WorldWideScience

Sample records for Uranium-Molybdenum Fuels

  1. Corrosion Evaluation of RERTR Uranium Molybdenum Fuel

    A K Wertsching

    2012-09-01

    As part of the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) mandate to replace the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel for low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, research into the development of LEU fuel for research reactors has been active since the late 1970’s. Originally referred to as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program the new effort named Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is nearing the goal of replacing the standard aluminum clad dispersion highly enriched uranium aluminide fuel with a new LEU fuel. The five domestic high performance research reactors undergoing this conversion are High Flux Isotope reactor (HFIR), Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Reactor, Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor II (MITR-II). The design of these reactors requires a higher neutron flux than other international research reactors, which to this point has posed unique challenges in the design and development of the new mandated LEU fuel. The new design utilizes a monolithic fuel configuration in order to obtain sufficient 235U within the LEU stoichoimetry to maintain the fission reaction within the domestic test reactors. The change from uranium aluminide dispersion fuel type to uranium molybdenum (UMo) monolithic configuration requires examination of possible corrosion issues associated with the new fuel meat. A focused analysis of the UMo fuel under potential corrosion conditions, within the ATR and under aqueous storage indicates a slow and predictable corrosion rate. Additional corrosion testing is recommended for the highest burn-up fuels to confirm observed corrosion rate trends. This corrosion analysis will focus only on the UMo fuel and will address corrosion of ancillary components such as cladding only in terms of how it affects the fuel. The calculations and corrosion scenarios are weighted with a conservative bias to

  2. Update on uranium-molybdenum fuel foil fabrication development activities at the Y-12 National Security Complex in 2007

    In support of the RERTR Program, efforts are underway at Y-12 to develop and validate a production oriented, monolithic uranium molybdenum (U-Mo) foil fabrication process adaptable for potential implementation in a manufacturing environment. These efforts include providing full-scale prototype depleted and enriched U-Mo foils in support of fuel qualification testing. The work has three areas of focus; develop and demonstrate a feasible foil fabrication process utilizing depleted uranium-molybdenum (DU-Mo) source material, transition these production techniques to enriched uranium (EU-Mo) source material, and evaluate full-scale implementation of the developed production techniques. In 2006, Y-12 demonstrated successful fabrication of full-size DU-10Mo foils. In 2007, Y-12 activities were expanded to include continued DU-Mo foil fabrication with a focus on process refinement, source material impurity effects (specifically carbon), and the feasibility of physical vapor deposition (PVD) on DU-10Mo mini-foils. FY2007 activities also included a transition to EU-Mo and fabrication of full-size enriched foils. The purpose of this report is to update the RERTR audience on Y-12 efforts in 2007 that support the overall RERTR Program goals. (author)

  3. Qualification of uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel - conclusions of an international workshop

    Thirty-one participants representing 21 reactors, fuel developers, fuel fabricators, and fuel reprocessors in 11 countries discussed the requirements for qualification of U-MO alloy fuel at a workshop held at Argonne National Laboratory on January 17--18, 2000. Consensus was reached that the qualification plans of the US RERTR program and the French U-Mo fuel development program are valid. The items to be addressed during qualification are summarized in the paper

  4. Neutronics conceptual design of the innovative research reactor core using uranium molybdenum fuel

    The multipurpose of research reactor utilization make many countries build the new research reactor. Trend of this reactor for this moment is multipurpose reactor type with a compact core to get high neutron flux at the low or medium level of power. The research newest. Reactor in Indonesia right now is already 25 year old. Therefore, it is needed to design a new research reactor, called innovative research reactor (IRR) and then as an alternative to replace the old research reactor. The aim of this research is to get the optimal configuration of equilibrium core with the acceptance criteria are minimum thermal neutron flux is 2.5E14 n/cm2 s at the power level of 20 MW (minimum), length of cycle of more than 40 days, and the most efficient of using fuel in the core. Neutronics design has been performed for new fuel of U-9Mo-AI with various fuel density and reflector. Design calculation has been performed using WIMSD-5B and BATAN-FUEL computer codes. The calculation result of the conceptual design shows four core configurations namely 5x5, 5x7, 6x5 and 6x6. The optimalization result for equilibrium core of innovative research reactor is the 5x5 configuration with 450 gU fuel loading, berilium reflector, maximum thermal neutron flux at reflector is 3.33E14 n/cm2 sand length of cycle is 57 days is the most optimal of IRR. (author)

