WorldWideScience

Sample records for visible spectral range

  1. Silicon nitride PhC nanocavities as versatile platform for visible spectral range devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanello, F.; Martiradonna, L.; Qualtieri, A.; Stomeo, T.; Grande, M.; Pompa, P. P.; Cingolani, R.; Bramati, A.; De Vittorio, M.

    2012-06-01

    We propose silicon nitride two-dimensional photonic crystal resonators as flexible platform to realize photonic devices based on spontaneous emission engineering of nanoemitters in the visible spectral range. The versatility of our approach is demonstrated by coupling the two dipole-like modes of a closed band gap H1 nanocavity with: (i) DNA strands marked with Cyanine 3 organic dyes, (ii) antibodies bounded to fluorescent proteins and (iii) colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals localized in the maximum of the resonant electric field. The experimental results are in good agreement with the numerical simulations, highlighting the good coupling of the nanocavities with both organic and inorganic light emitters.

  2. Continuous Spatial Tuning of Laser Emissions in a Full Visible Spectral Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Yun Jeong

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve a continuous tuning of laser emission, the authors designed and fabricated three types of cholesteric liquid crystal cells with pitch gradient, a wedge cell with positive slope, a wedge cell with negative slope, and a parallel cell. The length of the cholesteric liquid crystal pitch could be elongated up to 10 nm, allowing the lasing behavior of continuous or discontinuous spatial tuning determined by the boundary conditions of the cholesteric liquid crystal cell. In the wedge cell with positive slope, the authors demonstrated a continuous spatial laser tuning in the near full visible spectral range, with a tuning resolution less than 1 nm by pumping with only a single 355 nm laser beam. This continuous tuning behavior is due to the fact that the concentration of pitch gradient matches the fixed helical pitch determined by the cell thickness. This characteristic continuous spatial laser tuning could be confirmed again by pumping with a 532 nm laser beam, over 90 nm in the visible spectral range. The scheme of the spatial laser tuning in the wedge cell bearing a pitch gradient enabled a route to designing small-sized optical devices that allow for a wide tunability of single-mode laser emissions.

  3. Broadband black phosphorus optical modulator in visible to mid-infrared spectral range

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Rui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Yang, Ruinong; Yang, Bingchao; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Jiyang

    2015-01-01

    Black phosphorous (BP), a two-dimensional (2D) material, has a direct bandgap, which fills up the bandgap lacuna left by graphene topological insulators and transition-metal dichalcogenides because of its dependence on the layers and applied strains. Theoretically, the direct and tunable band gap indicates the broadband applications in optoelectronics with high efficiencies in the spectral range from visible to mid-infrared. Here, a BP broadband optical modulator is experimentally constructed and the passively modulated lasers at 639 nm (red), 1.06 um (near-infrared) and 2.1 um (mid-infrared) are realized by using the BP optical modulator as the saturable absorber in bulk lasers. The obtained results provide a promising alternative for rare broadband optical modulators and broaden the application range of BP in photonics.

  4. Detector calibration in the spectral range from vacuum-ultraviolet to visible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electrotechnical Laboratory is responsible for establishing optical units in Japan. Optical units are classified into photometric units which are weighted by human eye responsivity such as candela and radiometric units which are pure physical units such as watt. In this report, the overview of the techniques to determine the radiometric scales for detectors in the spectral region from ultraviolet to visible is described. The characteristics of semiconductor photodiodes as the primary standard detector and rare gas ionization chambers as another example of the primary standard detector are discussed. For characterizing the response of detectors, quantum efficiency or responsivity is used. The definitions of both are given. In order to realize a detector standard, the calibration with a primary standard detector the use of a primary standard radiation source and an efficiency-evaluated monochromatizing component, or the extension of spectral range of an existing detector standard by using a thermal detector is carried out. Noble gas ionization chambers as the primary standard detector in vacuum ultraviolet region, the self-calibration method, and semiconductor photodiodes as the absolute detector are described. (K.I.)

  5. Radiative transfer model STORM for full Stokes vector calculations in the visible and near infrared spectral range

    OpenAIRE

    Böttger, U.; Preusker, R.

    2006-01-01

    Based on the Matrix-Operator Method the radiative transfer code STORM (STOkes vector Radiative transfer Model) is introduced, which was developed in a joint project of DLR and Institut f{ü}r Weltraumwissenschaften-Freie Universität Berlin. STORM calculates the Stokes parameters (I, Q, U, V) in a plane parallel, multi layered atmosphere in the visible and near infrared spectral range. The scattering characteristics of aerosols are determined by Mie theory. The surface represents a Lambertian r...

  6. Radiative transfer model STORM for full Stokes vector calculations in the visible and near infrared spectral range

    OpenAIRE

    Böttger, U.; Preusker, R.

    2006-01-01

    Based on the Matrix-Operator Method the radiative transfer code STORM (STOkes vector Radiative transfer Model) is introduced, which was developed in a joint project of DLR and Institut f{ü}r Weltraumwissenschaften-Freie Universität Berlin. STORM calculates the Stokes parameters (I, Q, U, V) in a plane parallel, multi layered atmosphere in the visible and near infrared spectral range. The scattering characteristics of aerosols are determined by Mie theory. The surface repr...

  7. Blackbody-based calibration for temperature calculations in the visible and near-IR spectral ranges using a spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahla Keyvan; Rodney Rossow; Carlos Romero [University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO (United States). Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Center for Artificial Intelligence in Engineering and Education

    2006-03-15

    This paper presents, the results of a method used to create a blackbody-based referenced calibration curve for a spectrometer in the visible and near-IR range. This method would allow the use of optical temperature measurements in high temperature furnaces when distance, environment, and emissivity effects are not accurately known. A probe containing a lens connected to a fiber-optic cable is inserted into a furnace and aimed toward a hot wall source. Spectral intensity data is fed back to a spectrometer and then to a monitoring computer. Initial data is taken along with another method to measure the source temperature, usually a thermocouple or IR-gun. The spectral data is compared to the blackbody intensities generated from the source temperature to create the calibration curve. This calibration curve is then used to correct intensities for temperature calculations using a spectrometer where furnace conditions are similar to those of the calibration data. This calibration method provides much more accurate temperature measurement results than the common practice of using a halogen reference. The results in the visible range compare favorably with those taken in the near-IR range under the same conditions. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Evidence for graphene plasmons in the visible spectral range probed by molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, Philipp; Severin, Nikolai; Benson, Oliver; Rabe, Jrgen P

    2014-01-01

    Graphene is considered to be plasmon active only up to the infrared based on combined tight binding model and random phase approximation calculations. Here we show that the optical properties of graphene as measured by ellipsometry and simulated by density functional theory imply the existence of strongly localized graphene plasmons in the visible with a line width of 0.1 eV. Using small emitters that provide the high wavevectors necessary to excite graphene plasmons at optical frequencies we demonstrate graphene plasmon induced excitation enhancement by nearly 3 orders of magnitude.

  9. Analysis of global water vapour trends from satellite measurements in the visible spectral range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mieruch

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Global water vapour total column amounts have been retrieved from spectral data provided by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME flying on ERS-2, which was launched in April 1995, and the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY onboard ENVISAT launched in March 2002. For this purpose the Air Mass Corrected Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (AMC-DOAS approach has been used. The combination of the data from both instruments provides us with a long-term global data set spanning more than 11 years with the potential of extension up to 2020 by GOME-2 data on MetOp.

    Using linear and non-linear methods from time series analysis and standard statistics the trends of H2O columns and their errors have been calculated. In this study, factors affecting the trend such as the length of the time series, the magnitude of the variability of the noise, and the autocorrelation of the noise are investigated. Special emphasis has been placed on the calculation of the statistical significance of the observed trends, which reveal significant local changes from −5% per year to +5% per year. These significant trends are distributed over the whole globe. Increasing trends have been calculated for Greenland, East Europe, Siberia and Oceania, whereas decreasing trends have been observed for the northwest USA, Central America, Amazonia, Central Africa and the Arabian Peninsular.

  10. Photoluminescent (CdSe)ZnS quantum dot-polymethylmethacrylate polymer composite thin films in the visible spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We synthesized (CdSe)ZnS quantum dot (QD)-polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) polymer composite and fabricated QD-polymer composite films. We produced the CdSe and (CdSe)ZnS QDs by direct colloidal chemical synthesis and the surface-passivation method-an overcoating of the dots with a larger-bandgap material. PMMA is transparent in the visible spectral range and was chosen as the embedding matrix for QDs. A 28%(wt/wt) of PMMA in MMA was the most appropriate concentration to produce a film of good quality and maximize the solubility of quantum dots without phase separation of the QDs from the matrix. We fabricated green or red light emitting (CdSe)ZnS QD-PMMA polymer composite film by combining the green or red light emitting (CdSe)ZnS dots with PMMA of high optical transparency in the visible region and spin-coating the composite solution. The fabricated green light emitting (CdSe)ZnS-PMMA composite film had a good quantum yield of 40% and a narrow emission band at 543 nm with a full width at half maximum of ∼35 nm. A white light emitting device can be fabricated by combining our green/red light emitting QD-polymer composites with a blue light emitting LED as an excitation source. Our QD-polymer composites can be applied to flexible coloured filters, large-area coloured wall-papers and full colour displays

  11. Asymmetric one-dimensional photonic crystal for optical sensing in the visible spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gas sensor based on an asymmetric one-dimensional (1D) photonic band gap structure with one defect layer was designed and fabricated through layer-by-layer deposition of spin-coated poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) and vacuum-deposited As2S3. Initially, the thickness variations, Δd, were determined of the thin films resulting from the poly methyl methacrylate exposure to chloroform vapor in the concentration range 100 – 9000 ppm. It was found that the value of Δd depends on the gas concentration and the exposure time. A two-layer structure was prepared consisting of PMMA and vacuum-deposited As2S3. Further, the permeability of thin As2S3 films to chloroform vapors was investigated. The asymmetric photonic structure consisted of 11 alternating layers of As2S3 and PMMA. The defect PMMA layer was located before the last high-refractive-index film of chalcogenide glass. The thickness of the defect layer of PMMA was pre-calculated so that the pass band be centered at the wavelength of 550 nm. An offset was observed of the position of the pass band to the larger wavelengths after exposure to chloroform vapor. The multilayered structure proposed is promising for optical sensor applications.

  12. TiN/(Al,Sc)N metal/dielectric superlattices and multilayers as hyperbolic metamaterials in the visible spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bivas; Naik, Gururaj V.; Saber, Sammy; Akatay, Cem; Stach, Eric A.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Sands, Timothy D.

    2014-09-01

    Hyperbolic metamaterials (HMMs) based on metal/dielectric multilayers have garnered attention in recent years due to their extraordinary optical properties emanating from hyperbolic dispersion of isofrequency surfaces. We have developed a new class of epitaxial metal/dielectric superlattice HMMs based on transition-metal nitrides—titanium nitride (TiN) and aluminum scandium nitride (AlxSc1-xN)—that could potentially lead to better HMM performance without requiring any traditional plasmonic materials such as gold (Au) and silver (Ag). Our results suggest that the TiN/(Al,Sc)N superlattices grown on (001) MgO substrates are nominally monocrystalline and pseudomorphic, exhibiting sharp interfaces with interface roughnesses of about one to two atomic layers. HMMs deposited on (0001) sapphire substrates grow in 111 orientation with local epitaxy inherent to individual grains, while on (001) Si substrates, the HMMs are polycrystalline. The HMM properties extracted with effective medium theory along with nonlocal field corrections indicate that the TiN/(Al,Sc)N superlattices grown on MgO substrates have both transverse negative (type-I) and transverse positive (type-II) hyperbolic dispersion of the isofrequency surfaces in the visible to near-IR spectral regions. The carrier concentration of TiN layers was varied deliberately by tuning the deposition conditions, thereby shifting the spectral range of both type-I and type-II HMM dispersions. The epitaxial thin-film-based HMMs developed here mark the beginning of a new generation of optical metamaterials with enhanced electromagnetic properties.

  13. Radiative transfer model STORM for full Stokes vector calculations in the visible and near infrared spectral range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Böttger

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Matrix-Operator Method the radiative transfer code STORM (STOkes vector Radiative transfer Model is introduced, which was developed in a joint project of DLR and Institut f{ü}r Weltraumwissenschaften-Freie Universität Berlin. STORM calculates the Stokes parameters (I, Q, U, V in a plane parallel, multi layered atmosphere in the visible and near infrared spectral range. The scattering characteristics of aerosols are determined by Mie theory. The surface represents a Lambertian reflector or a wind ruffled water surface described by Cox-Munk model. The results of one calculation are the upward and downward directed Stokes parameters for one wavelength at a desired number of sun incident and viewing angles at varying altitudes in the principal plane and other azimuth angles. STORM is applied for an analysis in view of designing downward looking Earth observing optical remote sensing systems and values of the degree of polarization are presented as generic basis for remote sensing system design and data processing.

  14. The interaction of alcohol radicals with human hemoglobin. Pt. 1. Spectral properties of hemoglobin in the visible range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous deoxyhemoglobin solutions (2 mg/ml) were gamma-irradiated by a 60Co source in the presence of methanol, ethanol, 1-butanol and t-butanol under N2O or argon. The effects of the interaction of the particular alcohol radical species with hemoglobin were determined according to the detected spectral alterations in the visible range. The amounts of stable final products in the form of methemoglobin (MetHb) and the sum of hemichromes and cholehemichromes (Hemichr) were estimated in irradiated preparations. For preparations irradiated under N2O, the radiation yield for MetHb formation was three-fold lower in the presence of ethanol and 1-butanol [G(MetHb) = 0.33[ compared with preparations irradiated in the presence of t-butanol or without alcohol [G(MetHb) = 1.00[. The yield of hemichromes and cholehemichromes in preparations irradiated under N2O increased in the order: ethanol (G = 0.38), 1-butanol (B = 0.52), t-butanol (G = 0.59), and in the absence of alcohol (G 0.72). The high effectivity of t-butanol radicals for iron oxidation and Hb destruction is apparently due to their oxidative properties, compared with the other radicals. It was also shown that ethanol radicals reduce MetHb 10 times more effectively [G(Fe(II)) = 2.5[ compared with t-butanol radicals [G(Fe(II)) = 0.24[. For samples irradiated under argon all the observed changes were similar, regardless of the presence of alcohols. This effect can be attributed to reconstruction reactions of Hb molecules in the presence of both oxidizing (OH or t-but.) and reducing agents (e-aq). The following sequence of effectivities of water radiolysis products and secondary alcohol radicals for hemoglobin destruction has been identified: meth., eth. ? 1-but. ? e-aq ? t-but. ? .OH. (orig.)

  15. Enhanced optical transmission through a star-shaped bull's eye at dual resonant-bands in UV and the visible spectral range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Tavakol; Khazaeinezhad, Reza; Jung, Woohyun; Joo, Boram; Kong, Byung-Joo; Oh, Kyunghwan

    2015-07-13

    Dual resonant bands in UV and the visible range were simultaneously observed in the enhanced optical transmission (EOT) through star-shaped plasmonic structures. EOTs through four types of polygonal bull's eyes with a star aperture surrounded by the concentric star grooves were analyzed and compared for 3, 4, 5, and 6 corners, using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. In contrast to plasmonic resonances in the visible range, the UV-band resonance intensity was found to scale with the number of corners, which is related with higher order multipole interactions. Spectral positions and relative intensities of the dual resonances were analyzed parametrically to find optimal conditions to maximize EOT in UV-visible dual bands. PMID:26191917

  16. Optical, spectral and phase-matching properties of BIBO, BBO and LBO crystals for optical parametric oscillation in the visible and near-infrared wavelength ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, R.; Major, A.

    2013-03-01

    The phase-matching properties of BIBO, BBO and LBO crystals for optical parametric oscillators (OPO) with wavelength tuning in the visible and near infrared spectral ranges were numerically investigated. The phase-matching configurations with a pump wavelength of 520 nm that provide the largest effective nonlinearity in each crystal were considered and compared. In addition, dispersive characteristics, including the group velocity mismatch and group velocity dispersion, which are of significant importance in femtosecond OPOs, were calculated. Finally, the attainable gain bandwidths for each crystal were estimated.

  17. Optical, spectral and phase-matching properties of BIBO, BBO and LBO crystals for optical parametric oscillation in the visible and near-infrared wavelength ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phase-matching properties of BIBO, BBO and LBO crystals for optical parametric oscillators (OPO) with wavelength tuning in the visible and near infrared spectral ranges were numerically investigated. The phase-matching configurations with a pump wavelength of 520 nm that provide the largest effective nonlinearity in each crystal were considered and compared. In addition, dispersive characteristics, including the group velocity mismatch and group velocity dispersion, which are of significant importance in femtosecond OPOs, were calculated. Finally, the attainable gain bandwidths for each crystal were estimated. (paper)

  18. Ion-induced effects in GEM and GEM/MHSP gaseous photomultipliers for the UV and the visible spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the progress in the study of cascaded GEM and GEM/MHSP gas avalanche photomultipliers operating at atmospheric pressure, with CsI and bialkali photocathodes. They have single-photon sensitivity, ns time resolution and good localization properties. We summarize operational aspects and results, with the highlight of a high-gain stable gated operation of a visible-light device. Of particular importance are the results of a recent ion-backflow reduction study in different cascaded multipliers, affecting the detector's stability and the photocathode's lifetime. We report on the significant progress in ion-blocking and provide first results on bialkali-photocathode aging under gas multiplication

  19. Ion-induced effects in GEM & GEM/MHSP gaseous photomultipliers for the UV and the visible spectral range

    CERN Document Server

    Breskin, Amos; Lyashenko, A; Chechik, R; Amaro, F D; Maia, J M; Veloso, J F C; Dos Santos, J M F

    2005-01-01

    We report on the progress in the study of cascaded GEM and GEM/MHSP gas avalanche photomultipliers operating at atmospheric pressure, with CsI and bialkali photocathodes. They have single-photon sensitivity, ns time resolution and good localization properties. We summarize operational aspects and results, with the highlight of a high-gain stable gated operation of a visible-light device. Of particular importance are the results of a recent ion-backflow reduction study in different cascaded multipliers, affecting the detector's stability and the photocathode's liftime. We report on the significant progress in ion-blocking and provide first results on bialkali-photocathode aging under gas multiplication.

  20. Aerosol radiative effects in the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared spectral ranges using long-term aerosol data series over the Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mateos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the aerosol radiative properties is a crucial challenge for climate change studies. This study aims to provide a complete characterization of aerosol radiative effects in different spectral ranges within the shortwave (SW solar spectrum. For this purpose, long-term datasets of aerosol properties from six AERONET stations located in the Iberian Peninsula (Southwestern Europe are analyzed in term of climatology characterization and trends. Aerosol information is used as input to the libRadtran model in order to determine the aerosol radiative effect at the surface in the ultraviolet (AREUV, visible (AREVIS, near-infrared (ARENIR, and the entire SW range (ARESW under cloud-free conditions. Over the whole Iberian Peninsula, aerosol radiative effects in the different spectral ranges are: ?1.1 UV ?2, ?5.7 VIS ?2, ?2.8 NIR ?2, and ?9.5 SW ?2. The four variables showed positive statistically significant trends between 2004 and 2012, e.g., ARESW increased +3.6 W m?2 per decade. This fact is linked to the decrease in the aerosol load, which presents a trend of ?0.04 per unit of aerosol optical depth at 500 nm per decade, hence a reduction of aerosol effect on solar radiation at the surface is seen. Monthly means of ARE show a seasonal pattern with larger values in spring and summer. The aerosol forcing efficiency (AFE, ARE per unit of aerosol optical depth, is also evaluated in the four spectral ranges. AFE exhibits a dependence on single scattering albedo and a weaker one on ngstrm exponent. AFE is larger (in absolute value for small and absorbing particles. The contributions of the UV, VIS, and NIR ranges to the SW efficiency vary with the aerosol types. Aerosol size determines the fractions of AFEVIS/AFESW and AFENIR/AFESW. VIS range is the dominant region for all types, although non-absorbing large particles cause a more equal contribution of VIS and NIR intervals. The AFEUV / AFESW ratio shows a higher contribution for absorbing fine particles.

  1. Spectral Aerosol Extinction (SpEx: a new instrument for in situ ambient aerosol extinction measurements across the UV/visible wavelength range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Jordan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new instrument for the measurement of in situ ambient aerosol extinction over the 300700 nm wavelength range, the Spectral Aerosol Extinction (SpEx instrument. This measurement capability is envisioned to complement existing in situ instrumentation, allowing for simultaneous measurement of the evolution of aerosol optical, chemical, and physical characteristics in the ambient environment. In this work, a detailed description of the instrument is provided along with characterization tests performed in the laboratory. Measured spectra of NO2 and polystyrene latex spheres (PSLs agreed well with theoretical calculations. Good agreement was also found with simultaneous aerosol extinction measurements at 450, 530, and 630 nm using CAPS PMex instruments in a series of 22 tests including non-absorbing compounds, dusts, soot, and black and brown carbon analogs. SpEx can more accurately distinguish the presence of brown carbon from other absorbing aerosol due to its 300 nm lower wavelength limit compared to measurements limited to visible wavelengths. Extinction spectra obtained with SpEx contain more information than can be conveyed by a simple power law fit (typically represented by ngstrm Exponents. Planned future improvements aim to lower detection limits and ruggedize the instrument for mobile operation.

  2. An Impurity Emission Survey in the near UV and Visible Spectral Ranges of Electron Cyclotron Heated (ECH) Plasma in the TJ-II Stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a near-ultraviolet and visible spectroscopic survey (220-600 nm) of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heated plasmas created in the TJ-II stellarator, with central electron temperatures up to 2 keV and central electron densities up to 1.7 x 10 ''19 m''-3. Approximately 1200 lines from thirteen elements have been identified. The purpose of the work is to identify the principal impurities and spectral lines present in TJ-II plasmas, as well as their possible origin to search for transitions from highly ionised ions. This work will act as a base for identifying suitable transitions for following the evolution of impurities under different operating regimens and multiplet systems for line polarisation studies. It is intended to use the database creates as a spectral line reference for comparing spectra under different operating and plasma heating regimes. (Author)

  3. An Impurity Emission Survey in the near UV and Visible Spectral Ranges of Electron Cyclotron Heated (ECH) Plasma in the TJ-II Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.

    2001-07-01

    We report on a near-ultraviolet and visible spectroscopic survey (220-600 nm) of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heated plasmas created in the TJ-II stellarator, with central electron temperatures up to 2 keV and central electron densities up to 1.7 x 10 ''19 m''-3. Approximately 1200 lines from thirteen elements have been identified. The purpose of the work is to identify the principal impurities and spectral lines present in TJ-II plasmas, as well as their possible origin to search for transitions from highly ionised ions. This work will act as a base for identifying suitable transitions for following the evolution of impurities under different operating regimens and multiplet systems for line polarisation studies. It is intended to use the database creates as a spectral line reference for comparing spectra under different operating and plasma heating regimes. (Author)

  4. Temporal behavior of light-emission in the visible spectral range from a Ti-K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-H cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, R.L. [BlackLight Power, Inc., Cranbury, NJ (United States)

    2001-04-01

    We report the generation of a hydrogen plasma and extreme ultraviolet emission as recorded via the hydrogen Balmer emission in the visible range. Typically, a hydrogen plasma is generated and the emission of extreme ultraviolet light from hydrogen gas is achieved via a discharge at high voltage, a high-power inductively coupled plasma, or a plasma created and heated to extreme temperatures by RF coupling (e.g. >10{sup 6} K) with confinement provided by a toroidal magnetic field. The observed plasma formed at low temperatures (e.g. {approx_equal} 10{sup 3} K) from atomic hydrogen generated at a tungsten filament that heated a titanium dissociator coated with potassium carbonate. The temporal behavior of the plasma was recorded via hydrogen Balmer {alpha} line emission when all power into the cell was terminated. A 2 s decay of the plasma was observed after a fast decay of the electric field to zero. The persistence of emission following the removal of all of the power to the cell indicates that a novel chemical power source is present that forms an energetic plasma in hydrogen. No unusual behavior was observed with the control sodium carbonate. (author)

  5. Analysis of visible spectral lines in LHD helium discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, visible spectral lines in LHD helium discharges are analyzed and it was found that they could be well fitted with gaussian profile. The results reveal a simple mechanism of helium atom recycling. Ion temperatures were also derived from the fitting. A typical value of the ion temperature obtained was about 6 eV. (author)

  6. Globally integrated measurements of the Earth's visible spectral albedo

    CERN Document Server

    Montanes-Rodriguez, P; Goode, P R; Hickey, J; Koonin, S E

    2005-01-01

    We report spectroscopic observations of the earthshine reflected from the Moon. By applying our photometry methodology to spectroscopy, we were able to precisely determine the Earth's reflectance, and its variation as a function of wavelength through a single night as the Earth rotates. These data imply that planned regular monitoring of earthshine spectra will yield valuable, new inputs for climate models, which would be complementary to those from the more standard broadband measurements of satellite platforms. The mean spectroscopic albedo over the visible is consistent with simultaneous broadband photometric measurements. We found no evidence for an appreciable "red" or "vegetation edge" in the Earth's spectral albedo, and no evidence for changes in this spectral region (700 -740 nm) over the 40 degrees of Earth's rotation covered by our observations.

  7. [Visible-NIR spectral feature of citrus greening disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiu-hua; Li, Min-zan; Won Suk, Lee; Reza, Ehsani; Ashish, Ratn Mishra

    2014-06-01

    Citrus greening (Huanglongbing, or HLB) is a devastating disease caused by Candidatus liberibacter which uses psyllids as vectors. It has no cure till now, and poses a huge threat to citrus industry around the world. In order to diagnose, assess and further control this disease, it is of great importance to first find a quick and effective way to detect it. Spectroscopy method, which was widely considered as a fast and nondestructive way, was adopted here to conduct a preliminary exploration of disease characteristics. In order to explore the spectral differences between the healthy and HLB infected leaves and canopies, this study measured the visible-NIR spectral reflectance of their leaves and canopies under lab and field conditions, respectively. The original spectral data were firstly preprocessed with smoothing (or moving average) and cluster average procedures, and then the first derivatives were also calculated to determine the red edge position (REP). In order to solve the multi-peak phenomenon problem, two interpolation methods (three-point Lagrangian interpolation and four-point linear extrapolation) were adopted to calculate the REP for each sample. The results showed that there were, obvious differences at the visible & NIR spectral reflectance between the healthy and HLB infected classes. Comparing with the healthy reflectance, the HLB reflectance was higher at the visible bands because of the yellowish symptoms on the infected leaves, and lower at NIR bands because the disease blocked water transportation to leaves. But the feature at NIR bands was easily affected by environmental factors such as light, background, etc. The REP was also a potential indicator to distinguish those two classes. The average REP was slowly moving toward red bands while the infection level was getting higher. The gap of the average REPs between the healthy and HLB classes reached to a maximum of 20 nm. Even in the dataset with relatively lower variation, the classification accuracy of threshold segmentation method by the REP could reach to more than 90%. The four-point linear extrapolation method had slightly better result than the three-point Lagrangian interpolation method. This study provided useful theoretical foundation to detect HLB by spectral reflectance. PMID:25358163

  8. Surface plasmon coupled fluorescence in the ultraviolet and visible spectral regions using zinc thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Kadir; Previte, Michael J R; Zhang, Yongxia; Geddes, Chris D

    2008-10-01

    The use of zinc thin films deposited onto glass supports for surface plasmon coupled fluorescence (SPCF) over a broad 200 nm wavelength range is demonstrated. Fresnel calculations performed in the ultraviolet and visible spectral range are predicted to generate surface plasmon modes in 30 nm zinc thin films. In this spectral range, the extent of coupling of light to zinc thin films was shown to be significant as compared to similar aluminum, gold, and silver thin films. The experimental demonstration of SPCF using 30 nm zinc thin films in the ultraviolet and visible spectral regions was undertaken using three different fluorophores 2-AP, POPOP, and FITC, respectively. Surface plasmon coupled fluorescence from zinc thin films was p-polarized and highly directional with lambda max conferred at an angle of 58, 68, and 60 degrees for FITC, POPOP, and 2-AP, respectively. s-Polarized emission from zinc thin films was negligible for all fluorophores except for a sample spin coated from a 10% PVA solution, which resulted in significant s-polarized emission due to the generation of waveguide modes. The experimental results are consistent with reflectivity curves that are theoretically predicted using Fresnel calculations. Given the growing use and utility of plasmon-enhanced fluorescence in the analytical and biological sciences, our findings will serve as a useful tool for workers in the ultraviolet and visible spectral regions. PMID:18763808

  9. A Molecular Chameleon: Reversible pH- and Cation-Induced Control of the Optical Properties of Phthalocyanine-Based Complexes in the Visible and Near-Infrared Spectral Ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonova, Evgeniya A; Martynov, Alexander G; Nefedov, Sergey E; Kirakosyan, Gayane A; Gorbunova, Yulia G; Tsivadze, Aslan Yu

    2016-03-01

    A series of novel nonperipherally substituted tetra-15-crown-5-dibutoxyoxanthrenocyanines (H2, Mg, Zn), acting as chameleons with the unique properties of switchable absorption and emission in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral range have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction. The attachment of 15-crown-5-?-dibutoxyoxanthreno moieties to phthalocyanine is responsible for the high solubility of the resulting molecules and the red shift of the Q band to the NIR region and offers a unique possibility for postsynthetic modification of the optical properties of the molecules. Both aggregation of phthalocyanine and its participation in an acid-base equilibrium strongly alter their optical properties. For example, the absorption of complexes can be reversibly tuned from 686 up to 1028 nm because of the cation-induced formation of supramolecular dimers or subsequent protonation of meso-N atoms orf macrocycle, in contrast to peripherally substituted tetra-15-crown-5-phthalocyanines without oxanthrene moieties. The reversibility of these processes can be controlled by the addition of [2.2.2]cryptand or amines. All investigated compounds exhibit fluorescence with moderate quantum yield, which can also be switched between the ON and OFF states by the action of similar agents. PMID:26910047

  10. Visible spectral imager for occultation and nightglow (VISION) for the PICASSO Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saari, Heikki; Näsilä, Antti; Holmlund, Christer; Mannila, Rami; Näkki, Ismo; Ojanen, Harri J.; Fussen, Didier; Pieroux, Didier; Demoulin, Philippe; Dekemper, Emmanuel; Vanhellemont, Filip

    2015-10-01

    PICASSO - A PICo-satellite for Atmospheric and Space Science Observations is an ESA project led by the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, in collaboration with VTT, Clyde Space Ltd. (UK), and the Centre Spatial de Liège (BE). VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd. will deliver the Visible Spectral Imager for Occultation and Nightglow (VISION) for the PICASSO mission. The VISION targets primarily the observation of the Earth's atmospheric limb during orbital Sun occultation. By assessing the radiation absorption in the Chappuis band for different tangent altitudes, the vertical profile of the ozone is retrieved. A secondary objective is to measure the deformation of the solar disk so that stratospheric and mesospheric temperature profiles are retrieved by inversion of the refractive raytracing problem. Finally, occasional full spectral observations of polar auroras are also foreseen. The VISION design realized with commercial of the shelf (CoTS) parts is described. The VISION instrument is small, lightweight (~500 g), Piezo-actuated Fabry-Perot Interferometer (PFPI) tunable spectral imager operating in the visible and near-infrared (430 - 800 nm). The spectral resolution over the whole wavelength range will be better than 10 nm @ FWHM. VISION has is 2.5° x 2.5° total field of view and it delivers maximum 2048 x 2048 pixel spectral images. The sun image size is around 0.5° i.e. ~500 pixels. To enable fast spectral data image acquisition VISION can be operated with programmable image sizes. VTT has previously developed PFPI tunable filter based AaSI Spectral Imager for the Aalto-1 Finnish CubeSat. In VISION the requirements of the spectral resolution and stability are tighter than in AaSI. Therefore the optimization of the of the PFPI gap control loop for the operating temperature range and vacuum conditions has to be improved. VISION optical, mechanical and electrical design is described.

  11. Measuring black carbon spectral extinction in the visible and infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. J. A.; Peters, D. M.; McPheat, R.; Lukanihins, S.; Grainger, R. G.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents measurements of the spectral extinction of black carbon aerosol from 400 nm to 15 ?m. The aerosol was generated using a Miniature Combustion Aerosol Standard soot generator and then allowed to circulate in an aerosol cell where its extinction was measured using a grating spectrometer in the visible and a Fourier transform spectrometer in the infrared. Size distribution, number concentration, and mass extinction cross sections have also been obtained using single-particle aerosol samplers. A mean mass extinction cross section at 550 nm of 8.3 1.6 m2 g-1 is found which, assuming a reasonable single scatter albedo of 0.2, corresponds to a mass absorption cross section of 6.6 1.3 m2 g-1. This compares well with previously reported literature values. Computer analysis of electron microscope images of the particles provides independent confirmation of the size distribution as well as fractal parameters of the black carbon aerosol. The aerosol properties presented in this work are representative of very fresh, uncoated black carbon aerosol. After atmospheric processing of such aerosols (which could include mixing with other constituents and structural changes), different optical properties would be expected.

  12. HIGHLY SENSITIVE LASER SPECTROMETERS FOR NEAR INFRARED AND VISIBLE RANGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Stasheuski

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser spectrometers for registration of luminescent signals with nanosecond temporal resolution are presented. The versatile spectrometer is capable to operate with up to tenth of nanometer resolution in wide spectral range. The specialized spectrometer for singlet oxygen luminescence measuring in vitro and in vivo possesses unique sensitivity in the near infrared region. Experimental results confirming high technical capacities of the setups are presented.

  13. The refractive index of human hemoglobin in the visible range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because the refractive index of hemoglobin in the visible range is sensitive to the hemoglobin concentration, optical investigations of hemoglobin are important for medical diagnostics and treatment. Direct measurements of the refractive index are, however, challenging; few such measurements have previously been reported, especially in a wide wavelength range. We directly measured the refractive index of human deoxygenated and oxygenated hemoglobin for nine wavelengths between 400 and 700 nm for the hemoglobin concentrations up to 140 g l-1. This paper analyzes the results and suggests a set of model functions to calculate the refractive index depending on the concentration. At all wavelengths, the measured values of the refractive index depended on the concentration linearly. Analyzing the slope of the lines, we determined the specific refraction increments, derived a set of model functions for the refractive index depending on the concentration, and compared our results with those available in the literature. Based on the model functions, we further calculated the refractive index at the physiological concentration within the erythrocytes of 320 g l-1. The results can be used to calculate the refractive index in the visible range for arbitrary concentrations provided that the refractive indices depend on the concentration linearly.

  14. The refractive index of human hemoglobin in the visible range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhernovaya, O; Tuchin, V [International Research-Educational Center of Optical Technologies for Industry and Medicine ' Photonics' , Saratov State University, 83 Astrakhanskaya str., 410012 Saratov (Russian Federation); Sydoruk, O [Optical and Semiconductor Devices Group, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, South Kensington Campus, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Douplik, A, E-mail: alexandre.douplik@aot.uni-erlangen.de [Medical Photonics Engineering Group, Chair of Photonic Technologies, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Paul-Gordan-Strasse 3, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-07-07

    Because the refractive index of hemoglobin in the visible range is sensitive to the hemoglobin concentration, optical investigations of hemoglobin are important for medical diagnostics and treatment. Direct measurements of the refractive index are, however, challenging; few such measurements have previously been reported, especially in a wide wavelength range. We directly measured the refractive index of human deoxygenated and oxygenated hemoglobin for nine wavelengths between 400 and 700 nm for the hemoglobin concentrations up to 140 g l{sup -1}. This paper analyzes the results and suggests a set of model functions to calculate the refractive index depending on the concentration. At all wavelengths, the measured values of the refractive index depended on the concentration linearly. Analyzing the slope of the lines, we determined the specific refraction increments, derived a set of model functions for the refractive index depending on the concentration, and compared our results with those available in the literature. Based on the model functions, we further calculated the refractive index at the physiological concentration within the erythrocytes of 320 g l{sup -1}. The results can be used to calculate the refractive index in the visible range for arbitrary concentrations provided that the refractive indices depend on the concentration linearly.

  15. The role of geological surfaces in determining visible-near infra red spectral signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S. E.; Buckingham, W. F.

    1981-01-01

    The goal of the study described here is to determine new criteria for improved target discrimination in areas of hydrothermal mineralization. It is noted that the portion of materials, that is, geological surfaces detected by sensing devices, must be accurately determined before elemental and mineralogical characterization. The depth from which visible-near infrared radiation is reflected from target surfaces depends on composition and fabric. Reflectance spectra are obtained from binary mixtures of hematite, goethite, kaolinite and montmorillonite with a reflecting sphere spectrometer over a wavelength range of 400-2500 nm. The reflection (or absorption) intensity is plotted vs. the sample thickness (determined by scanning electron microscopy) to determine the sample thickness at which absorption saturates. The optical depth is seen to vary as a function of mineralogy and wavelength. In general, the maximum depth from which reflection features are discerned is from 12 to 47 microns measured in the visible-near infrared spectral region.

  16. Visible spectral power emitted from a laser produced uranium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. D.; Jalufka, N. W.

    1975-01-01

    The development of plasma-core nuclear reactors for advanced terrestrial and space-power sources is researched. Experimental measurements of the intensity and the spectral distribution of radiation from a nonfissioning uranium plasma are reported.

  17. Investigation into the ways of tuning parametric oscillators of visible and IR ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different versions of optical parametric oscillator (OPO) schemes were experimentally realised and investigated, which utilise AgGaS2, LiNbO3 and HgGa2S4 single crystals as well as an Hg1-xCdxGa2S4 solid solution. The OPOs generate radiation in the 1.2-5.7-μm range and make use of different ways of output wavelength tuning, including fast wavelength tuning (in a time shorter than 0.1 ms) with the help of an acoustooptical deflector. The output spectral line was narrowed by means of an intracavity acoustooptical filter. An OPO for the visible range with an electrodynamic tuning to an arbitrary wavelength in this range in a time of 5ms was implemented employing a BBO single crystal. (invited paper)

  18. Evaluating Potential Spectral Impacts of Various Artificial Lights on Melatonin Suppression, Photosynthesis, and Star Visibility

    OpenAIRE

    Aubé, Martin; Roby, Johanne; Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Artificial light at night can be harmful to the environment, and interferes with fauna and flora, star visibility, and human health. To estimate the relative impact of a lighting device, its radiant power, angular photometry and detailed spectral power distribution have to be considered. In this paper we focus on the spectral power distribution. While specific spectral characteristics can be considered harmful during the night, they can be considered advantageous during the day. As an example...

  19. Precise Measurement of Lunar Spectral Irradiance at Visible Wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, C E; Lykke, K R; Woodward, J T; Smith, A W

    2013-01-01

    We report a measurement of lunar spectral irradiance with an uncertainty below 1 % from 420 nm to 1000 nm. This measurement uncertainty meets the stability requirement for many climate data records derived from satellite images, including those for vegetation, aerosols, and snow and ice albedo. It therefore opens the possibility of using the Moon as a calibration standard to bridge gaps in satellite coverage and validate atmospheric retrieval algorithms. Our measurement technique also yields detailed information about the atmosphere at the measurement site, suggesting that lunar observations are a possible solution for aerosol monitoring during the polar winter and can provide nighttime measurements to complement aerosol data collected with sun photometers. Our measurement, made with a novel apparatus, is an order of magnitude more accurate than the previous state-of-the-art and has continuous spectral coverage, removing the need to interpolate between filter passbands. PMID:26401440

  20. Spectral Aging Model Applied to Meteosat First Generation Visible Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Decoster

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Meteosat satellites have been operational since the early eighties, creating so far a continuous time period of observations of more than 30 years. In order to use this data for climate data records, a consistent calibration is necessary between the consecutive instruments. Studies have shown that the Meteosat First Generation (MFG satellites (1982–2006 suffer from in-flight degradation which is spectral of nature and is not corrected by the official calibration of EUMETSAT. Continuing on previous published work by the same authors, this paper applies the spectral aging model to a set of clear-sky and cloudy targets, and derives the model parameters for all six MFG satellites (Meteosat-2 to -7. Several problems have been encountered, both due to the instrument and due to geophysical occurrences, and these are discussed and illustrated here in detail. The paper shows how the spectral aging model is an improvement compared to the EUMETSAT calibration method with a stability of 1%–2% for Meteosat-4 to -7, which increases up to 6% for ocean sites using the full MFG time period.

  1. Hyper-Spectral Imager in visible and near-infrared band for lunar compositional mapping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A S Kiran Kumar; A Roy Chowdhury

    2005-12-01

    India s ?rst lunar mission,Chandrayaan-1,will have a Hyper-Spectral Imager in the visible and near-infrared spectral bands along with other instruments.The instrument will enable mineralogical mapping of the Moon s crust in a large number of spectral channels.The planned Hyper-Spectral Imager will be the ?rst instrument to map the lunar surface with the capability of resolving the spectral region,0.4 to 0.92 m in 64 continuous bands with a resolution of better than 15 nm and a spatial resolution of 80 m.Spectral separation will be done using a wedge ?lter and the image will be mapped onto an area detector.The detector output will be processed in the front-end processor to generate the 64-band data with 12-bit quantization.This paper gives a description of the Hyper-Spectral Imager instrument.

  2. Passive ranging of dynamic rocket plumes using infrared and visible oxygen attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R. Anthony; Hawks, Michael R.

    2011-05-01

    Atmospheric oxygen absorption bands in observed spectra of boost phase missiles can be used to accurately estimate range from sensor to target. One method is to compare observed values of band averaged absorption to radiative transfer models. This is most effective using bands where there is a single absorbing species. This work compares spectral attenuation of two oxygen absorption bands in the near-infrared (NIR) and visible (Vis) spectrum, centered at 762 nm and 690 nm, to passively determine range. Spectra were observed from a static test of a full-scale solid rocket motor at a 900m range. The NIR O2 band provided range estimates accurate to within 3%, while the Vis O2 band had a range error of 15%. A Falcon 9 rocket launch at an initial range of 13km was also tracked and observed for 90 seconds after ignition. The NIR O2 band provided in-flight range estimates accurate to within 2% error for the first 30 seconds of tracked observation. The Vis O2 band also provided accurate range estimates with an error of approximately 4%. Rocket plumes are expected to be significantly brighter at longer wavelengths, but absorption in the NIR band is nearly ten times stronger than the Vis band, causing saturation at shorter path lengths. An atmospheric band is considered saturated when all the in-band frequencies emitted from the rocket plume are absorbed before reaching the sensor.

  3. Studying soil properties using visible and near infrared spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, S.; Garfagnoli, F.; Innocenti, L.; Chiarantini, L.

    2009-04-01

    This research is carried out inside the DIGISOIL Project, whose purposes are the integration and improvement of in situ and proximal measurement technologies, for the assessment of soil properties and soil degradation indicators, going form the sensing technologies to their integration and their application in digital soil mapping. The study area is located in the Virginio river basin, about 30 km south of Firenze, in the Chianti area, where soils with agricultural suitability have a high economic value connected to the production of internationally famous wines and olive oils. The most common soil threats, such as erosion and landslide, may determine huge economic losses, which must be considered in farming management practices. This basin has a length of about 23 km for a basin area of around 60,3 Km2. Geological formations outcropping in the area are Pliocene to Pleistocene marine and lacustrine sediments in beds with almost horizontal bedding. Vineyards, olive groves and annual crops are the main types of land use. A typical Mediterranean climate prevails with a dry summer followed by intense and sometimes prolonged rainfall in autumn, decreasing in winter. In this study, three types of VNIR and SWIR techniques, operating at different scales and in different environments (laboratory spectroscopy, portable field spectroscopy) are integrated to rapidly quantify various soil characteristics, in order to acquire data for assessing the risk of occurrence for typically agricultural practice-related soil threats (swelling, compaction, erosion, landslides, organic matter decline, ect.) and to collect ground data in order to build up a spectral library to be used in image analysis from air-borne and satellite sensors. Difficulties encountered in imaging spectroscopy, such as influence of measurements conditions, atmospheric attenuation, scene dependency and sampling representation are investigated and mathematical pre-treatments, using proper algorithms, are applied and tested. Data on detection limits of ground-based, airborne and satellite sensors are also provided. The problem of the influence of soil moisture and soil roughness on reflectance is also examined. Spectral indexes, derived from absorption features, are related to laboratory results on clay minerals, carbonate and iron content, soil moisture and organic matter amount, in order to investigate the potential of hyperspectral sensors to estimate soil properties, using empirical prediction models.

  4. Visibility analysis of point cloud in close range photogrammetry

    OpenAIRE

    B. Alsadik; Gerke, M.; Vosselman, G.

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing development of advanced techniques in photogrammetry, computer vision (CV), robotics and laser scanning to efficiently acquire three dimensional geometric data offer new possibilities for many applications. The output of these techniques in the digital form is often a sparse or dense point cloud describing the 3D shape of an object. Viewing these point clouds in a computerized digital environment holds a difficulty in displaying the visible points of the object from a giv...

  5. Studies of the ECR plasma in the visible light range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution visible light (VL) plasma photographs were taken at the ATOMKI-ECRIS by an 8 mega-pixel digital camera. Plasmas were generated from gases of He, methane, N, O, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe and from their mixtures. The analysis of the photo series gave many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas. VL photos convey information mainly on the cold electron component of the plasma. Cold electrons are confined in the central part of the plasma. It is a further challenging task to understand the colors of this special type of plasmas. The colors can be determined by the VL electron transitions of the plasma atoms and ions combined with the human eye sensitivity. There is a good visual agreement between the calculated normalized color and the real color of the plasmas. Through the examples of He and Xe we analyze the physical processes which affect the characteristic colors of these plasmas. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  6. Retrieving Soil Hydraulic Properties by Diffuse Spectral Reflectance Data in Vis-NIR-SWIR Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeian, E.; Homaee, M.; Vereecken, H.; Montzka, C.; Norouzi, A. A.; Van Genuchten, M.

    2014-12-01

    Information about the soil water characteristics is necessary for modeling water flow and solute transport processes in vadose zone. Soil spectroscopy in the visible, near-infrared and shortwave infrared (Vis-NIR-SWIR) range has been widely used as a rapid, cost-effective and non-destructive technique to predict basic soil properties. In this paper we used three different approaches to retrieve soil hydraulic parameters from spectral data in the visible, near-infrared and shortwave-infrared (Vis-NIR-SWIR) region and basic soil properties. Using stepwise multiple linear statistics coupled with bootstrapping, we derived and validated three types of point and parametric transfer functions: i) spectral transfer functions (STFs), ii) pedotransfer functions (PTFs) and iii) spectral pedotransfer functions (SPTFs) which respectively used spectral data, basic soil properties and spectral based basic soil predictions as their inputs. We further evaluated a direct fit of the van Genuchten (VG) and Brooks-Corey (BC) retention models to the predicted water contents obtained with each approach. According to the results, soil water contents, the VG and BC parameters as well as basic soil properties showed significant (p<0.01) correlation with spectral reflectance values, especially for the SWIR region. The STFs performed slightly better than the PTFs in terms of R2 and RMSE in estimating water contents in the mid and dry parts of retention curve. In the wet range, PTFs were found to perform better than the other two approaches. Compared to the STFs, however, better water content estimates were obtained using the SPTFs in the wet range. The parametric STFs and SPTFs of both the VG and BC models developed from spectral data performed slightly better than parametric PTFs for the retention curve. The best predictions were obtained with a direct fit of the retention models to soil water contents estimated with point transfer functions. Our findings suggest that spectral information, as a promising approach, may be used to accurately predict soil water contents, and indirectly the water retention curve. Using spectral data as an input of PTFs provides an effective way of including this temporal dynamic soil property in soil water retention predictions.

  7. Innovative static spectropolarimeter concept for wide spectral ranges: tolerancing study

    CERN Document Server

    Pertenais, Martin; Parès, Laurent; Petit, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Developing an efficient and robust polarimeter for wide spectral ranges and space applications is a main issue in many projects. As part of the UVMag consortium created to develop UV facilities in space (e.g. the Arago mission proposed to ESA), we are studying an innovative concept of polarimeter that is robust, simple, and efficient on a wide spectral range. The idea, based on the article by Sparks et al. (2012), is to use polarization scramblers to create a spatial modulation of the polarization. Along the height of the wedges of the scramblers, the thickness of the birefringent material crossed by the light, and thus the retardance, vary continuously. This variation creates an intensity modulation of the light related to the entrance polarization state. Analyzing this modulation with a linear polarizer, and dispersing the light spectrally in the orthogonal spatial direction, enables the measurement of the full Stokes vector over the entire spectrum. This determination is performed with a single-shot measur...

  8. Diamond photonic crystals for the IR spectral range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononenko, T V; Dyachenko, P N; Konov, V I

    2014-12-15

    2D photonic crystals formed inside monocrystalline diamond to operate in the IR spectral range are reported. The photonic structures consisting of 150-μm-long graphitized wires arranged in a square matrix with a period of 4 μm were produced by laser writing with ultrashort pulses. Transmittance spectra (λ=1-14  μm) measured for the structures with increasing thickness demonstrate the occurrence of few minima being different for TM and TE polarization modes. Complex refraction index of the laser-modified material was evaluated for the first time in order to be used in computer simulation of the structures. PMID:25503041

  9. Evaluating potential spectral impacts of various artificial lights on melatonin suppression, photosynthesis, and star visibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubé, Martin; Roby, Johanne; Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Artificial light at night can be harmful to the environment, and interferes with fauna and flora, star visibility, and human health. To estimate the relative impact of a lighting device, its radiant power, angular photometry and detailed spectral power distribution have to be considered. In this paper we focus on the spectral power distribution. While specific spectral characteristics can be considered harmful during the night, they can be considered advantageous during the day. As an example, while blue-rich Metal Halide lamps can be problematic for human health, star visibility and vegetation photosynthesis during the night, they can be highly appropriate during the day for plant growth and light therapy. In this paper we propose three new indices to characterize lamp spectra. These indices have been designed to allow a quick estimation of the potential impact of a lamp spectrum on melatonin suppression, photosynthesis, and star visibility. We used these new indices to compare various lighting technologies objectively. We also considered the transformation of such indices according to the propagation of light into the atmosphere as a function of distance to the observer. Among other results, we found that low pressure sodium, phosphor-converted amber light emitting diodes (LED) and LED 2700 K lamps filtered with the new Ledtech's Equilib filter showed a lower or equivalent potential impact on melatonin suppression and star visibility in comparison to high pressure sodium lamps. Low pressure sodium, LED 5000 K-filtered and LED 2700 K-filtered lamps had a lower impact on photosynthesis than did high pressure sodium lamps. Finally, we propose these indices as new standards for the lighting industry to be used in characterizing their lighting technologies. We hope that their use will favor the design of new environmentally and health-friendly lighting technologies. PMID:23861808

  10. Wide spectral range characterization of antireflective coatings and their optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franta, Daniel; Ne?as, David; Ohldal, Ivan; Jankuj, Ji?

    2015-09-01

    Development of antireflective coatings realized by thin film systems requires their characterization and optimization of their properties. Functional properties of such interference devices are determined by optical constants and thicknesses of the individual films and various defects taking place in these systems. In optics industry the characterization of the films is mostly performed in a relatively narrow spectral range using simple dispersion models and, moreover, the defects are not taken into account at all. This manner of characterization fails if applied to real-world non-ideal thin film systems because the measured data do not contain sufficient information about all the parameters describing the system including imperfections. Reliable characterization requires the following changes: extension of spectral range of measurements, combination of spectrophotometry and ellipsometry, utilization of physically correct dispersion models (Kramers-Kronig consistency, sum rules), inclusion of structural defects instrument imperfection into the models and simultaneous processing of all experimental data. This enables us to remove or reduce a correlation among the parameters searched so that correct and sufficiently precise determination of parameter values is achieved. Since the presence and properties of the defects are difficult to control independently by tuning of the deposition conditions, the optimization does not in general involve the elimination of defects. Instead they are taken into account in the design of the film systems. The outlined approach is demonstrated on the characterization and optimization of ultraviolet antireflective coating formed by double layer of Al2O3 and MgF2 deposited on fused silica.

  11. Composition, mineralogy, and porosity of multiple asteroid systems from visible and near-infrared spectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, S. S.; Marchis, F.; Emery, J. P.; Enriquez, J. E.; Assafin, M.

    2015-02-01

    We aim to provide a taxonomic and compositional characterization of Multiple Asteroid Systems (MASs) located in the main belt (MB) using visible (0.45-0.85 μm) and near-infrared (0.7-2.5 μm) spectral data of 42 MB MASs. The compositional and mineralogical analysis is applied to determine meteorite analogs for the MASs, which, in turn, are applied to the MAS density measurements of Marchis et al. (Marchis et al. [2012]. Icarus 221, 1130-1161) to estimate the porosity of the systems. The macroporosities are used to evaluate the primary MAS formation hypotheses. Our spectral survey consists of visible and near-infrared spectral data. The visible observing campaign includes 25 MASs obtained using the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope with the Goodman High Throughput Spectrometer. The infrared observing campaign includes 34 MASs obtained using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) with the SpeX spectragraph. For completeness, both visible and NIR data sets are supplemented with publicly available data, and the data sets are combined where possible. The MASs are classified using the Bus-DeMeo taxonomic system. In order to determine mineralogy and meteorite analog, we perform a NIR spectral band parameter analysis using a new analysis routine, the Spectral Analysis Routine for Asteroids (SARA). The SARA routine determines band centers, areas, and depths by utilizing the diagnostic absorption features near 1- and 2-μm due to Fe2+ crystal field transitions in olivine + pyroxene and pyroxene, respectively. The band parameter analysis provides the Gaffey subtype for the S-complex MASs; the relative abundance olivine-to-pyroxene ratio; and olivine and pyroxene modal abundances for S-complex and V-type MASs. This mineralogical information is then applied to determine meteorite analogs. Through applying calibration studies, we are able to determine the H, L, and LL meteorite analogs for 15 MASs with ordinary chondrite-like (OC) mineralogies. We observe an excess (10/15) of LL-like mineralogies. Of the ten MASs with LL-like mineralogies, seven are consistent with Flora family membership, supporting the hypothesis that the Flora family is a source of LL-like NEAs and LL chondrites on Earth. Our band parameter analysis is unable to clearly distinguish between the HED subgroups for the 6 V-type MASs. Using the measured densities of the meteorite analog and the MAS densities from Marchis et al. (Marchis et al. [2012]. Icarus 221, 1130-1161), we estimate the macroporosity for 13 MASs. We find that all of the MASs with estimated macroporosities are in agreement with formation hypotheses.

  12. Composition, Mineralogy, and Porosity of Multiple Asteroid Systems from Visible and Near-infrared Spectral Data

    CERN Document Server

    Lindsay, Sean S; Emery, Joshua P; Enriquez, J Emilio; Assafin, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    We provide a taxonomic and compositional characterization of Multiple Asteroid Systems (MASs) located in the main belt (MB) using visible and near-infrared (0.45-2.5 um) spectral data of 42 MB MASs. The mineralogical analysis is applied to determine meteorite analogs for the MASs, which, in turn, are applied to the MAS density measurements of Marchis et al. (2012) to estimate the system porosity. The macroporosities are used to evaluate the primary MAS formation hypotheses. The visible observing campaign includes 25 MASs obtained using the SOAR telescope with the Goodman High Throughput Spectrometer. The infrared observing campaign includes 34 MASs obtained using the NASA IRTF with the SpeX spectragraph. The MASs are classified using the Bus-DeMeo taxonomic system. We perform a NIR spectral band parameter analysis using a new analysis routine, the Spectral Analysis Routine for Asteroids (SARA). The SARA routine determines band centers, areas, and depths by utilizing the diagnostic absorption features near 1- ...

  13. All optical fog-sensor for determining the fog visibility range in optical wireless communication links

    OpenAIRE

    Ijaz, Muhammad; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Le Minh, Hoa; Rajbhandari, Sujan

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this research work is to use an all optical based fog sensor to study the atmospheric visibility of fog and its constituents on the optical wireless communication (OWC) links in a controlled laboratory test-bid. The fog sensor measures the transmittance of the Infrared (IR) radiations which is used to determine the link visibility. Experimental results obtained show that using the fog sensor the visibility range from 0.37 – 1 km and above with respect to different fog density can ...

  14. Method for detection and imaging over a broad spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefremenko, Volodymyr; Gordiyenko, Eduard; Pishko, legal representative, Olga; Novosad, Valentyn; Pishko, deceased; Vitalii

    2007-09-25

    A method of controlling the coordinate sensitivity in a superconducting microbolometer employs localized light, heating or magnetic field effects to form normal or mixed state regions on a superconducting film and to control the spatial location. Electron beam lithography and wet chemical etching were applied as pattern transfer processes in epitaxial Y--Ba--Cu--O films. Two different sensor designs were tested: (i) a 3 millimeter long and 40 micrometer wide stripe and (ii) a 1.25 millimeters long, and 50 micron wide meandering-like structure. Scanning the laser beam along the stripe leads to physical displacement of the sensitive area, and, therefore, may be used as a basis for imaging over a broad spectral range. Forming the superconducting film as a meandering structure provides the equivalent of a two-dimensional detector array. Advantages of this approach are simplicity of detector fabrication, and simplicity of the read-out process requiring only two electrical terminals.

  15. Measurements of the Reflectivity in the Ultraviolet and Visible Wavelength Range in a Mountainous Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reflectivity distribution of the surrounding area of Zugspitze (2964 m) was measured within the scope of the EU project CUVRA. The albedo measurements were performed in the UVA and visible range by using a CCD camera and a UVA sensor. First results of the albedo distribution in the visible wavelength range of the surrounding areas are shown. The reflectivity of snow, rocks and of vegetation and its dependence on illumination are studied. The albedo of snow surfaces ranges between 0.4 in the shade and values up to 2 when the orientation of the facet is favourable. Reflectivity of rocks and forests lies between 0.1 and 0.25. Further work on the albedo in the UV wavelength range will be carried out. First, a relationship between UV albedo and visible albedo will be established. (author)

  16. Visible spectroscopy of the Polana-Eulalia family complex: Spectral homogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de León, J.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Delbo, M.; Campins, H.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; Tanga, P.; Cellino, A.; Bendjoya, P.; Gayon-Markt, J.; Licandro, J.; Lorenzi, V.; Morate, D.; Walsh, K. J.; DeMeo, F.; Landsman, Z.; Alí-Lagoa, V.

    2016-03-01

    The Polana-Eulalia family complex is located in the inner part of the asteroid belt, bounded by the ν6 and the 3:1 resonances, where we can find another three collisional families of primitive asteroids (Erigone, Clarissa, and Sulamitis), and a low-albedo population of background objects. This region of the belt is believed to be the most likely origin of the two primitive near-Earth asteroids that are the current targets of two sample return missions: NASA's OSIRIS-REx and JAXA's Hayabusa 2 to Asteroids (101955) Bennu and (162173) Ryugu (also known as 1999 JU3), respectively. Therefore, understanding these families will enhance the scientific return of these missions. We present the results of a spectroscopic survey of asteroids in the region of the Polana-Eulalia family complex, and also asteroids from the background population of low-albedo, low-inclination objects. We obtained visible spectra of a total of 65 asteroids, using the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) and the 3.6 m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), both located at the El Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory, in the island of La Palma (Spain), and the 3.6 m New Technology Telescope (NTT), located at the European Southern Observatory of La Silla, in Chile. From the spectral analysis of our sample we found that, in spite of the presence of distinct dynamical groups, the asteroids in this region present spectral homogeneity at visible wavelengths, showing a continuum of spectral slopes, from blue to moderately red, typical of primitive asteroids classified as B- and C-types. We conclude that visible spectra cannot be used to distinguish between members of the Polana and the Eulalia families, or members of the background population. The visible spectra of the two targets of sample return missions, Asteroids Bennu and Ryugu, are compatible with the spectra of the asteroids in this region, supporting previous studies that suggested either the Polana family or the background population as the most likely origins of these NEAs.

  17. Statistical Analysis of Partial Discharges in SF6 Gas via Optical Detection in Various Spectral Ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ren

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Partial discharge (PD detection is essential to the operation of high-voltage systems. In this context, we investigate the basic characteristics of light emission during PDs in SF6 gas from the perspective of insulation diagnosis. A synchronous system is constructed using three optical photoelectric instruments with separate wavelength responses in the ultraviolet (UV, 189–352 nm, visible (VIS, 381–675 nm, and near-infrared (NIR, 737–920 nm spectral ranges and a wide-band PD current pulse detector with a response of 1 pC. The results indicate that light emission depends upon the type of insulation defect and discharge energy. An increase in PD charge gives rise to more components in the spectral range from UV to VIS, and the presence of an insulator surface in discharges yields a more complex VIS-to-NIR spectrum. The phase-resolved partial discharge pattern (PRPD of UV light pulses can reasonably reflect the electroluminescence process in the presence of the insulator surface and weak corona at negative voltage points. The PRPD of VIS light describes the features of the actual PD pattern in most cases. In comparison with the other two spectral ranges, light intensity in the VIS range is more sensitive to changes in gas-pressure-normalized voltage (Vrms/p. The linear fitting analysis of the relationships between the light intensity and PD charge shows that UV light detection has a greater sensitivity to the PD charge and that UV detection exhibits a greater degree of linearity. NIR detection is applicable only to severe PDs. We believe that our findings can significantly aid in application of optical PD diagnosis in SF6 gas insulated systems.

  18. Experimental demonstration of a broadband array of invisibility cloaks in the visible frequency range

    OpenAIRE

    Smolyaninova, V. N.; Smolyaninov, I. I.; Ermer, H. K.

    2012-01-01

    Very recently Farhat et al. [1] have suggested that arrays of invisibility cloaks may find important applications in low-interference communication, noninvasive probing, sensing and communication networks, etc. We report on the first experimental realization of such an array of broadband invisibility cloaks, which operates in the visible frequency range. Wavelength and angular dependencies of the cloak array performance have been studied.

  19. Visible and near-infrared spectral signatures for adulteration assessment of extra virgin olive oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Ottevaere, H.; Thienpont, H.; Conte, L.; Marega, M.; Cichelli, A.; Attilio, C.; Cimato, A.

    2010-04-01

    Because of its high price, the extra virgin olive oil is frequently target for adulteration with lower quality oils. This paper presents an innovative optical technique capable of quantifying the adulteration of extra virgin olive oil caused by lowergrade olive oils. It relies on spectral fingerprinting the test liquid by means of diffuse-light absorption spectroscopy carried out by optical fiber technology in the wide 400-1700 nm spectral range. Then, a smart multivariate processing of spectroscopic data is applied for immediate prediction of adulterant concentration.

