experimental results are compared with values derived from the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI-79). The experimental data show a seasonal variation not predicted by the model. (author)

  13. Circuit Methods for VLF Antenna Couplers. [for use in Loran or Omega receiver systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhans, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The limitations of different E-field antenna coupler or preamplifier circuits are presented. All circuits were evaluated using actual Loran or Omega signals. Electric field whip or wire antennas are the simplest types which can be used for reception of VLF signals in the 10 to 100 kHz range. JFET or MOSFET transistors provide impedance transformation and some voltage gain in simple circuits where the power for operating the preamplifier uses the same coaxial cable that feeds the signal back to the receiver. The circuit techniques provide useful alternative methods for Loran-Omega receiver system designers.

  14. Constraints on ship NOx emissions in Europe using GEOS-Chem and OMI satellite NO2 observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. M. Vinken

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a top-down ship NOx emission inventory for the Baltic Sea, North Sea, Bay of Biscay and Mediterranean Sea, based on satellite observed tropospheric NO2 columns of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI for 2005–2006. We improved the representation of ship emissions in the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model, and compared simulated NO2 columns to consistent satellite observations. Relative differences between simulated and observed NO2 columns have been used to constrain ship emissions in four European seas (Baltic Sea, North Sea, Bay of Biscay and Mediterranean Sea. The constrained ship tracks account for 39% of total top-down European ship NOx emissions, which amounts to 0.96 Tg N for 2005, and 1.0 Tg N for 2006 (11–15% lower than the bottom-up EMEP ship emission inventory. Our results indicate that EMEP emissions in the Mediterranean Sea are too high (by 60% and misplaced by up to 150 km, which can have important consequences for local air quality simulations. In the North Sea, our top-down emissions amount to 0.05 Tg N for 2005 (35% lower than EMEP. Increased top-down emissions were found for the Baltic Sea and Bay of Biscay, with emission totals of 0.05 Tg N (131% higher than EMEP and 0.08 Tg N for 2005 (128% higher than EMEP, respectively. Our study explicitly accounts for the (non-linear sensitivity of satellite retrievals to changes in the a priori NO2 profiles. Although the effect of this sensitivity might be minor for small emission increments, our findings stress the need for consistent information in satellite retrieval and model, as satellite observations are never fully independent of model information (i.e. assumptions on vertical NO2 profiles. Our study provides for the first time a space-based top-down ship NOx emission inventory, and can serve as a framework for future studies to constrain ship emissions using satellite NO2 observations in other seas.

  15. Layer-like IR limb emission enhancement observed by SABER/TIMED in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Kutepov, A.; Janches, D.; Rezac, L.; Plane, J. M.; Gordley, L. L.; Marshall, T.; Russell, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    We report first results of our study of characteristics and variability of the layer-like IR limb 4.3 mm daytime emission enhancement observed by SABER/TIMED utilizing nearly a decade of SABER observations. The enhancement is observed in a localized region of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) at a tangent height between 85 and 95 km. Also, it has a distinct spatial and temporal variability, and is not predicted by current Non-Local Thermal Equilibrium (NLTE) models for generation of the IR molecular emissions in the MLT. We discuss the characteristics and variability of this layer, compare them with similar effects detected by other instruments, and consider possible physical processes which may influence formation of the IR radiation in the MLT to explain the observed emission enhancement.

  16. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF THE RADIO GALAXY 3C 445 AND THE HOT SPOT X-RAY EMISSION MECHANISM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present new Chandra observations of the radio galaxy 3C 445, centered on its southern radio hot spot. Our observations detect X-ray emission displaced upstream and to the west of the radio-optical hot spot. Attempting to reproduce both the observed spectral energy distribution and the displacement excludes all one-zone models. Modeling of the radio-optical hot spot spectrum suggests that the electron distribution has a low-energy cutoff or break approximately at the proton rest mass energy. The X-rays could be due to external Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background coming from the fast (Lorentz factor ? ? 4) part of a decelerating flow, but this requires a small angle between the jet velocity and the observer's line of sight (? ? 140). Alternatively, the X-ray emission can be synchrotron from a separate population of electrons. This last interpretation does not require the X-ray emission to be beamed.

  17. Emissions of mercury in southern Africa derived from long-term observations at Cape Point, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.-G. Brunke

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mercury emissions in South Africa have so far been estimated only by a bottom-up approach from activities and emission factors for different processes. In this paper we derive GEM/CO (GEM being gaseous elemental mercury, Hg0, GEM/CO2, GEM/CH4, CO/CO2, CH4/CO2, and CH4/CO emission ratios from plumes observed during long-term monitoring of these species at Cape Point between March 2007 and December 2009. The average observed GEM/CO, GEM/CO2, GEM/CH4, CO/CO2, CH4/CO2, and CH4/CO emission ratios were 2.40 ± 2.65 pg m?3 ppb?1 (n = 47, 62.7 ± 80.2 pg m?3 ppm?1 (n = 44, 3.61 ± 4.66 pg m?3 ppb?1 (n = 46, 35.6 ± 25.4 ppb ppm?1 (n = 52, 20.2 ± 15.5 ppb ppm?1 (n = 48, and 0.876 ± 1.106 ppb ppb?1 (n = 42, respectively. The observed CO/CO2, CH4/CO2, and CH4/CO emission ratios agree within the combined uncertainties of the observations and emissions with the ratios calculated from EDGAR (version 4.2 CO2, CO, and CH4 inventories for South Africa and southern Africa (South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, and Mozambique in 2007 and 2008 (inventories for 2009 are not available yet. Total elemental mercury emission of 13.1, 15.2, and 16.1 t Hg yr?1 are estimated independently using the GEM/CO, GEM/CO2, and GEM/CH4 emission ratios and the annual mean CO, CO2, and CH4 emissions, respectively, of South Africa in 2007 and 2008. The average of these independent estimates of 14.8 t GEM yr?1 is much less than the total emission of 257 t Hg yr?1 shown by older inventories which are now considered to be wrong. Considering the uncertainties of our emission estimate, of the emission inventories, and the fact that emission of GEM represents 50–78 % of all mercury emissions, our estimate is comparable to the currently cited GEM emissions in 2004 and somewhat smaller than emissions in 2006. A further increase of mercury emissions due to increasing electricity consumption will lead to a more pronounced difference. A quantitative assessment of the difference and its significance, however, will require emission inventories for the years of observations (2007–2009 as well as better data on the speciation of the total mercury emissions in South Africa.

  18. The Supernova Blast Wave and the Molecular Cloud: an Observational Study of Molecular Shock Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Matthew Joseph

    1995-01-01

    Shock waves in molecular clouds heat, compress, accelerate, and chemically alter the gas they encounter. Despite their crucial role in determining the physical state of the dense interstellar medium and despite their making possible direct observations of H_2, molecular shocks are still poorly understood, as evidenced by the many discrepancies between theory and observations. In my dissertation, I use the supernova remnant IC 443 as a laboratory to test our understanding of shock -excited H_2 emission. By examining roughly 20 separate 2-4 ?m Ha transitions, I find the non-uniform temperature structure essentially reproduces that found in Orion Peak 1, and so is consistent with the partially dissociating J-shock model presented by Brand and collaborators. Subsequent mid-infrared observations of the pure rotational S(2) transition at 12 mu m strengthens these conclusions. Velocity resolved line profiles of the strong 1-0 S(1) transition uncover a relationship between the remnant's large-scale geometry and the line profile's full-width at 10% intensity, centroid, and shape. The relationship contradicts any model requiring local bow geometries to explain broad H_2 line widths. Comparing the 1-0 S(1) data with similar observations of the 2-1 S(1) line, I demonstrate that the excitation temperature in the shocked gas depends primarily on position, not velocity. Taken together, the identical velocity extent of the 1-0 S(1) and the 2-1 S(1) lines and their upper state energy separation of E/k ~ 6000 K proves the H_2 -emitting gas reaches its full velocity dispersion prior to cooling below roughly 1500 K. Finally, I compare, with similar spatial and spectral resolution, H_2 and HCO^+ J = 1 - 0 and find evidence for temperature gradients as a result of both preshock density inhomogeneities and postshock cooling.

  19. Observations of a mode transition in a hydrogen hollow cathode discharge using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Sam, E-mail: sam.dixon@anu.edu.au; Charles, Christine; Dedrick, James; Boswell, Rod [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Gans, Timo; O' Connell, Deborah [Department of Physics, York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-07

    Two distinct operational modes are observed in a radio frequency (rf) low pressure hydrogen hollow cathode discharge. The mode transition is characterised by a change in total light emission and differing expansion structures. An intensified CCD camera is used to make phase resolved images of Balmer ? emission from the discharge. The low emission mode is consistent with a typical ? discharge, and appears to be driven by secondary electrons ejected from the cathode surface. The bright mode displays characteristics common to an inductive discharge, including increased optical emission, power factor, and temperature of the H{sub 2} gas. The bright mode precipitates the formation of a stationary shock in the expansion, observed as a dark region adjacent to the source-chamber interface.

  20. Observations of 6-200 ?m emission of the Ophiuchus cloud LDN 1688

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, M. G.; Juvela, M.; Lehtinen, K.; Mattila, K.; Lemke, D.

    2013-01-01

    We examine two positions, ON1 and ON2, within the Ophiuchus cloud LDN 1688 using observations made with the ISO photo-polarimeter (ISOPHOT) instrument aboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) satellite. The data include mid-infrared spectra (˜6-12 ?m) and several photometric bands up to 200 ?m. The data probe the emission from molecular polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-type species, transiently heated very small grains and large classical dust grains. We compare the observations to earlier studies, especially those carried out towards an isolated translucent cloud in Chamaeleon (Paper I). The spectra towards the two LDN 1688 positions are very similar to each other in spite of position ON1 having a larger column density and probably being subjected to a stronger radiation field. The ratios of the mid-infrared features are similar to those found in other diffuse and translucent clouds. Compared to Paper I, the 7.7/11.3 ?m band ratios are lower, ˜2.0, at both LDN 1688 positions. A continuum is detected in the ˜10 ?m region. This is stronger towards the position ON1 but still lower than on any of the sightlines in Paper I. The far-infrared opacities are higher than in diffuse medium. The value of the position ON2, ?200/N(H) = 3.9 × 10- 25 cm2/H, is twice the value found for ON1. The radiation field of LDN 1688 is dominated by the two embedded B-type double stars, ? Oph AB and HD 147889, with an additional contribution from the Upper Sco OB association. The strong heating is reflected in the high colour temperature, ˜24 K, of the large grain emission. Radiative transfer modelling confirms a high level of the radiation field and points to an increased abundance of PAH grains. However, when the hardening of the radiation field caused by the local B stars is taken into account, the observations can be fitted with almost no change to the standard dust models. However, all the examined models underestimate the level of the mid-infrared continuum.

  1. Observation of cw stimulated Raman emission in the neon 2p-->1s manifold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, X.-W.; Sandle, W. J.; Ballagh, R. J.; Warrington, D. M.

    1993-02-01

    We report previously unobserved cw laser emission from a commercial HeNe laser. This lasing is based on near-resonant stimulated electronic Raman scattering (SERS) involving NeI 1s 5?2p?1s 4, and 1s 5?2p?1s 2, electronic states when the laser cavity is pumped externally by cw dye laser radiation. Two of the emitted lines [2p 2?1s 4 (603.0 nm) and 2p 2?1s 2 (659.9 nm); both pumped at 588.2 nm (1s 5?2p 2)] are explored in some detail. Output power of the Raman laser has been measured as a function of the laser-atom detuning, the Ne discharge current and the pumping laser power. These Raman lines can be several times stronger than the 633 nm HeNe laser output itself. The observations are qualitatively consistent with calculations of Raman gain showing the possibility of all 14 dipole-allowed 2p?1s Stokes-Raman laser lines being observable with commercial HeNe lasers, given mirror coatings of sufficient spectral width.

  2. Observations of 6 - 200 {\\mu}m emission of the Ophiuchus cloud LDN 1688

    CERN Document Server

    Rawlings, M G; Lehtinen, K; Mattila, K; Lemke, D

    2012-01-01

    We examine two positions, ON1 and ON2, within the Ophiuchus cloud LDN 1688 using observations made with the ISOPHOT instrument aboard the ISO satellite. The data include mid-IR spectra (~6-12{\\mu}m) and several photometric bands up to 200{\\mu}m. The data probe the emission from molecular PAH-type species, transiently-heated Very Small Grains (VSGs), and large classical dust grains. We compare the observations to earlier studies, especially those carried out towards an isolated translucent cloud in Chamaeleon (Paper I). The spectra towards the two LDN 1688 positions are very similar to each other, in spite of position ON1 having a larger column density and probably being subjected to a stronger radiation field. The ratios of the mid-IR features are similar to those found in other diffuse and translucent clouds. Compared to paper I, the 7.7/11.3{\\mu}m band ratios are lower, ~2.0, at both LDN 1688 positions. A continuum is detected in the ~10{\\mu}m region. This is stronger towards the position ON1 but still lowe...

  3. A flare observed in coronal, transition region, and helium I 10830 Å emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 2012 June 17, we observed the evolution of a C-class flare associated with the eruption of a filament near a large sunspot in the active region NOAA 11504. We obtained high spatial resolution filtergrams using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory in broadband TiO at 706 nm (bandpass: 10 Å) and He I 10830 Å narrow band (bandpass: 0.5 Å, centered 0.25 Å to the blue). We analyze the spatio-temporal behavior of the He I 10830 Å data, which were obtained over a 90''×90'' field of view with a cadence of 10 s. We also analyze simultaneous data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, and data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and GOES spacecrafts. Non-thermal effects are ignored in this analysis. Several quantitative aspects of the data, as well as models derived using the '0D' enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops model code, indicate that the triplet states of the 10830 Å multiplet are populated by photoionization of chromospheric plasma followed by radiative recombination. Surprisingly, the He II 304 Å line is reasonably well matched by standard emission measure calculations, along with the C IV emission which dominates the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly 1600 Å channel during flares. This work lends support to some of our previous work combining X-ray, EUV, and UV data of flares to build models of energy transport from corona to chromosphere.

  4. A flare observed in coronal, transition region, and helium I 10830 Å emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda [Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Qiu, Jiong [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States); Judge, Philip G. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    On 2012 June 17, we observed the evolution of a C-class flare associated with the eruption of a filament near a large sunspot in the active region NOAA 11504. We obtained high spatial resolution filtergrams using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory in broadband TiO at 706 nm (bandpass: 10 Å) and He I 10830 Å narrow band (bandpass: 0.5 Å, centered 0.25 Å to the blue). We analyze the spatio-temporal behavior of the He I 10830 Å data, which were obtained over a 90''×90'' field of view with a cadence of 10 s. We also analyze simultaneous data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, and data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and GOES spacecrafts. Non-thermal effects are ignored in this analysis. Several quantitative aspects of the data, as well as models derived using the '0D' enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops model code, indicate that the triplet states of the 10830 Å multiplet are populated by photoionization of chromospheric plasma followed by radiative recombination. Surprisingly, the He II 304 Å line is reasonably well matched by standard emission measure calculations, along with the C IV emission which dominates the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly 1600 Å channel during flares. This work lends support to some of our previous work combining X-ray, EUV, and UV data of flares to build models of energy transport from corona to chromosphere.

  5. Observation of The Mesopause Passage Through Oh and O2 Emission Layers In August 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilyeva, G. A.; Ammosov, P. P.

    The intensity and rotational temperature of OH (TOH) molecular emissions and the first atmospheric band of O2(0-1) (TO2) are measured at station Maimaga (63N, 129,5E) with the digital infrared diffraction spectrograph registering the two molecu- lar bands simultaneously. Since it is widely known that the hydroxyl emission occurs near 87 km and the molecular oxygen near 95 km, our simultaneous measurements of the nightly averages of the associated rotational temperatures gives information about the temperatures at these two altitudes. The analysis of 59 nightly averaged values of TOH for the period of 1999 to 2001 shows that the temperature at the hydroxyl emis- sion height increases from 150 K early in August to 220 K at the end of September. The comparison of this temperature increase with data obtained by other investigators at different latitudes shows the agreement with the known fact that the amplitude of the seasonal variation increases with increasing latitude. The analysis of data from August 9 to September 30, 2001 shows that TO2>TOH early in August and TO2TOH at the end of August. Such a change of the temperature vertical gradient from the positive to negative sign implies the shift of the mesopause to a higher level than the excited hydroxyl layer. According to the twoUlevel mesopause concept, developed in recent years [C.Y.She, U. Von Zahn, Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 103, No.D5, PP.5855-5862, 1998], the position of minimum temperature varies from the summer state (88 km) to winter (100 km) state during a very short time. It is possible that ob- served change of the vertical temperature gradient corresponds to the transition of the mesopause from the summer to winter state. From our data, the transition occurred during one week close to 28 August. The time of the sign change of temperature ver- tical gradient at the hydroxyl emission height in 2001 is observed about two weeks earlier than is predicted according to the atmospheric model MSISEU90, and about one month in comparison with the thermal mesosphere structure model above the Arc- tic [F.-J. Lubken, Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 104, No.D8, PP.9135-9150, 1998

  6. Ultraviolet imaging telescope and optical emission-line observations of H II regions in M81

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jesse K.; Cheng, K.-P.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Cornett, Robert H.; Hintzen, P. M. N.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew M.; Smith, Eric P.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1995-01-01

    Images of the type Sab spiral galaxy M81 were obtained in far-UV and near-UV bands by the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) during the Astro-1 Spacelab mission of 1990 December. Magnitudes in the two UV bands are determined for 52 H II regions from the catalog of Petit, Sivan, & Karachentsev (1988). Fluxes of the H-alpha and H-beta emission lines are determined from CCD images. Extinctions for the brightest H II regions are determined from observed Balmer decrements. Fainter H II regions are assigned the average of published radio-H-alpha extinctions for several bright H II regions. The radiative transfer models of Witt, Thronson, & Capuano (1992) are shown to predict a relationship between Balmer Decrement and H-alpha extinction consistent with observed line and radio fluxes for the brightest 7 H II regions and are used to estimate the UV extinction. Ratios of Lyman continuum with ratios predicted by model spectra computed for initial mass function (IMF) slope equal to -1.0 and stellar masses ranging from 5 to 120 solar mass. Ages and masses are estimated by comparing the H-alpha and far-UV fluxes and their ratio with the models. The total of the estimated stellar masses for the 52 H II regions is 1.4 x 10(exp 5) solar mass. The star-formation rate inferred for M81 from the observed UV and H-alpha fluxes is low for a spiral galaxy at approximately 0.13 solar mass/yr, but consistent with the low star-formation rates obtained by Kennicutt (1983) and Caldwell et al. (1991) for early-type spirals.