  5. Development, preparation and characterization of uranium molybdenum alloys for dispersion fuel application

    Most of the research and test reactors worldwide have undergone core conversion from high enriched uranium base fuel to low enriched uranium base fuel under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program, which was launched in the late 1970s to reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation. To realize this goal, high density uranium compounds and γ-stabilized uranium alloy powder were identified. In Metallic Fuels Division of BARC, R and D efforts are on to develop these high density uranium base alloys. This paper describes the preparation flow sheet for different compositions of Uranium and molybdenum alloys by an innovative powder processing route with uranium and molybdenum metal powders as starting materials. The same composition of U-Mo alloys were also fabricated by conventional method i.e. ingot metallurgy route. The U-Mo alloys prepared by both the methods were then characterized by XRD for phase analysis. The photomicrographs of alloys with different compositions prepared by powder metallurgy and ingot metallurgy routes are also included in the paper. The paper also covers the comparison of properties of the alloys prepared by powder metallurgy and ingot metallurgy routes

  6. Development of a high density fuel based on uranium-molybdenum alloys with high compatibility in high temperatures

    This work has as its objective the development of a high density and low enriched nuclear fuel based on the gamma-UMo alloys, for utilization where it is necessary satisfactory behavior in high temperatures, considering its utilization as dispersion. For its accomplishment, it was started from the analysis of the RERTR ('Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors') results and some theoretical works involving the fabrication of gamma-uranium metastable alloys. A ternary addition is proposed, supported by the properties of binary and ternary uranium alloys studied, having the objectives of the gamma stability enhancement and an ease to its powder fabrication. Alloys of uranium-molybdenum were prepared with 5 to 10% Mo addition, and 1 and 3% of ternary, over a gamma U7Mo binary base alloy. In all the steps of its preparation, the alloys were characterized with the traditional techniques, to the determination of its mechanical and structural properties. To provide a process for the alloys powder obtention, its behavior under hydrogen atmosphere were studied, in thermo analyser-thermo gravimeter equipment. Temperatures varied from the ambient up to 1000 deg C, and times from 15 minutes to 16 hours. The results validation were made in a semi-pilot scale, where 10 to 50 g of powders of some of the alloys studied were prepared, under static hydrogen atmosphere. Compatibility studies were conducted by the exposure of the alloys under oxygen and aluminum, to the verification of possible reactions by means of differential thermal analysis. The alloys were exposed to a constant heat up to 1000 deg C, and their performances were evaluated in terms of their reaction resistance. On the basis of the results, it was observed that ternary additions increases the temperatures of the reaction with aluminum and oxidation, in comparison with the gamma UMo binaries. A set of conditions to the hydration of the alloys were defined, more restrictive in terms of temperature, time and

  7. Thermophysical properties determination of uranium-molybdenum fuel by the flash laser method

    The conversion of nuclear facilities using high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels and targets has been worldwide encouraged considering the nuclear non-proliferation treaty. A research program under development at CDTN aims the obtaining of uranium and molybdenum alloys to enable the HEU to LEU conversions. Samples of alloys produced with 3,5,7 and 10 weight percent of molybdenum were prepared and their thermophysical properties were determined at room temperature. The thermal diffusivity was measured by the laser flash method. This conceptually simple method presents advantages in comparison to the various methods used in the past. The thermal conductivity was determined by mathematical model developed by the laboratory. The obtained results show good agreement with the literature data with thermal conductivity values ranging from 7.15 up to 19.51 W ·m-1 ·K-1, the thermal diffusivity from 3.83 x 10-6 up to 6.37 x 10-6 m2·s-1 and the specific heat from 114 up to 184 J·kg-1·K-1. The GUM (Guide to the Expression Uncertainty in Measurement) uncertainty framework and the adaptive Monte Carlos Method (MCM) were used to obtain the associated standard uncertainty with an estimate of the output quantities. (author)