  20. Retrieval of absorptive gas columnar amounts using atmospheric hyper-spectral irradiance measurements within visible spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua; Li, Zhengqiang; Li, Donghui; Xie, Yisong; Li, Kaitao; Qie, Lili; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Xingfeng; Zheng, Xiaobin; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yanna

    2015-10-01

    A hyper spectral ground-based instrument named Atmosphere-Surface Radiation Automatic Instrument (ASRAI) has been developed for the purpose of in-situ calibration of satellites. The apparatus has both upward and downward looking views, and thus can observe both the atmosphere and land surface. The solar transmitted irradiance can be derived from the measured full spectral irradiance and diffused spectral irradiance of atmosphere within visible spectrum (0.4-1.0?m). A method similar to that of King et al. which originally intended to apply to multi-wavelength measurements, is adopted to determine absorptive gaseous columnar amount from hyper spectrum. The solar irradiance at top of atmosphere and absorption coefficients of water vapor (H2O), ozone (O3), oxygen (O2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are recalculated at an instrumental spectral resolution by convolution method. Based on the gaseous characteristics of absorption, the total columnar amounts of water vapor and oxygen are first inferred from solar transmitted irradiance at strong absorption wavelength of 0.934?m and 0.763?m respectively. The total columnar amounts of ozone and nitrogen dioxide, together with aerosol optical depth, are determined by a nonlinear least distance fitting method which minimizes a ?2 statistic to obtain optimal solutions. ASRAI was deployed for observation in Dunhuang site in China in August of 2014. Our results demonstrate that the algorithm is reasonable. Although the validation is preliminary, the hyper spectrum measured by ASRAI exhibits good ability to retrieve the abundance of absorptive gases and aerosols.

  1. Separate photosensitizers mediate degradation of the 32-kDa photosystem II reaction center protein in the visible and UV spectral regions.

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, B.M.; Gaba, V.; Canaani, O; Malkin, S; Mattoo, A.K.; Edelman, M

    1989-01-01

    A component of the photosystem II reaction center, the 32-kDa protein, is rapidly turned over in the light. The mechanism of its light-dependent metabolism is largely unknown. We quantified the rate of 32-kDa protein degradation over a broad spectral range (UV, visible, and far red). The quantum yield for degradation was highest in the UVB (280-320 nm) region. Spectral evidence demonstrates two distinctly different photosensitizers for 32-kDa protein degradation. The data implicate the bulk p...

  2. Driver steering dynamics measured in car simulator under a range of visibility and roadmaking conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, R. W.; Mcruer, D. T.

    1977-01-01

    A simulation experiment was conducted to determine the effect of reduced visibility on driver lateral (steering) control. The simulator included a real car cab and a single lane road image projected on a screen six feet in front of the driver. Simulated equations of motion controlled apparent car lane position in response to driver steering actions, wind gusts, and road curvature. Six drivers experienced a range of visibility conditions at various speeds with assorted roadmaking configurations (mark and gap lengths). Driver describing functions were measured and detailed parametric model fits were determined. A pursuit model employing a road curvature feedforward was very effective in explaining driver behavior in following randomly curving roads. Sampled-data concepts were also effective in explaining the combined effects of reduced visibility and intermittent road markings on the driver's dynamic time delay. The results indicate the relative importance of various perceptual variables as the visual input to the driver's steering control process is changed.

  3. Thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of solid and liquid uranium and plutonium carbides in the visible-near infrared range

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of uranium and plutonium carbides under extreme conditions is essential for designing a new metallic fuel materials for next generation of a nuclear reactor. The present work is devoted to the study of the thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of liquid and solid uranium and plutonium carbides at their melting/freezing temperatures. The Stefan-Boltzmann law, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, internal energy density, enthalpy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, and normal total emissivity are calculated using experimental data for the frequency dependence of the normal spectral emissivity of liquid and solid uranium and plutonium carbides in the visible-near infrared range. It is shown that the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions of uranium carbide have a slight difference during liquid-to-solid transition. Unlike UC, such a difference between these ...

  4. Experimental Demonstration of Non-Resonant Hyperlens in the Visible Range

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Jingbo; Litchinitser, Natalia M

    2014-01-01

    A metamaterial hyperlens offers a unique solution to overcome the diffraction limit by transforming evanescent waves responsible for imaging subwavelength features of an object into propagating waves. However, the first realizations of optical hyperlenses were limited by a narrow working bandwidth and significant resonance-induced loss. Here, we report the first experimental demonstration of a non-resonant waveguide-coupled hyperlens operating in the visible wavelength range. A detailed investigation of various materials systems proves that a radial fan-shaped configuration is superior to the concentric layer-based configuration in that it relies on non-resonant negative dielectric response, and, as a result, enables broadband and low-loss performance in the visible range.

  5. Experimental demonstration of a broadband array of invisibility cloaks in the visible frequency range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very recently Farhat et al (2011, Phys. Rev. B 84 235105) suggested that arrays of invisibility cloaks may find important applications in low-interference communication, noninvasive probing, sensing and communication networks and so on. We report on the first experimental realization of such an array of broadband invisibility cloaks that operates in the visible frequency range. The wavelength and angular dependences of the cloak array performance have been studied. (paper)

  6. The UV-A and visible solar irradiance spectrum: inter-comparison of absolutely calibrated, spectrally medium resolution solar irradiance spectra from balloon- and satellite-borne measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Gurlit

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the ENVISAT/-SCIAMACHY satellite validation, solar irradiance spectra are absolutely measured at moderate resolution in the UV/visible spectral range (in the UV from 316.7–418 nm and the visible from 400–652 nm at a full width half maximum resolution of 0.55 nm and 1.48 nm, respectively from aboard the azimuth-controlled LPMA/DOAS balloon gondola at around 32 km balloon float altitude. After accounting for the atmospheric extinction due to Rayleigh scattering and gaseous absorption (O3, and NO2, the measured solar spectra are compared with previous observations. Our solar irradiance is +1.6% larger than the re-calibrated Kurucz et al. (1984 solar spectrum (Fontenla et al., 1999, called MODTRAN 3.5 in the visible spectral range (435–650 nm, +1.5% larger in the (370–415 nm wavelength interval, but −4% smaller in the UV spectral range (316.7–370 nm, when the Kurucz spectrum is convolved to the spectral resolution of our instrument. The same comparison with the SOLSPEC solar spectrum (Thuillier et al., 1997, 1998a, b confirms the somewhat larger solar irradiance (+1.7% measured by the balloon instrument from 435–500 nm, but not from 500–650 nm, where the SOLSPEC is −1.3% lower than MODTRAN 3.5. Comparison of the SCIAMACHY solar spectrum from channels 1 to 4 (– re-calibrated by the University of Bremen – with MODTRAN 3.5 indicates an agreement of +0.2% in the visible spectral range (435–585 nm. With this calibration, the SCIAMACHY solar spectrum is congruent with the balloon observations (−1% in the 316.7–370 nm wavelength range, but both are up to −5%/−3% smaller than MODTRAN 3.5 and SOLSPEC, respectively. In agreement with findings of Skupin et al. (2002 our study emphasizes that the present ESA SCIAMACHY level 1 calibration is systematically +15% larger in the considered wavelength intervals when compared to all available other solar irradiance measurements.

  7. Using Visible Spectral Information to Predict Long-Wave Infrared Spectral Emissivity: A Case Study over the Sokolov Area of the Czech Republic with an Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gila Notesco

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Remote-sensing platforms are often comprised of a cluster of different spectral range detectors or sensors to benefit from the spectral identification capabilities of each range. Missing data from these platforms, caused by problematic weather conditions, such as clouds, sensor failure, low temporal coverage or a narrow field of view (FOV, is one of the problems preventing proper monitoring of the Earth. One of the possible solutions is predicting a detector or sensor’s missing data using another detector/sensor. In this paper, we propose a new method of predicting spectral emissivity in the long-wave infrared (LWIR spectral region using the visible (VIS spectral region. The proposed method is suitable for two main scenarios of missing data: sensor malfunctions and narrow FOV. We demonstrate the usefulness and limitations of this prediction scheme using the airborne hyperspectral scanner (AHS sensor, which consists of both VIS and LWIR spectral regions, in a case study over the Sokolov area, Czech Republic.

  8. Polylogarithmic representation of radiative and thermodynamic properties of thermal radiation in a given spectral range: II. Real-body radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2015-01-01

    The general analytical expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of a real-body are obtained in a finite range of frequencies at different temperatures. The frequency dependence of the spectral emissivity is represented as a power series. The Stefan-Boltzmann law, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, internal energy density, enthalpy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, and total emissivity are expressed in terms of the polylogarithm functions. The general expressions for the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions are applied for the study of thermal radiation of liquid and solid zirconium carbide. These functions are calculated using experimental data for the frequency dependence of the normal spectral emissivity in the visible-near infrared range at the melting (freezing) point. The gaps between the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions of liquid and solid zirconium carbide are observed. The g...

  9. The UV-A and visible solar irradiance spectrum: inter-comparison of absolutely calibrated, spectrally medium resolution solar irradiance spectra from balloon- and satellite-borne measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Gurlit

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the ENVISAT/-SCIAMACHY satellite validation, solar irradiance spectra are absolutely measured at moderate resolution in the UV/visible spectral range (in the UV from 316.7-418 nm and the visible from 400-652 nm at a full width half maximum resolution of 0.55 nm and 1.48 nm, respectively from aboard the azimuth-controlled LPMA/DOAS balloon gondola at around 32 km balloon float altitude. After accounting for the atmospheric extinction due to Rayleigh scattering and gaseous absorption (O3 and NO2, the measured solar spectra are compared with previous observations. Our solar irradiance spectrum perfectly agrees within +0.03% with the re-calibrated Kurucz et al.(1984 solar spectrum (Fontenla et al., 1999, called MODTRAN 3.7 in the visible spectral range (415-650 nm, but it is +2.1% larger in the (370-415 nm wavelength interval, and -4% smaller in the UV-A spectral range (316.7-370 nm, when the Kurucz spectrum is convolved to the spectral resolution of our instrument. Similar comparisons of the SOLSPEC (Thuillier et al., 1997, 1998a, b and SORCE/SIM (Harder et al., 2000 solar spectra with MODTRAN 3.7 confirms our findings with the values being -0.5%, +2%, and -1.4% for SOLSPEC -0.33%, -0.47%, and -6.2% for SORCE/SIM, respectively. Comparison of the SCIAMACHY solar spectrum from channels 1 to 4 (- re-calibrated by the University of Bremen - with MODTRAN 3.7 indicates an agreement within -0.4% in the visible spectral range (415-585 nm, -1.6% within the 370-415 nm, and -5.7% within 325-370 nm wavelength interval, in agreement with the results of the other sensors. In agreement with findings of Skupin et al.(2002 our study emphasizes that the present ESA SCIAMACHY level 1 calibration is systematically +15% larger in the considered wavelength intervals when compared to all available other solar irradiance measurements.

  10. Photonic crystal cavity modes in the visible range characterized by scattering spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We fabricate L3 cavities in a silicon nitride photonic crystal, with cavity modes in the visible range. We demonstrate a noninvasive method to characterize the cavities: the sample is illuminated on its edge and the upward-scattering spectrum is measured. We determine the modes' wavelengths, polarizations, and quality factors. We find modes between 700 and 830 nm with quality factors up to 280, polarized along or perpendicular to the cavity. The tuning of the cavity characteristics by means of its geometric parameters (holes sizes and shift) is discussed. The results are analyzed and compared with numerical simulations.

  11. Magnesium as Novel Material for Active Plasmonics in the Visible Wavelength Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterl, Florian; Strohfeldt, Nikolai; Walter, Ramon; Griessen, Ronald; Tittl, Andreas; Giessen, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Investigating new materials plays an important role for advancing the field of nanoplasmonics. In this work, we fabricate nanodisks from magnesium and demonstrate tuning of their plasmon resonance throughout the whole visible wavelength range by changing the disk diameter. Furthermore, we employ a catalytic palladium cap layer to transform the metallic Mg particles into dielectric MgH2 particles when exposed to hydrogen gas. We prove that this transition can be reversed in the presence of oxygen. This yields plasmonic nanostructures with an extinction spectrum that can be repeatedly switched on or off or kept at any intermediate state, offering new perspectives for active plasmonic metamaterials. PMID:26312401

  12. Observation of the fine structure for rovibronic spectral lines in visible part of emission spectra of $D_2$

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, B P; Zhukov, A S

    2011-01-01

    For the first time the fine structure of rovibronic spectral lines in visible part of emission spectra of $D_2$ molecule has been observed. Observed splitting in visible doublets is about 0.2 cm$^{-1}$ in good accordance with previous observations in the infrared part of the spectrum ($a^3\\Sigma_g^+ \\to c^3\\Pi_u$ electronic transition) by means of FTIR and laser spectroscopy. Relative intensities of the fine structure components are in agreement with our calculations of adiabatic line strengths for Hund's case "b" coupling scheme.

  13. Scientometric analyses of the international visibility of German psychology researchers and their range of specialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens B. Fell

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available With reference to the role of networking, accelerated by current developments within large parts of the scientific community, the assumption is examined that the range of specialization of scientists in terms of membership in professional sections of scientific societies is related to the international impact of their publications. The sample consists of 2,788 German psychologists enrolled in the German Psychological Society (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Psychologie, DGPs. A log-linear model suggests that the citation pattern of DGPs members with no citations of their papers published in 2000 or 2005 respectively in the time intervals 2000-2004 or 2005-2009 generally differs from that of their colleagues across four ranges of specialization categories. Configural Frequency Analysis led to the identification of distinct subgroups of scientific specialization and international visibility, i.e., citations by others. Specifically, for those individuals who enjoy international visibility, one key to success seems to be multiple professional specializations with reference to different subdisciplines of psychology.

  14. Tunable femtosecond laser in the visible range with an intracavity frequency-doubled optical parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang-Feng; Xu, Liang; Lin, Qing-Feng; Zhong, Xin; Han, Hai-Nian; Wei, Zhi-Yi

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrated experimentally a synchronously pumped intracavity frequency-doubled femtosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) using a periodically-poled lithium niobate (PPLN) as the nonlinear material in combination with a lithium triborate (LBO) as the doubling crystal. A Kerr-lens-mode-locked (KLM) Ti:sapphire oscillator at the wavelength of 790 nm was used as the pump source, which was capable of generating pulses with a duration as short as 117 fs. A tunable femtosecond laser covering the 624-672 nm range was realized by conveniently adjusting the OPO cavity length. A maximum average output power of 260 mW in the visible range was obtained at the pump power of 2.2 W, with a typical pulse duration of 205 fs assuming a sech2 pulse profile.

  15. Calibration of a high dynamic range, low light level visible source

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Veigne, Joe; Szarlan, Todd; Radtke, Nate

    2011-05-01

    Usage of image intensified (I2) and other low light level devices have grown considerably over the past decade1,2 As the systems have become more common place, the demand for production line test equipment has also grown. Accurate measurements of device response are a key part of determining acceptable system operation. However, differences in the spectral response of the unit under test (UUT) devices and the control detector; and the spectral distribution of the source, can lead to errors in test accuracy. These errors can be compounded by spectral variation in the source (or color temperature shifts) as a function of attenuation. These issues are often further confused by test system requirements that are not consistent with the desired parameter to be measured. For example, source requirements are often specified in illuminance while the UUT actually measures irradiance. We report on the calibration of a large dynamic range light source test system (> 7 orders), and discuss output compensation approaches for systems which control in a band different than the UUT being tested.

  16. Infrared spectroscopy with visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikov, Dmitry A.; Paterova, Anna V.; Kulik, Sergei P.; Krivitsky, Leonid A.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral measurements in the infrared optical range provide unique fingerprints of materials, which are useful for material analysis, environmental sensing and health diagnostics. Current infrared spectroscopy techniques require the use of optical equipment suited for operation in the infrared range, components of which face challenges of inferior performance and high cost. Here, we develop a technique that allows spectral measurements in the infrared range using visible-spectral-range components. The technique is based on nonlinear interference of infrared and visible photons, produced via spontaneous parametric down conversion. The intensity interference pattern for a visible photon depends on the phase of an infrared photon travelling through a medium. This allows the absorption coefficient and refractive index of the medium in the infrared range to be determined from the measurements of visible photons. The technique can substitute and/or complement conventional infrared spectroscopy and refractometry techniques, as it uses well-developed components for the visible range.

  17. Infrared Spectroscopy with Visible Light

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashnikov, Dmitry A; Kulik, Sergei P; Krivitsky, Leonid A

    2015-01-01

    Spectral measurements in the infrared (IR) optical range provide unique fingerprints of materials which are useful for material analysis, environmental sensing, and health diagnostics. Current IR spectroscopy techniques require the use of optical equipment suited for operation in the IR range, which faces challenges of inferior performance and high cost. Here we develop a spectroscopy technique, which allows spectral measurements in the IR range using visible spectral range components. The technique is based on nonlinear interference of infrared and visible photons, produced via Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion (SPDC). The intensity interference pattern for a visible photon depends on the phase of an IR photon, which travels through the media. This allows determining properties of the media in the IR range from the measurements of visible photons. The technique can substitute and/or complement conventional IR spectroscopy techniques, as it uses well-developed optical components for the visible range.

  18. Characterizing aerosol extinction in the UV-NIR spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmestad, Gary; Roberts, David

    2011-06-01

    The Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) is developing a transportable multi-lidar system known as the Integrated Atmospheric Characterization System (IACS). The system will comprise three lidars: an imaging lidar for profiling refractive turbulence, a Raman lidar for profiling water vapor, and an aerosol lidar operating at 0.355, 1.064, and 1.625 microns for profiling aerosol extinction. All of the lidar transmit/receive optics will be co-aligned on a common mount, pointable at any elevation angle from below horizontal to vertical. The entire system will be computer controlled to facilitate pointing and automatic data acquisition. The purpose of IACS is to characterize optical propagation paths during outdoor tests of electro-optical systems. The tests are anticipated to include ground-to-ground, air-to-ground, and ground-to-air scenarios, so the system must accommodate arbitrary slant paths through the atmosphere with maximum measurement ranges of 5-10 km. Elevation angle scans will be used to calibrate the atmospheric extinction profiles and data from the three wavelengths will be used to determine the aerosol Angstrom coefficient, enabling interpolation of results to other wavelengths in the 0.355 to 1.6 micron region. Some of the lidar engineering challenges and solutions are presented here.

  19. Tuning light emission of PbS nanocrystals from infrared to visible range by cation exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binetti, Enrico; Striccoli, Marinella; Sibillano, Teresa; Giannini, Cinzia; Brescia, Rosaria; Falqui, Andrea; Comparelli, Roberto; Corricelli, Michela; Tommasi, Raffaele; Agostiano, Angela; Curri, M. Lucia

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, with intense and sharp-line emission between red and near-infrared spectral regions, are of great interest for optoelectronic and bio-imaging applications. The growth of an inorganic passivation layer on nanocrystal surfaces is a common strategy to improve their chemical and optical stability and their photoluminescence quantum yield. In particular, cation exchange is a suitable approach for shell growth at the expense of the nanocrystal core size. Here, the cation exchange process is used to promote the formation of a CdS passivation layer on the surface of very small PbS nanocrystals (2.3 nm in diameter), blue shifting their optical spectra and yielding luminescent and stable nanostructures emitting in the range of 700-850 nm. Structural, morphological and compositional investigation confirms the nanocrystal size contraction after the cation-exchange process, while the PbS rock-salt crystalline phase is retained. Absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrate the growth of a passivation layer with a decrease of the PbS core size, as inferred by the blue-shift of the excitonic peaks. The surface passivation strongly increases the photoluminescence intensity and the excited state lifetime. In addition, the nanocrystals reveal increased stability against oxidation over time. Thanks to their absorption and emission spectral range and the slow recombination dynamics, such highly luminescent nano-objects can find interesting applications in sensitized photovoltaic cells and light-emitting devices.

  20. Tuning light emission of PbS nanocrystals from infrared to visible range by cation exchange

    KAUST Repository

    Binetti, Enrico

    2015-10-27

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, with intense and sharp-line emission between red and near-infrared spectral regions, are of great interest for optoelectronic and bio-imaging applications. The growth of an inorganic passivation layer on nanocrystal surfaces is a common strategy to improve their chemical and optical stability and their photoluminescence quantum yield. In particular, cation exchange is a suitable approach for shell growth at the expense of the nanocrystal core size. Here, the cation exchange process is used to promote the formation of a CdS passivation layer on the surface of very small PbS nanocrystals (2.3 nm in diameter), blue shifting their optical spectra and yielding luminescent and stable nanostructures emitting in the range of 700–850 nm. Structural, morphological and compositional investigation confirms the nanocrystal size contraction after the cation-exchange process, while the PbS rock-salt crystalline phase is retained. Absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrate the growth of a passivation layer with a decrease of the PbS core size, as inferred by the blue-shift of the excitonic peaks. The surface passivation strongly increases the photoluminescence intensity and the excited state lifetime. In addition, the nanocrystals reveal increased stability against oxidation over time. Thanks to their absorption and emission spectral range and the slow recombination dynamics, such highly luminescent nano-objects can find interesting applications in sensitized photovoltaic cells and light-emitting devices.

  1. Visible luminescence peculiar to sintered silica nanoparticles: Spectral and decay properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report that the sintering at 1000 °C of silica nanoparticles (an average diameter of 14 nm) produces a transparent sample that exhibits a bright visible emission under UV excitation. The use of time resolved luminescence spectroscopy and a tunable laser source allows us to single out three contributions centered at 1.96 eV, 2.41 eV and 3.43 eV. The excitation spectra of these emissions evidence bell shaped bands consistent with transitions between localized defects’ states. For each emission we study the intensity and the lifetime in the temperature range from 300 K down to 10 K, thus evidencing the competition between radiative and non-radiative processes in the optical cycle of luminescent centers. The comparison with the luminescence properties of silica, both nanoparticles and bulk, points out that the observed emissions are peculiar to the sintered silica network. - Highlights: • Solid-phase sintering at 1000 °C of silica nanoparticles produces a transparent sample. • Sintered silica nanoparticles emit a bright luminescence under UV excitation. • Three emissions, centered around 2.0 V, 2.4 eV and 3.4 eV, are distinguished on the basis of the excitation and decay properties. • The observed excitation/emission bands originate from localized defect states peculiar to the sintered silica network. • The luminescence efficiency decreases with temperature due to the activation of non-radiative channels

  2. Measurements of ZEFF spatial profiles from bremsstrahlung emission in the visible and near infrared spectral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of plasma radiation (i.e., breusstrahlung) in the infrared (IR) range (λ=933, 978 nm), at six lines of sight from z=-20 cm to z=8 cm above the equatorial plane, using the detection system of the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) Thomson scattering system (TSS) are reported. The agreement of IR with visible (λ=540 nm) bremsstrahlung intensity S, [S=photons/(m2srnms)] measurements is within 20%endash 30% and depends upon the absolute calibration of both systems. The intensity is equal S(z)=left-angle ZeffGn2/Te1/2 right-angle, where left-angle · right-angle means average on a line of sight. For determining the Zeff the Gaunt factor(G) is needed, and analysis the Born endash Elwert formula is used. The Zeff spatial profiles (i.e., Zeff(r)), are determined using the plasma temperature (Te) and density (ne) measured by the TSS and the Abel inverted intensity profiles, determined using the plasma radiation S(z) measured from six horizontal chords. Zeff(r) behavior in a variety of FTU discharges is presented. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  3. Tailoring Metallodielectric Structures for Super Resolution and Superguiding Applications in the Visible and Near IR Ranges

    CERN Document Server

    De Ceglia, D; Cappeddu, M G; Centini, M; Akozbek, N; DOrazio, A; Haus, J W; Bloemer, M J; Scalora, M

    2008-01-01

    We discuss propagation effects in realistic, transparent, metallo-dielectric photonic band gap structures in the context of negative refraction and super-resolution in the visible and near infrared ranges. In the resonance tunneling regime, we find that for transverse-magnetic incident polarization, field localization effects contribute to a waveguiding phenomenon that makes it possible for the light to remain confined within a small fraction of a wavelength, without any transverse boundaries, due to the suppression of diffraction. This effect is related to negative refraction of the Poynting vector inside each metal layer, balanced by normal refraction inside the adjacent dielectric layer: The degree of field localization and material dispersion together determine the total momentum that resides within any given layer, and thus the direction of energy flow. We find that the transport of evanescent wave vectors is mediated by the excitation of quasi-stationary, low group velocity surface waves responsible for...

  4. Photocatalysis in the visible range of sub-stoichiometric anatase films prepared by MOCVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anatase phase of titanium oxide is the most promising photocatalyst material for organic pollutant degradation. However, due to its large band gap energy (3.2 eV) it is not viable to use sunlight as an energy source for the photocatalysis activation, and so, ultraviolet (UV) radiation below the wavelength of 380 nm is required. This paper focuses on the experimental demonstration of the reduction of this large band gap energy by inducing defects in the anatase structure under the form of oxygen sub-stoichiometry. TiO2 thin films were prepared in a metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) reactor. The samples stoichiometry was measured by the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) technique. Optical characterisation was also performed and the photodegradation activity in the visible range was tested using nonylphenol, which is one of the most harmful pollutants present in waste waters

  5. Photocatalysis in the visible range of sub-stoichiometric anatase films prepared by MOCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justicia, I. [ICMAB/CSIC, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Garcia, G. [ICMAB/CSIC, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)]. E-mail: gemma@icmab.es; Battiston, G.A. [ICIS/CNR, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Gerbasi, R. [ICIS/CNR, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Ager, F. [CNA/CSIC Parque Tecnologico Cartuja 93, Avda Thomas A, Edison, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Guerra, M. [IIQAB/CSIC Jordi Girona, 18 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Caixach, J. [IIQAB/CSIC Jordi Girona, 18 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Pardo, J.A. [ICMAB/CSIC, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Rivera, J. [IIQAB/CSIC Jordi Girona, 18 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Figueras, A. [ICMAB/CSIC, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Campus UNAM Juriquilla, 76230 Queretaro (Mexico)

    2005-08-25

    Anatase phase of titanium oxide is the most promising photocatalyst material for organic pollutant degradation. However, due to its large band gap energy (3.2 eV) it is not viable to use sunlight as an energy source for the photocatalysis activation, and so, ultraviolet (UV) radiation below the wavelength of 380 nm is required. This paper focuses on the experimental demonstration of the reduction of this large band gap energy by inducing defects in the anatase structure under the form of oxygen sub-stoichiometry. TiO{sub 2} thin films were prepared in a metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) reactor. The samples stoichiometry was measured by the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) technique. Optical characterisation was also performed and the photodegradation activity in the visible range was tested using nonylphenol, which is one of the most harmful pollutants present in waste waters.

  6. Statistical analysis of the impact of spectral correlation on observed formation constants from UV-visible spectroscopic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinrath, Günther; Lis, Stefan; Piskula, Zbigniew

    2004-01-01

    Information retrieved from UV-visible spectroscopic data by application of a self-modelling factor analysis algorithm showed apparently systematically shifted thermodynamic properties for the same chemical system as a function of spectral slit widths. This empirical observation triggered a systematic investigation into the likely effects of residual and spectral correlation on the numerical results from quantitative spectroscopic investigations. If slit width was a nuisance factor it would reduce the comparability of information evaluated from spectroscopic data. The influence of spectral slit width was investigated by simulation, i.e. by generating and evaluating synthetic spectra with known properties. The simulations showed that increasing spectral correlation may introduce bias into factor analysis evaluations. By evaluation of the complete measurement uncertainty budget using threshold bootstrap target factor (TB CAT) analysis, the apparent shifts are insignificant relative to the total width of the quantity's measurement uncertainty. Increasing the slit widths causes some systematic effects, for example broadening of the registered spectral bands and reduction of spectral noise, because of higher light intensity passing to the detector. Hence, the observed systematic shifts in mean values might be caused by some latent correlation. As a general conclusion, slit width does not affect bias. However, the simulations show that spectral correlation and residual correlation may cause bias. Residual correlation can be taken into account by computer-intensive statistical methods, for example moving block or threshold bootstrap analysis. Spectral correlation is a property of the chemical system under study and cannot be manipulated. As a major result, evidence is given showing that stronger spectral correlation ( r<-0.7) causes non-negligible bias in the evaluated thermodynamic information from such a system. PMID:14615865

  7. Discrete spectral selection and wavelength encoding from a visible continuum using optical MEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a novel optical system for discrete selection of precise, user-defined spectral regions from the emitted spectrum of a white light source. The device, which is based on an array of electrostatically actuated, achromatic micro-mirrors, allows us to select signals with spectral widths between 4 and 15 nm from the super-continuum (∼400 to ∼750 nm), with an extinction ratio of more than 90% and a spectral power density of 15 µW nm−1. Each optical MEMS element from the array can be switched asynchronously at a selected frequency performing both the spatial selection and the frequency modulation of a specific narrow spectral region. The method we describe allows the spectral and/or temporal and polarization encoding of the selected spectral bands and may find extensive applications in biomedical research

  8. Practical Atmospheric Correction Algorithms for a Multi-Spectral Sensor From the Visible Through the Thermal Spectral Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borel, C.C.; Villeneuve, P.V.; Clodium, W.B.; Szymenski, J.J.; Davis, A.B.

    1999-04-04

    Deriving information about the Earth's surface requires atmospheric corrections of the measured top-of-the-atmosphere radiances. One possible path is to use atmospheric radiative transfer codes to predict how the radiance leaving the ground is affected by the scattering and attenuation. In practice the atmosphere is usually not well known and thus it is necessary to use more practical methods. The authors will describe how to find dark surfaces, estimate the atmospheric optical depth, estimate path radiance and identify thick clouds using thresholds on reflectance and NDVI and columnar water vapor. The authors describe a simple method to correct a visible channel contaminated by a thin cirrus clouds.

  9. External quantum efficiency of Pt/n-GaN Schottky diodes in the spectral range 5-500nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The external quantum efficiency in the spectral wavelength range 5-500nm of a large active area Pt/n-type GaN Schottky photodiode that exhibits low reverse bias leakage current, is reported. The Schottky photodiodes were fabricated from n-/n+ epitaxial layers grown by low pressure metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy on single crystal c-plane sapphire. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of several 0.25cm2 devices are presented together with the capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics of one of these devices. A leakage current as low as 14 pA at 0.5V reverse bias is reported, for a 0.25cm2 diode. The ultraviolet quantum efficiency measurements show that the diodes can be used as radiation hard detectors for the 5-365nm spectral range without the use of visible blocking filters. A peak responsivity of 77.5mA/W at 320nm is reported for one of the fabricated devices, corresponding to a spectral detectivity, D*=1.5x1014cmHz1/2W-1. The average detectivity between 250 and 350nm, for the same device, is reported to be D-bar*=1.3x1014cmHz1/2W-1. The spatial responsivity uniformity variation was established, using H2 Lyman-? radiation, to be +/-3% across the surface of a typical 0.25cm2 diode

  10. Demonstration of a spatial-spectral holographic LIDAR range-Doppler processor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new approach to laser interferometric Doppler and ranging (LIDAR) processing using spatial-spectral holography (SSH). In this approach, broadband optical signals from a random noise or frequency-modulated laser are transmitted and reflected off remote targets. The return signals interfere spatially and spectrally with a local copy of the original transmit signal in an SSH medium, resulting in spectral gratings that have a spectral period inversely proportional to the LIDAR target's range and a position proportional to the target's Doppler (or velocity). These gratings are subsequently read out by a slowly chirped source onto a parallel detector array, and the velocity and range of the targets are inferred. We present the theoretical framework that describes the function of the LIDAR processor, as well as proof-of-concept experimental results

  11. Multi range spectral feature fitting for hyperspectral imagery in extracting oilseed rape planting area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhuokun; Huang, Jingfeng; Wang, Fumin

    2013-12-01

    Spectral feature fitting (SFF) is a commonly used strategy for hyperspectral imagery analysis to discriminate ground targets. Compared to other image analysis techniques, SFF does not secure higher accuracy in extracting image information in all circumstances. Multi range spectral feature fitting (MRSFF) from ENVI software allows user to focus on those interesting spectral features to yield better performance. Thus spectral wavelength ranges and their corresponding weights must be determined. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the performance of MRSFF in oilseed rape planting area extraction. A practical method for defining the weighted values, the variance coefficient weight method, was proposed to set up criterion. Oilseed rape field canopy spectra from the whole growth stage were collected prior to investigating its phenological varieties; oilseed rape endmember spectra were extracted from the Hyperion image as identifying samples to be used in analyzing the oilseed rape field. Wavelength range divisions were determined by the difference between field-measured spectra and image spectra, and image spectral variance coefficient weights for each wavelength range were calculated corresponding to field-measured spectra from the closest date. By using MRSFF, wavelength ranges were classified to characterize the target's spectral features without compromising spectral profile's entirety. The analysis was substantially successful in extracting oilseed rape planting areas (RMSE ≤ 0.06), and the RMSE histogram indicated a superior result compared to a conventional SFF. Accuracy assessment was based on the mapping result compared with spectral angle mapping (SAM) and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). The MRSFF yielded a robust, convincible result and, therefore, may further the use of hyperspectral imagery in precision agriculture.

  12. Detection of wavelengths in the visible range using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Leonardo; Morales, Yailteh; Mattos, Lorenzo; Torres, Cesar O.

    2013-11-01

    This paper shows the design and implementation of a fiber optic sensor for detecting and identifying wavelengths in the visible range. The system consists of a diffuse optical fiber, a conventional laser diode 650nm, 2.5mW of power, an ambient light sensor LX1972, a PIC 18F2550 and LCD screen for viewing. The principle used in the detection of the lambda is based on specular reflection and absorption. The optoelectronic device designed and built used the absorption and reflection properties of the material under study, having as active optical medium a bifurcated optical fiber, which is optically coupled to an ambient light sensor, which makes the conversion of light signals to electricas, procedure performed by a microcontroller, which acquires and processes the signal. To verify correct operation of the assembly were utilized the color cards of sewing thread and nail polish as samples for analysis. This optoelectronic device can be used in many applications such as quality control of industrial processes, classification of corks or bottle caps, color quality of textiles, sugar solutions, polymers and food among others.

  13. [Influence of human body target's spectral characteristics on visual range of low light level image intensifiers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Ju; Yang, Wen-Bin; Xu, Hui; Liu, Lei; Tao, Yuan-Yaun

    2013-11-01

    To study the effect of different human target's spectral reflective characteristic on low light level (LLL) image intensifier's distance, based on the spectral characteristics of the night-sky radiation and the spectral reflective coefficients of common clothes, we established a equation of human body target's spectral reflective distribution, and analyzed the spectral reflective characteristics of different human targets wearing the clothes of different color and different material, and from the actual detection equation of LLL image intensifier distance, discussed the detection capability of LLL image intensifier for different human target. The study shows that the effect of different human target's spectral reflective characteristic on LLL image intensifier distance is mainly reflected in the average reflectivity rho(-) and the initial contrast of the target and the background C0. Reflective coefficient and spectral reflection intensity of cotton clothes are higher than polyester clothes, and detection capability of LLL image intensifier is stronger for the human target wearing cotton clothes. Experimental results show that the LLL image intensifiers have longer visual ranges for targets who wear cotton clothes than targets who wear same color but polyester clothes, and have longer visual ranges for targets who wear light-colored clothes than targets who wear dark-colored clothes. And in the full moon illumination conditions, LLL image intensifiers are more sensitive to the clothes' material. PMID:24555382

  14. Thin chalcogenide capillaries as efficient waveguides in the mid-IR - THz spectral range

    CERN Document Server

    Mazhorova, Anna; Ung, Bora; Rozé, Mathieu; Gorgutsa, Stepan; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2011-01-01

    We present chalcogenide glass As2Se3 capillaries as efficient waveguides in the mid-IR and THz spectral ranges. The capillaries are fabricated using a double crucible glass drawing technique. The wall thickness of the glass capillary is properly designed and controlled during drawing, and we are able to produce capillaries with different wall thickness, starting from 12 \\mum and up to 130 \\mum. Such capillaries show low loss properties in the whole target wavelength region. In the mid-IR range guidance is governed by Fresnel reflection and antiguidance mechanisms (ARROWs), while in the THz spectral range thin walls capillaries guide via total internal reflection.

  15. Luminescence of nuclear-induced rare-gas plasmas in near infrared spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, A. A.; Gorbunov, V. V.; Melnikov, S. P.; Mukhamatullin, A. Kh.; Pikulev, A. A.; Sinitsyn, A. V.; Sinyanskii, A. A.; Tsvetkov, V. M.

    2006-05-01

    The investigation results of the spectral-luminescent characteristics of rare gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe and their binary mixtures He-Ne(Ar,Kr,Xe), Ne-Ar(Kr,Xe), Ar-Kr(Xe), and Kr-Xe under high pressures in the 740-1100 nm spectral range are presented. Excitation of gas media was carried out by uranium fission fragments. The information on the absolute intensities of the spectral lines belonging to the transitions of Nel, An, KrI, and XeI was obtained. The lines belonging to atomic transitions of 0, N, and C were also observed.

  16. Few layers graphene as thermally activated optical modulator in the visible-near IR spectral range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, J L; Hernández-Cordero, Juan; Muhl, S; Mendoza, D

    2016-01-01

    We report the temperature modulation of the optical transmittance of a few layers of graphene (FLG). The FLG was heated either by the Joule effect of the current flowing between coplanar electrodes or by the absorption of a continuous-wave 532 nm laser. The optical signals used to evaluate the modulation of the FLG were at 633, 975, and 1550 nm; the last wavelengths are commonly used in optical communications. We also evaluated the effect of the substrate on the modulation effect by comparing the performance of a freely suspended FLG sample with one mounted on a glass substrate. Our results show that the modulation of the optical transmittance of FLG can be from millihertz to kilohertz. PMID:26696185

  17. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy of semiconductors for optical applications beyond the visible spectral range

    OpenAIRE

    Chernikov, Alexey A.

    2012-01-01

    Since the development of the first light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in the early 1960’s [1, 2], opto-electronic technology based on the semiconducting materials evolved rapidly in the last half of the century. Today, barely all aspects of the generation, control, and detection of light are potentially covered by the solid-state semiconductor devices. The reason is a unique combination of flexibility, low-cost fabrication, as well as c...

  18. Micro-optical elements functioning in non-visible spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Andy Z. Z.; Bergström, Andreas; Huo, Vicky Z. J.; Almqvist, Susanne; Kaplan, Wlodek; Andersson, Jan Y.

    2010-05-01

    Nowadays novel micro-fabrication and wafer-based manufacturing approach allows realizing micro-optics in a way scientists have dreamt for generations, in particular, utilizing nano-imprint lithography as fabrication tooling enables greatly accelerating the micro-optics technology to its frontier. In this report, we present wafer-scale fabrication of various types of micro-optical elements based on photoresist, benzocyclobutene, photocurable imprint resist, and semiconductor materials by using thermal reflow, reactive ion etching, and imprint techniques. Especially, several concave or convex 3-dimensional micro-optical structures shaped by imprint method are detailed. These micro-optical elements can be monolithically or hybrid integrated onto optoelectronics devices, such as photodetectors and emitters as optical beam focuser, collimator, filter, or anti-reflectance elements. As application examples, polymer microlenses were integrated directly on the top of UV dual functional devices and quantum dot long wavelength infrared photodetectors, respectively.

  19. Continuous Spatial Tuning of Laser Emissions in a Full Visible Spectral Range

    OpenAIRE

    Mi-Yun Jeong; Jeong Weon Wu

    2011-01-01

    In order to achieve a continuous tuning of laser emission, the authors designed and fabricated three types of cholesteric liquid crystal cells with pitch gradient, a wedge cell with positive slope, a wedge cell with negative slope, and a parallel cell. The length of the cholesteric liquid crystal pitch could be elongated up to 10 nm, allowing the lasing behavior of continuous or discontinuous spatial tuning determined by the boundary conditions of the cholesteric liquid crystal cell. In the w...

  20. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy of semiconductors for optical applications beyond the visible spectral range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernikov, Alexey A.

    2011-07-01

    The work discussed in this thesis is focused on the experimental studies regarding these three steps: (1) investigation of the fundamental effects, (2) characterization of new material systems, and (3) optimization of the semiconductor devices. In all three cases, the experimental technique of choice is photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The thesis is organized as follows. Chapter 2 gives a summary of the PL properties of semiconductors relevant for this work. The first section deals with the intrinsic processes in an ideal direct band gap material, starting with a brief summary of the theoretical background followed by the overview of a typical PL scenario. In the second part of the chapter, the role of the lattice-vibrations, the internal electric fields as well as the influence of the band-structure and the dielectric environment are discussed. Finally, extrinsic PL properties are presented in the third section, focusing on defects and disorder in real materials. In chapter 3, the experimental realization of the spectroscopic studies is discussed. The time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) setup is presented, focusing on the applied excitation source, non-linear frequency mixing, and the operation of the streak camera used for the detection. In addition, linear spectroscopy setup for continous-wave (CW) PL and absorption measurements is illustrated. Chapter 4 aims at the study of the interactions between electrons and lattice-vibrations in semiconductor crystals relevant for the proper description of carrier dynamics as well as the heat-transfer processes. The presented discussion covers the experimental studies of many-body effects in phonon-assisted emission of semiconductors due to the carriercarrier Coulomb-interaction. The corresponding theoretical background is discussed in detail in chapter 2. The investigations are focused on the two main questions regarding electron-hole plasma contributions to the phonon-assisted light-matter interaction as well as the impact of Coulomb-correlations on the carrier-phonon scattering. The experiments presented in chapter 5 deal with the characterization of recently synthesizedmaterial systems: ZnO/(ZnMg)O heterostructures, GaN quantum wires (QWires), as well as (GaAs)Bi quantum wells (QWs). TRPL spectroscopy is applied to gain insight as well as a better understanding of the respective carrier relaxation and recombination processes crucial for the device operation. The aim of the studies is the systematic investigation of carrier dynamics influenced by disorder. The measurements are supported by kinetic Monte- Carlo simulations, providing a quantitative analysis of carrier localization effects. In chapter 6, optimization and characterization studies of semiconductor lasers, based on the well-studied (GaIn)As material system designed for NIR applications, are performed. The device under investigation is the so-called vertical-external-cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL). The experiments focus on the study of the thermal properties of a high-power VECSEL. The distribution and removal of the excess heat as well as the optimization of the laser for increased performance are addressed applying different heat-spreading and heat-transfer approaches. Based on these investigations, the possibility for power-scaling is evaluated and the underlying restrictions are analyzed. The latter investigations are performed applying spatially-resolved PL spectroscopy. An experimental setup is designed for monitoring the spatial distribution of heat in the semiconductor structure during laser operation.

  1. AlGaInP quantum dots for optoelectronic applications in the visible spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of this work is the fabrication and characterization of AlGaInP quantum dots on GaP an GaAs substrates. Based on such quantum dots, semiconductor lasers have been realized, emitting between 660 nm and 730 nm at room temperature. The examination of broad-area lasers processed on these structures suggests that active layers of larger quantum dots with higher aluminium contents lead to lasers with better performance at similar emission wavelength. Additionally, quantum dots grown on GaP substrates have been characterized, that were embedded in AlGaP barriers. Since these barriers exhibit an indirect bandgap, a non-trivial band alignment within these structures is expected. In this work, numerical 3D-simulations are employed to calculate the band alignment including strain and internal fields. Also, ground state wavefunctions of charge carriers have been determined. A thorough comparison between theory and experiment connects the measured emission wavelength and luminescence intensities with calculated transition energies and wavefunction overlaps.

  2. Analysis of the Intrinsic Mid-Infrared L-band to Visible--Near-Infrared Flux Ratios in Spectral Synthesis Models of Composite Stellar Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Duho; Windhorst, Rogier A

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the intrinsic flux ratios of various visible--near-infrared filters with respect to 3.5micron for simple and composite stellar populations, and their dependence on age, metallicity and star formation history. UV/optical light from stars is reddened and attenuated by dust, where different sightlines across a galaxy suffer varying amounts of extinction. Tamura et al. (2009) developed an approximate method to correct for dust extinction on a pixel-by-pixel basis, dubbed the "beta_V" method, by comparing the observed flux ratio to an empirical estimate of the intrinsic ratio of visible and ~3.5micron data. Through extensive modeling, we aim to validate the "beta_V" method for various filters spanning the visible through near-infrared wavelength range, for a wide variety of simple and composite stellar populations. Combining Starburst99 and BC03 models, we built spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of simple (SSP) and composite (CSP) stellar populations for various realistic star formation histories (SF...

  3. Comparison of plasma visible spectral emissions between Nova-UNICAMP and TCABR tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison between the visible spectrum emissions observed on the Nova-UNICAMP and TCABR tokamak plasmas has been made in this work using a hand top HR4000 Ocean Optics spectrometer equipped with a CCD detector. A number of 58 emission lines, in which 22 are common to both machines, have been observed and identified. The differences in the observed spectrum can be explained by the difference in the time integration used in these measurements and by the materials compositions of the limiter and electrode in the TCABR tokamak. Nearby peak emissions have been separated using multi-peak Gaussian fit curves obtaining separation between peak centres with the same order of the spectrometer resolution. The HR4000 spectrometer can be routinely used to monitor the impurity species in the visible spectrum from the different tokamak windows.

  4. Comparison of Plasma Visible Spectral Emissions Between Nova-UNICAMP and TCABR Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, F.; Machida, M.; Ronchi, G.; Schmutzler, L. M. F.; Severo, J. H. F.; Nascimento, I. C.; Sanada, E. K.

    2014-05-01

    A comparison between the visible spectrum emissions observed on the Nova-UNICAMP and TCABR tokamak plasmas has been made in this work using a hand top HR4000 Ocean Optics spectrometer equipped with a CCD detector. A number of 58 emission lines, in which 22 are common to both machines, have been observed and identified. The differences in the observed spectrum can be explained by the difference in the time integration used in these measurements and by the materials compositions of the limiter and electrode in the TCABR tokamak. Nearby peak emissions have been separated using multi-peak Gaussian fit curves obtaining separation between peak centres with the same order of the spectrometer resolution. The HR4000 spectrometer can be routinely used to monitor the impurity species in the visible spectrum from the different tokamak windows.

  5. [Nitrogen status diagnosis of summer maize by using visible spectral analysis technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qin-Ping; Jia, Liang-Liang; Rui, Yu-Kui; Chen, Xin-Ping; Zhang, Fu-Suo

    2009-02-01

    In the present paper, a field experiment with different N rates was conducted to study the possibility of using the visible spectrum of crop canopy to diagnose N status for the summer maize. Visible spectrum parameters were compared with the leaf SPAD readings, total N concentration and vein nitrate concentration. Field measurement data showed that the greenness intensity, blueness intensity, normalized redness intensity, normalized greenness intensity and normalized blueness intensity of the maize canopy have significant relationships with leaf SPAD readings, total N concentration and vein nitrate concentration (under a low N input condition, with vein nitrate concentration leaves unfold stage. The greenness intensity, blueness intensity, normalized greenness intensity and normalized blueness intensity have significant relationship with the vein nitrate concentration under a low N input condition (vein nitrate concentration visible spectrum parameters reached a plateau with the vein nitrate concentration increasing. To sum up, the normalized greenness intensity (NGI) and normalized blueness intensity (NBI) have higher r values (0.45-0.66) than other parameters. PMID:19445221

  6. Dispersion model for optical thin films applicable in wide spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franta, Daniel; Nečas, David; Ohlídal, Ivan; Giglia, Angelo

    2015-09-01

    In the optics industry thin film systems are used to construct various interference devices such as antireflective coatings, high-reflectance mirrors, beam splitters and filters. The optical characterization of complex optical systems can not be performed by measurements only in the short spectral range in which the interference devices will be employed because the measured data do not contain sufficient information about all relevant parameters of these systems. The characterization of film materials requires the extension of the spectral range of the measurements to the IR region containing phonon absorption and to the UV region containing the electronic excitations. However, this leads to necessity of a dispersion model suitable for the description of the dielectric response in the wide spectral range. Such model must respect the physical conditions following from theory of dispersion, particularly Kramers-Kronig relations and integrability imposed by sum rules. This work presents the construction of a universal dispersion model composed from individual contributions representing both electronic and phonon excitations. The efficiency of presented model is given by the fact that all the contributions are described by analytical expressions. It is shown that the model is suitable for precise modeling of spectral dependencies of optical constants of a broad class of materials used in the optical industry for thin film systems such as MgF2, SiO2, Al2O3, HfO2, Ta2O5 and TiO2 in the spectral range from far IR to vacuum UV.

  7. High-q microring resonator with narrow free spectral range for pulse repetition rate multiplication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Ji, Hua; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Galili, Michael; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a silicon-on-insulator microring resonator with a free-spectral-range of 0.32 nm, an extinction ratio of 27 dB, and a quality factor of ~140900 at 1550 nm that is used for pulse repetition-rate multiplication from 10 to 40 GHz.......We demonstrate a silicon-on-insulator microring resonator with a free-spectral-range of 0.32 nm, an extinction ratio of 27 dB, and a quality factor of ~140900 at 1550 nm that is used for pulse repetition-rate multiplication from 10 to 40 GHz....

  8. A new list of thorium and argon spectral lines in the visible

    OpenAIRE

    Lovis, C; Pepe, F.

    2007-01-01

    Aims. We present a new list of thorium and argon emission lines in the visible obtained by analyzing high-resolution (R=110,000) spectra of a ThAr hollow cathode lamp. The aim of this new line list is to allow significant improvements in the quality of wavelength calibration for medium- to high-resolution astronomical spectrographs. Methods. We use a series of ThAr lamp exposures obtained with the HARPS instrument (High Accuracy Radial-velocity Planet Searcher) to detect previously unknown li...

  9. Spectral absorptions on Phobos and Deimos in the visible/near infrared wavelengths and their compositional constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraeman, A. A.; Murchie, S. L.; Arvidson, R. E.; Clark, R. N.; Morris, R. V.; Rivkin, A. S.; Vilas, F.

    2014-02-01

    Absorption features on Phobos and Deimos in the visible/near infrared wavelength region (0.4-3.9 μm) are mapped using observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM). Fe2+ electronic absorptions diagnostic of olivine and pyroxene are not detected. A broad absorption centered around 0.65 μm within the red spectral units of both moons is detected, and this feature is also evident in telescopic, Pathfinder, and Phobos-2 observations of Phobos. A 2.8 μm metal-OH combination absorption on both moons is also detected in the CRISM data, and this absorption is shallower in the Phobos blue unit than in the Phobos red unit and Deimos. The strength, position, and shape of both of the 0.65 μm and 2.8 μm absorptions are similar to features seen on red-sloped, low-albedo primitive asteroids. Two end-member hypotheses are presented to explain the spectral features on Phobos and Deimos. The first invokes the presence of highly desiccated Fe-phyllosilicate minerals indigenous to the bodies, and the second invokes Rayleigh scattering and absorption of small iron particles formed by exogenic space weathering processing, coupled with implantation of H from solar wind. Both end-member hypotheses may play a role, and in situ exploration will be needed to ultimately determine the underlying causes for the pair of spectral features observed on Phobos and Deimos.

  10. Visible light optical coherence tomography for in vivo imaging the spectral contrasts of the retinal nerve fiber layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyang; Hu, Jianming; Knighton, Robert W.; Huang, Xiang-Run; Puliafito, Carmen A.; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate goal of the study is to provide an imaging tool to detect the earliest signs of glaucoma before clinically visible damage occurs to the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). Studies have shown that the optical reflectance of the damaged RNFL at short wavelength (RNFL. To image the spectral contrasts we built a dual-band spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with centered wavelength of 415nm (VIS) and 808nm (NIR), respectively. The light at the two bands was provided by the fundamental and frequency-doubled outputs of a broadband Ti: Sapphire laser. The depth resolutions of the VIS and NIR OCT systems are 12.2?m and 4.7?m in the air. The system was applied to imaging the rat retina in vivo. Significantly different appearances between the OCT cross sectional images at the two bands are observed. The experimental results showed that the dual-band OCT system is feasible for imaging the spectral contrasts of the RNFL.

  11. Sb-free quantum cascade lasers in the 3–4 μm spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the design and implementation of Sb-free short wavelength strain-compensated quantum cascade lasers in the 3–4 μm spectral range is presented. Due to the presence of highly strained AlAs-barrier layers, the optimization of the epitaxial growth process is firstly discussed. The used active region design is then presented together with the observed laser performance. Watt-level room temperature emission at 3.3 μm is shown for Fabry–Perot devices and laser operation in pulsed mode is observed above 350 K. The laser performance is comparable with Sb-containing quantum cascade lasers. Spectral tuning of the lasers in an external cavity configuration over more than 275 cm−1 is achieved with an emission wavelength as short as 3.15 μm. For the first time in this spectral range, results on single-mode buried heterostructure distributed feedback lasers are shown. (paper)

  12. Fabrication of WideRangeVisible Photocatalyst Bi2WO6?x nanoplates via Surface Oxygen Vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yanhui; Yao, Wenqing; Zong, Ruilong; Zhu, Yongfa

    2016-01-01

    Bi2WO6 as a high visible-light-driven catalyst has been aroused broad interest. However, it can only be excitated by the light with ??rangevisible photoresponse Bi2WO6?x nanoplates were fabricated by introducing surface oxygen vacancies through the controllable hydrogen reduction method. The visible photoresponse wavelength range is extended from 450?nm to more than 600?nm. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of Bi2WO6?x is also increased and is 2.1 times as high as that of pristine Bi2WO6. The extending of the photoresponse range and the enhancement of the photoactivity both can be attributed to the surface-oxygen-vacancy states. This is because surface-oxygenvacancy states generated above and partly overlapping of with the valence band (VB) will result in the rising of valence band maximum (VBM), thus broadening the VB width. This approach is proposed to develop many types of widerangevisible optical materials and to be applicable to many narrow and wide bandgap materials. PMID:26777609

  13. Fabrication of Wide-Range-Visible Photocatalyst Bi2WO6-x nanoplates via Surface Oxygen Vacancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yanhui; Yao, Wenqing; Zong, Ruilong; Zhu, Yongfa

    2016-01-01

    Bi2WO6 as a high visible-light-driven catalyst has been aroused broad interest. However, it can only be excitated by the light with ??range-visible photoresponse Bi2WO6-x nanoplates were fabricated by introducing surface oxygen vacancies through the controllable hydrogen reduction method. The visible photoresponse wavelength range is extended from 450?nm to more than 600?nm. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of Bi2WO6-x is also increased and is 2.1 times as high as that of pristine Bi2WO6. The extending of the photoresponse range and the enhancement of the photoactivity both can be attributed to the surface-oxygen-vacancy states. This is because surface-oxygen-vacancy states generated above and partly overlapping of with the valence band (VB) will result in the rising of valence band maximum (VBM), thus broadening the VB width. This approach is proposed to develop many types of wide-range-visible optical materials and to be applicable to many narrow and wide bandgap materials. PMID:26777609

  14. First Experiences Using Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Volcano Observation in the Visible Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, M.; Krüger, L.; Bange, J.

    2007-05-01

    Many of the most active volcanoes in the world are located in Middle and South America. While permanently installed sensors for seismicity give reliable supervision of volcanic activities, they lack the possibility to determine occurrence and extent of surface activities. Both from the point of science and civil protection, visible documentation of activities is of great interest. While satellites and manned aircraft already offer many possibilities, they also have disadvantages like delayed or poor image data availability or high costs. The Institute of Aerospace Systems of the Technical University of Braunschweig, in collaboration with the spin-off company Mavionics, developed a family of extremely small and lightweight Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), with the smallest aircraft weighting only 550~g (19~ounces) at a wing span of 50 cm (20~inch). These aircraft are operating completely automatically, controlled by a highly miniaturized autopilot system. Flight mission is defined by a list of GPS waypoints using a conventional notebook. While in radio range, current position and status of the aircraft is displayed on the notebook and waypoints can easily be changed by the user. However, when radio connection is not available, the aircraft operates on its on, completing the flight mission automatically. This greatly increases the operating range of the system. Especially for the purpose of volcano observation in South America, the aircraft Carolo~P330 was developed, weighting 5~kg (11~pounds) at a wing span of 3.3~m ( 11~ft). The whole system can be easily carried by car and the electric propulsion system avoids handling of flammable liquids. The batteries can be recharged in the field. Carolo~P330 has an endurance of up to 90~minutes at a flight speed of 25~m/s, giving it a maximum range of 67 km (41~miles). It was especially designed to operate under harsh conditions. The payload is a digital still camera, which delivers aerial images with a resolution of up to 8~megapixel. On a field campaign in 2005, the performance of the system was evaluated at the two active Ecuadorian volcanoes Cotopaxi and El~Reventador. After hand-launch at Mt. Cotopaxi, the autopilot brought the aircraft up to 7,000~m above sea level (starting from a plateau on 4,500~m a.s.l.), with temperatures around the freezing point. At El~Reventador active lava flows were documented in the tropical montane rain forest. Since the position and attitude of the aircraft is recorded within the autopilot system, the single aerial images can be referenced automatically after the flight to form a mosaic of images. The whole processing chain from mission planning to image mosaic takes less than half a day. Besides the technical details of this cost-effective remote sensing system, the results of the measurement campaign in 2005 will be presented. An outlook will discuss the installation of other payload for thermal imaging or air sampling.

  15. UV and visible reflection spectral study of CO adsorption on the surface of yttrium, erbium, and holmium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffuse reflection spectroscopy in the UV and visible ranges was used to study the surface compounds formed upon the adsorption of CO on Y2O3, Er2O3, and Ho2-O3. The adsorption of CO at 300 K on a surface aged at 1073 K is accompanied by the appearance of bands at 340, 350, and 450 nm, which are related to dioxoketenes (C2O3)2-, croconates (CO)52-, and rhodizonates (CO)62-

  16. Optical properties of human colon tissues in the 350 2500 nm spectral range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashkatov, A N; Genina, E A; Kochubey, V I; Kolesnikova, E A; Tuchin, V V [N.G. Chernyshevsky Saratov State University, Saratov (Russian Federation); Rubtsov, V S [V.I.Razumovsky Saratov State Medical University, Saratov (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-31

    We present the optical characteristics of the mucosa and submucosa of human colon tissue. The experiments are performed in vitro using a LAMBDA 950 spectrophotometer in the 350 2500 nm spectral range. The absorption and scattering coefficients and the scattering anisotropy factor are calculated based on the measured diffuse reflectance and total and collimated transmittance spectra using the inverse Monte Carlo method. (laser biophotonics)

  17. Spectral printer modeling for transparency media: toward high dynamic range scene reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElvain, Jon; Miller, Jonathan; Jin, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    We propose a system for display of large format images such that natural scenes can be approximated in a laboratory setting, both spectrally and in dynamic range. The system uses a large area (48"x36") high intensity light box constructed using multiple xenon arc lamps with diffusers to maximize surface uniformity. This source is used as a back light for multiple transparency layers mounted on a rigid plexiglass substrate, where images are printed on the transparency layers using a wide format inkjet printer. A detailed transparency printer model for this system is described, where the spectral transmittance can be predicted with a high degree of accuracy for any given combination of input digital ink values (CMYKRGB). This spectral printer model, in conjunction with knowledge of the spectral characteristics of the back light, can be used to approximate the spectral radiance of a target scene. On a per-pixel level, nonlinear constrained optimization is used to solve for the combination of printer inks that produces the best estimate to the spectrum of the target scene. With this system, it is then possible to create realistic static images with a large dynamic range that can be used to benchmark camera systems in a controlled laboratory setting.

  18. Composite multi-lobe descriptor for cross spectral face recognition: matching active IR to visible light images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhicheng; Schmid, Natalia A.

    2015-05-01

    Matching facial images across electromagnetic spectrum presents a challenging problem in the field of biometrics and identity management. An example of this problem includes cross spectral matching of active infrared (IR) face images or thermal IR face images against a dataset of visible light images. This paper describes a new operator named Composite Multi-Lobe Descriptor (CMLD) for facial feature extraction in cross spectral matching of near-infrared (NIR) or short-wave infrared (SWIR) against visible light images. The new operator is inspired by the design of ordinal measures. The operator combines Gaussian-based multi-lobe kernel functions, Local Binary Pattern (LBP), generalized LBP (GLBP) and Weber Local Descriptor (WLD) and modifies them into multi-lobe functions with smoothed neighborhoods. The new operator encodes both the magnitude and phase responses of Gabor filters. The combining of LBP and WLD utilizes both the orientation and intensity information of edges. Introduction of multi-lobe functions with smoothed neighborhoods further makes the proposed operator robust against noise and poor image quality. Output templates are transformed into histograms and then compared by means of a symmetric Kullback-Leibler metric resulting in a matching score. The performance of the multi-lobe descriptor is compared with that of other operators such as LBP, Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG), ordinal measures, and their combinations. The experimental results show that in many cases the proposed method, CMLD, outperforms the other operators and their combinations. In addition to different infrared spectra, various standoff distances from close-up (1.5 m) to intermediate (50 m) and long (106 m) are also investigated in this paper. Performance of CMLD is evaluated for of each of the three cases of distances.

  19. Stability of curcumin in different solvent and solution media: UV-visible and steady-state fluorescence spectral study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Satyajit; Ghosh, Soumen; Moulik, Satya P

    2016-05-01

    In aqueous solution, curcumin is photodegradable (light sensitive), it is also self-degradable in the dark. In basic medium, the second process is enhanced. The dark process has been studied in water and also in a number of protic and aprotic solvents, and aqueous solutions of ionic liquids, pluronics, reverse micelles and salt. The kinetics of the process followed the first order rate law; a comparative as well as individual assessment of which has been made. The kinetics of curcumin self-degradation has been found to be fairly dependent on salt (NaCl) concentration. Curcumin molecules in solution may remain in the enol or keto-enol form. From the visible spectral analysis, an estimate of the proportions of these forms in aqueous ethanol medium has been made. The temperature effect on the visible and fluorescence spectra of curcumin has been also studied. The steady state fluorescence anisotropy of the photoactive curcumin has been evaluated in different solvent and solution media. The reversibility of the steady state fluorescence anisotropy of curcumin on heating and cooling conditions has been examined. The results herein presented are new and ought to be useful as the study of physicochemistry of curcumin has been gaining importance in the light of its biological importance. PMID:26985735

  20. Retrieval of the aerosol microstructure parameters from sun photometer data measured in a limited spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veretennikov, V. V.; Menshchikova, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of the upper limit λmax of the spectral range in which the atmospheric transmission is measured on the results of retrieval of the aerosol microstructure parameters when solving the inverse problem of sun photometry from the data of numerical modeling and field experiments is investigated. In the numerical experiment the aerosol model comprising fine submicron (f) and coarsely dispersed (c) particle fractions is used. Here λmax is chosen from the range 1.052-3.973 μm. The method of integral distributions is used to solve the inverse problem. It is demonstrated that the limited spectral range causes underestimation of the contribution of large particles to aerosol distributions. In particular, at λmax = 1.246 μm, losses of the retrieved concentration of particles of the c fraction against the background of the decreased (to 18 % at λ = 1.246 μm) volume aerosol concentration can reach 42 %.