  7. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from behind-the-limb solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Petrosian, Vahe'; Liu, Wei; da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Allafort, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Fermi-LAT >30 MeV observations have increased the number of detected solar flares by almost a factor of 10 with respect to previous space observations. These sample both the impulsive and long duration phases of GOES M and X class flares. Of particular interest is the recent detections of three solar flares whose position behind the limb was confirmed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. While gamma-ray emission up to tens of MeV resulting from proton interactions has been detected before from occulted solar flares, the significance of these particular events lies in the fact that these are the first detections of >100 MeV gamma-ray emission from footpoint-occulted flares. We will present the Fermi-LAT, RHESSI and STEREO observations of these flares and discuss the various emission scenarios for these sources and implications for the particle acceleration mechanisms.

  8. Observation of CH4 and other Non-CO2 Green House Gas Emissions from California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Marc L.; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Riley, William J.; Andrews, Arlyn C.

    2009-01-09

    In 2006, California passed the landmark assembly bill AB-32 to reduce California's emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to global climate change. AB-32 commits California to reduce total GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, a reduction of 25 percent from current levels. To verify that GHG emission reductions are actually taking place, it will be necessary to measure emissions. We describe atmospheric inverse model estimates of GHG emissions obtained from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project. In collaboration with NOAA, we are measuring the dominant long-lived GHGs at two tall-towers in central California. Here, we present estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions obtained by statistical comparison of measured and predicted atmospheric mixing ratios. The predicted mixing ratios are calculated using spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and surface footprints, that provide a proportional relationship between the surface emissions and the mixing ratio signal at tower locations. The footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. Integral to the inverse estimates, we perform a quantitative analysis of errors in atmospheric transport and other factors to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated emissions. Regressions of modeled and measured mixing ratios suggest that total CH{sub 4} emissions are within 25% of the inventory estimates. A Bayesian source sector analysis obtains posterior scaling factors for CH{sub 4} emissions, indicating that emissions from several of the sources (e.g., landfills, natural gas use, petroleum production, crops, and wetlands) are roughly consistent with inventory estimates, but livestock emissions are significantly higher than the inventory. A Bayesian 'region' analysis is used to identify spatial variations in CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions within California. Although, only regions near the tower are significantly constrained by the tower measurements, CH{sub 4} emissions from the south Central Valley appear to be underestimated in a manner consistent with the under-prediction of livestock emissions. Finally, we describe a pseudo-experiment using predicted CH{sub 4} signals to explore the uncertainty reductions that might be obtained if additional measurements were made by a future network of tall-tower stations spread over California. These results show that it should be possible to provide high-accuracy estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions as a means to verify future emissions reductions.

  9. Inverse Modeling of Urban and Regional Emissions of CO in China using Observations from the MOPITT Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z.; Jones, D. B.; Kar, J.; Wang, Y.; Kopacz, M.; Henze, D. K.; Singh, K.; Shim, C.; Drummond, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Observations of CO from the MOPITT satellite instrument show enhanced abundances of CO over the Wei River valley in China. High CO mixing ratios, often exceeding 300 ppbv at 800 hPa are observed in the vicinity of Linfen. Simulations of atmospheric CO with the GEOS-Chem model consistently underestimate the observed CO in this region. MOPITT also reveals higher abundances of CO across southeastern China than predicted by GEOS-Chem. Previous inverse modeling of CO observations using the GEOS-Chem model suggested that CO emissions in East Asia were more than 60% greater than the a priori emission inventory estimates in the model. However, that work was done using a version of GEOS-Chem with coarse horizontal resolution. We have conducted an inverse modeling analysis of the MOPITT data at a spatial resolution of 0.5° x 0.67° across Asia, using the adjoint of the nested GEOS-Chem model, to better quantify urban and regional emissions of CO. We focus on quantifying emissions from Xian, Linfen, and Taiyuan, three major industrial cities in the Wei River valley. We also examine the variations in CO emissions in summers of 2006, 2007, and 2008 in the Beijing region to assess the impact of the strict pollution controls that were implemented in August 2008 to improve local air quality for the Olympic Games.

  10. Case studies of quasi-periodic VLF emissions and related ULF fluctuations of the magnetic field.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Santolík, Ond?ej; N?mec, F.; Parrot, M.

    s. l : American Geophysical Union, 2014. [AGU Fall Meeting. 15.12.2014-19.12.2014, San Francisco] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm14/webprogrampreliminary/Paper16132.html

  11. Statistical investigation of six years of the Demeter measurements of the VLF quasi-periodic emissions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hayosh, Mykhaylo; N?mec, F.; Santolík, Ond?ej; Parrot, M.

    San Francisco : AGU, 2013. SM43A-2259. [AGU Fall Meeting 2013. 09.12.2013-13.12.2013, San Francisco] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Wave propagation * Magnetosphere: inner Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://abstractsearch.agu.org/meetings/2013/FM/sections/SM/sessions/SM43A/abstracts/SM43A-2259.html

  12. The European VLF/LF radio network to search for earthquake precursors: setting up and natural/man-made disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. F. Biagi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the last years disturbances in VLF/LF radio signals related to seismic activity have been presented. The radio data were collected by receivers located on the ground or on satellites. The ground-based research implies systematic data collection by a network of receivers. Since 2000 the "Pacific VLF network", conducted by Japanese researchers, has been in operation. During 2008 a radio receiver was developed by the Italian factory Elettronika (Palo del Colle, Bari. The receiver is equipment working in VLF and LF bands. It can monitor 10 frequencies distributed in these bands and, for each of them, it saves the power level. At the beginning of 2009, five receivers were made for the realization of the "European VLF/LF Network"; two were planned for Italy and one for Greece, Turkey and Romania, respectively. In 2010 the network was enlarged to include a new receiver installed in Portugal. In this work, first the receiver and its setting up in the different places are described. Then, several disturbances in the radio signals related to the transmitters, receivers, meteorological/geomagnetic conditions are presented and described.

  13. Recent Observations and Modeling of Narrowband Stimulated Electromagnetic Emissions SEEs at the HAARP Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Wayne; Bernhardt, Paul; McCarrick, Michael; Briczinski, Stanley; Mahmoudian, Alireza; Fu, Haiyang; Ranade Bordikar, Maitrayee; Samimi, Alireza

    There has been significant interest in so-called narrowband Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission SEE over the past several years due to recent discoveries at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program HAARP facility near Gakone, Alaska. Narrowband SEE (NSEE) has been defined as spectral features in the SEE spectrum typically within 1 kHz of the transmitter (or pump) frequency. SEE is due to nonlinear processes leading to re-radiation at frequencies other than the pump wave frequency during heating the ionospheric plasma with high power HF radio waves. Although NSEE exhibits a richly complex structure, it has now been shown after a substantial number of observations at HAARP, that NSEE can be grouped into two basic classes. The first are those spectral features, associated with Stimulated Brillouin Scatter SBS, which typically occur when the pump frequency is not close to electron gyro-harmonic frequencies. Typically, these spectral features are within roughly 50 Hz of the pump wave frequency where it is to be noted that the O+ ion gyro-frequency is roughly 50 Hz. The second class of spectral features corresponds to the case when the pump wave frequency is typically within roughly 10 kHz of electron gyro-harmonic frequencies. In this case, spectral features ordered by harmonics of ion gyro-frequencies are typically observed, and termed Stimulated Ion Bernstein Scatter SIBS. There is also important parametric behavior on both classes of NSEE depending on the pump wave parameters including the field strength, antenna beam angle, and electron gyro-harmonic number. This presentation will first provide an overview of the recent NSEE experimental observations at HAARP. Both Stimulated Brillouin Scatter SBS and Stimulated Ion Bernstein Scatter SIBS observations will be discussed as well as their relationship to each other. Possible theoretical formulation in terms of parametric decay instabilities will be provided. Computer simulation model results will be presented to provide insight into associated higher order nonlinear effects including particle acceleration and wave-wave processes. Both theory and model results will be put into the context of the experimental observations. Finally, possible applications of NSEE will be pointed out including triggering diagnostics for artificial ionization layer formation, proton precipitation event diagnostics, and electron temperature measurements in the heated volume.

  14. Improved model of isoprene emissions in Africa using OMI satellite observations of formaldehyde: implications for oxidants and particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, E. A.; Jacob, D. J.; Guenther, A.; Chance, K.; Kurosu, T. P.; Murphy, J. G.; Reeves, C. E.; Pye, H. O. T.

    2014-03-01

    We use a 2005-2009 record of isoprene emissions over Africa derived from OMI satellite observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) to better understand the factors controlling isoprene emission on the scale of the continent and evaluate the impact of isoprene emissions on atmospheric composition in Africa. OMI-derived isoprene emissions show large seasonality over savannas driven by temperature and leaf area index (LAI), and much weaker seasonality over equatorial forests driven by temperature. The commonly used MEGAN (version 2.1) global isoprene emission model reproduces this seasonality but is biased high, particularly for equatorial forests, when compared to OMI and relaxed-eddy accumulation measurements. Isoprene emissions in MEGAN are computed as the product of an emission factor Eo, LAI, and activity factors dependent on environmental variables. We use the OMI-derived emissions to provide improved estimates of Eo that are in good agreement with direct leaf measurements from field campaigns (r = 0.55, bias = -19%). The largest downward corrections to MEGAN Eo values are for equatorial forests and semi-arid environments, and this is consistent with latitudinal transects of isoprene over West Africa from the AMMA aircraft campaign. Total emission of isoprene in Africa is estimated to be 77 Tg C a-1, compared to 104 Tg C a-1 in MEGAN. Simulations with the GEOS-Chem oxidant-aerosol model suggest that isoprene emissions increase mean surface ozone in West Africa by up to 8 ppbv, and particulate matter by up to 1.5 ?g m-3, due to coupling with anthropogenic influences.

  15. Global Partitioning of NOx Sources Using Satellite Observations: Relative Roles of Fossil Fuel Combustion, Biomass Burning and Soil Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaegle, Lyatt; Steinberger, Linda; Martin, Randall V.; Chance, Kelly

    2005-01-01

    This document contains the following abstract for the paper "Global partitioning of NOx sources using satellite observations: Relative roles of fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning and soil emissions." Satellite observations have been used to provide important new information about emissions of nitrogen oxides. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are significant in atmospheric chemistry, having a role in ozone air pollution, acid deposition and climate change. We know that human activities have led to a three- to six-fold increase in NOx emissions since pre-industrial times, and that there are three main surface sources of NOx: fuel combustion, large-scale fires, and microbial soil processes. How each of these sources contributes to the total NOx emissions is subject to some doubt, however. The problem is that current NOx emission inventories rely on bottom-up approaches, compiling large quantities of statistical information from diverse sources such as fuel and land use, agricultural data, and estimates of burned areas. This results in inherently large uncertainties. To overcome this, Lyatt Jaegle and colleagues from the University of Washington, USA, used new satellite observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) instrument. As the spatial and seasonal distribution of each of the sources of NOx can be clearly mapped from space, the team could provide independent topdown constraints on the individual strengths of NOx sources, and thus help resolve discrepancies in existing inventories. Jaegle's analysis of the satellite observations, presented at the recent Faraday Discussion on "Atmospheric Chemistry", shows that fuel combustion dominates emissions at northern mid-latitudes, while fires are a significant source in the Tropics. Additionally, she discovered a larger than expected role for soil emissions, especially over agricultural regions with heavy fertilizer use. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  16. ELF/VLF Perturbations Above the Haarp Transmitter Recorded by the Demeter Satellite in the Upper Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titova, E. E.; Demekhov, A. G.; Mochalov, A. A.; Gvozdevsky, B. B.; Mogilevsky, M. M.; Parrot, M.

    2015-08-01

    In the studies of the data received from DEMETER (orbit altitude above the Earth is about 700 km), we detected for the first time electromagnetic perturbations, which are due to the ionospheric modification by HAARP, a high-power high-frequency transmitter, simultaneously in the extremely low-frequency (ELF, below 1200 Hz) and very low-frequency (VLF, below 20 kHz) ranges. Of the thirteen analyzed flybys of the satellite above the heated area, the ELF/VLF signals were detected in three cases in the daytime (LT = 11-12 h), when the minimum distance between the geomagnetic projections of the satellite and the heated area center on the Earth's surface did not exceed 31 km. During the nighttime flybys, the ELF/VLF perturbations were not detected. The size of the perturbed region was about 100 km. The amplitude, spectrum, and polarization of the ELF perturbations were analyzed, and their comparison with the characteristics of natural ELF noise above the HAARP transmitter was performed. In particular, it was shown that in the daytime the ELF perturbation amplitude above the heated area can exceed by a factor of 3 to 8 the amplitude of natural ELF noise. The absence of the nighttime records of artificial ELF/VLF perturbations above the heated area can be due to both the lower frequency of the heating signal, at which the heating occurs in the lower ionosphere, and the higher level of natural noise. The spectrum of the VLF signals related to the HAARP transmitter operation had two peaks at frequencies of 8 to 10 kHz and 15 to 18 kHz, which are close to the first and second harmonics of the lower-hybrid resonance in the heated area. The effect of the whistler wave propagation near the lower-hybrid resonance region on the perturbation spectrum recorded in the upper ionosphere for these signals has been demonstrated. In particular, some of the spectrum features can be explained by assuming that the VLF signals propagate in quasiresonance, rather than quasilongitudinal, regime. It is noted that the profile and dynamics of the ELF perturbation frequency spectrum conform to the assumption of their connection with quasistatic small-scale electron-density inhomogeneities occurring in the heated region and having lifetimes of a few seconds or more. The possible mechanisms of the ELF/VLF perturbation formation in the ionospheric plasma above the high-latitude HAARP facility at the DEMETER flyby altitudes are discussed.

  17. Optical observations geomagnetically conjugate to sprite-producing lightning discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Marshall

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical studies have predicted that large positive cloud-to-ground discharges can trigger a runaway avalanche process of relativistic electrons, forming a geomagnetically trapped electron beam. The beam may undergo pitch angle and energy scattering during its traverse of the Earth's magnetosphere, with a small percentage of electrons remaining in the loss cone and precipitating in the magnetically conjugate atmosphere. In particular, N2 1P and N2+1N optical emissions are expected to be observable. In July and August 2003, an attempt was made to detect these optical emissions, called "conjugate sprites", in correlation with sprite observations in Europe near . Sprite observations were made from the Observatoire du Pic du Midi (OMP in the French Pyrenées, and VLF receivers were installed in Europe to detect causative sferics and ionospheric disturbances associated with sprites. In the Southern Hemisphere conjugate region, the Wide-angle Array for Sprite Photometry (WASP was deployed at the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO, near Sutherland, South Africa, to observe optical emissions with a field-of-view magnetically conjugate to the Northern Hemisphere observing region. Observations at OMP revealed over 130 documented sprites, with WASP observations covering the conjugate region successfully for 30 of these events. However, no incidences of optical emissions in the conjugate hemisphere were found. Analysis of the conjugate optical data from SAAO, along with ELF energy measurements from Palmer Station, Antarctica, and charge-moment analysis, show that the lightning events during the course of this experiment likely had insufficient intensity to create a relativistic beam.

    Keywords. Ionosphere (Ionsophere-magnetosphere interactions; Ionospheric disturbances; Instruments and techniques

  18. Observation of an ionospheric disturbance caused by a gamma-ray burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a first observation of an ionospheric disturbance from a gamma-ray burst. The burst, GB830801, occurred at 22:14:18 UT on 1 August 1983 and was one of the strongest ever observed. The total fluence was 2 x 10-3 erg cm-2, most of which occurred in the first 4 s of the burst. Simultaneously, a change was observed in the amplitude of a very-low-frequency (VLF) radio signal from a transmitter in Rugby, England, monitored at Palmer Station, Antarctica, indicative of an ionospheric disturbance. Weaker disturbances were also recorded at the same receiving site on signals from VLF stations in Annapolis, Maryland and Lualualei, Hawaii. The times of the burst and the disturbances are coincident within the 10-s resolution of the VLF recording system. (author)

  19. Observations of free-free and anomalous microwave emission from LDN 1622 with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, S. E.; Dickinson, C.; Cleary, K.