  8. Post-irradiation examination of uranium-molybdenum dispersion fuel irradiated to high burn-up in NRU

    UMo dispersion fuels are promising candidates for research and test reactors. Mini-elements containing U7Mo and U10Mo (7 and 10 wt% Mo in U alloy) fuel particles dispersed in aluminium have been fabricated with a nominal loading of 4.5 gU/cm3. In order to compare the performance of the different UMo alloys, the mini-elements were irradiated adjacent to each other under nominally identical conditions in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor. Maximum element linear ratings up to 100 kW/m and discharge burnups up to 80 atom% 235U were achieved. The experiment was conducted in phases such that adjacent pairs of mini-elements could be removed for post-irradiation examinations (PIE) after 20, 40, 60 and 80 atom% 235U burnup. PIE included underwater inspections, visual examinations and photography in the hot cells, gamma spectroscopy, dimensional measurements, immersion density measurements, metallography, and chemical burnup analysis. The results from the high burnup fuels are presented in this paper. The assessments compare the microstructural changes, porosity formation and fuel swelling in the two UMo dispersion fuels. The results indicate that U7Mo fuel is less stable that U10 Mo fuel under the conditions tested in NRU. (author)

  9. Irradiation performance of uranium-molybdenum alloy dispersion fuels; Desempenho sob irradiacao de elementos combustiveis do tipo U-Mo

    Almeida, Cirila Tacconi de

    2005-07-01

    The U-Mo-Al dispersion fuels of Material Test Reactors (MTR) are analyzed in terms of their irradiation performance. The irradiation performance aspects are associated to the neutronic and thermal hydraulics aspects to propose a new core configuration to the IEA-R1 reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP using U-Mo-Al fuels. Core configurations using U-10Mo-Al fuels with uranium densities variable from 3 to 8 gU/cm{sup 3} were analyzed with the computational programs Citation and MTRCR-IEA R1. Core configurations for fuels with uranium densities variable from 3 to 5 gU/cm{sup 3} showed to be adequate to use in IEA-R1 reactor e should present a stable in reactor performance even at high burn-up. (author)

  10. Set up of Uranium-Molybdenum powder production (HMD process)

    Powder metallurgy offers different alternatives for the production of Uranium-Molybdenum (UMo) alloy powder in sizes smaller than 150 microns. This powder is intended to be used as a dispersion fuel in an aluminum matrix for research, testing and radioisotopes production reactors (MTR). A particular process of massive hydriding the UMo alloy in gamma phase has been developed. This work describes the final adjustments of process variables to obtain UMo powder by hydriding-milling-de hydriding (HMD) and its capability for industrial scaling up. (author)

  11. Spectrographic analysis of uranium-molybdenum alloys

    A spectrographic method of analysis has been developed for uranium-molybdenum alloys containing up to 10 % Mo. The carrier distillation technique, with gallium oxide and graphite as carriers, is used for the semiquantitative determination of Al, Cr, Fe, Ni and Si, involving the conversion of the samples into oxides. As a consequence of the study of the influence of the molybdenum on the line intensities, it is useful to prepare only one set of standards with 0,6 % MoO3. Total burning excitation is used for calcium, employing two sets of standards with 0,6 and 7.5 MoO3. (Author) 5 refs

  12. Development of a high density fuel based on uranium-molybdenum alloys with high compatibility in high temperatures; Desenvolvimento de um combustivel de alta densidade a base das ligas uranio-molibdenio com alta compatibilidade em altas temperaturas