  1. Evaluation of water-use efficiency in foxtail millet (Setaria italica) using visible-near infrared and thermal spectral sensing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Ellsworth, Patrick Z; Zhou, Jianfeng; Cousins, Asaph B; Sankaran, Sindhuja

    2016-05-15

    Water limitations decrease stomatal conductance (gs) and, in turn, photosynthetic rate (Anet), resulting in decreased crop productivity. The current techniques for evaluating these physiological responses are limited to leaf-level measures acquired by measuring leaf-level gas exchange. In this regard, proximal sensing techniques can be a useful tool in studying plant biology as they can be used to acquire plant-level measures in a high-throughput manner. However, to confidently utilize the proximal sensing technique for high-throughput physiological monitoring, it is important to assess the relationship between plant physiological parameters and the sensor data. Therefore, in this study, the application of rapid sensing techniques based on thermal imaging and visual-near infrared spectroscopy for assessing water-use efficiency (WUE) in foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv) was evaluated. The visible-near infrared spectral reflectance (350-2500nm) and thermal (7.5-14µm) data were collected at regular intervals from well-watered and drought-stressed plants in combination with other leaf physiological parameters (transpiration rate-E, Anet, gs, leaf carbon isotopic signature-δ(13)Cleaf, WUE). Partial least squares regression (PLSR) analysis was used to predict leaf physiological measures based on the spectral data. The PLSR modeling on the hyperspectral data yielded accurate and precise estimates of leaf E, gs, δ(13)Cleaf, and WUE with coefficient of determination in a range of 0.85-0.91. Additionally, significant differences in average leaf temperatures (~1°C) measured with a thermal camera were observed between well-watered plants and drought-stressed plants. In summary, the visible-near infrared reflectance data, and thermal images can be used as a potential rapid technique for evaluating plant physiological responses such as WUE. PMID:26992551

  2. Development of a Compact Range-gated Vision System to Monitor Structures in Low-visibility Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image acquisition in disaster area or radiation area of nuclear industry is an important function for safety inspection and preparing appropriate damage control plans. So, automatic vision system to monitor structures and facilities in blurred smoking environments such as the places of a fire and detonation is essential. Vision systems can't acquire an image when the illumination light is blocked by disturbance materials, such as smoke, fog and dust. To overcome the imaging distortion caused by obstacle materials, robust vision systems should have extra-functions, such as active illumination through disturbance materials. One of active vision system is a range-gated imaging system. The vision system based on the range-gated imaging system can acquire image data from the blurred and darken light environments. Range-gated imaging (RGI) is a direct active visualization technique using a highly sensitive image sensor and a high intensity illuminant. Currently, the range-gated imaging technique providing 2D and range image data is one of emerging active vision technologies. The range-gated imaging system gets vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, a high intensity illuminant illuminates for ultra-short time and a highly sensitive image sensor is gated by ultra-short exposure time to only get the illumination light. Here, the illuminant illuminates objects by flashing strong light through disturbance materials, such as smoke particles and dust particles. In contrast to passive conventional vision systems, the RGI active vision technology enables operation even in harsh environments like low-visibility smoky environment. In this paper, a compact range-gated vision system is developed to monitor structures in low-visibility environment. The system consists of illumination light, a range-gating camera and a control computer. Visualization experiments are carried out in low-visibility foggy environment to see imaging capability

  3. Development of a Compact Range-gated Vision System to Monitor Structures in Low-visibility Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Yong-Jin; Park, Seung-Kyu; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Dong-Lyul; Choi, Young-Soo; Jeong, Kyung-Min [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Image acquisition in disaster area or radiation area of nuclear industry is an important function for safety inspection and preparing appropriate damage control plans. So, automatic vision system to monitor structures and facilities in blurred smoking environments such as the places of a fire and detonation is essential. Vision systems can't acquire an image when the illumination light is blocked by disturbance materials, such as smoke, fog and dust. To overcome the imaging distortion caused by obstacle materials, robust vision systems should have extra-functions, such as active illumination through disturbance materials. One of active vision system is a range-gated imaging system. The vision system based on the range-gated imaging system can acquire image data from the blurred and darken light environments. Range-gated imaging (RGI) is a direct active visualization technique using a highly sensitive image sensor and a high intensity illuminant. Currently, the range-gated imaging technique providing 2D and range image data is one of emerging active vision technologies. The range-gated imaging system gets vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, a high intensity illuminant illuminates for ultra-short time and a highly sensitive image sensor is gated by ultra-short exposure time to only get the illumination light. Here, the illuminant illuminates objects by flashing strong light through disturbance materials, such as smoke particles and dust particles. In contrast to passive conventional vision systems, the RGI active vision technology enables operation even in harsh environments like low-visibility smoky environment. In this paper, a compact range-gated vision system is developed to monitor structures in low-visibility environment. The system consists of illumination light, a range-gating camera and a control computer. Visualization experiments are carried out in low-visibility foggy environment to see imaging capability.

  4. Metasurfaces based on Gallium Nitride High Contrast Gratings at Visible Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenhai; He, Shumin; Liu, Qifa; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yongjin; Zhu, Hongbo; Grünberg Research Centre Team

    2015-03-01

    Metasurfaces are currently attracting global attention due to their ability to achieve full control of light propagation. However, these metasurfaces have thus far been constructed mostly from metallic materials, which greatly limit the diffraction efficiencies because of the ohmic losses. Semiconducting metasurfaces offer one potential solution to the issue of losses. Besides, the use of semiconducting materials can broaden the applicability of metasurfaces, as they enable facile integration with electronics and mechanical systems and can benefit from mature semiconductor fabrication technologies. We have proposed visible-light metasurfaces (VLMs) capable of serving as lenses and beam deflecting elements based on gallium nitride (GaN) high contrast gratings (HCGs). By precisely manipulating the wave-fronts of the transmitted light, we theoretically demonstrate an HCG focusing lens with transmissivity of 83.0% and numerical aperture of 0.77, and a VLM with beam deflection angle of 6.03° and transmissivity as high as 93.3%. The proposed metasurfaces are promising for GaN-based visible light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which would be robust and versatile for controlling the output light propagation and polarization, as well as enhancing the extraction efficiency of the LEDs.

  5. Semiconductor lasers with a continuous tuning range above 100 nm in the nearest IR spectral region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostin, Yu O.; Ladugin, M. A.; Lobintsov, A. A.; Marmalyuk, A. A.; Chamorovsky, A. Yu; Shramenko, M. V.; Yakubovich, S. D.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed two new types of lasers based on quantum-confined semiconductor optical amplifiers with an acousto-optic tunable filter in an external fibre ring cavity. The lasers offer continuous wavelength tuning ranges from 780 to 885 and from 880 to 1010 nm, 20 mW of cw output power, and a tuning rate up to 104 nm s-1 at an instantaneous spectral linewidth less than 0.1 nm.

  6. Design of superachromatic quarter-wave retarders in a broad spectral range

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera Fenández, José María; Vilas, José Luis; Sánchez Brea, Luis Miguel; Bernabeu Martínez, Eusebio

    2015-01-01

    A superachromatic quarter-wave retarder using an arbitrary number of waveplates in a broadband spectral range has been proposed. Their design is based on the optimization of a merit function, the achromatism degree (AcD), which represents a global behavior metric for the retardation. By means of this technique, the thickness and azimuth of each waveplate is determined. The achromatism degree is a measure of the distance between the overall retardation and a target retardation weighted by the ...

  7. Radiometric calibration of optical microscopy and microspectroscopy apparata over a broad spectral range using a special thin-film luminescence standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Valenta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Application capabilities of optical microscopes and microspectroscopes can be considerably enhanced by a proper calibration of their spectral sensitivity. We propose and demonstrate a method of relative and absolute calibration of a microspectroscope over an extraordinary broad spectral range covered by two (parallel detection branches in visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The key point of the absolute calibration of a relative spectral sensitivity is application of the standard sample formed by a thin layer of Si nanocrystals with stable and efficient photoluminescence. The spectral PL quantum yield and the PL spatial distribution of the standard sample must be characterized by separate experiments. The absolutely calibrated microspectroscope enables to characterize spectral photon emittance of a studied object or even its luminescence quantum yield (QY if additional knowledge about spatial distribution of emission and about excitance is available. Capabilities of the calibrated microspectroscope are demonstrated by measuring external QY of electroluminescence from a standard poly-Si solar-cell and of photoluminescence of Er-doped Si nanocrystals.

  8. Radiometric calibration of optical microscopy and microspectroscopy apparata over a broad spectral range using a special thin-film luminescence standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application capabilities of optical microscopes and microspectroscopes can be considerably enhanced by a proper calibration of their spectral sensitivity. We propose and demonstrate a method of relative and absolute calibration of a microspectroscope over an extraordinary broad spectral range covered by two (parallel) detection branches in visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The key point of the absolute calibration of a relative spectral sensitivity is application of the standard sample formed by a thin layer of Si nanocrystals with stable and efficient photoluminescence. The spectral PL quantum yield and the PL spatial distribution of the standard sample must be characterized by separate experiments. The absolutely calibrated microspectroscope enables to characterize spectral photon emittance of a studied object or even its luminescence quantum yield (QY) if additional knowledge about spatial distribution of emission and about excitance is available. Capabilities of the calibrated microspectroscope are demonstrated by measuring external QY of electroluminescence from a standard poly-Si solar-cell and of photoluminescence of Er-doped Si nanocrystals

  9. Study on the Incidence of Opportunity Crime on Residential Streets Considering Traffic Volume and Visible Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaki MATSUNAGA

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available As a basic step, in this study we propose a model to describe the snatchincident on residential streets. This model is based on one of themethodologies of social science and the Crime Prevention ThroughEnvironmental Designs concept. The objective variable is the feasibility ofsnatch and explanatory variables are physical factors concerning roadnetwork design and traffic regulation, like traffic volume and visible rangeon streets.As the result of the application to actual situations, the model providedreasonable predictions for distribution of point of incidence in a streetsection. It is possible to examine the influence that road network design andtraffic regulation have on snatch by extending this model to road network.

  10. Thin chalcogenide capillaries as efficient waveguides in the mid-IR - THz spectral range

    OpenAIRE

    Mazhorova, Anna; Markov, Andrey; Ung, Bora; Rozé, Mathieu; Gorgutsa, Stepan; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2011-01-01

    We present chalcogenide glass As2Se3 capillaries as efficient waveguides in the mid-IR and THz spectral ranges. The capillaries are fabricated using a double crucible glass drawing technique. The wall thickness of the glass capillary is properly designed and controlled during drawing, and we are able to produce capillaries with different wall thickness, starting from 12 \\mum and up to 130 \\mum. Such capillaries show low loss properties in the whole target wavelength region. In the mid-IR rang...

  11. Wavelength conversion based spectral imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin

    There has been a strong, application driven development of Si-based cameras and spectrometers for imaging and spectral analysis of light in the visible and near infrared spectral range. This has resulted in very efficient devices, with high quantum efficiency, good signal to noise ratio and high...... resolution for this spectral region. Today, an increasing number of applications exists outside the spectral region covered by Si-based devices, e.g. within cleantech, medical or food imaging. We present a technology based on wavelength conversion which will extend the spectral coverage of state of the art...... visible or near infrared cameras and spectrometers to include other spectral regions of interest....

  12. ETA CARINAE ACROSS THE 2003.5 MINIMUM: ANALYSIS IN THE VISIBLE AND NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRAL REGION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an analysis of the visible through near-infrared spectrum of Eta Carinae (? Car) and its ejecta obtained during the '? Car Campaign with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT)'. This is a part of larger effort to present a complete ? Car spectrum, and extends the previously presented analyses with the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) in the UV (1240-3159 A) to 10,430 A. The spectrum in the mid- and near-UV is characterized by the ejecta absorption. At longer wavelengths, stellar wind features from the central source and narrow-emission lines from the Weigelt condensations dominate the spectrum. However, narrow absorption lines from the circumstellar shells are present. This paper provides a description of the spectrum between 3060 and 10,430 A, including line identifications of the ejecta absorption spectrum, the emission spectrum from the Weigelt condensations and the P Cygni stellar wind features. The high spectral resolving power of VLT/UVES enables equivalent width measurements of atomic and molecular absorption lines for elements with no transitions at the shorter wavelengths. However, the ground-based seeing and contributions of nebular-scattered radiation prevent direct comparison of measured equivalent widths in the VLT/UVES and HST/STIS spectra. Fortunately, HST/STIS and VLT/UVES have a small overlap in wavelength coverage which allows us to compare and adjust for the difference in scattered radiation entering the instruments' apertures. This paper provides a complete online VLT/UVES spectrum with line identifications and a spectral comparison between HST/STIS and VLT/UVES between 3060 and 3160 A.

  13. A sharp and visible range plasmonic in heavily doped metal oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As alternatives to conventional metals, metal oxide semiconductors offer many advantages in the field of plasmonic applications. Herein, the influence of antimony doping on the plasmon resonance properties of tin oxide films prepared by spray pyrolysis has been investigated. The colour of heavily doped antimony tin oxide films was tuned from colourless (transparent) to dark bluish. The crystallinity and morphology of these films were studied by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction reveals that these films have purely cassetirite structure and no secondary phases of tin and antimony oxides are present. The surface morphology shows films have grainy structure which decreases with increase in antimony content. The Hall effect and electrical conductivity measurements show that the majority carriers are electrons and conductivity decreases by three orders of magnitude with increase in antimony content up to 50 wt%. The optical absorption shows that with increase in doping the plasmon peak becomes sharp and shifts to the visible region. Such plasmonic features are rarely reported on such materials. These results are analysed in terms of classical theory of surface plasmon resonance. The better plasmonic features, low cost, ease of synthesis and good chemical stability make these materials potential candidates for plasmonic applications. (papers)

  14. Integration of visible-through microwave-range multispectral image data sets for geologic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Fred A.; Dietz, John B.

    1991-01-01

    Multispectral remote sensing data sets collected during the Geologic Remote Sensing Field Experiment (GRSFE) conducted during 1989 in the southwestern U.S. were used to produce thematic image maps showing details of the surface geology. LANDSAT TM (Thematic Mapper) images were used to map the distribution of clays, carbonates, and iron oxides. AVIRIS (Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) data were used to identify and map calcite, dolomite, sericite, hematite, and geothite, including mixtures. TIMS (Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner) data were used to map the distribution of igneous rock phases and carbonates based on their silica contents. AIRSAR (Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar) data were used to map surface textures related to the scale of surface roughness. The AIRSAR also allowed identification of previously unmapped fault segments and structural control of lithology and minerology. Because all of the above data sets were geographically referenced, combination of different data types and direct comparison of the results with conventional field and laboratory data sets allowed improved geologic mapping of the test site.

  15. Eta Carinae across the 2003.5 Minimum: Analysis in the visible and near infrared spectral region

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, K E; Weis, K; Gull, T R; Stahl, O; Bomans, D J

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of the visible through near infrared spectrum of Eta Carinae and its ejecta obtained during the "Eta Carinae Campaign with the UVES at the ESO VLT". This is a part of larger effort to present a complete Eta Carinae spectrum, and extends the previously presented analyses with the HST/STIS in the UV (1240-3159 A) to 10,430 A. The spectrum in the mid and near UV is characterized by the ejecta absorption. At longer wavelengths, stellar wind features from the central source and narrow emission lines from the Weigelt condensations dominate the spectrum. However, narrow absorption lines from the circumstellar shells are present. This paper provides a description of the spectrum between 3060 and 10,430 A, including line identifications of the ejecta absorption spectrum, the emission spectrum from the Weigelt condensations and the P-Cygni stellar wind features. The high spectral resolving power of VLT/UVES enables equivalent width measurements of atomic and molecular absorption lines for element...

  16. Model-based deduction of CMYK surface coverages from visible and infrared spectral measurements of halftone prints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugnon, Thomas; Brichon, Mathieu; Hersch, Roger David

    2007-01-01

    The Yule-Nielsen modified Spectral Neugebauer reflection prediction model enhanced with an ink spreading model provides high accuracy when predicting reflectance spectra from ink surface coverages. In the present contribution, we try to inverse the model, i.e. to deduce the surface coverages of a printed color halftone patch from its measured reflectance spectrum. This process yields good results for cyan, magenta, and yellow inks, but unstable results when simultaneously fitting cyan, magenta, yellow, and black inks due to redundancy between these four inks: black can be obtained by printing either the black ink or similar amounts of the cyan, magenta, and yellow inks. To overcome this problem, we use the fact that the black pigmented ink absorbs light in the infrared domain, whereas cyan, magenta, and yellow inks do not. Therefore, with reflection spectra measurements spanning both the visible and infrared domain, it is possible to accurately deduce the black ink coverage. Since there is no redundancy anymore, the cyan, magenta, yellow, and pigmented black ink coverages can be recovered with high accuracy.

  17. Infrared absolute intensities of ozone in the 10 and 5 ?m spectral range: New investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infrared high resolution spectra of ozone 16O3 have been recorded in the 10 and 5 ?m spectral ranges in order to derive their absolute intensities with a best achievable accuracy. Spectra have been recorded with the home made stepping mode FTS of GSMA (Reims). In the two spectral regions, we use UV-IR crossed beam cell. The quantification of ozone is achieved using UV cross section at 253.65 nm. A check of this UV calibration is also performed using direct pressure measurements of quasi-pure samples of O3. The intensities are derived from infrared spectra using multifit procedure already tested. In the 10 ?m range, where 12 different spectra have been recorded, 65 well selected lines led to a good agreement (better than 0.3%) with the HITRAN 2008 (or 2004) values, confirming our previous work [De Backer-Barilly MR, Barbe A. Absolute intensities of the 10 ?m bands of 16O3. J Mol Spectrosc 305:2001;43-53]. In the 5 ?m range, where 18 transitions are selected, we also note a correct agreement with HITRAN 2008, despite a slightly larger averaged value between (1.9%) experimental and theoretical (HITRAN). As conclusion, authors suggest the use of current HITRAN 2008 data for atmospheric retrievals.

  18. Design of superachromatic quarter-wave retarders in a broad spectral range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Fernandez, Jose Maria; Vilas, Jose Luis; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2015-11-20

    A superachromatic quarter-wave retarder using an arbitrary number of waveplates in a broadband spectral range has been proposed. Their design is based on the optimization of a merit function, the achromatism degree (AcD), which represents a global behavior metric for the retardation. By means of this technique, the thickness and azimuth of each waveplate is determined. The achromatism degree is a measure of the distance between the overall retardation and a target retardation weighted by the spectrum of the incident light. We report on a particular case where all waveplates are made of quartz. As application examples, the design of a quarter-wave retarder using two, three, and four waveplates in the spectral ranges of 500-700 nm and 400-1000 nm was studied. The numerical results show that for these ranges, the best designs obtained present a maximum difference of 0.013° and 0.010° with respect to the target retardation, respectively. In addition, an analysis of their achromatic stability is presented. These results can be applied in the aerospace industry, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and spectrogoniometry, among others. PMID:26836534

  19. Photonic crystals and Bragg gratings for the mid-IR and terahertz spectral ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usikova, A. A., E-mail: usikova@mail.ioffe.ru; Ilinskaya, N. D.; Matveev, B. A.; Shubina, T. V.; Kopev, P. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    A method for the fabrication of 2D periodic structures by contact optical photolithography with image inversion is reported. The optical properties of photonic crystals and Bragg gratings for mid-IR and terahertz emitters are considered. The possibility of raising the integral emission intensity of light-emitting diodes for the mid-IR spectral range is demonstrated. The requirements to gratings for the output of terahertz emission generated by surface plasmons excited in layers of narrow-gap degenerate semiconductors with an accumulation layer are determined.

  20. Fully-tunable femtosecond laser source in the ultraviolet spectral range

    CERN Document Server

    Mahieu, B; Callegari, C; Coreno, M; De Ninno, G; Devetta, M; Frassetto, F; Garzella, D; Negro, M; Spezzani, C; Vozzi, C; Stagira, S; Poletto, L

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the full tunability of a coherent femtosecond source in the whole ultraviolet spectral region. The experiment relies on the technique of high-order harmonic generation driven by a near-infrared parametric laser source in krypton gas. By tuning the drive wavelength in the range between 1100 to 1900 nm, we generated intense harmonics from near to extreme ultraviolet. A number of photons per shot of the order of 10^7 has been measured for the first harmonic orders. Many novel scientific prospects are expected to benefit from the use of such a table-top tunable source.

  1. Spectral supralinearity prediction of silicon photodiodes in the near-infrared range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Minoru; Amemiya, Kuniaki; Numata, Takayuki; Fukuda, Daiji

    2015-12-20

    A model describing spectral supralinearity for a silicon photodiode in the near-infrared region is presented. This theoretical model is based on the internal quantum efficiency model of the photodiode using Shockley-Read-Hall recombination, which depends on the inner structure parameters of the photodiodes. Comparing the experimental results with the theoretical calculation results, the model enables us to quantitatively predict the starting power level, shape, and wavelength dependence of the supralinearity for a silicon photodiode. This model contributes to high-accuracy measurements over wide optical power ranges and various incident wavelengths. PMID:26837039

  2. Optical properties of peritoneal biological tissues in the spectral range of 350-2500 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashkatov, A. N.; Genina, E. A.; Kozintseva, M. D.; Kochubei, V. I.; Gorodkov, S. Yu.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    The optical characteristics of biological tissues sampled from the anterior abdominal wall of laboratory rats are for the first time experimentally studied in a wide wavelength range (350-2500 nm). The experiments have been performed in vitro using a LAMBDA 950 (PerkinElmer, United States) spectrophotometer. Inverse Monte Carlo simulation is used to restore the spectral dependences for scattering and absorption coefficients, as well as the scattering anisotropy factor for biological tissue based on the recorded spectra of diffuse reflection and total and collimated transmissions.

  3. Spectral broadening due to long-range Coulomb interactions in the molecular metal TTF-TCNQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We employ density-functional theory to calculate realistic parameters for an extended Hubbard model of the molecular metal TTF-TCNQ. Considering both intra- and intermolecular screening in the crystal, we find that longer-range Coulomb interactions along the molecular stacks, as well as inter-stack coupling are of importance. Contrary to past belief, these terms do not lead to the formation of a Wigner lattice, but simply broaden the spectral function. We show how this can be understood already in perturbation theory. Moreover we calculate the effect of the nearest neighbor repulsion on the Luttinger parameter. (orig.)

  4. Spectral broadening due to long-range Coulomb interactions in the molecular metal TTF-TCNQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, E.; Dolfen, A. [Inst. fuer Festkoerperforschung, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Cano-Cortes, L.; Merino, J. [Univ. Autonona de Madrid (Spain); Behler, J.; Reuter, K. [Fritz-Haber-Inst., Berlin (Germany); Delley, B. [Paul-Scherrer-Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

    2007-07-01

    We employ density-functional theory to calculate realistic parameters for an extended Hubbard model of the molecular metal TTF-TCNQ. Considering both intra- and intermolecular screening in the crystal, we find that longer-range Coulomb interactions along the molecular stacks, as well as inter-stack coupling are of importance. Contrary to past belief, these terms do not lead to the formation of a Wigner lattice, but simply broaden the spectral function. We show how this can be understood already in perturbation theory. Moreover we calculate the effect of the nearest neighbor repulsion on the Luttinger parameter. (orig.)

  5. Dispersion properties and low infrared optical losses in epitaxial AlN on sapphire substrate in the visible and infrared range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani, A., E-mail: ali.soltani@iemn.univ-lille1.fr; Stolz, A.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Rousseau, M.; Bourzgui, N.; De Jaeger, J.-C. [Institut d' Électronique, Microélectronique et Nanotechnologie, UMR-CNRS 8520, PRES Université Lille Nord de France, Cité Scientifique, Avenue Poincaré, CS 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Charrier, J. [Fonctions Optiques pour les Technologies de l' informatiON, UMR-CNRS 6082, ENSSAT 6, rue de Kerampont, CS 80518, 22305 Lannion Cedex (France); Mattalah, M. [Laboratoire de Microélectronique, Université Djilali Liabes, 22000 Sidi Bel Abbes (Algeria); Barkad, H. A. [Institut Universitaire Technologique Industriel, Université de Djibouti, Avenue Georges Clémenceau, BP 1904 Djibouti (Djibouti); Mortet, V. [Institute of Physics of Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Fyzikální ústav AV CR, v.v.i., Na Slovance 1999/2 (Czech Republic); BenMoussa, A. [Solar Terrestrial Center of Excellence, Royal Observatory of Belgium, Circular 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-04-28

    Optical waveguiding properties of a thick wurtzite aluminum nitride highly [002]-textured hetero-epitaxial film on (001) basal plane of sapphire substrate are studied. The physical properties of the film are determined by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, microRaman, and photocurrent spectroscopy. The refractive index and the thermo-optic coefficients are determined by m-lines spectroscopy using the classical prism coupling technique. The optical losses of this planar waveguide are also measured in the spectral range of 450–1553 nm. The lower value of optical losses is equal to 0.7 dB/cm at 1553 nm. The optical losses due to the surface scattering are simulated showing that the contribution is the most significant at near infrared wavelength range, whereas the optical losses are due to volume scattering and material absorption in the visible range. The good physical properties and the low optical losses obtained from this planar waveguide are encouraging to achieve a wide bandgap optical guiding platform from these aluminum nitride thin films.

  6. Dispersion properties and low infrared optical losses in epitaxial AlN on sapphire substrate in the visible and infrared range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical waveguiding properties of a thick wurtzite aluminum nitride highly [002]-textured hetero-epitaxial film on (001) basal plane of sapphire substrate are studied. The physical properties of the film are determined by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, microRaman, and photocurrent spectroscopy. The refractive index and the thermo-optic coefficients are determined by m-lines spectroscopy using the classical prism coupling technique. The optical losses of this planar waveguide are also measured in the spectral range of 450–1553 nm. The lower value of optical losses is equal to 0.7 dB/cm at 1553 nm. The optical losses due to the surface scattering are simulated showing that the contribution is the most significant at near infrared wavelength range, whereas the optical losses are due to volume scattering and material absorption in the visible range. The good physical properties and the low optical losses obtained from this planar waveguide are encouraging to achieve a wide bandgap optical guiding platform from these aluminum nitride thin films

  7. Large dynamic range SPR measurements in the visible using a ZnSe prism

    CERN Document Server

    Canning, John; Cook, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Large dynamic index measurement range (n = 1 to n = 1.7) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) shifts is demonstrated with a ZnSe prism at 632.8 nm, limited by the available high index liquid hosts. In contrast to borosilicate based SPR measurements where angular limitations restrict solvent use to water and requires considerable care dealing with Fresnel reflections, the ZnSe approach allows SPR spectroscopies to be applied to a varied range of solvents An uncertainty in angular resolution between 1.5 and 6 deg, depending on the solvent and SPR angle, was estimated. The refractive index change for a given glucose concentration in water was measured to be n = (0.114 to 0.007) per precentage C6H12O6 conc. Given the transmission properties of ZnSe the processes can be readily extended into the mid infrared.

  8. Scientometric analyses of the international visibility of German psychology researchers and their range of specialization

    OpenAIRE

    Clemens B. Fell; Alexander von Eye; Gabriel Schui; Günter Krampen

    2012-01-01

    With reference to the role of networking, accelerated by current developments within large parts of the scientific community, the assumption is examined that the range of specialization of scientists in terms of membership in professional sections of scientific societies is related to the international impact of their publications. The sample consists of 2,788 German psychologists enrolled in the German Psychological Society (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Psychologie, DGPs). A log-linear model su...

  9. Spectral characterisation of Sm{sup 3+} ions doped Oxy-fluoroborate glasses for visible orange luminescent applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahamuda, Sk.; Swapna, K.; Venkateswarlu, M. [Department of Physics, KL University, Green Fields, Vaddeswaram 522502, Guntur (Dt.), AP (India); Srinivasa Rao, A., E-mail: drsrallam@gmail.com [Department of Physics, KL University, Green Fields, Vaddeswaram 522502, Guntur (Dt.), AP (India); Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Bawana Road, New Delhi 110042 (India); Shakya, Suman; Vijaya Prakash, G. [Nanophotonics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology-Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Oxy-fluoroborate (OFB) glasses doped with different concentrations of Sm{sup 3+} ions have been prepared using conventional melt quenching technique and characterised for their lasing potentialities using spectroscopic techniques such as FTIR, optical absorption, emission and emission decay measurements. The FTIR spectrum has been recorded to determine the various functional groups present in the OFB base glass. From the absorption spectra, the bonding parameters (?) were evaluated to find the bonding nature present between Sm{sup 3+} ions with its neighbouring ligands. The JuddOfelt intensity (JO) parameters (?{sub ?}, where ?=2, 4, and 6), measured from the experimental oscillator strengths of the absorption spectral futures, are used to evaluate the radiative parameters for the fluorescent transitions {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}?{sup 6}H{sub 5/2}, {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}?{sup 6}H{sub 7/2}, {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}?{sup 6}H{sub 9/2} and {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}?{sup 6}H{sub 11/2} of Sm{sup 3+} ions in OFB glasses. The asymmetric ratio has been evaluated to understand the local disorder of Sm{sup 3+} ions in the glass network. The experimental lifetimes (?{sub exp}) measured from the decay curves are coupled with radiative lifetimes (?{sub rad}) to measure quantum efficiency (?) of the prepared glasses. The experimental lifetimes (?{sub exp}) for {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} emission state decrease with increase in Sm{sup 3+} ion concentration due to energy transfer. In order to elucidate the nature of energy transfer mechanism, the non-exponential decay curves are well fitted to the InokutiHirayama model for S=6, which indicates that the energy transfer mechanism is of dipoledipole type. The branching ratio (?{sub R}), stimulated emission cross-section (?{sub se}) and quantum efficiency (?) values measured for the most intense emission transition {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}?{sup 6}H{sub 7/2} (598 nm) optimise the concentration of Sm{sup 3+} ions as 1 mol% to produce bright visible orange lasing emission from these OFB glasses. - highlights: Sm{sup 3+} doped OFB glasses have been synthesised using melt quenching technique. From the absorption spectra, JO parameters have been calculated using the JO theory. Emission cross-sections and efficiencies are calculated for laser transitions. CIE colour co-ordinates were evaluated using emission spectra. OFBSm1.0 glass was found to be the best for laser action in the visible orange region.

  10. Transparency of GaN substrates in the mid-infrared spectral range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welna, M.; Kudrawiec, R.; Motyka, M.; Misiewicz, J. [Institute of Physics, Wroclaw University of Technology (Poland); Kucharski, R.; Zajac, M.; Doradzinski, R.; Dwilinski, R. [AMMONO S.A., Warsaw (Poland); Rudzinski, M. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-03-15

    Transparency of truly bulk GaN substrates obtained by ammonothermal method was measured in the mid infrared spectral range by Fourier spectroscopy. The same measurements were performed for GaN templates grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy on sapphire and SiC substrates. It has been clearly observed that truly bulk GaN substrates are transparent up to {proportional_to}7 {mu}m whereas GaN templates grown on sapphire and SiC are transparent only up to {proportional_to}6.5 and {proportional_to}5.5 {mu}m, respectively, due to non-transparency of sapphire and SiC in this spectral range. It has been shown that the transparency ''cut off'' at {proportional_to}7 {mu}m for GaN crystals results from the absorption of light by the second harmonic of optical phonons, which is very significant due to the strong electron-phonon coupling in this material. Also it has been clearly presented that the absorption ''cut-off'' in the infrared spectral region can be easily tuned by increasing of free carrier concentration in GaN. It was observed that the infrared transparency can be shifted from {proportional_to}7 to {proportional_to}2 {mu}m or even shorter wavelengths when the electron concentration is increased up to {proportional_to}10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. A Determination of the Spectral Index of Galactic Synchrotron Emission in the 1 - 10 GHz Range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an analysis of simultaneous multifrequency measurements of the Galactic emission in the 1 - 10 GHz range with 18 degree angular resolution taken from a high-altitude site. Our data yield a determination of the synchrotron spectral index between 1.4 and 7.5 GHz of βsyn=2.81 ± 0.16. Combining our data with maps made by Haslam et al. and Reich and Reich, we find βsyn=2.76 ± 0.11 in the 0.4 - 7.5 GHz range. These results are in agreement with the few previously published measurements. The variation of βsyn with frequency based on our results and compared with other data found in the literature suggests a steepening of the synchrotron spectrum toward high frequencies, as expected from theory because of the steepening of the parent cosmic-ray electron energy spectrum. Comparison between the Haslam data and the 19 GHz map of Cottingham also indicates a spatial variation of the spectral index on large angular scales. Additional high-quality data are necessary to provide a serious study of these effects. copyright copyright 1998. The American Astronomical Society

  12. Single-Shot 60 dB Dynamic Range Laser Contrast Measurement Using Self-Referencing Spectral Interferometry

    OpenAIRE

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Johnson, R.P.; T. Shimada; Shah, R. C.; Jung, D.; Gautier, D. C.; Hegelich, B. M.; Fernandez, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    High dynamic range contrast measurement of laser pulses is typically obtained by cross-correlating the laser pulse with a self-generated reference laser pulse directly in the temporal domain. Alternatively, it is also possible to measure the spectral interferogram of the laser pulse with the references pulse in the spectral domain, from which the high dynamic range contrast measurement can be extracted using inverse Fourier-transformation. Here, we demonstrate single-shot 60 dB dynamic range ...

  13. Intercomparison of reflectances observed by GOME and SCIAMACHY in the visible wavelength range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilstra, Lieuwe G.; Stammes, Piet

    2006-06-01

    We compare the Earth reflectances of the spectrometers Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) over their overlapping wavelength range (240-800 nm). The goal is to investigate the quality of the radiometric calibration of SCIAMACHY using calibrated GOME data as a reference. However, severe degradation of the GOME instrument in the UV since 2001 prevents it from being a reliable reference below 500 nm. Above 500 nm, GOME is reliable and we find substantial disagreement between GOME and SCIAMACHY, of the order of 15%-20%, which we can attribute completely to the current calibration problems of SCIAMACHY. These numbers are supported by a previous study in which SCIAMACHY was compared with the imager Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) onboard the Envisat satellite.

  14. LADEE UVS (UltraViolet Visible Spectrometer) and the Search for Lunar Exospheric Dust: A Detailed Spectral Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Cook, Amanda; Colaprete, Anthony; Shirley, Mark; Vargo, Kara; Elphic, Richard C.; Hermalyn, Brendan; Stubbs, Timothy John; Glenar, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) executed science observations in lunar orbit spanning 2013-Oct-16- 2014-04-18 UT. LADEE's Ultraviolet/Visible Spectrometer (UVS) studies the composition and temporal variations of the tenuous lunar exosphere and dust environment, utilizing two sets of optics: a limb-viewing telescope, and a solar-viewer. The limb-viewing telescope observes illuminated dust and emitting gas species while the Sun is just behind the lunar limb. The solar viewer, with its diffuser, allows UVS to also stare directly at the solar disk as it approaches the limb, sampling progressively lower exosphere altitudes. Solar viewer "Occultation" activities occur at the lunar sunrise limb, as the LADEE spacecraft passes into the lunar night side, facing the Sun (the spacecraft orbit is near-equatorial retrograde). A loss of transmission of sunlight occurs by the occultation of dust grains along the line-of-sight. So-called "Inertial Limb" activities have the limb-viewing telescope pointed at the lit exosphere just after the Sun has set. Inertial Limb activities follow a similar progression of diminishing sampling altitudes but hold the solar elongation angle constant so the zodiacal light contribution remains constant while seeking to observe the weak lunar horizon glow. On the dark side of the moon, "Sodium Tail" activities pointed the limb-viewing telescope in the direction of the Moon's sodium tail (similar to anti-sunward), during different lunar phases. Of the UVS data sets, these show the largest excess of scattered blue light, indicative of the presence of small (approximately 100 nm) dust grains in the tail. Correlations are sought between dust in the sodium tail and meteor streams and magnetotail crossings to investigate impact- versus electrostatic-lofting. Once lofted, nanoparticles can become charged and picked up by the solar wind. The LADEE UVS Occultation, Inertial Limb, and Sodium Tail spectral datasets provide evidence of a lunar dust exosphere.

  15. Fluorescence imaging of viscous materials in the ultraviolet-visible wavelength range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an approach of an innovative measurement principle for the quality control of viscous materials during a manufacturing process based on fluorescence imaging. The main contribution to the state of the art provided by this measurement system is that three equal fluorescence images of a static or moving viscous object are available in different optical paths. The independent images are obtained by two beam splitters which are connected in series. Based on these images, it is possible to evaluate each image separately. In our case, three optical bandpass filters with different center wavelengths of 405 nm, 420 nm, and 440 nm were used to filter the separate fluorescence images. The developed system is useable for the detection of impurities in the micrometer range. Further, incorrect mixing ratios of particular components and wrong single components in the viscous materials can be detected with the setup. Moreover, it is possible to realize static and dynamic measurements. In this case the maximum speed of the objects was 0.2 m/s for the dynamic measurements. Advantages of this measurement setup are the universality due to the use of optical standard components, the small dimension and the opportunity to integrate it easily into ongoing processes. In addition, the measurement system works on a non-contact basis. Thus, the expense for maintenance is at a very low level compared to currently available measurement setups for the investigated application. Furthermore, the setup provides for the first time a simultaneous analysis of more than one component and the detection of impurities concerning their nature and size in a manufacturing process

  16. Fluorescent dye labeled DNA size standards for molecular mass detection in visible/infrared range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreelakshmi Yellamaraju

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING is a high throughput reverse genetics tool which detects mismatches (single point mutations or small indels in large number of individuals of mutagenized populations. Currently, TILLING is intensively used for genomics assisted molecular breeding of several crop plants for desired traits. Most commonly used platform for mutation detection is Li-COR DNA Analyzer, where PCR amplified products treated with single strand mismatch specific nuclease are resolved on denaturing gels. The molecular size of any cut product can be easily estimated by comparing with IR dye labeled markers of known sizes. Similar fluorescent dye labeled size markers are also used for several genotyping experiments. Currently, commercially available size standards are expensive and are restricted up to only 700 bp which renders estimation of products of sizes greater than 700 bases inaccurate. Findings A simple protocol was developed for labeling 5' end of multiple DNA size markers with fluorescent dyes. This method involves cloning a pool of different size markers of DNA in a plasmid vector. PCR amplification of plasmid using IR dye labeled universal primers generates 5' fluorescent labeled products of various sizes. The size of products constituting the ladder can be customized as per the need. The generated size markers can be used without any further purification and were found to be stable up to one year at -20°C. Conclusions A simple method was developed for generating fluorescent dye labeled size standards. This method can be customized to generate different size standards as per experimental needs. The protocol described can also be adapted for developing labeled size standards for detection on platforms other than Li-COR i.e. other than infra red range of the spectrum.

  17. Spectral Decay Characteristics in High Frequency Range of Observed Records from Crustal Large Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurugi, M.; Kagawa, T.; Irikura, K.

    2010-12-01

    Spectral decay characteristics in high frequency range of observed records from crustal large earthquakes occurred in Japan is examined. It is very important to make clear spectral decay characteristics in high frequency range for strong ground motion prediction. Target earthquakes are three events, the 2003 Miyagi-Ken Hokubu earthquake (Mw : 6.1), the 2005 Fukuoka-Ken Seiho-oki earthquake (Mw 6.6), and the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake (Mw 6.9). The borehole data of each event are used in the analysis. The Butterworth type high-cut filter with cut-off frequency, fmax and its power coefficient of high-frequency decay, s [Boore(1983)], are assumed to express the high-cut frequency characteristics of ground motions. The four parameters such as seismic moment, corner frequency, cut-off frequency and its power coefficient of high-frequency decay are estimated by comparing observed spectra at rock sites with theoretical spectra. The theoretical spectra are calculated based on the omega squared source characteristics convolved with propagation-path effects and high-cut filter shapes. In result, the fmaxs of the records from each earthquakes are estimated from 6.5Hz to 8.4Hz, and the power coefficient, s, are estimated from 0.90 to 0.96, respectively. The fmax filter shapes of these earthquakes are almost same. The average characteristics of the three fmax filter shapes express in fmax is 7.64Hz, the power coefficient, s, is 0.91, respectively. The obtained results in this study may contribute to strong ground motion prediction in high frequency range. References: Hanks,T.C.: fmax, Bulletin of Seismological Society of America, 72, 1867-1879, 1982. Boore,D.M.: Stochastic simulation of high-frequency ground motion based on seismological models of the radiated spectra, Bulletin of Seismological Society of America, 73, 1865-1894, 1983.

  18. Spectral Decay Characteristics in High Frequency Range of Observed Records from Crustal Large Earthquakes (Part 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurugi, M.; Kagawa, T.; Irikura, K.

    2012-12-01

    Spectral decay characteristics in high frequency range of observed records from crustal large earthquakes occurred in Japan is examined. It is very important to make spectral decay characteristics clear in high frequency range for strong ground motion prediction in engineering purpose. The authors examined spectral decay characteristics in high frequency range of observed records among three events, the 2003 Miyagi-Ken Hokubu earthquake (Mw 6.1), the 2005 Fukuoka-Ken Seiho-oki earthquake (Mw 6.6), and the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake (Mw 6.9) in previous study [Tsurugi et al.(2010)]. Target earthquakes in this study are two events shown below. *EQ No.1 Origin time: 2011/04/11 17:16, Location of hypocenter: East of Fukushima pref., Mj: 7.0, Mw: 6.6, Fault type: Normal fault *EQ No.2 Origin time: 2011/03/15 22:31, Location of hypocenter: East of Shizuoka pref., Mj: 6.4, Mw: 5.9, Fault type: Strike slip fault The borehole data of each event are used in the analysis. The Butterworth type high-cut filter with cut-off frequency, fmax and its power coefficient of high-frequency decay, s [Boore(1983)], are assumed to express the high-cut frequency characteristics of ground motions. The four parameters such as seismic moment, corner frequency, cut-off frequency and its power coefficient of high-frequency decay are estimated by comparing observed spectra at rock sites with theoretical spectra. The theoretical spectra are calculated based on the omega squared source characteristics convolved with propagation-path effects and high-cut filter shapes. In result, the fmax's of the records from the earthquakes are estimated 8.0Hz for EQ No.1 and 8.5Hz for EQ No.2. These values are almost same with those of other large crustal earthquakes occurred in Japan. The power coefficient, s, are estimated 0.78 for EQ No.1 and 1.65 for EQ No.2. The value for EQ No.2 is notably larger than those of other large crustal earthquakes. It is seems that the value of the power coefficient, s, became large under the effect of complex ground structure and volcanic front. The obtained results may contribute to strong ground motion prediction in high frequency range for crustal earthquakes. Acknowledgement: This study commissioned by Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization. We thank the National Research Institute for Earth Science Disaster Prevention to provide the strong-motion data. References: Hanks,T.C. : fmax, Bulletin of Seismological Society of America, 72, 1867-1879, 1982. Boore,D.M. : Stochastic simulation of high-frequency ground motion based on seismological models of the radiated spectra, Bulletin of Seismological Society of America, 73, 1865-1894, 1983. Tsurugi,M., Kagawa,T., and Irikura,K. : Spectral Decay Characteristics in High Frequency Range of Observed Records from Crustal Large Earthquakes, AGU Fall Meeting, 2010.

  19. Broadband semiconductor optical amplifiers of the spectral range 750 – 1100 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A line of travelling-wave semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) based on heterostructures used for production of broadband superluminescent diodes is developed. The pure small-signal gains of the developed SOA modules are about 25 dB, while the gain bandwidths at a level of –10 dB reach 50 – 100 nm. As a whole, the SOA modules cover the IR spectral range from 750 to 1100 nm. The SOAs demonstrate a high reliability at a single-mode fibre-coupled cw output power up to 50 mW. Examples of application of two of the developed SOA modules as active elements of broadband fast-tunable lasers are presented. (lasers)

  20. Broadband semiconductor optical amplifiers of the spectral range 750 1100 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, E V; Il' chenko, S N; Lobintsov, A A; Shramenko, M V [Superlum Diodes Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation); Ladugin, M A [' Sigm Plyus' Ltd, Moscow (Russian Federation); Marmalyuk, A A [Open Joint-Stock Company M.F. Stel' makh Polyus Research Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Yakubovich, S D [Moscow State Institute of Radio-Engineering, Electronics and Automation (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-30

    A line of travelling-wave semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) based on heterostructures used for production of broadband superluminescent diodes is developed. The pure small-signal gains of the developed SOA modules are about 25 dB, while the gain bandwidths at a level of 10 dB reach 50 100 nm. As a whole, the SOA modules cover the IR spectral range from 750 to 1100 nm. The SOAs demonstrate a high reliability at a single-mode fibre-coupled cw output power up to 50 mW. Examples of application of two of the developed SOA modules as active elements of broadband fast-tunable lasers are presented. (lasers)

  1. Circuit model optimization of a nano split ring resonator dimer antenna operating in infrared spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metamaterials are comprised of metallic structures with a strong response to incident electromagnetic radiation, like, for example, split ring resonators. The interaction of resonator ensembles with electromagnetic waves can be simulated with finite difference or finite elements algorithms, however, above a certain ensemble size simulations become inadmissibly time or memory consuming. Alternatively a circuit description of metamaterials, a well developed modelling tool at radio and microwave frequencies, allows to significantly increase the simulated ensemble size. This approach can be extended to the IR spectral range with an appropriate set of circuit element parameters accounting for physical effects such as electron inertia and finite conductivity. The model is verified by comparing the coupling coefficients with the ones obtained from the full wave numerical simulations, and used to optimize the nano-antenna design with improved radiation characteristics.

  2. Circuit model optimization of a nano split ring resonator dimer antenna operating in infrared spectral range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gneiding, N., E-mail: Natalia.Gneiding@physik.uni-erlangen.de [Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Zhuromskyy, O.; Peschel, U. [Institute of Optics, Information and Photonics, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Shamonina, E. [Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, OX1 3PJ Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-28

    Metamaterials are comprised of metallic structures with a strong response to incident electromagnetic radiation, like, for example, split ring resonators. The interaction of resonator ensembles with electromagnetic waves can be simulated with finite difference or finite elements algorithms, however, above a certain ensemble size simulations become inadmissibly time or memory consuming. Alternatively a circuit description of metamaterials, a well developed modelling tool at radio and microwave frequencies, allows to significantly increase the simulated ensemble size. This approach can be extended to the IR spectral range with an appropriate set of circuit element parameters accounting for physical effects such as electron inertia and finite conductivity. The model is verified by comparing the coupling coefficients with the ones obtained from the full wave numerical simulations, and used to optimize the nano-antenna design with improved radiation characteristics.

  3. Estimation of a radiative transfer model in the longwave spectral range: sensitivity study and application to real cases

    OpenAIRE

    Sicard, Michal; Bertoln Martnez, Santiago; Mallet, Marc; Dubuisson, Philippe; Comern Tejero, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    The aerosol radiative effect in the longwave spectral range is often neglected in atmospheric aerosol forcing studies, hence very few researches are conducted in this field at local scale, and even less at regional scale. However, strong absorbing aerosols, like mineral dust, can have a small, but non-negligible heating effect in the longwave spectral range which can slightly counteract the aerosol cooling effect in the shortwave. The objective of this research is to perform a sensitivity stu...

  4. New developments in the radiance calibration of deuterium lamps in the UV and VUV spectral range at the PTB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) operates a unique beam line for the radiometric calibration of ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation sources by direct comparison of their unknown spectral radiant flux with the calculable spectral radiant flux of the electron storage ring BESSY I in the spectral range 40 nm to 400 nm. At this beam line the relative standard uncertainty of the calculated spectral radiant flux of the synchrotron radiation is u = 3 x 10-3 and it allows the calibration of the spectral radiance of deuterium lamps with a relative standard uncertainty of 2.5 x 10-2 above 165 nm. The high-accuracy beam line is now complemented by new instrumentation specially designed for the dissemination of the spectral radiance and radiant intensity scale using deuterium lamps as transfer source standards. This instrumentation allows the calibration of radiation sources in the 115 nm to 400 nm spectral range without significant loss in accuracy and the measurement of spectrally and spatially resolved radiance profiles such as to image the plasma topography of the discharge. The new instrumentation is described. Results for the radiometric long-term stability of selected deuterium lamps are shown. The radiance and radiant intensity as well as the radiance profile of different types of commercially available deuterium lamp are presented. (authors)

  5. A panoply of insertion devices at SOLEIL for a wide spectral range and flexible polarisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SOLEIL storage ring presents a very high fraction of its circumference dedicated to accommodate Insertion Devices (ID). Over the 25 presently planned insertion devices presenting a large variety of systems, 16 have been already installed and commissioned in September 2009. The UV-VUV region is covered with electromagnetic devices, offering tuneable polarisations. An electromagnet/permanent magnet undulator using copper sheets coils for fast switching of the helicity is under construction. 13 APPLE-II type undulators, with period ranging from 80 down to 36 mm, provide photons in the 0.1-10 keV region, some of them featuring tapering or quasi-periodicity. Five U20 in vacuum undulators cover typically the 3-30 keV range whereas an in vacuum wiggler, with compensation of the magnetic forces via adequate springs will cover the 10-50 keV spectral domain. R and D on cryogenic in-vacuum undulator is also under progress. A magnetic chicane using permanent magnet dipoles has also been designed in order to accommodate two canted undulators on the same straight section. A wiggler dedicated to slicing (production of femto second long pulses) is also being designed, its radiation will also serve for an X-ray beamline.

  6. Pulsed, all solid-state light source in the visible spectral region based on non-linear cavity dumping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Andersen, Martin; Johansson, Sandra; Janousek, Jiri; Buchhave, Preben; Laurell, Fredrik

    We propose a novel generic approach for generation of pulsed light in the visible spectrum, based on SFG between the high circulating intra-cavity power of a high finesse CW laser and a single-passed pulsed laser....

  7. Spectral modeling in the VNIR range of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko nucleus from VIRTIS-M onboard Rosetta

    OpenAIRE

    Raponi, A.; Ciarnello, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; De Sanctis, M.C.; Erard, S.; Leyrat, C.; Bockelee-Morvan, D; Tosi, F.; Capria, M. T.; Piccioni, G...; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Drossart, P; Quirico, E.

    2015-01-01

    Topic of this work is the analysis of the surface composition of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko using the data obtained by the VIRTIS instrument onboard the Rosetta spacecraft. We have focused on the VNIR spectral range (0.4 - 2.5 ?m) which presents a nearly flat spectrum with quite uniform spectral slopes across the entire comet surface. In this work we report about the spectral modeling of CG VIS-IR spectra by means of Hapkes radiative transfer model.

  8. Spectral modeling in the VNIR range of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko nucleus from VIRTIS-M onboard Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raponi, A.; Ciarniello, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Erard, S.; Leyrat, C.; Bockele-Morvan, D.; Tosi, F.; Capria, M. T.; Piccioni, G.; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Drossart, P.; Quirico, E.; Beck, P.; Schmitt, B.; Barucci, A.; Arnold, G.; Blecka, M.

    2015-10-01

    Topic of this work is the analysis of the surface composition of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko using the data obtained by the VIRTIS instrument [1] onboard the Rosetta spacecraft. We have focused on the VNIR spectral range (0.4 - 2.5 ?m) which presents a nearly flat spectrum with quite uniform spectral slopes across the entire comet surface. In this work we report about the spectral modeling of CG VIS-IR spectra by means of Hapke's radiative transfer model.

  9. Justification of choice of the spectral range for the study of combustion processes with the use of thermography in the middle IR range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafontsev, M. V.; Loboda, E. L.; Reyno, V. V.; Anufriev, I. S.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the emission spectra of flame formed during combustion of different fuels and gives the grounds for application of various narrow spectral ranges in the mid-infrared region to record the temperature fields in flame and flame screened objects.

  10. Using Visible Spectral Information to Predict Long-Wave Infrared Spectral Emissivity: A Case Study over the Sokolov Area of the Czech Republic with an Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Gila Notesco; Eyal Ben-Dor; Simon Adar; Yoel Shkolnisky

    2013-01-01

    Remote-sensing platforms are often comprised of a cluster of different spectral range detectors or sensors to benefit from the spectral identification capabilities of each range. Missing data from these platforms, caused by problematic weather conditions, such as clouds, sensor failure, low temporal coverage or a narrow field of view (FOV), is one of the problems preventing proper monitoring of the Earth. One of the possible solutions is predicting a detector or sensors missing data using an...

  11. In-flight validation and calibration of the spectral and radiometric characteristics of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert O.; Conel, James E.; Margolis, Jack S.; Carrere, Veronique; Bruegge, Carol J.; Rast, Michael; Hoover, Gordon

    1990-01-01

    Through an in-flight calibration experiment at Rogers Dry Lake, California on September 20, 1989, the radiometric and spectral properties of AVIRIS were determined. In-flight spectral channel positions and the spectral response function in 10 regions of the AVIRIS spectral range, taking in all four spectrometers, are shown to agree closely with the corresponding parameters measured in the laboratory. The intraflight stability for the Rogers Dry Lake calibration site is better than 2 percent with the exception of the strong atmospheric water absorptions where the measured radiance is close to zero. This experiment has provided both direct generation of an in-flight spectral and radiometric calibration and validation of the laboratory calibration at the reported level accuracy.

  12. Spatial distribution of spectral parameters of high latitude geomagnetic disturbances in the Pc5/Pi3 frequency range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Pilipenko

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze spectral parameters of the geomagnetic disturbances within the 14 mHz (Pc5/Pi3 frequency range for 29 observatories from polar to auroral latitudes. The main object of this study is the broadband (noise background under quiet and moderately disturbed conditions. To obtain a quantitative description of background high-latitude long period ULF activity the log-log dependence of the spectral power on frequency is expanded over Legendre polynomials, and the coefficients of this expansion (spectral moments are used to describe the most common features of these spectra. Not only the spectral power, but also the spectral slope and higher spectral moments, averaged over relatively long time intervals, demonstrate a systematic dependence on corrected geomagnetic (CGM latitude, ?, and magnetic local time, MLT. The 2-D distributions of the spectral moments in ?-MLT coordinates are characterized by existence of structures, narrow in latitude and extended in MLT, which can be attributed to the projections of different magnetospheric domains. Spatio-temporal distributions of spectral power of elliptically (P-component and randomly (N-component polarized signal are similar, but not identical. The N-component contribution to the total signal becomes non-negligible in regions with a high local activity, such as the auroral oval and dayside polar cusp. The spectral slope indicates a larger relative contribution of higher frequencies upon the latitude decrease, probably, as a result of the resonant effects in the ULF noise. The higher spectral moments are also controlled mostly by CGM latitude and MLT and are fundamentally different for the polarized and non-polarized components. This study is a step towards the construction of an empirical model of the ULF wave power in Earth's magnetosphere.

  13. Cloud spectral transmittance in the UV and visible at Ushuaia (54 degrees 49 minutes S, 68 degrees 19 minutes W)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Susana B.; Vigliarolo, Paula; Vera, Carolina; Deferrari, Guillermo

    2002-01-01

    The presence of clouds is responsible for an important variation in the UV and visible radiation at the Earth's surface. Although for practical purposes cloud transmittance is often considered plane in the UV and visible, a wavelength dependence is observed. In this paper we performed a statistical study of cloud transmittance at Ushuaia for wavelengths between 295 and 600 nm, following different procedures. A decrease of the transmittance for increasing wavelengths in the UVA and the visible was observed (0 to 50% decrease at 600 nm regarding to 340 nm) in good agreement with the observations made by other authors. Nevertheless, for wavelengths below 320 nm our results show discrepancy with other papers. Since Ushuaia is a small town n a fairly unpolluted area, a possible reason for this differences is that, as a consequence of low ozone amounts in the troposphere, Rayleigh scatter is more important than ozone absorption, even in this part of the spectrum.

  14. Fabry-Perot Based Ranging Interferometer Receiver for High Spectral Resolution Lidar Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Michigan Aerospace Corporation (MAC) is pleased to present the following Phase II proposal for a Fabry-Perot Based Interferometer Receiver for the High Spectral...

  15. Dispersed fluorescence spectrometry from the VIS to VUV spectral range for experiments at heavy-ion storage facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiß, Philipp; Schmidt, Philipp; Ozga, Christian; Knie, André; Ehresmann, Arno

    2015-11-01

    For the electronic- and charge-state specific determination of VUV-VIS fluorescence emission cross sections after collisions between heavy ions and neutral gases or electrons a fluorescence spectrometer for the VUV-VIS spectral range is planned. Tentative experiments showed that signal rates after collisions between Xe atoms and {{Xe}}54+ ions are high enough to allow efficient experiments.

  16. Optically visible post-AGB/RGB stars and young stellar objects in the Small Magellanic Cloud: candidate selection, spectral energy distributions and spectroscopic examination

    CERN Document Server

    Kamath, D; Van Winckel, H

    2014-01-01

    We have carried out a search for optically visible post-AGB candidates in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We used mid-IR observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope to select optically visible candidates with a mid-IR excess. We obtained low-resolution optical spectra for 801 candidates. After removing contaminants and poor quality spectra, the final sample comprised of 63 post-AGB/RGB candidates of A - F spectral type. Using the spectra, we estimated the stellar parameters: effective temperature, surface gravity and [Fe/H]. We also estimated the reddening and deduced the luminosity using the stellar parameters combined with photometry. Based on a luminosity criterion, 42 of these 63 sources were classified as post-RGB candidates and the remaining as post-AGB candidates. From the spectral energy distributions we found that 6 of the 63 post-AGB/RGB candidates have a circumstellar shell suggesting that they are single stars, while 27 of them have a surrounding disc, suggesting that they are binaries. For th...

  17. High spectral resolution observations of Martian atmosphere in infrared - submillimeter range from ground-based instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Hiromu; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Aoki, Shohei; Murata, Isao; Maezawa, Hiroyuki; Okano, Shoichi; Sagawa, Hideo; Kasai, Yasuko

    2010-05-01

    With increased knowledge on our "neighbor" planets Mars and Venus, based on recent aggressive explorations by the US and Europe, our image on them is changing significantly. In particular, Mars is called ‘a frozen water planet'. It is almost certain that Mars once had duration with warm and wet climate [Head et al., 1999; Donahue, 1995; Parker et al., 1993]. It still conserves a large amount of water ice under the surface [Boynton et al., 2002; Mitrofanov et al., 2002; Feldman et al., 2002]. The question "Why and when did they diverge?" is essential for their environments which potentially could create and keep the life or not. Many molecules in planetary atmospheres show transitions in the mid infrared - submillimeter region. Thus, high-resolution spectroscopy in this region is significantly indispensable to study planetary atmospheres. We searched sulfur oxide (SO2 and SO) in the Martian atmosphere by the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). Sulfur oxide is one of the most evident species in terrestrial volcanic gases. Although it has not yet been detected at Mars, this detection can constraint the Martian crustal and volcanic activities. We observed northern winter of Mars on 26/Dec./2007 (Ls=8.1) in 346 GHz range with ~ 1h integration, and got the upper limit of the SO2 mixing ratio, 2 ppb. We concluded that the crustal or volcanic gas produced into the atmosphere is tenuous in northern winter [Nakagawa et al., 2009]. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful tool for astrophysical studies. To achieve highest spectral resolution and sensitivity as well as compact instrumentation heterodyne systems are advantageous over direct-detection methods. Our group in Tohoku University has developed own heterodyne system for infrared spectrometer for Earth's atmosphere over the past 20 years. The failure of earlier attempts to build tunable systems using tunable diode lasers was due mostly to insufficient laser power. Recently, quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) offer sufficient optical output power of several milliwatts to guarantee an efficient heterodyning process and high system sensitivity. The use of QCLs in our system led to a breakthrough giving the heterodyne infrared spectrometer for planetary atmosphere. We report experiments evaluating the feasibility of QCLs at mid-infrared wavelengths for use as local oscillator (LO) in a heterodyne receiver. Performance tests with the QCL provided by Hamamatsu Photonics (operating at 7.7 um), and QCL provided by Maxion Technologies (operating at 10.6 um in room temperature) were evaluated.

  18. Efficient noncollinear parametric amplification of weak femtosecond pulses in the visible and near-infrared spectral range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, V; Ollikainen, O; Gallus, J; Wild, U; Rebane, A; Kalintsev, A

    1998-01-15

    We report measurement of efficient amplification of weak femtosecond supercontinuum seed pulses by use of a noncollinear optical parametric process in BBO crystal pumped with 150-fs pulses from a frequency-doubled regenerative-amplified Ti:sapphire laser at 390nm . The highest amplification factor, 10(8) , was achieved for 3x10(-16)J energy seed pulses at wavelength of 560nm. PMID:18084425

  19. Natural variability of bio-optical properties in Case 1 waters: attenuation and reflectance within the visible and near-UV spectral domains, as observed in South Pacific and Mediterranean waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Morel

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties of Case 1 waters have been empirically related to the chlorophyll concentration, [Chl], historically used as an index of the trophic state and of the abundance of the biological materials. The natural variability around the mean statistical relationships is here examined by comparing the apparent optical properties (spectral downward irradiance attenuation and reflectance as a function of [Chl] which were determined in two environments, the Pacific and Mediterranean waters. These oceanic zones apparently form two extremes of the bio-optical variability range. The systematic deviations, in both directions with respect to the average laws, mainly result from the differing contents in non-algal detrital materials and dissolved colored substance for a given [Chl] level. These contents are higher and lower than the average, in the Mediterranean Sea and Pacific Ocean, respectively. The divergences between the two water bodies, detected in the visible spectral domain, are considerably accentuated in the UV domain. The bio-optical properties in this spectral domain (310400 nm are systematically explored. Their prediction based on the sole [Chl] index is problematic; although it is probably possible on a regional scale, an ubiquitous relationship does not seem to exist for the global scale.

  20. Photoinduced catalytic adsorption of model contaminants on Bi/Cu pillared montmorillonite in the visible light range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montmorillonite K10 clay was pillared with BiCl3 and Cu(NO3)2 to extend its applicability as catalytic adsorbent to degrade aqueous solution of anionic azo-dye Methyl Orange (MO) in the presence of visible light irradiation. The preparation of Bi/Cu-montmorillonite utilized benig...

  1. Application of prominent spectral lines in the 125-180 nm range for inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, O.; Heitland, P. [Spectro Analytical Instruments GmbH, Kleve (Germany)

    2001-12-01

    A new axially viewed ICP optical emission spectrometer featuring an argon-filled optic and CCD detectors was evaluated for the application of prominent spectral lines in the 125-180 nm range. This wavelength range was investigated for several analytical applications of inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). There are different advantages for the application of spectral lines below 180 nm. A number of elements, such as Al, Br, Cl, Ga, Ge, I, In, N, P, Pb, Pt, S and Te, were found to have the most intense spectral lines in the wavelength range from 125-180 nm. Compared with lines above 180 nm higher signal-to-background ratios were found. Low limits of detection using pneumatic nebulization of aqueous solutions for sample introduction were calculated for Al II 167.080 nm (0.04 {mu}g L{sup -1}), Br I 154.065 nm (9 {mu}g L{sup -1}), Cl I 134.724 nm (19 {mu}g L{sup -1}), Ga II 141.444 nm (0.8 {mu}g L{sup -1}), Ge II 164.919 nm (1.3 {mu}g L{sup -1}), I I 142.549 nm (13 {mu}g L{sup -1}), In II 158.583 nm (0.2 {mu}g L{sup -1}), P I 177.500 nm (0.9 {mu}g L{sup -1}), Pb II 168.215 nm (1.5 {mu}g L{sup -1}), Pt II 177.709 nm (2.6 {mu}g L{sup -1}), S I 180.731 nm (1.9 {mu}g L{sup -1}) and Te I 170.00 nm (4.6 {mu}g L{sup -1}). Numerous application examples for the use of those lines and other important spectral lines below 180 nm are given. Because of fewer emission lines from transition elements, such as Fe, Co, Cr, lines below 180 nm often offer freedom from spectral interferences. Additional lines of lower intensity for the determination of higher elemental concentrations are also available in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range. This is specially useful when the concentrations are not in the linear range of calibration curves obtained with commonly used lines. (orig.)