    2015-11-01

    LDN 1622 has previously been identified as a possible strong source of dust-correlated anomalous microwave emission (AME). Previous observations were limited by resolution meaning that the radio emission could not be compared with current generation high-resolution infrared data from Herschel, Spitzer or Wide-field Infrared Sky Explorer. This paper presents arcminute resolution mapping observations of LDN 1622 at 4.85 and 13.7 GHz using the 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. The 4.85 GHz map reveals a corona of free-free emission enclosing LDN 1622 that traces the photodissociation region of the cloud. The brightest peaks of the 4.85 GHz map are found to be within ?10 per cent agreement with the expected free-free predicted by Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas H ? data of LDN 1622. At 13.7 GHz, the AME flux density was found to be 7.0 ± 1.4 mJy and evidence is presented for a rising spectrum between 13.7 and 31 GHz. The spinning dust model of AME is found to naturally account for the flux seen at 13.7 GHz. Correlations between the diffuse 13.7 GHz emission and the diffuse mid-infrared emission are used to further demonstrate that the emission originating from LDN 1622 at 13.7 GHz is described by the spinning dust model.

  20. HST-COS Observations of Hydrogen, Helium, Carbon and Nitrogen Emission from the SN 1987A Reverse Shock

    CERN Document Server

    France, Kevin; Penton, Steven V; Kirshner, Robert P; Challis, Peter; Laming, J Martin; Bouchet, Patrice; Chevalier, Roger; Fransson, Claes; Garnavich, Peter M; Heng, Kevin; Larsson, Josefin; Lawrence, Stephen; Lundqvist, Peter; Panagia, Nino; Pun, Chun S J; Smith, Nathan; Sollerman, Jesper; Sonneborn, George; Sugerman, Ben; Wheeler, J Craig

    2011-01-01

    We present the most sensitive ultraviolet observations of Supernova 1987A to date. Imaging spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph shows many narrow (dv \\sim 300 km/s) emission lines from the circumstellar ring, broad (dv \\sim 10 -- 20 x 10^3 km/s) emission lines from the reverse shock, and ultraviolet continuum emission. The high signal-to-noise (> 40 per resolution element) broad LyA emission is excited by soft X-ray and EUV heating of mostly neutral gas in the circumstellar ring and outer supernova debris. The ultraviolet continuum at \\lambda > 1350A can be explained by HI 2-photon emission from the same region. We confirm our earlier, tentative detection of NV \\lambda 1240 emission from the reverse shock and we present the first detections of broad HeII \\lambda1640, CIV \\lambda1550, and NIV] \\lambda1486 emission lines from the reverse shock. The helium abundance in the high-velocity material is He/H = 0.14 +/- 0.06. The NV/H-alpha line ratio requires partial ion-electron e...

  1. Free tropospheric observations of Carbonyl Sulfide from Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer over ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuai, Le; Worden, John; Campbell, Ellitt; Kulawik, Susan; Montzka, Stephen; Liu, Jiabin

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is the most abundant sulfur gas in the troposphere with a global averaging mixing ratio of about 500 part per trillion (ppt). The ocean is the primary source of OCS, emitting OCS directly or its precursors, carbon disulfide and dimethyl sulfide. The most important atmospheric sink of OCS is uptake by terrestrial plants via photosynthesis. Although the global budget of atmospheric OCS has been studied, the global integrated OCS fluxes have large uncertainties, e.g. the uncertainties of the ocean fluxes are as large as 100% or more and how the ocean sources are distributed is not well known. We developed a retrieval algorithm for free tropospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS) observations above the ocean using radiance measurements from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). These first observations of the free tropospheric OCS provide global maps with information of OCS seasonal and spatial variability in the mid troposphere. These data will help to characterize ocean OCS fluxes. Evaluation of the biases and uncertainties in the TES OCS estimates against aircraft profiles from the HIPPO campaign and ground data from the NOAA Mauna Loa site suggests that the OCS retrievals (1) have less than 1.0 degree of freedom for signals (DOFs), (2) are sensitive in the mid-troposphere with a peak sensitivity typically between 300 to 500 hPa, (3) and have much smaller systematic errors from temperature, CO2 and H2O calibrations relative to random errors from measurement noise. Here we estimate the monthly means from TES measurements averaged over multiple years so that random errors are reduced and useful information about OCS seasonal and latitudinal variability can be derived. With this averaging, TES OCS data are found to be consistent (within the calculated uncertainties) with NOAA ground observations and HIPPO aircraft measurements and captures the seasonal and latitudinal variations observed by these in situ data within the estimated uncertainties. This TES OCS monthly data will be used to constrain the ocean flux, understand the tropical ocean variability (e.g., west-east contrast over the Pacific).

  2. Suzaku Observation of Diffuse X-ray Emission from the Carina Nebula

    OpenAIRE

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Petre, Robert; Matsumoto, Hironori; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Holt, Stephan S.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ozawa, Hideki; Tsuboi, Yohko; Soong, Yang; Kitamoto, Shunji; Sekiguchi, Akiko; Kokubun, Motohide

    2006-01-01

    We studied extended X-ray emission from the Carina Nebula taken with the Suzaku CCD camera XIS on 2005 Aug. 29. The X-ray morphology, plasma temperature and absorption to the plasma are consistent with the earlier Einstein results. The Suzaku spectra newly revealed emission lines from various species including oxygen, but not from nitrogen. This result restricts the N/O ratio significantly low, compared with evolved massive stellar winds, suggesting that the diffuse emission...

  3. Observational cosmology with the PLANCK satellite: modelling of the polarized Galactic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is dedicated to the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies measurement and to the characterisation of the foreground Galactic emissions. This work is in the framework of the Planck satellite data analysis preparation. First, this thesis give a description of the Big Bang model and of the CMB physics. Then, we present the Archeops, WMAP and PLANCK experiments and their data analysis. Part two is devoted to the description of the diffuse Galactic synchrotron, free-free and thermal dust emissions and to the study of those emissions in the Galactic plane. Using comparison between our simulations and the WMAP, Archeops and IRIS data we are able to provide partial maps of the spatial variations of the dust grain temperature and of the spectral index of the synchrotron and thermal dust emissions. Third part is dedicated to the study of the two main polarized Galactic emissions: synchrotron and thermal dust emissions. We evaluate effective models based on template maps. We also build physical model based on physics for these emissions that is to say shape of the Galactic magnetic field and matter density in our Galaxy. Using maps and Galactic profiles, we compare our simulations of these emissions to the Archeops and WMAP data. Thanks to that we are able to provide for the first time a coherent model of the synchrotron and thermal dust emissions. Then we propose a method to improved the constraints on our model using the PLANCK data. Finally the last part focuses on the angular power spectra of the polarized Galactic emissions. We estimate the contamination due to these foreground emissions on the CMB signal. In addition we propose a method to minimize the contamination of the CMB PLANCK data by the thermal dust emission using masks. (author)

  4. Unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV): Flight testing and evaluation of two-channel E-field very low frequency (VLF) instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    Using VLF frequencies, transmitted by the Navy`s network, for airborne remote sensing of the earth`s electrical, magnetic characteristics was first considered by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) around the mid 1970s. The first VLF system was designed and developed by the USGS for installation and operation on a single engine, fixed wing aircraft used by the Branch of Geophysics for geophysical surveying. The system consisted of five channels. Two E-field channels with sensors consisting of a fixed vertical loaded dipole antenna with pre-amp mounted on top of the fuselage and a gyro stabilized horizontal loaded dipole antenna with pre-amp mounted on a tail boom. The three channel magnetic sensor consisted of three orthogonal coils mounted on the same gyro stabilized platform as the horizontal E-field antenna. The main features of the VLF receiver were: narrow band-width frequency selection using crystal filters, phase shifters for zeroing out system phase variances, phase-lock loops for generating real and quadrature gates, and synchronous detectors for generating real and quadrature outputs. In the mid 1990s the Branch of Geophysics designed and developed a two-channel E-field ground portable VLF system. The system was built using state-of-the-art circuit components and new concepts in circuit architecture. Small size, light weight, low power, durability, and reliability were key considerations in the design of the instrument. The primary purpose of the instrument was for collecting VLF data during ground surveys over small grid areas. Later the system was modified for installation on a Unmanned Airborne Vehicle (UAV). A series of three field trips were made to Easton, Maryland for testing and evaluating the system performance.

  5. Characteristics of VLF wave propagation in the Earth's magnetosphere in the presence of an artificial density duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasmanik, Dmitry; Demekhov, Andrei

    We study the propagation of VLF waves in the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere in the presence of large-scale artificial plasma inhomogeneities which can be created by HF heating facilities like HAARP and ``Sura''. A region with enhanced cold plasma density can be formed due to the action of HF heating. This region is extended along geomagnetic field (up to altitudes of several thousand km) and has rather small size across magnetic field (about 1 degree). The geometric-optical approximation is used to study wave propagation. The plasma density and ion composition are calculated with the use of SAMI2 model, which was modified to take the effect of HF heating into account. We calculate ray trajectories of waves with different initial frequency and wave-normal angles and originating at altitudes of about 100 km in the region near the heating area. The source of such waves could be the lightning discharges, modulated HF heating of the ionosphere, or VLF transmitters. Variation of the wave amplitude along the ray trajectories due to refraction is considered and spatial distribution of wave intensity in the magnetosphere is analyzed. We show that the presence of such a density disturbances can lead to significant changes of wave propagation trajectories, in particular, to efficient guiding of VLF waves in this region. This can result in a drastic increase of the VLF-wave intensity in the density duct. The dependence of wave propagation properties on parameters of heating facility operation regime is considered. We study the variation of the spatial distribution of VLF wave intensity related to the slow evolution of the artificial inhomogeneity during the heating.

  6. Decreasing emissions of NOx relative to CO2 in East Asia inferred from satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, M.; Buchwitz, M.; Hilboll, A.; Richter, A.; Schneising, O.; Hilker, M.; Heymann, J.; Bovensmann, H.; Burrows, J. P.

    2014-11-01

    At present, global CO2 emission inventories are mainly based on bottom-up estimates that rely, for example, on reported fossil fuel consumptions and fuel types. The associated uncertainties propagate into the CO2-to-NOx emission ratios that are used in pollution prediction and monitoring, as well as into biospheric carbon fluxes derived by inverse models. Here we analyse simultaneous and co-located satellite retrievals from SCIAMACHY (ref. ; SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY) of the column-average dry-air mole fraction of CO2 (refs , ) and NO2 (refs , , ) for the years 2003-2011 to provide a top-down estimate of trends in emissions and in the ratio between CO2 and NOx emissions. Our analysis shows that the CO2-to-NOx emission ratio has increased by 4.2 +/- 1.7% yr-1 in East Asia. In this region, we find a large positive trend of CO2 emissions (9.8 +/- 1.7% yr-1), which we largely attribute to the growing Chinese economy. This trend exceeds the positive trend of NOx emissions (5.8 +/- 0.9% yr-1). Our findings suggest that the recently installed and renewed technology in East Asia, such as power plants, transportation and so on, is cleaner in terms of NOx emissions than the old infrastructure, and roughly matches relative emission levels in North America and Europe.

  7. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS OBSERVATIONS OF EUROPA'S ATMOSPHERIC ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION AT EASTERN ELONGATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report results of a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) campaign with the Advanced Camera for Surveys to observe Europa at eastern elongation, i.e., Europa's leading side, on 2008 June 29. With five consecutive HST orbits, we constrain Europa's atmospheric O I 1304 A and O I 1356 A emissions using the prism PR130L. The total emissions of both oxygen multiplets range between 132 ± 14 and 226 ± 14 Rayleigh. An additional systematic error with values on the same order as the statistical errors may be due to uncertainties in modeling the reflected light from Europa's surface. The total emission also shows a clear dependence of Europa's position with respect to Jupiter's magnetospheric plasma sheet. We derive a lower limit for the O2 column density of 6 x 1018 m-2. Previous observations of Europa's atmosphere with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph in 1999 of Europa's trailing side show an enigmatic surplus of radiation on the anti-Jovian side within the disk of Europa. With emission from a radially symmetric atmosphere as a reference, we searched for an anti-Jovian versus sub-Jovian asymmetry with respect to the central meridian on the leading side and found none. Likewise, we searched for departures from a radially symmetric atmospheric emission and found an emission surplus centered around 90 deg. west longitude, for which plausible mechanisms exist. Previous work about the possibility of plumes on Europa due to tidally driven shear heating found longitudes with strongest local strain rates which might be consistent with the longitudes of maximum UV emissions. Alternatively, asymmetries in Europa's UV emission can also be caused by inhomogeneous surface properties, an optically thick atmospheric contribution of atomic oxygen, and/or by Europa's complex plasma interaction with Jupiter's magnetosphere.

  8. VLF-LF radio signals collected at Bari (South Italy: a preliminary analysis on signal anomalies associated with earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. F. Biagi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning of 2002 an OmniPAL receiver was put into operation at the Department of Physics of Bari University (Southern Italy. The electric field strength of five VLF-LF signals transmitted from United Kingdom (f=16kHz, France (f=20.9kHz, Germany (f=23.4kHz, Iceland (f=37.5kHz and Italy (f=54kHz has been monitoring with a 5s sampling frequency. In a first step we reduced the amount of the data taking one datum each 10min (mean of the ±5min raw data and then we smoothed these data by a running adjacent averaging over 7 days. Analysing the trends we obtained, we revealed at first in the signal from the Italian transmitter two clear intensity decreases in April 2002 and in August-September 2002. At these times we observed earthquakes with M=4.3 and M=5.6 respectively near the transmitter-receiver path and a precursory effect in the previous decreases appeared. Then, we noted that all of the five radio trends in the time interval March 2002-February 2003 are more disturbed than in other periods; in particular an evident simultaneous decrease appears in January-February 2003. We propose that these disturbances are related to general excitation of the margin between the African and European plates. In a second step we examined the terminator time (evening changes for the Italian transmitter in July-September 2002, and we found significant deviations from the mean value at the end of August, which is supportive for some precursory ionospheric signature of earthquakes.

  9. Rocket-borne instrument for observations of near-infrared and far-infrared extended astrophysical emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuhara, Hideo; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Tanaka, Masahiro; Bock, James J.; Hristov, Viktor V.; Lange, Andrew E.; Mauskopf, Philip D.; Richards, Paul L.

    1994-01-01

    We give a detailed description of the design and flight performance of an instrument onboard the S-520-15 rocket of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science. The isntrument, consisting of a near-infrared spectrometer and a far-infrared photometer at the focus of a 10 cm liquid-helium cooled telescope, was designed to observe both the brightness and distribution of diffuse emission with high sensitivity. The rocket was successfully launched and the instrument observed near-infrared and far-infrared continuum emission, as well as (C II) 157.7 micrometer line emission from regions at high Galactic latitude. We also give a brief description of the design and performance of an onboard attitude control system.

  10. Fermi large area telescope observations of the cosmic-ray induced ?-ray emission of the Earth's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on measurements of the cosmic-ray induced ?-ray emission of Earth's atmosphere by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The Large Area Telescope has observed the Earth during its commissioning phase and with a dedicated Earth limb following observation in September 2008. These measurements yielded ?6.4x106 photons with energies >100 MeV and ?250 hours total live time for the highest quality data selection. This allows the study of the spatial and spectral distributions of these photons with unprecedented detail. The spectrum of the emission--often referred to as Earth albedo gamma-ray emission--has a power-law shape up to 500 GeV with spectral index ?=2.79±0.06.

  11. Changes of VLF wave intensity observed by the DEMETER spacecraft in the vicinity of earthquakes.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Píša, D.; N?mec, F.; Parrot, M.; Santolík, Ond?ej

    San Francisco : AGU, 2012. NH44A-07. [AGU Fall Meeting /45./. 03.12.2012-07.12.2012, San Francisco] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm12/waisfm12.html#instr

  12. DE-1 and COSMOS 1809 observations of lower hybrid waves excited by VLF whistler mode waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, T. F; Inan, U. S.; Lauben, D.; Sonwalkar, V. S.; Helliwell, R. A.; Sobolev, Ya. P.; Chmyrev, V. M.; Gonzalez, S.

    1994-01-01

    Past work demostrates that strong lower hybrid (LH) waves can be excited by electromagnetic whistler mode waves throughout large regions of the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere. The effects of the excited LH waves upon the suprathermal ion population in the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere depend upon the distribution of LH wave amplitude with wavelength lambda. The present work reports plasma wave data from the DE-1 and COSMOS 1809 spacecraft which suggests that the excited LH wave spectrum has components for which lambda less than or equal to 3.5 m when excitation occurs at a frequency roughly equal to the local lower hybrid resonance frequency. This wavelength limit is a factor of approximately 3 below that reported in past work and suggests that the excited LH waves can interact with suprathermal H(+) ions with energy less than or equal to 6 eV. This finding supports recent work concerning the heating of suprathermal ions above thunderstorm cells.