    Oliveira, Fabio Branco Vaz de

    2008-07-01

    This work has as its objective the development of a high density and low enriched nuclear fuel based on the gamma-UMo alloys, for utilization where it is necessary satisfactory behavior in high temperatures, considering its utilization as dispersion. For its accomplishment, it was started from the analysis of the RERTR ('Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors') results and some theoretical works involving the fabrication of gamma-uranium metastable alloys. A ternary addition is proposed, supported by the properties of binary and ternary uranium alloys studied, having the objectives of the gamma stability enhancement and an ease to its powder fabrication. Alloys of uranium-molybdenum were prepared with 5 to 10% Mo addition, and 1 and 3% of ternary, over a gamma U7Mo binary base alloy. In all the steps of its preparation, the alloys were characterized with the traditional techniques, to the determination of its mechanical and structural properties. To provide a process for the alloys powder obtention, its behavior under hydrogen atmosphere were studied, in thermo analyser-thermo gravimeter equipment. Temperatures varied from the ambient up to 1000 deg C, and times from 15 minutes to 16 hours. The results validation were made in a semi-pilot scale, where 10 to 50 g of powders of some of the alloys studied were prepared, under static hydrogen atmosphere. Compatibility studies were conducted by the exposure of the alloys under oxygen and aluminum, to the verification of possible reactions by means of differential thermal analysis. The alloys were exposed to a constant heat up to 1000 deg C, and their performances were evaluated in terms of their reaction resistance. On the basis of the results, it was observed that ternary additions increases the temperatures of the reaction with aluminum and oxidation, in comparison with the gamma UMo binaries. A set of conditions to the hydration of the alloys were defined, more restrictive in terms of temperature

  13. Qualification of Uranium-Molybdenum Alloys for Research Reactor Community

    Uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloys are being produced to refuel international research reactors - replacing current highly-enriched uranium fuel assemblies. Over the past two years, Y-12 Analytical Chemistry has been the primary qualification laboratory for current U-Mo materials development in the U.S. During this time, multiple analytical techniques have been explored to obtain complete and accurate characterization of U-Mo materials. For the chemical characterization of U-Mo materials, three primary techniques have been utilized: (i) thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) for uranium content and isotopic analyses, (ii) a combination of inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) techniques for determination of molybdenum content and trace elemental concentrations and (iii) combustion analyses for trace elemental analyses. Determination of uranium content, uranium isotopic composition and elemental impurities by combustion analyses (H, C, O, N) required only minimal changes to existing analytical methodology for uranium metal analyses. However, spectral interferences (both isobaric and optical) due to high molybdenum content presented significant challenges to the use of ICP instrumentation. While providing a brief description of methods for determination of uranium content and H, C, O and N content, this manuscript concentrates on the challenges faced in applying ICP techniques to qualification of U-Mo fuels. Multiple ICP techniques were explored to determine the effectiveness (e.g., accuracy, precision, speed of analysis, etc.) for determining both molybdenum content and trace elemental impurity concentrations: high-resolution inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICPMS), inductively- coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) and inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The merits and limitations of these techniques for qualification of U-Mo alloys are presented, to include the limits of quantitation and uncertainties