  2. THE SECOND STAGE OF FERMI at ELETTRA: A SEEDED FEL IN THE SOFT X-RAY SPECTRAL RANGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second stage of the FERMI FEL, named FEL-2, is based on the principle of high-gain harmonic generation and relies on a double-seeded cascade. Recent developments stimulated a revision of the original setup, which was designed to cover the spectral range between 40 and 10 nm. The numerical simulations we present here show that the nominal (expected) electron-beam performance allows extension of the FEL spectral range down to 4 nm. A significant amount of third harmonic power can be also expected. We also show that the proposed setup is flexible enough for exploiting future developments of new seed sources, e.g., high harmonic generation in gases.

  3. Broadband superluminescent diodes and semiconductor optical amplifiers for the spectral range 750 - 800 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied superluminescent diodes (SLDs) and semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) based on an (AlxGa1-x)As/GaAs single quantum well structure with an Al content x ∼ 0.1 in a 10-nm-thick active layer. Depending on the length of the active channel, the single-mode fibre coupled cw output power of the SLDs is 1 to 30 mW at a spectral width of about 50 nm. The width of the optical gain band in the active channel exceeds 40 nm. Preliminary operating life tests have demonstrated that the devices are sufficiently reliable. (lasers)

  4. TESIS experiment on study of solar corona in EUV spectral range (CORONAS-PHOTON project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new orbital station, namely: the CORONAS-PHOTON one (to be launched in 2006) equipped with systems to explore Sun at the intensification period of the solar activity 24-th cycle and at its peak is being designed within the framework of the CORONAS National Sun Space Exploration Program. The station equipment consists of systems to observe Sun within the spectral soft X-ray and vacuum ultraviolet bands. Paper lists and describes the TESIS experiment tools designed for the CORONAS-PHOTON Project to ensure the Sun atmospheric research within short-wave band

  5. Development of on-line sorting system for detection of infected seed potatoes using visible near-infrared transmittance spectral technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, an online seed potato sorting system using a visible and near infrared (40 1100 nm) transmittance spectral technique and statistical model was evaluated for the nondestructive determination of infected and sound seed potatoes. Seed potatoes that had been artificially infected with Pectobacterium atrosepticum, which is known to cause a soil borne disease infection, were prepared for the experiments. After acquiring transmittance spectra from sound and infected seed potatoes, a determination algorithm for detecting infected seed potatoes was developed using the partial least square discriminant analysis method. The coefficient of determination(R2p) of the prediction model was 0.943, and the classification accuracy was above 99% (n = 80) for discriminating diseased seed potatoes from sound ones. This online sorting system has good potential for developing a technique to detect agricultural products that are infected and contaminated by pathogens.

  6. Development of on-line sorting system for detection of infected seed potatoes using visible near-infrared transmittance spectral technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Yong; Cho, Byoung Kwan [Dept. of Biosystems Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Mo, Chang Yeun [Rural Development Administration, National Institute of Agricultural Engineering, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jun Soon [Dept. of Horticultural Bioscience, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    In this study, an online seed potato sorting system using a visible and near infrared (40 1100 nm) transmittance spectral technique and statistical model was evaluated for the nondestructive determination of infected and sound seed potatoes. Seed potatoes that had been artificially infected with Pectobacterium atrosepticum, which is known to cause a soil borne disease infection, were prepared for the experiments. After acquiring transmittance spectra from sound and infected seed potatoes, a determination algorithm for detecting infected seed potatoes was developed using the partial least square discriminant analysis method. The coefficient of determination(R{sup 2}{sub p}) of the prediction model was 0.943, and the classification accuracy was above 99% (n = 80) for discriminating diseased seed potatoes from sound ones. This online sorting system has good potential for developing a technique to detect agricultural products that are infected and contaminated by pathogens.

  7. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF GAS-PHASE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CATIONS IN THE 1050 ?m SPECTRAL RANGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gas-phase infrared spectra of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) cations have been recorded in the 10-50 ?m (or 1000-200 cm1) spectral range via IR multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy. Ionized PAHs are formed by UV laser ionization in an effusive beam and subsequently irradiated with a single pulse of narrowband tunable infrared light produced by the Free-Electron Laser for IntraCavity Experiments FELICE. The ion population is then analyzed in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Upon resonance, dissociation is induced so that IR spectra can be recorded by monitoring either the depleted parent ion intensity or the appearance of fragment ions as a function of the wavelength. The intracavity IR fluence enables the recording of IRMPD spectra of strongly bound PAH cations in the hitherto inaccessible far-IR spectral range. Experimental spectra are presented for the radical cations of anthracene, tetracene, pentacene, and coronene. Spectra calculated with density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311g(2df,2pd) level reproduce IR frequencies reasonably accurately in this spectral range when a uniform scaling factor of 0.94 over the complete 10-50 ?m spectral range is employed. We show that even vibrational modes with a calculated IR intensity lower than 1 km mol1 can be observed. For the catacondensed PAH cations we find CH out-of-plane bending vibrations involving four adjacent CH groups within a few wavenumbers of 733 cm1, closely matching the 13.6 ?m UIR band. For the larger systems, pentacene and coronene, we observe a continuous structureless background absorption above 400 cm1 which is attributed to the high density of IR dipole allowed combination modes for these systems.

  8. Directional visible light scattering by silicon nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Yuan Hsing; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E; Yu, Ye Feng; Lukiyanchuk, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Directional light scattering by spherical silicon nanoparticles in the visible spectral range is experimentally demonstrated for the first time. These unique scattering properties arise due to simultaneous excitation and mutual interference of magnetic and electric dipole resonances inside a single nanosphere. Directivity of the far-field radiation pattern can be controlled by changing light wavelength and the nanoparticle size. Forward-to-backward scattering ratio above 6 can be experimentally obtained at visible wavelengths. These unique properties of silicon nanoparticles make them promising for design of novel low-loss visible- and telecom-range nanoantenna devices.

  9. Spectral synthesis provides 2-D videos on a 1-D screen with 360{\\deg}-visibility and mirror-immunity

    CERN Document Server

    Grusche, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    Spatial-light-modulator (SLM)-based tunable sources have complex setups. A simpler setup, comprising an SLM-projector and a dispersive element, synthesizes light as effectively, based on a Superposition of Newtonian Spectra (SNS). As a generalization of SNS, two-dimensional (2-D) grayscale videos are spectrally encoded on a one-dimensional (1-D), translucent screen, and viewed through another dispersive element. This Projected-Image Circumlineascopy (PICS) produces semitransparent, rainbow-coloured, virtual 2-D videos that face every viewer anywhere around the 1-D screen. They are invariant under reflection of the 1-D screen in mirrors parallel to it. SNS bandwidth and PICS image geometry are calculated using geometric optics and Dispersion Diagrams.

  10. On the detectability of cosmic ray electron spectral features in the microwave/mm-wave range

    CERN Document Server

    Tartari, Andrea; Sironi, Giorgio; Zannoni, Mario; Spinelli, Sebastiano

    2010-01-01

    Recent measurements of cosmic ray electron energy spectra suggest that above 10 GeV there may be deviations from a single power law spectrum. There are hints (ATIC) for a bump occurring between 100 GeV and 1TeV, meaning that there might be more high energy electrons than expected. Whether these electrons are produced within pulsar magnetospheres, or due to Dark Matter annihilation or decay, this is still matter of debate. Understanding the nature of these ultra high energy particles is a difficult task that can be fulfilled using all the available astrophysical observables. We investigate how different energy spectra produce different observable manifestations in the radio/microwave/mm-wave domain, where corresponding deviations from a synchrotron power law could appear. We raise the question around the detectability of these possible radio spectral features, which may be interesting for a wide scientific community including astrophysicists and scientists working on foregrounds removal for CMB experiments.

  11. Spectral Unmixing of Forest Crown Components at Close Range, Airborne and Simulated Sentinel-2 and EnMAP Spectral Imaging Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Clasen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Forest biochemical and biophysical variables and their spatial and temporal distribution are essential inputs to process-orientated ecosystem models. To provide this information, imaging spectroscopy appears to be a promising tool. In this context, the present study investigates the potential of spectral unmixing to derive sub-pixel crown component fractions in a temperate deciduous forest ecosystem. However, the high proportion of foliage in this complex vegetation structure leads to the problem of saturation effects, when applying broadband vegetation indices. This study illustrates that multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA can contribute to overcoming this challenge. Reference fractional abundances, as well as spectral measurements of the canopy components, could be precisely determined from a crane measurement platform situated in a deciduous forest in North-East Germany. In contrast to most other studies, which only use leaf and soil endmembers, this experimental setup allowed for the inclusion of a bark endmember for the unmixing of components within the canopy. This study demonstrates that the inclusion of additional endmembers markedly improves the accuracy. A mean absolute error of 7.9% could be achieved for the fractional occurrence of the leaf endmember and 5.9% for the bark endmember. In order to evaluate the results of this field-based study for airborne and satellite-based remote sensing applications, a transfer to Airborne Imaging Spectrometer for Applications (AISA and simulated Environmental Mapping and Analysis Program (EnMAP and Sentinel-2 imagery was carried out. All sensors were capable of unmixing crown components with a mean absolute error ranging between 3% and 21%.

  12. Derivation of a MODIS-compatible enhanced vegetation index from visible infrared imaging radiometer suite spectral reflectances using vegetation isoline equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Kenta; Miura, Tomoaki; Yoshioka, Hiroki; Huete, Alfredo R.

    2013-01-01

    We developed a unique methodology that spectrally translates the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) across sensors for data continuity based on vegetation isoline equations and derived a moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS)-compatible EVI for the visible/infrared imager/radiometer suite (VIIRS) sensor. The derived equation had four coefficients that were a function of soil, canopy, and atmosphere, e.g., soil line slope, leaf area index (LAI), and aerosol optical thickness (AOT). The PROSAIL canopy reflectance and 6S atmospheric models were employed to numerically characterize the MODIS-compatible VIIRS EVI. MODIS-compatible VIIRS EVI values only differed from those of MODIS EVI by, at most, 0.002 EVI units, whereas VIIRS and MODIS EVI values differed by 0.018 EVI units. The derived coefficients were sensitive mainly to LAI and AOT for the full- and a partial-covered canopy, respectively. The MODIS-compatible EVI resulted in a reasonable level of accuracy when the coefficients were fixed at values found via optimization for model-simulated and actual sensor data (83 and 41% reduction in the root mean square error, respectively), demonstrating the potential practical utility of the derived equation. The developed methodology can be used to obtain a spectrally compatible EVI for any pair of sensors in the data continuity context.

  13. Dye-sensitized 1D anatase TiO2 nanorods for tunable efficient photodetection in the visible range

    OpenAIRE

    Parreira, P.; Torres, Erica; Nunes, Clarisse; Carvalho, C. Nunes de; Lavareda, G.; A. Amaral; Brites, Maria João

    2012-01-01

    TiO2 films with enhanced photosensitivity were deposited on alkali free glass substrates without intentional substrate heating by pulsed DC magnetron reactive sputtering with an average thickness of about 2 μm. Three dyes, commercial N719 and two new organic dyes were impregnated in order to control the optical spectral selectivity of such films. The type of dye used proved to dramatically influence the device's response to radiation pulses. The practical breakthrough is the use of different ...

  14. High dynamic range measurement of spectral responsivity and linearity of a radiation thermometer using a super-continuum laser and LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To realize the temperature scale above the freezing point of silver according to the definition of ITS-90, the dynamic range of the spectral responsivity is one of the most important factors which limit its uncertainty. When the residual spectral response at both side bands of a spectral band is not negligible, a significant uncertainty can be caused by a low dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement. In general, incandescent lamps are used to measure the spectral responsivity and the linearity. The dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement is often limited by a trade-off with the desired spectral resolution, which is less than 6 decades. Nonlinearity is another limiting fact of uncertainties of the temperature scale. Tungsten lamps have disadvantage in the nonlinearity measurements in terms of adjustability of radiance level and spectral selectivity. We report spectral responsivity measurements of which the measurable dynamic range is enhanced 50 times after replacing a QTH lamp with a super continuum laser. We also present a spectrally selected linearity measurement over a wide dynamic range using high-brightness light emitting diode arrays to observe a slight saturation of linearity

  15. High dynamic range measurement of spectral responsivity and linearity of a radiation thermometer using a super-continuum laser and LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Y. S.; Lee, D. H.; Park, C. W.; Park, S. N.

    2013-09-01

    To realize the temperature scale above the freezing point of silver according to the definition of ITS-90, the dynamic range of the spectral responsivity is one of the most important factors which limit its uncertainty. When the residual spectral response at both side bands of a spectral band is not negligible, a significant uncertainty can be caused by a low dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement. In general, incandescent lamps are used to measure the spectral responsivity and the linearity. The dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement is often limited by a trade-off with the desired spectral resolution, which is less than 6 decades. Nonlinearity is another limiting fact of uncertainties of the temperature scale. Tungsten lamps have disadvantage in the nonlinearity measurements in terms of adjustability of radiance level and spectral selectivity. We report spectral responsivity measurements of which the measurable dynamic range is enhanced 50 times after replacing a QTH lamp with a super continuum laser. We also present a spectrally selected linearity measurement over a wide dynamic range using high-brightness light emitting diode arrays to observe a slight saturation of linearity.

  16. High dynamic range measurement of spectral responsivity and linearity of a radiation thermometer using a super-continuum laser and LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Y. S.; Lee, D. H.; Park, C. W.; Park, S. N. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science 209 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-11

    To realize the temperature scale above the freezing point of silver according to the definition of ITS-90, the dynamic range of the spectral responsivity is one of the most important factors which limit its uncertainty. When the residual spectral response at both side bands of a spectral band is not negligible, a significant uncertainty can be caused by a low dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement. In general, incandescent lamps are used to measure the spectral responsivity and the linearity. The dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement is often limited by a trade-off with the desired spectral resolution, which is less than 6 decades. Nonlinearity is another limiting fact of uncertainties of the temperature scale. Tungsten lamps have disadvantage in the nonlinearity measurements in terms of adjustability of radiance level and spectral selectivity. We report spectral responsivity measurements of which the measurable dynamic range is enhanced 50 times after replacing a QTH lamp with a super continuum laser. We also present a spectrally selected linearity measurement over a wide dynamic range using high-brightness light emitting diode arrays to observe a slight saturation of linearity.

  17. A Determination of the Spectral Index of Galactic Synchrotron Emission in the 1-10 GHz range

    CERN Document Server

    Platania, P; Bersanelli, M; Amici, G D; Kogut, A J; Levin, S; Maino, D; Smoot, G F

    1997-01-01

    We present an analysis of simultaneous multifrequency measurements of the Galactic emission in the 1-10 GHz range with 18 degrees, angular resolution taken from a high altitude site. Our data yield a determination of the synchrotron spectral index between 1.4 GHz and 7.5 GHz of 2.81 +/- 0.16. Combining our data with the maps from Haslam et al. (1982) and Reich & Reich (1986) we find 2.76 +/- 0.11 in the 0.4 - 7.5 GHz range. These results are in agreement with the few previously published measurements. The variation of spectral index with frequency based on our results and compared with other data found in the literature suggests a steepening of the synchrotron spectrum towards high frequencies as expected from theory, because of the steepening of the parent cosmic ray electron energy spectrum. Comparison between the Haslam data and the 19 GHz map (Cottingham 1987) also indicates a significant spectral index variation on large angular scale. Addition quality data are necessary to provide a serious study of...

  18. A fast radiative transfer model for visible through shortwave infrared spectral reflectances in clear and cloudy atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computationally efficient radiative transfer model (RTM) for calculating visible (VIS) through shortwave infrared (SWIR) reflectances is developed for use in satellite and airborne cloud property retrievals. The full radiative transfer equation (RTE) for combinations of cloud, aerosol, and molecular layers is solved approximately by using six independent RTEs that assume the plane-parallel approximation along with a single-scattering approximation for Rayleigh scattering. Each of the six RTEs can be solved analytically if the bidirectional reflectance/transmittance distribution functions (BRDF/BTDF) of the cloud/aerosol layers are known. The adding/doubling (AD) algorithm is employed to account for overlapped cloud/aerosol layers and non-Lambertian surfaces. Two approaches are used to mitigate the significant computational burden of the AD algorithm. First, the BRDF and BTDF of single cloud/aerosol layers are pre-computed using the discrete ordinates radiative transfer program (DISORT) implemented with 128 streams, and second, the required integral in the AD algorithm is numerically implemented on a twisted icosahedral mesh. A concise surface BRDF simulator associated with the MODIS land surface product (MCD43) is merged into a fast RTM to accurately account for non-isotropic surface reflectance. The resulting fast RTM is evaluated with respect to its computational accuracy and efficiency. The simulation bias between DISORT and the fast RTM is large (e.g., relative error >5%) only when both the solar zenith angle (SZA) and the viewing zenith angle (VZA) are large (i.e., SZA>45° and VZA>70°). For general situations, i.e., cloud/aerosol layers above a non-Lambertian surface, the fast RTM calculation rate is faster than that of the 128-stream DISORT by approximately two orders of magnitude. -- Highlights: ► An efficient radiative transfer model is developed for cloud remote sensing. ► Multi-layered clouds and a non-Lambertian surface can be fully considered. ► A twisted icosahedral mesh is employed to accelerate the calculation.

  19. Spectral optical properties of long-range transport Asian dust and pollution aerosols over Northeast Asia in 2007 and 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jung

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available As a part of the IGAC (International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Mega-cities program, aerosol physical and optical properties were continuously measured from March 2007 to March 2008 at an urban site (37.57° N, 126.94° E in Seoul, Korea. Spectral optical properties of long-range transported Asian dust and pollution aerosols have been investigated based on the year long measurement data. Optically measured black carbon/thermally measured elemental carbon (BC/EC ratio showed clear monthly variation with high values in summer and low values in winter mainly due to the enhancement of light attenuation by the internal mixing of EC. Novel approach has been suggested to retrieve the spectral light absorption coefficient (babs from Aethalometer raw data by using BC/EC ratio. Mass absorption efficiency, σabs(=babs/EC at 550 nm at the measurement site was determined to be 9.0±1.3, 8.9±1.5, 9.5±2.0, and 10.3±1.7 m2 g−1 in spring, summer, fall, and winter, respectively with an annual mean of 9.4±1.8 m2 g−1. Threshold values to classify severe haze events were suggested in this study. Increasing trend of aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA with wavelength was observed during Asian dust events while little spectral dependence of SSA was observed during long-range transport pollution (LTP events. Satellite aerosol optical thickness (AOT and Hysplit air mass backward trajectory analyses as well as chemical analysis were performed to characterize the dependence of spectral optical properties on aerosol type. Results from this study can provide useful information for studies on regional air quality and aerosol's effects on climate change.

  20. Infrared normal spectral emissivity of Ti–6Al–4V alloy in the 500–1150 K temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► First heating cycle acts as a annealing, relieving the surface stresses. ► Stress relieving occurs mainly above 900 K. ► Emissivity decreases between 0.35 and 0.10 in the 2.5–22 μm spectral range. ► Emissivity increases linearly with temperature, with the same slope for λ > 10 μm. ► Good agreement between resistivity and emissivity by means of Hagen–Rubens relation. - Abstract: Thermal radiative emissivity is related to the optical and electrical properties of materials, and it is a key parameter required in a large number of industrial applications. In the case of Ti–6Al–4V, spectral emissivity experimental data are not available for the range of temperatures between 400 and 1200 K, where almost all industrial applications take place. The experimental results in this paper show that the normal spectral emissivity decreases with wavelength from a value of about 0.35 at 2.5 μm to about 0.10 at 22 μm. At the same time, the spectral emissivity shows a slight linear increase with temperature between 500 and 1150 K, with approximately the same slope for all wavelengths. Additionally, the influence of the samples thermal history on the emissivity is studied. A strong decrease in the emissivity values appears due to the effect of surface stress relaxation processes. This means that the radiative properties of this alloy strongly depend on the surface stress state. A thermal treatment to relieve the surface stress should be carried out to achieve a steady state of the radiative properties. In addition, a good qualitative agreement is found between the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity obtained using conventional measurements and the one obtained from the emissivity experimental results by using the Hagen–Rubens equation.

  1. Spectral optical properties of long-range transport Asian dust and pollution aerosols over Northeast Asia in 2007 and 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jung

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available As a part of the IGAC (International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Mega-cities program, aerosol physical and optical properties were continuously measured from March 2007 to March 2008 at an urban site (37.57° N, 126.94° E in Seoul, Korea. Spectral optical properties of long-range transported Asian dust and pollution aerosols have been investigated based on the year long measurement data. Optically measured black carbon/thermally measured elemental carbon (BC/EC ratio showed clear monthly variation with high values in summer and low values in winter mainly due to the enhancement of light attenuation by the internal mixing of EC. Novel approach has been suggested to retrieve the spectral light absorption coefficient (babs from Aethalometer raw data by using BC/EC ratio. Mass absorption efficiency, σabs (=babs/EC at 550 nm was determined to be 9.0±1.3, 8.9±1.5, 9.5±2.0, and 10.3±1.7 m2 g−1 in spring, summer, fall, and winter, respectively with an annual mean of 9.4±1.8 m2 g−1. Threshold values to classify severe haze events were suggested in this study. Increasing trend of aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA with wavelength was observed during Asian dust events while little spectral dependence of SSA was observed during long-range transport pollution (LTP events. Satellite aerosol optical thickness (AOT and Hysplit air mass backward trajectory analyses as well as chemical analysis were performed to characterize the dependence of spectral optical properties on aerosol type. Results from this study can provide useful information for studies on regional air quality and aerosol's effects on climate change.

  2. Infrared normal spectral emissivity of Ti-6Al-4V alloy in the 500-1150 K temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, L. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Industria de Turbo Propulsores, S.A., Planta de Zamudio, Edificio 300, 48170 Zamudio, Bizkaia (Spain); Risueno, E. [CIC Energigune, Parque Tecnologico, Albert Einstein 48, 01510 Minano, Alava, Spain. (Spain); Perez-Saez, R.B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.es [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644,48080 Bilbao, Spain. (Spain); Tello, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644,48080 Bilbao, Spain. (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First heating cycle acts as a annealing, relieving the surface stresses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stress relieving occurs mainly above 900 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Emissivity decreases between 0.35 and 0.10 in the 2.5-22 {mu}m spectral range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Emissivity increases linearly with temperature, with the same slope for {lambda} > 10 {mu}m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Good agreement between resistivity and emissivity by means of Hagen-Rubens relation. - Abstract: Thermal radiative emissivity is related to the optical and electrical properties of materials, and it is a key parameter required in a large number of industrial applications. In the case of Ti-6Al-4V, spectral emissivity experimental data are not available for the range of temperatures between 400 and 1200 K, where almost all industrial applications take place. The experimental results in this paper show that the normal spectral emissivity decreases with wavelength from a value of about 0.35 at 2.5 {mu}m to about 0.10 at 22 {mu}m. At the same time, the spectral emissivity shows a slight linear increase with temperature between 500 and 1150 K, with approximately the same slope for all wavelengths. Additionally, the influence of the samples thermal history on the emissivity is studied. A strong decrease in the emissivity values appears due to the effect of surface stress relaxation processes. This means that the radiative properties of this alloy strongly depend on the surface stress state. A thermal treatment to relieve the surface stress should be carried out to achieve a steady state of the radiative properties. In addition, a good qualitative agreement is found between the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity obtained using conventional measurements and the one obtained from the emissivity experimental results by using the Hagen-Rubens equation.

  3. Nonlinear spectral imaging of biological tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Palero, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis demonstrates live high resolution 3D imaging of tissue in its native state and environment. The nonlinear interaction between focussed femtosecond light pulses and the biological tissue results in the emission of natural autofluorescence and second-harmonic signal. Because biological intrinsic emission is generally very weak and extends from the ultraviolet to the visible spectral range, a broad-spectral range and high sensitivity 3D spectral imaging system i...

  4. A new undulator for the extension of the spectral range of the CLIO FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcouille, O.; Berset, J.M.; Glotin, F. [LURE, Orsay (France)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    We built a new undulator in order to extend the lasing range of the CLIO infrared FEL. Presently, CLIO operates in the wavelength range 2 - 17 {mu}m. Beyond 14 {mu}m, the power decreases rapidly, because of the diffraction losses of the vacuum chamber (7 mm height and 2 m long). Thus, lasing at higher wavelengths implies installing a chamber with a height approximately twice. Then the minimum gap is increased and the maximum deflection parameter, K, is reduced from 2 to 1 : the laser tunability is greatly reduced. This is why a new undulator has been built.

  5. [Spectral Analysis of CdZnSe Ternary Quantum Dots Sensitized TiO2 Tubes and Its Application in Visible-Light Photocatalysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhi-zhong; Ren, Li-li; Pan, Hai-bo; Li, Chun-yan; Chen, Jing-hua; Chen, Jian-zhong

    2015-11-01

    In this work, cadmium nitrate hexahydrate [Cd(NO₃)₂ · 6H₂O] is as a source of cadmium, zinc nitrate [Zn(NO₃)₂] as a source of zinc source, and NaHSe as a source of selenium which was prepared through reducing the elemental selenium with sodium borohydride (NaBH₄). Then water-soluble Cd₁₋xZnxSe ternary quantum dots with different component were prepared by colloid chemistry. The as-prepared Cd₁₋xZnx Se ternary quantum dots exhibit stable fluorescent property in aqueous solution, and can still maintain good dispersivity at room temperature for four months. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) were used to analyze crystal structure and morphology of the prepared Cd₁₋xZnxSe. It is found that the as-prepared ternary quantum dots are cubic phase, show as sphere, and the average of particle size is approximate 4 nm. The spectral properties and energy band structure of the as-prepared ternary quantum dots were modulated through changing the atom ratio of elements Zn and Cd. Compared with binary quantum dots CdSe and ZnSe, the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Visible) absorption spectrum and fluorescence (FL) emission spectrum of ternary quantum dots are both red-shift. The composites (Cd₀.₅ Zn₀.₅ Se@TNTs) of Cd₀.₅ Zn₀.₅ Se ternary quantum dots and TiO₂ nanotubes (TNTs) were prepared by directly immerging TNTs into quantum dots dispersive solution for 5 hours. TEM image shows that the Cd₀.₅ Zn₀.₅ Se ternary quantum dots were closely combined to nanotube surface. The infrared spectra show that the Ti-Se bond was formed between Cd₀.₅ Zn₀.₅ Se ternary quantum dots and TiO₂ nanotubes, which improve the stability of the composite. Compared to pristine TNTs, UV-Visible absorption spectrum of the composites is significantly enhanced in the visible region of light. And the absorption band edge of Cd₀.₅Zn₀.₅ Se@TNTs red-shift from 400 to 700 nm. The recombination of the photogenerated electron-hole pairs was restrained with the as-prepared ternary quantum dots. Therefore, the visible-light photocatalytic efficiency was greatly improved. After visible-light irradiation for 60 min, the degradation of Cd₀.₅ Zn₀.₅ Se@TNTs photocatalysts for RhB is nearly 100%, which is about 3. 3 times of that of pristine TNTs and 2. 5 times of that of pure Cd₀.₅ Zn₀.₅ Se ternary quantum dots, respectively. PMID:26978928

  6. Long range wind lidars based on novel high spectral brilliance all-fibered sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, L.; Dolfi-Bouteyre, A.; Besson, C.; Augère, B.; Bourdon, P.; Durécu, A.; Goular, D.; Le Gouët, J.; Planchat, C.; Renard, W.; Valla, M.; Canat, G.

    2015-10-01

    New Lidar applications related to aircraft safety in the area of an airport include mapping wind velocity and monitoring turbulences within a radius longer than 8km in a short acquisition time (360° map in 1 minute). During landing and takeoff, a minimal distance separation between aircrafts is set by referring to wake turbulence categories. However, it was shown that wake vortices can dissipate quicker because of atmospheric turbulence (characterized by eddy dissipation rate - EDR) or can be transported out of the way on oncoming traffic by cross-winds. Long range scanning Lidars provide radial wind data that can be used to calculate EDR. To reach long range within a short acquisition time, coherent wind Lidars require high power (~kW), narrow linewidth (few MHz) pulsed laser sources with nearly TF limited pulse duration (~1μs). Eyesafe, all-fiber laser sources based on MOPFA (master oscillator, power fiber amplifier) architecture offer many advantages over bulk sources such as low sensitivity to vibrations, efficiency and versatility. However, narrow linewidth pulsed fiber lasers and amplifiers are usually limited by nonlinear effects such as stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) to 300W with commercial fibers. We investigated various solutions to push this limit further. For example, a source based on a new fiber composition yielded a peak power of 1120W for 650ns pulse duration with excellent beam quality. Based on these innovative solutions we built a Lidar with a record range of 16km in 0.1s averaging time. In this proceeding, we present some recent results obtained with our wind Lidars based on these high power sources with record ranges. EDR measurements using the developed algorithm based on structure function calculation are presented, as well as its validation with simulations and measurements campaign results.

  7. Influence of temperature on Pr:YAlO3 laser operation in the orange and near-infrared spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuous wave Pr:YAlO3 laser behavior in the orange (622 nm) and near-infrared (747 nm) spectral range down to cryogenic temperature is reported. To minimize resonator losses, dielectric films were deposited on the crystal facets to form a microchip geometry. More than 300 mW of output power at 747 nm wavelength with a slope efficiency close to the quantum limit is demonstrated. Furthermore, the first diode-pumped Pr:YAlO3 orange laser is described, as we believe. (letter)

  8. WDM/TDM PON experiments using the AWG free spectral range periodicity to transmit unicast and multicast data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Carlos; Prat, Josep

    2005-04-01

    A hybrid WDM/TDM PON architecture implemented by means of two cascaded Arrayed Waveguide Gratings (AWG) is presented. Using the Free Spectral Range (FSR) periodicity of AWGs we transmit unicast and multicast traffic on different wavelengths to each Optical Network Unit (ONU). The OLT is equipped with two laser stacks, a tunable one for unicast transmission and a fixed one for multicast transmission. We propose the ONU to be reflective in order to avoid any light source at the Costumer Premises Equipment (CPE). Optical transmission tests demonstrate correct transmission at 2.5 Gbps up to 30 km.

  9. Wideband range-Doppler processing and beamforming using electro-optic arrays and spectral hole burning materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braker, Benjamin; Wagner, Kelvin

    2010-07-01

    Ubiquitous radar systems look everywhere at all times and require both parallel radar processors and parallel beamformers. Current systems operate with subgigahertz bandwidths and produce a handful of angle-of-arrival (AOA) beams. We present an electro-optic radar processor that combines the multigigahertz wideband capabilities of a spectral hole burning correlator with wideband Doppler processing and the thousands of parallel channels available from an electro-optical beamformer. Preliminary experiments demonstrate 150 MHz bandwidth range correlations across 20 AOA beams. PMID:20648114

  10. Influence of temperature on Pr:YAlO3 laser operation in the orange and near-infrared spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibrich, M.; ulc, J.; Jelnkov, H.

    2014-10-01

    Continuous wave Pr:YAlO3 laser behavior in the orange (622 nm) and near-infrared (747 nm) spectral range down to cryogenic temperature is reported. To minimize resonator losses, dielectric films were deposited on the crystal facets to form a microchip geometry. More than 300 mW of output power at 747 nm wavelength with a slope efficiency close to the quantum limit is demonstrated. Furthermore, the first diode-pumped Pr:YAlO3 orange laser is described, as we believe.

  11. The spectral characteristics of Gd2SiO5:Eu3+ in VUV-UV range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation source was used to investigated the spectral characteristics of Gd2SiO5:Eu3+ in VUV-UV range. The various energy transfers at room temperature and 10 K, including from host or Gd3+ ions to Eu3+ ions and transfer between Eu3+ ions at two different lattice sites, were discussed. In addition the emission spectra under 186 nm and 276 nm excitation were compared from the view of quantum cutting. The results indicate that Gd2SiO5:Eu3+ is a kind of material with potential high efficiency quantum cutting

  12. The relationship between professional operatic soprano voice and high range spectral energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jennifer J.; Davis, Pamela; Oates, Jennifer; Chapman, Janice

    2004-07-01

    Operatic sopranos need to be audible over an orchestra yet they are not considered to possess a singer's formant. As in other voice types, some singers are more successful than others at being heard and so this work investigated the frequency range of the singer's formant between 2000 and 4000 Hz to consider the question of extra energy in this range. Such energy would give an advantage over an orchestra, so the aims were to ascertain what levels of excess energy there might be and look at any relationship between extra energy levels and performance level. The voices of six operatic sopranos (national and international standard) were recorded performing vowel and song tasks and subsequently analyzed acoustically. Measures taken from vowel data were compared with song task data to assess the consistency of the approaches. Comparisons were also made with regard to two conditions of intended projection (maximal and comfortable), two song tasks (anthem and aria), two recording environments (studio and anechoic room), and between subjects. Ranking the singers from highest energy result to lowest showed the consistency of the results from both vowel and song methods and correlated reasonably well with the performance level of the subjects. The use of formant tuning is considered and examined.

  13. Long- and Short-Range Electrostatic Fields in GFP Mutants: Implications for Spectral Tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobizhev, M; Callis, P R; Nifos, R; Wicks, G; Stoltzfus, C; Barnett, L; Hughes, T E; Sullivan, P; Rebane, A

    2015-01-01

    The majority of protein functions are governed by their internal local electrostatics. Quantitative information about these interactions can shed light on how proteins work and allow for improving/altering their performance. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its mutation variants provide unique optical windows for interrogation of internal electric fields, thanks to the intrinsic fluorophore group formed inside them. Here we use an all-optical method, based on the independent measurements of transition frequency and one- and two-photon absorption cross sections in a number of GFP mutants to evaluate these internal electric fields. Two physical models based on the quadratic Stark effect, either with or without taking into account structural (bond-length) changes of the chromophore in varying field, allow us to separately evaluate the long-range and the total effective (short- and long-range) fields. Both types of the field quantitatively agree with the results of independent molecular dynamic simulations, justifying our method of measurement. PMID:26286372

  14. Morfology of SEE spectral features in a wide pump wave frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, E. N.; Frolov, V. L.; Grach, S. M.; Kotov, P. V.

    Systematic study of stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) stationary spectrum dependence on the pump wave (PW) frequency f_0 was continued. Investigations were performed at the SURA facility for the PW frequency range 4.3≤ f_0 ≤ 9.5 MHz with stepping of ≈ 5-50 kHz including the vicinities of the electron gyroharmonics nfce from n=4 to n=7 for most prominent SEE features like downshifted maximum (DM) and its satellites, narrow and broad continua (NC and BC), upshifted maximum (UM), broad upshifted maximum (BUM), and broad upshifted structure (BUS) (for references see, e.g., Leyser et al., J. Geophys. Res., 1993, v. 98, p. 17597, 1994, Frolov et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 2001, v. 28, p. 3103). Main attention was paid to maximal and integral intensities of the SEE features and their frequency shifts Δ f from f_0. The results can be summarized as follows. (i) While the SEE qualitative behaviour periodically repeats between successive gyroharmonics, maximal intensity for all of the SEE features is observed for 4fce5fce (except of narrow range below 6 and 7fce) the BC is replaced by a set of DM satellites in the SEE spectrum. (iii) DM intensity decreases with f_0 and DM peak frequency shift increases with f_0 as Δ fDM ˜ 2 f_0\\cdot10-3 across the whole f_0 frequency range, except of narrow ranges near f_0 ≃ nfce, where the DM intensity falls up to the noise level, and Δ fDM decreases up to ≈ 9 kHz. (iv) The UM behaviour is similar for the DM one, but for f_0≃ nfce the maximal UM and minimal DM intensities occur for the same f_0, while the minimal UM is observed for f_0 less by 10-20 kHz in comparison with f_0 for the minimal DM. (v) Maximal BUM intensity is observed for f_0 just above nfce where the frequency shift of BUM peak Δ fBUM ≃ 20 kHz; for f_0 ≳ nfce+30 kHz Δ fBUM linearly increases as Δ fBUM ≃ f_0 - nfce. (vi) The BUS is observed for f_0 well above nfce (n=3-5) in the PW frequency range nfce+150 kHz ≲ f_0 ≲ (n+1/2)fce. BUS intensity can have a weak maximum (peak) at Δ fBUS ˜ 14-30 kHz, and Δ fBUS slightly increases with f_0 between successive gyroharmonics and decreases with n.The results obtained help much to deeper insight into physical mechanisms of generation of the upper-hybrid related SEE features.The work was supported by INTAS grant 03-515583, RFBR grants 04-02-17544 and 03-02-16309, grant E02-3.2-36 of Education Ministry of Russian Federation.

  15. Exploring negative refraction conditions for quantum cascade semiconductor metamaterials in the terahertz spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daničić, A.; Radovanović, J.; Ramović, S.; Milanović, V.

    2016-03-01

    In order to avoid losses in metamaterial unit cells at frequencies of interest, caused by metallic inclusions, an active medium design has been proposed. As candidate structures for this active medium, we have chosen quantum cascade lasers because of their high output gain. Here we analyze and compare two quantum cascade structures that emit at 4.6 THz and 3.9 THz, respectively, placed under the influence of a strong magnetic field. We first solve the full system of rate equations for all relevant Landau levels, and obtain the necessary information about carrier distribution among the levels, after which we are able to evaluate the permittivity component along the growth direction of the structure. With these data one can determine the conditions under which negative refraction occurs, and calculate the values of the refractive index of the structure, as well as the range of frequencies at which the structure exhibits negative refraction for a predefined total electron sheet density.

  16. Visibility studies and orbit determination of space debris objects for a combined passive-optical and laser ranging station

    OpenAIRE

    Radtke, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    At the Institute of Technical Physics at the German Aerospace Center (DLR-TP), a proposed concept combines two methods of well established orbital observations: First, optical observations using passive reflection of sunlight, which is in constant use for characterizing space debris in GEO regions. Second, an active satellite range laser ranging, which has been used for decades to measure distances to cooperative LEO and MEO objects at accuracies down to few millimeters. In ...

  17. Chlorine detection in cement with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in the infrared and ultraviolet spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A significant parameter to monitor the status of concrete buildings like bridges or parking garages is the determination of the depth profile of the chlorine concentration below the exposed concrete surface. This information is required to define the needed volume of restoration for a construction. Conventional methods like wet chemical analysis are time- and cost-intensive so an alternative method is developed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The idea is to deploy LIBS to analyze drill cores by scanning the sample surface with laser pulses. Chlorine spectral lines in the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV)-range were studied for chlorine detection in hydrated cement samples. The excitation energies of these spectral lines are above 9.2 eV. Hence high plasma temperatures and pulse energies in the range of some hundred millijoules are needed to induce sufficient line intensity levels at the required working distance. To further increase the line intensity and to lower the detection limit (LOD) of chlorine a measuring chamber is used where different ambient pressures and gases can be chosen for the measurements. The influences on the line intensity for pressures between 5 mbar and 400 mbar using helium as process gas and the influence of different laser burst modi like single and collinear double pulses are investigated. For the first time a LOD according to DIN 32 645 of 0.1 mass% was achieved for chlorine in hydrated cement using the UV line 134.72 nm.

  18. Chlorine detection in cement with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in the infrared and ultraviolet spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlen, Christoph Dominic; Wiens, Eugen; Noll, Reinhard; Wilsch, Gerd; Reichling, Kenji

    2009-10-01

    A significant parameter to monitor the status of concrete buildings like bridges or parking garages is the determination of the depth profile of the chlorine concentration below the exposed concrete surface. This information is required to define the needed volume of restoration for a construction. Conventional methods like wet chemical analysis are time- and cost-intensive so an alternative method is developed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The idea is to deploy LIBS to analyze drill cores by scanning the sample surface with laser pulses. Chlorine spectral lines in the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV)-range were studied for chlorine detection in hydrated cement samples. The excitation energies of these spectral lines are above 9.2 eV. Hence high plasma temperatures and pulse energies in the range of some hundred millijoules are needed to induce sufficient line intensity levels at the required working distance. To further increase the line intensity and to lower the detection limit (LOD) of chlorine a measuring chamber is used where different ambient pressures and gases can be chosen for the measurements. The influences on the line intensity for pressures between 5 mbar and 400 mbar using helium as process gas and the influence of different laser burst modi like single and collinear double pulses are investigated. For the first time a LOD according to DIN 32 645 of 0.1 mass% was achieved for chlorine in hydrated cement using the UV line 134.72 nm.

  19. Novel SO2 spectral evaluation scheme using the 360–390 nm wavelength range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wagner

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS is a well established spectroscopic method to determine trace gases in the atmosphere. During the last decade, passive DOAS, which uses solar radiation scattered in the atmosphere as a light source, has become a standard tool to determine SO2 column densities and emission fluxes from volcanoes and other large sources by ground based as well as satellite measurements. For the determination of SO2 column densities, the structured absorption of the molecule in the 300–330 nm region (due to the A1B1←X1A1 transition is used. However, there are several problems limiting the accuracy of the technique in this particular application. Here we propose to use an alternative wavelength region (360–390 nm due to the spin-forbidden a3B2←X1A1 transition for the DOAS evaluation of SO2 in conditions where high SO2 column densities prevail. We show this range to have considerable advantages in such cases, in particular when the particle content of the plume is high and when measurements are performed at large distances from the area of interest.

  20. An in-vacuum wiggler for SOLEIL Hard X-rays spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of Hard X-rays has become a tricky problem on medium energy storage rings. It requires Insertion Devices (IDs) with high magnetic field and a large number of periods. To cover the 20-50 keV photon energy range at SOLEIL (2.75 GeV), an in-vacuum wiggler (WSV50) has been preferred to a superconducting ID. The wiggler is composed of 38 periods of 50 mm producing a 2.1 T field at a minimum magnetic gap of 5.5 mm. To minimize the magnetic forces acting between magnet arrays (8.5 tons), a compensation system composed of non magnetic springs has been mounted apart from the magnet system to reduce the mechanical deformations. The wiggler has been assembled step by step by means of a genetic algorithm which minimizes the magnetic errors measured with a flipping coil. This paper presents the mechanical and magnetic design of the wiggler as well as the construction and the magnetic measurements.

  1. Novel SO2 spectral evaluation scheme using the 360–390 nm wavelength range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wagner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS is a well established spectroscopic method to determine trace gases in the atmosphere. During the last decade, passive DOAS, which uses solar radiation scattered in the atmosphere as a light source, has become a standard tool to determine SO2 column densities and emission fluxes from volcanoes and other large sources by ground based as well as satellite measurements. For the determination of SO2 column densities, the structured absorption of the molecule in the 300–330 nm region (due to the A1B1 ← X1A1 transition is used. However, there are several problems limiting the accuracy of the technique in this particular application. Here we propose to use an alternative wavelength region (360–390 nm due to the spin-forbidden a3B2 ← X1A1 transition for the DOAS evaluation of SO2 in conditions where high SO2 column densities prevail. We show this range to have considerable advantages in such cases, in particular when the particle content of the plume is high and when measurements are performed at large distances from the area of interest.

  2. Photoionization and electron radical recombination dynamics in photoactive yellow protein investigated by ultrafast spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared spectral region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingyi; Paparelli, Laura; Hospes, Marijke; Arents, Jos; Kennis, John T M; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Groot, Marie Louise

    2013-09-26

    Photoinduced ionization of the chromophore inside photoactive yellow protein (PYP) was investigated by ultrafast spectroscopy in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. An absorption band that extended from around 550 to 850 nm was observed and ascribed to solvated electrons, ejected from the p-hydroxycinnamic acid anion chromophore upon the absorption of two 400 nm photons. Global kinetic analysis showed that the solvated electron absorption decayed in two stages: a shorter phase of around 10 ps and a longer phase of more than 3 ns. From a simulation based on a diffusion model we conclude that the diffusion rate of the electron is about 0.8 Å(2)/ps in wild type PYP, and that the electron is ejected to a short distance of only several angstroms away from the chromophore. The chromophore-protein pocket appears to provide a water-similar local environment for the electron. Because mutations at different places around the chromophore have different effect on the electron recombination dynamics, we suggest that solvated electrons could provide a new method to investigate the local dielectric environment inside PYP and thus help to understand the role of the protein in the photoisomerization process. PMID:23477674

  3. Detector-level spectral characterization of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite long-wave infrared bands M15 and M16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Francis; Cao, Changyong

    2015-06-01

    The Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor data record (SDR) product achieved validated maturity status in March 2014 after roughly two years of on-orbit characterization (S-NPP spacecraft launched on 28 October 2011). During post-launch analysis the VIIRS Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Environmental Data Record (EDR) team observed an anomalous striping pattern in the daytime SST data. Daytime SST retrievals use the two VIIRS long-wave infrared bands: M15 (10.7 μm) and M16 (11.8 μm). To assess possible root causes due to detector-level spectral response function (SRF) effects, a study was conducted to compare the radiometric response of the detector-level and operational-band averaged SRFs of VIIRS bands M15 and M16. The study used simulated hyperspectral blackbody radiance data and clear-sky ocean hyperspectral radiances under different atmospheric conditions. It was concluded that the SST product is likely impacted by small differences in detector-level SRFs and that if users require optimal radiometric performance, detector-level processing is recommended for both SDR and EDR products. Future work should investigate potential SDR product improvements through detector-level processing in support of the generation of Suomi NPP VIIRS climate quality SDRs. PMID:26192672

  4. Calculation of spectral shifts in UV–visible region and photoresponsive behaviour of fluorinated liquid crystals: Effect of solvent and substituent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photoresponsive behaviour of fluorinated liquid crystals p-phenylene-4-methoxy benzoate-4-trifluoromethylbenzoate (FLUORO1), and 4-propyloxyphenyl-4-(4-trifluoromethylbenzoyloxy) benzoate (FLUORO2) has been systematically investigated using the CNDO/S + CI and INDO/S + CI methods. These methods have been employed to calculate/analyze the spectral shifts, and absorbance measurements in UV–visible region of the systems. The electronic transitions, absorption wavelength, HOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital), and LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) energies have been calculated. Further, ultraviolet (UV) stability of the molecules has been discussed in the light of absorption wavelength and electronic transition oscillator strength (f). The effect of different solvent media and substituents on transition energies, oscillator strength, and other absorption parameters have also been reported. The present article provides valuable information regarding enhancing the UV stability of molecules by marinating their conductivity. Highlights: ► The strongest bands of FLUORO molecules can be assigned as π → π∗ transitions. ► A small red-shift indicates a weak exciton coupling of chromophores. ► No n → π∗ transition occurs due to the rigidity of the ring system of the molecules. ► The HOMO, LUMO, and Eg values have been found to be independent of solvent effect.

  5. Direct milling and casting of polymer-based optical waveguides for improved transparency in the visible range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snakenborg, Detlef; Perozziello, Gerardo; Klank, Henning; Geschke, Oliver; Kutter, Jrg Peter

    2006-01-01

    properties. Direct micromilling enabled us to fabricate 100 mu m wide optical waveguides. Propagation losses of less than 1 dB cm(-1) could be achieved throughout the entire visual range down to a wavelength of 400 nm. A casting process amenable to high number production of such devices was furthermore...

  6. Diode laser spectroscopy in extended wavelength ranges

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Ulf

    2000-01-01

    Diode laser spectroscopy performed in the ultraviolet, visible and infrared spectral regions is presented. The accessible wavelength range for visible and near-infrared diode lasers is extended by the use of sum- and difference-frequency generation. Sum-frequency generation to the ultraviolet spectral region was employed using a blue and a red diode laser. Mercury spectroscopy was demonstrated with the generated ultraviolet beam. Difference-frequency generation with two near-infrared d...

  7. Satellite monitoring of different vegetation types by differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS in the red spectral range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wagner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for the satellite remote sensing of different types of vegetation and ocean colour is presented. In contrast to existing algorithms relying on the strong change of the reflectivity in the red and near infrared spectral region, our method analyses weak narrow-band (few nm reflectance structures (i.e. "fingerprint" structures of vegetation in the red spectral range. It is based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS, which is usually applied for the analysis of atmospheric trace gas absorptions. Since the spectra of atmospheric absorption and vegetation reflectance are simultaneously included in the analysis, the effects of atmospheric absorptions are automatically corrected (in contrast to other algorithms. The inclusion of the vegetation spectra also significantly improves the results of the trace gas retrieval. The global maps of the results illustrate the seasonal cycles of different vegetation types. In addition to the vegetation distribution on land, they also show patterns of biological activity in the oceans. Our results indicate that improved sets of vegetation spectra might lead to more accurate and more specific identification of vegetation type in the future.

  8. New methods of highly efficient controlled generation of radiation by liquid crystal nanostructures in a wide spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the recent results of research focused on a new kind of soft matter-the liquid-crystal nanocomposites with controllable mechanical and nonlinear optical properties. These are promising media for implementation of ultra-compact photonic devices and efficient sources of coherent radiation in a wide spectral range. We overview the technology of preparation of nematic-liquid-crystal media saturated with disclination defects. The defects were formed in different ways: by embedding nanoparticles and molecular objects, by exposure to alpha-particle flux. The defect locations were controlled by applying an electric field. We also present and discuss the recently discovered features of nematic-liquid-crystal media: a thermal orientation effect leading to the fifth-order optical nonlinearity, enormous second-order susceptibility revealed by measurements, and structural changes upon exposure to laser radiation. We report on efficient generation of harmonics, sum and difference optical frequencies in nematic-liquid-crystal media. In addition, transformation of laser radiation spectra to spectral supercontinua, and filamentation of laser beams were also observed in nematic-liquid-crystal media. We conclude that most nonlinear optical effects result from changes of the orientational order in the examined nematic liquid crystals. These changes lead to the symmetry breaking and disclination appearances.

  9. A HIGH-RESOLUTION, MULTI-EPOCH SPECTRAL ATLAS OF PECULIAR STARS INCLUDING RAVE, GAIA , AND HERMES WAVELENGTH RANGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an Echelle+CCD, high signal-to-noise ratio, high-resolution (R = 20,000) spectroscopic atlas of 108 well-known objects representative of the most common types of peculiar and variable stars. The wavelength interval extends from 4600 to 9400 A and includes the RAVE, Gaia, and HERMES wavelength ranges. Multi-epoch spectra are provided for the majority of the observed stars. A total of 425 spectra of peculiar stars, which were collected during 56 observing nights between 1998 November and 2002 August, are presented. The spectra are given in FITS format and heliocentric wavelengths, with accurate subtraction of both the sky background and the scattered light. Auxiliary material useful for custom applications (telluric dividers, spectrophotometric stars, flat-field tracings) is also provided. The atlas aims to provide a homogeneous database of the spectral appearance of stellar peculiarities, a tool useful both for classification purposes and inter-comparison studies. It could also serve in the planning and development of automated classification algorithms designed for RAVE, Gaia, HERMES, and other large-scale spectral surveys. The spectrum of XX Oph is discussed in some detail as an example of the content of the present atlas.

  10. Fully automated dual-frequency three-pulse-echo 2DIR spectrometer accessing spectral range from 800 to 4000 wavenumbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel dual-frequency two-dimensional infrared instrument is designed and built that permits three-pulse heterodyned echo measurements of any cross-peak within a spectral range from 800 to 4000 cm−1 to be performed in a fully automated fashion. The superior sensitivity of the instrument is achieved by a combination of spectral interferometry, phase cycling, and closed-loop phase stabilization accurate to ∼70 as. The anharmonicity of smaller than 10−4 cm−1 was recorded for strong carbonyl stretching modes using 800 laser shot accumulations. The novel design of the phase stabilization scheme permits tuning polarizations of the mid-infrared (m-IR) pulses, thus supporting measurements of the angles between vibrational transition dipoles. The automatic frequency tuning is achieved by implementing beam direction stabilization schemes for each m-IR beam, providing better than 50 μrad beam stability, and novel scheme for setting the phase-matching geometry for the m-IR beams at the sample. The errors in the cross-peak amplitudes associated with imperfect phase matching conditions and alignment are found to be at the level of 20%. The instrument can be used by non-specialists in ultrafast spectroscopy

  11. Spectral line lists of a nitrogen gas discharge for wavelength calibration in the range $4500-11000$cm$^{-1}$

    CERN Document Server

    Boesch, A

    2015-01-01

    A discharge of nitrogen gas, as created in a microwave-induced plasma, exhibits a very dense molecular emission line spectrum. Emission spectra of this kind could serve as wavelength calibrators for high-resolution astrophysical spectrographs in the near-infrared, where only very few calibration sources are currently available. The compilation of a spectral line list and the characterization of line intensities and line density belong to the initial steps when investigating the feasibility of potential wavelength calibration sources. Although the molecular nitrogen spectrum was extensively studied in the past, to our knowledge, no line list exists that covers a continuous range of several thousand wavenumbers in the near-infrared. We recorded three high-resolution ($\\Delta \\tilde{\

  12. Quantum efficiency of cesium iodide photocathodes in the 120-220 nm spectral range traceable to a primary detector standard

    CERN Document Server

    Rabus, H; Richter, M; Ulm, G; Friese, J; Gernhäuser, R; Kastenmüller, A; Maier-Komor, P; Zeitelhack, K

    1999-01-01

    Differently prepared CsI samples have been investigated in the 120-220 nm spectral range for their quantum efficiency, spatial uniformity and the effect of radiation aging. The experiments were performed at the PTB radiometry laboratory at the Berlin synchrotron radiation facility BESSY. A calibrated GaAsP Schottky photodiode was used as transfer detector standard to establish traceability to the primary detector standard, because this type of photodiode - unlike silicon p-on-n photodiodes - proved to be of sufficiently stable response when exposed to vacuum ultraviolet radiation. The paper reviews the experimental procedures that were employed to characterize and calibrate the GaAsP photodiode and reports the results that were obtained on the investigated CsI photocathodes.

  13. Design concepts of monolithic metamorphic vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for the 1300–1550 nm spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possible design concepts for long-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for the 1300–1550 nm spectral range on GaAs substrates are suggested. It is shown that a metamorphic GaAs–InGaAs heterostructure with a thin buffer layer providing rapid transition from the lattice constant of GaAs to that of InxGa1–xAs with an indium fraction of x < 0.3 can be formed by molecular-beam epitaxy. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the effective localization of mismatch dislocations in the thin buffer layer and full suppression of their penetration into the overlying InGaAs metamorphic layer

  14. Design concepts of monolithic metamorphic vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for the 1300–1550 nm spectral range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorov, A. Yu., E-mail: anton@beam.ioffe.ru; Karachinsky, L. Ya.; Novikov, I. I.; Babichev, A. V.; Nevedomskiy, V. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Institute (Russian Federation); Bugrov, V. E. [ITMO University (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    Possible design concepts for long-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for the 1300–1550 nm spectral range on GaAs substrates are suggested. It is shown that a metamorphic GaAs–InGaAs heterostructure with a thin buffer layer providing rapid transition from the lattice constant of GaAs to that of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1–x}As with an indium fraction of x < 0.3 can be formed by molecular-beam epitaxy. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the effective localization of mismatch dislocations in the thin buffer layer and full suppression of their penetration into the overlying InGaAs metamorphic layer.

  15. Ultra-wide-range measurements of thin-film filter optical density over the visible and near-infrared spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequime, Michel; Liukaityte, Simona; Zerrad, Myriam; Amra, Claude

    2015-10-01

    We present the improved structure and operating principle of a spectrophotometric mean that allows us for the recording of the transmittance of a thin-film filter over an ultra-wide range of optical densities (from 0 to 11) between 400 and 1000 nm. The operation of this apparatus is based on the combined use of a high power supercontinuum laser source, a tunable volume hologram filter, a standard monochromator and a scientific grade CCD camera. The experimentally recorded noise floor is in good accordance with the optical density values given by the theoretical approach. A demonstration of the sensitivity gain provided by this new set-up with respect to standard spectrophotometric means is performed via the characterization of various types of filters (band-pass, long-pass, short-pass, and notch). PMID:26480197

  16. A quantitative comparison of {sup {alpha}}-A turbidity parameter retrieved in different spectral ranges based on spectroradiometer solar radiation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachorro, V.E.; Vergaz, R.; Frutos, A.M. de [University of Valladolid (Spain). Atmospheric Optics Group

    2001-07-01

    Spectroradiometric direct irradiance measurements in the 300-1100nm wavelength range with a spectral resolution of 6.2nm have been used in a study of the variation in the Angstrom turbidity parameter {alpha} and its dependence on the spectral range used in its determination. The measurements have been carried out under clear sky conditions at two different climate stations in Spain. Least-square fits of the experimental spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) to the Angstrom formula in different spectral ranges, selected for convenience depending on the objective or application (e.g., UV-VIS (350-400nm), VIS (400-670nm), VIS-NIR (370-870nm), etc.), result in different sets for the {alpha} parameter. Due to this dependence on the spectral range, where the {alpha}-values are determined, a quantitative comparative analysis is carried out in order to assess the differences for a given data-base covering very different atmospheric conditions. The study reveals the necessity of a 'standard spectral range' to achieve confident data comparisons. We show some applications that are relevant for aerosol studies, from UV absorption by aerosols to satellite remote sensing. (author)

  17. Observing ice clouds in the submillimeter spectral range: the CloudIce mission proposal for ESA's Earth Explorer 8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Buehler

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Passive submillimeter-wave sensors are a way to obtain urgently needed global data on ice clouds, particularly on the so far poorly characterized "essential climate variable" ice water path (IWP and on ice particle size. CloudIce was a mission proposal to the European Space Agency ESA in response to the call for Earth Explorer 8 (EE8, which ran in 2009/2010. It proposed a passive submillimeter-wave sensor with channels ranging from 183 GHz to 664 GHz. The article describes the CloudIce mission proposal, with particular emphasis on describing the algorithms for the data-analysis of submillimeter-wave cloud ice data (retrieval algorithms and demonstrating their maturity. It is shown that we have a robust understanding of the radiative properties of cloud ice in the millimeter/submillimeter spectral range, and that we have a proven toolbox of retrieval algorithms to work with these data. Although the mission was not selected for EE8, the concept will be useful as a reference for other future mission proposals.

  18. Multispectral measurement of contrast in tissue-mimicking phantoms in near-infrared spectral range of 650 to 1600 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, Daniel; Zhang, Hairong; Kim, David M; Berezin, Mikhail Y

    2014-08-01

    In order to identify the optimal imaging conditions for the highest spatial contrast in biological tissue, we explored the properties of a tissue-mimicking phantom as a function of the wavelengths in a broad range of near-infrared spectra (650 to 1600 nm). Our customized multispectral hardware, which featured a scanning transmission microscope and imaging spectrographs equipped with silicon and InGaAs charge-coupled diode array detectors, allowed for direct comparison of the Michelson contrast obtained from a phantom composed of a honeycomb grid, Intralipid, and India ink. The measured contrast depended on the size of the grid, luminance, and the wavelength of measurements. We demonstrated that at low thickness of the phantom, a reasonable contrast of the objects can be achieved at any wavelength between 700 and 1400 nm and between 1500 and 1600 nm. At larger thicknesses, such contrast can be achieved mostly between 1200 and 1350 nm. These results suggest that distinguishing biological features in deep tissue and developing contrast agents for in vivo may benefit from imaging in this spectral range. PMID:25104414

  19. Visible-range hybrid femtosecond systems based on a XeF(C-A) amplifier: state of the art and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, S V; Aristov, A I; Grudtsyn, Ya V; Ivanov, N G; Koval' chuk, B M; Losev, B F; Mamaev, S B; Mesyats, Gennadii A; Mikheev, L D; Panchenko, Yu N; Polivin, A V; Stepanov, S G; Ratakhin, N A; Yalovoi, V I; Yastremskii, Arkadii G

    2013-03-31

    Results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the hybrid (solid state/gas) visible-range femtosecond systems THL-100 (IHCE SB RAS) and THL-30 (P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute) based on a Ti : sapphire front end and a photochemical XeF(C-A) amplifier are reported. The front end generates 50-fs optical pulses with the second-harmonic (475 nm) energy of up to 5 mJ. The active medium of the amplifier is produced in a mixture XeF{sub 2} - N{sub 2} subjected to VUV radiation of xenon excited by an electron beam. The computer model is developed for calculating parameters of the XeF(C - A) amplifier, which is in a good agreement with experiments. In the THL-100 system with the 25-cm output aperture of the XeF(C-A) amplifier, a record visible-range femtosecond radiation peak power of 14 GW was obtained in a 50-fs pulse with the time contrast of above 10{sup 8}. The measured power of an amplified spontaneous emission of the XeF(C-A) amplifier in the angle of 0.2 mrad was 32 W. The result obtained testifies that the hybrid approach to the development of ultrahigh-power systems provides a high time contrast of radiation (greater than 10{sup 12} for the projected peak power of 100 TW). In the THL-30 system, prospects for shortening an amplified femtosecond pulse are studied and it is experimentally shown that by compensating a third-order dispersion in a hybrid system one can obtain pulses with duration of at least 27 fs with a recompression of amplified pulses in bulk glass. Also, a new phenomenon was observed of spectrum broadening and self-compression of negatively chirped femtosecond pulses in the visible range under a nonlinear interaction of wide-aperture beams with fused silica. This result opens prospects for development of the new methods of selfcompression for femtosecond pulses that are lacking physical limitations on pulse energy and realisation of self-compression of amplified pulses in the output window of the XeF(C-A) amplifier. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  20. A new facility for the synchrotron radiation-based calibration of transfer radiation sources in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet spectral range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornagel, Reiner; Fliegauf, Rolf; Klein, Roman, E-mail: roman.klein@ptb.de; Kroth, Simone; Paustian, Wolfgang; Richter, Mathias [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Berlin (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has a long tradition in the calibration of radiation sources in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet spectral range, with traceability to calculable synchrotron radiation. Within this context, new instrumentation in the PTB laboratory at the Metrology Light Source (MLS) has been put into operation that opens up extended and improved calibration possibilities. A new facility for radiation source calibrations has been set up in the spectral range from 7 nm to 400 nm based on a combined normal incidence-grazing incidence monochromator. The facility can be used for the calibration of transfer sources in terms of spectral radiant intensity or mean spectral radiance, with traceability to the MLS primary source standard. We describe the design and performance of the experimental station and give examples of some commissioning results.

  1. X-ray grating spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range at the LULI 2000 laser facilitya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverdin, Charles; Thais, Frdric; Loisel, Guillaume; Busquet, M.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Blenski, T.; Caillaud, T.; Ducret, J. E.; Foelsner, W.; Gilles, D.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.; Poirier, M.; Serres, F.; Silvert, V.; Soullie, G.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Villette, B.

    2012-10-01

    An x-ray grating spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range with an average spectral resolution ?E/?E? 50. It has been used at the LULI-2000 laser facility at cole Polytechnique (France) to measure the ?n = 0, n = 3 transitions of several elements with neighboring atomic number: Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu in the same experimental conditions. Hence a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is required. This spectrometer features one line of sight looking through a heated sample at backlighter emission. It is outfitted with one toroidal condensing mirror and several flat mirrors cutting off higher energy photons. The spectral dispersion is obtained with a flatfield grating. Detection consists of a streak camera sensitive to soft x-ray radiation. Some experimental results showing the performance of this spectrometer are presented.