  13. Unusual attenuation events in the VLF range observed by the DEMETER spacecraft.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Záhlava, J.; N?mec, F.; Parrot, M.; Rodger, C. J.; Santolík, Ond?ej

    Víde? : European Geosciences Union, 2015. EGU2015-3901. ISSN 1607-7962. [EGU General Assembly 2015. 12.04.2015-17.04.2015, Víde?] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2015/EGU2015-3901.pdf

  14. Inverse modeling of Texas NOx emissions using space-based and ground-based NO2 observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Tang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Inverse modeling of nitrogen oxide (NOx emissions using satellite-based NO2 observations has become more prevalent in recent years, but has rarely been applied to regulatory modeling at regional scales. In this study, OMI satellite observations of NO2 column densities are used to conduct inverse modeling of NOx emission inventories for two Texas State Implementation Plan (SIP modeling episodes. Addition of lightning, aircraft, and soil NOx emissions to the regulatory inventory narrowed but did not close the gap between modeled and satellite observed NO2 over rural regions. Satellite-based top-down emission inventories are created with the regional Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx using two techniques: the direct scaling method and discrete Kalman filter (DKF with Decoupled Direct Method (DDM sensitivity analysis. The simulations with satellite-inverted inventories are compared to the modeling results using the a priori inventory as well as an inventory created by a ground-level NO2 based DKF inversion. The DKF inversions yield conflicting results: the satellite-based inversion scales up the a priori NOx emissions in most regions by factors of 1.02 to 1.84, leading to 3–55% increase in modeled NO2 column densities and 1–7 ppb increase in ground 8 h ozone concentrations, while the ground-based inversion indicates the a priori NOx emissions should be scaled by factors of 0.34 to 0.57 in each region. However, none of the inversions improve the model performance in simulating aircraft-observed NO2 or ground-level ozone (O3 concentrations.

  15. Observation and analysis of self-amplified spontaneous emission at the APS low-energy undulator test line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exponential growth of self-amplified spontaneous emission at 530 nm was first experimentally observed at the Advanced Photon Source low-energy undulator test line in December 1999. Since then, further detailed measurements and analysis of the results have been made. Here, we present the measurements and compare these with calculations based on measured electron beam properties and theoretical expectations

  16. First observation of self-amplified spontaneous emission in a free-electron laser at 109 nm wavelength

    OpenAIRE

    Andruszkow, J.; Ayvazian, V.; Bakker, R.; Balakin, V.; Barni, D.; Bazhan, A.; Bosotti, A.; Brefeld, W.; Brinkmann, R.; Buhler, S.; Carneiro, J P V.; Chel, S.; Cho, Y; Choroba, S.; Colby, E R.

    2000-01-01

    We present the first observation of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) in a free-electron laser (FEL) in the vacuum ultraviolet regime at 109 nm wavelength (11 eV). The observed free-electron laser gain (approximately 3000) and the radiation characteristics, such as dependency on bunch charge, angular distribution, spectral width, and intensity fluctuations, are all consistent with the present models for SASE FELs.

  17. First Observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission in a Free-Electron Laser at 109 nm Wavelength

    CERN Document Server

    Andruszków, J; Ayvazyan, V T; Baboi, N I; Bakker, R; Balakin, V; Barni, D; Bazhan, A; Bernard, M; Bosotti, A; Bourdon, J C; Brefeld, W; Brinkmann, R; Bühler, S; Carneiro, J P; Castellano, M G; Castro, P; Catani, L; Chel, S; Cho, Y; Choroba, S; Colby, E R; Decking, W; Den Hartog, P; Desmons, M; Dohlus, M; Edwards, D; Edwards, H T; Faatz, B; Feldhaus, J; Ferrario, M; Fitch, M J; Flöttmann, K; Fouaidy, M; Gamp, A; Garvey, Terence; Geitz, M A; Gluskin, E S; Gretchko, V; Hahn, U; Hartung, W H; Hubert, D; Hüning, M; Ischebek, R; Jablonka, M; Joly, J M; Juillard, M; Junquera, T; Jurkiewicz, P; Kabel, A C; Kahl, J; Kaiser, H; Kamps, T; Katelev, V V; Kirchgessner, J L; Körfer, M; Kravchuk, L V; Kreps, G; Krzywinski, J; Lokajczyk, T; Lange, R; Leblond, B; Leenen, M; Lesrel, J; Liepe, M; Liero, A; Limberg, T; Lorenz, R; Lu, H H; Lu, F H; Magne, C; Maslov, M A; Materlik, G; Matheisen, A; Menzel, J; Michelato, P; Möller, W D; Mosnier, A; Müller, U C; Napoly, O; Novokhatskii, A V; Omeich, M; Padamsee, H; Pagani, C; Peters, F; Petersen, B; Pierini, P; Pflüger, J; Piot, P; Phung Ngoc, B; Plucinski, L; Proch, D; Rehlich, K; Reiche, S; Reschke, D; Reyzl, I; Rosenzweig, J; Rossbach, J; Roth, S; Saldin, E L; Sandner, W; Sanok, Z; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, G; Schmüser, P; Schneider, J R; Schneidmiller, E A; Schreiber, H J; Schreiber, S; Schütt, P; Sekutowicz, J; Serafini, L; Sertore, D; Setzer, S; Simrock, S; Sonntag, B F; Sparr, B; Stephan, F; Sytchev, V V; Tazzari, S; Tazzioli, F; Tigner, Maury; Timm, M; Tonutti, M; Trakhtenberg, E; Treusch, R; Trines, D; Verzilov, V A; Vielitz, T; Vogel, V; Von Walter, G; Wanzenberg, R; Weiland, T; Weise, H; Weisend, J G; Wendt, M; Werner, M; White, M M; Will, I; Wolff, S; Yurkov, M V; Zapfe, K; Zhogolev, P; Zhou, F

    2000-01-01

    We present the first observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) in a free-electron laser (FEL) in the Vacuum Ultraviolet regime at 109 nm wavelength (11 eV). The observed free-electron laser gain (approx. 3000) and the radiation characteristics, such as dependency on bunch charge, angular distribution, spectral width and intensity fluctuations all corroborate the existing models for SASE FELs.

  18. Signatures of the lunar semi-diurnal tide in terrestrial airglow emissions as observed with SCIAMACHY/Envisat

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Savigny, Christian; Lednytskyy, Olexandr; Teiser, Georg

    2015-04-01

    Many aspects of lunar tidal signatures in the atmosphere are not well understood. Regarding lunar tidal signatures in airglow emissions, the available results generally suffer from lack of statistical significance and are partly contradictory. This talk presents the first - to our best knowledge - statistically significant lunar semi-diurnal tidal signatures in several airglow parameters, i.e. OI green line emission rates, OH(3-1) emission rates, as well as OH emission altitude and atomic oxygen concentrations. Moreover, the established lunar semi-diurnal tidal signatures in mesopause temperature are clearly identified in OH(3-1) temperatures. All data sets were retrieved from SCIAMACHY/Envisat limb-emission measurements on the Earth's nightside. Apart from the presence of statistically significant lunar tidal signatures in the various airglow parameters, a coherent relationship is found between the studied parameters indicating that the observed signatures are largely driven by vertical motions, e.g. tidally driven downwelling leads to downward transport of atomic oxygen and hence enhanced OI green line and OH emission rates, as well as a temperature increase due to adiabatic warming.

  19. Detection and characterization of a 500 mic dust emissivity excess in the Galactic Plane using Herschel/Hi-GAL observations

    CERN Document Server

    Paradis, D; Noriega-Crespo, A; Mény, C; Piacentini, F; Thompson, M A; Marshall, D J; Veneziani, M; Bernard, J -P; Molinari, S

    2011-01-01

    Past and recent observations have revealed unexpected variations of the FIR-mm dust emissivity. In the Herschel spectral range, those are often referenced to as a 500 {\\mu}m emission excess. Several dust emission models have been developed to interpret astrophysical data in the FIR-mm domain. However, these are commonly not able to fully reconcile theoretical predictions with observations. On the contrary, the recently revised Two Level System (TLS) model seems to provide a promising way to interpret the existing data. The newly available Herschel Hi-GAL data which covers most of the inner Milky-Way offers a unique opportunity to investigate possible variations in the dust emission properties both with wavelength and the environment. By combining the IRIS 100 {\\mu}m with the Hi-GAL 160, 250, 350 and 500 {\\mu}m data, we model the dust emission spectra in each pixel of the Hi-GAL maps, using both the TLS model and, for comparison, a single modified black-body fit. The effect of temperature mixing along the line...

  20. Evaluation of Biogenic and Fire Emissions in a Global Chemistry Model with NOMADSS, DC3 and SEAC4RS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, L. K.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Park, M.; Kaser, L.; Apel, E. C.; Guenther, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous measurements of compounds produced by biogenic and fire emissions were made during several recent field campaigns in the southeast United States, providing a unique data set for emissions and chemical model evaluation. The NCAR Community Atmosphere Model with Chemistry (CAM-chem) is coupled to the Community Land Model (CLM), which includes the biogenic emissions model MEGAN-v2.1, allowing for online calculation of emissions from vegetation for 150 compounds. Simulations of CAM-chem for summers 2012 and 2013 are evaluated with the aircraft and ground-based observations from DC3, NOMADSS and SEAC4RS. Comparison of directly emitted biogenic species, such as isoprene, terpenes, methanol and acetone, are used to evaluate the MEGAN emissions. Evaluation of oxidation products, including methyl vinyl ketone (MVK), methacrolein, formaldehyde, and other oxygenated VOCs are used to test the model chemistry mechanism. In addition, several biomass burning inventories are used in the model, including FINN, QFED, and FLAMBE, and are compared for their impact on atmospheric composition and ozone production, and evaluated with the aircraft observations.

  1. Observational studies on the near-infrared unidentified emission bands in galactic H II regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a large collection of near-infrared spectra (2.5-5.4 ?m) of Galactic H II regions and H II region-like objects, we perform a systematic investigation of astronomical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features. Thirty-six objects were observed using the infrared camera on board the AKARI satellite as a part of a director's time program. In addition to the well known 3.3-3.6 ?m features, most spectra show a relatively weak emission feature at 5.22 ?m with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios, which we identify as the PAH 5.25 ?m band (previously reported). By careful analysis, we find good correlations between the 5.25 ?m band and both the aromatic hydrocarbon feature at 3.3 ?m and the aliphatic hydrocarbon features at around 3.4-3.6 ?m. The present results give us convincing evidence that the astronomical 5.25 ?m band is associated with C-H vibrations, as suggested by previous studies, and show its potential to probe the PAH size distribution. The analysis also shows that the aliphatic-to-aromatic ratio of I 3.4-3.6 ?m/I 3.3 ?m decreases against the ratio of the 3.7 ?m continuum intensity to the 3.3 ?m band, I cont, 3.7 ?m/I 3.3 ?m, which is an indicator of the ionization fraction of PAHs. The midinfrared color of I 9 ?m/I 18 ?m also declines steeply against the ratio of the hydrogen recombination line Br? at 4.05 ?m to the 3.3 ?m band, I Br?/I 3.3 ?m. These facts indicate possible dust processing inside or at the boundary of ionized gas.

  2. First estimates of volume distribution of HF-pump enhanced emissions at 6300 and 5577 Å : a comparison between observations and theory

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavsson, B; Kosch, M.; Wong, A.; Pedersen, T; Heinselman, C.; C. Mutiso; Bristow, B.; Hughes, J.; Wang, W

    2008-01-01

    We present bi-static observations of radio-wave induced optical emissions at 6300 and 5577 Å from a night-time radio-induced optical emission ionospheric pumping experiment at the HIPAS (Fairbanks) facility in Alaska. The optical observations were made at HIPAS and from HAARP located 285 km south-east. From these observations the altitude distribution of the emissions is estimated with tomography-like methods. These estimates are compared with theoretical models. Other diagnostics used...

  3. Evaluating uncertainties in nitrous oxide emission inventories with multi-scale observations for an agriculture-dominated region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Lee, X.; Griffis, T. J.; Baker, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Although agriculture accounts for about 80% of the global anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, large uncertainties exist in regional inventories of N2O emissions from agriculture. The uncertainties mainly include poorly quantified plant flux, large heterogeneity of direct N2O emissions from cropland, and underestimated N2O lost through leaching and run off. To evaluate these uncertainties we conducted observations on three contrasting scales in the Midwest U.S., an agriculture dominated region (Zhang et al., 2014a). Observations at the plant, ecosystem, and regional scales include: 1) N2O flux measurements from the aboveground section of corn and soybean plants using newly designed plant chamber; 2) N2O flux-gradient measurements in a soybean-corn rotation field; and 3) N2O concentration measurements at 3 m and 200 m level on a communication tower (KCMP tower, 44°41'19''N, 93°4'22''W) that were used to estimate regional N2O fluxes with boundary layer methods (Zhang et al., 2014b). With these observations we evaluated the uncertainties in two frequently-used N2O inventories: EDGAR42 (Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research, release version 4.2); and a national GHG inventory (U.S. EPA, 2014). The results indicate that EDGAR42 and EPA inventory underestimated N2O emissions for the region around the KCMP tower at least by a factor of three and two respectively. The underestimation is not likely caused by neglecting N2O flux from crops since N2O fluxes from unfertilized soybean and fertilized corn plants were about one magnitude lower than N2O emissions from the soil-plant ecosystem. The direct N2O emissions from cropland accounted for less than 20% of the regional flux, suggesting a significant influence by other sources and indirect emissions in the regional N2O budget. ReferencesU.S. EPA (2014) Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2012, 529 pp., Washington, D.C.. X Zhang, X Lee, TJ Griffis, AE Andrews, JM Baker, MD Erickson, W Xiao, N Hu (2014 a) Quantifying nitrous oxide fluxes on multiple spatial scales in the Upper Midwest, USA, Int J Biometeorol. X Zhang, X Lee, TJ Griffis, JM Baker, W Xiao (2014 b) Estimating greenhouse gas fluxes from an agriculture-dominated landscape using multiple planetary boundary layer methods, Atmos Chem Phys Discuss.

  4. Emission Ratios for Ammonia and Formic Acid and Observations of Peroxy Acetyl Nitrate (PAN and Ethylene in Biomass Burning Smoke as Seen by the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivienne H. Payne

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We use the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES aboard the NASA Aura satellite to determine the concentrations of the trace gases ammonia (NH3 and formic acid (HCOOH within boreal biomass burning plumes, and present the first detection of peroxy acetyl nitrate (PAN and ethylene (C2H4 by TES. We focus on two fresh Canadian plumes observed by TES in the summer of 2008 as part of the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS-B campaign. We use TES retrievals of NH3 and HCOOH within the smoke plumes to calculate their emission ratios (1.0% ± 0.5% and 0.31% ± 0.21%, respectively relative to CO for these Canadian fires. The TES derived emission ratios for these gases agree well with previous aircraft and satellite estimates, and can complement ground-based studies that have greater surface sensitivity. We find that TES observes PAN mixing ratios of ~2 ppb within these mid-tropospheric boreal biomass burning plumes when the average cloud optical depth is low ( < 0.1 and that TES can detect C2H4 mixing ratios of ~2 ppb in fresh biomass burning smoke plumes.

  5. Atmospheric observation-based global SF6 emissions - comparison of top-down and bottom-up estimates

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Ingeborg; Naegler, Tobias; Heinz, Renate; Osusko, Daniel; Cuevas, Emilio; Engel, Andreas; Ilmberger, Johann; Langenfelds, Ray L.; Neininger, Bruno; Rohden, Christoph von; Steele, L. Paul; Weller, Rolf; Worthy, Douglas E. W; Zimov, Sergej A.

    2010-01-01

    Emissions of sulphur hexafluoride (SF6), one of the strongest greenhouse gases on a per molecule basis, are targeted to be collectively reduced under the Kyoto Protocol. Because of its long atmospheric lifetime (estimated as 800 to 3200 years), the accumulation of SF6 in the atmosphere is a direct measure of its global emissions. Examination of our extended data set of globally distributed high-precision SF6 observations shows an increase in SF6 abundance from near zero in the 1970s to a glob...

  6. Soft X-ray emissions related to the solar wind charge exchange observed by the X-ray satellite observatories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have observed the emission spectra in collisions of bare and hydrogen-like C and O ions with helium atoms and hydrogen molecules as target gases in the soft X-ray region using a window-less Si(Li) detector at collision energies around 100 keV. Because it is found that the 1s-2p emission is dominant in each spectrum, we indicate that the cascade from the upper states give the large population of the 2p state after the consideration using state-selective capture cross sections calculated by the TC-AOCC method.

  7. Pervasive faint Fe XIX emission from a solar active region observed with EUNIS-13: Evidence for nanoflare heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present spatially resolved EUV spectroscopic measurements of pervasive, faint Fe XIX 592.2 Å line emission in an active region observed during the 2013 April 23 flight of the Extreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS-13) sounding rocket instrument. With cooled detectors, high sensitivity, and high spectral resolution, EUNIS-13 resolves the lines of Fe XIX at 592.2 Å (formed at temperature T ? 8.9 MK) and Fe XII at 592.6 Å (T ? 1.6 MK). The Fe XIX line emission, observed over an area in excess of 4920 arcsec2 (2.58 × 109 km2, more than 60% of the active region), provides strong evidence for the nanoflare heating model of the solar corona. No GOES events occurred in the region less than 2 hr before the rocket flight, but a microflare was observed north and east of the region with RHESSI and EUNIS during the flight. The absence of significant upward velocities anywhere in the region, particularly the microflare, indicates that the pervasive Fe XIX emission is not propelled outward from the microflare site, but is most likely attributed to localized heating (not necessarily due to reconnection) consistent with the nanoflare heating model of the solar corona. Assuming ionization equilibrium we estimate Fe XIX/Fe XII emission measure ratios of ?0.076 just outside the AR core and ?0.59 in the core.