  14. Uranium-Molybdenum Dissolution Flowsheet Studies

    Pierce, R. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2007-03-01

    The Super Kukla (SK) Prompt Burst Reactor operated at the Nevada Test Site from 1964 to 1978. The SK material is a uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy material of 90% U/10% Mo by weight at approximately 20% 235U enrichment. H-Canyon Engineering (HCE) requested that the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) define a flowsheet for safely and efficiently dissolving the SK material. The objective is to dissolve the material in nitric acid (HNO3) in the H-Canyon dissolvers to a U concentration of 15-20 g/L (3-4 g/L 235U) without the formation of precipitates or the generation of a flammable gas mixture. Testing with SK material validated the applicability of dissolution and solubility data reported in the literature for various U and U-Mo metals. Based on the data, the SK material can be dissolved in boiling 3.0-6.0 M HNO3 to a U concentration of 15-20 g/L and a corresponding Mo concentration of 1.7-2.2 g/L. The optimum flowsheet will use 4.0-5.0 M HNO3 for the starting acid. Any nickel (Ni) cladding associated with the material will dissolve readily. After dissolution is complete, traditional solvent extraction flowsheets can be used to recover and purify the U. Dissolution rates for the SK material are consistent with those reported in the literature and are adequate for H-Canyon processing. When the SK material dissolved at 70-100 o C in 1-6 M HNO3, the reaction bubbled vigorously and released nitrogen oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) gas. Gas generation tests in 1 M and 2 M HNO3 at 100 o C generated less than 0.1 volume percent hydrogen (H2) gas. It is known that higher HNO3 concentrations are less favorable for H2 production. All tests at 70-100 o C produced sufficient gas to mix the solutions without external agitation. At room temperature in 5 M HNO3, the U-Mo dissolved slowly and the U-laden solution sank to the bottom of the dissolution vessel because of its greater density. The effect of the density difference insures that the SK material cannot dissolve and

  15. Pourbaix diagrams for uranium, molybdenum and technetium

    Pourbaix diagrams represent in redox potential - pH space the isothermal phase equilibrium of a particular element in contact with water. The phase equilibrium involving aqueous ions or complex ions potentially coexisting with solid oxides or hydrated oxides is essential in understanding fuel behaviour in direct contact with water. The treatment will describe a method of constructing the diagrams by Gibbs energy minimization, highlight the significant features of the diagrams, and show how the data may be used in support of a mass transport model. Recent modelling activity in our laboratory has put emphasis on high temperature equilibrium involving UO2 with noble metal fission products. Under lower temperature conditions, defective fuel may come into direct contact with the water phase. The chemical consequences require the introduction of aqueous ions into the computations. The data must be consistent with that for the solid oxide phases used in the U-O temperature-composition phase diagram development. A good test of self-consistency is the generation of the Pourbaix diagram for that element. The presentation will show how these diagrams may be developed by means that do not require an a priori knowledge of adjacent phases or domains. The technique of Gibbs energy minimization will be illustrated with graphical and tabular displays of the steps in this versatile approach. The presentation will conclude by showing how the data may be blended together to understand the boundary condition in the transport of Mo and Tc from defective fuel into the primary heat transfer system. (author)

  16. New Phase in the System Uranium-Molybdenum-Silicon

    During the investigation of the ternary system uranium-molybdenum-silicon, a new phase with the composition U4Mo5-Si3 was formed. Structure determination exclusively based on the powder data showed that the particular phase belongs to the hexagonal system. Space group P6/mmc or one of the sub-groups is indicated. Unit cell dimensions were found to be a = 5.370A, c = 8 . 582A. A comparison of calculated and observed intensities shows close resemblance to the structure of the Laves phases of the C14-type. (author)

  17. Effects of heat treatments on the thermal diffusivity of Uranium-Molybdenum alloy

    Camarano, D. M.; Mansur, F. A.; Santos, A. M. M.; Ferraz, W. B.; Pedrosa, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    U-Mo alloys are the most investigated nuclear fuel material to be used in research reactors. The addition of molybdenum stabilizes the gamma phase of uranium and increases its melting point. A research program under development at Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) aims the obtaining of uranium-molybdenum alloys to enable the high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) conversions. U-Mo ingots with 10% by weight were induction melted and heat treated at 300 °C for 72 h, 120 h and 240 h. Thermal diffusivity was determined by the laser flash method and thermal quadrupole method, from room temperature to 300 oC and 400oC. It was observed that the thermal diffusivity tends to increase with increasing temperature.