  2. GaInN/GaN quantum well laser structures emitting in the blue-green spectral range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draeger, Daniel; Rossow, Uwe; Joenen, Holger; Hangleiter, Andreas [Institute of Applied Physics, Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany); Schenk, David; Duboz, Jean-Yves [CRHEA-CNRS, Valbonne (France)

    2008-07-01

    Presently, GaN-based laser diodes are limited to the violet-blue region of the spectrum. Our aim is to obtain laser emission in the blue-green spectral range. In order to study GaInN-based laser structures, low pressure MOVPE was used to grow such structures on a variety of substrates (freestanding GaN, GaN templates, and SiC). This allows investigations of the influence of the substrate related dislocation densities on gain, losses and carrier recombination. Our samples were investigated by optical gain spectroscopy using the variable stripe length method. In order to reach wavelengths longer than 450 nm an increase of the indium concentration to more than 25 % is needed. Such high In content requires careful optimization of the growth conditions in order to avoid damaging of the quantum wells by thermal stress. Combining the results of the gain measurement with a theoretical calculation of the gain spectra we determine the threshold power, carrier density and the carrier recombination times of the sample. On bulk GaN substrates we find threshold power levels as low as 20 kW/cm{sup 2}. Up to now we obtain optical gain up to a peak wavelength of 465 nm with losses of about 30 cm{sup -1}. Our next targets are a wavelength of 480 nm as well as a further reduction of the threshold power.

  3. A high resolution, multi-epoch spectral atlas of peculiar stars including RAVE, GAIA and HERMES wavelength ranges

    CERN Document Server

    Tomasella, L; Zwitter, T

    2010-01-01

    We present an Echelle+CCD, high S/N, high resolution (R = 20\\,000) spectroscopic atlas of 108 well-known objects representative of the most common types of peculiar and variable stars. The wavelength interval extends from 4600 to 9400 Ang, and includes the RAVE, Gaia and HERMES wavelength ranges. Multi-epoch spectra are provided for the majority of observed stars. A total of 425 spectra of peculiar stars are presented, which have been collected during 56 observing nights between November 1998 and August 2002. The spectra are given in FITS format and heliocentric wavelengths, with accurate subtraction of both the sky background and the scattered light. Auxiliary material useful for custom applications (telluric dividers, spectro-photometric stars, flat-field tracings) is also provided. The atlas aims to provide a homogeneous database of the spectral appearance of stellar peculiarities, a tool useful both for classification purposes and inter-comparison studies. It could also serve the planning for and training...

  4. Multiple fiber Bragg grating sensor network with a rapid response and wide spectral dynamic range using code division multiple access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngbok; Jeon, Sie-Wook; Park, Chang-Soo

    2011-05-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor networks have been intensively researched in optical sensor area and it developed in wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) and time division multiplexing (TDM) technologies which was adopted for its interrogating many optical sensors. In particular, WDM technology can be easily employed to interrogate FBG sensor however, the number of FBG sensors is limited. On the other hand, the TDM technique can extremely expand the number of sensor because the FBG sensors have same center wavelength. However, it suffers from a reduced sensor output power due to low reflectivity of FBG sensor. In this paper, we proposed and demonstrated the FBG sensor network based on code division multiple access (CDMA) with a rapid response and wide spectral dynamic range. The reflected semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) as a light source was directly modulated by the generated pseudorandom binary sequence (PRBS) code and the modulated signal is amplified and goes through FBG sensors via circulator. When the modulated optical signal experienced FBG sensor array, the optical signal which was consistent with center wavelength of FBGs is reflected and added from each sensors. The added signal goes into dispersion compensating fiber (DCF) as a dispersion medium. After through the DCF, the optical signal is converted into electrical signal by using photodetector (PD). For separate individual reflected sensor signal, the sliding correlation method was used. The proposed method improves the code interference and it also has advantages such as a large number of sensors, continuously measuring individual sensors, and decreasing the complexity of the sensor network.

  5. Optimal spectral inversion of atmospheric radiometric measurements in the near-UV to near-IR range: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussen, Didier; Vanhellemont, Filip; Bingen, Christine

    2002-01-01

    WWe present a general analysis of the error budget in the spectral inversion of atmospheric radiometric measurements. By focussing on the case of an occultation experiment, we simplify the problem through a reduced number of absorbers in a linearized formalism. However, our analysis is quite general and applies to many other situations. For a spectrometer having an infinite spectral resolution, we discuss the origin of systematic and random errors. In particular, the difficult case of aerosols is investigated and several inversion techniques are compared. We underline the importance of carefully simulating the spectral inversion as a function of the target constituent to be retrieved, and the required accuracy level.

  6. Evidence for Alteration in Chemical and Physical Properties of Water and Modulation of its Biological Functions by Sunlight Transmitted through Color Ranges of the Visible Spectrum-A Novel Study

    OpenAIRE

    M. Rajeswara Rao; Angel, Michael F; Das, Suman K.; Koelle, Margot S.; Don Obenhuber; Reno, William L.; Asit Panja; Cohly, Hari H.P.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the changes in the properties of water when exposed to sunlight for 40 days. We hypothesize and prove that solar irradiation to water entraps electromagnetic radiation as potential energy, which becomes kinetic energy in various systems. It is postulated that photochemically-induced energy transfers, associated with individual spectral emission of visible spectrum of solar light, exert diverse influences on biological systems. Bottles of distilled water, individually wrapped i...

  7. ZnO/a-Si Distributed Bragg Reflectors for Light Trapping in Thin Film Solar Cells from Visible to Infrared Range

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Aqing; Zhu, Kaigui

    2015-01-01

    Distributed bragg reflectors (DBRs) consisting of ZnO and amorphous silicon (a-Si) were prepared by magnetron sputtering method for selective light trapping. The quarter-wavelength ZnO/a-Si DBRs with only 6 periods exhibit a peak reflectance of above 99% and have a full width at half maximum that is greater than 347 nm in the range of visible to infrared. The 6-pair reversed quarter-wavelength ZnO/a-Si DBRs also have a peak reflectance of 98%. Combination of the two ZnO/a-Si DBRs leads to a broader stopband from 686 nm to 1354 nm. Using the ZnO/a-Si DBRs as the rear reflector of a-Si thin film solar cells significantly increases the photocurrent in the spectrum range of 400 nm to 1000 nm, in comparison with that of the cells with Al reflector. The obtained results suggest that ZnO/a-Si DBRs are promising reflectors of a-Si thin-film solar cells for light trapping.

  8. Band gap engineering in PbS nanostructured thin films from near-infrared down to visible range by in situ Cd-doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report on the modification of optical band gap of PbS nanostructured films over a wide spectral range (∼475-1000 nm) due to in situ Cd-doping and size confinement. The films investigated in this study are grown by chemical bath deposition (CBD) at different temperatures and the doping was conducted for a fixed impurity concentration. The PbS films grown under optimal deposition conditions are found to crystallize in face centered cubic (fcc) structure with an average crystallite size in the range of 22-27 nm. The estimated optical band gap was in the range of 1.22-1.42 eV, for films grown at different temperatures. Doping was found to influence the film growth and results in a reduction of crystallite size (down to 9 nm). Consequently, quantum size effect becomes pronounced in the Cd-doped PbS films, which lead to a significant enhancement in the optical band gap (up to 2.61 eV). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirms the substitutional doping of Cd into PbS lattice. Band gap modification due to quantum confinement and formation of ternary PbCdS are addressed.

  9. Anomalies of The Moon's Thermal Emission In The Ir Spectral Range (10,5-12,5 Micron).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugacheva, S. G.; Shevchenko, V. V.

    New satellite measurements of the lunar surface radiation temperature were used to construct the spatial angular function of thermal radiation of the Moon in the infrared (10.5-12.5micron) spectral range. The basic material for investigations is the scanned cosmic spectrozonal images of the lunar surface transmitted by the first Russian geo- stationary artificial meteorological satellite "GOMS". In this paper I describe an ana- lytic model for the lunar thermal field, which is realized as an angular function of the thermal infrared radiation emitted by the lunar surface and analyse thermal anomalies of the lunar surface.A comparison of the regression dependence with radiation tem- peratures measured at some points of the lunar surface shows a systematic departure of the measured values from the average values. These deviations, depending on the surface albedo, characterize the photometric inhomogeneity of the lunar surface layer. On the lunar surface four groups of thermal anomalies are chosen: the thermal anoma- lies at the expense of different heat conduction of the lunar ground, thermal anomalies on the edge of the Moon's limb, "hot spots" - sites of the surface, which area are less than the sanction of the detector, anomalies stipulated by the relief of the surface. On detail study of large-scale photographs some anomalies are identified with small-sized craters, others with separate clusters of stones. The difference in temperature of the surface of the thermal anomalies can exceed 20 deg. The differences of temperature of the lunar surface layer indicate the extremely low heat conduction and high porosity of the material. Major factors of the photometric inhomogeneity are strong irregularities of the relief and the varied heat conduction of the lunar ground. The thermal anomalies for highland regions and for mare regions are shown in figure.

  10. Surface plasmon coupled fluorescence in the visible to near-infrared spectral regions using thin nickel films: application to whole blood assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Kadir; Zhang, Yongxia; Geddes, Chris D

    2009-05-15

    Nickel thin films thermally evaporated onto glass supports are used to demonstrate surface plasmon coupled fluorescence (SPCF) over a broad 400 nm wavelength range (400-800 nm) for potential assays that can be run in buffer and/or whole blood. In contrast to traditional fluorescence-based assays, SPCF converts otherwise isotropic emission into highly directional and polarized emission, an attractive concept for surface assays. Theoretical Fresnel calculations performed in the ultraviolet to near-infrared spectral range (344-1240 nm) predict the near-field generation of surface plasmons in 15 and 20 nm nickel thin films. The angles of minimum reflectivity for nickel thin films with 10 nm SiO(x) and 30 nm polymer overcoats over the 428-827 nm wavelength range occur over a 10 degree range. To experimentally corroborate the theoretical calculations, a polymeric solution of five different fluorophores, POPOP (lambda(max, emission) = 428 nm), FITC (517 nm), S101 (600 nm), Zn PhCy (710 nm), and IR 780 (814 nm), were spin coated separately onto 15 and 20 nm nickel thin films. SPCF intensity (s- and p-polarized) from fluorophores at the corresponding emission lambda(max) was measured at angles between 0-90 degrees. In addition, the free-space emission and SPCF intensity of FITC on 20 nm nickel thin film were also measured to demonstrate the angular-dependent nature of SPCF. SPCF from nickel thin films was p-polarized and highly directional with lambda(max) confirmed at an angle of 65 degrees for all the fluorophores as predicted by Fresnel calculations. The utility of nickel thin films for whole blood bioassays is demonstrated with a long-wavelength fluorophore, where the SPCF intensity of Zn PhCy (50 pM-50 microM) in whole blood at 710 nm was measured at 65 degrees. Using Fresnel calculations it is also predicted that the evanescent field above the nickel films penetrates deeper into solution than for other metals used to date for SPCF, an attractive notion in SPCF-based biosensing applications. PMID:19354285

  11. Spectral Imaging by Upconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    We present a method to obtain spectrally resolved images using upconversion. By this method an image is spectrally shifted from one spectral region to another wavelength. Since the process is spectrally sensitive it allows for a tailored spectral response. We believe this will allow standard...... silicon based cameras designed for visible/near infrared radiation to be used for spectral images in the mid infrared. This can lead to much lower costs for such imaging devices, and a better performance....

  12. The non-contact detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints using visible wavelength hyperspectral imaging: Part II effectiveness on a range of substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadd, Samuel; Li, Bo; Beveridge, Peter; O'Hare, William T; Campbell, Andrew; Islam, Meez

    2016-05-01

    Biological samples, such as blood, are regularly encountered at violent crime scenes and successful identification is critical for criminal investigations. Blood is one of the most commonly encountered fingerprint contaminants and current identification methods involve presumptive tests or wet chemical enhancement. These are destructive however; can affect subsequent DNA sampling; and do not confirm the presence of blood, meaning they are susceptible to false positives. A novel application of visible wavelength reflectance hyperspectral imaging (HSI) has been used for the non-contact, non-destructive detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints across a range of coloured substrates of varying porosities. The identification of blood was based on the Soret γ band absorption of haemoglobin between 400nm and 500nm. Ridge detail was successfully visualised to the third depletion across light coloured substrates and the stain detected to the tenth depletion on both porous and non-porous substrates. A higher resolution setup for blood stained fingerprints on black tiles, detected ridge detail to the third depletion and the stain to the tenth depletion, demonstrating considerable advancements from previous work. Diluted blood stains at 1500 and 1000 fold dilutions for wet and dry stains respectively were also detected on pig skin as a replica for human skin. PMID:27162017

  13. Tailoring optical properties of WO3 films in the visible to infrared range by ion bombardment and its description by an oscillator model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaporated and sputtered tungstentrioxide (WO3) films were bombarded with 300-keV He+ and Ar+ ions, respectively, and the resulting changes of the real [n(λ)] and imaginary [k(λ)] parts of the refractive index in the visible to infrared range of the wavelength λ were determined in situ. The primary effect of an ion-induced blue coloration is directly reflected by an absorption band centered at 1100 nm, which is growing for increasing ion fluences and exponentially approaching saturation. This monotonous increase of absorption is accompanied by changes of n(λ) with a characteristic fixed point n(λ*) independent of the ion bombardment, while for λ>λ* an ion-induced increase and for λ3 matrix and ion-induced Lorentz oscillators. While the density of these oscillators as well as their damping coefficients exhibit an exponential saturation behavior for increasing ion fluences, their eigenfrequencies as well as the matrix contribution are practically independent of the bombardment

  14. Choice of a Spectral Range for Measuring Temperature Fields in a Flame and Recording High-temperature Objects Screened by the Flame Using IR Diagnostic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loboda, E. L.; Reino, V. V.; Agafontsev, M. V.

    2015-06-01

    Results of experimental investigations of radiation spectra of flame produced from combustion of different fuels are presented. Based on an analysis of the spectra, the well-founded choice of spectral ranges for IR diagnostic methods is performed to measure temperature fields in the flame and to record high-temperature objects screened by the flame.

  15. Third-harmonic generation with a more than 500 nm tunable spectral range in a step-index tellurite fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate third-harmonic generation (THG) with a tunable spectral range of more than 500 nm in a step-index tellurite fiber. Third-harmonic (TH) signals with a peak wavelength from 524 to 1043 nm are obtained in a 3 cm-long fiber when the fundamental wavelength shifts from 1560 to 3100 nm. To our knowledge, the tunable spectral range covering almost one octave is the widest tunable range of THG in fibers so far. The far-field patterns of the TH signals by 1560 nm to 2100 nm pumping are recorded by a charge coupled device camera, which are close to the fundamental mode profile. The THG in such a wide tunable range is attributable to the high nonlinearity of the tellurite fiber and the high pump peak power of the pump pulse. (letters)

  16. An Empirically-derived non-LTE XUV-Visible Spectral Synthesis Model of the M1 V Exoplanet Host Star GJ832

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsky, Jeffrey; Fontenla, Juan; Witbrod, Jesse; France, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    GJ832 (HD 204961) is a nearby M1 V host star with two exoplanets: a Jovian mass planet and a super-Earth. We have obtained near-UV and far-UV spectra of GJ832 with the STIS and COS instruments on HST as part of the Cycle 19 MUSCLES pilot program (France et al. 2013). Our objective is to obtain the first accurate physical model for a representative M-dwarf host star in order to understand the stellar radiative emission at all wavelengths and to infer the radiation environment of their exoplanets that drives their atmospheric photochemistry.We have calculated a full non-LTE model for GJ 832 including the photosphere, chromosphere, transition region, and corona to fit the observed emission lines formed over a wide range of temperatures and the X-ray flux. Our one-dimensional semi-empirical model uses the Solar-Stellar Physical Modelling tools that are an offspring of the tools used by Fontenla and collaborators for computing solar models. For this model of GJ832, we calculate the populations of 52 atoms and ions and 20 molecules with 2 million spectral lines. We find excellent agreement with the observed H-alpha, CaII, MgII, CII, SiIV, CIV, and NV lines. Our model for GJ832 has a temperature minimum in the lower chromosphere much cooler than the Sun and then a steep temperature rise different from the Sun. The different thermal structure of GJ832 compared to the Sun results in the formation regions of the emission lines being different for the two stars. We also compute theradiative cooling rates as a function of height and temperature in the atmosphere of GJ832.This work is supported by grants from STScI to the University of Colorado.

  17. Design of a sun tracker for the automatic measurement of spectral irradiance and construction of an irradiance database in the 330-1100 nm range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canada, J.; Maj, A. [Departamento de Termodinamica Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera, s/n. 46022 Valencia (Spain); Utrillas, M.P.; Martinez-Lozano, J.A.; Pedros, R.; Gomez-Amo, J.L. [Departamento de Fisica de la Tierra y Termodinamica, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    An automatic global and direct solar spectral irradiance system has been designed based on two LICOR spectro radiometers equipped with fibre optics and remote cosine sensors. To measure direct irradiance a sun tracker based on step motors has been developed. The whole system is autonomous and works continuously. From the measurements provided by this system a spectral irradiance database in the 330-1100 nm range has been created. This database contains normal direct and global horizontal irradiances as well as diffuse irradiance on a horizontal plane, together with total atmospheric optical thickness and aerosol optical depth. (author)

  18. Validation of HITEMP-2010 for carbon dioxide and water vapour at high temperatures and atmospheric pressures in 450-7600 cm-1 spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Michael; Weber, Roman; Mancini, Marco; Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the work is validation of HITEMP-2010 at atmospheric pressures and temperatures reaching 1770 K. To this end, spectral transmissivities at 1 cm-1 resolution and excellent signal-to-noise-ratio have been measured for 22 CO2 /H2 O /N2 mixtures. In this paper we consider the 450 cm-1-7600 cm-1 spectral range. The LbL calculations and their comparison with the measured spectra have clearly shown that HITEMP-2010 is an excellent database (superior to previous versions) for calculating emissivities and absorption coefficients for CO2 and H2 O molecules in the 500-1770 K range. Several absorption lines listed in HITEMP-2010 have not been observed in the measured spectra and/or are wrongly scaled with temperature. The complete (there are no missing bands) spectra spanning the 450 - 7600cm-1 range are appended as Supplementary Material.

  19. Use of the near vacuum UV spectral range for the analysis of W-based materials for fusion applications using LIBS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribula, M.; Kritof, J.; Sucho?ov, M.; Hor??kov, M.; Plav?an, J.; Hakola, A.; Veis, P.

    2016-02-01

    The vacuum UV (VUV)-near Infrared (NIR) laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique was applied to investigate the composition of W-based samples with a protective carbon layer. The sample was analyzed under pressures from 5 to 105 Pa and atmosphere (air, He). The spectra were recorded with three spectrometers at delays from 200 ns to 10 ?s at atmospheric pressures and from 100 to 500 ns at low pressures. The electron density was determined from the measured spectra using Stark broadening and the electron temperature from the W IW III Sahaplot in the VUVNIR spectral range. The better precision was achieved due to usage W III spectral lines of tungsten. The achieved results are more reliable than results obtained without W III spectral lines. The calibration free LIBS method was then applied to determine the W and C contents of the analyzed sample.

  20. Co2+:GGG nonlinear optical crystal for the 1.3 - 1.7 -μm spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cobalt-doped GGG crystal is grown and its properties are studied. The absorption and fluorescence spectra in the visible and IR regions are measured. The absorption cross sections of the Co2+ ion in the GGG crystal at a wavelength of 1535 nm are determined for transitions from the ground (σgs = 4.8 x 10-20 cm2) and metastable states (σes = 1.4 x 10-20 cm2). Preliminary experimental results on Q-switching of erbium laser radiation by a Co2+:GGG passive Q-switch are presented. (active media)

  1. First spectral emissivity study of a solar selective coating in the 150-600°C temperature range

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Sáez, R. B.; Céspedes, E.; Sánchez-García, J. A.; Álvarez-Fraga, L.; Escobar Galindo, R; Albella, J. M.; Prieto, C

    2013-01-01

    A complete experimental study of temperature dependence of the total spectral emissivity has been performed, for the first time, for absorber-reflector selective coatings used in concentrated solar power (CSP) systems for energy harvesting. The coating consist of double cermet layers of silicon oxide with different amounts of molybdenum over a silver infrared mirror layer. The experimental measurements were carried out by a high accurate radiometer (HAIRL) with controlled atmosphere in the mi...

  2. Spectral analysis of ICRF [Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies] wave field measurements in the Tara Central Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple spectral analysis technique has been developed to analyse the digital signals from an array of magnetic probes for ICRF field measurements in the Tara Tandem Mirror central cell. The wave dispersion relations of both the applied ICRF and the Alfven Ion Cyclotron Instability have been studied and the waves have been identified as slow in cyclotron waves. The radial profiles of field amplitude and wave vectors were also generated. 9 refs., 10 figs

  3. Uranium plasma emission coefficient in the visible and near UV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, J. M., Jr.; Usher, J. L.; Schneider, R. T.; Campbell, H. D.

    1971-01-01

    Measurements of the specific emission coefficient in the near ultra-violet and visible region of a uranium arc plasma are reported. Spatial unfolding of the intensity profile is used to determine the emission coefficient in the spectral range of 2000 A to 6000 A. The uranium partial pressure is estimated to range between .001 and .01 atmosphere, and the corresponding temperature range is 5000 - 10,000 K.

  4. Searching for the spectral features of minerals on the surface and in the dust of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in NIR spectral range of VIRTIS-M data

    Science.gov (United States)

    B??cka, M. I.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Raponi, A.; Ciarniello, M.; Arnold, G.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Erard, S.; Bockele-Morvan, D. D.; Tosi, F.; Capria, M. T.; Piccioni, G.; Palomba, E.; Fonti, S.; Longobardo, A.; Drossart, P.; Schmitt, B.; Quirico, E.; Rinaldi, G.; Wawrzaszek, A.

    2015-10-01

    The main subject of the paper is constraining the composition of the surface and possibly of the dust on the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by means of comparison between the data from the VIRTIS instrument [1] onboard Rosetta and adopted model of the surface of asteroids [9]. As a first step we have taken into account the spectral range 2.0 - 4.0 ?m. For our calculations Mie and Hapke's models have been considered.

  5. Searching for the spectral features of minerals on the surface and in the dust of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in NIR spectral range of VIRTIS-M data

    OpenAIRE

    Blecka, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Raponi, A.; Ciarnello, M.; Arnold, Gabriele; De Sanctis, M.C.; Erard, S.; Bockelee-Morvan, D; Tosi, F.; Capria, M. T.; Piccioni, G...; Palomba, E.; Fonti, S.; Longobardo, A.

    2015-01-01

    The main subject of the paper is constraining the composition of the surface and possibly of the dust on the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by means of comparison between the data from the VIRTIS instrument onboard Rosetta and adopted model of the surface of asteroids [9]. As a first step we have taken into account the spectral range 2.0 - 4.0 ?m. For our calculations Mie and Hapkes models have been considered.

  6. Composite films prepared by plasma ion-assisted deposition (IAD) for design and fabrication of antireflection coatings in visible and near-infrared spectral regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Ho, Fang C.

    1994-11-01

    Ion-assisted deposition (IAD) processes configured with a well-controlled plasma source at the center base of a vacuum chamber, which accommodates two independent e-gun sources, is used to deposition TiO2MgF2 and TiO2-SiO2 composite films of selected component ratios. Films prepared by this technology are found durable, uniform, and nonabsorbing in visible and near-IR regions. Single- and multilayer antireflection coatings with refractive index from 1.38 to 2.36 at (lambda) equals 550 nm are presented. Methods of enhancement in optical performance of these coatings are studied. The advantages of AR coatings formed by TiO2-MgF2 composite films over those similar systems consisting of TiO2-SiO2 composite films in both visible and near-IR regions are also presented.

  7. VNIIOFI Spectroradiometer Based on a Circular Variable Filter for the Spectral Range from 2.5 ?m up to 14 ?m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, S. P.; Morozov, P. A.; Sapritsky, V. I.; Lisiansky, B. E.; Dovgilov, N. L.

    2003-09-01

    The VNIIOFI Spectroradiometer (VSR) has been developed for the Medium Background Facility which is intended for calibrations and comparisons of low-temperature sources in the temperature range from -60 C up to +80 C. The VSR is designed to measure the radiance temperature of the blackbody sources in the spectral range from 2.5 ?m up to 14 ?m in a cryogenic vacuum environment (liquid nitrogen cooled shroud). The VSR is based on the Circular Variable Filter (CVF) assembly with a slit aperture and an InSb-CdHgTe two color sandwich detector with an integral Stirling cooler. The Circular Variable Filter covers the 2.5 ?m to 14.1 ?m region in three segments. The width of the slit equal to 1.2 mm provides a spectral resolution from 80 nm to 360 nm for the spectral range from 2.5 ?m to 14.1 ?m accordingly. The Circular Variable Filter assembly is rotated by a stepper motor. The Cassegrain telescope is used as a foreoptic unit. Radiation passes through the CVF and is focused on the detector with help of the ellipsoidal mirror. Radiation from a low-temperature (77 K) blackbody is used as a reference level of radiation. The instrument has a field of view of 8.9 mrad with a distance to the object being equal to 2250 mm. The spectral and temporal characterizations of the spectroradiometer are reported. The facility for CVF calibration is described. Temperature resolutions for the calibrated sources are given for different temperatures and for different wavelengths. A brief description of the design, operation principles and specifications of the main parts of the spectroradiometer such as the Cassegrain telescope, CVF and detector assembly are presented. The measurement uncertainties of radiance temperature associated with spectral bandwidth are discussed.

  8. Superluminescent InAs/AlGaAs/GaAs quantum dot heterostructure diodes emitting in the 1100-1230-nm spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superluminescent diodes (SLDs) based on a multilayer InAs/AlGaAs quantum dot heterostructure are studied. It is shown that the emission spectra of SLDs strongly depend on the active-channel length and injection current. In particular, the conditions are determined under which the emission spectrum covers the spectral range between 1100 and 1230 nm due to the levelling of the intensities of quantum transitions from the first and second excited states. Commercial SLDs emitting in this spectral range are not available at present. The SLD design provides cw operation and efficient coupling with a single-mode fibre. The output power achieves 1 mW in free space and 0.5 mW when coupled out through a fibre. Preliminary resource tests have demonstrated a rather high reliability of the developed SLDs. (lasers)

  9. Spectral ellipsometry study in the range of electronic excitations and band structure of [(CH3)2CHNH3]4Cd3Cl10 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical dielectric functions ε(E) of the (IPA)4Cd3Cl10 crystal were measured in the spectral range of fundamental electronic excitations 3.5–10 eV and in the temperature range of 310–400 K containing the phase transition point between the orthorhombic phases Cmce and Pbca. Measurements were performed by spectroscopic ellipsometry with using of synchrotron radiation. Electronic band structure, density of states and dielectric functions ε(E) of (IPA)4Cd3Cl10 were calculated and analyzed on the basis of the density functional theory. Top valence and bottom conduction bands were found to be formed mainly by the cadmium–chlorine complexes of the crystals. - Highlights: ► Spectral ellipsometry in the VUV range is used for study of (IPA)4Cd3Cl10 crystals. ► Band structure of (IPA)4Cd3Cl10 crystal has been calculated for the first time. ► Origin of the lowest energy spectral band of dielectric function is determined. ► Width of temperature dependency of dielectric permittivity is large (near 50 K). ► Maximum of temperature dependency of dielectric permittivity is small (near 2%)

  10. VERUCLAY – a new type of photo-adsorbent active in the visible light range: modification of montmorillonite surface with organic surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montmorillonite K10 was treated with VeruSOL-3, a biodegradable and food-grade surfactant mixture of coconut oil, castor oil and citrus extracts, to manufacture a benign catalytic adsorbent that is active in the visible light. Veruclay was characterized by SEM, XRD, TGA, UVDRS, a...

  11. VERUCLAY a new type of photo-adsorbent active in the visible light range: modification of montmorillonite surface with organic surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montmorillonite K10 was treated with VeruSOL-3, a biodegradable and food-grade surfactant mixture of coconut oil, castor oil and citrus extracts, to manufacture a benign catalytic adsorbent that is active in the visible light. Veruclay was characterized by SEM, XRD, TGA, UVDRS, a...

  12. Relative spectral response measurement of spectrometers using undulator radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Undulator radiation with known spectral characteristics is recognized as an excellent light source that can be used to measure the spectral response of a variety of spectral measurement devices in a wide range from infrared to x-ray. This technique has been developed at Duke Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Laboratory to successfully measure the spectral response of several spectrometers in the near-infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions. In this paper, we present both simulation and experimental results of the spectral response measurement, with a focus on high-accuracy spectral response reconstruction. Using simulation studies, we have tested and confirmed the validity of the spectral response measurement method while taking into account major sources of errors. Especially, it shows that the spectral response reconstruction technique developed in this work is rather robust against the spectral broadening of undulator radiation. The usefulness of this spectral response measurement method is also confirmed with the experimental study on a spectrometer in the visible region. Overall, we have achieved good results with the measured spectral response, with an RMS uncertainty of about 2.7% in the range from 414 to 591 nm. Using multiple measurements, the reproducibility of this method has also been tested with a relative difference of about 2.3% (RMS in the range from 415 to 590 nm). For high-accuracy measurements of a broad radiation spectrum, the knowledge of the spectral response of the spectrometer is critical. In this paper, we will show that the details of the measured undulator radiation spectra can be properly restored by correcting the raw spectrum using the measured spectral response. The method of spectral response measurement using undulator radiation is also useful to calibrate spectral devices in extreme spectral ranges such as VUV and x-ray

  13. Lasing of multiperiod quantum-cascade lasers in the spectral range of (5.6–5.8)-μm under current pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorov, A. Yu., E-mail: anton@beam.ioffe.ru; Babichev, A. V.; Karachinsky, L. Ya.; Novikov, I. I. [Ioffe Institute (Russian Federation); Nikitina, E. V. [St. Petersburg Academic University (Russian Federation); Tchernycheva, M. [University Paris Sud XI, Institut d’Electronique Fondamentale (France); Sofronov, A. N.; Firsov, D. A.; Vorobjev, L. E. [Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Pikhtin, N. A.; Tarasov, I. S. [Ioffe Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    The lasing of multiperiod quantum-cascade lasers in the spectral range of (5.6–5.8)-μm under current pumping are demonstrated. The quantum-cascade laser heterostructure is grown by molecular-beam epitaxy technique. Despite the relatively short laser cavity length and high level of external loss the laser shows the lasing in the temperature range of 80–220 K. The threshold current density below 4 kA/cm{sup 2} at 220 K with the characteristic temperature T{sub 0} = 123 K was demonstrated.

  14. Lasing of multiperiod quantum-cascade lasers in the spectral range of (5.6–5.8)-μm under current pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lasing of multiperiod quantum-cascade lasers in the spectral range of (5.6–5.8)-μm under current pumping are demonstrated. The quantum-cascade laser heterostructure is grown by molecular-beam epitaxy technique. Despite the relatively short laser cavity length and high level of external loss the laser shows the lasing in the temperature range of 80–220 K. The threshold current density below 4 kA/cm2 at 220 K with the characteristic temperature T0 = 123 K was demonstrated

  15. AlGaInP quantum dots for optoelectronic applications in the visible spectral range; AlGaInP-Quantenpunkte fuer optoelektronische Anwendungen im sichtbaren Spektralbereich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhard, Sven

    2013-01-10

    The scope of this work is the fabrication and characterization of AlGaInP quantum dots on GaP an GaAs substrates. Based on such quantum dots, semiconductor lasers have been realized, emitting between 660 nm and 730 nm at room temperature. The examination of broad-area lasers processed on these structures suggests that active layers of larger quantum dots with higher aluminium contents lead to lasers with better performance at similar emission wavelength. Additionally, quantum dots grown on GaP substrates have been characterized, that were embedded in AlGaP barriers. Since these barriers exhibit an indirect bandgap, a non-trivial band alignment within these structures is expected. In this work, numerical 3D-simulations are employed to calculate the band alignment including strain and internal fields. Also, ground state wavefunctions of charge carriers have been determined. A thorough comparison between theory and experiment connects the measured emission wavelength and luminescence intensities with calculated transition energies and wavefunction overlaps.

  16. Third-harmonic generation in silicon and photonic crystals of macroporous silicon in the spectral intermediate-IR range; Erzeugung der Dritten Harmonischen in Silizium und Photonischen Kristallen aus makroporoesem Silizium im spektralen mittleren IR-Bereich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitzschke, Kerstin

    2007-11-01

    Nonlinear optical spectroscopy is a powerful method to study surface or bulk properties of condensed matter. In centrosymmetric materials like silicon even order nonlinear optical processes are forbidden. Besides self-focussing or self phase modulation third-harmonic-generation (THG) is the simplest process that can be studied. This work demonstrates that THG is a adapted non-contact and non-invasive optical method to get information about bulk structures of silicon and Photonic crystals (PC), consisting of silicon. Until now most studies are done in the visible spectral range being limited by the linear absorption losses. So the extension of THG to the IR spectral range is extremely useful. This will allow the investigation of Photonic Crystals, where frequencies near a photonic bandgap are of special interest. 2D- photonic structures under investigation were fabricated via photoelectrochemical etching of the Si (100) wafer (thickness 500 {mu}m) receiving square and hexagonal arranged pores. The typical periodicity of the structures used is 2 {mu}m and the length of the pores reached to 400 {mu}m. Because of stability the photonic structures were superimposed on silicon substrate. The experimental set-up used for the THG experiments generates tuneable picosecond IR pulses (tuning range 1500-4000 cm{sup -1}). The IR-pulse hit the sample either perpendicular to the sample surface or under an angle {theta}. The sample can be rotated (f) around the surface normal. The generated third harmonic is analysed by a polarizer, spectrally filtered by a polychromator and registered by a CCD camera. The setup can be used either in transmission or in reflection mode. Optical transmission and reflection spectra of the Si bulk correspond well with the theoretical description, a 4-fold and a 8-fold dependencies of the azimuth angle resulting in the structure of the x{sup (3)}-tensor of (100)-Si. The situation changes dramatically if the PC with hexagonal structure is investigated. In reflection mode a six fold symmetry is observed. This can only be explained by the symmetry of the Photonic Crystal. Changing the transmission mode the result depends on the mount of the PC - fundamental entering from the structure side or fundamental entering from the bulk side. Common to both results are there six maxima. To explain the difference between the transmission and reflection results one has to recognise, that the effective interaction length is limited: so in the reflection geometry of generated TH is from the structured region, whereas in the transmission cases a combination of the structure and the bulk has to be taken into account. This work gives a first theoretical description of this effects. (orig.)

  17. UV—visible spectral characterization and density functional theory simulation analysis on laser-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of laser energy density on the crystallization of hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films was studied both theoretically and experimentally. The thin films were irritated by a frequency-doubled (λ = 532 nm) Nd:YAG pulsed nanosecond laser. An effective density functional theory model was built to reveal the variation of bandgap energy influenced by thermal stress after laser irradiation. Experimental results establish correlation between the thermal stress and the shift of transverse optical peak in Raman spectroscopy and suggest that the relatively greater shift of the transverse optical (TO) peak can produce higher stress. The highest crystalline fraction (84.5%) is obtained in the optimized laser energy density (1000 mJ/cm2) with a considerable stress release. The absorption edge energy measured by the UV-visible spectra is in fairly good agreement with the bandgap energy in the density functional theory (DFT) simulation

  18. A cylindrical guarded capacitor for spectral permittivity measurements of hard rock samples in the MHz-range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, V.; Wilting, W.; Gruse, M.; Wagner, N.

    2015-10-01

    A shielded and guarded capacitor for non-destructive measurement of the complex permittivity of cylindrical rock samples has been developed. In combination with a vector network analyzer, the measurement system allows for rapid determination of spectral permittivity. The geometrical construction of the capacitor allows for scanning the properties of cylindrical samples, such as drill cores, and determination of anisotropy. The complex permittivity is calculated from the scattering parameters, which are determined using a network analyzer. The calculation is based on a π-network model for the cell and takes stray capacitances and capacitances related to the guard electrode into account. Using this method, good measurement accuracy is achieved between 10 MHz and 200 MHz. The validity of this method was proven by finite element modeling of the field distributions in the cell based on 3D electromagnetic simulation. The influence of typical geometrical imperfections of drill cores, such as varying diameter, finite length and heterogeneities has been studied and quantified by extensive measurements of test samples. These tests confirmed that due to the short shielded electrode, spatial variations in permittivity can be resolved on a sub-centimeter scale.

  19. Reflectance measurements of leaves for detecting visible and non-visible ozon damage to crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Turbo), white clover (Trifolium repens cv. Karina) and maize (Zea mays cv. Bonny) plants were exposed for 20–30 days in open top chambers to charcoal-filtered air (CF, control) and CF air supplied with O3 for 8–12 h/per day in the concentration range of 180–240 μg O3/m3 (8–12 h/day treatment mean). At the end of the O3 treatment spectral reflectance measurements were made on single leaves of all 3 species and on canopies of wheat and clover using a CCD (Charged Coupled Device) camera and wavelength filters with 11 wavelength bands ranging from 450 nm to 950 nm. Different vegetation indices such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the ≪main inflection point≫ (MIP) were calculated. Based on these results it was shown that visible O3 damages were correlated to the spectral reflectance changes: Both leaves and canopies showed an increased reflectance of visible light after ozone treatment. While clover and maize leaves as well as clover and wheat canopies showed a decreased near infrared (NIR) reflectance, the NIR reflectance of wheat leaves did not change, even if the leaves had visible symptoms. A decreased infrared reflectance was detectable for all clover leaves after O3 treatment although for part of the leaves no visible foliar damage symptoms could be observed

  20. Polarizers for a spectral range centered at 121.6 nm operating by reflectance or by transmittance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larruquert, Juan I.; Malvezzi, A. Marco; Giglia, Angelo; Aznárez, José A.; Rodríguez-de Marcos, Luis; Méndez, José A.; Miotti, Paolo; Frassetto, Fabio; Massone, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Gerardo; Fineschi, Silvano; Nannarone, Stefano

    2015-05-01

    Polarimetry is a powerful tool to interpret how the coronal plasma is involved in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's inner parts to the outer space. Space polarimetry in the far ultraviolet (FUV) provides essential information of processes governed by the Doppler and Hanle resonant electron scattering effects. Among the key FUV spectral lines to observe these processes, H I Lyman α (121.6 nm) is the most intense. Some developing or proposed solar physics missions, such as CLASP, SolmeX, and COMPASS, plan to perform polarimetry at 121.6 nm. Classical solutions, such as a parallel plate of a transparent material, either MgF2 or LiF, result in a modest efficiency of the passing polarization component. The development of more efficient linear polarizers at this wavelength will benefit future space instruments. A research has been conducted to develop polarizers based on (Al/MgF2)n multilayer coatings in a band containing 121.6 nm, to obtain a significant efficiency increase over plates. Coatings operating by reflectance resulted in a high efficiency after approximately one year of storage under nitrogen. In parallel, coating polarizers operating by transmittance have been prepared for the first time. Transmissive polarizers have the advantage that they involve no deviation of the beam. As a further benefit, the developed transmittance polarizers additionally incorporate filtering properties to help reject wavelengths both shortwards and longwards of a band containing 121.6 nm. Hence a polarizer combined with a filter is obtained with a single device. The combined polarizer-filter could enable a higher performance polarimeter for solar physics if the use of a separate filter to isolate Lyman α turns unnecessary.

  1. Construction of TSL lector equipment with spectral resolution for the determination of thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) properties of NaCl: Tl+ induced by UV-visible radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A revision of physical models of thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) in crystals induced by both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the connection of TSL with other thermally stimulated processes and physico-chemical phenomena because basic information on physical mechanics for TSL can be obtained through them. Glow curves of TSL induced by UV-visible radiation in NaCl: Tl+ were measured. Additionally, the following spectrums were obtained for the same samples: optical absorption, excitation, fluorescent emission, and TSL emission. An optical absorption peak was correlated with the Thallium ion concentration. With respect to the TSL emission spectrums, some peaks associated to Thallium dimmers were at 298 and at 480 nm; others which were attributed to NaCl intrinsic properties were at 365, 430, 450 and 525 nm. Also TSL glow curves were studied as a function of the Thallium ion concentration (0.8 ppm to 14.8 ppm). They were de convoluted so as to calculate the activation energy, the frequency factor and the kinetic order for each separate TSL peak. Anomalous values were observed for some frequency factors. A method and TSL lector equipment to obtain TSL emission spectra were developed. (Author)

  2. Improved EDGE2D-EIRENE simulations of JET ITER-like wall L-mode discharges utilising poloidal VUV/visible spectral emission profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, K.D., E-mail: Kerry.Lawson@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Groth, M. [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Espoo (Finland); Belo, P. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Brezinsek, S. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4 Plasmaphysik, Jülich (Germany); Corrigan, G. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Czarnecka, A. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Association EURATOM-IPPLM, Warsaw (Poland); Delabie, E. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Drewelow, P. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Greifswald (Germany); Harting, D. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4 Plasmaphysik, Jülich (Germany); Książek, I. [Institute of Physics, Opole University, ul.Oleska 48, 45-052 Opole (Poland); Maggi, C.F. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Marchetto, C. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, CNR, Milano (Italy); Meigs, A.G. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Menmuir, S. [Euratom/VR Association, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Stamp, M.F. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Wiesen, S. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK-4 Plasmaphysik, Jülich (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    A discrepancy in the divertor radiated powers between EDGE2D-EIRENE simulations, both with and without drifts, and JET-ILW experiments employing a set of NBI-heated L-mode discharges with step-wise density variation is investigated. Results from a VUV/visible poloidally scanning spectrometer are used together with bolometric measurements to determine the radiated power and its composition. The analysis shows the importance of D line radiation in contributing to the divertor radiated power, while contributions from D radiative recombination are smaller than expected. Simulations with W divertor plates underestimate the Be content in the divertor, since no allowance is made for Be previously deposited on the plates being re-eroded. An improved version of EDGE2D-EIRENE is used to test the importance of the deposited layer in which the sputtering yield from supposed pure Be divertor plates is reduced to match the spectroscopic signals, while keeping the sputtering yield for the Be main chamber walls unchanged.

  3. Ultrawideband coherent noise lidar range-Doppler imaging and signal processing by use of spatial-spectral holography in inhomogeneously broadened absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Youzhi; Hoskins, Alan; Schlottau, Friso; Wagner, Kelvin H; Embry, Carl; Babbitt, William Randall

    2006-09-01

    We introduce a new approach to coherent lidar range-Doppler sensing by utilizing random-noise illuminating waveforms and a quantum-optical, parallel sensor based on spatial-spectral holography (SSH) in a cryogenically cooled inhomogeneously broadened absorber (IBA) crystal. Interference between a reference signal and the lidar return in the spectrally selective absorption band of the IBA is used to sense the lidar returns and perform the front-end range-correlation signal processing. Modulating the reference by an array of Doppler compensating frequency shifts enables multichannel Doppler filtering. This SSH sensor performs much of the postdetection signal processing, increases the lidar system sensitivity through range-correlation gain before detection, and is capable of not only Doppler processing but also parallel multibeam reception using the high-spatial resolution of the IBA crystals. This approach permits the use of ultrawideband, high-power, random-noise, cw lasers as ranging waveforms in lidar systems instead of highly stabilized, injection-seeded, and amplified pulsed or modulated laser sources as required by most conventional coherent lidar systems. The capabilities of the IBA media for many tens of gigahertz bandwidth and resolution in the 30-300 kHz regime, while using either a pseudo-noise-coded waveform or just a high-power, noisy laser with a broad linewidth (e.g., a truly random noise lidar) may enable a new generation of improved lidar sensors and processors. Preliminary experimental demonstrations of lidar ranging and simulation on range-Doppler processing are presented. PMID:16912777

  4. Arecibo Spectral Line Scan of the Hot Molecular Core in W51: Results from the C-Band High Frequency Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Esteban; Arce, H. G.; Minchin, R. F.; Ghosh, T.; Salter, C. J.; Lebron Santos, M. E.; De Vries, C. H.

    2013-06-01

    In 2010 we began an ambitious project with the 305m Arecibo Telescope: a spectral line scan of the W51 hot molecular core covering all available frequency bands, from 1 to 10 GHz. The observations were taken in the summers of 2010, 2011, and 2012. All frequency bands were observed with the Mock spectrometer, which allowed simultaneous observations of 14 adjacent spectral windows, 8192 channels each, ~0.3 km/s channel width. In this update report we concentrate on results from the C-Band High frequency range, from 6.0 to 8.2 GHz. We achieved a typical rms of ~15 mJy. We report detection of more than 70 spectral lines; among the most prominent are radio recombination lines, including alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon hydrogen lines; emission and absorption lines of excited hydroxyl transitions at 6.030, 6.035 and 6.049 GHz; and methanol masers and absorption of the 6.67 GHz transition.

  5. Validation of HITEMP-2010 for carbon dioxide and water vapour at high temperatures and atmospheric pressures in 450-7600cm-1 spectral range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberti, Michael; Weber, Roman; Mancini, Marco; Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the work is validation of HITEMP-2010 at atmospheric pressures and temperatures reaching 1770K. To this end, spectral transmissivities at 1cm-1 resolution and excellent signal-to-noise-ratio have been measured for 22 CO2/H2O/N2 mixtures. In this paper we consider the 450cm-1-7600...... absorption lines listed in HITEMP-2010 have not been observed in the measured spectra and/or are wrongly scaled with temperature. The complete (there are no missing bands) spectra spanning the 450-7600cm-1 range are appended as Supplementary Material....

  6. Adjustment of a goniometer for X-rays optics calibration in the spectral range 1.5-20 KeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this memoir is the adjustment of a (θ, 2θ) goniometer coupled to X-rays source to calibrate mirrors (single layers like C, Ni, Au, etc... and multilayers like C/W, Si/W, etc...) in the spectral range 1.5 - 20 keV. For each kind of tested optics the adjustment of the goniometer include the procedure alignment of the different components (X-ray source, collimation slits, optics, detectors) and the first reflectivity measurements. Those measurements are compared those realized at LURE, using synchrotron radiation provided by SUPER ACO storage ring, and to a theoretical simulation

  7. Monolithic integration of InGaN segments emitting in the blue, green, and red spectral range in single ordered nanocolumns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work reports on the selective area growth by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of InGaN/GaN nanocolumnar heterostructures. The optimization of the In/Ga and total III/V ratios, as well as the growth temperature, provides control on the emission wavelength, either in the blue, green, or red spectral range. An adequate structure tailoring and monolithic integration in a single nanocolumnar heterostructure of three InGaN portions emitting in the red-green-blue colors lead to white light emission.

  8. Parametric modeling of the dielectric function and identification of the critical point of a CdMgTe alloy in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the parameters necessary to construct the dielectric functions of Cd1-xMgxTe ternary alloys at room temperature for arbitrary compositions from x = 0 to x = 0.5. The experimental spectra were measured by using vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopic ellipsometry in the spectral range from 0.7 to 9.0 eV. By performing a band structure calculation with the linear augmented Slatertype orbital method, we newly identify the four higher band gaps as E2 + Δ2, E2(Δ), E2(Σ), and E'1 transitions.

  9. Monolithic integration of InGaN segments emitting in the blue, green, and red spectral range in single ordered nanocolumns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, S.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E. [ISOM and Dept. Ingenieria Electronica, ETSI Telecomunicacion, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kong, X.; Trampert, A. [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoeperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-05-06

    This work reports on the selective area growth by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of InGaN/GaN nanocolumnar heterostructures. The optimization of the In/Ga and total III/V ratios, as well as the growth temperature, provides control on the emission wavelength, either in the blue, green, or red spectral range. An adequate structure tailoring and monolithic integration in a single nanocolumnar heterostructure of three InGaN portions emitting in the red-green-blue colors lead to white light emission.

  10. White LEDs as broad spectrum light sources for spectrophotometry: demonstration in the visible spectrum range in a diode-array spectrophotometric detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, Tomasz; Breadmore, Michael C; Macka, Mirek

    2010-11-01

    Although traditional lamps, such as deuterium lamps, are suitable for bench-top instrumentation, their compatibility with the requirements of modern miniaturized instrumentation is limited. This study investigates the option of utilizing solid-state light source technology, namely white LEDs, as a broad band spectrum source for spectrophotometry. Several white light LEDs of both RGB and white phosphorus have been characterized in terms of their emission spectra and energy output and a white phosphorus Luxeon LED was then chosen for demonstration as a light source for visible-spectrum spectrophotometry conducted in CE. The Luxeon LED was fixed onto the base of a dismounted deuterium (D(2) ) lamp so that the light-emitting spot was geometrically positioned exactly where the light-emitting spot of the original D(2) lamp is placed. In this manner, the detector of a commercial CE instrument equipped with a DAD was not modified in any way. As the detector hardware and electronics remained the same, the change of the deuterium lamp for the Luxeon white LED allowed a direct comparison of their performances. Several anionic dyes as model analytes with absorption maxima between 450 and 600 nm were separated by CE in an electrolyte of 0.01 mol/L sodium tetraborate. The absorbance baseline noise as the key parameter was 5 × lower for the white LED lamp, showing clearly superior performance to the deuterium lamp in the available, i.e. visible part of the spectrum. PMID:21077241

  11. Evidence for Alteration in Chemical and Physical Properties of Water and Modulation of its Biological Functions by Sunlight Transmitted through Color Ranges of the Visible Spectrum-A Novel Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rajeswara Rao

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the changes in the properties of water when exposed to sunlight for 40 days. We hypothesize and prove that solar irradiation to water entraps electromagnetic radiation as potential energy, which becomes kinetic energy in various systems. It is postulated that photochemically-induced energy transfers, associated with individual spectral emission of visible spectrum of solar light, exert diverse influences on biological systems. Bottles of distilled water, individually wrapped in spectral-colored cellophane were exposed to sunlight and compared to an unwrapped bottle to determine chemical and physical changes as well as modifications of biological properties. Each bottle of water was named according to the color of cellophane paper with letter E (stands for exposed as a prefix with (E-violet, E-indigo, E-blue, E-green, E-yellow, E-orange, and Ered. E-control (without wrap was exposed to polychromatic sunlight. This study addresses two main issues viz., the chemical and physical changes in E-water and its effect on biological activities. Chemical and physical composition analysis using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry; physical conductance by a Wheatstone Bridge type conductivity meter; osmolarity by a vapor pressure osmometer; and, salt solubility profile of 10% sodium bicarbonate were determined. Furthermore, testing the effect of E-waters on human lymphocyte proliferation, mosquito larvae hatching and seed germination determined the functional role of solar radiation through specific spectrum/s of visible light on various biological processes. We found that water exposed to visible spectral emissions of sunlight had an altered elemental composition, electrical conductance, osmolarity and salt-solubility, as well as differences in bio-modulatory effects. A gradual increase in leaching of Boron from Eviolet to E-red was noted. E-indigo showed maximal increase in electrical conductance and maximal salt solubility of sodium bicarbonate. E-blue inhibited phyto-hemagglutinin-induced immune cell proliferation and mosquito larvae hatching. E-orange stimulated root elongation in seed germination. We conclude that 40-day exposure of water to specific solar spectrum changes chemical and physical properties and influences on biological activity.

  12. Modification of modulated plasma plumes for the quasi-phase-matching of high-order harmonics in different spectral ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the technique allowing the fine tuning of the distance between the laser-produced plasma plumes on the surfaces of different materials, as well as the variation of the sizes of these plumes. The modification of plasma formations is based on the tilting of the multi-slit mask placed between the heating laser beam and target surface, as well as the positioning of this mask in the telescope placed on the path of heating radiation. The modulated plasma plumes with the sizes of single plume ranging between 0.1 and 1 mm were produced on the manganese and silver targets. Modification of the geometrical parameters of plasma plumes proved to be useful for the fine tuning of the quasi-phase-matched high-order harmonics generated in such structures during propagation of the ultrashort laser pulses. We show the enhancement of some groups of harmonics along the plateau range and the tuning of maximally enhanced harmonic by variable modulation of the plasma

  13. Sensitivity Gains, Linearity, and Spectral Reproducibility in Nonuniformly Sampled Multidimensional MAS NMR Spectra of High Dynamic Range.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Hou, Guangjin; Sun, Shangjin; Rice, David M.; Hoch, Jeffrey C.; Rovnyak, David S.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2014-04-22

    Recently, we have demonstrated that considerable inherent sensitivity gains are attained in MAS NMR spectra acquired by nonuniform sampling (NUS) and introduced maximum entropy interpolation (MINT) processing that assures the linearity of transformation between the time and frequency domains. In this report, we examine the utility of the NUS/MINT approach in multidimensional datasets possessing high dynamic range, such as homonuclear 13C–13C correlation spectra. We demonstrate on model compounds and on 1–73-(U-13C,15N)/74–108-(U-15N) E. coli thioredoxin reassembly, that with appropriately constructed 50 % NUS schedules inherent sensitivity gains of 1.7–2.1-fold are readily reached in such datasets. We show that both linearity and line width are retained under these experimental conditions throughout the entire dynamic range of the signals. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the reproducibility of the peak intensities is excellent in the NUS/MINT approach when experiments are repeated multiple times and identical experimental and processing conditions are employed. Finally, we discuss the principles for design and implementation of random exponentially biased NUS sampling schedules for homonuclear 13C–13C MAS correlation experiments that yield high quality artifact-free datasets.

  14. A Novel Smart Pan/Tilt/Zoom Visible/Infrared Sensor for UAV On-Board Video Surveillance of Launch Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has a pressing need for increasing the efficiency of launch range surveillance during mission launch operations. Difficulty in verifying a cleared range causes...

  15. Sunspot visibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper advances a detailed theory of sunspot visibility based on the physiology of the human eye. It is found that the average person under optimal conditions can detect a sunspot whose penumbral diameter is as small as 27 arcsec. The technique for filtering the sunlight, the observer's diet, age, and amount of close-up reading will not change sunspot visibility in practical cases, so the modern observations and theory are fully comparable with the ancient Chinese observations.

  16. High resolution spectral survey of symbiotic stars in the near-IR over the GAIA wavelength range

    CERN Document Server

    Marrese, P M; Munari, U; Marrese, Paola M.; Sordo, Rosanna; Munari, Ulisse

    2002-01-01

    High resolution (R~20,000), high signal-to-noise (S/N~100) spectra were collected for ~40 symbiotic stars with the Asiago echelle spectrograph over the same 8480-8740 Ang wavelength range covered by the ESA Cornerstone mission GAIA, centered on the near-IR CaII triplet and the head of the Paschen series. A large number (~140) of cool MKK giant and supergiant templates were observed with the same instrumentation to serve as a reference and classification grid. The spectra offer bright prospects in classifying and addressing the nature of the cool component of symbiotic stars (deriving T(eff), log g, [Fe/H], [alpha/Fe], V(rot)sin i both via MDM-like methods and syntetic atmosphere modeling) and mapping the physical condition and kinematics of the gas regions responsible for the emission lines.

  17. Towards a comprehensive eye model for zebrafish retinal imaging using full range spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Maria; Weber, Anke; Cimalla, Peter; Köttig, Felix; Brand, Michael; Koch, Edmund

    2014-03-01

    In regenerative medicine, the zebrafish is a prominent animal model for studying degeneration and regeneration processes, e.g. of photoreceptor cells in the retina. By means of optical coherence tomography (OCT), these studies can be conducted over weeks using the same individual and hence reducing the variability of the results. To allow an improvement of zebrafish retinal OCT imaging by suitable optics, we developed a zebrafish eye model using geometrical data obtained by in vivo dispersion encoded full range OCT as well as a dispersion comprising gradient index (GRIN) lens model based on refractive index data found in the literature. Using non-sequential ray tracing, the focal length of the spherical GRIN lens (diameter of 0.96 mm) was determined to be 1.22 mm at 800 nm wavelength giving a Matheissen's ratio (ratio of focal length to radius of the lens) of 2.54, which fits well into the range between 2.19 and 2.82, found for various fish lenses. Additionally, a mean refractive index of 1.64 at 800 nm could be retrieved for the lens to yield the same focal position as found for the GRIN condition. With the aid of the zebrafish eye model, the optics of the OCT scanner head were adjusted to provide high-resolution retinal images with a field of view of 30° x 30°. The introduced model therefore provides the basis for improved retinal imaging with OCT and can be further used to study the image formation within the zebrafish eye.

  18. Simulation of laser propagation through a three-layer human skin model in the spectral range from 1000 to 1900 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasouri, Babak; Murphy, Thomas E; Berberoglu, Halil

    2014-01-01

    For understanding the mechanisms of low-level laser/light therapy (LLLT), accurate knowledge of light interaction with tissue is necessary. We present a three-dimensional, multilayer reduced-variance Monte Carlo simulation tool for studying light penetration and absorption in human skin. Local profiles of light penetration and volumetric absorption were calculated for uniform as well as Gaussian profile beams with different spreads over the spectral range from 1000 to 1900 nm. The results showed that lasers within this wavelength range could be used to effectively and safely deliver energy to specific skin layers as well as achieve large penetration depths for treating deep tissues, without causing skin damage. In addition, by changing the beam profile from uniform to Gaussian, the local volumetric dosage could increase as much as three times for otherwise similar lasers. We expect that this tool along with the results presented will aid researchers in selecting wavelength and laser power in LLLT. PMID:25003752

  19. Simulation of a surface plasmon resonance-based fiber-optic sensor for gas sensing in visible range using films of nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A surface plasmon resonance-based fiber-optic sensor coated with nanocomposite film for sensing small concentrations of gases in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum has been analyzed. The nanocomposites considered are nanoparticles of Ag, Au and indium tin oxide (ITO) with their varying fraction dispersed in the host dielectric matrix of WO3, SnO2 and TiO2. For analysis, the effective indices of nanocomposites are calculated by adopting the MaxwellGarnett model for nanoparticles of dimensions much smaller than the wavelength of radiation used for investigation. The effects of the volume fraction of nanoparticles in different nanocomposites and the thickness of the nanocomposite layer on the sensitivity of the sensor have been studied. It has been found that the sensor with the ITOTiO2 coated nanocomposite with a small volume fraction and optimized film thickness possesses higher sensitivity

  20. Large-Scale Structure of the Molecular Gas in Taurus Revealed by High Linear Dynamic Range Spectral Line Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Goldsmith, Paul F; Narayanan, Gopal; Snell, Ronald; Li, Di; Brunt, Chris

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of a 100 square degree survey of the Taurus Molecular Cloud region in the J = 1-0 transition of 12CO and 13CO. The image of the cloud in each velocity channel includes ~ 3 million Nyquist sampled pixels on a 20" grid. The high sensitivity and large linear dynamic range of the maps in both isotopologues reveal a very complex, highly structured cloud morphology. There are large scale correlated structures evident in 13CO emission having very fine dimensions, including filaments, cavities, and rings. The 12CO emission shows a quite different structure, with particularly complex interfaces between regions of greater and smaller column density defining the boundaries of the largest-scale cloud structures. The axes of the striations seen in the 12CO emission from relatively diffuse gas are aligned with the direction of the magnetic field. Using a column density-dependent model for the CO fractional abundance, we derive the mass of the region mapped to be 24,000 solar masses, a factor of three ...

  1. Method to analyze remotely sensed spectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, Christopher L.; Van Benthem, Mark H.

    2009-02-17

    A fast and rigorous multivariate curve resolution (MCR) algorithm is applied to remotely sensed spectral data. The algorithm is applicable in the solar-reflective spectral region, comprising the visible to the shortwave infrared (ranging from approximately 0.4 to 2.5 .mu.m), midwave infrared, and thermal emission spectral region, comprising the thermal infrared (ranging from approximately 8 to 15 .mu.m). For example, employing minimal a priori knowledge, notably non-negativity constraints on the extracted endmember profiles and a constant abundance constraint for the atmospheric upwelling component, MCR can be used to successfully compensate thermal infrared hyperspectral images for atmospheric upwelling and, thereby, transmittance effects. Further, MCR can accurately estimate the relative spectral absorption coefficients and thermal contrast distribution of a gas plume component near the minimum detectable quantity.

  2. Spectral Modulation Effect in Teleseismic P-waves from North Korean Nuclear Tests Recorded in Broad Azimuthal Range and Possible Source Depth Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitterman, Y.; Kim, S. G.; Hofstetter, R.

    2015-09-01

    Three underground nuclear explosions, conducted by North Korea in 2006, 2009 and 2013, are analyzed. The last two tests were recorded by the Israel Seismic Network. Pronounced coherent minima (spectral nulls) at 1.2-1.3 Hz were revealed in the spectra of teleseismic P-waves. For a ground-truth explosion with a shallow source depth, this phenomenon can be interpreted in terms of the interference between the down-going P-wave and the pP phase reflected from the Earth's surface. This effect was also observed at ISN stations for a Pakistan nuclear explosion at a different frequency 1.7 Hz and the PNE Rubin-2 in West Siberia at 1 Hz, indicating a source-effect and not a site-effect. Similar spectral minima having essentially the same frequency, as at ISN, were observed in teleseismic P-waves for all the three North Korean explosions recorded at networks and arrays in Kazakhstan (KURK), Norway (NNSN), Australia (ASAR, WRA) and Canada (YKA), covering a broad azimuthal range. Data of 2009 and 2013 tests at WRA and KURK arrays showed harmonic spectral modulation with three multiple minima frequencies, evidencing the clear interference effect. These observations support the above-mentioned interpretation. Based on the null frequency dependency on the near-surface acoustic velocity and the source depth, the depth of the North Korean tests was estimated about 2.0-2.1 km. It was shown that the observed null frequencies and the obtained source depth estimates correspond to P-pP interference phenomena in both cases of a vertical shaft or a horizontal drift in a mountain. This unusual depth estimation needs additional validation based on more stations and verification by other methods.

  3. Human Contrast Threshold and Astronomical Visibility

    CERN Document Server

    Crumey, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The standard visibility model in light pollution studies is the formula of Hecht (1947), as used e.g. by Schaefer (1990). However it is applicable only to point sources and is shown to be of limited accuracy. A new visibility model is presented for uniform achromatic targets of any size against background luminances ranging from zero to full daylight, produced by a systematic procedure applicable to any appropriate data set (e.g Blackwell (1946)), and based on a simple but previously unrecognized empirical relation between contrast threshold and adaptation luminance. The scotopic luminance correction for variable spectral radiance (colour index) is calculated. For point sources the model is more accurate than Hecht's formula and is verified using telescopic data collected at Mount Wilson by Bowen (1947), enabling the sky brightness at that time to be determined. The result is darker than the calculation by Garstang (2004), implying that light pollution grew more rapidly in subsequent decades than has been sup...

  4. The potential for extending the spectral range accessible to the european X-ray free electron laser in the direction of longer wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Saldin, E L; Yurkov, M V

    2004-01-01

    The baseline specifications of European XFEL give a range of wavelengths between 0.1 nm and 2 nm. This wavelength range at fixed electron beam energy 17.5 GeV can be covered by operating the SASE FEL with three undulators which have different period and tunable gap. A study of the potential for the extending the spectral range accessible to the XFEL in the direction of longer wavelengths is presented. The extension of the wavelength range to 6 nm would be cover the water window in the VUV region, opening the facility to a new class of experiments. There are at least two possible sources of VUV radiation associated with the X-ray FEL; the "low (2.5 GeV) energy electron beam dedicated" and the " 17.5 GeV spent beam parasitic" (or "after-burner") source modes. The second alternative, "after-burner undulator" is the one we regard as most favorable. It is possible to place an undulator as long as 80 meters after 2 nm undulator. Ultimately, VUV undulator would be able to deliver output power approaching 100 GW. A b...