  8. Pervasive faint Fe XIX emission from a solar active region observed with EUNIS-13: Evidence for nanoflare heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W. [Catholic University of America at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Daw, Adrian N. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Rabin, D. M., E-mail: Jeffrey.W.Brosius@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Code 670, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We present spatially resolved EUV spectroscopic measurements of pervasive, faint Fe XIX 592.2 Å line emission in an active region observed during the 2013 April 23 flight of the Extreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS-13) sounding rocket instrument. With cooled detectors, high sensitivity, and high spectral resolution, EUNIS-13 resolves the lines of Fe XIX at 592.2 Å (formed at temperature T ? 8.9 MK) and Fe XII at 592.6 Å (T ? 1.6 MK). The Fe XIX line emission, observed over an area in excess of 4920 arcsec{sup 2} (2.58 × 10{sup 9} km{sup 2}, more than 60% of the active region), provides strong evidence for the nanoflare heating model of the solar corona. No GOES events occurred in the region less than 2 hr before the rocket flight, but a microflare was observed north and east of the region with RHESSI and EUNIS during the flight. The absence of significant upward velocities anywhere in the region, particularly the microflare, indicates that the pervasive Fe XIX emission is not propelled outward from the microflare site, but is most likely attributed to localized heating (not necessarily due to reconnection) consistent with the nanoflare heating model of the solar corona. Assuming ionization equilibrium we estimate Fe XIX/Fe XII emission measure ratios of ?0.076 just outside the AR core and ?0.59 in the core.

  9. Detecting of ELF/VLF Signals Generated by GEMINIDS 2011 Meteors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkari, Amir Kayone; Zeinali, M. M.; Taraz, M.

    2015-07-01

    For a long time, the generation mechanism of simultaneous sound with passing of large meteors was a research edge until a reasonable mechanism was proposed for that. This mechanism is based on the existence of ELF/VLF radio signals. This research that aims for detection of these signals archives an improvement over previous works. The signal was found on the extremely low frequency (ELF) band which could not be generated by other sources like lightning, has a frequency range between several Hertz to 500 Hz, and so could be missed with noises produce by electrical machines. The new signal is presented at this work has a good correlation with synchronized visual data that were collected on the peak of Geminids 2011 meteor shower.

  10. Fermi-LAT Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission Toward the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has provided the most detailed view to date of the emission towards the Galactic centre (GC) in high-energy gamma-rays. This paper describes the analysis of data taken during the first 62 months of the mission in the energy range 1-100 GeV from a $15^\\circ \\times 15^\\circ$ region about the direction of the GC, and implications for the interstellar emissions produced by cosmic ray (CR) particles interacting with the gas and radiation fields in the inner Galaxy and for the point sources detected. Specialised interstellar emission models (IEMs) are constructed that enable separation of the gamma-ray emission from the inner $\\sim 1$ kpc about the GC from the fore- and background emission from the Galaxy. Based on these models, the interstellar emission from CR electrons interacting with the interstellar radiation field via the inverse Compton (IC) process and CR nuclei inelastically scattering off the gas producing gamma-rays via $\\pi^0$ decays from the inner $\\sim 1$ kpc is d...

  11. Observation of the fine structure for rovibronic spectral lines in visible part of emission spectra of $D_2$

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, B P; Zhukov, A S

    2011-01-01

    For the first time the fine structure of rovibronic spectral lines in visible part of emission spectra of $D_2$ molecule has been observed. Observed splitting in visible doublets is about 0.2 cm$^{-1}$ in good accordance with previous observations in the infrared part of the spectrum ($a^3\\Sigma_g^+ \\to c^3\\Pi_u$ electronic transition) by means of FTIR and laser spectroscopy. Relative intensities of the fine structure components are in agreement with our calculations of adiabatic line strengths for Hund's case "b" coupling scheme.

  12. Assessment of cardiac single-photon emission computed tomography performance using a scanning linear observer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chih-Jie; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Volokh, Lana [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); GE Healthcare, Haifa 39120 (Israel)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is widely used to detect myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction. It is important to assess and compare different SPECT system designs in order to achieve the highest detectability of cardiac defects. Methods: Whitaker et al.'s study ['Estimating random signal parameters from noisy images with nuisance parameters: linear and scanning-linear methods,' Opt. Express 16(11), 8150-8173 (2008)] on the scanning linear observer (SLO) shows that the SLO can be used to estimate the location and size of signals. One major advantage of the SLO is that it can be used with projection data rather than with reconstruction data. Thus, this observer model assesses the overall hardware performance independent of any reconstruction algorithm. In addition, the computation time of image quality studies is significantly reduced. In this study, three systems based on the design of the GE cadmium zinc telluride-based dedicated cardiac SPECT camera Discovery 530c were assessed. This design, which is officially named the Alcyone Technology: Discovery NM 530c, was commercialized in August, 2009. The three systems, GE27, GE19, and GE13, contain 27, 19, and 13 detectors, respectively. Clinically, a human heart can be virtually segmented into three coronary artery territories: the left-anterior descending artery, left-circumflex artery, and right coronary artery. One of the most important functions of a cardiac SPECT system is to produce images from which a radiologist can accurately predict in which territory the defect exists [http://www.asnc.org/media/PDFs/PPReporting081511.pdf, Guideline from American Society of Nuclear Cardiology]. A good estimation of the extent of the defect from the projection images is also very helpful for determining the seriousness of the myocardial ischemia. In this study, both the location and extent of defects were estimated by the SLO, and the system performance was assessed by localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) [P. Khurd and G. Gindi, 'Decision strategies maximizing the area under the LROC curve,' Proc. SPIE 5749, 150-161 (2005)] or estimation receiver operating characteristic (EROC) [E. Clarkson, 'Estimation receiver operating characteristic curve and ideal observers for combined detection/estimation tasks,' J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 24, B91-B98 (2007)] curves. Results: The area under the LROC/EROC curve (AULC/AUEC) and the true positive fraction (TPF) at a specific false positive fraction (FPF) can be treated as the figures of merit. For radii estimation with a 1 mm tolerance, the AUEC values of the GE27, GE19, and GE13 systems are 0.8545, 0.8488, and 0.8329, and the TPF at FPF = 5% are 77.1%, 76.46%, and 73.55%, respectively. The assessment of all three systems revealed that the GE19 system yields estimated information and cardiac defect detectability very close to those of the GE27 system while using eight fewer detectors. Thus, 30% of the expensive detector units can be removed with confidence. Conclusions: As the results show, a combination of the SLO and LROC/EROC curves can determine the configuration that yields the most relevant estimation/detection information. Thus, this is a useful method for assessing cardiac SPECT systems.

  13. Multi-model simulation of CO and HCHO in the Southern Hemisphere: comparison with observations and impact of biogenic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, G.; Williams, J. E.; Fisher, J. A.; Emmons, L. K.; Jones, N. B.; Morgenstern, O.; Robinson, J.; Smale, D.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Griffith, D. W. T.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the impact of biogenic emissions on carbon monoxide (CO) and formaldehyde (HCHO) in the Southern Hemisphere (SH), with simulations using two different biogenic emission inventories for isoprene and monoterpenes. Results from four atmospheric chemistry models are compared to continuous long-term ground-based CO and HCHO column measurements at the SH Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) sites, the satellite measurement of tropospheric CO columns from the Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT), and in situ surface CO measurements from across the SH, representing a subset of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Global Monitoring Division (NOAA GMD) network. Simulated mean model CO using the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (v2.1) computed in the frame work of the Land Community Model (CLM-MEGANv2.1) inventory is in better agreement with both column and surface observations than simulations adopting the emission inventory generated from the LPJ-GUESS dynamical vegetation model framework, which markedly underestimate measured column and surface CO at most sites. Differences in biogenic emissions cause large differences in CO in the source regions which propagate to the remote SH. Significant inter-model differences exist in modelled column and surface CO, and secondary production of CO dominates these inter-model differences, due mainly to differences in the models' oxidation schemes for volatile organic compounds, predominantly isoprene oxidation. While biogenic emissions are a significant factor in modelling SH CO, inter-model differences pose an additional challenge to constrain these emissions. Corresponding comparisons of HCHO columns at two SH mid-latitude sites reveal that all models significantly underestimate the observed values by approximately a factor of 2. There is a much smaller impact on HCHO of the significantly different biogenic emissions in remote regions, compared to the source regions. Decreased biogenic emissions cause decreased CO export to remote regions, which leads to increased OH; this in turn results in increased HCHO production through methane oxidation. In agreement with earlier studies, we corroborate that significant HCHO sources are likely missing in the models in the remote SH.

  14. Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Atul Jain

    2005-04-17

    This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

  15. Constraining ammonia dairy emissions during NASA DISCOVER-AQ California: surface and airborne observation comparisons with CMAQ simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D. J.; Liu, Z.; Sun, K.; Tao, L.; Nowak, J. B.; Bambha, R.; Michelsen, H. A.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Agricultural ammonia (NH3) emissions are highly uncertain in current bottom-up inventories. Ammonium nitrate is a dominant component of fine aerosols in agricultural regions such as the Central Valley of California, especially during winter. Recent high resolution regional modeling efforts in this region have found significant ammonium nitrate and gas-phase NH3 biases during summer. We compare spatially-resolved surface and boundary layer gas-phase NH3 observations during NASA DISCOVER-AQ California with Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) regional model simulations driven by the EPA NEI 2008 inventory to constrain wintertime NH3 model biases. We evaluate model performance with respect to aerosol partitioning, mixing and deposition to constrain contributions to modeled NH3 concentration biases in the Central Valley Tulare dairy region. Ammonia measurements performed with an open-path mobile platform on a vehicle are gridded to 4 km resolution hourly background concentrations. A peak detection algorithm is applied to remove local feedlot emission peaks. Aircraft NH3, NH4+ and NO3- observations are also compared with simulations extracted along the flight tracks. We find NH3 background concentrations in the dairy region are underestimated by three to five times during winter and NH3 simulations are moderately correlated with observations (r = 0.36). Although model simulations capture NH3 enhancements in the dairy region, these simulations are biased low by 30-60 ppbv NH3. Aerosol NH4+ and NO3- are also biased low in CMAQ by three and four times respectively. Unlike gas-phase NH3, CMAQ simulations do not capture typical NH4+ or NO3- enhancements observed in the dairy region. In contrast, boundary layer height simulations agree well with observations within 13%. We also address observational constraints on simulated NH3 deposition fluxes. These comparisons suggest that NEI 2008 wintertime dairy emissions are underestimated by a factor of three to five. We test sensitivity to emissions by increasing the NEI 2008 NH3 emissions uniformly across the dairy region and evaluate the impact on modeled concentrations. These results are applicable to improving predictions of ammoniated aerosol loading and highlight the value of mobile platform spatial NH3 measurements to constrain emission inventories.

  16. HST-COS Observations on Hydrogen, Helium, Carbon, and Nitrogen Emission from the SN 1987A Reverse Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Penton, Steven V.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Challis, Peter; Laming, J. Martin; Bouchet, Patrice; Chevalier, Roger; Garnavich, Peter M.; Fransson, Claes; Heng, Kevin; Larsson, Josefin; Lawrence, Stephen; Lundqvist, Peter; Panagia, Nino; Pun, Chun S. J.; Smith, Nathan; Sollerman, Jesper; Sonneborn, George; Sugerman, Ben; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2011-01-01

    We present the most sensitive ultraviolet observations of Supernova 1987 A to date. Imaging spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph shows many narrow (Delta v approximates 300 km/s) emission lines from the circumstellar ring, broad Delta v approximates 10-20 x 10(exp 3) km/s) emission lines from the reverse shock, and ultraviolet continuum emission. The high signal-to-noise ratio (>40 per resolution element) broad Ly-alpha emission is excited by soft X-ray and EUV heating of mostly neutral gas in the circumstellar ring and outer supernova debris. The ultraviolet continuum at lambda > 1350 A can be explained by H-I two-photon (2s(exp 2)S(sub 1/2)-l(exp 2)S(sub 1/2)) emission from the same region. We confirm our earlier, tentative detection of N V lambda 1240 emission from the reverse shock and present the first detections of broad He II lambda1640, C IV lambda 1550, and N IV ] lambda1486 emission lines from the reverse shock. The helium abundance in the high-velocity material is He/H = 0.14 +/- 0.06. The N V /H alpha line ratio requires partial ion-electron equilibration (T(sub e)/T(sub p) approximately equal to 0.14-0.35). We find that the N/C abundance ratio in the gas crossing the reverse shock is significantly higher than that in the circumstellar ring, a result that may be attributed to chemical stratification in the outer envelope of the supernova progenitor. The N/C abundance may have been stratified prior to the ring expUlsion, or this result may indicate continued CNO processing in the progenitor subsequent to the expUlsion of the circumstellar ring.

  17. Growth in NOx emissions from power plants in China: bottom-up estimates and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Lei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Using OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument tropospheric NO2 columns and a nested-grid 3-D global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem, we investigated the growth in NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants and their contributions to the growth in NO2 columns in 2005–2007 in China. We first developed a unit-based power plant NOx emission inventory for 2005–2007 to support this investigation. The total capacities of coal-fired power generation have increased by 48.8% in 2005–2007, with 92.2% of the total capacity additions coming from generator units with size ?300 MW. The annual NOx emissions from coal-fired power plants were estimated to be 8.11 Tg NO2 for 2005 and 9.58 Tg NO2 for 2007, respectively. The modeled summer average tropospheric NO2 columns were highly correlated (R2 = 0.79–0.82 with OMI measurements over grids dominated by power plant emissions, with only 7–14% low bias, lending support to the high accuracy of the unit-based power plant NOx emission inventory. The ratios of OMI-derived annual and summer average tropospheric NO2 columns between 2007 and 2005 indicated that most of the grids with significant NO2 increases were related to power plant construction activities. OMI had the capability to trace the changes of NOx emissions from individual large power plants in cases where there is less interference from other NOx sources. Scenario runs from GEOS-Chem model suggested that the new power plants contributed 18.5% and 10% to the annual average NO2 columns in 2007 in Inner Mongolia and North China, respectively. The massive new power plant NOx emissions significantly changed the local NO2 profiles, especially in less polluted areas. A sensitivity study found that changes of NO2 shape factors due to including new power plant emissions increased the summer average OMI tropospheric NO2 columns by 3.8–17.2% for six selected locations, indicating that the updated emission information could help to improve the satellite retrievals.

  18. Equatorial noise emissions with quasiperiodic modulation of wave intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    N?mec, F.; Santolík, O.; Hrbá?ková, Z.; Pickett, J. S.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2015-04-01

    Equatorial noise (EN) emissions are electromagnetic wave events at frequencies between the proton cyclotron frequency and the lower hybrid frequency observed in the equatorial region of the inner magnetosphere. They propagate nearly perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, and they exhibit a harmonic line structure characteristic of the proton cyclotron frequency in the source region. However, they were generally believed to be continuous in time. We investigate more than 2000 EN events observed by the Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations and Wide-Band Data Plasma Wave investigation instruments on board the Cluster spacecraft, and we show that this is not always the case. A clear quasiperiodic (QP) time modulation of the wave intensity is present in more than 5% of events. We perform a systematic analysis of these EN events with QP modulation of the wave intensity. Such events occur usually in the noon-to-dawn magnetic local time sector. Their occurrence seems to be related to the increased geomagnetic activity, and it is associated with the time intervals of enhanced solar wind flow speeds. The modulation period of these events is on the order of minutes. Compressional ULF magnetic field pulsations with periods about double the modulation periods of EN wave intensity and magnitudes on the order of a few tenths of nanotesla were identified in about 46% of events. We suggest that these compressional magnetic field pulsations might be responsible for the observed QP modulation of EN wave intensity, in analogy to formerly reported VLF whistler mode QP events.

  19. Observation of gamma-ray emission from the galaxy M87 above 250 GeV with VERITAS

    CERN Document Server

    Acciari, V A; Blaylock, G; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Butt, Y; Celik, O; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Cogan, P; Colin, P; Cui, W; Daniel, M K; Duke, C; Ergin, T; Falcone, A D; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortin, P; Fortson, L F; Gibbs, K; Gillanders, G H; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Hays, E; Holder, J; Horan, D; Hughes, S B; Hui, M C; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, Philip; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D B; Kildea, J; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Lee, K; Maier, G; McCann, A; McCutcheon, M; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nagai, T; Ong, R A; Pandel, D; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reynolds, P T; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Smith, A W; Steele, D; Swordy, S P; Toner, A Syson J A; Valcarcel, L; Vasilev, V V; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; White, R J; Williams, D A; Wissel, S A; Wood, M D; Zitzer, B

    2008-01-01

    The multiwavelength observation of the nearby radio galaxy M87 provides a unique opportunity to study in detail processes occurring in Active Galactic Nuclei from radio waves to TeV gamma-rays. Here we report the detection of gamma-ray emission above 250 GeV from M87 in spring 2007 with the VERITAS atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array and discuss its correlation with the X-ray emission. The gamma-ray emission is measured to be point-like with an intrinsic source radius less than 4.5 arcmin. The differential energy spectrum is fitted well by a power-law function: dPhi/dE=(7.4+-1.3_{stat}+-1.5_{sys})(E/TeV)^{-2.31+-0.17_{stat}+-0.2_{sys}} 10^{-9}m^{-2}s^{-1}TeV^{-1}. We show strong evidence for a year-scale correlation between the gamma-ray flux reported by TeV experiments and the X-ray emission measured by the ASM/RXTE observatory, and discuss the possible short-time-scale variability. These results imply that the gamma-ray emission from M87 is more likely associated with the core of the galaxy than with othe...