  18. Basic design of a rotating disk centrifugal atomizer for uranium-molybdenum alloys

    One of the most used techniques to produce metallic powders is the centrifugal atomization with a rotating disk. This process is employ to fabricate ductile metallic particles of uranium-molybdenum alloys (typically U- 7 % Mo, by weight) for nuclear fuel elements for research and testing reactors. These alloys exhibit a face-centered cubic structure (γ phase) which is stable above 700 C degrees and can be retained at room temperature. The rotating disk centrifugal atomization allows a rapid solidification of spherical metallic droplets of about 40 to 100 μm, considered adequate to manufacture nuclear fuel elements. Besides the thermo-physical properties of both the alloy and the cooling gas, the main parameters of the process are the radius of the disk (R), the diameter of the atomization chamber (D), the disk rotation speed (ω), the liquid volume flow rate (Q) and the superheating of the liquid (ΔT). In this work, they were applied approximate analytical models to estimate the optimal geometrical and operative parameters to obtain spherical metallic powder of U- 7 % Mo alloy. Three physical phenomena were considerate: the liquid metal flow along the surface of the disk, the fragmentation and spheroidization of the droplets and the cooling and solidification of the droplets. The principal results are the more suitable gas is helium; R ≅ 20 mm; D ≥ 1 m; ≅ 20,000 - 50,000 rpm; Q ≅ 4 - 10 cm3/s; ΔT ≅ 100 - 200 C degrees. By applying the relevant non-dimensional parameters governing the main physical phenomena, the conclusion is that the more appropriate non-radioactive metal to simulate the atomization of U- 7 % Mo is gold

  19. Study and comparison of analytical methods for dosing molybdenum in uranium-molybdenum alloys

    Methods to determine molybdenum in uranium-molybdenum alloys are developed by various technic: molecular absorption spectrophotometry, emission spectroscopy, X ray fluorescence, atomic absorption spectrophotometry. After a comparison on samples in which molybdenum content lies between 1 and 10 per cent by weight, one concludes in the interest of some of the exposed methods for routine analysis. (author)

  20. Surface engineering of low enriched uranium-molybdenum

    Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Detavernier, C.

    2013-09-01

    Recent attempts to qualify the LEU(Mo) dispersion plate fuel with Si addition to the Al matrix up to high power and burn-up have not yet been successful due to unacceptable fuel plate swelling at a local burn-up above 60% 235U. The root cause of the failures is clearly related directly to the formation of the U(Mo)-Al(Si) interaction layer. Excessive formation of these layers around the fuel kernels severely weakens the local mechanical integrity and eventually leads to pillowing of the plate. In 2008, SCK·CEN has launched the SELENIUM U(Mo) dispersion fuel development project in an attempt to find an alternative way to reduce the interaction between U(Mo) fuel kernels and the Al matrix to a significantly low level: by applying a coating on the U(Mo) kernels. Two fuel plates containing 8gU/cc U(Mo) coated with respectively 600 nm Si and 1000 nm ZrN in a pure Al matrix were manufactured. These plates were irradiated in the BR2 reactor up to a maximum heat flux of 470 W/cm2 until a maximum local burn-up of approximately 70% 235U (˜50% plate average) was reached. Awaiting the PIE results, the advantages of applying a coating are discussed in this paper through annealing experiments and TRIM (the Transport of Ions in Matter) calculations.

  1. PURIFICATION OF URANIUM FROM URANIUM/MOLYBDENUM ALLOY

    Pierce, R; Ann Visser, A; James Laurinat, J

    2007-10-15

    The Savannah River Site will recycle a nuclear fuel comprised of 90% uranium-10% molybdenum by weight. The process flowsheet calls for dissolution of the material in nitric acid to a uranium concentration of 15-20 g/L without the formation of precipitates. The dissolution will be followed by separation of uranium from molybdenum using solvent extraction with 7.5% tributylphosphate in n-paraffin. Testing with the fuel validated dissolution and solubility data reported in the literature. Batch distribution coefficient measurements were performed for the extraction, strip and wash stages with particular focus on the distribution of molybdenum.