  5. Synthesis, spectral (FT-IR, UV-visible, NMR) features, biological activity prediction and theoretical studies of 4-Amino-3-(4-hydroxybenzyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-5(4H)-thione and its tautomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ambrish Kumar; Kumar, Abhishek; Misra, Neeraj; Manjula, P. S.; Sarojini, B. K.; Narayana, B.

    2016-03-01

    Triazole compounds constitute an important class of organic chemistry due to their various biological and corrosion inhibition activities. The synthesis scheme of a new triazole compound namely, 4-Amino-3-(4-hydroxybenzyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-5(4H)-thione (4AHT) has been theoretically analyzed. Our density functional theory (DFT) based calculations show that the synthesis of 4AHT is energetically feasible at the room temperature as the reaction is exothermic, spontaneous as well as favored in forward direction. The calculated bond-lengths are found to be in good agreement with corresponding crystallographic values. We have considered two possible tautomers of 4AHT viz. thione and thiol forms. The FT-IR (KBr disc), UV-visible (ethanol) and 1H-NMR (DMSO) spectra of 4AHT have been recorded. The vibrational modes have been assigned on the basis of their potential energy distributions and scaled wavenumbers agree well with the FT-IR wavenumbers. Time dependent DFT calculations are performed to analyze the electronic transitions for various excited states which reproduce the experimental peak observed in UV-visible spectrum. Using gauge independent atomic orbital method 1H-NMR chemical shifts have been calculated and correlated with the experimental chemical shifts with the linear correlation coefficient of 0.9453. Our spectral analyses reveal the dominance of thione over thiol form of 4AHT. The chemical reactivity of 4AHT has been discussed by molecular electrostatic potential surface as well as various electronic parameters. The biological activities of 4AHT have also been explored theoretically and it has been found that the title molecule can act as a potential inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 enzyme. These findings may guide the synthesis and design of new triazole compounds with interesting biological activity.

  6. The gas turbulence in planetary nebulae: quantification and multi-D maps from long-slit, wide-spectral range echellogram

    CERN Document Server

    Sabbadin, F; Benetti, S; Ragazzoni, R; Cappellaro, E

    2008-01-01

    This methodological paper is part of a short series dedicated to the long-standing astronomical problem of de-projecting the bi-dimensional, apparent morphology of a three-dimensional distribution of gas. We focus on the quantification and spatial recovery of turbulent motions in planetary nebulae (and other classes of expanding nebulae) by means of long-slit echellograms over a wide spectral range. We introduce some basic theoretical notions, discuss the observational methodology, and develop an accurate procedure disentangling all broadening components of the velocity profile in all spatial positions of each spectral image. This allows us to extract random, non-thermal motions at unprecedented accuracy, and to map them in 1-, 2- and 3-dimensions. We present the solution to practical problems in the multi-dimensional turbulence-analysis of a testing-planetary nebula (NGC 7009), using the three-step procedure (spatio-kinematics, tomography, and 3-D rendering) developed at the Astronomical Observatory of Padua...

  7. The Herschel/HIFI spectral survey of OMC-2 FIR 4 (CHESS): An overview of the 480 to 1902 GHz range

    CERN Document Server

    Kama, M; Dominik, C; Ceccarelli, C; Fuente, A; Caux, E; Higgins, R; Tielens, A G G M; Alonso-Albi, T

    2013-01-01

    Broadband spectral surveys of protostars offer a rich view of the physical, chemical and dynamical structure and evolution of star-forming regions. The Herschel Space Observatory opened up the terahertz regime to such surveys, giving access to the fundamental transitions of many hydrides and to the high-energy transitions of many other species. A comparative analysis of the chemical inventories and physical processes and properties of protostars of various masses and evolutionary states is the goal of the Herschel CHEmical Surveys of Star forming regions (CHESS) key program. This paper focusses on the intermediate-mass protostar, OMC-2 FIR 4. We obtained a spectrum of OMC-2 FIR 4 in the 480 to 1902 GHz range with the HIFI spectrometer onboard Herschel and carried out the reduction, line identification, and a broad analysis of the line profile components, excitation, and cooling. We detect 719 spectral lines from 40 species and isotopologs. The line flux is dominated by CO, H2O, and CH3OH. The line profiles ar...

  8. Visible-Infrared Hyperspectral Image Projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The VisIR HIP generates spatially-spectrally complex scenes. The generated scenes simulate real-world targets viewed by various remote sensing instruments. The VisIR HIP consists of two subsystems: a spectral engine and a spatial engine. The spectral engine generates spectrally complex uniform illumination that spans the wavelength range between 380 nm and 1,600 nm. The spatial engine generates two-dimensional gray-scale scenes. When combined, the two engines are capable of producing two-dimensional scenes with a unique spectrum at each pixel. The VisIR HIP can be used to calibrate any spectrally sensitive remote-sensing instrument. Tests were conducted on the Wide-field Imaging Interferometer Testbed at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center. The device is a variation of the calibrated hyperspectral image projector developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD. It uses Gooch & Housego Visible and Infrared OL490 Agile Light Sources to generate arbitrary spectra. The two light sources are coupled to a digital light processing (DLP(TradeMark)) digital mirror device (DMD) that serves as the spatial engine. Scenes are displayed on the DMD synchronously with desired spectrum. Scene/spectrum combinations are displayed in rapid succession, over time intervals that are short compared to the integration time of the system under test.

  9. Visible spectroscopy on ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report visible spectroscopy and impurity investigations on ASDEX are reviewed and several sets of visible spectra are presented. As a basis for identification of metallic impurity lines during plasma discharges spectra from a stainless steel - Cu arc have been recorded. In a next step a spectrum overview of ASDEX discharges is shown which reveals the dominating role of lines from light impurities like carbon and oxygen throughout the UV and visible range (2000 A ≤ λ ≤ 8000 A). Metallic impurity lines of neutrals or single ionized atoms are observed near localized surfaces. The dramatic effect of impurity reduction by boronization of the vessel walls is demonstrated in a few examples. In extension to some ivesti-gations already published, further diagnostic applications of visible spectroscopy are presented. Finally, the hardware and software system used on ASDEX are described in detail. (orig.)

  10. Low-Loss Coupling of Quantum Cascade Lasers into Hollow-Core Waveguides with Single-Mode Output in the 3.7–7.6 μm Spectral Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Patimisco

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated low-loss and single-mode laser beam delivery through hollow-core waveguides (HCWs operating in the 3.7–7.6 μm spectral range. The employed HCWs have a circular cross section with a bore diameter of 200 μm and metallic/dielectric internal coatings deposited inside a glass capillary tube. The internal coatings have been produced to enhance the spectral response of the HCWs in the range 3.5–12 µm. We demonstrated Gaussian-like outputs throughout the 4.5–7.6 µm spectral range. A quasi single-mode output beam with only small beam distortions was achieved when the wavelength was reduced to 3.7 μm. With a 15-cm-long HCW and optimized coupling conditions, we measured coupling efficiencies of >88% and transmission losses of <1 dB in the investigated infrared spectral range.

  11. Low-Loss Coupling of Quantum Cascade Lasers into Hollow-Core Waveguides with Single-Mode Output in the 3.7–7.6 μm Spectral Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patimisco, Pietro; Sampaolo, Angelo; Mihai, Laura; Giglio, Marilena; Kriesel, Jason; Sporea, Dan; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K.; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated low-loss and single-mode laser beam delivery through hollow-core waveguides (HCWs) operating in the 3.7–7.6 μm spectral range. The employed HCWs have a circular cross section with a bore diameter of 200 μm and metallic/dielectric internal coatings deposited inside a glass capillary tube. The internal coatings have been produced to enhance the spectral response of the HCWs in the range 3.5–12 µm. We demonstrated Gaussian-like outputs throughout the 4.5–7.6 µm spectral range. A quasi single-mode output beam with only small beam distortions was achieved when the wavelength was reduced to 3.7 μm. With a 15-cm-long HCW and optimized coupling conditions, we measured coupling efficiencies of >88% and transmission losses of <1 dB in the investigated infrared spectral range. PMID:27089343

  12. Low-Loss Coupling of Quantum Cascade Lasers into Hollow-Core Waveguides with Single-Mode Output in the 3.7-7.6 μm Spectral Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patimisco, Pietro; Sampaolo, Angelo; Mihai, Laura; Giglio, Marilena; Kriesel, Jason; Sporea, Dan; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated low-loss and single-mode laser beam delivery through hollow-core waveguides (HCWs) operating in the 3.7-7.6 μm spectral range. The employed HCWs have a circular cross section with a bore diameter of 200 μm and metallic/dielectric internal coatings deposited inside a glass capillary tube. The internal coatings have been produced to enhance the spectral response of the HCWs in the range 3.5-12 µm. We demonstrated Gaussian-like outputs throughout the 4.5-7.6 µm spectral range. A quasi single-mode output beam with only small beam distortions was achieved when the wavelength was reduced to 3.7 μm. With a 15-cm-long HCW and optimized coupling conditions, we measured coupling efficiencies of >88% and transmission losses of <1 dB in the investigated infrared spectral range. PMID:27089343

  13. Depolarization effect in rare-earth doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} films in blue and UV spectral range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasimov, Naghi; Mammadov, Eldar; Babayev, Sardar; Mamedova, Irada; Mamedov, Nazim [Department of Ellipsometry, Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, H. Javid ave. 33, Baku-1143 (Azerbaijan); Joudrier, Anne L.; Andriamiadamanana, Christian; Naghavi, Negar; Guillemoles, Jean F. [Institute for Research and Development of Photovoltaic Energy, 6 Quai Watier, 78401 Chatou, Paris (France)

    2015-06-15

    The 200 to 300 nm thick, Er and Er,Yb doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited onto silicon substrate by spin coating have been studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry over the 192-1680 nm spectral range at room temperature. All samples have been found to be strongly depolarizing in the blue and UV part of the spectrum. Complimentary examination of the sample surfaces, using confocal photoluminescence microscopy has disclosed the non-uniform distribution of the rare-earth dopants. The depolarization effects have then been modeled and found to be best reproduced by taking the thickness non-uniformity as the main source of depolarization. The optical constants of the studied films have been determined after four-step modeling with sequential decrease of the mean square error. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Light-Emitting-Diodes based on ordered InGaN nanocolumns emitting in the blue, green and yellow spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of ordered arrays of InGaN/GaN nanocolumnar light emitting diodes by molecular beam epitaxy, emitting in the blue (441 nm), green (502 nm), and yellow (568 nm) spectral range is reported. The device active region, consisting of a nanocolumnar InGaN section of nominally constant composition and 250 to 500 nm length, is free of extended defects, which is in strong contrast to InGaN (planar) layers of similar composition and thickness. Electroluminescence spectra show a very small blue shift with increasing current (almost negligible in the yellow device) and line widths slightly broader than those of state-of-the-art InGaN quantum wells. (paper)

  15. Gallium Phosphide as a material for visible and infrared optics

    OpenAIRE

    Vclavk J.; Vpenka D.

    2013-01-01

    Gallium phosphide is interesting material for optical system working in both visible and MWIR or LWIR spectral ranges. Number of a material available for these applications is limited. They are typically salts, fluorides or sulphides and usually exhibit unfavorable properties like brittleness; softness; solubility in water and small chemical resistance. Although GaP has do not offer best optical parameters excels over most other material in mechanical and chemical resistance. The article...

  16. Visibility Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildgaard, Lorna Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Research production, which earns universities money, is accredited publications in peer-reviewed journals and books. Increasing research productivity is one policy amongst many used by management to boost growth and income. It is time for a pat on the back, the growth of knowledge and visibility ...

  17. The Herschel/HIFI spectral survey of OMC-2 FIR 4 (CHESS). An overview of the 480 to 1902 GHz range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kama, M.; López-Sepulcre, A.; Dominik, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Fuente, A.; Caux, E.; Higgins, R.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Alonso-Albi, T.

    2013-08-01

    Context. Broadband spectral surveys of protostars offer a rich view of the physical, chemical and dynamical structure and evolution of star-forming regions. The Herschel Space Observatory opened up the terahertz regime to such surveys, giving access to the fundamental transitions of many hydrides and to the high-energy transitions of many other species. Aims: A comparative analysis of the chemical inventories and physical processes and properties of protostars of various masses and evolutionary states is the goal of the Herschel CHEmical Surveys of Star forming regions (CHESS) key program. This paper focusses on the intermediate-mass protostar, OMC-2 FIR 4. Methods: We obtained a spectrum of OMC-2 FIR 4 in the 480 to 1902 GHz range with the HIFI spectrometer onboard Herschel and carried out the reduction, line identification, and a broad analysis of the line profile components, excitation, and cooling. Results: We detect 719 spectral lines from 40 species and isotopologs. The line flux is dominated by CO, H2O, and CH3OH. The line profiles are complex and vary with species and upper level energy, but clearly contain signatures from quiescent gas, a broad component likely due to an outflow, and a foreground cloud. Conclusions: We find abundant evidence for warm, dense gas, as well as for an outflow in the field of view. Line flux represents 2% of the 7 L⊙ luminosity detected with HIFI in the 480 to 1250 GHz range. Of the total line flux, 60% is from CO, 13% from H2O and 9% from CH3OH. A comparison with similar HIFI spectra of other sources is set to provide much new insight into star formation regions, a case in point being a difference of two orders of magnitude in the relative contribution of sulphur oxides to the line cooling of Orion KL and OMC-2 FIR 4. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Influence of different spectral ranges of light and Ca2+ -channel blockers on Ca2+ and K+ levels in Phaseolus coccineus L. pulvini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Białczyk

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different spectral ranges of light on the modification of transport processes in isolated parts of Phaseolus coccineus pulvini was analysed in a bath medium by determining the Ca2+ and K+ contents. After 1 h incubation of separated fragments of the extensor and flexor in solutions containing deionized water, medium, or medium with verapamil or nifedipine, the investigated material was irradiated with monochromatic light of different wavelengths. The concentration of Ca2+, K+ and the pH value were determined in the medium. The obtained results suggest the occurrence of a specific coupling between the concentration of Ca2+ and K+ dependend on the wavelength of the applied light and part of the pulvinus. Certain spectral ranges of light brought about opposite effects on ion transport in opposite parts of the pulvinus. Changes in the pH of mediums containing isolated parts of the pulvini part to different effects of blue, red, and far-red light on the activity of H+-pumps located in the motor cells. The use of verapamil and nifedipine, specific Ca2+-channel blockers, made it possible to demonstrate the significant effect of Ca2+ on the activity and functioning of K+ -channels. The two types of inhibitors decreased the influx of Ca2+ and K+ to motor cells of the pulvini, however they did not limit the efflux of ions to the medium. The obtained results suggest that Ca2+ ions take part in transduction of the light signal. It seems probable that the action of blue light is also mediated by part of the Ca2+ ions.

  19. AIM results for space-qualified HgCdTe photovoltaic detectors from 0.9-μm to 13-μm spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiml, M.; Bauer, A.; Bitterlich, H.; Bruder, M.; Hofmann, K.; Lutz, H.; Mai, M.; Nothaft, H.-P.; Rühlich, I.; Wendler, J.; Wiedmann, T.; Wollrab, R.; Ziegler, J.

    2006-09-01

    Remote sensing from space is an emerging market for applications in security, climate research, weather forecast, and global environmental monitoring, to mention a few. In particular, next generation systems demand for large, two-dimensional arrays in the short (SWIR, 0.9-2.5 μm) and the very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) spectral range up to 15 μm. AIM's developments for space applications benefit from AIM's experiences in high-performance thermal imaging and seeker-head applications. AIM has delivered a 13 μm cut-off demonstrator for a high resolution Fourier-transform imaging spectrometer in limb geometry. For this 256 x 256 VLWIR sensor we measured a responsivity of 100 LSB/K and a noise equivalent temperature difference of 22 mK with 14 bit ADCs at 880 Hz full frame-rate. The substrate and epitaxial layer grown at AIM exhibit very good uniformity and low dark currents. Currently, AIM develops a 1024 x 256 SWIR detector (0.9-2.5 μm) with a capacitance transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) for hyperspectral imaging. The radiation hardness of AIM's FPA technology (MCT sensor and Silicon read-out integrated circuit) has been successfully tested by a total ionization dose (TID) experiment using ESTEC's 60Co γ-source. Our reference module withstands 30 krad TID. For enhanced reliability of the IDCA, AIM has developed a compact 1 W pulse-tube cooler with flexure bearing compressor, which induces also a very low vibration output. In summary, AIM will be able to supply space qualified detector modules covering the spectral range from 0.9 to 13 μm in the near future.

  20. General approach to high power, coherent visible and ultraviolet light sources

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Martin Thalbitzer; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of this project is to develop a generic approach to synthesise any wavelength in the visible and UV spectral region based on sum frequency generation. The approach is based on a hybrid system combining solid state and semiconductor technology. The generation of light in the UV spectral region require nonlinear materials with a transparency range extending into the ultraviolet, the ability to sustain high photon energies and with the ability to obtain phasematching for the desire...

  1. How Visible is Visible English?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Peter A.; Bick, Margaret

    1977-01-01

    The fingerspelling component of thirteen samples of Visible English (the system of communication in which all speech is supposed to be simultaneoously fingerspelled) used by teachers in classrooms in two schools for the deaf were analyzed linguistically. Only 56 percent of what should have been fingerspelled was present and legible. (Author/CFM)

  2. Visible Light Emission from Atomic Scale Patterns Fabricated by the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.; Stokbro, Kurt; Aono, M.

    1999-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) induced light emission from artificial atomic scale structures comprising silicon dangling bonds on hydrogen-terminated Si(001) surfaces has been mapped spatially and analyzed spectroscopically in the visible spectral range. The light emission is based on a nov...

  3. Spectral range calculation inside the Research Irradiating Facility Army Technology Center using code MCNPX and comparison with the spectra of energy Caesium 137 raised in laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the MCNPX code, the objective was to calculate by means of computer simulation spectroscopy range inside the irradiation chamber upper radiator gamma research irradiating facility Army Technology Center (CTEx). The calculations were performed in the spectral range usual 2 points for research purposes irradiating the energy spectra of gamma rays from the source of Cesium chloride 137. Sought the discretization of the spectrum in 100 channels at points of upper bound of 1cm higher and lower dose rates previously known. It was also conducted in the laboratory lifting the spectrum of Cesium-137 source using NaI scintillator detector and multichannel analyzer. With the source spectrum Cesium-137 contained in the literature and raised in the laboratory, both used as reference for comparison and analysis in terms of probability of emission maximum of 0.661 MeV The spectra were quite consistent in terms of the behavior of the energy distributions with scores. The position of maximum dose rate showed absorption detection almost maximum energy of 0.661 MeV photopeak In the spectrum of the position of minimum dosage rate, it was found that due to the removal of the source point of interest, some loss detection were caused by Compton scattering. (author)

  4. A new method to extract gas concentrations in the ultraviolet and visible wavelength ranges, based on differential optical absorption technique and Fourier transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By combining differential optical absorption technique with Fourier transformation we obtain a measuring method exhibiting high sensitivity, good accuracy and good robustness against wavelength displacements in the spectrum obtained. The method also separates different gases in the absorption spectrum from each other in an effective way. The above mentioned features make this method attractive. The ability to separate gases is especially rewarding; it means that we need not know which gases are present when we start to measure. The only prerequisite is that the gases involved absorb in the wavelength range that is to be measured. The method appears to be well suited for the detection of atmospheric pollutions

  5. Salinity and spectral reflectance of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, A.; Baumgardner, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    The basic spectral response related to the salt content of soils in the visible and reflective IR wavelengths is analyzed in order to explore remote sensing applications for monitoring processes of the earth system. The bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) was determined at 10 nm of increments over the 520-2320-nm spectral range. The effect of salts on reflectance was analyzed on the basis of 162 spectral measurements. MSS and TM bands were simulated within the measured spectral region. A strong relationship was found in variations of reflectance and soil characteristics pertaining to salinization and desalinization. Although the individual MSS bands had high R-squared values and 75-79 percent of soil/treatment combinations were separable, there was a large number of soil/treatment combinations not distinguished by any of the four highly correlated MSS bands under consideration.

  6. Building global models for fat and total protein content in raw milk based on historical spectroscopic data in the visible and short-wave near infrared range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenteva, Anastasiia; Galyanin, Vladislav; Savenkova, Elena; Bogomolov, Andrey

    2016-07-15

    A large set of fresh cow milk samples collected from many suppliers over a large geographical area in Russia during a year has been analyzed by optical spectroscopy in the range 400-1100nm in accordance with previously developed scatter-based technique. The global (i.e. resistant to seasonal, genetic, regional and other variations of the milk composition) models for fat and total protein content, which were built using partial least-squares (PLS) regression, exhibit satisfactory prediction performances enabling their practical application in the dairy. The root mean-square errors of prediction (RMSEP) were 0.09 and 0.10 for fat and total protein content, respectively. The issues of raw milk analysis and multivariate modelling based on the historical spectroscopic data have been considered and approaches to the creation of global models and their transfer between the instruments have been proposed. Availability of global models should significantly facilitate the dissemination of optical spectroscopic methods for the laboratory and in-line quantitative milk analysis. PMID:26948605

  7. Nonlinear spectral imaging of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palero, J. A.

    2007-07-01

    The work presented in this thesis demonstrates live high resolution 3D imaging of tissue in its native state and environment. The nonlinear interaction between focussed femtosecond light pulses and the biological tissue results in the emission of natural autofluorescence and second-harmonic signal. Because biological intrinsic emission is generally very weak and extends from the ultraviolet to the visible spectral range, a broad-spectral range and high sensitivity 3D spectral imaging system is developed. Imaging the spectral characteristics of the biological intrinsic emission reveals the structure and biochemistry of the cells and extra-cellular components. By using different methods in visualizing the spectral images, discrimination between different tissue structures is achieved without the use of any stain or fluorescent label. For instance, RGB real color spectral images of the intrinsic emission of mouse skin tissues show blue cells, green hair follicles, and purple collagen fibers. The color signature of each tissue component is directly related to its characteristic emission spectrum. The results of this study show that skin tissue nonlinear intrinsic emission is mainly due to the autofluorescence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), flavins, keratin, melanin, phospholipids, elastin and collagen and nonlinear Raman scattering and second-harmonic generation in Type I collagen. In vivo time-lapse spectral imaging is implemented to study metabolic changes in epidermal cells in tissues. Optical scattering in tissues, a key factor in determining the maximum achievable imaging depth, is also investigated in this work.

  8. InSb quantum dots for the mid-infrared spectral range grown on GaAs substrates using metamorphic InAs buffer layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type II InSb/InAs quantum dots (QDs) were successfully grown on GaAs substrates using three different metamorphic buffer layer (MBL) designs. The structural properties of the resulting metamorphic InAs buffer layers were studied and compared using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and high resolution x-ray diffraction measurements. Photoluminescence (PL) originating from the InSb QDs was observed from each of the samples and was found to be comparable to the PL of InSb QDs grown onto homo-epitaxially deposited InAs. The 4 K PL intensity and linewidth of InSb QDs grown onto a 3 µm thick InAs buffer layer directly deposited onto GaAs proved to be superior to that from QDs grown onto an InAs MBL using either AlSb or GaSb interlayers. Light-emitting diode structures containing ten layers of InSb QD in the active region were subsequently fabricated and electroluminescence from the QDs was obtained in the mid-infrared spectral range up to 180 K. This is the first step towards obtaining mid-infrared InSb QD light sources on GaAs substrates. (paper)

  9. Calculating (14)N(16)O2 spectral line parameters in an infrared range: A comparison of "global" and "local" effective operator methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsekhovskaya, O K; Egorov, O V; Kashirskii, D E

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen dioxide, (14)N(16)O2, line positions and intensities calculated by us based on a "local" effective operator method are compared to the recent results of the "global" calculation. The comparison was made for theoretical absorption coefficients in the spectral range of 600-3700cm(-1) using the measured data taken from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In order to conduct the calculations, empirical parameters of the effective rotational Hamiltonian of the twenty-one vibrational states were applied from the most recent experimental works. The second order parameters of the dipole moment function of (14)N(16)O2 were determined for the first time. The "local" line list in this research consists of one hundred and four bands and includes the line intensities of the v1+v2+v3 band of (14)N(16)O2 that have not yet been investigated in the literature. Among these bands, only eleven bands are included in HITRAN2012. The reasons behind the disagreements between the theoretical and measured absorption coefficients of (14)N(16)O2 are discussed. PMID:27111152

  10. ORFEUS II echelle spectra On the influence of iron-group line blanketing in the Far-UV spectral range of hot subdwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Deetjen, J L

    2000-01-01

    We present an analysis of the subdwarf O star Feige 67 with a fully metal-line blanketed NLTE model atmosphere based on high-resolution Far-UV (912-2000 A) and Near-UV (2000-3400 A) spectra from new ORFEUS II echelle observations and the IUE final archive. The Far-UV spectra are heavily blanketed by iron and nickel lines, preventing the detection of the stellar continuum and complicating the abundance analysis. Important points concerning the account for blanketing by millions of iron-group lines and for an accurate determination of iron and nickel abundances are discussed: The usage of all theoretically and experimentally known line opacities of the iron-group elements, the consideration of a broad wavelength range for a reliable determination of the stellar continuum flux, and the role of interstellar reddening. This paper outlines a basic approach for spectral analysis of future high-resolution Far-UV spectra of hot compact stars. During this study we re-analyzed the iron and nickel abundance of our exempl...

  11. Predicting visibility of aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew; Ramirez, Cesar V; Salud, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Visual detection of aircraft by human observers is an important element of aviation safety. To assess and ensure safety, it would be useful to be able to be able to predict the visibility, to a human observer, of an aircraft of specified size, shape, distance, and coloration. Examples include assuring safe separation among aircraft and between aircraft and unmanned vehicles, design of airport control towers, and efforts to enhance or suppress the visibility of military and rescue vehicles. We have recently developed a simple metric of pattern visibility, the Spatial Standard Observer (SSO). In this report we examine whether the SSO can predict visibility of simulated aircraft images. We constructed a set of aircraft images from three-dimensional computer graphic models, and measured the luminance contrast threshold for each image from three human observers. The data were well predicted by the SSO. Finally, we show how to use the SSO to predict visibility range for aircraft of arbitrary size, shape, distance, and coloration. PMID:19462007

  12. Magnifying superlens in the visible frequency range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyaninov, Igor I; Hung, Yu-Ju; Davis, Christopher C

    2007-03-23

    We demonstrate a magnifying superlens that can be integrated into a conventional far-field optical microscope. Our design is based on a multilayer photonic metamaterial consisting of alternating layers of positive and negative refractive index, as originally proposed by Narimanov and Engheta. We achieved a resolution on the order of 70 nanometers. The use of such a magnifying superlens should find numerous applications in imaging. PMID:17379804

  13. Magnifying Superlens in the Visible Frequency Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyaninov, Igor I.; Hung, Yu-Ju; Davis, Christopher C.

    2007-03-01

    We demonstrate a magnifying superlens that can be integrated into a conventional far-field optical microscope. Our design is based on a multilayer photonic metamaterial consisting of alternating layers of positive and negative refractive index, as originally proposed by Narimanov and Engheta. We achieved a resolution on the order of 70 nanometers. The use of such a magnifying superlens should find numerous applications in imaging.

  14. Comparison between visible and near-IR flame spectra from natural gas-fired furnace for blackbody temperature measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahla Keyvan; Rodney Rossow; Carlos Romero; Xianchang Li [University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    2004-06-01

    This paper reports the results from investigating the feasibility of calculating flame temperature from a natural gas-fired furnace based on blackbody radiation in the visible spectral range. If successful, the visible spectral range would provide data for multi-task applications such as emission line analysis and temperature calculation simultaneously. A probe containing a lens connected to the fiber-optic cables is inserted into the furnace and pointed towards the flame. Spectral intensity data are fed back to a spectrometer and then to a monitoring computer. The approach is first applied to various furnace types using the visible range to establish a baseline for the technique. The results for temperature calculations in the visible range are then compared with those taken in the near-IR (NIR) range under the same conditions. This comparison indicates that temperatures calculated from visible region could be as accurate as the one obtained from NIR region. Challenges associated with this technique are also discussed. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Gold nanoparticles as a saturable absorber for visible 635 nm Q-switched pulse generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Duanduan; Peng, Jian; Cai, Zhiping; Weng, Jian; Luo, Zhengqian; Chen, Nan; Xu, Huiying

    2015-09-01

    Gold nanoparticle (GNP) possesses saturable absorption bands in the visible region induced by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). We firstly applied the GNP as a visible saturable absorber (SA) for the red Q-switched pulse generation. The GNPs were embedded in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) for film-forming and inserted into a praseodymium (Pr(3+))-doped fiber laser cavity to achieve 635 nm passive Q-switching. The visible 635 nm Q-switched fiber laser has a wide range of pulse-repetition-rate from 285.7 to 546.4 kHz, and a narrow pulse width of 235 ns as well as the maximum output power of 11.1 mW. The results indicate that the GNPs-based SA is available for pulsed operation in the visible spectral range. PMID:26368498

  16. Specific features of diffuse reflection of human face skin for laser and non-laser sources of visible and near-IR light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specific features of diffuse reflection from different areas of human face skin for laser and non-laser sources of visible and near-IR light have been investigated to localise the closed-eye (eyelid) region. In the visible spectral range the reflection from the eyelid skin surface can be differentiated by measuring the slope of the spectral dependence of the effective optical density of skin in the wavelength range from 650 to 700nm. In the near-IR spectral range the reflectances of the skin surface at certain wavelengths, normalised to the forehead skin reflectance, can be used as a criterion for differentiating the eyelid skin. In this case, a maximum discrimination is obtained when measuring the skin reflectances at laser wavelengths of 1310 and 1470nm, which correspond to the spectral ranges of maximum and minimum water absorption. (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

  17. Monitoring Urban Wastewaters Characteristics by Visible and Short Wave Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Melendez-Pastor

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available On-line monitoring of wastewater parameters is a major scientific and technical challenge because of the great variability of wastewater characteristics and the extreme physical-chemical conditions that endure the sensors. Wastewater treatment plant managers require fast and reliable information about the input sewage and the operation of the different treatment stages. There is a great need for the development of sensors for the continuous monitoring of wastewater parameters. In this sense, several optical systems have been evaluated. This article presents an experimental laboratory-based approach to quantify commonly employed urban wastewater parameters, namely biochemical oxygen demand in five days (BOD5, chemical oxygen demand (COD, total suspended solids (TSS, and the ratio BOD5:COD, with a visible and short wave near infrared (V/SW-NIR spectrometer (4001000 nm. Partial least square regression (PLSR models were developed in order to quantify the wastewater parameters with the recorded spectra. PLSR models were developed for the full spectral range and also for the visible and near infrared spectral ranges separately. Good PLSR models were obtained with the visible spectral range for BOD5 (RER = 9.64, COD (RER = 10.88, and with the full spectral range for the TSS (RER = 9.67. The results of this study show that V/SW-NIR spectroscopy is a suitable technique for on-line monitoring of wastewater parameters.

  18. Visible Light Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Sagotra, Reena Aggarwal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Visible light communication (VLC is becoming an alternative choice for next-generation wireless technology by offering low cost, unregulated bandwidth and ubiquitous infrastructures support. This technology is envisioned to be used in a wide range of applications both indoor as well as outdoor. Visible Light Communication (VLC uses light emitting diodes (LEDs, for the dual role of illumination and data transmission. With this leading edge technology, data including video and audio, internet traffic etc can be transmitted at high speeds using LED light. Using LEDs is helping to drive this technology in the form of Visible Light Communication (VLC. In this paper, a visible light communications system is proposed that employs wavelength division multiplexing, to transmit multiple data streams from different data sources simultaneously andtransmission of audio song and also an image was demonstrated by using LED light. Not limit to this, multiple source signals simultaneously in different frequency bands were transmitted through the LED circuitry, and the signals were recovered successfully. This demonstrates the feasibility studies of our design in signals broadcasting

  19. Using cuttlefish ink as an additive to produce -non-iridescent structural colors of high color visibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yafeng; Dong, Biqin; Chen, Ang; Liu, Xiaohan; Shi, Lei; Zi, Jian

    2015-08-26

    Non-iridescent structural colors of high color visibility are produced by amorphous photonic structures, in which -natural cuttlefish ink is used as an additive to break down the long-range order of the structures. The color hue and its spectral purity can be tuned by adjusting the diameter of the polystyrene (PS) spheres and the proportion of ink particles. PMID:26175211

  20. Empirical classification of VLT/Giraffe stellar spectra in the wavelength range 6440-6810 A in the gamma Vel cluster, and calibration of spectral indices

    OpenAIRE

    F. Damiani; Prisinzano, L.; Micela, G.; S. Randich; Gilmore, G.; Drew, J. E.; Jeffries, R. D.; Frémat, Y.; E. J. Alfaro; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Pancino, E.; Recio-Blanco, A.

    2014-01-01

    We study spectral diagnostics available from optical spectra with R=17000 obtained with the VLT/Giraffe HR15n setup, using observations from the Gaia-ESO Survey, on the gamma Vel young cluster, in order to determine the fundamental parameters of these stars. We define a set of spectroscopic indices, sampling TiO bands, H-alpha core and wings, and many temperature- and gravity-sensitive lines. Combined indices tau (gamma) are also defined as Teff (log g) indicators over a wide spectral-type ra...

  1. Machine vision beyond visible spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Hammoud, Riad I; McMillan, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    The material of this book encompasses many disciplines, including visible, infrared, far infrared, millimeter wave, microwave, radar, synthetic aperture radar, and electro-optical sensors as well as the very dynamic topics of image processing, computer vision and pattern recognition. This book is composed of six parts: advanced background modeling for surveillance; advances in Tracking in Infrared imagery; methods for Pose estimation in Ultrasound and LWIR imagery; recognition in multi-spectral and synthetic aperture radar; fusion of disparate sensors; and smart Sensors.

  2. Resonant Visible Light Modulation with Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Renwen; de Abajo, F Javier Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Fast modulation and switching of light at visible and near-infrared (vis-NIR) frequencies is of utmost importance for optical signal processing and sensing technologies. No fundamental limit appears to prevent us from designing wavelength-sized devices capable of controlling the light phase and intensity at gigaherts (and even terahertz) speeds in those spectral ranges. However, this problem remains largely unsolved, despite recent advances in the use of quantum wells and phase-change materials for that purpose. Here, we explore an alternative solution based upon the remarkable electro-optical properties of graphene. In particular, we predict unity-order changes in the transmission and absorption of vis-NIR light produced upon electrical doping of graphene sheets coupled to realistically engineered optical cavities. The light intensity is enhanced at the graphene plane, and so is its absorption, which can be switched and modulated via Pauli blocking through varying the level of doping. Specifically, we explor...

  3. Visible spectroscopy at the Extrap-T1 pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide range UV to visible spectrum from 2450 to 8050 Angstrom has been acquired and analysed for the EXTRAP-T1 plasma. The impurity lines in the spectrum are mainly from carbon and oxygen species up to four times ionized, but also nitrogen lines are present. No traces of metal impurity are observed. We have identified most of the spectral lines and compare intensities from several multiplets with predicted values. A spectral range free from line emission is found which is suitable for continuum measurements. Furthermore, line strictures are identified as originating from the CH molecule and are observed both using a center chord line of sight and an edge chord line-of-sight through the plasma. (au)

  4. Spectral homogenization techniques for the hyperspectral image projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillberry, Logan E.; Rice, Joseph P.

    2015-05-01

    In an effort to improve technology for performance testing and calibration of multispectral and hyperspectral imagers, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been developing a Hyperspectral Image Projector (HIP) capable of projecting dynamic scenes than include distinct, programmable spectra in each of its 1024x768 spatial pixels. The HIP is comprised of a spectral engine, which is a light source capable generating the spectra in the scene, coupled to a spatial engine, capable of projecting the spectra into the correct locations of the scene. In the prototype HIP, the light exiting the Visible-Near-Infrared (VNIR) / Short-Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) spectral engine is spectrally dispersed and needs to be spectrally homogenized before it enters the spatial engine. In this paper we describe the results from a study of several different techniques for performing this spectral homogenization. These techniques include an integrating sphere, a liquid light guide, a randomized fiber bundle, and an engineered diffuser, in various combinations. The spectral uniformity of projected HIP scenes is measured and analyzed using the spectral angle mapper (SAM) algorithm over the VNIR spectral range. The SAM provides a way to analyze the spectral uniformity independently from the radiometric uniformity. The goal of the homogenizer is a spectrally uniform and bright projected image. An integrating sphere provides the most spectrally uniform image, but at a great loss of light compared with the other methods. The randomized fiber bundle generally outperforms the liquid light guide in both spectral homogenization and brightness. Using an engineered diffuser with the randomized fiber bundle increases the spectral uniformity by a factor of five, with a decrease in brightness by a factor of five, compared with the randomized fiber bundle alone. The combination of an engineered diffuser with a randomized fiber bundle provides comparable spectral uniformity to the integrating sphere while enabling 40 times greater brightness.

  5. Validation of line and continuum spectroscopic parameters with measurements of atmospheric emitted spectral radiance from far to mid infrared wave number range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The latest release of a high-resolution transmission molecular absorption database along with two improved models of water vapor continuum absorption are used to check their impact on the improvement of state-of-art radiative transfer. Radiative transfer performance has been assessed using high mountains atmospheric emitted spectral downwelling radiance observations in the 360-1200 cm-1 spectral regions. These high mountains observations are particularly suited to check the behavior and performance in the water vapor rotation band. In addition, they also have allowed us to gain insight into understanding the quality of recent new compilation of lines and related treatment for the ν2 CO2 band and the O3 band at 9.6μm. Comparisons are made between forward calculations of atmospheric transmission spectra and spectral radiances measured using two ground-based Fourier transform instruments. The results demonstrate that water vapor absorption largely benefits from the recent improvement in the related continuum (both self and foreign). In addition, ozone absorption is very accurately reproduced and, although to a less extent, this is also the case of CO2 absorption in the long wave ν2 band.

  6. Optical coherence tomography: non-destructive imaging and spectral information of pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latour, Gaël; Moreau, Julien; Elias, Mady; Frigerio, Jean-Marc

    2007-07-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive and non-destructive technique which is very interesting for the study of works of art. Based on a Michelson interferometer, our device has been adapted for the recording of information in the visible range. This system allows three-dimensional imaging of painting with a micrometer resolution. 3D imaging of pictorial layers is presented where the pigments embedded in the binder are clearly visible. Furthermore, an adapted signal processing gives access to the spectral information issued from pigments. Tests on pigments in powder are presented and show that their spectral responses are different.

  7. PlanetCam UPV/EHU: A Two-channel Lucky Imaging Camera for Solar System Studies in the Spectral Range 0.38-1.7 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendikoa, Iñigo; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustín; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Hueso, Ricardo; Félix Rojas, José; Aceituno, Jesús; Aceituno, Francisco; Murga, Gaizka; De Bilbao, Lander; García-Melendo, Enrique

    2016-03-01

    We present PlanetCam UPV/EHU, an astronomical camera designed fundamentally for high-resolution imaging of Solar System planets using the “lucky imaging” technique. The camera observes in a wavelength range from 380 nm to 1.7 μm and the driving science themes are atmosphere dynamics and vertical cloud structure of Solar System planets. The design comprises two configurations that include one channel (visible wavelengths) or two combined channels (visible and short wave infrared) working simultaneously at selected wavelengths by means of a dichroic beam splitter. In this paper the camera components for the two configurations are described, as well as camera performance and the different tests done for the precise characterization of its radiometric and astrometric capabilities at high spatial resolution. Finally, some images of solar system objects are presented as well as photometric results and different scientific cases on astronomical targets.

  8. The Visible and Near Infrared module of EChO

    OpenAIRE

    Adriani, A.;; Bellucci, G.; Gambicorti, L.; Focardi, M; Oliva, E.; M. Farina; di Giorgio, A.M.; Santoli, F.; Pace, E.; Piccioni, G...; Filacchione, G.; Pancrazzi, M.; Tozzi, A; Micela, G.

    2014-01-01

    The Visible and Near Infrared (VNIR) is one of the modules of EChO, the Exoplanets Characterization Observatory proposed to ESA for an M-class mission. EChO is aimed to observe planets while transiting by their suns. Then the instrument had to be designed to assure a high efficiency over the whole spectral range. In fact, it has to be able to observe stars with an apparent magnitude Mv= 9-12 and to see contrasts of the order of 10-4 - 10-5 necessary to reveal the characteristics of the atmosp...

  9. Gallium Phosphide as a material for visible and infrared optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vclavk J.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Gallium phosphide is interesting material for optical system working in both visible and MWIR or LWIR spectral ranges. Number of a material available for these applications is limited. They are typically salts, fluorides or sulphides and usually exhibit unfavorable properties like brittleness; softness; solubility in water and small chemical resistance. Although GaP has do not offer best optical parameters excels over most other material in mechanical and chemical resistance. The article describes its most important characteristics and outlines some applications where GaP should prove useful.

  10. The benefits of visibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The benefits of visibility improvement (or the damages with additional degradation) refer to increases (or decreases) in utility obtained in three different dimensions. The first of these is associated with the nature of the visibility change. Visual range may be improved so that features of an area become more distinct or the sky becomes clearer. Alternatively, normal features of an area may be marred, say by the site of a power plant or its plume (called plume blight). The second dimension is the location of the change: in an urban area, in a rural setting, or in a recreational area or area of particular beauty, such as the Grand Canyon. The third dimension is the type of value: use or non-use. Thus, a person who visits the Grand Canyon (or may visit it in the future) may hold use values for improving his view of the Canyon or its surroundings and may also old non-use values for improved visibility (whether for altruistic or other reasons) irrespective of present or planned visits. In all, therefore, there are 12 possible combinations of the elements in these three dimension, each of which is logically distinct from the others and which demands attention in the literature to derive willingness to pay (WTP)

  11. Demonstration of Magnetic Dipole Resonances of Dielectric Nanospheres in the Visible Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evlyukhin, A. B.; Novikov, S. M.; Zywietz, U.; Eriksen, R. L.; Reinhardt, C.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Chichkov, B. N.

    2012-01-01

    Strong resonant light scattering by individual spherical Si nanoparticles is experimentally demonstrated, revealing pronounced resonances associated with the excitation of magnetic and electric modes in these nanoparticles. It is shown that the low-frequency resonance corresponds to the magnetic...... dipole excitation. Due to high permittivity, the magnetic dipole resonance is observed in the visible spectral range for Si nanoparticles with diameters of similar to 200 nm, thereby opening a way to the realization of isotropic optical metamaterials with strong magnetic responses in the visible region....

  12. Optimized 2D array of thin silicon pillars for efficient antireflective coatings in the visible spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust, Julien; Fehrembach, Anne-Laure; Bedu, Frédéric; Ozerov, Igor; Bonod, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Light reflection occuring at the surface of silicon wafers is drastically diminished by etching square pillars of height 110 nm and width 140 nm separated by a 100 nm gap distance in a square lattice. The design of the nanostructure is optimized to widen the spectral tolerance of the antireflective coatings over the visible spectrum for both fundamental polarizations. Angle and polarized resolved optical measurements report a light reflection remaining under 5% when averaged in the visible spectrum for both polarizations in a wide angular range. Light reflection remains almost insensitive to the light polarization even in oblique incidence. PMID:27109643

  13. COLLI - a Monte Carlo program for calculating neutron spectral fluences in the energy range 10 keV to 20 MeV - description and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The program described can be applied to calculating the transport of neutrons through an arrangement of bodies that can be extensively varied in geometry and materials. The information obtainable by this program includes data on the spectral fluence of scattered neutrons for a set of up to 10 random measuring points. Fortran IV is the programming language. For the calculation of neutron interactions, point cross sections of the ENDF data library are used, either in the original version or in a condensed form. The data are processed for the following elements: Hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, aluminum, silicon, calcium, iron, copper, tungsten, and lead. (orig./HP)

  14. Spectral mixture analysis of multispectral thermal infrared images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote spectral measurements of light reflected or emitted from terrestrial scenes is commonly integrated over areas sufficiently large that the surface comprises more than one component. Techniques have been developed to analyze multispectral or imaging spectrometer data in terms of a wide range of mixtures of a limited number of components. Spectral mixture analysis has been used primarily for visible and near-infrared images, but it may also be applied to thermal infrared data. Two approaches are reviewed: binary mixing and a more general treatment for isothermal mixtures of a greater number of components

  15. Visibly Pushdown Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srba, Jiri

    We investigate the possibility of (bi)simulation-like preorder/equivalence checking on the class of visibly pushdown automata and its natural subclasses visibly BPA (Basic Process Algebra) and visibly one-counter automata. We describe generic methods for proving complexity upper and lower bounds......, PSPACE-complete on visibly one-counter automata and P-complete on visibly BPA. Our PSPACE lower bound for visibly one-counter automata improves also the previously known DP-hardness results for ordinary one-counter automata and one-counter nets. Finally, we study regularity checking problems for visibly...

  16. Electric dipole-free interaction of visible light with pairs of subwavelength-size silver particles

    OpenAIRE

    Grahn, Patrick; Shevchenko, Andriy; Kaivola, Matti

    2012-01-01

    In subwavelength-sized particles, light-induced multipole moments of orders higher than the electric dipole are usually negligibly small, which allows for the light-matter interaction to be accurately treated within the electric dipole approximation. In this work we show that in a specially designed meta-atom, a disc metadimer, the electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole can be the only excitable multipoles. This condition is achieved in a narrow but tunable spectral range of visible light bo...

  17. Electric dipole-free interaction of visible light with silver metadimers

    OpenAIRE

    Grahn, P.; Shevchenko, A.; Kaivola, M.

    2012-01-01

    In subwavelength-sized particles, light-induced multipole moments of orders higher than the electric dipole are usually negligibly small, which allows for the light-matter interaction to be accurately treated within the electric dipole approximation. In this work we show that in a specially designed meta-atom, a disc metadimer, the electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole can be the only excitable multipoles. This condition is achieved in a narrow but tunable spectral range of visible light bo...

  18. Electrically tunable selective reflection of light from ultraviolet to visible and infrared by heliconical cholesterics

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Jie; Li, Yannian; Li, Quan; Paterson, Daniel A.; John M. D. Storey; Imrie, Corrie T.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2015-01-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals with helicoidal molecular architecture are known for their ability to selectively reflect light with the wavelength that is determined by the periodicity of molecular orientations. Here we demonstrate that by using a cholesteric with oblique helicoidal(heliconical) structure, as opposed to the classic right-angle helicoid, one can vary the wavelength of selectively reflected light in a broad spectral range, from ultraviolet to visible and infrared (360-1520 nm for ...

  19. The Shining Future of UV Spectral Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Pellerin, Anne; Finkelstein, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    With the coming generation of instruments and telescopes capable of spectroscopy of high redshift galaxies, the spectral synthesis technique in the rest-frame UV and Far-UV range will become one of a few number of tools remaining to study their young stellar populations in detail. The rest-frame UV lines and continuum of high redshift galaxies, observed with visible and infrared telescopes on Earth, can be used for accurate line profile fitting such as PV@1118,1128A, CIII@1176A, and CIV@1550A...

  20. Water vapor retrieval from OMI visible spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.; González Abad, G.; Miller, C. Chan

    2014-06-01

    There are distinct spectral features of water vapor in the wavelength range covered by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) visible channel. Although these features are much weaker than those at longer wavelengths, they can be exploited to retrieve useful information about water vapor. They have an advantage in that their small optical depth leads to fairly simple interpretation as measurements of the total water vapor column density. We have used the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) OMI operational retrieval algorithm to derive the slant column density (SCD) of water vapor using the 430-480 nm spectral region after extensive optimization. We convert from SCD to vertical column density (VCD) using the air mass factor (AMF), which is calculated using look-up tables of scattering weights and assimilated water vapor profiles. Our Level 2 product includes not only water vapor VCD but also the associated scattering weights and AMF. In the tropics, our standard water vapor product has a median SCD of 1.3 × 1023 molecules cm-2 and a median relative uncertainty of about 11%, about a factor of 2 better than that from a similar OMI algorithm that uses a narrower retrieval window. The corresponding median VCD is about 1.2 × 1023 molecules cm-2. We have examined the sensitivities of SCD and AMF to various parameters and compared our results with those from the GlobVapour product, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET).

  1. Feature Point Descriptors: Infrared and Visible Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo Ricaurte; Carmen Chiln; Cristhian A. Aguilera-Carrasco; Vintimilla, Boris X.; Sappa, Angel D.

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript evaluates the behavior of classical feature point descriptors when they are used in images from long-wave infrared spectral band and compare them with the results obtained in the visible spectrum. Robustness to changes in rotation, scaling, blur, and additive noise are analyzed using a state of the art framework. Experimental results using a cross-spectral outdoor image data set are presented and conclusions from these experiments are given.

  2. The Effect of Epidermal Structures on Leaf Spectral Signatures of Ice Plants (Aizoaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Hans-Jürgen Heim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal structures (ES of leaves are known to affect the functional properties and spectral responses. Spectral studies focused mostly on the effect of hairs or wax layers only. We studied a wider range of different ES and their impact on spectral properties. Additionally, we identified spectral regions that allow distinguishing different ES. We used a field spectrometer to measure ex situ leaf spectral responses from 350 nm–2500 nm. A spectral library for 25 species of the succulent family Aizoaceae was assembled. Five functional types were defined based on ES: flat epidermal cell surface, convex to papillary epidermal cell surface, bladder cells, hairs and wax cover. We tested the separability of ES using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA based on the spectral data. Subsequently, variable importance (VIP was calculated to identify spectral regions relevant for discriminating our functional types (classes. Classification performance was high, with a kappa value of 0.9 indicating well-separable spectral classes. VIP calculations identified six spectral regions of increased importance for the classification. We confirmed and extended previous findings regarding the visible-near-infrared spectral region. Our experiments also confirmed that epidermal leaf traits can be classified due to clearly distinguishable spectral signatures across species and genera within the Aizoaceae.

  3. [Research on spectral reflectance characteristics for Glycyrrhizae Radix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Xie, Cai-Xiang; Li, Xiao-Jin; Wen, Mei-Jia; Jia, Guang-Lin; Shi, Ming-Hui; Guo, Bao-Lin; Jia, Xiao-Guang

    2014-02-01

    In order to study the spectral reflectance differences of Glycyrrhizae Radix under different growth conditions and lay the foundation for quantitative monitoring of Glycyrrhizae Radix remote sensing images, spectra of Glycyrrhiza species under different growth period and different varieties and different regions were measured by a portable spectrometer. The results showed that the reflectivity of annual G. uralensis was obviously higher than that of the two years plant in the visible light band own to the contents of crown layer chlorophyll. The reflectivity of two years G. pallidiflora was higher than that of G. uralensis in the near infrared band own to the leaf area index and the content of leaf water. The red edge spectrum of annual plant fluctuated largely than that of two years plant due to vegetation coverage and leaf area index. G. pallidiflora grew well than G. uralensis. Under different regions of the Glycyrrhiza species, spectral data analysis showed that within a certain range, the average annual precipitation and average annual evaporation were the major factors to affect the differences of Glycyrrhiza species spectral data under different regions owe to the leaf water content, the higher leaf water content, the lower spectral reflectance. The principal component analysis and continuum-removed method of the spectral data under different regions found that, within a certain range, the average annual precipitation and average annual evaporation were the major factors caused by the differences of Glycyrrhiza species spectral data under the different regions, Glycyrrhiza species spectral similarity related to the spatial distance. PMID:24946542

  4. Analysis of the influence of the plasma thermodynamic regime in the spectrally resolved and mean radiative opacity calculations of carbon plasmas in a wide range of density and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the spectrally resolved, multigroup and mean radiative opacities of carbon plasmas are calculated for a wide range of plasma conditions which cover situations where corona, local thermodynamic and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium regimes are found. An analysis of the influence of the thermodynamic regime on these magnitudes is also carried out by means of comparisons of the results obtained from collisional-radiative, corona or SahaBoltzmann equations. All the calculations presented in this work were performed using ABAKO/RAPCAL code. -- Highlights: ? Spectrally resolved, multigroup and mean radiative opacities of carbon plasmas are calculated. ? Corona, local thermodynamic and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium regimes are analyzed. ? Simulations performed using the computational package ABAKO/RAPCAL. ? A criterion for the establishment of the thermodynamic regime is proposed.

  5. First INTEGRAL observations of V404 Cygni during the 2015 outburst : spectral behavior in the 20 - 650 keV energy range

    CERN Document Server

    Roques, Jean-Pierre; Bazzano, Angela; Fiocchi, Mariateresa; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Ubertini, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    In June 2015, the source V404 Cygni (= GS2023+38) underwent an extraordinary outburst. We present the results obtained during the first revolution dedicated to this target by the INTEGRAL mission, and focus on the spectral behavior in the hard X-ray domain, using both SPI and IBIS instruments. The source exhibits extreme variability, and reaches fluxes of several tens of Crab. However, the emission between 20 and 650 keV can be understood in terms of two main components, varying on all the observable timescales, similar to what is observed in the persistent black hole system Cyg X-1. The low energy component (up to ~ 200 keV) presents a rather unusual shape, probably due to the intrinsic source variability. Nonetheless, a satisfactory description is obtained with a Comptonization model, if an unusually hot population of seed photons ($kT_0$ ~ 7 keV) is introduced. Above this first component, a clear excess extending up to 400-600 keV leads us to investigate a scenario where an additional (cutoff) power law co...

  6. The Visible and Near Infrared module of EChO

    CERN Document Server

    Adriani, A; Gambicorti, L; Focardi, M; Oliva, E; Farina, M; Di Giorgio, A M; Santoli, F; Pace, E; Piccioni, G; Filacchione, G; Pancrazzi, M; Tozzi, A; Micela, G

    2014-01-01

    The Visible and Near Infrared (VNIR) is one of the modules of EChO, the Exoplanets Characterization Observatory proposed to ESA for an M-class mission. EChO is aimed to observe planets while transiting by their suns. Then the instrument had to be designed to assure a high efficiency over the whole spectral range. In fact, it has to be able to observe stars with an apparent magnitude Mv= 9-12 and to see contrasts of the order of 10-4 - 10-5 necessary to reveal the characteristics of the atmospheres of the exoplanets under investigation. VNIR is a spectrometer in a cross-dispersed configuration, covering the 0.4-2.5 micron spectral range with a resolving power of about 330 and a field of view of 2 arcsec. It is functionally split into two channels respectively working in the 0.4-1 and 1.0-2.5 micron spectral ranges. Such a solution is imposed by the fact the light at short wavelengths has to be shared with the EChO Fine Guiding System (FGS) devoted to the pointing of the stars under observation. The spectromete...

  7. First INTEGRAL Observations of V404 Cygni during the 2015 Outburst: Spectral Behavior in the 20-650 keV Energy Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roques, Jean-Pierre; Jourdain, Elisabeth; Bazzano, Angela; Fiocchi, Mariateresa; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Ubertini, Pietro

    2015-11-01

    In 2015 June, the source V404 Cygni (= GS2023+38) underwent an extraordinary outburst. We present the results obtained during the first revolution dedicated to this target by the INTEGRAL mission and focus on the spectral behavior in the hard X-ray domain, using both SPI and IBIS instruments. The source exhibits extreme variability and reaches fluxes of several tens of Crab. However, the emission between 20 and 650 keV can be understood in terms of two main components, varying on all the observable timescales, similar to what is observed in the persistent black hole system Cyg X-1. The low-energy component (up to ˜200 keV) presents a rather unusual shape, probably due to the intrinsic source variability. Nonetheless, a satisfactory description is obtained with a Comptonization model, if an unusually hot population of seed photons (kT0 ˜ 7 keV) is introduced. Above this first component, a clear excess extending up to 400-600 keV leads us to investigate a scenario where an additional (cutoff) power law could correspond to the contribution of the jet synchrotron emission, as proposed in Cyg X-1. A search for an annihilation feature did not provide any firm detection, with an upper limit of 2 × 10-4 ph cm-2 s-1 (2σ) for a narrow line centered at 511 keV, on the averaged obtained spectrum. Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data center funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland), Czech Republic, and Poland with the participation of Russia and USA.

  8. Effect of GaAsP barrier layers on the parameters of InGaAs/AlGaAs laser diodes emitting in the 1050-1100-nm spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve the parameters of laser diodes emitting in the 1000-1070-nm spectral range and develop highly efficient laser diodes emitting in the 1070-1100-nm range, it is proposed to introduce GaAsP barrier layers into the active region of the quantum-well InGaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure, which compensate for enhanced mechanical stresses. This considerably improves the luminescence characteristics of heterostructures and changes conditions for generating misfit dislocations. The long-wavelength lasing at 1100 nm becomes possible due to an increase in the thickness of quantum wells and in the molar fraction of InAs in them. The manufactured laser diodes emitting in the 1095-1100-nm range have low threshold currents, the high output power and high reliability. (lasers)

  9. Spectral filtering for plant production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Roy E.; Mcmahon, Margaret J.; Rajapakse, Nihal C.; Decoteau, Dennis R.

    1994-01-01

    Both plants and animals have one general commonality in their perception of light. They both are sensitive primarily to the 400 to 700 nm wavelength portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. This is referred to as the visible spectrum for animals and as the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) spectrum for plants. Within this portion of the spectrum, animals perceive colors. Relatively recently it has been learned that within this same spectral range plants also demonstrate varying responses at different wavelengths, somewhat analogous to the definition of various colors at specific wavelengths. Although invisible to the human eye, portions of the electromagnetic spectrum on either side of the visible range are relatively inactive photosynthetically but have been found to influence important biological functions. These portions include the ultraviolet (UV approximately equal to 280-400 nm) and the far-red (FR approximately equal to 700-800 nm). The basic photoreceptor of plants for photosynthesis is chlorophyll. It serves to capture radiant energy which combined with carbon dioxide and water produces oxygen and assimulated carbon, used for the synthesis of cell wall polysaccarides, proteins, membrane lipids and other cellular constituents. The energy and carbon building blocks of photosynthesis sustain growth of plants. On the other hand, however, there are other photoreceptors, or pigments, that function as signal transducers to provide information that controls many physiological and morphological responses of how a plant grows. Known photomorphogenic receptors include phytochrome (the red/far-red sensor in the narrow bands of 655-665 nm and 725-735 nm ranges, respectively) and 'cryptochrome' (the hypothetical UV-B sensor in the 280-320 nm range). Since the USDA team of W. L. Butler, S. B. Hendricks, H. A. Borthwick, H. A. Siegleman and K. Norris in Beltsville, MD detected by spectroscopy, extracted and identified phytochrome as a protein in the 1950's, many other investigators have found evidence of its control functions in plants. Considerably less, however, is known about the yet non-isolated cryptochrome. The information-transferring roles of photoreceptors in plants at specific spectral ranges quite naturally stimulated plant scientists and engineers to consider physically manipulating light to achieve desired physiological and morphological characteristics. One way to manipulate light is to filter it through materials that selectively transmit portions of the sun's spectrum in and near the PAR range.

  10. Optical properties of La0.85(Sr,Ba)0.15MnO3 single crystals in infrared spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optical spectra (reflection and absorption) of La0.85Sr0.15MnO3 (LSM) and La0.85Ba0.15MnO3 (LBM) single crystals are studied in the infrared range, where the interaction of charge carriers with light dominates. In paramagnetic state, the small lattice polarons dominate the optical properties of LBM single crystal but in the optical spectra of LSM crystal the polarons manifest themselves weaker. The activation energy of polaron hopping E a is determined

  11. The New Visibility

    OpenAIRE

    John B. Thompson

    2008-01-01

    The starting point is the idea that the world media produces a new mediated visibility, making visible the actions and events ever more difficult to control. It is an explicit strategy of those who know well be mediated visibility can be a weapon in fighting the daily struggles. This essay briefly outline my thinking the new visibility and its implications. Begin by placing the issue of visibility in the context of a social theory of the media, since - as I will try show - the emergence of a ...

  12. A Visible, Spatially-Modulated Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SMIFTS) for Astronomical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafert, J. B.; Holbert, E. T.; Rusk, E. T.; Durham, S. E.; Caudill, E.; Keating, D.; Newby, H.

    1992-12-01

    We have constructed several visible, Spatially-Modulated Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers (SMIFTS) for spatially resolved spectral imaging in the visible wavelength region based on work by several authors including Yoshihara and Kitade (1967), Okamoto et al. (1984), Barnes (1985) and Smith and Schempp (1991). Our spectrometers require no moving parts, are compact and enjoy a number of advantages over the other spectral data collection technologies. The unique combination of characteristics define an important niche for astronomical, remote sensing, and reconnaissance spectral data acquisition. Our SMIFTS simultaneously acquires hundreds or thousands of spectral bands for hundreds or thousands of spectral channesl. This type of sensor has been called a "hyperspectral" sensor to emphasize the major quantitative difference between this type of sensor and multispectral imagers which collect only a few spectral bands. The SMIFTS consists of input optics (a telescope), a field limiting aperture, a beamsplitter which divides the input beam into two paths, two mirrors which redirect the split beams through the same path, a collimating lens which forms the interferogram of the input aperture on the detector plane, and a cylindrical imaging lens. Thus on the detector array one axis contains spatial information and the other axis contains the spectral information for each point of the spatial axis. The result of this arrangement is that each row of the detector array contains the interferogram of the corresponding point on the aperture or slit. This slit can be fixed upon the target, or the slit can be scanned across the target to build up a second axis of spatial information resulting in a data set with four dimensions: two spatial, one spectral, and one temporal. We present sample data for both astronomical and remote sensing applications taken with the Malabar SMIFTS. Barnes, T.H. "Photodiode Array Fourier Transform Spectrometer with Improved Dynamic Range", Appl. Opt, 24, 3702, (1985)

  13. Komatiites as Mercury surface analogues: Spectral measurements at PEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturilli, Alessandro; Helbert, Jörn; St. John, James M.; Head, James W.; Vaughan, William M.; D'Amore, Mario; Gottschalk, Matthias; Ferrari, Sabrina

    2014-07-01

    The elemental composition of Mercury's surface, which has been recently measured by the NASA MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, suggests a mineralogy dominated by magnesium-rich orthopyroxene and feldspar. The most magnesium-rich and aluminium-poor regions of Mercury's surface (which are presumably orthopyroxene-rich) have compositions, and possibly mineralogies, analogous to terrestrial boninites and basaltic komatiites. Unfortunately, little is known about the spectral properties of komatiites, especially at the high surface temperatures of Mercury. We therefore have collected three terrestrial komatiites with different compositions plus a synthetic komatiitic sample, and measured their reflectances in the visible and thermal infrared spectral ranges. Samples divided into four grain size ranges (when enough material was available) were measured fresh and after thermal processing in vacuum (10 Pa) at 500 °C, comparable to Mercury peak surface temperatures. Our measurements show that spectral changes between fresh and thermally processed samples occur in both spectral channels, but are stronger in the visible range, with reddening affecting all the samples, while darkening is more selective. It is important to note that darkening and reddening after thermally processing the samples are independent of the komatiites ferrous iron content. In fact the synthetic sample which is nearly iron-free is most strongly affected. From our study it turns out that thermally processing the samples in vacuum at Mercury surface temperature produces the removal of samples' colour centres. The results of our study show also that the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) instrument on MESSENGER orbiting Mercury currently cannot distinguish between different compositions of komatiites, while the future MErcury Radiometer and Thermal infrared Imaging Spectrometer (MERTIS) on the upcoming ESA BepiColombo mission will resolve their differences in the 7-14 μm spectral range.