  20. Observation of charged particles on board the scientific satellite 'JIKIKEN'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charged particle detectors (ESP) on board the Japanese sixth scientific satellite ''JIKIKEN'' have measured electron fluxes in the energy range between a few eV and 10 keV and ion fluxes in the energy between 10 eV and 30 keV in the magnetosphere of L-shells from L asymptotically equals 2.5 to L asymptotically equals 8. In this paper, instrumentation, data processing and hitherto obtained results are described. The main results are as follows: (1) On quiet days, significant electron and ion fluxes were hardly observed. On disturbed days, intence fluxes of keV-electrons were observed at L gt = 4, suggesting plasma injection from the plasma sheet. Injected keV-electrons often have non-monotonic energy spectra and have a good correlation with VLF emission activities. Ring current ions in the energy range above 1 keV were also observed on disturbed days after magnetic storm. (2) Energy dispersion of electrons which were injected from the plasma sheet due to magnetospheric substorm which occurred after magnetic storm was observed. (author)

  1. Water vapor emission from IRC+10216 and other carbon-rich stars: model predictions and prospects for multitransition observations

    CERN Document Server

    González-Alfonso, Eduardo; Melnick, Gary J

    2007-01-01

    We have modeled the emission of H2O rotational lines from the extreme C-rich star IRC+10216. Our treatment of the excitation of H2O emissions takes into account the excitation of H2O both through collisions, and through the pumping of the nu2 and nu3 vibrational states by dust emission and subsequent decay to the ground state. Regardless of the spatial distribution of the water molecules, the H2O 1_{10}-1_{01} line at 557 GHz observed by the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) is found to be pumped primarily through the absorption of dust-emitted photons at 6 $\\mu$m in the nu2 band. As noted by previous authors, the inclusion of radiative pumping lowers the ortho-H2O abundance required to account for the 557 GHz emission, which is found to be (0.5-1)x10^{-7} if the presence of H2O is a consequence of vaporization of orbiting comets or Fischer-Tropsch catalysis. Predictions for other submillimeter H2O lines that can be observed by the Herschel Space Observatory (HSO) are reported. Multitransition HSO...

  2. Differential emission measure and electron distribution function reconstructed from RHESSI and SDO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motorina, G. G.; Kontar, E. P.

    2015-12-01

    To solve a number of problems in solar physics related to mechanisms of energy release in solar corona parameters of hot coronal plasma are required, such as energy distribution, emission measure, differential emission measure, and their evolution with time. Of special interest is the distribution of solar plasma by energies, which can evolve from a nearly Maxwellian distribution to a distribution with a more complex structure during a solar flare. The exact form of this distribution for low-energy particles, which receive the bulk of flare energy, is still poorly known; therefore, detailed investigations are required. We present a developed method of simultaneous fitting of data from two spacecrafts Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) and Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), using a differential emission measure and a thin target model for the August 14, 2010 flare event.

  3. Differential Emission Measure and Electron Distribution Function Reconstructed from RHESSI and SDO Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Motorina, G G

    2015-01-01

    To solve a number of problems in solar physics related to mechanisms of energy release in solar corona parameters of hot coronal plasma are required, such as energy distribution, emission measure, differential emission measure, and their evolution with time. Of special interest is the distribution of solar plasma by energies, which can evolve from a nearly Maxwellian distribution to a distribution with a more complex structure during a solar flare. The exact form of this distribution for low-energy particles, which receive the bulk of flare energy, is still poorly known; therefore, detailed investigations are required. We present a developed method of simultaneous fitting of data from two spacecrafts Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) and Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), using a differential emission measure and a thin target model for the August 14, 2010 flare event.

  4. Contribution of Solar Hydrogen Ly? Line Emission in Total Ionization Rate in Ionospheric D-region During the Maximum of Solar X-flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina, A.; ?adež, V. M.; Baj?eti?, J.

    2015-11-01

    The solar Ly? line emission can be considered as the dominant source of ionization processes in the ionospheric D-region at altitudes above 70 km during unperturbed conditions. However, large sudden impacts of radiation in some other energy domains can also significantly influence the ionization rate and, in this paper, we present a study on the contribution of Ly? radiation to the ionization rate when the ionosphere is disturbed by solar X-flares. We give relevant analytical expressions and make calculations and numerical simulations for the low ionosphere using data collected by the VLF receiver located in Serbia for the VLF radio signal emitted by the DHO transmitter in Germany.

  5. A Climatology of Dust-Emission Events over North Africa Based on 27 Years of Surface Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, S.; Knippertz, P.; Schepanski, K.

    2012-04-01

    The huge quantity of mineral dust emitted annually from North Africa makes this area crucial to the global dust cycle. Once in the atmosphere, dust aerosols have a significant impact on the global radiation budget, clouds, the carbon cycle and can even act as a fertilizer to rain forests in South America. Current model estimates of dust production from North Africa are uncertain. At the heart of this problem is insufficient understanding of key dust emitting processes such as haboobs (cold pools generated through evaporation of convective precipitation), low-level jets (LLJs), and dry convection (dust devils and dust plumes). Scarce observations in this region, in particular in the Sahara, make model evaluation difficult. This work uses long-term surface observations from the MIDAS data set (~120 stations in the arid part of North Africa) to explore the diurnal, seasonal, decadal and geographical variations in dust emission events and their associated wind thresholds. The threshold values are determined from probability density functions of observed 10-minute anemomenter wind speeds. Emission events are defined using the present weather codes (WW) of SYNOP reports. These codes represent events of smaller intensity such as "Dust or sand raised by wind" to severe dust storms. During the 27-year study period (1984-2011) stations are required to have a minimum of 1000 dust observations to be included in the analysis. Dust emission frequency (DEF) is calculated for different time intervals (e.g. monthly, 3-hourly) taking into account the different number of measurements available at each station. North of 25°N a maximum during March-May is evident and relatively consistent over the whole North African region. Wind-speed thresholds for dust emission north of 25°N are higher than south of 25°N in the Sahel, where station-to-station variability is larger, and enhanced DEF activity during February-March is observed. The variability in this region is closely linked to the advance and retreat of the summer monsoon. The diurnal cycle in DEF shows reflections of the individual emission mechanisms. At night, winds are usually light and dust emission is low. Many stations show a sharp increase in wind speed and DEF between 06 and 09 UTC, a probable result of the downward mixing of momentum from nocturnal LLJs. Peaks at both midday and 15 UTC are common in the diurnal cycles of both winds and DEF. Midday peaks are likely due to small scale dry convection, while the afternoon peaks may contain signals from both dry convection and gusty winds associated with haboob outflows. Into the evening and overnight the DEF signal gets smaller and is often caused by long-lived haboobs.

  6. Producer observations of the long term effects of acid forming emissions in livestock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of interviews with livestock producers is presented to illustrate the environmental problems caused by sour gas plants in the Pincher Creek area of Alberta. Farmers located in the emission plume from the Shell Waterton plant and Gulf sour gas plants were interviewed and provided anecdotal evidence of adverse impacts of sour gas plant emissions on livestock. Common problems that are noticed in livestock include eye irritation, increased respiratory infections, mineral deficiencies, eye cancer, waterhole water quality deterioration, low calf birth weights, decreased cattle weight gain, and birth defects. Crop losses, lowered grass production, machinery corrosion, and water pollution also occur. 1 fig

  7. Intergalactic medium emission observations with the cosmic web imager. II. Discovery of extended, kinematically linked emission around SSA22 Ly? BLOB 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intergalactic medium (IGM) is the dominant reservoir of baryons, delineates the large-scale structure of the universe at low to moderate overdensities, and provides gas from which galaxies form and evolve. Simulations of a cold-dark-matter- (CDM-) dominated universe predict that the IGM is distributed in a cosmic web of filaments and that galaxies should form along and at the intersections of these filaments. While observations of QSO absorption lines and the large-scale distribution of galaxies have confirmed the CDM paradigm, the cosmic web of IGM has never been confirmed by direct imaging. Here we report our observation of the Ly? blob 2 (LAB2) in SSA22 with the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI). This is an integral field spectrograph optimized for low surface brightness, extended emission. With 22 hr of total on- and off-source exposure, CWI has revealed that LAB2 has extended Ly? emission that is organized into azimuthal zones consistent with filaments. We perform numerous tests with simulations and the data to secure the robustness of this result, which relies on data with modest signal-to-noise ratios. We have developed a smoothing algorithm that permits visualization of data cube slices along image or spectral image planes. With both raw and smoothed data cubes we demonstrate that the filaments are kinematically associated with LAB2 and display double-peaked profiles characteristic of optically thick Ly? emission. The flux is 10-20 times brighter than expected for the average emission from the IGM but is consistent with boosted fluorescence from a buried QSO or gravitation cooling radiation. Using simple emission models, we infer a baryon mass in the filaments of at least 1-4 × 1011 M ?, and the dark halo mass is at least 2 × 1012 M ?. The spatial-kinematic morphology is more consistent with inflow from the cosmic web than outflow from LAB2, although an outflow feature maybe present at one azimuth. LAB2 and the surrounding gas have significant and coaligned angular momentum, strengthening the case for their association.

  8. Radio-emission of pre-main sequence stars of the Rho Ophiuchi cloud: observations and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of the radio continuum emission of a young star population have been made at VLA on the whole molecular cloud Rho Ophiuchi, one of the closest site of star formation. A dozen of stellar sources have been detected. Radio emission of some identified objects seems to have a magnetic nature and be produced by gyrosynchrotron mechanism. In particular, one of the sources shows a radio radiation circularly polarized; two other stars have a radiation strongly variable probably due to magnetic eruptions more important than those detected in X radiation. More generally, radio observations select probably a specific population of young stars characterized by magnetic field presence extended on several stellar radii and by absence of dense circumstellar environment. Spatial distribution of these objects suggest, they are younger than most of the pre-main sequence stars

  9. Single VLF plane wave characteristics and plasma parameter determination by means of amplitude measurements on board a satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical formulae are given which permit the determination of a single VLF wave characteristics (wave normal, Poynting's vector, etc.) and plasma parameters (Langmuir and cyclotron frequencies) on the basis of amplitude wave measurements. Apart of the assumption of the single wave nature of electromagnetic field the consideration is limited by the ''quasilongitudinal'' wave propagation. The results will provide the information on the wave source location, the existence of magnetospheric ducts and other features of the wave propagation

  10. Detection of organic compound signatures in infra-red, limb emission spectra observed by the MIPAS-B2 instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Remedios, J.J.; Allen, G; Waterfall, A. M.; Oelhaf, H; Kleinert, A.

    2006-01-01

    Organic compounds play a central role in troposphere chemistry and increasingly are a viable target for remote sensing observations. In this paper, infra-red spectral features of three organic compounds are investigated in thermal emission spectra recorded by a balloon-borne instrument, MIPAS-B2, operating at high spectral resolution. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that PAN and acetone can be detected in infra-red remote sensing spectra of the upper troposphere; detection results are...

  11. Directional features of the downshifted peak observed in HF-induced stimulated electromagnetic emission spectra obtained using an interferometer

    OpenAIRE

    Tereshchenko, E. D.; R. Yu. Yurik; Khudukon, B. Z.; Rietveld, M. T.; Isham, B.; Belyey, V.; Brekke, A.; T. Hagfors; Grill, M.

    2006-01-01

    A high frequency (HF) ionospheric modification experiment was carried out between 25 September and 8 October 2004, using the EISCAT HF transmitter located near Tromsø, Norway. During this experiment the spectra of the stimulated HF sideband waves (stimulated electromagnetic emission or SEE) induced by the HF pump were observed using an interferometer consisting of three spaced receiving antennas with baselines both along and perpendicular to the meridian, and a multi-channel coherent...

  12. Spitzer observations of dust emission from H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massive stars can alter physical conditions and properties of their ambient interstellar dust grains via radiative heating and shocks. The H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) offer ideal sites to study the stellar energy feedback effects on dust because stars can be resolved, and the galaxy's nearly face-on orientation allows us to unambiguously associate H II regions with their ionizing massive stars. The Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the LMC provides multi-wavelength (3.6-160 ?m) photometric data of all H II regions. To investigate the evolution of dust properties around massive stars, we have analyzed spatially resolved IR dust emission from two classical H II regions (N63 and N180) and two simple superbubbles (N70 and N144) in the LMC. We produce photometric spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of numerous small subregions for each region based on its stellar distributions and nebular morphologies. We use DustEM dust emission model fits to characterize the dust properties. Color-color diagrams and model fits are compared with the radiation field (estimated from photometric and spectroscopic surveys). Strong radial variations of SEDs can be seen throughout the regions, reflecting the available radiative heating. Emission from very small grains drastically increases at locations where the radiation field is the highest, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) appear to be destroyed. PAH emission is the strongest in the presence of molecular clouds, provided that the radiation field is low.

  13. Probing the origin of VHE emission from M 87 with MWL observations in 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Raue, Martin; Mazin, Daniel; Colin, Pierre; Hui, Michelle; Beilicke, Matthias; Walker, Craig; MAGIC,; VERITAS,

    2012-01-01

    The large majority of extragalactic very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) sources belongs to the class of active galactic nuclei (AGN), in particular the BL Lac sub-class. AGNs are characterized by an extremely bright and compact emission region, powered by a super-massive black hole (SMBH) and an accretion disk, and relativistic outflows (jets) detected all across the electro-magnetic spectrum. In BL Lac sources the jet axis is oriented close to the line of sight, giving rise to a relativistic boosting of the emission. In radio galaxies, on the other hand, the jet makes a larger angle to the line of sight allowing to resolve the central core and the jet in great details. The giant radio galaxy M 87 with its proximity (1 6Mpc) and its very massive black hole ((3-6) x 10^9 M_solar) provides a unique laboratory to investigate VHE emission in such objects and thereby probe particle acceleration to relativistic energies near SMBH and in jets. M 87 has been established as a VHE emitter since 2005. The VHE emission dis...

  14. Spitzer observations of dust emission from H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Ian W. [Now at Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA. (United States); Evans, Jessica Marie; Xue, Rui; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Segura-Cox, Dominique M., E-mail: ianws@bu.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Massive stars can alter physical conditions and properties of their ambient interstellar dust grains via radiative heating and shocks. The H II regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) offer ideal sites to study the stellar energy feedback effects on dust because stars can be resolved, and the galaxy's nearly face-on orientation allows us to unambiguously associate H II regions with their ionizing massive stars. The Spitzer Space Telescope survey of the LMC provides multi-wavelength (3.6-160 ?m) photometric data of all H II regions. To investigate the evolution of dust properties around massive stars, we have analyzed spatially resolved IR dust emission from two classical H II regions (N63 and N180) and two simple superbubbles (N70 and N144) in the LMC. We produce photometric spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of numerous small subregions for each region based on its stellar distributions and nebular morphologies. We use DustEM dust emission model fits to characterize the dust properties. Color-color diagrams and model fits are compared with the radiation field (estimated from photometric and spectroscopic surveys). Strong radial variations of SEDs can be seen throughout the regions, reflecting the available radiative heating. Emission from very small grains drastically increases at locations where the radiation field is the highest, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) appear to be destroyed. PAH emission is the strongest in the presence of molecular clouds, provided that the radiation field is low.

  15. P-MaNGA Galaxies: emission-lines properties - gas ionization and chemical abundances from prototype observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfiore, F.; Maiolino, R.; Bundy, K.; Thomas, D.; Maraston, C.; Wilkinson, D.; Sánchez, S. F.; Bershady, M.; Blanc, G. A.; Bothwell, M.; Cales, S. L.; Coccato, L.; Drory, N.; Emsellem, E.; Fu, H.; Gelfand, J.; Law, D.; Masters, K.; Parejko, J.; Tremonti, C.; Wake, D.; Weijmans, A.; Yan, R.; Xiao, T.; Zhang, K.; Zheng, T.; Bizyaev, D.; Kinemuchi, K.; Oravetz, D.; Simmons, A.

    2015-05-01

    MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) is a 6-yr Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) survey that will obtain spatially resolved spectroscopy from 3600 to 10 300 Å for a representative sample of over 10 000 nearby galaxies. In this paper, we present the analysis of nebular emission-line properties using observations of 14 galaxies obtained with P-MaNGA, a prototype of the MaNGA instrument. By using spatially resolved diagnostic diagrams, we find extended star formation in galaxies that are centrally dominated by Seyfert/LINER-like emission, which illustrates that galaxy characterizations based on single fibre spectra are necessarily incomplete. We observe extended low ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINER)-like emission (up to 1Re) in the central regions of three galaxies. We make use of the H? equivalent width [EW(H?)] to argue that the observed emission is consistent with ionization from hot evolved stars. We derive stellar population indices and demonstrate a clear correlation between Dn(4000) and EW(H?A) and the position in the ionization diagnostic diagram: resolved galactic regions which are ionized by a Seyfert/LINER-like radiation field are also devoid of recent star formation and host older and/or more metal-rich stellar populations. We also detect extraplanar LINER-like emission in two highly inclined galaxies, and identify it with diffuse ionized gas. We investigate spatially resolved metallicities and find a positive correlation between metallicity and star formation rate surface density. We further study the relation between N/O versus O/H on resolved scales. We find that, at given N/O, regions within individual galaxies are spread towards lower metallicities, deviating from the sequence defined by galactic central regions as traced by Sloan 3-arcsec fibre spectra. We suggest that the observed dispersion can be a tracer for gas flows in galaxies: infalls of pristine gas and/or the effect of a galactic fountain.

  16. Evidence of increasing acoustic emissivity at high frequency with solar cycle 23 in Sun-as-a-star observations

    OpenAIRE

    Simoniello, R.; Finsterle, W.; Garcia, R. A.; Salabert, D.; Jimenez, A.

    2009-01-01

    We used long high-quality unresolved (Sun-as-a-star observations) data collected by GOLF and VIRGO instruments on board the ESA/NASA SOHO satellite to investigate the amplitude variation with solar cycle 23 in the high-frequency band (5.7 < nu< 6.3 mHz). We found an enhancement of acoustic emissivity over the ascending phase of about 18+-3 in velocity observations and a slight enhancement of 3+-2 in intensity. Mode conversion from fast acoustic to fast magneto-acoustic waves...

  17. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from behind-the-limb solar flares

    OpenAIRE

    Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Omodei, Nicola; Petrosian, Vahe; Liu, Wei; da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Allafort, Alice; Collaboration, for the Fermi-LAT

    2015-01-01

    Fermi-LAT >30 MeV observations have increased the number of detected solar flares by almost a factor of 10 with respect to previous space observations. These sample both the impulsive and long duration phases of GOES M and X class flares. Of particular interest is the recent detections of three solar flares whose position behind the limb was confirmed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. While gamma-ray emission up to tens of MeV resulting from proton interactions has been detected b...

  18. Identification of natural plasma emissions observed close to the plasmapause by the Cluster-Whisper relaxation sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Canu

    Full Text Available We use the data collected by the Whisper instrument onboard the Cluster spacecraft for a first test of its capabilities in the identification of the natural plasma waves observed in the Earth’s magnetosphere. The main signatures observed at the plasma frequency, upper hybrid frequency, and electron Bernstein modes were often difficult to be reliably recognized on previous missions. We use here the characteristic frequencies provided by the resonances triggered by the relaxation sounder of Whisper to identify with good confidence the various signatures detected in the complex wave spectra collected close to the plasmapause. Coupled with the good sensitivity, frequency and time resolution of Whisper, the resonances detected by the sounder allow one to precisely spot these natural emissions. This first analysis seems to confirm the interpretation of Geos observations: the natural emissions observed in Bernstein modes above the plasma frequency, now widely observed onboard Cluster, are not modeled by a single Maxwellian electrons distribution function. Therefore, multi-temperature electron distribution functions should be considered.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (active perturbation experiments; waves and instabilities; instrument and techniques

  19. TeV Gamma-Ray Emission Observed from Geminga with HAWC

    CERN Document Server

    Baughman, B M

    2015-01-01

    Geminga is a radio-quiet pulsar ~250 parsecs from Earth that was first discovered as a GeV gamma-ray source and then identified as a pulsar. Milagro observed an extended TeV source spatially consistent with Geminga. HAWC observes a similarly extended source. Observations of Geminga's flux and extension will be presented.

  20. CRISM Limb Observations of Coincident CO2 Ice Clouds and O2 Emission in the Mars Equatorial Mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, R. T.; Smith, Michael; Lefvère, Franck; Sandor, Brad; Wolff, Michael; McConnochie, Tim; Seelos, Kim; Nair, Hari; Toigo, Anthony; Murchie, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Limb observations with the CRISM visible/near IR (0.4-4 ?m) imaging spectrometer (Murchie et al., 2009) onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have supported a broad range of atmospheric airglow (1.27 ?m O2, 1.45 and 2.9 ?m OH) and aerosol (dust, H2O and CO2 ice) vertical profile retrievals. Most recently, CRISM limb observations over Ls=62-137° in MY32 (Dec 2013-May 2014) have obtained the first visible-to-near IR scattering spectra of CO2 ice clouds in the Mars equatorial mesosphere (i.e., 60-70 km altitudes, 10S-10N, over Ls=0-140° Clancy et al, 2007, Montemessin et al, 2007). These spectra are highly diagnostic of both the CO2 ice composition and cloud paritcle sizes (Reff=1-2 ?m). The current report regards May 27, 2014 (Ls=137°) CRISM limb imaging observations of CO2 ice clouds centered near 10S,75W at an altitude of 60 km.What is distinct about the May 2014 observation is the coincidence of striking mesospheric O2(1?g) 1.27 ?m dayglow, indicative of very low H2O/temperature conditions, which lead to locally intense O3 enhancements (and 1.27 ?m O2 emission associated with O3 photolysis). In this respect, we have an unique temperature indicator in the presence of CO2 ice clouds. Interestingly, LMD GCM photochemical simulations exhibit such localized O2 dayglow at the same location/season, associated with a thermal tide temperature minimum (the current best explanation for mesospheric CO2 ice cloud formation). We present CO2 cloud optical depth and particle size determinations, and discuss observed and modeled O2 mesospheric peak emissions in the context of very cold atmospheric temperatures implied by local CO2 ice formation and O2 emission.

  1. Selected Energy Growth of Nitrides Observed with In Situ Emission Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarotto, Vincent; Kordesch, M. E.

    1996-11-01

    Pulsed Super Sonic Molecular Beam (PSSMB) sources has been combined with in situ emission in order to optimize the growth of wide bandgap semiconductors such as AlN. PSSMB gas sources offer a very narrow energy spread neutral beam for the growth of materials. Trimethyl Aluminum and ammonia were pulsed simultaneously for growth of AlN. The typical pulse rate used was 3 Hz with an on-time of 300 us. Molecular velocities of about 1600m/s have been verified with fast ion gauge. Post deposition in situ analysis with XPS, SEM and Photoelectron Emission Microscopy (PEEM) have been performed. Images of growth and deposition phenomena will be shown. This work was funded partially by BMDO/ONR grant N0014-95-0298.

  2. Deep observations of CO line emission from star-forming galaxies in a cluster candidate at z=1.5

    CERN Document Server

    Aravena, M; Salvato, M; Tanaka, M; Lentati, L; Schinnerer, E; Walter, F; Riechers, D; Smolcic, V; Capak, P; Aussel, H; Bertoldi, F; Chapman, S C; Farrah, D; Finoguenov, A; Floc'h, E Le; Lutz, D; Magdis, G; Oliver, S; Riguccini, L; Berta, S; Magnelli, B; Pozzi, F

    2012-01-01

    We report results from a deep Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) search for CO 1-0 line emission from galaxies in a candidate galaxy cluster at z~1.55 in the COSMOS field. We target 4 galaxies with optical spectroscopic redshifts in the range z=1.47-1.59. Two of these 4 galaxies, ID51613 and ID51813, are nominally detected in CO line emission at the 3-4 sigma level. We find CO luminosities of 2.4x10^10 K km/s pc^2 and 1.3x10^10 K km/s pc^2, respectively. Taking advantage from the clustering and 2-GHz bandwidth of the JVLA, we perform a search for emission lines in the proximity of optical sources within the field of view of our observations. We limit our search to galaxies with K4 sigma) in the data cube, which we identify with the CO line emission. To test the reliability of the line peaks found, we performed a parallel search for line peaks using a Bayesian inference method. Monte Carlo simulations show that such associations are statistically significant, with probabilities of chance association of 3.5% and 10...

  3. High Galactic latitude polarized emission at 1.4 GHz and implications for cosmic microwave background observations

    CERN Document Server

    Carretti, E; Sault, R J; Cortiglioni, S; Poppi, S

    2005-01-01

    We analyse the polarized emission at 1.4 GHz in a 3x3 deg^2 area at high Galactic latitude (b ~ -40deg). The region, centred in (RA=5h, Dec=-49deg), was observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array radio-interferometer, whose 3-30 arcmin angular sensitivity range allows the study of scales appropriate for CMB Polarization (CMBP) investigations. The angular behavior of the diffuse emission is analysed through the E- and B-mode power spectra. These follow a power law $C^X_l \\propto l^{\\beta_X}$ with slopes \\beta_E = -1.97 \\pm 0.08 and \\beta_B = -1.98 \\pm 0.07. The emission is found to be about a factor 25 fainter than in Galactic plane regions. The comparison of the power spectra with other surveys indicates that this area is intermediate between strong and negligible Faraday rotation effects. A similar conclusion can be reached by analysing both the frequency and Galactic latitude behaviors of the diffuse Galactic emission of the 408-1411 MHz Leiden survey data. We present an analysis of the Faraday rot...

  4. Synthesis of silver hollow nanoparticles and observation of photoluminescence emission properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of hollow silver nanoparticles (HSNs) along-with solid silver nanoparticles are reported by Nd:YAG laser ablation of solid silver target immersed in water medium with a laser ablation time (LAT) duration of 50 min and with the incident laser fluence of 151 J/cm2. It is found that only solid silver nanoparticles are produced when the experiment is carried out with smaller values of LAT duration. The synthesized samples are characterized by using transmission electron microscopy and UV–Visible absorption spectroscopy. The UV–Visible absorption spectra of the samples show sharp absorptions in the ultraviolet and in visible regions due to interband transition and surface plasmon resonance oscillations in Ag nanoparticles, respectively. It is found that all samples exhibit photoluminescence (PL) emission, at room temperature, in the UV–Visible region peaked at ?346 nm, due to the recombination of electrons with holes from sp conduction band to d band of Ag. The sample containing HSNs exhibits strong PL emission and the value of peak PL emission intensity is enhanced by the factor of 2.4 in comparison to that obtained from the sample synthesized with LAT duration of 20 min. The synthesized HSNs may find applications in catalysis and in chemical sensing. - Highlights: ?Hollow silver nanoparticles of 15–60 nm particle sizes are prepared by laser ablation. ?Prepared Ag nanoparticles show sharp absorptions in the UV and visible regions. ?Strong interband transition along-with SPR oscillations is reported. ?Enhancement (2.4 times) in photoluminescence emission in the UV region is reported.

  5. Multispacecraft Cluster observations of quasiperiodic emissions close to the geomagnetic equator.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    N?mec, F.; Pickett, J. S.; Santolík, Ond?ej

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 119, ?. 11 (2014), s. 9101-9112. ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ?R GAP205/10/2279; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11122 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : QP emissions * Cluster space craft Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JA020321/abstract

  6. Conjugate observations of quasi-periodic emissions by Cluster and DEMETER spacecraft.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    N?mec, F.; Santolík, Ond?ej; Parrot, M.; Pickett, J. S.; Hayosh, Mykhaylo; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2013-01-01

    Ro?. 118, ?. 1 (2013), s. 198-208. ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ?R GAP205/10/2279; GA ?R(CZ) GAP209/11/2280 Grant ostatní: GA ?R(CZ) GPP209/12/P658 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : quasi-periodic * QP emissions Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2012JA018380/abstract

  7. Locations of chorus emissions observed by the Polar Plasma Wave Instrument.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sigsbee, K.; Menietti, J. D.; Santolík, Ond?ej; Pickett, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    Ro?. 115, - (2010), A00F12/1-A00F12/17. ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA AV ?R IAA301120601; GA ?R GA205/09/1253 Grant ostatní: MŠMT(CZ) MSM0021620860; GA MŠk(CZ) ME 842 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : chorus emissions * locations * Polar spacecrat * PWI Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2010

  8. Multi-band Whistler-mode Chorus Emissions Observed by the Cluster Spacecraft.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macúšová, Eva; Santolík, Ond?ej

    Praha : Matfyzpress, 2011, s. 91-96. ISBN 978-80-7378-185-9. [WDS 2011 - Annual Conference of Doctoral Students /20./. Prague (CZ), 31.05.2011-03.06.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Cluster spacecraft * Whistler-mode chorus emissions Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.mff.cuni.cz/veda/konference/wds/proc/pdf11/WDS11_215_f2_Macusova.pdf

  9. Suzaku Observation of Diffuse X-ray Emission from the Carina Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaguchi, K; Matsumoto, H; Tsujimoto, M; Holt, S S; Ezoe, Y; Ozawa, H; Tsuboi, Y; Soong, Y; Kitamoto, S; Sekiguchi, A; Kokubun, M; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Petre, Robert; Matsumoto, Hironori; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Holt, Stephan S.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ozawa, Hideki; Tsuboi, Yohko; Soong, Yang; Kitamoto, Shunji; Sekiguchi, Akiko; Kokubun, Motohide

    2006-01-01

    We studied extended X-ray emission from the Carina Nebula taken with the Suzaku CCD camera XIS on 2005 Aug. 29. The X-ray morphology, plasma temperature and absorption to the plasma are consistent with the earlier Einstein results. The Suzaku spectra newly revealed emission lines from various species including oxygen, but not from nitrogen. This result restricts the N/O ratio significantly low, compared with evolved massive stellar winds, suggesting that the diffuse emission is originated in an old supernova remnant or a super shell produced by multiple supernova remnants. The X-ray spectra from the north and south of Eta Carinae showed distinct differences between 0.3-2 keV. The south spectrum shows strong L-shell lines of iron ions and K-shell lines of silicon ions, while the north spectrum shows them weak in intensity. This means that silicon and iron abundances are a factor of 2-4 higher in the south region than in the north region. The abundance variation may be produced by an SNR ejecta, or relate to th...

  10. Suzaku Observation of Diffuse X-ray Emission from the Carina Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Petre, Robert; Matsumoti, Hironori; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Holt, Stephan S.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ozawa, Hideki; Tsuboi, Yohko; Soong, Yang; Kitamoto, Shunji; Sekiguchi, Akiko; Kokubun, Motohide

    2007-01-01

    We studied extended X-ray emission from the Carina Nebula taken with the Suzaku CCD camera XIS on 2005 Aug. 29. The X-ray morphology, plasma temperature and absorption to the plasma are consistent with the earlier Einstein results. The Suzaku spectra newly revealed emission lines from various spices including oxygen, but not from nitrogen. This result restricts the N/O ratio significantly low, compared with evolved massive stellar winds, suggesting that the diffuse emission is originated in an old supernova remnant or a super shell produced by multiple supernova remnants. The X-ray spectra from the north and south of eta Car showed distinct differences between 0.3-2 keV. The south spectrum shows strong L-shell lines of iron ions and K-shell lines of silicon ions, while the north spectrum shows them weak in intensity. This means that silicon and iron abundances are a factor of 2-4 higher in the south region than in the north region. The abundance variation may be produced by an SNR ejecta, or relate to the dust formation around the star forming core.

  11. The composition of Martian aeolian sands: Thermal emissivity from Viking IRTM observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1992-01-01

    Aeolian sands provide excellent surfaces for the remote determination of the mineralogic composition of Martian materials, because such deposits consist of relatively well-sorted, uniform particle sizes and might consist of chemically unaltered, primary mineral grains derived from bedrock. Dark features on the floors of Martian craters are controlled by aeolian processes and many consist largely of unconsolidated, windblown sand. Measurement of the thermal emissivity of geologic materials provides a way to identify mid-infrared absorption bands, the strength and positions of which vary with mineral structure and composition. The Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) had four surface-sensing mid-IR bands, three of which, the 7, 9, and 11 micron channels, correspond to absorption features characteristic of carbonates, sialic, and mafic minerals, respectively. In this study, the highest quality IRTM data were constrained so as to avoid the effects of atmospheric dust, clouds, surface frosts, and particle size variations (the latter using data obtained between 7 and 9 H, and they were selected for dark intracrater features such that only data taken directly from the dark feature were used, so as to avoid thermal contributions from adjacent but unrelated materials. Three-point emissivity spectra of Martian dart intracrater features were compared with laboratory emission spectra of minerals and terrestrial aeolian sands convolved using the IRTM response function to the four IRTM spectral channels.

  12. Evaluating greenhouse gas emissions inventories for agricultural burning using satellite observations of active fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiao-Wen; Jin, Yufang; Giglio, Louis; Foley, Jonathan A; Randerson, James T

    2012-06-01

    Fires in agricultural ecosystems emit greenhouse gases and aerosols that influence climate on multiple spatial and temporal scales. Annex 1 countries of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), many of which ratified the Kyoto Protocol, are required to report emissions of CH4 and N2O from these fires annually. In this study, we evaluated several aspects of this reporting system, including the optimality of the crops targeted by the UNFCCC globally and within Annex 1 countries, and the consistency of emissions inventories among different countries. We also evaluated the success of individual countries in capturing interannual variability and long-term trends in agricultural fire activity. In our approach, we combined global high-resolution maps of crop harvest area and production, derived from satellite maps and ground-based census data, with Terra and Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements of active fires. At a global scale, we found that adding ground nuts (e.g., peanuts), cocoa, cotton and oil palm, and removing potato, oats, rye, and pulse other from the list of 14 crops targeted by the UNFCCC increased the percentage of active fires covered by the reporting system by 9%. Optimization led to a different recommended list for Annex 1 countries, requiring the addition of sunflower, cotton, rapeseed, and alfalfa and the removal of beans, sugarcane, pulse others, and tuber-root others. Extending emissions reporting to all Annex 1 countries (from the current set of 19 countries) would increase the efficacy of the reporting system from 6% to 15%, and further including several non-Annex 1 countries (Argentina, Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Thailand, Kazakhstan, Mexico, and Nigeria) would capture over 55% of active fires in croplands worldwide. Analyses of interannual trends from the United States and Australia showed the importance of both intensity of fire use and crop production in controlling year-to-year variations in agricultural fire emissions. Remote sensing provides an effective means for evaluating some aspects of the current UNFCCC emissions reporting system; and, if combined with census data, field experiments and expert opinion, has the potential to improve the robustness of the next generation inventory system. PMID:22827140

  13. Observation-constrained estimates of the black carbon climate effect using high-resolution emission inventory and model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Balkanski, Yves; Boucher, Olivier; Ciais, Philippe; Schuster, Gregory; Chevallier, Frédéric; Samset, Bjørn; Liu, Junfeng; Piao, Shilong; Valari, Myrto; Tao, Shu

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) is an important short-lived climate forcer with significant impacts on climate and health. However, the direct radiative forcing (RF) of BC is subject to a large uncertainty, due to the limitations that models have to capture the observed light absorption. In this study, we investigated the effect of using highly disaggregated inventory and high-resolution model on modelling of BC radiation absorption. It's found that the low resolution in emission inventory and model is a significant and overlooked source of error in previous studies. Using a detailed 10-km emission inventory and a 50-km atmospheric model allows us to reduce the under-estimation of BC absorption by more than 50% over Asia. Downscaling the BC field to 10 km further reduces the bias to -5% in Asia. The underestimation of coarse-resolution models can be attributed to the fact that about half of the observational sites are located in locations within the top 90th percentile of BC AAOD. To reinforce these results, we applied a Bayesian method and obtain a best estimate of 0.37 Wm-2, with a 90% uncertainty range of 0.11-0.83 W m-2. Our best estimate is lower than previously thought and, importantly, the uncertainty is reduced by 40%. This lower RF of BC implies that reducing BC emissions might improve air quality but bring less co-benefit for climate than expected.