  14. Vibrational behavior of Gelucire 50/13 by Raman and IR spectroscopies: A focus on the 1800-1000 cm-1 spectral range according to temperature and degree of hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hadri, M.; Achahbar, A.; El Khamkhami, J.; Khelifa, B.; Tran Le Tuyet, C.; Faivre, V.; Abbas, O.; El Marssi, M.; Bougrioua, F.; Bresson, S.

    2015-03-01

    The present paper reports on physical and thermal properties of polyoxyethylene glycol glycerides (Gelucire 50/13) used as sustained release matrix forming agent in pharmaceutical applications. Gelucire 50/13 was essentially studied by Raman and IR spectroscopies according to the temperature and the degree of hydration. The hydration behavior of this amphiphilic excipient has been investigated with increasing water contents to study the behavior during dissolution. In the spectral range 1800-1000 cm-1, Raman and IR spectroscopies of Gelucire 50/13 were performed to characterize the contribution of its each components at room temperature, with emphasis placed on the evolution of the CH2 wagging and twisting, ν(Csbnd C) and ν(Csbnd O) vibrational modes regions (1400-1000 cm-1), along with analysis of the IR and Raman-active δ(CH2) deformation region (1500-1400 cm-1). In comparison with temperature and degree of hydration, in the spectral range 1800-1000 cm-1, the vibrational changes were directly correlated with conformational changes of the Gelucire structure. Overall, IR and Raman spectroscopy clearly demonstrated that the different functional groups studied could be characterized independently, allowing for the understanding of their role in Gelucire structure.

  15. Ultraviolet, Visible, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) range is one of the most commonly encountered laboratory techniques in food analysis. Diverse examples, such as the quantification of macrocomponents (total carbohydrate by the phenol-sulfuric acid method), quantification of microcomponents, (thiamin by the thiochrome fluorometric procedure), estimates of rancidity (lipid oxidation status by the thiobarbituric acid test), and surveillance testing (enzyme-linked immunoassays), are presented in this text. In each of these cases, the analytical signal for which the assay is based is either the emission or absorption of radiation in the UV-Vis range. This signal may be inherent in the analyte, such as the absorbance of radiation in the visible range by pigments, or a result of a chemical reaction involving the analyte, such as the colorimetric copper-based Lowry method for the analysis of soluble protein.

  16. USGS Digital Spectral Library splib06a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Wise, Richard A.; Livo, K. Eric; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Sutley, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction We have assembled a digital reflectance spectral library that covers the wavelength range from the ultraviolet to far infrared along with sample documentation. The library includes samples of minerals, rocks, soils, physically constructed as well as mathematically computed mixtures, plants, vegetation communities, microorganisms, and man-made materials. The samples and spectra collected were assembled for the purpose of using spectral features for the remote detection of these and similar materials. Analysis of spectroscopic data from laboratory, aircraft, and spacecraft instrumentation requires a knowledge base. The spectral library discussed here forms a knowledge base for the spectroscopy of minerals and related materials of importance to a variety of research programs being conducted at the U.S. Geological Survey. Much of this library grew out of the need for spectra to support imaging spectroscopy studies of the Earth and planets. Imaging spectrometers, such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Airborne Visible/Infra Red Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) or the NASA Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) which is currently orbiting Saturn, have narrow bandwidths in many contiguous spectral channels that permit accurate definition of absorption features in spectra from a variety of materials. Identification of materials from such data requires a comprehensive spectral library of minerals, vegetation, man-made materials, and other subjects in the scene. Our research involves the use of the spectral library to identify the components in a spectrum of an unknown. Therefore, the quality of the library must be very good. However, the quality required in a spectral library to successfully perform an investigation depends on the scientific questions to be answered and the type of algorithms to be used. For example, to map a mineral using imaging spectroscopy and the mapping algorithm of Clark and others (1990a, 2003b), one simply needs a diagnostic absorption band. The mapping system uses continuum-removed reference spectral features fitted to features in observed spectra. Spectral features for such algorithms can be obtained from a spectrum of a sample containing large amounts of contaminants, including those that add other spectral features, as long as the shape of the diagnostic feature of interest is not modified. If, however, the data are needed for radiative transfer models to derive mineral abundances from reflectance spectra, then completely uncontaminated spectra are required. This library contains spectra that span a range of quality, with purity indicators to flag spectra for (or against) particular uses. Acquiring spectral measurements and performing sample characterizations for this library has taken about 15 person-years of effort. Software to manage the library and provide scientific analysis capability is provided (Clark, 1980, 1993). A personal computer (PC) reader for the library is also available (Livo and others, 1993). The program reads specpr binary files (Clark, 1980, 1993) and plots spectra. Another program that reads the specpr format is written in IDL (Kokaly, 2005). In our view, an ideal spectral library consists of samples covering a very wide range of materials, has large wavelength range with very high precision, and has enough sample analyses and documentation to establish the quality of the spectra. Time and available resources limit what can be achieved. Ideally, for each mineral, the sample analysis would include X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EM) or X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and petrographic microscopic analyses. For some minerals, such as iron oxides, additional analyses such as Mossbauer would be helpful. We have found that to make the basic spectral measurements, provide XRD, EM or XRF analyses, and microscopic analyses, document the results, and complete an entry of one spectral library sample, all takes about

  17. An analysis of visibility-based continuum subtraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sault, R. J.

    1994-10-01

    Continuum emission is often a viewed as a contaminant in radio interferometric spectral-line imaging. At best, it makes the analysis of the spectral-line images difficult. At worst, it limits the dynamic range of the images. In recent papers, van Langevelde & Cotton (1990) introduced a visibility-based continuum subtraction technique to radio interferometry, and Cornwell et al. (1992) analysed its properties. The technique is based on modelling the continuum by a first-order polynomial in the visibility spectrum. We present a quantitative analysis of the technique, both in terms of the residual continuum and the sensitivity to noise. The analysis is for polynomial fits of arbitrary order. A less complete analysis of a related, image-based, continuum subtraction technique is also presented. We show that higher order polynomials can be useful for data with large field size and bandwidth, and that stability in the presence of noise is not a problem. Some errors in the papers cited above are corrected.

  18. Control of Surface Plasmon Resonance of Au/SnO2 by Modification with Ag and Cu for Photoinduced Reactions under Visible-Light Irradiation over a Wide Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Atsuhiro; Hashimoto, Keiji; Kominami, Hiroshi

    2016-03-18

    Gold particles supported on tin(IV) oxide (0.2 wt % Au/SnO2 ) were modified with copper and silver by the multistep photodeposition method. Absorption around λ=550 nm, attributed to surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Au, gradually shifted to longer wavelengths on modification with Cu and finally reached λ=620 nm at 0.8 wt % Cu. On the other hand, the absorption shifted to shorter wavelength with increasing amount of Ag and reached λ=450 nm at 0.8 wt % Ag. These Cu- and Ag-modified 0.2 wt % Au/SnO2 materials (Cu-Au/SnO2 and Ag-Au/SnO2 ) and 1.0 wt % Au/SnO2 were used for mineralization of formic acid to carbon dioxide in aqueous suspension under irradiation with visible light from a xenon lamp and three kinds of light-emitting diodes with different wavelengths. The reaction rates for the mineralization of formic acid over these materials depend on the wavelength of light. Apparent quantum efficiencies of Cu-Au/SnO2 , Au/SnO2 , and Ag-Au/SnO2 reached 5.5 % at 625 nm, 5.8 % at 525 nm, and 5.1 % at 450 nm, respectively. These photocatalysts can also be used for selective oxidation of alcohols to corresponding carbonyl compounds in aqueous solution under visible-light irradiation. Broad responses to visible light in formic acid mineralization and selective alcohol oxidation were achieved when the three materials were used simultaneously. PMID:26880569

  19. Witness bar visibility graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Cortés, Carmen; Hurtado Díaz, Fernando Alfredo; Márquez, Alberto; Valenzuela, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Bar visibility graphs were introduced in the seventies as a model for some VLSI layout problems. They have been also studied since then by the graph drawing community, and recently several generalizations and restricted versions have been proposed. We introduce a generalization, witness-bar visibility graphs, and we prove that this class encom- passes all the bar-visibility variations considered so far. In addition, we show that many classes of graphs are contained in this family,...

  20. Photodetectors: Inorganic UV-Visible-SWIR Broadband Photodetector Based on Monodisperse PbS Nanocrystals (Small 10/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Woong; Kim, Do Young; Baek, Sujin; Yu, Hyeonggeun; So, Franky

    2016-03-01

    Synthesis of highly mono-dispersed large PbS nanocrystals (NCs) with low particle size dispersion is demonstrated by F. So and co-workers on page 1328, by controlling the sulfur concentration below the nucleation threshold during multiple injections of the sulfur precursor. These NCs are used to fabricate multi-spectral photodetectors and high detectivity values in the UV-Visible-SWIR (short-wave-IR) wavelength range from 350 nm to 2000 nm are demonstrated. PMID:26948839

  1. Energetic and Polarization Features of the Visible and Near-IR Radiation Extinction by Large Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shefer, O. V.

    2015-02-01

    A qualitative estimate of the extinction of optical radiation transmitted through large crystals of different shapes is given. Conditions of occurrence of the spectral behavior of the extinction coefficient in the visible and near-IR wavelength ranges are determined for large crystals. It is shown that this salient feature is mainly caused by radiation passed through predominantly oriented plate crystals. It is demonstrated that the polarization characteristics of the extinction can reach several tens of percent in the near-IR wavelength range.

  2. The Accuracy of Measurements of the Spectral-Line Frequencies in the Studies of the Rotational Transitions of the 16O12C32S Molecule in the Millimeter and Submillimeter Wave Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubiatnikov, G. Yu; Belov, S. P.; Lapinov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The absolute error of determining the center frequency of the molecule spectral line during a single measurement, which is obtained by fitting the line shape to the model profile, is usually significantly smaller than the statistical spread in the frequencies of the repeated measurements. We discuss the possible causes of the systematic errors leading to an increase in the uncertainty of measurements of the line-center frequency. For an example of the multiple spectral measurements of the rotational transitions of the 16O12C32S molecule in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave ranges (with a frequency of up to 522 GHz), by the Lamb-dip method, we determine the absolute error of the performed measurements, which amounts to 0 .4 kHz. New precision values of the center frequencies of the rotational transitions of the 16O12C32S molecule and more accurate values of the rotational constants, which are calculated using the measured frequencies, are presented.

  3. On the modeling of hyperspectral remote-sensing reflectance of high-sediment-load waters in the visible to shortwave-infrared domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Zhongping; Shang, Shaoling; Lin, Gong; Chen, Jun; Doxaran, David

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated three key components in modeling hyperspectral remote-sensing reflectance in the visible to shortwave-infrared (Vis-SWIR) domain of high-sediment-load (HSL) waters, which are the relationship between remote-sensing reflectance (Rrs) and inherent optical properties (IOPs), the absorption coefficient spectrum of pure water (aw) in the IR-SWIR region, and the spectral variation of sediment absorption coefficient (ased). Results from this study indicate that it is necessary to use a more generalized Rrs-IOP model to describe the spectral variation of Rrs of HSL waters from Vis to SWIR; otherwise it may result in a spectrally distorted Rrs spectrum if a constant model parameter is used. For hyperspectral aw in the IR-SWIR domain, the values reported in Kou et al. (1993) provided a much better match with the spectral variation of Rrs in this spectral range compared to that of Segelstein (1981). For ased spectrum, an empirical ased spectral shape derived from sample measurements is found working much better than the traditional exponential-decay function of wavelength in modeling the spectral variation of Rrs in the visible domain. These results would improve our understanding of the spectral signatures of Rrs of HSL waters in the Vis-SWIR domain and subsequently improve the retrieval of IOPs from ocean color remote sensing, which could further help the estimation of sediment loading of such waters. Limitations in estimating chlorophyll concentration in such waters are also discussed. PMID:26974638

  4. Spectral calibration for deriving surface mineralogy of Asteroid (25143) Itokawa from Hayabusa Near-Infrared Spectrometer (NIRS) Data

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatt, Megha; Corre, Lucille Le; Sanchez, Juan A; Dunn, Tasha; Izawa, Matthew R M; Li, Jian-Yang; Becker, Kris J; Weller, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    We present spectral calibration equations for determining mafic silicate composition of near-Earth asteroid (25143) Itokawa from visible/near-infrared spectra measured using the Near Infrared Spectrometer (NIRS), on board the Japanese Hayabusa spacecraft. Itokawa was the target of the Hayabusa sample return mission and has a surface composition similar to LL-type ordinary chondrites. Existing laboratory spectral calibrations use a spectral wavelength range that is wider (0.75-2.5 microns) than that of the NIRS instrument (0.85-2.1 microns) making them unfit for interpreting the Hayabusa spectral data currently archived in the Planetary Data System. We used laboratory measured near-infrared reflectance spectra of ordinary (H, L and LL) chondrites from the study of Dunn et al. (2010), which we resampled to the NIRS wavelength range. Using spectral parameters extracted from these resampled spectra we established a relationship between band parameters and their mafic silicate composition (olivine and low-Ca pyrox...

  5. Multi-resolution spectral analysis of wildfire potassium emission signatures using laboratory, airborne and spaceborne remote sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Amici, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione CNT, Roma, Italia; Wooster, M. J.; Piscini, A.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione CNT, Roma, Italia

    2011-01-01

    Thermal remote sensing studies of actively burning wildfires are usually based on the detection of Planckian energy emissions in the MIR (3–5 μm), LWIR (8–14 μm) and/or SWIR (1.0–2.5 μm) spectral regions. However, vegetation also contains a series of trace elements which present unique narrowband spectral emission lines in the visible and near infrared wavelength range when the biomass is heated to high temperatures during the process of flaming combustion. These spectral lines can be discrim...

  6. Visible Human Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Human Journal of Endoscopy. NLM's Current Bibliographies in Medicine, Visible Human Project ® (CBM 2013-4 to 2014-5) : 39 ... 2013 through May 2014. NLM's Current Bibliographies in Medicine, Visible Human Project ® (CBM 2010-3 to 2013-3) : 75 ...

  7. Compact multispectral continuous zoom camera for color and SWIR vision with integrated laser range finder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, M.; Gerken, M.; Achtner, Bertram; Kraus, M.; Münzberg, M.

    2014-06-01

    In an electro-optical sensor suite for long range surveillance tasks the optics for the visible (450nm - 700nm) and the SWIR spectral wavelength range (900nm - 1700 nm) are combined with the receiver optics of an integrated laser range finder (LRF) .The incoming signal from the observed scene and the returned laser pulse are collected within the common entrance aperture of the optics. The common front part of the optics is a broadband corrected lens design from 450 - 1700nm wavelength range. The visible spectrum is split up by a dichroic beam splitter and focused on a HDTV CMOS camera. The returned laser pulse is spatially separated from the scene signal by a special prism and focused on the laser receiver diode of the integrated LRF. The achromatic lens design has a zoom factor 14 and F#2.6 in the visible path. In the SWIR path the F-number is adapted to the corresponding chip dimensions . The alignment of the LRF with respect to the SWIR camera line of sight can be controlled by adjustable integrated wedges. The two images in the visible and the SWIR spectral range match in focus and field of view (FOV) over the full zoom range between 2° and 22° HFOV. The SWIR camera has a resolution of 640×512 pixels. The HDTV camera provides a resolution of 1920×1080. The design and the performance parameters of the multispectral sensor suite is discussed.

  8. Spectral Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Jie; Wang, Li-Lian

    2011-01-01

    Along with finite differences and finite elements, spectral methods are one of the three main methodologies for solving partial differential equations on computers. This book provides a detailed presentation of basic spectral algorithms, as well as a systematical presentation of basic convergence theory and error analysis for spectral methods. Readers of this book will be exposed to a unified framework for designing and analyzing spectral algorithms for a variety of problems, including in particular high-order differential equations and problems in unbounded domains. The book contains a large

  9. Visible and UV emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visible and ultra-violet emission spectroscopy is a well established plasma diagnostic technique extensively used in contemporary fusion experiments. Theoretical plasma models are required to derive the relevant physical parameters. These models are reviewed in the first part of this paper. They allow spectral line intensities and radiative power losses to be calculated from the knowledge of the detailed atomic physics processes occurring in the plasma. In tokamak plasma experiments, impurity contamination and transport are important concerns. Basic spectroscopic methods used in their understanding are described. They include the determination of impurity concentrations either by line emission modelling (through the use of an impurity transport code), or by direct charge-exchange recombination measurement. They also include the evaluation of neutral particle fluxes at the plasma periphery. Finally, the experimental techniques used in the derivation of impurity transport coefficients are reported

  10. Spectral properties of optical anisotropy induced by laser radiation in dye solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectral studies of induced quasi-crystal properties (which can be quantitatively characterised by the difference in the refractive indices of ordinary and extraordinary waves, Δn=no-ne) in Rhodamine 6G and Rhodamine 4C solutions in glycerine excited in the visible and UV ranges of the absorption spectrum are presented. It is demonstrated that the observed spectral dependences of Δn of these dye solutions excited in the visible (long-wavelength) and UV (short-wavelength) ranges of the absorption spectrum can be interpreted in terms of an oscillator model of a molecule. The proposed method for the analysis of induced optical anisotropy in solutions of organic compounds allows the relative orientation of oscillators in a molecule and, thus, the relative orientation of electronic transitions in a molecule to be determined in a reliable way. (iv international conference on atom and molecular pulsed lasers (ampl'99))

  11. The spectral shift function and spectral flow

    OpenAIRE

    Azamov, N. A.; Carey, A. L.; Sukochev, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper extends Krein's spectral shift function theory to the setting of semifinite spectral triples. We define the spectral shift function under these hypotheses via Birman-Solomyak spectral averaging formula and show that it computes spectral flow.

  12. Spectral imager based on Fabry-Perot interferometer for Aalto-1 nanosatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannila, Rami; Näsilä, Antti; Viherkanto, Kai; Holmlund, Christer; Näkki, Ismo; Saari, Heikki

    2013-09-01

    The Aalto-1 is a 3U-cubesat project coordinated by Aalto University. The satellite, Aalto-1, will be mainly built by students as project assignments and thesis works. The Aalto-1 is planned to launch on 2014. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland is developing the main Earth observation payload, a miniaturized spectral imager unit, for the satellite. The spectral imager unit contains a spectral imager, a visible RGB-camera and control electronics of the cameras. Detailed design of the spectral imager unit has been completed and assembly of the spectral imager unit will be done in the autumn 2013. The spectral imager is based on a tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) accompanied by an RGB CMOS image sensor. The FPI consists of two highly reflective surfaces separated by a tunable air gap and it is based on a piezo-actuated structure. The piezo-actuated FPI uses three piezo-actuators and is controlled in a closed capacitive feedback loop. The spectral resolution of the imager will be 8-15 nm at full width at half maximum and it will operate in the wavelength range 500-900 nm. Imaging resolution of the spectral imager is 1024x1024 pixels and the focal length of the optics is 32 mm and F-number is 3.4. Mass of the spectral imager unit is approximately 600 grams, and dimensions are 97 mm x 97 mm x 48 mm.

  13. Miniaturized spectral imager for Aalto-1 nanosatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannila, Rami; Näsilä, Antti; Praks, Jaan; Saari, Heikki; Antila, Jarkko

    2011-11-01

    The Aalto-1 is a 3U-cubesat project coordinated by Aalto University. The satellite, Aalto-1, will be mainly built by students as project assignments and thesis works. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland will develop the main Earth observation payload, a miniaturized spectral imager, for the satellite. It is a novel highly miniaturized tunable filter type spectral imager. Mass of the spectral imager will be less than 400 grams, and dimensions will be approximately 80 mm x 80 mm x 45 mm. The spectral imager is based on a tunable Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI) accompanied by an RGB CMOS image sensor. The FPI consists of two highly reflective surfaces separated by a tunable air gap and it is based either on a microelectromechanical (MEMS) or piezo-actuated structure. The MEMS FPI is a monolithic device, i.e. it is made entirely on one substrate in a batch process, without assembling separate pieces together. The gap is adjusted by moving the upper mirror with electrostatic force. Benefits of the MEMS FPI are low mass and small size. However, large aperture (2-10 mm) MEMS FPIs are currently under development, thus it is not yet known if their performance is adequate. The piezo-actuated FPI uses three piezo-actuators and is controlled in a closed capacitive feedback loop. The drawback of the piezo-actuated FPI is its higher mass. However, it has a large aperture which enables a shorter exposure times. Selection of the FPI type will be done after thorough evaluation. Depending on the selected FPI type, the spectral resolution of the imager will be 5 - 10 nm at full width at half maximum and it will operate in the visible and/or near infrared range.

  14. Automated testing of ultraviolet, visible, and infrared sensors using shared optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetta, Jason A.; Scopatz, Stephen D.

    2007-04-01

    Complex systems ranging from unmanned vehicles to night vision goggles rely on a various spectral regions to achieve the demanding imaging performance they require. The lines between infrared, visible, and ultraviolet are quickly blurring as multi-sensor systems become more sophisticated and image fusion becomes commonplace. Typically sensor testing requires hardware and software exclusively designed for the spectral region of interest. Thus a system with ultraviolet through infrared imaging capabilities could require up to three separate test benches for sensor characterization. This not only drives up the cost of testing but also leads to a discontinuity of methods and possibly skewed results. This paper will discuss hardware and software developed by the authors that utilize identical test methods and shared optics to complete infrared, visible, and ultraviolet sensor performance analysis. Challenges encompassing multiple source switching and combining will be addressed along with design choices related to specifying optics and targets of sufficient quality and construction to provide performance to cover the full spectral region. Test methodology controlled by a single software suite will be summarized including modulation transfer function, signal to noise ratio, uniformity, focus, distortion, intrascene dynamic range, and sensitivity. Examples of results obtained by these test systems will be presented.

  15. Simultaneous Spectral Temporal Adaptive Raman Spectrometer - SSTARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, Jordana

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a prime candidate for the next generation of planetary instruments, as it addresses the primary goal of mineralogical analysis, which is structure and composition. However, large fluorescence return from many mineral samples under visible light excitation can render Raman spectra unattainable. Using the described approach, Raman and fluorescence, which occur on different time scales, can be simultaneously obtained from mineral samples using a compact instrument in a planetary environment. This new approach is taken based on the use of time-resolved spectroscopy for removing the fluorescence background from Raman spectra in the laboratory. In the SSTARS instrument, a visible excitation source (a green, pulsed laser) is used to generate Raman and fluorescence signals in a mineral sample. A spectral notch filter eliminates the directly reflected beam. A grating then disperses the signal spectrally, and a streak camera provides temporal resolution. The output of the streak camera is imaged on the CCD (charge-coupled device), and the data are read out electronically. By adjusting the sweep speed of the streak camera, anywhere from picoseconds to milliseconds, it is possible to resolve Raman spectra from numerous fluorescence spectra in the same sample. The key features of SSTARS include a compact streak tube capable of picosecond time resolution for collection of simultaneous spectral and temporal information, adaptive streak tube electronics that can rapidly change from one sweep rate to another over ranges of picoseconds to milliseconds, enabling collection of both Raman and fluorescence signatures versus time and wavelength, and Synchroscan integration that allows for a compact, low-power laser without compromising ultimate sensitivity.

  16. Strong Ionic Hydrogen Bonding Causes a Spectral Isotope Effect in Photoactive Yellow Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Kaledhonkar, Sandip; Hara, Miwa; Stalcup, T. Page; Xie, Aihua; Hoff, Wouter D.

    2013-01-01

    Standard hydrogen bonds are of great importance for protein structure and function. Ionic hydrogen bonds often are significantly stronger than standard hydrogen bonds and exhibit unique properties, but their role in proteins is not well understood. We report that hydrogen/deuterium exchange causes a redshift in the visible absorbance spectrum of photoactive yellow protein (PYP). We expand the range of interpretable isotope effects by assigning this spectral isotope effect (SIE) to a functiona...

  17. SPECTRAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SELECTED HERMATYPIC CORALS FROM GULF OF KACHCHH, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ray Chaudhury

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hermatypic, scleractinian corals are the most important benthic substrates in a coral reef ecosystem. The existing, high (spatial resolution, broad-band, multi-spectral, space-borne sensors have limited capability to spatially detect and spectrally discriminate coral substrates. In situ hyperspectral signatures of eight coral targets were collected with the help of Analytical Spectral Devices FieldSpec spectroradiometer from Paga and Laku Point reefs of Gulf of Kachchh, India to study the spectral behaviour of corals. The eight coral targets consisted of seven live corals representing four distinct colony morphologies and one bleached coral target. The coral spectra were studied over a continuous range of 350 to 1350 nm. The corals strongly reflected in the NIR and MIR regions with regional central maximas located at 820 and 1070 nm respectively. In the visible region the live coral spectra conformed to "brown mode" of coral reflectance with triple-peaked pattern at 575, 600 and 650 nm. All coral spectra are characterized with two distinct absorption features: chlorophyll absorption at 675 nm and water absorption at 975 nm. The live and the bleached corals get distinguished in the visible region over 400 to 600 nm region. Water column over the targets modifies the spectral shape and magnitude. First and second-order derivatives help in identifying spectral windows to distinguish live and bleached corals.

  18. The visible and near infrared module of EChO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, A.; Bellucci, G.; Gambicorti, L.; Focardi, M.; Oliva, E.; Farina, M.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Santoli, F.; Pace, E.; Piccioni, G.; Filacchione, G.; Pancrazzi, M.; Tozzi, A.; Micela, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Visible and Near Infrared (VNIR) is one of the modules of EChO, the Exoplanets Characterization Observatory proposed to ESA for an M-class mission. EChO is aimed to observe planets while transiting by their suns. Then the instrument had to be designed to assure a high efficiency over the whole spectral range. In fact, it has to be able to observe stars with an apparent magnitude Mv = 9-12 and to see contrasts of the order of 10-4-10-5 necessary to reveal the characteristics of the atmospheres of the exoplanets under investigation. VNIR is a spectrometer in a cross-dispersed configuration, covering the 0.4-2.5 μm spectral range with a resolving power of about 330 and a field of view of 2 arcsec. It is functionally split into two channels respectively working in the 0.4-1.0 μm and 1.0-2.5 μm spectral ranges. Such a solution is imposed by the fact the light at short wavelengths has to be shared with the EChO Fine Guiding System (FGS) devoted to the pointing of the stars under observation. The spectrometer makes use of a HgCdTe detector of 512 by 512 pixels, 18 μm pitch and working at a temperature of 45 K as the entire VNIR optical bench. The instrument has been interfaced to the telescope optics by two optical fibers, one per channel, to assure an easier coupling and an easier colocation of the instrument inside the EChO optical bench.

  19. All-fiber femtosecond Cherenkov laser at visible wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Møller, Uffe Visbech; Tu, Haohua; Boppart, Stephen A.; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    electrically tunable femtosecond CR output in the visible (VIS) spectral range of 580-630 nm, with the 3 dB spectral bandwidth not exceeding 36 nm, with average power in the milliwatt range. Relative intensity noise (RIN) of this laser, affecting the sensitivity of bio-imaging and microscopy systems, is found...... average output powers are shown in Fig. 1(c). When the average emitted CR power is increasing from 0.46 mW to 4.2 mW, the central wavelength is shifting from 630 nm to 580 nm, and the 3 dB bandwidth of the spectrum increases from 14 nm to 36 nm. The physical mechanism of wavelength tunability with...... changing the pump power is related to different linear and nonlinear compression conditions for weaker and stronger pump laser pulses in the hollow-core pulse compressor and CR stages of the laser (Fig. 1(a)). Fig. 1 (d) shows the autocorrelation (AC) of the CR with the output power of 1.7 mW. The FWHM of...

  20. Spectral curves of surface reflectance in some Antarctic regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four surface reflectance models of solar radiation were determined by examining several sets of field measurements taken for clear-sky conditions at various sites in Antarctica. Each model consists of the mean spectral curve of surface reflectance in the 0.25-2.7 ?m wavelength range and of the dependence curve of total abedo on the solar elevation angle h, within the range from 50 to 550. The TNB (Terra Nova Bay) model refers to a rocky terrain where granites are predominant; the NIS (Nansen Ice Sheet) model to a glacier surface made uneven by sastrugi and streaked by irregular fractures; the HAP (High Altitude Plateau) model to a flat ice surface covered by fresh snow and scored by light sastrugi; and the RIS (Ross Ice Shelf) model to an area covered by the sea ice pack presenting many discontinuities in the reflectance features, due to melt water lakes, puddles, refrozen ice and snow pots. The reflectance curve obtained for the TNB model presents gradually increasing values as wavelength increases through the visible spectral range and almost constant values at infrared wavelengths, giving a total albedo value equal to 0.264 at = 300, which increases by about 80% through the lower range of h and decreases by 12% through the upper range. The reflectance curves of the NIS, HAP and RIS models are all peaked at visible wavelengths and exhibit decreasing values throughout the infrared spectral range, giving values of total albedo equal to 0.464, 0.738 and 0.426 at h 300, respectively. These values were estimated to increase by 8-14% as h decreases from 300 to 50 and to decrease by 2-4% only as h increases from 300 to 550

  1. [Design of full-polarized and multi-spectral imaging system based on LCVR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Hui-jie; Cheng, Xuan; Xiong, Sheng-jun

    2011-05-01

    A new full-polarized multi-spectral imaging system is described, which uses electronically controlled LCVR (liquid crystal variable retarder) to modulate the full-polarized state of light in the visible to IR range. The system consisted of optical lenses, LCVRs, filters and CCD. Firstly, the system structure, working theory and optical design are introduced in the present paper. A polarization calibration method is provided and the calibration system was set up, which realized high-precision polarization calibration using a small polarized source. Then, a field experiment with the imaging system was carried out. Polarized spectral images with higher spectral and spatial resolution were collected. Finally, the data acquired were rough processed to get polarization degree image of the targets. It is concluded that the experiment has proved that the imaging system is effective in obtaining full-polarized and multi- spectral data. The image captured by the system can be applied to object identification and object classification. PMID:21800604

  2. Spectral Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Cecconi, Jaures

    2011-01-01

    G. Bottaro: Quelques resultats d'analyse spectrale pour des operateurs differentiels a coefficients constants sur des domaines non bornes.- L. Garding: Eigenfuction expansions.- C. Goulaouic: Valeurs propres de problemes aux limites irreguliers: applications.- G. Grubb: Essential spectra of elliptic systems on compact manifolds.- J.Cl. Guillot: Quelques resultats recents en Scattering.- N. Schechter: Theory of perturbations of partial differential operators.- C.H. Wilcox: Spectral analysis of the Laplacian with a discontinuous coefficient.

  3. Biologically-inspired empirical mode decomposition fusion of visible and infrared images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissinto, Paterne Sena

    Visible and infrared image fusion technology effectively enhances image information content and rendering quality. They are many image fusion approaches that can be utilized to produce high quality fused images. Outdoor scenes exhibit no linearity, are random, and their images have independently distributed pixel colors. Many of the existing image fusion methods including but not limited to, Principal Component Analysis, Wavelet Transform based, make assumption of both image content linearity and dependent distribution and when applied to grayscale fusion. Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) represents input images as Instrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) carrying their spatial and frequency components about each pixel with no a priori assumption. Visible and infrared signals lay in different spectrum ranges. Spectral emissivity and reflectivity, depending on wavelength, special contrast can be enhanced not only in visible video but also in infrared imagery. This work proposed a biologically-inspired fusion of visible and infrared images based on EMD and opponent processing (Bio-EMD). First, registered visible and infrared captures of the same scene are decomposed into Intrinsic Mode Functions through EMD. Then, the fused image is generated by opponent processing the source IMFs. Finally, the results are evaluated based on the amount on information transferred, the clarity of details, vividness of depictions, and range of meaning differences in lightness and chromaticity. Perceptual comparison of the results showed that opponent-processing-based techniques outperformed algorithms based on intensities, and some other techniques. Quantitative assessment confirmed that the proposed technique transferred twice information as much as the state-of-the-art methods did. Bio-EMD provided a high level sharpness, yielded more natural-looking colors, and produced a high magnitude of visually meaningful differences in lightness and chromaticity for the fusion of low-light visible and infrared images. These results were obtained without optimization of filters involved in the process.

  4. Two-dimensional material-based saturable absorbers: towards compact visible-wavelength all-fiber pulsed lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhengqian; Wu, Duanduan; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Peng, Jian; Weng, Jian; Xu, Shuo; Zhu, Chunhui; Wang, Fengqiu; Sun, Zhipei; Zhang, Han

    2015-12-01

    Passive Q-switching or mode-locking by placing a saturable absorber inside the laser cavity is one of the most effective and popular techniques for pulse generation. However, most of the current saturable absorbers cannot work well in the visible spectral region, which seriously impedes the progress of passively Q-switched/mode-locked visible pulsed fibre lasers. Here, we report a kind of visible saturable absorber--two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs, e.g. WS2, MoS2, MoSe2), and successfully demonstrate compact red-light Q-switched praseodymium (Pr3+)-doped all-fibre lasers. The passive Q-switching operation at 635 nm generates stable laser pulses with ~200 ns pulse duration, 28.7 nJ pulse energy and repetition rate from 232 to 512 kHz. This achievement is attributed to the ultrafast saturable absorption of these layered TMDs in the visible region, as well as the compact and all-fibre laser-cavity design by coating a dielectric mirror on the fibre end facet. This work may open a new route for next-generation high-performance pulsed laser sources in the visible (even ultraviolet) range.Passive Q-switching or mode-locking by placing a saturable absorber inside the laser cavity is one of the most effective and popular techniques for pulse generation. However, most of the current saturable absorbers cannot work well in the visible spectral region, which seriously impedes the progress of passively Q-switched/mode-locked visible pulsed fibre lasers. Here, we report a kind of visible saturable absorber--two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs, e.g. WS2, MoS2, MoSe2), and successfully demonstrate compact red-light Q-switched praseodymium (Pr3+)-doped all-fibre lasers. The passive Q-switching operation at 635 nm generates stable laser pulses with ~200 ns pulse duration, 28.7 nJ pulse energy and repetition rate from 232 to 512 kHz. This achievement is attributed to the ultrafast saturable absorption of these layered TMDs in the visible region, as well as the compact and all-fibre laser-cavity design by coating a dielectric mirror on the fibre end facet. This work may open a new route for next-generation high-performance pulsed laser sources in the visible (even ultraviolet) range. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06981e

  5. Visible photoluminescence of nanopowder of silicon, produced by silicon evaporation by powerful electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The silicon nanopowders, formed by the silicon massive sample evaporation by the electron beam in the argon atmosphere, are studied through the methods of the photoluminescence (PL) and combination light scattering (CS). The PL peak is identified at the room temperature in the visible spectral range of the powders, consisting of the silicon nanocrystals. The PL peak strong short-wave shift may be explained as the effect of the electrons and holes dimensional quantization in the silicon small-size (about 2 nm) nanocrystals. The silicon nanocrystals dimensions are determined through the analytical data on the CS photoluminescence and they coincided with the evaluations based on the photoluminescence data

  6. Spatial and spectral performance of a chromotomosynthetic hyperspectral imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostick, Randall L; Perram, Glen P

    2012-03-01

    The spatial and spectral resolutions achievable by a prototype rotating prism chromotomosynthetic imaging (CTI) system operating in the visible spectrum are described. The instrument creates hyperspectral imagery by collecting a set of 2D images with each spectrally projected at a different rotation angle of the prism. Mathematical reconstruction techniques that have been well tested in the field of medical physics are used to reconstruct the data to produce the 3D hyperspectral image. The instrument operates with a 100 mm focusing lens in the spectral range of 400-900 nm with a field of view of 71.6 mrad and angular resolution of 0.8-1.6 ?rad. The spectral resolution is 0.6 nm at the shortest wavelengths, degrading to over 10 nm at the longest wavelengths. Measurements using a point-like target show that performance is limited by chromatic aberration. The system model is slightly inaccurate due to poor estimation of detector spatial resolution, this is corrected based on results improving model performance. As with traditional dispersion technology, calibration of the transformed wavelength axis is required, though with this technology calibration improves both spectral and spatial resolution. While this prototype does not operate at high speeds, components exist which will allow for CTI systems to generate hyperspectral video imagery at rates greater than 100 Hz. PMID:22462909

  7. Graphite oxide–TiO2 nanocomposite and its efficient visible-light-driven photocatalytic hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► GO–TiO2 nanocomposites were fabricated by a facile hydrothermal process. ► The implanted GO expand the spectral responsive range of TiO2 to visible light for H2 production. ► As a result, stable photocatalytic H2 production efficiency were obtained over GO–TiO2. - Abstract: Graphite oxide (GO)–TiO2 nanocomposite was prepared by a facile hydrothermal process and was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, Transmission electron microscopy, UV–vis diffusion reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. TiO2 particles with average particle size of ∼20 nm in the nanocomposites are attached to the surface of GO and/or intercalated into the interlayer of GO. The obtained GO–TiO2 was used as photocatalyst for H2 production under visible light (λ ≥ 420 nm) irradiation, and an optimal photocatalytic H2 production rate of 380 μmol h−1 can be obtained over 2 wt% GO–TiO2. The encouraging results presented here demonstrate that GO can serve as visible-light-driven photocatalyst and photosensitizer to expand the photoresponsive range of TiO2 to visible light for H2 production. The possible mechanism for H2 production was proposed for better understanding the visible-light-driven photocatalytic behaviour of the GO–TiO2 nanocomposite.

  8. Si nanocrystals embedded in SiO2: Optical studies in the vacuum ultraviolet range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pankratov, V.; Osinniy, Viktor; Kotlov, A.; Nylandsted Larsen, Arne; Bech Nielsen, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence excitation and transmission spectra of Si nanocrystals of different diameters embedded in a SiO2 matrix have been investigated in the broad visible-vacuum ultraviolet spectral range using synchrotron radiation. The dependence of the photoluminescence excitation spectra on the na...... discussed. Moreover, it is demonstrated that no energy transfer takes place between the SiO2 and Si nanocrystals when the excitation energy is higher than the band-to-band transition energy in SiO2....

  9. Security in Visible Light Communication : Novel Challenges and Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Rohner, Christian; Raza, Shahid; Puccinelli, Daniele; Voigt, Thiemo

    2015-01-01

    As LED lighting becomes increasingly ubiquitous, Visible Light Communication is attracting the interest of academia and industry as a complement to RF as the physical layer for the Internet of Things. Aside from its much greater spectral availability compared to RF, visible light has several attractive properties that may promote its uptake: its lack of health risks, its opportunities for spatial reuse, its relative immunity to multipath fading, its lack of electromagnetic interference, and i...

  10. Visible Epiglottis in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Jamaluddin Ahmed, Farooque; Shinohara, Andrá Luis; Bonifécio da Silva, Salete Moura; Andreo, Jesus Carlos; RODRIGUES, Antonio de Castro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT% Visible epiglottis is a rare anatomical variant which is usually asymptomatic without the need of any medical or surgical intervention. It is most commonly seen in children but there are some reports of its prevalence in adults too. Cases of visible epiglottis seem to be unfamiliar among dental professionals. In this report, we have attempted to present this anatomical variant of epiglottis in the feld of dentistry by describing a case of an 8-year-old girl who presented to the depa...

  11. UVISS preliminary visibility analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this work is to obtain a preliminary assessment of the sky visibility for anastronomical telescope located on the express pallet of the International SpaceStation (ISS)} taking into account the major constraints imposed on the instrument by the ISSattitude and structure. Part of the...... work is also to setup the kernel of a software tool for the visibility analysis thatshould be easily expandable to consider more complex strucures for future activities.This analysis is part of the UVISS assessment study and it is meant to provide elementsfor the definition and the selection of the...

  12. Ground-based atmospheric infrared and visible emission measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. J.; Steed, A. J.; Ware, G. A.; Offermann, D.; Lange, G.; Lauche, H.

    1985-03-01

    Ground-based measurements of night-sky NIR and visible emissions were made at the Andenes, Norway, and Kiruna, Sweden, rocket launch sites during the Energy Budget Campaign of 1980. Optical measurements were made using visible and infrared photometers, a Michelson interometer and a grating spectrometer. The spectral range of the spectrometers was 0.85-1.7 microns. Photometer wavelength coverages were at 1.7 microns, 1.27, 6300 A, 5577 A, 5525 A and 3914 A. Emission intensities of OH, O2, N2(+) and O airglow and auroral species are presented. Correlations were observed between the O2(a1 delta-g) emission at 1.27 microns and the OH(8,5) emission at 1.3 microns, giving further evidence that the two species of the night airglow have an emission mechanism in common. Values of the roational temperatures of the OH airglow were derived which are indicative of the temporal history of the near-mesopause atmospheric temperature. Airglow intensities and temperatures are compared with indices of auroral zone geomagnetic activity and with key atmospheric measurements obtained in the campaign. Correlations were found with high significance levels. The trends in the observed mesopause temperature appear to be part of a general disturbance of the atmosphere due to planetary waves.

  13. Understanding the visibility of blood on dark surfaces: A practical evaluation of visible light, NIR, and SWIR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotman, Tom G; Westen, Antoinette A; van der Weerd, Jaap; de Bruin, Karla G

    2015-12-01

    Bloodstains on dark surfaces are often difficult to detect due to a lack of contrast. Infrared photography is in many cases a solution as it enhances the contrast between blood and background. Still, on some surfaces bloodstains cannot be visualized. In this study, we investigate why bloodstains on certain surfaces are not detected and how visibility can be improved. Bloodstains on 166 dark fabrics were photographed by four different cameras and for each, the visibility of the bloodstains was scored. The spectral properties of the dark fabrics were examined as well as the properties of the dyes used to colour the textiles. In addition, spreading of the blood within the textile and the roughness of the material were taken into account. In the investigated set of textiles, visibility of blood is mainly determined by the spectral properties of the textile dye. In addition, a high surface roughness of the textile reduces the visibility. PMID:26386337

  14. An improved version of the Visible and Near Infrared (VNIR) spectrometer of EChO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, G.; Adriani, A.; Gambicorti, L.; Focardi, M.; Oliva, E.; Farina, M.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Pace, E.; Piccioni, G.; Filacchione, G.; Pancrazzi, M.; Tozzi, A.; Micela, G.

    2014-08-01

    The Visible and Near Infrared (VNIR) is one of the modules of EChO, the Exoplanets Characterization Observatory proposed to ESA for an M-class mission. EChO is aimed to observe planets while transiting by their suns. Then the instrument has be designed to assure a high efficiency over the whole spectral range. In fact, it has to be able to observe stars with an apparent magnitude Mv= 912 and able to see contrasts of 10-410-5 in order to reveal the characteristics of the atmospheres of the exoplanets under investigation. VNIR was originally designed for covering the spectral range from 0.4 to 1.0 ?m [1] but now the design has been reviewed and its spectral range has been extended up to 2.5 ?m. It is a spectrometer in a cross-dispersed configuration that, then, uses the combination of a diffraction grating and a prism to spread the light in different wavelengths and in a useful number of orders of diffraction. Its resolving power is about 330 over the entire spectral range and its field of view is approximately 2 arcsec. The spectrometer is functionally split into two channels respectively working in the 0.4-1.0 ?m and 1.0-2.5 ?m spectral ranges. Such a solution is imposed by the fact the light at low wavelengths has to be shared with the EChO Fine Guiding System (FGS) devoted to the pointing of the stars under observation. The instrument works at 45K and its weight is 6 kg.

  15. Solar synthesis: prospects in visible light photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Danielle M; Yoon, Tehshik P

    2014-02-28

    Chemists have long aspired to synthesize molecules the way that plants do-using sunlight to facilitate the construction of complex molecular architectures. Nevertheless, the use of visible light in photochemical synthesis is fundamentally challenging because organic molecules tend not to interact with the wavelengths of visible light that are most strongly emitted in the solar spectrum. Recent research has begun to leverage the ability of visible light-absorbing transition metal complexes to catalyze a broad range of synthetically valuable reactions. In this review, we highlight how an understanding of the mechanisms of photocatalytic activation available to these transition metal complexes, and of the general reactivity patterns of the intermediates accessible via visible light photocatalysis, has accelerated the development of this diverse suite of reactions. PMID:24578578

  16. Spectral Ranking

    CERN Document Server

    Vigna, Sebastiano

    2009-01-01

    This note tries to attempt a sketch of the history of spectral ranking, a general umbrella name for techniques that apply the theory of linear maps (in particular, eigenvalues and eigenvectors) to matrices that do not represent geometric transformations, but rather some kind of relationship between entities. Albeit recently made famous by the ample press coverage of Google's PageRank algorithm, spectral ranking was devised more than fifty years ago, almost exactly in the same terms, and has been studied in psychology and social sciences. I will try to describe it in precise and modern mathematical terms, highlighting along the way the contributions given by previous scholars.

  17. Spectral branes

    OpenAIRE

    ~Vassilevich, D. ~V.

    2001-01-01

    We study the objects (called spectral branes or S-branes) which are obtained by imposing non-local spectral boundary conditions at the boundary of the world sheet of the bosonic string. They possess many nice properties which make them an ideal test ground for the string theory methods. Depending on a particular choice of the boundary operator S-branes may be commutative or non-commutative. We demonstrate that projection of the B-field on the brane directions (i.e. on the components which act...

  18. Making Invisible Forces Visible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratner, Helene; Pors, Justine Grønbæk

    This paper investigates managerial tactics of visualisation when a need to know and manage employees' values and attitudes is expressed. Using the Danish public school as a case study, we explore how school managers use teachers' emotions to render visible presumably invisible information about...

  19. Evaluation of Visible Plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Thomas

    Developed for presentation at the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971, this outline discusses plumes with contaminants that are visible to the naked eye. Information covers: (1) history of air pollution control regulations, (2) need for methods of evaluating…

  20. Reflectance of Natural Vegetation of Western Rajasthan Region in Visible and Near-infrared Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Kumar

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the study of spectral characteristics of natural vegetation of Western Rajasthan region in the visible and the near-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The leaves of ten species of natural vegetation normally grow in Western Rajasthan were evaluated for their spectral reflectance in the wavelength range 400-900 nm under normal laboratory conditions. The change in reflectance due to change in physical condition of plants because of wilting has been observed for three consecutive days. To observe the change due to climatic conditions, the measurements have been carried out in two different seasons. The study aims to undertake design of colour schemes for camouflage painting of various military objects.

  1. Multispectral concealed weapon detection in visible, infrared, and terahertz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Marcin; Kastek, Mariusz; Polakowski, Henryk; Palka, Norbert; Piszczek, Marek; Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw

    2014-05-01

    Detection of concealed dangerous objects is a very demanding problem of public safety. So far, the problem of detecting objects hidden under clothing was considered only in the case of airports but it is becoming more and more important for public places like metro stations, and government buildings. The development of imaging devices and exploration of new spectral bands is a chance to introduce new equipment for assuring public safety. It has been proved that objects hidden under clothing can be detected and visualized using terahertz (THz) cameras. However, passive THz cameras still offer too low image resolution for objects recognition. On the other hand new infrared cameras offer sufficient parameters to detect objects covered with fabrics in some conditions, as well as high image quality and big pixel resolutions. The purpose of the studies is to investigate the possibilities of using various cameras operating in different spectral ranges for detection of concealed objects. In the article, we present the measurement setup consisting of medium wavelength infrared (MWIR), long wavelength infrared (LWIR), THz and visible cameras and the initial results of measurements with various types of clothing and test objects.

  2. Correction of the recording artifacts and detection of the functional deviations in ECG by means of syndrome decoding with an automatic burst error correction of the cyclic codes using periodograms for determination of the code component spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovic, Evgenie D.; Aleksandrov, Pavel L.; Gradov, Oleg V.; Mamalyga, Leonid M.; Mamalyga, Maksim L.

    2016-01-01

    Aims This paper describes a novel approach to the analysis of electrocardiographic data based on the consideration of the repetitive P, Q, R, S, T sequences as cyclic codes. In Part I we introduce a principle similar to the syndrome decoding using the control numbers, which allows correcting the noise combinations. Materials and methods We propose to apply the burst-error-correcting algorithms for automatic detection of the ECG artifacts and the functional abnormalities, including those compared to the reference model. Our approach is compared to the symbolic dynamics methods. During the automated search of the code components (i.e. point values and spectral ranges one-to-one corresponding to P, Q, R, S, T) considered in Part II, the authors apply the Lomb-Scargle periodogram method with the phase control which allows to determine the code components not only from the main harmonics, but also using the sidebands, avoiding the phase errors. Results The results of the method testing on rats with the heart failure using a simplified telemetric recording from the implantable chips are given in Part III. A complete independence of the results of the determination of the code points (fingerprints) from the variables for which the calculation is performed is shown. We also prove the robustness of the above approach with respect to the most types of the non-adaptive filtration. Conclusion The above method can be useful not only for experimental medicine, but also for veterinary and clinical diagnostic practice. This method is adequately reproduced both on animals and human ECG, except for some constant values.

  3. Spectral analysis by correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectral density of a signal, which represents its power distribution along the frequency axis, is a function which is of great importance, finding many uses in all fields concerned with the processing of the signal (process identification, vibrational analysis, etc...). Amongst all the possible methods for calculating this function, the correlation method (correlation function calculation + Fourier transformation) is the most promising, mainly because of its simplicity and of the results it yields. The study carried out here will lead to the construction of an apparatus which, coupled with a correlator, will constitute a set of equipment for spectral analysis in real time covering the frequency range 0 to 5 MHz. (author)

  4. Visibility graph motifs

    CERN Document Server

    Iacovacci, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    Visibility algorithms transform time series into graphs and encode dynamical information in their topology, paving the way for graph-theoretical time series analysis as well as building a bridge between nonlinear dynamics and network science. In this work we introduce and study the concept of visibility graph motifs, smaller substructures that appear with characteristic frequencies. We develop a theory to compute in an exact way the motif profiles associated to general classes of deterministic and stochastic dynamics. We find that this simple property is indeed a highly informative and computationally efficient feature capable to distinguish among different dynamics and robust against noise contamination. We finally confirm that it can be used in practice to perform unsupervised learning, by extracting motif profiles from experimental heart-rate series and being able, accordingly, to disentangle meditative from other relaxation states. Applications of this general theory include the automatic classification a...

  5. Spectral Predictors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J

    2006-11-17

    Many scientific, imaging, and geospatial applications produce large high-precision scalar fields sampled on a regular grid. Lossless compression of such data is commonly done using predictive coding, in which weighted combinations of previously coded samples known to both encoder and decoder are used to predict subsequent nearby samples. In hierarchical, incremental, or selective transmission, the spatial pattern of the known neighbors is often irregular and varies from one sample to the next, which precludes prediction based on a single stencil and fixed set of weights. To handle such situations and make the best use of available neighboring samples, we propose a local spectral predictor that offers optimal prediction by tailoring the weights to each configuration of known nearby samples. These weights may be precomputed and stored in a small lookup table. We show that predictive coding using our spectral predictor improves compression for various sources of high-precision data.

  6. Two-dimensional material-based saturable absorbers: towards compact visible-wavelength all-fiber pulsed lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhengqian; Wu, Duanduan; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Peng, Jian; Weng, Jian; Xu, Shuo; Zhu, Chunhui; Wang, Fengqiu; Sun, Zhipei; Zhang, Han

    2016-01-14

    Passive Q-switching or mode-locking by placing a saturable absorber inside the laser cavity is one of the most effective and popular techniques for pulse generation. However, most of the current saturable absorbers cannot work well in the visible spectral region, which seriously impedes the progress of passively Q-switched/mode-locked visible pulsed fibre lasers. Here, we report a kind of visible saturable absorber-two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs, e.g. WS2, MoS2, MoSe2), and successfully demonstrate compact red-light Q-switched praseodymium (Pr(3+))-doped all-fibre lasers. The passive Q-switching operation at 635 nm generates stable laser pulses with ∼200 ns pulse duration, 28.7 nJ pulse energy and repetition rate from 232 to 512 kHz. This achievement is attributed to the ultrafast saturable absorption of these layered TMDs in the visible region, as well as the compact and all-fibre laser-cavity design by coating a dielectric mirror on the fibre end facet. This work may open a new route for next-generation high-performance pulsed laser sources in the visible (even ultraviolet) range. PMID:26658877

  7. Spectral Density on the Lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Makovoz, D.; Miller, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral density in the pseudoscalar and vector channels is extracted from the SU(2) lattice quenched data. It is shown to consist of three sharp poles within the energy range accessible on the lattice.

  8. Visible-Near-Infrared Range Whispering Gallery Resonance from Photonic μ-Sphere Cavities Self-Assembled from a Blend of Polystyrene and Poly[4,7-bis(3-octylthiophene-2-yl)benzothiadiazole-co-2,6-bis(pyrazolyl)pyridine] Coordinated to Tb(acac)3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Yemineni S L V; Venkatakrishnarao, Dasari; Biswas, Arani; Mohiddon, Mahamad Ahamad; Viswanathan, Nirmal; Chandrasekar, Rajadurai

    2016-01-13

    A novel red emitting copolymer (P1) was prepared (Mn ∼ 10.7 kDa) by copolymerizing tridentate ligand, namely 2,6-bis(pyrazolyl)pyridine (BPP) with 4,7-bis(2-ethynyl-5-thienyl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole. This copolymer readily formed an orange yellow emitting metal containing conjugated polymer (P1.Tb) with Tb(acac)3. Further, a judicial blend of P1.Tb with polystyrene and its subsequent self-assembly in THF/water produced microspheres with smooth surface area. Interestingly, continuous wave laser excitation of a single microsphere displayed whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonance modes over a broad wavelength range covering visible (Vis) and near-infrared (NIR) regions (0.550-0.875 μm). The estimated Q factor was up to 700, which is very high for a metal containing conjugated polymer (MCCP)-based optical gain medium. PMID:26694108

  9. Instrument measures many optical properties in visible and IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    Electro-optical system measures reflectance, reflectance ratio, transmission, absorption, refractive index, and absorption coefficient in both visible and infrared (IR) spectral regions. System effectively combining capabilities of ellisometer, reflectometer, and spectrophotometer is expected to find application in environmental and material composition testing fields.

  10. New fractal structures for frequencies close to the visible range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malureanu, Radu; Sandru, A.; Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    can be used as an efficient sensor, both in transmission as well as in reflection. Thus, a variation of only 0.09 in the refraction index will for example change the structure’s behaviour from 90% reflection to 90% transmission. Such resonances lead to a sensitivity of 780 nm/RIU. Another advantage of...

  11. [VISIBLE LIGHT AND HUMAN SKIN (REVIEW)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibadze, A; Chikvaidze, E; Katsitadze, A; Kvachadze, I; Tskhvediani, N; Chikviladze, A

    2015-09-01

    Biological effect of a visible light depends on extend of its property to penetrate into the tissues: the greater is a wavelength the more is an effect of a radiation. An impact of a visible light on the skin is evident by wave and quantum effects. Quanta of a visible radiation carry more energy than infrared radiation, although an influence of such radiation on the skin is produced by the light spectrum on the boarder of the ultraviolet and the infrared rays and is manifested by thermal and chemical effects. It is determined that large doses of a visible light (405-436 nm) can cause skin erythema. At this time, the ratio of generation of free radicals in the skin during an exposure to the ultraviolet and the visible light range from 67-33% respectively. Visible rays of 400-500 nm length of wave cause an increase of the concentration of oxygen's active form and mutation of DNA and proteins in the skin. The urticaria in 4-18% of young people induced by photodermatosis is described. As a result of a direct exposure to sunlight photosensitive eczema is more common in elderly. Special place holds a hereditary disease - porphyria, caused by a visible light. In recent years, dermatologists widely use phototherapy. The method uses polychromatic, non-coherent (wavelength of 515-1200 nm) pulsating beam. During phototherapy/light treatment a patient is being exposed to sunlight or bright artificial light. Sources of visible light are lasers, LEDs and fluorescent lamps which have the full range of a visible light. Phototherapy is used in the treatment of acne vulgaris, seasonal affective disorders, depression, psoriasis, eczema and neurodermities. LED of the red and near infrared range also is characterized by the therapeutic effect. They have an ability to influence cromatophores and enhance ATP synthesis in mitochondria. To speed up the healing of wounds and stimulate hair growth light sources of a weak intensity are used. The light of blue-green spectrum is widely used for the treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemy. A photodynamic therapy takes a special place. The third generation of the blue (410 nm), yellow (595 nm) and red photosensitors are used. Photodynamic therapy is used in the treatment of cancer as well. PMID:26355315

  12. Complex visible scene projection technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Gao, Yang; Zhang, Yi; Fei, Jindong; Du, Huijie; Du, Jian; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Hongming

    2015-09-01

    The first and most essential capability a visible scene projection system must have is low background and high contrast during dynamic simulation. A complex visible scene projection system was developed to meet the above requirements. The complex visible scene projection system mainly consists of the optical fiber subsystem, LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) subsystem, multiple focal plane coupler and the collimation objective. The design and build and details of the system characterization of a prototype complex visible scene projector were summarized.

  13. Multiple lead underwriters and IPO visibility - European evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Holopainen, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I study whether issuers employing multiple lead underwriters (MLUs) experience greater pre-IPO and post-IPO visibility in European context. My sample consists of 573 IPOs. The sample is collected from the Securities Data Corporations (SDC) database. The sample includes IPOs with issue dates ranging from 2001 to 2010. All issuing companies are listed in the EU-15 countries. Company visibility is analyzed using both pre-IPO and post-IPO visibility measures, for which the dat...

  14. Fast calculations of the spectral diffuse-to-global ratios for approximating spectral irradiance at the street canyon level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Hernandez, Roberto; Smedley, Andrew R. D.; Webb, Ann R.

    2015-05-01

    Two radiative transfer models are presented that simplify calculations of street canyon spectral irradiances with minimum data input requirements, allowing better assessment of urban exposures than can be provided by standard unobstructed radiation measurements alone. Fast calculations improve the computational performance of radiation models, when numerous repetitions are required in time and location. The core of the models is the calculation of the spectral diffuse-to-global ratios (DGR) from an unobstructed global spectral measurement. The models are based on, and have been tested against, outcomes of the SMARTS2 algorithm (i.e. Simple Model of the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer of Sunshine). The modelled DGRs can then be used to partition global spectral irradiance values into their direct and diffuse components for different solar zenith angles. Finally, the effects of canyon obstructions can be evaluated independently on the direct and diffuse components, which are then recombined to give the total canyon irradiance. The first model allows ozone and aerosol inputs, while the second provides a further simplification, restricted to average ozone and aerosol contents but specifically designed for faster calculations. To assess the effect of obstructions and validate the calculations, a set of experiments with simulated obstructions (simulated canyons) were performed. The greatest source of uncertainty in the simplified calculations is in the treatment of diffuse radiation. The measurement-model agreement is therefore dependent on the region of the sky obscured and ranges from <5 % at all wavelengths to 20-40 % (wavelength dependent) when diffuse sky only is visible from the canyon.

  15. Fast calculations of the spectral diffuse-to-global ratios for approximating spectral irradiance at the street canyon level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Hernandez, Roberto; Smedley, Andrew R. D.; Webb, Ann R.

    2016-05-01

    Two radiative transfer models are presented that simplify calculations of street canyon spectral irradiances with minimum data input requirements, allowing better assessment of urban exposures than can be provided by standard unobstructed radiation measurements alone. Fast calculations improve the computational performance of radiation models, when numerous repetitions are required in time and location. The core of the models is the calculation of the spectral diffuse-to-global ratios (DGR) from an unobstructed global spectral measurement. The models are based on, and have been tested against, outcomes of the SMARTS2 algorithm (i.e. Simple Model of the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer of Sunshine). The modelled DGRs can then be used to partition global spectral irradiance values into their direct and diffuse components for different solar zenith angles. Finally, the effects of canyon obstructions can be evaluated independently on the direct and diffuse components, which are then recombined to give the total canyon irradiance. The first model allows ozone and aerosol inputs, while the second provides a further simplification, restricted to average ozone and aerosol contents but specifically designed for faster calculations. To assess the effect of obstructions and validate the calculations, a set of experiments with simulated obstructions (simulated canyons) were performed. The greatest source of uncertainty in the simplified calculations is in the treatment of diffuse radiation. The measurement-model agreement is therefore dependent on the region of the sky obscured and ranges from <5 % at all wavelengths to 20-40 % (wavelength dependent) when diffuse sky only is visible from the canyon.

  16. Non-Euclidean Visibility Problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fernando Chamizo

    2006-05-01

    We consider the analog of visibility problems in hyperbolic plane (represented by Poincaré half-plane model $\\mathbb{H}$), replacing the standard lattice $\\mathbb{Z} × \\mathbb{Z}$ by the orbit = under the full modular group $SL_2(\\mathbb{Z})$. We prove a visibility criterion and study orchard problem and the cardinality of visible points in large circles.

  17. WWW visibility in marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Ollila, T. (Timo)

    2013-01-01

    Social media is a vital channel for marketers nowadays. Customers are more empowered today than ever before and the Internet is accelerating the trend toward greater customer empowerment. In few years Web 2.0 has become a highly important media and it has changed the Web into platform where individuals can communicate, assemble and organize data. Web 2.0 also offers a variety of different “tools” for companies to be used in marketing. Because companies and products are visible and discussed i...

  18. Point-focus spectral splitting solar concentrator for multiple cells concentrating photovoltaic system

    CERN Document Server

    Maragliano, Carlo; Stefancich, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present and experimentally validate a low-cost design of a spectral splitting concentrator for the efficient conversion of solar energy. The optical device consists of a dispersive prismatic lens made of polycarbonate designed to simultaneously concentrate the solar light and split it into its spectral components. With respect to our previous implementation, this device concentrates the light along two axes and generates a light pattern compatible with the dimensions of a set of concentrating photovoltaic cells while providing a higher concentration ratio. The mathematical framework and the constructive approach used for the design are presented and the device performance is simulated using ray-tracing software. We obtain spectral separation in the visible range within a 3x1 cm2 area and a maximum concentration of 210x for a single wavelength. The device is fabricated by injection molding and its performance is experimentally investigated. We measure an optical transmissivity above 90% in the...

  19. Hard X-Ray Imaging of Individual Spectral Components in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M; Krucker, Säm

    2015-01-01

    We present a new analytical technique, combining Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations, to visualize solar flare emission as a function of spectral component (e.g., isothermal temperature) rather than energy. This computationally inexpensive technique is applicable to all spatially-invariant spectral forms and is useful for visualizing spectroscopically-determined individual sources and placing them in context, e.g., comparing multiple isothermal sources with nonthermal emission locations. For example, while extreme ultraviolet images can usually be closely identified with narrow temperature ranges, due to the emission being primarily from spectral lines of specific ion species, X-ray images are dominated by continuum emission and therefore have a broad temperature response, making it difficult to identify sources of specific temperatures regardless of the energy band of the image. We combine RHESSI calibrated X-ray visibilities wi...

  20. An experimental system for spectral line ratio measurements in the TJ-II stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chord-integrated emissions of spectral lines have been monitored in the TJ-II stellarator by using a spectral system with time and space scanning capabilities and relative calibration over the entire UV-visible spectral range. This system has been used to study the line ratio of lines of different ionization stages of carbon (C5+ 5290 A and C4+ 2271 A) for plasma diagnostic purposes. The local emissivity of these ions has been reconstructed, for quasistationary profiles, by means of the inversion Fisher method described previously. The experimental line ratio is being empirically studied and in parallel a simple spectroscopic model has been developed to account for that ratio. We are investigating whether the role played by charge exchange processes with neutrals and the existence of non-Maxwellian electrons, intrinsic to Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) heating, leave any distinguishable mark on this diagnostic method.

  1. Spectral response of rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves to Fe(2+) stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, GuangYu; Chen, Xin; Shi, Yi; Liu, XinHui

    2009-08-01

    In the management of lake eutrophication, the regulation effect of Fe is considered, in addition to the controlling nitrogen- and phosphorus input. Based on the "Fe hypothesis", this paper tentatively applied plant spectral response to the remote sensing early-warning mechanism of lake eutrophication. A laboratory water culture experiment with rice (Oryza sativa L.) was conducted to study Fe uptake by plants and the chlorophyll concentration and visible-near infrared spectrum of vegetable leaves as well as their interrelations under Fe(2+) stress. Three spectral indices, i.e., A (1) (integral value of the changes of spectral reflectivity in the range 460-670 nm under Fe(2+) stress), A (2) (integral value of the changes of spectral reflectivity in the range of 760-1000 nm under Fe(2+) stress) and S (blue-shift range of red edge curve under Fe(2+) stress), were used to establish quantitative models about the relationships between the rice leaf spectrum and Fe(2+) stress. With the increase of Fe(2+) in a culture solution, the Fe content in rice plants increased, while the chlorophyll concentration in vegetative leaves decreased. The spectral reflectivity of vegetable leaves increased in the visible light band but decreased in the near infrared band, and the blue-shift range of the red edge curve increased. The indices A (1), A (2) and S all had significant correlations with the Fe content in rice leaves, the correlation coefficient being respectively 0.951 (P 0.96) and predict the Fe level in rice leaves. PMID:19727593

  2. Transit spectroscopy of exoplanets from space: how to optimize the wavelength coverage and spectral resolving power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encrenaz, T.; Tinetti, G.; Tessenyi, M.; Drossart, P.; Hartogh, P.; Coustenis, A.

    2015-12-01

    The study of exoplanets is an exploding field in astronomy. Recent discoveries have made possible the development of a new research field, the spectroscopic characterization of the exoplanetary atmospheres, using both primary and eclipse transits. A dedicated space mission will make possible the characterization of many classes of exoplanets, from the hot Jupiters to the temperate super-Earths. In this paper, we discuss how the spectral range and the spectral resolving power can be optimized for identifying a maximum number of candidate atmospheric species. Spectral modeling shows that the simultaneous observation of the whole spectral range, from 0.55 to 16 μm is ideal for (1) capturing all types of planets at different temperatures, (2) detecting the variety of chemical atmospheric compounds with some redundancy, and (3) enabling an optimal retrieval of the chemical abundances and thermal profile. Limiting the spectral interval to 11 μm would make the retrieval more difficult in the case of cold exoplanets. In the visible range, the extension down to 0.4 s at different temperatures, (2) detecting the variety of chemical atmospheric compounds with some redundancy, and (3) enabling an optimal retrieval of the chemical abundances andst candidate molecules.

  3. Retrieval of atmospheric horizontal visibility by statistical regression from NOAA/AVHRR satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Huang; Hong, Wang; Junping, Qian; Guofu, Wang

    2006-07-01

    Based on the atmospheric horizontal visibility data from forty-seven observational stations along the eastern coast of China near the Taiwan Strait and simultaneous NOAA/AVHRR multichannel satellite data during January 2001 to December 2002, the spectral characters associated with visibility were investigated. Successful retrieval of visibility from multichannel NOAA/AVHRR data was performed using the principal component regression (PCR) method. A sample of retrieved visibility distribution was discussed with a sea fog process. The correlation coefficient between the observed and retrieved visibility was about 0.82, which is far higher than the 99.9% confidence level by statistical test. The rate of successful retrieval is 94.98% of the 458 cases during 2001 2002. The error distribution showed that high visibilities were usually under-estimated and low visibilities were over-estimated and the relative error between the observed and retrieved visibilities was about 21.4%.

  4. Planar Visibility Counting

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Matthias; Jähn, Claudius; der Heide, Friedhelm Meyer auf; Ziegler, Martin

    2008-01-01

    For a fixed virtual scene (=collection of simplices) S and given observer position p, how many elements of S are weakly visible (i.e. not fully occluded by others) from p? The present work explores the trade-off between query time and preprocessing space for these quantities in 2D: exactly, in the approximate deterministic, and in the probabilistic sense. We deduce the EXISTENCE of an O(m^2/n^2) space data structure for S that, given p and time O(log n), allows to approximate the number of occluded segments up to arbitrary constant absolute error; here m denotes the size of the Visibility Graph--which may be quadratic, but typically is just linear in the size n of the scene S. On the other hand, we present a data structure CONSTRUCTIBLE in O(n*log(n)+m^2*polylog(n)/l) preprocessing time and space with similar approximation properties and query time O(l*log n), where l

  5. Comparison of visible and near-infrared Raman cross-sections of explosives in solution and in the solid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Erik D; Guicheteau, Jason A; Fountain, Augustus W; Christesen, Steven D

    2012-06-01

    Raman cross-sections of explosives in solution and in the solid state have been measured using visible and near-infrared excitation via secondary calibration. These measurements are valuable for both fundamental scientific purposes and applications in the standoff detection of explosives. The explosive compounds RDX, HMX, TNT, 2,4-DNT, 2,6-DNT, and ammonium nitrate were measured using discrete excitation wavelengths ranging from 532 nm to 785 nm. A comparison of the spectral features and cross-sections between the solid state and solution was performed. Comparison is also made to cross-sections measured with deep ultraviolet excitation. PMID:22732533

  6. Application of Visible and Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging to Determine Soluble Protein Content in Oilseed Rape Leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Chu Zhang; Fei Liu; Wenwen Kong; Yong He

    2015-01-01

    Visible and near-infrared hyperspectral imaging covering spectral range of 380–1030 nm as a rapid and non-destructive method was applied to estimate the soluble protein content of oilseed rape leaves. Average spectrum (500–900 nm) of the region of interest (ROI) of each sample was extracted, and four samples out of 128 samples were defined as outliers by Monte Carlo-partial least squares (MCPLS). Partial least squares (PLS) model using full spectra obtained dependable performance with the co...

  7. Liquid-Crystal Coats Help Make Flows Visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Obara, Clifford J.

    1991-01-01

    Visible indication of transition of boundary layer from laminar to turbulent flow plays important role in aerodynamic tests in wind tunnels and in flight. In newly developed method, liquid-crystal coats used to make visible such features of boundary-layer flows as transitions, separations, and locations of shocks. Changes of color rapid and reversible. For flight applications, provides capability for making transitions visible throughout almost entire altitude and speed ranges of subsonic aircraft. Also applicable to visible indication of supersonic flows and suitable for general use in high- and low-speed wind-tunnel and water-tunnel testing.

  8. On court interpreters' visibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubslaff, Friedel; Martinsen, Bodil

    assessing the quality of the service rendered/received. The paper presents a small-scale case study based on an interpreted witness interrogation. Recent research on the interpreter's role has shown that interpreters across all settings perceive themselves as "visible" (Angelelli 2003, 2004). This has led...... in by the participants almost immediately after the interrogations and supplemented by interviews. The main objective of the project is to explore the interpreters' own perception of the quality of the service they render as well as the professional users´ and the other language users' perception of...... the quality of the service they receive. Ultimately, the findings will be used for training purposes. Future - and, for that matter, already practising - interpreters as well as the professional users of interpreters ought to take the reality of the interpreters' work in practice into account when...

  9. UVMag: stellar formation, evolution, structure and environment with space UV and visible spectropolarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Neiner, C; Fullerton, A; Gry, C; Hussain, G; Lebre, A; Morin, J; Petit, P; Sundqvist, J O; ud-Doula, A; Vidotto, A A; Wade, G A

    2014-01-01

    Important insights into the formation, structure, evolution and environment of all types of stars can be obtained through the measurement of their winds and possible magnetospheres. However, this has hardly been done up to now mainly because of the lack of UV instrumentation available for long periods of time. To reach this aim, we have designed UVMag, an M-size space mission equipped with a high-resolution spectropolarimeter working in the UV and visible spectral range. The UV domain is crucial in stellar physics as it is very rich in atomic and molecular lines and contains most of the flux of hot stars. Moreover, covering the UV and visible spectral domains at the same time will allow us to study the star and its environment simultaneously. Adding polarimetric power to the spectrograph will multiply tenfold the capabilities of extracting information on stellar magnetospheres, winds, disks, and magnetic fields. Examples of science objectives that can be reached with UVMag are presented for pre-main sequence,...

  10. Ion irradiation of the Murchison meteorite: Visible to mid-infrared spectroscopic results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, C.; Brunetto, R.; Barucci, M. A.; Dartois, E.; Duprat, J.; Engrand, C.; Godard, M.; Ledu, D.; Quirico, E.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: The goal of this study is to simulate space weathering processes on primitive bodies. We use ion implantation as a simulation of solar wind irradiation, which has been suggested by several authors to be the major component of space weathering on main belt asteroids. The laboratory analogs we irradiate and analyze are carbonaceous chondrites; we started the study with the Allende CV meteorite and in this companion paper we present results on the Murchison CM meteorite. Methods: We performed irradiations on pressed pellets of Murchison with 40 keV He+ and Ar+ ions using fluences up to 3 × 1016 ions/cm2. Reflectance spectra were acquired ex situ before and after irradiation in the visible to mid-infrared range (0.4-16 μm). A Raman analysis was also performed to investigate the modifications of the aromatic carbonaceous component. Results: Our results indicate that spectral variations after irradiation within the visible range are smaller than spectral variations due to sample grain size or viewing geometry of the Murchison meteorite. The aqueous alteration band profile near 3 μm changes after irradiation, as adsorbed water is removed, and phyllosilicates are affected. Raman spectroscopy highlights the insoluble organic matter (IOM) modification under irradiation. We observe a shift of the silicates band at 9.9 μm, probably due to a preferential loss of Mg (compared to Fe, the lighter Mg is more easily sputtered backward) and/or amorphization of Mg-rich materials. We compare our results to previous experiments on organic-rich materials (like asphaltite or carbonaceous chondrites), and on ordinary chondrites and olivine grains. We find that the reddening/darkening trend observed on silicate-rich surfaces is not valid for all carbonaceous chondrites, and that the spectral modifications after irradiation are a function of the initial albedo.

  11. Spectral Classification of Galaxies: An Orthogonal Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, A. J.; Szalay, A. S.; M. A. Bershady; Kinney, A. L.; D. Calzetti

    1994-01-01

    Classification of galaxy spectral energy distributions in terms of orthogonal basis functions provides an objective means of estimating the number of significant spectral components that comprise a particular galaxy type. We apply the Karhunen-Lo\\`{e}ve transform to derive a spectral eigensystem from a sample of ten galaxy spectral energy distributions. These spectra cover a wavelength range of 1200 \\AA\\ to 1 $\\mu$m and galaxy morphologies from elliptical to starburst. We find that the distri...

  12. Somewhere under the rainbow: the visible to far infrared imaging lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Troy A.; Alexay, Christopher C.; Vogel, Steven

    2011-06-01

    This article explores the complex design challenges of optical imaging systems that can operate over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum, covering all bands from the visible to the far infrared simultaneously. Although the focus is placed on a refractive solution to these challenges, an effort to outline the limitations of reflective solutions is also presented. After exploring a novel method to optimize the choice of optical materials, an elegant and efficient example is provided: a refractive lens that is at once a total optical solution (one lens covering a broad spectral range) and a common aperture solution (one lens that works simultaneously with several camera types). This solution, StingRay Optics' own SuperBandTM Optic, is ultimately explored in its functionality to address this need in an advantageous manner.

  13. Electrically tunable selective reflection of light from ultraviolet to visible and infrared by heliconical cholesterics

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, Jie; Li, Quan; Paterson, Daniel A; Storey, John M D; Imrie, Corrie T; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-01-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals with helicoidal molecular architecture are known for their ability to selectively reflect light with the wavelength that is determined by the periodicity of molecular orientations. Here we demonstrate that by using a cholesteric with oblique helicoidal(heliconical) structure, as opposed to the classic right-angle helicoid, one can vary the wavelength of selectively reflected light in a broad spectral range, from ultraviolet to visible and infrared (360-1520 nm for the same chemical composition) by simply adjusting the electric field applied parallel to the helicoidal axis. The effect exists in a wide temperature range (including the room temperatures) and thus can enable many applications that require dynamically controlled transmission and reflection of electromagnetic waves, from energy-saving smart windows to tunable organic lasers, reflective color display, and transparent see-through displays.

  14. Tuning the effective plasma frequency of nanorod metamaterials from visible to telecom wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, M. E.; Peruch, S.; Vasilantonakis, N.; Wardley, W. P.; Dickson, W.; Wurtz, G. A.; Zayats, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    Hyperbolic plasmonic metamaterials are important for designing sensing, nonlinear, and emission functionalities, which are, to a large extent, determined by the epsilon-near-zero behaviour observed close to an effective plasma frequency of the metamaterial. Here, we describe a method for tuning the effective plasma frequency of a gold nanorod-based metamaterial throughout the visible and near-infrared spectral ranges. These metamaterials, fabricated by two-step anodization in selenic acid and chemical post-processing, consist of nanorods with diameters of around 10 nm and interrod distances of around 100 nm and have a low effective plasma frequency down to a wavelength range below 1200 nm. Such metamaterials open up new possibilities for a variety of applications in the fields of bio- and chemical sensing, nonlinearity enhancement, and fluorescence control in the infrared.

  15. Visible laser-induced photosensitive effects in Tb3+-/Ce3+-doped heavy metal glasses for optical waveguide fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiuling; Ma, Qiuhua; Wang, Hui; Chen, Qiuping

    2016-03-01

    A rare earth doped heavy metal PbO-Bi2O3-B2O3-CeO2-TbO2 system was fabricated and characterized for waveguide fabrication. A glass host was selected among 11 heavy metal oxides candidates for rare earth doping and photosensitive study in visible range. The influences of rare earth contents on spectral and properties of glasses were investigated. Glass Pb50Bi20B30 + 1 % Tb + 1 % Ce was found to be ideal for laser irradiation multifunctional waveguides material which exhibited good thermal stability, high absorption and big refractive index change (7.9 × 10-3) at 1553 nm after visible laser exposure at 10,000 pulses for 60 s.

  16. Spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption over the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, L. V.; Correia, A. L.; Artaxo, P.; Procópio, A. S.; Andreae, M. O.

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we examine the spectral dependence of aerosol absorption at different sites and seasons in the Amazon Basin. The analysis is based on measurements performed during three intensive field experiments at a pasture site (Fazenda Nossa Senhora, Rondônia) and at a primary forest site (Cuieiras Reserve, Amazonas), from 1999 to 2004. Aerosol absorption spectra were measured using two Aethalometers: a 7-wavelength Aethalometer (AE30) that covers the visible (VIS) to near-infrared (NIR) spectral range, and a 2-wavelength Aethalometer (AE20) that measures absorption in the UV and in the NIR. As a consequence of biomass burning emissions, about 10 times greater absorption values were observed in the dry season in comparison to the wet season. Power law expressions were fitted to the measurements in order to derive the absorption Ångström exponent, defined as the negative slope of absorption versus wavelength in a log-log plot. At the pasture site, about 70 % of the absorption Ångström exponents fell between 1.5 and 2.5 during the dry season, indicating that biomass burning aerosols have a stronger spectral dependence than soot carbon particles. Ångström exponents decreased from the dry to the wet season, in agreement with the shift from biomass burning aerosols, predominant in the fine mode, to biogenic and dust aerosols, predominant in the coarse mode. The lowest absorption Ångström exponents (90 % of data below 1.5) were observed at the forest site during the dry season. Also, results indicate that low absorption coefficients were associated with low Ångström exponents. This finding suggests that biogenic aerosols from Amazonia have a weaker spectral dependence for absorption than biomass burning aerosols, contradicting our expectations of biogenic particles behaving as brown carbon. In a first order assessment, results indicate a small (<1 %) effect of variations in absorption Ångström exponents on 24-h aerosol forcings, at least in the spectral range of 450-880 nm. Further studies should be taken to assess the corresponding impact in the UV spectral range. The assumption that soot spectral properties represent all ambient light absorbing particles may cause a misjudgment of absorption towards the UV, especially in remote areas. Therefore, it is recommended to measure aerosol absorption at several wavelengths to accurately assess the impact of non-soot aerosols on climate and on photochemical atmospheric processes.

  17. Visible and near-infrared multispectral analysis of geochemically measured rock fragments at the Opportunity landing site in Meridiani Planum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Catherine M.; Farrand, William H.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Fleischer, Iris; Schröder, Christian; Yingst, Aileen; Jolliff, Brad; Gellert, Ralf; Bell, Jim; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Klingelhöfer, Göstar; Cohen, Barbara; Calvin, Wendy; Rutherford, Malcolm; Ashley, James

    2010-11-01

    We have used visible and near-infrared Panoramic Camera (Pancam) spectral data acquired by the Opportunity rover to analyze 15 rock fragments at the Meridiani Planum landing site. These spectral results were then compared to geochemistry measurements made by the in situ instruments Mössbauer (MB) and Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) to determine the feasibility of mineralogic characterization from Pancam data. Our results suggest that dust and alteration rinds coat many rock fragments, which limits our ability to adequately measure the mineralogy of some rocks from Pancam spectra relative to the different field of view and penetration depths of MB and APXS. Viewing and lighting geometry, along with sampling size, also complicate the spectral characterization of the rocks. Rock fragments with the same geochemistry of sulfate-rich outcrops have similar spectra, although the sulfate-rich composition cannot be ascertained based upon Pancam spectra alone. FeNi meteorites have spectral characteristics, particularly ferric oxide coatings, that generally differentiate them from other rocks at the landing site. Stony meteorites and impact fragments with unknown compositions have a diverse range of spectral properties and are not well constrained nor diagnostic in Pancam data. Bounce Rock, with its unique basalt composition, is easily differentiated in the Pancam data from all other rock types at Meridiani Planum. Our Pancam analyses of small pebbles adjacent to these 15 rock fragments suggests that other rock types may exist at the landing site but have not yet been geochemically measured.

  18. Rapid analysis of sugar content of intact orange fruit using ultraviolet and visible transmittance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yande; Wen, Jianping; Ouyang, Aiguo; Ying, Yibin

    2006-10-01

    Sugar content (SC) is very important factors of navel orange internal quality and can be measured non-destructive by visible and near infrared spectroscopy. The feasibility of visible and near infrared spectroscopy for nondestructively measuring SC of navel orange fresh juices was investigated by means of spectral transmittance technique. A total 55 juice samples were used to develop the calibration and prediction models. Three different kinds of mathematical treatments (original, first derivative and second derivative) of spectra in the range of 400-800 nm were discussed and two kinds of reference standards were used. Different spectra correction algorithms (constant, multiplicative signal correction (MSC) and standard normal variate (SNV) were compared. Three kinds of calibration models including partial least square (PLS) regression, stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR) and principle component regression (PCR) were evaluated for the determination of SC in navel orange juice. Performance of different models was assessed in terms of root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) and correlation coefficient (r) of validation set of samples. The correlation coefficients of calibration models for SC was 0.97, the correlation coefficients of prediction models for SC was 0.86, and the corresponding RMSEP was 0.56. The results show that visible near infrared transmittance technique is a feasible method for non-destructive measurement of sugar content of fruit juice.

  19. Inactivation of viruses by coherent excitations with a low power visible femtosecond laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu T-C

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resonant microwave absorption has been proposed in the literature to excite the vibrational states of microorganisms in an attempt to destroy them. But it is extremely difficult to transfer microwave excitation energy to the vibrational energy of microorganisms due to severe absorption of water in this spectral range. We demonstrate for the first time that, by using a visible femtosecond laser, it is effective to inactivate viruses such as bacteriophage M13 through impulsive stimulated Raman scattering. Results and discussion By using a very low power (as low as 0.5 nj/pulse visible femtosecond laser having a wavelength of 425 nm and a pulse width of 100 fs, we show that M13 phages were inactivated when the laser power density was greater than or equal to 50 MW/cm2. The inactivation of M13 phages was determined by plaque counts and had been found to depend on the pulse width as well as power density of the excitation laser. Conclusion Our experimental findings lay down the foundation for an innovative new strategy of using a very low power visible femtosecond laser to selectively inactivate viruses and other microorganisms while leaving sensitive materials unharmed by manipulating and controlling with the femtosecond laser system.

  20. Near-infrared spectral imaging of the female breast for quantitative oximetry in optical mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a hybrid continuous-wave, frequency-domain instrument for near-infrared spectral imaging of the female breast based on a tandem, planar scanning of one illumination optical fiber and one collection optical fiber configured in a transmission geometry. The spatial sampling rate of 25 points/cm2 is increased to 400 points/cm2 by postprocessing the data with a 2D cubic spline interpolation. We then apply a previously developed spatial second-derivative algorithm to an edge-corrected intensity image (N-image) to enhance the visibility and resolution of optical inhomogeneities in breast tissue such as blood vessels and tumors. The spectral data at each image pixel consist of 515-point spectra over the 650-900 nm wavelength range, thus featuring a spectral density of two data points per nanometer. We process the measured spectra with a paired-wavelength spectral analysis method to quantify the oxygen saturation of detected optical inhomogeneities, under the assumption that they feature a locally higher hemoglobin concentration. Our initial measurements on two healthy human subjects have generated high-resolution optical mammograms displaying a network of blood vessels with values of hemoglobin saturation typically falling within the 60%-95% range, which is physiologically reasonable. This approach to spectral imaging and oximetry of the breast has the potential to efficiently exploit the high intrinsic contrast provided by hemoglobin in breast tissue and to contribute a useful tool in the detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of breast pathologies

  1. Choices, Choices: Spatial, Spectral, Algorithmic and Training Data Requirements For Accurate Forest Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, J. A.; Haverkamp, P.; Ramirez, C.; Yu, P. H.; Ustin, S.

    2011-12-01

    The number of choices among technologies and techniques for performing remote sensing analyses continue to increase at a rapid pace as new sensors come on-line, and new analytical algorithms are made available. For an end-user, the choice of the best sensor and technique combination for addressing a particular remote sensing problem and given economic constraints can be confusing. To help illuminate some of these decisions, we performed an analysis asking: what is the relationship between sensor characteristics and analytical techniques on the accuracy of remote sensing classification of a forested landscape? Specifically, we targeted three common forestry-related remote sensing goals: tree species classification, growth form classification, and percent cover of trees. For imagery characteristics, we examined the impacts of pixel size (ranging from 0.5m to 250m), spectral range, and resolution (wide-band panchromatic visible to narrow-band hyperspectral visible/near infrared/shortwave infrared), and data fusion with LiDAR. In terms of analytical techniques, we used a wide assortment of classification algorithms including maximum likelihood, RandomForests, Spectral Angle Mapper, linear spectral mixture analysis, etc. These algorithms were applied at the pixel level, a local window level, and to polygon objects representing individual plants or patches of plants. We also investigated the impact of training data sample size on the accuracy of thematic classes and structural estimates.

  2. Applications of spectral band adjustment factors (SBAF) for cross-calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Gyanesh

    2013-01-01

    To monitor land surface processes over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales, it is critical to have coordinated observations of the Earth's surface acquired from multiple spaceborne imaging sensors. However, an integrated global observation framework requires an understanding of how land surface processes are seen differently by various sensors. This is particularly true for sensors acquiring data in spectral bands whose relative spectral responses (RSRs) are not similar and thus may produce different results while observing the same target. The intrinsic offsets between two sensors caused by RSR mismatches can be compensated by using a spectral band adjustment factor (SBAF), which takes into account the spectral profile of the target and the RSR of the two sensors. The motivation of this work comes from the need to compensate the spectral response differences of multispectral sensors in order to provide a more accurate cross-calibration between the sensors. In this paper, radiometric cross-calibration of the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and the Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors was performed using near-simultaneous observations over the Libya 4 pseudoinvariant calibration site in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. The RSR differences of the analogous ETM+ and MODIS spectral bands provide the opportunity to explore, understand, quantify, and compensate for the measurement differences between these two sensors. The cross-calibration was initially performed by comparing the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectances between the two sensors over their lifetimes. The average percent differences in the long-term trends ranged from $-$5% to $+$6%. The RSR compensated ETM+ TOA reflectance (ETM+$^{ast}$) measurements were then found to agree with MODIS TOA reflectance to within 5% for all bands when Earth Observing-1 Hy- erion hyperspectral data were used to produce the SBAFs. These differences were later reduced to within 1% for all bands (except band 2) by using Environmental Satellite Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography hyperspectral data to produce the SBAFs.

  3. Mechanism of yeast cell photoinactivation by visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of inactivation of visible light without sensitizers added to the cells has been investigated. In particular, the problem on the nature of intracellular sensitizers has been studied. Visible light is shown to inactivate the cells only in the presence of oxygen, that gives evidence that the process of photoinactivation is carried out according a photodynamic mechanism with participation of the endogenic sensitizer. The pigment - sensitizer is identified as the protoporphyrin on the basis of comparison of data obtained for the absorption spectrum structure and pigment fluorescence with the literature data on the spectral properties of porphyrin compounds

  4. Search for Olivine Spectral Signatures on the Surface of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, E.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Farina, M.; Frigeri, A.; Longobardo, A.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; McSween, H. Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Sunshine, J.; McCord, T. B.

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of olivines on Vesta were first postulated from traditional petrogenetic models which suggest the formation of olivine as lower crustal cumulates. An indirect confirmation is given by their presence as a minor component in some samples of diogenite meteorites, the harzburgitic diogenites and the dunitic diogenites, and as olivine mineral clasts in howardites. Another indication for this mineral was given by interpretations of groundbased and Hubble Space Telescope observations that suggested the presence of local olivine-bearing units on the surface of Vesta. The VIR instrument onboard the DAWN mission has been mapping Vesta since July 2011. VIR acquired hyperspectral images of Vesta s surface in the wavelength range from 0.25 to 5.1 m during Approach, Survey and High Altitude Mapping (HAMO) orbits that allowed a 2/3 of the entire asteroid surface to be mapped. The VIR operative spectral interval, resolution and coverage is suitable for the detection and mapping of any olivine rich regions that may occur on the Vesta surface. The abundance of olivine in diogenites is typically lower than 10% but some samples richer in olivine are known. However, we do not expect to have extensive exposures of olivine-rich material on Vesta. Moreover, the partial overlap of olivine and pyroxene spectral signatures will make olivine difficult to detect. Different spectral parameters have been used to map olivine on extraterrestrial bodies, and here we discuss the different approaches used, and develop new ones specifically for Vesta. Our new methods are based on combinations of the spectral parameters relative to the 1 and 2 micron bands (the most prominent spectral features of Vesta surface in the visible and the infrared), such as band center locations, band depths, band areas, band area ratios. Before the direct application to the VIR data, the efficiency of each approach is evaluated by means of analysis of laboratory spectra of HED meteorites, pyroxenes, olivines and their mixtures.

  5. Using Visible/Near-Infrared Spectroscopy to Identify Cryptotephra Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCanta, M. C.; Thomson, B. J.; Fisher, E.

    2014-12-01

    Continually accumulating marine sediments incorporate tephra layers within their depositional record that can be linked to individual explosive volcanic events. These layers can range from several meters in thickness, to discrete layers invisible to the naked eye (cryptotephra). Identification of cryptotephra layers is paramount for complete characterization of the eruptive record of a volcanic center, not just the largest eruptive events. However, cryptotephra recognition is hampered by their small volume in most drill cores. A non-destructive method to distinguish tephra layers, particularly those of a high silica nature which may not be readily detectable with magnetic methods, is visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) spectroscopy. The Vis/NIR region of the light spectrum contains strong absorption features due to charge-transfer absorptions in transition metals (dominated by iron) and vibration and overtone bands due to hydroxyl and water (including near 1.4 ?m, 1.9 ?m, and 2.2-2.5 ?m). The exact position and nature of these bands provide a means to identify various carbonate-, hydroxyl-, iron-, phyllosilicate-, sulfate-, and water-bearing minerals (e.g., Pieters and Englert, 1993). We produced a series of mixtures of hemipelagic sediment and tephra which were used to identify band positions and features which strongly correlate with the presence of tephra (see figure). The addition of ~15-20 wt.% tephra to a sediment results in recognizable spectral changes. The mixture data was used to create a MATLAB program to run unknown sample analyses through. We then used an ASD FieldSpec to collect Vis/NIR data (0.39-2.5 ?m) on the upper 10 m of core collected during IODP 340 (U1396C) off the coast of Montserrat at 0.5 cm resolution and applied our tephra recognition program to this data. We identified 29 potential cryptotephra layers in the 10 m analyzed. Dissolution techniques are being completed to corroborate the spectral data.

  6. The modification of spectral characteristics of cytostatics by optical beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascu, Mihail Lucian; Brezeanu, Mihail; Carstocea, Benone D.; Voicu, Letitia; Gazdaru, Doina M.; Smarandache, Adriana A.

    2004-10-01

    Besides the biochemical action of methotrexate (MTX) and 5-fluorouracil (FU) their effect in destroying cancer tumours could be enhanced by exposure to light at different doses. Absorption, excitation and emission spectra of 10-4M - 10-5M MTX solutions in natural saline and sodium hydroxide at pH = 8.4 were measured, while their exposure to coherent and uncoherent light in the visible and near ultraviolet (UV) spectral ranges was made (Hg lamps and Nitrogen pulsed laser radiation were used). Absorption spectra exhibit spectral bands in the range 200 nm - 450 nm. The 200 - 450 nm excitation spectra were measured with emission centered on 470 nm; MTX fluorescence excitation was measured at 390 nm and the emission was detected between 400 nm and 600 nm showing a maximum at 470 nm. Spectra modifications, nonlinearly depending on exposure time (varying from 1 min to 20 min), evidenced MTX photo-dissociation to the fluorescent compound 2,4 diamino-formylpteridine. In the 5-FU case the absorption spectra exhibit bands between 200 nm and 450 nm. The emission fluorescence spectra were measured between 400 nm and 600 nm, with λex = 350 nm for UV Hg lamp and with λex = 360 nm for laser irradiated samples; at irradiation with N2 laser emitted radiation the excitation spectra were measured in the range of 200 nm - 400 nm, with λem = 440 nm. New vascularity rapid destruction was observed for conjunctive impregnated with 5-FU solution whilst exposed to incoherent UV and visible light.

  7. Macroscopic Invisibility Cloak for Visible Light

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Baile; Luo, Yuan; Liu, Xiaogang; Barbastathis, George

    2010-01-01

    Invisibility cloaks, a subject that usually occurs in science fiction and myths, have attracted wide interest recently because of their possible realization. The biggest challenge to true invisibility is known to be the cloaking of a macroscopic object in the broad range of wavelengths visible to the human eye. Here we experimentally solve this problem by incorporating the principle of transformation optics into a conventional optical lens fabrication with low-cost materials and simple manufa...

  8. Quantitative study on appearance of microvessels in spectral endoscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Takaaki; Shiraishi, Yasushi; Arai, Fumihito; Morimoto, Yoshinori; Yuasa, Atsuko

    2015-03-01

    Increase in abnormal microvessels in the superficial mucosa is often relevant to diagnostic findings of neoplasia in digestive endoscopy; hence, observation of superficial vasculature is crucial for cancer diagnosis. To enhance the appearance of such vessels, several spectral endoscopic imaging techniques have been developed, such as narrow-band imaging and blue laser imaging. Both techniques exploit narrow-band blue light for the enhancement. The emergence of such spectral imaging techniques has increased the importance of understanding the relation of the light wavelength to the appearance of superficial vasculature, and thus a new method is desired for quantitative analysis of vessel visibility in relation to the actual structure in the tissue. Here, we developed microvessel-simulating phantoms that allowed quantitative evaluation of the appearance of 15-?m-thick vessels. We investigated the relation between the vascular contrast and light wavelength by the phantom measurements and also verified it in experiments with swine, where the endoscopically observed vascular contrast was investigated together with its real vascular depth and diameter obtained by microscopic observation of fluorescence-labeled vessels. Our study indicates that changing the spectral property even in the wavelength range of blue light may allow selective enhancement of the vascular depth for clinical use.

  9. Visible spatial frequency domain imaging with a digital light microprojector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Alexander J; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Konecky, Soren D; Cui, Haotian; Rice, Tyler B; Choi, Bernard; Durkin, Anthony J; Tromberg, Bruce J

    2013-09-01

    There is a need for cost effective, quantitative tissue spectroscopy and imaging systems in clinical diagnostics and pre-clinical biomedical research. A platform that utilizes a commercially available light-emitting diode (LED) based projector, cameras, and scaled Monte Carlo model for calculating tissue optical properties is presented. These components are put together to perform spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI), a model-based reflectance technique that measures and maps absorption coefficients (μa) and reduced scattering coefficients (μs') in thick tissue such as skin or brain. We validate the performance of the flexible LED and modulation element (FLaME) system at 460, 530, and 632 nm across a range of physiologically relevant μa values (0.07 to 1.5  mm-1) in tissue-simulating intralipid phantoms, showing an overall accuracy within 11% of spectrophotometer values for μa and 3% for μs'. Comparison of oxy- and total hemoglobin fits between the FLaME system and a spectrophotometer (450 to 1000 nm) is differed by 3%. Finally, we acquire optical property maps of a mouse brain in vivo with and without an overlying saline well. These results demonstrate the potential of FLaME to perform tissue optical property mapping in visible spectral regions and highlight how the optical clearing effect of saline is correlated to a decrease in μs' of the skull. PMID:24005154

  10. Validation of UV-visible aerosol optical thickness retrieved from spectroradiometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Brogniez

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Global and diffuse UV-visible solar irradiances are routinely measured since 2003 with a spectroradiometer operated by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphrique (LOA located in Villeneuve d'Ascq, France. The analysis of the direct irradiance derived by cloudless conditions enables retrieving the aerosol optical thickness (AOT spectrum in the 330450 nm range. The site hosts also sunphotometers from the AERONET/PHOTONS network performing routinely measurements of the AOT at several wavelengths. On one hand, comparisons between the spectroradiometer and the sunphotometer AOT at 440 nm as well as, when available, at 340 and 380 nm, show good agreement. On the other hand, the AOT's spectral variations have been compared using the Angstrm exponents derived from AOT data at 340 and 440 nm for both instruments. The comparisons show that this parameter is difficult to retrieve accurately due to the small wavelength range and due to the weak AOT values. Thus, AOT derived at wavelengths outside the spectroradiometer range by means of an extrapolation using the Angstrm parameter would be of poor value, whereas, spectroradiometer's spectral AOT could be used for direct validation of other AOT, such as those provided by satellite instruments.

  11. Spectral dimensions from the spectral action

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The generalised spectral dimension $D_{ S}(T)$ provides a powerful tool for comparing different approaches to quantum gravity. In this work, we apply this formalism to the classical spectral actions obtained within the framework of almost-commutative geometry. Analysing the propagation of spin-0, spin-1 and spin-2 fields, we show that a non-trivial spectral dimension arises already at the classical level. The effective field theory interpretation of the spectral action yields plateau-structur...

  12. An integrated model of soil-canopy spectral radiance observations, photosynthesis, fluorescence, temperature and energy balance

    OpenAIRE

    C. van der Tol; Verhoef, W.; Timmermans, J.; Verhoef, A; Su, Z

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the model SCOPE (Soil Canopy Observation, Photochemistry and Energy fluxes), which is a vertical (1-D) integrated radiative transfer and energy balance model. It calculates the radiation and the energy balance of a vegetated land surface at the level of single leaves as well as at canopy level, and the spectrum of the outgoing radiation in the viewing direction, at a high spectral resolution over the range from 0.4 to 50 μm, thus including the visible, near and shortwave i...

  13. Visible-frequency hyperbolic metasurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    High, Alexander A.; Devlin, Robert C.; Dibos, Alan; Polking, Mark; Wild, Dominik S.; Perczel, Janos; de Leon, Nathalie P.; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Park, Hongkun

    2015-06-01

    Metamaterials are artificial optical media composed of sub-wavelength metallic and dielectric building blocks that feature optical phenomena not present in naturally occurring materials. Although they can serve as the basis for unique optical devices that mould the flow of light in unconventional ways, three-dimensional metamaterials suffer from extreme propagation losses. Two-dimensional metamaterials (metasurfaces) such as hyperbolic metasurfaces for propagating surface plasmon polaritons have the potential to alleviate this problem. Because the surface plasmon polaritons are guided at a metal-dielectric interface (rather than passing through metallic components), these hyperbolic metasurfaces have been predicted to suffer much lower propagation loss while still exhibiting optical phenomena akin to those in three-dimensional metamaterials. Moreover, because of their planar nature, these devices enable the construction of integrated metamaterial circuits as well as easy coupling with other optoelectronic elements. Here we report the experimental realization of a visible-frequency hyperbolic metasurface using single-crystal silver nanostructures defined by lithographic and etching techniques. The resulting devices display the characteristic properties of metamaterials, such as negative refraction and diffraction-free propagation, with device performance greatly exceeding those of previous demonstrations. Moreover, hyperbolic metasurfaces exhibit strong, dispersion-dependent spin-orbit coupling, enabling polarization- and wavelength-dependent routeing of surface plasmon polaritons and two-dimensional chiral optical components. These results open the door to realizing integrated optical meta-circuits, with wide-ranging applications in areas from imaging and sensing to quantum optics and quantum information science.

  14. A review of multitaper spectral analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babadi, Behtash; Brown, Emery N

    2014-05-01

    Nonparametric spectral estimation is a widely used technique in many applications ranging from radar and seismic data analysis to electroencephalography (EEG) and speech processing. Among the techniques that are used to estimate the spectral representation of a system based on finite observations, multitaper spectral estimation has many important optimality properties, but is not as widely used as it possibly could be. We give a brief overview of the standard nonparametric spectral estimation theory and the multitaper spectral estimation, and give two examples from EEG analyses of anesthesia and sleep. PMID:24759284

  15. Spectral Variability of FSRQs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Minfeng Gu; Y. L. Ai

    2011-03-01

    The optical variability of 29 flat spectrum radio quasars in SDSS Stripe 82 region are investigated by using DR7 released multi-epoch data. All FSRQs show variations with overall amplitude ranging from 0.24 mag to 3.46 mag in different sources. About half of FSRQs show a bluer-when-brighter trend, which is commonly observed for blazars. However, only one source shows a redder-when-brighter trend, which implies it is rare in FSRQs. In this source, the thermal emission may be responsible for the spectral behaviour.

  16. The visible spectrum of Pluto: secular and longitudinal variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Vania; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemí; Emery, Joshua P.; Licandro, Javier; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Grundy, Will; Binzel, Richard P.

    2015-11-01

    Continuous near-infrared spectroscopic observations during the last 30 years enabled the characterization of the Pluto's surface and the study of its variability. Nevertheless, only few data are available in the visible range, where the nature of the complex-organics can be studied.For this reason, we started an observational campaign to obtain the Pluto's relative reflectance in the visible range, with the aim of characterizing the different components of its surface, and providing ground based observations in support of the New Horizons mission. We observed Pluto on six nights in 2014, with the imager/spectrograph ACAM@WHT (La Palma, Spain). We obtained six spectra in the 0.40 - 0.93 µm range, that covered a whole Pluto's rotational period (6.4 days).To study longitudinal variations, we computed for all the spectra the spectral slope, and the position and the depth of the methane ice absorption bands. Also, to search for secular or seasonal variations we compared our data with previously published results.All the spectra present a red slope, indicating the presence of complex organics on Pluto's surface, and show the methane ice absorption bands between 0.73 and 0.90 μm. We also report the detection of the CH4 absorption band at 0.62 μm, already detected in the spectra of Makemake and Eris. The measurement of the band depth at 0.62 μm in the new spectra of Pluto, and in the spectra of Makemake and Eris, permits us to estimate the Lambert coefficient, not measured yet at this wavelength, at a temperature of 30 K and 40 K.We find that all the CH4 bands present a blue shift. This shift is minimum at the Charon-facing hemisphere, where the CH4 is also more abundant, indicating a higher degree of saturation of CH4 in the CH4:N2 dilution at this hemisphere.Comparing with data in the literature, we found that the longitudinal and secular variations of the parameters measured in our spectra are in accordance with previous results and with the distribution of the dark and bright material as showed by the Pluto's albedo maps from New Horizons.In 2015, new observations were run quasi-simultaneously with the New Horizons flyby at 10 different Pluto longitudes (July 3 to 14) . The data are currently being reduced.

  17. Design of cloaking metamaterials using spectral representation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai Leung, Lai; Fung, Tai Hang; Yu, Kin Wah

    2008-03-01

    Controlling the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves, for instance in cloaking problem, has become an important topic in nanophotonics. So far, following the cloaking model proposed by Pendry et al. [1], the experimental realization was only limited to the microwave region [2]. Since practical application lies in the visible range, we have extended the investigation to that region by utilizing nanocomposites with reference to the material parameters proposed by Pendry et al. and Shalaev et al. [3]. The calculations can be made much simpler by invoking the spectral representation theory [4]. The loss and dispersion effects, as well as the propagation of EM waves are assessed for the designed cloaking models in order to investigate the cloaking performance. Further analyses show that our models can accomplish the desired cloaking effect in the visible range. Moreover, the loss and dispersion effects are found to be small and acceptable.[1] J. B. Pendry, D. Schurig, and D. R. Smith, Science 312, 1780 (2006). [2] D. Schurig, J. J. Mock, B. J. Justice, S. A. Cummer, J. B. Pendry, A. F. Starr, D. R. Smith Science 314, 5801 (2006). [3] Wenshan Cai, Uday K. Chettiar, Alexander V. Kildishev and Vladimir M. Shalaev, Nature photonics 1 (2007). [4] L. Dong, Mikko Karttunen, K. W. Yu, Phys. Rev. E 72, 016613 (2005).

  18. Preliminary design of the full-Stokes UV and visible spectropolarimeter for UVMag/Arago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertenais, Martin; Neiner, Coralie; Pars, Laurent; Petit, Pascal; Snik, Frans; van Harten, Gerard

    2015-10-01

    The UVMag consortium proposed the space mission project Arago to ESA at its M4 call. Arago is dedicated to the study of the dynamic 3D environment of stars and planets. This space mission will be equipped with a high-resolution spectropolarimeter working from 119 to 888 nm. A preliminary optical design of the whole instrument has been prepared and is presented here. The design consists of the telescope, the instrument itself, and the focusing optics. Considering not only the scientific requirements, but also the cost and size constraints to fit an M-size mission, the telescope has a 1.3 m diameter primary mirror and is a classical Cassegrain-type telescope that allows a polarization-free focus. The polarimeter is placed at this Cassegrain focus. This is the key element of the mission and the most challenging one to be designed. The main challenge lies in the huge spectral range offered by the instrument; the polarimeter has to deliver the full Stokes vector with a high precision from the FUV (119 nm) to the NIR (888 nm). The polarimeter module is then followed by a high-resolution echelle-spectrometer achieving a resolution of 35000 in the visible range and 25000 in the UV. The two channels are separated after the echelle grating, allowing specific cross-dispersion and focusing optics for the UV and the visible ranges. Considering the large field of view and the high numerical aperture, the focusing optics for both the UV and the visible channels is a Three-Mirror-Anastigmatic (TMA) telescope, needed to focus the various wavelengths and many orders onto the detectors.

  19. Spectrally Resolved Two-Colour Femtosecond Photon Echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dao, Lap; Lincoln, Craig; Lowe, Martin; Hannaford, Peter

    We describe a potentially powerful multidimensional technique based on spectrally resolved 2-colour 3-pulse photon echoes in the visible region for probing vibrational and electronic dynamics in complex molecular systems on a femtosecond time scale. Recording of the spectrum of the photon echo signals yields detailed information about the temporal evolution of the amplitude of the nonlinear polarization induced in the sample by the three temporally separated femtosecond laser pulses. Suitable selection of the wavelengths of the three laser pulses allows different sets of energy levels to be selected and the dynamics of the ground and excited states to be separated and investigated. The technique is applied to studies of dynamical processes in a wide range of molecular systems, including the dye molecules Rhodamine 101, Rhodamine B and cresyl violet; the blue emitting semiconductor gallium nitride; semiconductor CdTe/ZnSe quantum dots; and the biomolecules myoglobin and carbonmonoxy myoglobin.

  20. Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA) is an unsupervised feature extraction technique similar to PCA that was developed to better distinguish spectral features in...

  1. On k-visibility graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Babbitt, Matthew; Geneson, J. T.; Khovanova, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    We examine several types of visibility graphs in which sightlines can pass through $k$ objects. For $k \\geq 1$ we bound the maximum thickness of semi-bar $k$-visibility graphs between $\\lceil \\frac{2}{3} (k + 1) \\rceil$ and $2k$. In addition we show that the maximum number of edges in arc and circle $k$-visibility graphs on $n$ vertices is at most $(k+1)(3n-k-2)$ for $n > 4k+4$ and ${n \\choose 2}$ for $n \\leq 4k+4$, while the maximum chromatic number is at most $6k+6$. In semi-arc $k$-visibil...

  2. Visibility regimes in mediatized publicness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Mateus

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering the relationship between politics, media and publicness, this paper ponders the consequences of visibility in the political field. Identifying some of its existing regimes, it will posit that today visibility plays an ambivalent function to politics: it can simultaneously operate as a synoptic monitoring and control of politicians; and at the same time it may stand as an opportunity to build a charismatic leadership. In fact, political visibilities are now negotiated between the boundaries of private and public realms, and they can take the form of a risk, or an opportunity to build on a charismatic leadership.

  3. A single-layer wide-angle negative-index metamaterial at visible freque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos, Stanley P. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); de Waele, Rene [FOM Inst. AMOLF, Amersterdam (Netherlands); Polman, Albert [FOM Inst. AMOLF, Amersterdam (Netherlands); Atwater, Harry A. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2010-04-18

    Metamaterials are materials with artificial electromagnetic properties defined by their sub-wavelength structure rather than their chemical composition. Negative-index materials (NIMs) are a special class of metamaterials characterized by an effective negative index that gives rise to such unusual wave behaviour as backwards phase propagation and negative refraction. These extraordinary properties lead to many interesting functions such as sub-diffraction imaging and invisibility cloaking. So far, NIMs have been realized through layering of resonant structures, such as split-ring resonators, and have been demonstrated at microwave to infrared frequencies over a narrow range of angles-of-incidence and polarization. However, resonant-element NIM designs suffer from the limitations of not being scalable to operate at visible frequencies because of intrinsic fabrication limitations, require multiple functional layers to achieve strong scattering and have refractive indices that are highly dependent on angle of incidence and polarization. Here we report a metamaterial composed of a single layer of coupled plasmonic coaxial waveguides that exhibits an effective refractive index of -2 in the blue spectral region with a figure-of-merit larger than 8. The resulting NIM refractive index is insensitive to both polarization and angle-of-incidence over a ±50° angular range, yielding a wide-angle NIM at visible frequencies.

  4. Deriving atmospheric visibility from satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffler, M.; Schneider, Ch.; Popp, Ch.; Wunderle, S.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric visibility is a measure that reflects different physical and chemical properties of the atmosphere. In general, poor visibility conditions come along with risks for transportation (e.g. road traffic, aviation) and can negatively impact human health since visibility impairment often implies the presence of atmospheric pollution. Ambient pollutants, particulate matter, and few gaseous species decrease the perceptibility of distant objects. Common estimations of this parameter are usually based on human observations or devices that measure the transmittance of light from an artificial light source over a short distance. Such measurements are mainly performed at airports and some meteorological stations. A major disadvantage of these observations is the gap between the measurements, leaving large areas without any information. As aerosols are one of the most important factors influencing atmospheric visibility in the visible range, the knowledge of their spatial distribution can be used to infer visibility with the so called Koschmieder equation, which relates visibility and atmospheric extinction. In this study, we evaluate the applicability of satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to infer atmospheric visibility on large spatial scale. First results applying AOD values scaled with the planetary boundary layer height are promising. For the comparison we use a full automated and objective procedure for the estimation of atmospheric visibility with the help of a digital panorama camera serving as ground truth. To further investigate the relation between the vertical measure of AOD and the horizontal visibility data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) site Laegeren (Switzerland), where the digital camera is mounted, are included as well. Finally, the derived visibility maps are compared with synoptical observations in central Europe.

  5. UV-visible luminescence properties of the broad-band Yb:CALGO laser crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffres, A.; Sharma, S. K.; Loiseau, P.; Viana, B.; Doualan, J. L.; Moncorg, R.

    2015-03-01

    Yb:CALGO is now recognized to exhibit outstanding properties for the production of high-power and ultra-short laser pulses in the near infrared spectral range. However, various UV-visible absorption bands can be also observed due to different types of charge transfer mechanisms. Some of them are assigned to the formation of color centers due to small polarons and others to O2-?Yb3+ ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) transitions. The former can be removed by using adequate thermal treatments. The latter are intrinsic and they are very intense with cross sections of about two orders of magnitude larger that the near infrared ones. In fact, such LMCT absorption bands are responsible for relatively large changes of ionic polarizabilities and to non-negligible pseudo-nonlinear changes of refractive indices which should certainly affect the laser properties of Yb:CALGO at high pump power levels.

  6. High-power fiber-coupled 100W visible spectrum diode lasers for display applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Andreas; Kster, Matthias; Khler, Bernd; Biesenbach, Jens

    2013-02-01

    Diode lasers in the blue and red spectral range are the most promising light sources for upcoming high-brightness digital projectors in cinemas and large venue displays. They combine improved efficiency, longer lifetime and a greatly improved color space compared to traditional xenon light sources. In this paper we report on high-power visible diode laser sources to serve the demands of this emerging market. A unique electro-optical platform enables scalable fiber coupled sources at 638 nm with an output power of up to 100 W from a 400 ?m NA0.22 fiber. For the blue diode laser we demonstrate scalable sources from 5 W to 100 W from a 400 ?m NA0.22 fiber.

  7. Visibility improvement of shadow regions using hyperspectral band integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidike, Paheding; Diskin, Yakov; Arigela, Saibabu; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2014-10-01

    We present a hyperspectral image enhancement technique that utilizes spectral angle information to improve the local contrast of shadow regions and increases spatial resolution of the output color image determined by the enhancement process. The proposed visibility improvement technique is presented in a two-stage approach. The first stage of the algorithm improves the contrast within the image, thus enhancing the textural details of the scene. To minimize the effects of illumination variations on the visibility of objects in the scene, the spectral angle mapper (SAM) is employed, which allows the local pixel information to be insensitive to changes in illumination. A color restoration process is used to provide an enhanced color image from computed spectral angle between the reference spectrum and unknown spectra. This step enables us to colorize the output image along with the enhanced shadow regions. In the second stage, the spatial resolution of the contrast enhanced image is increased by using single image super resolution technique on the enhanced image. The super resolution technique employs a nonlinear interpolation based on multi-level local Fourier phase features. The combination of the enhancement, color restoration, and super resolution approaches provide better visibility of objects in the shadow regions. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is verified using realworld hyperspectral data.

  8. Intercalibration of GOES Imager visible channels over the Sonoran Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fangfang; Wu, Xiangqian; Grotenhuis, Michael; Qian, Haifeng

    2014-07-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have been observing the Western Hemisphere since the late 1970s, providing valuable information for weather forecast and climate change studies. Due to the lack of an onboard calibration device for the visible channel, accurate reflectance of the visible channel data depends on vicarious calibration methods to provide postlaunch calibration coefficients to compensate for the degraded responsivity. In this study, the Sonoran Desert, which can be viewed by both GOES-East and GOES-West satellites, is used to intercalibrate the visible channels on board the three-axis stabilized GOES satellite Imagers traceable to the Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 6 (C6) calibration standard. It was found that when the anomalous reflectance in 2004 and 2005 are excluded, the Sonoran Desert is radiometrically, spatially, and spectrally stable at the GOES viewing geometries and thus can be considered as a pseudo-invariant calibration site to develop long-term GOES Imager visible data set. To characterize the desert target reflectance with the MODIS data, GOES observations over 1 year period are used to convert the MODIS reflectance to the GOES viewing and solar illumination geometries. The spectral band adjustment factor for each GOES Imager visible channel is generated with a set of clear-sky Hyperion measurements. A trending algorithm, which consists of a polynomial function for the description of instrument degradation performance and two sine terms for the impacts of the seasonal variations of the solar zenith angle and atmospheric components, is applied to fit the time series of prelaunch calibrated reflectance. The combined calibration uncertainty of the desert calibration method is less than 4% at the Aqua MODIS C6 calibration standard. The difference of the postlaunch calibration coefficients between the desert calibration and the current GOES visible operational calibration methods is mainly within 5%.

  9. Making the invisible visible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steensel, Maurice A M

    2016-04-01

    In this review, I will discuss how careful scrutiny of genetic skin disorders could help us to understand human biology. Like other organs, the skin and its appendages, such as hairs and teeth, experience fundamental biological processes ranging from lipid metabolism to vesicular transport and cellular migration. However, in contrast to other organ systems, they are accessible and can be studied with relative ease. By visually revealing the functional consequences of single gene defects, genetic skin diseases offer a unique opportunity to study human biology. Here, I will illustrate this concept by discussing how human genetic disorders of skin pigmentation reflect the mechanisms underlying this complex and vital process. PMID:26877141

  10. Generation of high-power femtosecond supercontinua in the near-IR spectral range using broadband parametric frequency conversion in LBO and DCDA crystals pumped at λ = 620 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pump wavelength of parametric amplifiers based on CLBO, DCDA and LBO crystals and pumped by the second harmonic of a femtosecond Cr : forsterite laser (620 nm) is close to optimal for broadband amplification because of the proximity of group velocities of interacting pulses. Injection of a broadband continuum into the range of the signal-wave gain in LBO and DCDA parametric amplifiers, pumped at λ = 620 nm, leads to generation of broadband femtosecond pulses with a spectrum ranging from 1050 to 1600 nm and peak powers up to 20 MW. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  11. Generation of high-power femtosecond supercontinua in the near-IR spectral range using broadband parametric frequency conversion in LBO and DCDA crystals pumped at λ = 620 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podshivalov, A. A.; Potemkin, F. V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.

    2014-09-01

    The pump wavelength of parametric amplifiers based on CLBO, DCDA and LBO crystals and pumped by the second harmonic of a femtosecond Cr : forsterite laser (620 nm) is close to optimal for broadband amplification because of the proximity of group velocities of interacting pulses. Injection of a broadband continuum into the range of the signal-wave gain in LBO and DCDA parametric amplifiers, pumped at λ = 620 nm, leads to generation of broadband femtosecond pulses with a spectrum ranging from 1050 to 1600 nm and peak powers up to 20 MW.

  12. Generation of high-power femtosecond supercontinua in the near-IR spectral range using broadband parametric frequency conversion in LBO and DCDA crystals pumped at λ = 620 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podshivalov, A A; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Potemkin, F V [Department of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-30

    The pump wavelength of parametric amplifiers based on CLBO, DCDA and LBO crystals and pumped by the second harmonic of a femtosecond Cr : forsterite laser (620 nm) is close to optimal for broadband amplification because of the proximity of group velocities of interacting pulses. Injection of a broadband continuum into the range of the signal-wave gain in LBO and DCDA parametric amplifiers, pumped at λ = 620 nm, leads to generation of broadband femtosecond pulses with a spectrum ranging from 1050 to 1600 nm and peak powers up to 20 MW. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  13. Incremental Visualizer for Visible Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukauskas, Linas; Bøhlen, Michael Hanspeter

    This paper discusses the integration of database back-end and visualizer front-end into a one tightly coupled system. The main aim which we achieve is to reduce the data pipeline from database to visualization by using incremental data extraction of visible objects in a fly-through scenarios. We...... also argue that passing only relevant data from the database will substantially reduce the overall load of the visualization system. We propose the system Incremental Visualizer for Visible Objects (IVVO) which considers visible objects and enables incremental visualization along the observer movement...... path. IVVO is the novel solution which allows data to be visualized and loaded on the fly from the database and which regards visibilities of objects. We run a set of experiments to convince that IVVO is feasible in terms of I/O operations and CPU load. We consider the example of data which uses...

  14. Visible Human Project®

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Visible Human Project® is the creation of complete, anatomically detailed, three-dimensional representations of the normal male and female human bodies....

  15. Visible spectroscopy of the new ESO Large Program on trans-Neptunian objects and Centaurs: final results

    CERN Document Server

    Fornasier, S; de Bergh, C; Alvarez-Candal, A; DeMeo, F; Merlin, F; Perna, D; Guilbert, A; Delsanti, A; Dotto, E; Doressoundiram, A

    2009-01-01

    A second large programme (LP) for the physical studies of TNOs and Centaurs, started at ESO Cerro Paranal on October 2006 to obtain high-quality data, has recently been concluded. In this paper we present the spectra of these pristine bodies obtained in the visible range during the last two semesters of the LP. We investigate the spectral behaviour of the TNOs and Centaurs observed, and we analyse the spectral slopes distribution of the full data set coming from this LP and from the literature. We computed the spectral slope for each observed object, and searched for possible weak absorption features. A statistical analysis was performed on a total sample of 73 TNOs and Centaurs to look for possible correlations between dynamical classes, orbital parameters, and spectral gradient. We obtained new spectra for 28 bodies, 15 of which were observed for the first time. All the new presented spectra are featureless, including 2003 AZ84, for which a faint and broad absorption band possibly attributed to hydrated sil...

  16. Point-focus spectral splitting solar concentrator for multiple cells concentrating photovoltaic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragliano, Carlo; Chiesa, Matteo; Stefancich, Marco

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we present and experimentally validate a low-cost design of a spectral splitting concentrator for the efficient conversion of solar energy. The optical device consists of a dispersive prismatic lens made of polycarbonate designed to simultaneously concentrate solar light and split it into its spectral components. With respect to our previous implementation, this device concentrates light along two axes and generates a light pattern compatible with the dimensions of a set of concentrating photovoltaic cells, while providing a higher concentration ratio. The mathematical framework and the constructive approach used for the design are presented and the device performance is simulated using ray-tracing software. We obtain spectral separation in the visible range within a 3 × 1 cm2 area and a maximum concentration of 210× for a single wavelength. The device is fabricated by injection molding and its performance is experimentally investigated. We measure an optical transmissivity above 90% in the range 400-800 nm and we observe a spectral distribution in good accordance with simulations. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of the device for cost effective high efficiency concentrated photovoltaic systems.

  17. Recent variability of the solar spectral irradiance and its impact on climate modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolli, I; de Wit, T Dudok; Krivova, N A; Tourpali, K; Weber, M; Unruh, Y C; Gray, L; Langematz, U; Pilewskie, P; Rozanov, E; Schmutz, W; Shapiro, A; Solanki, S K; Woods, T N

    2013-01-01

    The lack of long and reliable time series of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) measurements makes an accurate quantification of solar contributions to recent climate change difficult. Whereas earlier SSI observations and models provided a qualitatively consistent picture of the SSI variability, recent measurements by the SORCE satellite suggest a significantly stronger variability in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range and changes in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) bands in anti-phase with the solar cycle. A number of recent chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations have shown that this might have significant implications on the Earth's atmosphere. Motivated by these results, we summarize here our current knowledge of SSI variability and its impact on Earth's climate. We present a detailed overview of existing SSI measurements and provide thorough comparison of models available to date. SSI changes influence the Earth's atmosphere, both directly, through changes in shortwave (SW) heating and therefore, temp...

  18. Polarized spectral features of human breast tissues through wavelet transform and principal component analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anita Gharekhan; Ashok N Oza; M B Sureshkumar; Asima Pradhan; Prasanta K Panigrahi

    2010-12-01

    Fluorescence characteristics of human breast tissues are investigated through wavelet transform and principal component analysis (PCA). Wavelet transform of polarized fluorescence spectra of human breast tissues is found to localize spectral features that can reliably differentiate different tissue types. The emission range in the visible wavelength regime of 500–700 nm is analysed, with the excitation wavelength at 488 nm using laser as an excitation source, where flavin and porphyrin are some of the active fluorophores. A number of global and local parameters from principal component analysis of both high- and low-pass coefficients extracted in the wavelet domain, capturing spectral variations and subtle changes in the diseased tissues are clearly identifiable.

  19. Determination of geographical origin of alcoholic beverages using ultraviolet, visible and infrared spectroscopy: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uríčková, Veronika; Sádecká, Jana

    2015-09-01

    The identification of the geographical origin of beverages is one of the most important issues in food chemistry. Spectroscopic methods provide a relative rapid and low cost alternative to traditional chemical composition or sensory analyses. This paper reviews the current state of development of ultraviolet (UV), visible (Vis), near infrared (NIR) and mid infrared (MIR) spectroscopic techniques combined with pattern recognition methods for determining geographical origin of both wines and distilled drinks. UV, Vis, and NIR spectra contain broad band(s) with weak spectral features limiting their discrimination ability. Despite this expected shortcoming, each of the three spectroscopic ranges (NIR, Vis/NIR and UV/Vis/NIR) provides average correct classification higher than 82%. Although average correct classification is similar for NIR and MIR regions, in some instances MIR data processing improves prediction. Advantage of using MIR is that MIR peaks are better defined and more easily assigned than NIR bands. In general, success in a classification depends on both spectral range and pattern recognition methods. The main problem still remains the construction of databanks needed for all of these methods.

  20. No-visible-scar cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz M. Wróblewski

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS is a laparoscopic method providing a good cosmetic effect,but requiring the application of special ports and instruments enabling the surgeon to perform the procedure.We report three-ports cholecystectomy through umbilical and suprapubic incisions performed with typical laparos -copic instruments which calls no-visible-scar cholecystectomy (NVSC.Material and methods: Twenty patients with symptomatic cholelithiasis were qualified for NVSC. Typical CO2 pneumoperitoneumwas done after umbilical skin incision. Two ports of 5 mm were inserted in the maximum externaledges of this incision. After cystic duct and cystic artery dissection the right one was exchanged for a port of 11 mm.The second incision for the 11-mm trocar for the laparoscope was done in the suprapubic median line within the hairarea.Results: Cholecystectomies were performed without any conversion to classical laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LCHor open surgery. They were not technically identical due to the gradual improvement in the access and manipulationof instruments. The time of the intervention ranged from 2 hours during the introduction of the new method to 50 minfor the last procedures. No postoperative complications were observed and all patients were discharged not later thanafter conventional LCH.Conclusions: NVSC is a three-port laparoscopic intervention performed with typical laparoscopic instruments. It ismore convenient for the surgeon than single incision LCH, because the placement of the optic in the suprapubic regiongives more space for the instruments. It also provides a very good cosmetic effect of the intervention. The describedprocedure is easy to learn and in case of technical problems additional ports can be applied (as in typical LCH.