  14. Solar Control on Jupiter's Equatorial X-ray Emissions: 26-29 November 2003 XMM-Newton Observation

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, A; Elsner, R F; Gladstone, G R; Ramsay, G; Rodríguez, P; Soria, R; Cravens, T E; Bhardwaj, Anil; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Elsner, Ronald F; Ramsay, Gavin; Rodriguez, Pedro; Soria, Roberto; Cravens, Thomas E

    2005-01-01

    During November 26-29, 2003 XMM-Newton observed soft (0.2-2 keV) X-ray emission from Jupiter for 69 hours. The low-latitude X-ray disk emission of Jupiter is observed to be almost uniform in intensity with brightness that is consistent with a solar-photon driven process. The simultaneous lightcurves of Jovian equatorial X-rays and solar X-rays (measured by the TIMED/SEE and GOES satellites) show similar day-to-day variability. A large solar X-ray flare occurring on the Jupiter-facing side of the Sun is found to have a corresponding feature in the Jovian X-rays. These results support the hypothesis that X-ray emission from Jovian low-latitudes are solar X-rays scattered from the planet's upper atmosphere, and suggest that the Sun directly controls the non-auroral X-rays from Jupiter's disk. Our study also suggests that Jovian equatorial X-rays can be used to monitor the solar X-ray flare activity on the hemisphere of the Sun that is invisible to space weather satellites.

  15. Observations of Free-Free and Anomalous Microwave Emission from LDN 1622 with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Harper, S E; Cleary, K

    2015-01-01

    LDN 1622 has previously been identified as a possible strong source of dust-correlated Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME). Previous observations were limited by resolution meaning that the radio emission could not be compared with current generation high-resolution infrared data from Herschel, Spitzer or WISE. This Paper presents arcminute resolution mapping observations of LDN 1622 at 4.85 GHz and 13.7 GHz using the 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope. The 4.85 GHz map reveals a corona of free-free emission enclosing LDN 1622 that traces the photo-dissociation region of the cloud. The brightest peaks of the 4.85 GHz map are found to be within 10% agreement with the expected free-free predicted by SHASSA H{\\alpha} data of LDN 1622. At 13.7 GHz the AME flux density was found to be 7.0 $\\pm$ 1.4 mJy and evidence is presented for a rising spectrum between 13.7 GHz and 31 GHz. The spinning dust model of AME is found to naturally account for the flux seen at 13.7 GHz. Correlations between the diffuse 13.7 GH...

  16. Spatially resolving methane emissions in California: constraints from the CalNex aircraft campaign and from present (GOSAT, TES and future (TROPOMI, geostationary satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Wecht

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We apply a continental-scale inverse modeling system for North America based on the GEOS-Chem model to optimize California methane emissions at 1/2° × 2/3° horizontal resolution using atmospheric observations from the CalNex aircraft campaign (May–June 2010 and from satellites. Inversion of the CalNex data yields a best estimate for total California methane emissions of 2.86 ± 0.21 Tg yr?1, compared with 1.92 Tg yr?1 in the EDGAR v4.2 emission inventory used as a priori and 1.51 Tg yr?1 in the California Air Resources Board (CARB inventory used for state regulations of greenhouse gas emissions. These results are consistent with a previous Lagrangian inversion of the CalNex data. Our inversion provides 12 independent pieces of information to constrain the geographical distribution of emissions within California. Attribution to individual source types indicates dominant contributions to emissions from landfills/wastewater (1.1 Tg yr?1, livestock (0.87 Tg yr?1, and gas/oil (0.64 Tg yr?1. EDGAR v4.2 underestimates emissions from livestock while CARB underestimates emissions from landfills/wastewater and gas/oil. Current satellite observations from GOSAT can constrain methane emissions in the Los Angeles Basin but are too sparse to constrain emissions quantitatively elsewhere in California (they can still be qualitatively useful to diagnose inventory biases. Los Angeles Basin emissions derived from CalNex and GOSAT inversions are 0.42 ± 0.08 and 0.31 ± 0.08, respectively. An observation system simulation experiment (OSSE shows that the future TROPOMI satellite instrument (2015 launch will be able to constrain California methane emissions at a detail comparable to the CalNex aircraft campaign. Geostationary satellite observations offer even greater potential for constraining methane emissions in the future.

  17. GALAXY EVOLUTION EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF CS AND OH EMISSION IN COMET 9P/TEMPEL 1 DURING DEEP IMPACT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) observations of comet 9P/Tempel 1 using the near-ultraviolet (NUV) objective grism were made before, during and after the Deep Impact event that occurred on 2005 July 4 at 05:52:03 UT when a 370 kg NASA spacecraft was maneuvered into the path of the comet. The NUV channel provides usable spectral information in a bandpass covering 2000-3400 A with a point source spectral resolving power of R ? 100. The primary spectral features in this range include solar continuum scattered from cometary dust and emissions from OH and CS molecular bands centered near 3085 and 2575 A, respectively. In particular, we report the only cometary CS emission detected during this event. The observations allow the evolution of these spectral features to be tracked over the period of the encounter. In general, the NUV emissions observed from Tempel 1 are much fainter than those that have been observed by GALEX from other comets. However, it is possible to derive production rates for the parent molecules of the species detected by GALEX in Tempel 1 and to determine the number of these molecules liberated by the impact. The derived quiescent production rates are Q(H2O) = 6.4 x 1027 molecules s-1 and Q(CS2) = 6.7 x 1024 molecules s-1, while the impact produced an additional 1.6 x 1032 H2O molecules and 1.3 x 1029 CS2 molecules, a similar ratio as in quiescent outgassing.

  18. Early polarization observations of the optical emission of gamma-ray bursts: GRB150301B and GRB150413A

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbovskoy, E S; Buckley, D; Kornilov, V G; Balanutsa, P V; Tyurina, N V; Kuznetsov, A S; Kuvshinov, D A; Gorbunov, I A; Vlasenko, D; Popova, E; Chazov, V V; Potter, S; Kotze, M; Kniazev, A; Gress, O A; Budnev, N M; Ivanov, K I; Yazev, S A; Tlatov, A G; Senik, V A; Dormidontov, D V; Parhomenko, A V; Krushinski, V V; Zalozhnich, I S; Castro-Tirado, R Alberto; Sanchez-Ramrez, R; Sergienko, Yu P; Gabovich, A; Yurkov, V V; Levato, H; Saffe, C; Mallamaci, C; Lopez, C; Podest, F

    2015-01-01

    We report early optical linear polarization observations of two gamma-ray bursts made with the MASTER robotic telescope network. We found the minimum polar- ization for GRB150301B to be 8% at the beginning of the initial stage, whereas we detected no polarization for GRB150413A either at the rising branch or after the burst reached the power-law afterglow stage. This is the earliest measurement of the polarization (in cosmological rest frame) of gamma-ray bursts. The primary intent of the paper is to discover optical emission and publish extremely rare (unique) high- quality light curves of the prompt optical emission of gamma-ray bursts during the non-monotonic stage of their evolution. We report that our team has discovered the optical counterpart of one of the bursts, GRB150413A.

  19. Dynamics of the polar mesopause and lower thermosphere region as observed in the night airglow emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work utilizes night airglow emissions to deduce temperatures, dynamics, energetics, transport and photochemistry of the polar 80-110 km atmospheric region. The morphological behaviour of the polar 80-110 km region as seen in the night airglow emissions is best described by quasi regular to regular variations in the temperature and in the intensities of the emissions with periods ranging from minutes to a few days. Temperature amplitudes are seen from a few degrees up to ±50 K. Intensity changes up to several hundred percent may occur. Gravity waves from below are generally found to be present in the region, being responsible for much of the short period variations. The long period variations are seen to be related to circulation changes in the lower atmosphere. Stratospheric warmings are generally associated by a cooling of the 80-110 km region by a ratio approximately twice as large in amplitude as the heating at the 10 mbar level. The semidiurnal tide is found to be dominant with a peak to peak amplitude of about 5 K, in contrast to model calculations. Effects from geomagnetic phenomena on the energetics and dynamics of the region are not seen and, if present, have to be small or rare as compared to the influence from below. There is a mesopause temperature maximum at winter solstice. Pronounced differences in the day to day and seasonal behaviour of the odd oxygen associated nightglows at the North and South Pole are found. This may indicate fundamental differences at the two poles in the winter mesopause region circulation and energetics

  20. Broad Line Radio Galaxies Observed with Fermi-LAT: The Origin of the GeV Gamma-Ray Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, J.; /Waseda U., RISE; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Takahashi, Y.; /Waseda U., RISE; Cheung, C.C.; /Natl. Acad. Sci. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Hayashida, M.; /SLAC /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Grandi, P.; /Bologna Observ.; Burnett, T.H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Celotti, A.; /SISSA, Trieste; Fegan, S.J.; Fortin, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Maeda, K.; Nakamori, T.; /Waseda U., RISE; Taylor, G.B.; /New Mexico U.; Tosti, G.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Digel, S.W.; /SLAC /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; McConville, W.; /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U.; Finke, J.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; D' Ammando, F.; /IASF, Palermo /INAF, Rome

    2012-06-07

    We report on a detailed investigation of the {gamma}-ray emission from 18 broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) based on two years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. We confirm the previously reported detections of 3C 120 and 3C 111 in the GeV photon energy range; a detailed look at the temporal characteristics of the observed {gamma}-ray emission reveals in addition possible flux variability in both sources. No statistically significant {gamma}-ray detection of the other BLRGs was however found in the considered dataset. Though the sample size studied is small, what appears to differentiate 3C 111 and 3C 120 from the BLRGs not yet detected in {gamma}-rays is the particularly strong nuclear radio flux. This finding, together with the indications of the {gamma}-ray flux variability and a number of other arguments presented, indicate that the GeV emission of BLRGs is most likely dominated by the beamed radiation of relativistic jets observed at intermediate viewing angles. In this paper we also analyzed a comparison sample of high accretion-rate Seyfert 1 galaxies, which can be considered radio-quiet counterparts of BLRGs, and found none were detected in {gamma}-rays. A simple phenomenological hybrid model applied for the broad-band emission of the discussed radio-loud and radio-quiet type 1 active galaxies suggests that the relative contribution of the nuclear jets to the accreting matter is {ge} 1% on average for BLRGs, while {le} 0.1% for Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  1. Predawn enhancement of 6300-A emission observed near the plasmapause from the Isis-2 spacecraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, G. G.; Brace, L. H.; Whitteker, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    Data from several Isis-2 spacecraft passes are described in which the 6300-A atomic oxygen red line photometer mapped intensity steps resembling the predawn enhancement. Comparison with the electron density measured at the spacecraft indicates a plasmapause influence on the 6300-A emission rate, in that the intensity varies roughly inversely with the electron density at 1400 km. A simple calculation demonstrates the idea that field line opacity differences for photoelectrons are significant across the plasmapause. The measured electron temperatures are inadequate to account for the 6300-A excitation, thus confirming that it must arise from another mechanism.

  2. Observation of neutron emission in the process of X-pinch

    OpenAIRE

    Dalkarov, O. D.; Rusetskii, A. S.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Tilikin, I. N.

    2015-01-01

    The results of measuring the neutron flux in the process of the X-pinch are presented. The measurements were carried out using CR-39 track detectors. It was found that in the process of X-pinch recorded neutron emission over a wide energy range (from thermal to energies greater than 10 MeV) with an intensity of more than 108 neutrons per shot into 4{\\pi} sr solid angle (assuming isotropy of radiation and localizing the source in the "hot spot"). Data of track detectors sugge...

  3. Observation of neutron emission in the process of X-pinch

    CERN Document Server

    Dalkarov, O D; Pikuz, S A; Shelkovenko, T A; Tilikin, I N

    2015-01-01

    The results of measuring the neutron flux in the process of the X-pinch are presented. The measurements were carried out using CR-39 track detectors. It was found that in the process of X-pinch recorded neutron emission over a wide energy range (from thermal to energies greater than 10 MeV) with an intensity of more than 108 neutrons per shot into 4{\\pi} sr solid angle (assuming isotropy of radiation and localizing the source in the "hot spot"). Data of track detectors suggest that at the time of discharge produced fast neutrons are then slowed down and turned into thermal.

  4. IGM Emission Observations with the Cosmic Web Imager: II. Discovery of Extended, Kinematically-Linked Emission around SSA22 Lyman-alpha Blob 2

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, D Christopher; Matuszewski, Matt; Morrissey, Patrick; Rahman, Shahin; Moore, Anna; Steidel, Charles C; Matsuda, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    The intergalactic medium (IGM) is the dominant reservoir of baryons, delineates the large scale structure at low to moderate overdensities, and provides gas from which galaxies form and evolve. Simulations of a Cold Dark Matter (CDM) dominated universe predict that the IGM is distributed in a cosmic web of filaments, and that galaxies should form along and at the intersections of these filaments (Bond et al. 1994; Miralda-Escude et al. 1996). While observations of QSO absorption lines and the large scale distribution of galaxies have confirmed the CDM paradigm, the cosmic web has never been confirmed by direct imaging. Here we report the Lyman-alpha blob 2 (LAB2) in SSA22, with the Cosmic Web Imager. This is an integral field spectrograph optimized for low surface brightness, extended emission. With 22 hours of total source exposure, CWI has revealed that LAB2 has extended Lyman-alpha emission which is consistent with filaments. We perform tests to secure the robustness of this result, which relies on data wi...

  5. Applying an Inverse Model to Estimate Ammonia Emissions at Cattle Feedlots Using Three Different Observation-Based Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonkwiler, K. B.; Ham, J. M.; Nash, C.

    2014-12-01

    Accurately quantifying emissions of ammonia (NH3) from confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) is vital not only to the livestock industry, but essential to understanding nitrogen cycling along the Front Range of Colorado, USA, where intensive agriculture, urban sprawl, and pristine ecosystems (e.g., Rocky Mtn Nat'l Park) lie within 100-km of each other. Most observation-based techniques for estimating NH3 emissions can be expensive and highly technical. Many methods rely on concentration observations on location, which implicitly depends on weather conditions. A system for sampling NH3 using on-site weather data was developed to allow remote measurement of NH3 in a simple, cost-effective way. These systems use passive diffusive cartridges (Radiello, Sigma-Aldrich) that provide time-averaged concentrations representative of a typical two-week deployment. Cartridge exposure is robotically managed so they are only visible when winds are 1.4 m/s or greater from the direction of the CAFO. These concentration data can be coupled with stability parameters (measured on-site) in a simple inverse model to estimate emissions (FIDES, UMR Environnement et Grandes Cultures). Few studies have directly compared emissions estimates of NH3 using concentration data obtained from multiple measurement systems at different temporal and spatial scales. Therefore, in the summer and autumn of 2014, several conditional sampler systems were deployed at a 25,000-head cattle feedlot concomitant with an open-path infrared laser (GasFinder2, Boreal Laser Inc.) and a Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (CRDS) (G1103, Picarro Inc.) which each measured instantaneous NH3 concentrations. This study will test the sampler technology by first comparing concentration data from the three different methods. In livestock research, it is common to estimate NH3 emissions by using such instantaneous data in a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLs) model (WindTrax, Thunder Beach Sci.) Considering this, NH3 fluxes from the inverse model (FIDES) using all three datasets will be compared to emissions from the bLS model (WindTrax) using only high speed data (laser; CRDS). Results may lend further validity to the conditional sampler approach for more easily and accurately monitoring NH3 fluxes from CAFOs and other strong areal sources.

  6. Investigating the differential emission measure and energetics of microflares with combined SDO/AIA and RHESSI observations

    CERN Document Server

    Inglis, A R

    2014-01-01

    An important question in solar physics is whether solar microflares, the smallest currently observable flare events in X-rays, possess the same energetic properties as large flares. Recent surveys have suggested that microflares may be less efficient particle accelerators than large flares, and hence contribute less nonthermal energy, which may have implications for coronal heating mechanisms. We therefore explore the energetic properties of microflares by combining Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) and X-ray measurements. We present forward-fitting differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of 10 microflares. The fitting is constrained by combining, for the first time, high temperature RHESSI observations and flux data from SDO/AIA. Two fitting models are tested for the DEM; a Gaussian distribution and a uniform DEM profile. A Gaussian fit proved unable to explain the observations for any of the