  2. SASSE MODELING OF A URANIUM MOLYBDENUM SEPARATION FLOWSHEET

    Laurinat, J

    2007-05-31

    H-Canyon Engineering (HCE) is evaluating the feasibility of processing material from the Super Kukla Prompt Burst Reactor, which operated at the Nevada Test Site from 1964 to 1978. This material is comprised of 90 wt % uranium (U) (at approximately 20% 235U enrichment) alloyed with 10 wt % molybdenum (Mo). The objective is to dissolve the material in nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) in the H-Canyon dissolvers and then to process the dissolved material through H-Canyon First and Second Cycle solvent extraction. The U product from Second Cycle will be sent to the highly enriched uranium (HEU) blend down program. In the blend down program, enriched U from the 1EU product stream will be blended with natural U at a ratio of 1 part enriched U per 3.5 parts natural U to meet a reactor fuel specification of 4.95% 235U before being shipped for use by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in its nuclear plants. The TVA specification calls for <200 mg Mo/g U (200 ppm). Since natural U has about 10 mg Mo/g U, the required purity of the 1EU product prior to blending is about 800 mg Mo/g U, allowing for uncertainties. HCE requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) define a flowsheet for the safe and efficient processing of the U-10Mo material. This report presents a computational model of the solvent extraction portion of the proposed flowsheet. The two main objectives of the computational model are to demonstrate that the Mo impurity requirement can be met and to show that the solvent feed rates in the proposed flowsheet, in particular to 1A and 1D Banks, are adequate to prevent refluxing of U and thereby ensure nuclear criticality safety. SASSE (Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction), a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that supports Argonne National Laboratory's proprietary AMUSE (Argonne Model for Universal Solvent Extraction) code, was selected to model the U/Mo separation flowsheet. SASSE spreadsheet models of H-Canyon First and Second Cycle

  3. SASSE MODELING OF A URANIUM MOLYBDENUM SEPARATION FLOWSHEET

    H-Canyon Engineering (HCE) is evaluating the feasibility of processing material from the Super Kukla Prompt Burst Reactor, which operated at the Nevada Test Site from 1964 to 1978. This material is comprised of 90 wt % uranium (U) (at approximately 20% 235U enrichment) alloyed with 10 wt % molybdenum (Mo). The objective is to dissolve the material in nitric acid (HNO3) in the H-Canyon dissolvers and then to process the dissolved material through H-Canyon First and Second Cycle solvent extraction. The U product from Second Cycle will be sent to the highly enriched uranium (HEU) blend down program. In the blend down program, enriched U from the 1EU product stream will be blended with natural U at a ratio of 1 part enriched U per 3.5 parts natural U to meet a reactor fuel specification of 4.95% 235U before being shipped for use by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in its nuclear plants. The TVA specification calls for 3 concentrations for aluminum nitrate (Al(NO3))3 in the feed to 1A Bank. (Unlike Savanah River Site (SRS) fuels, the U/Mo material contains no aluminum (Al). As a result, higher HNO3 concentrations are required in the 1AF to provide the necessary salting.) The TVA limit for the final blended product is 200 (micro)g Mo/g U, which translates to approximately 800 mg Mo/g U for the Second Cycle product solution. SASSE calculations give a Mo impurity level of 4 (micro)g Mo/g U in the Second Cycle product solution, conservatively based on Mo organic-to-aqueous distributions measured during minibank testing for previous processing of Piqua reactor fuel. The calculated impurity level is slightly more than two orders of magnitude lower than the required level. The Piqua feed solution contained a significant concentration of Al(NO3)3, which is not present in the feed solution for the proposed flowsheet. Measured distribution data indicate that, without Al(NO3)3 or other salting agents present, Mo extracts into the organic phase to a much lesser extent, so that

  4. The Problem of Storing Fission Products Arising from the Processing of Irradiated Uranium-Molybdenum Alloys

    Uranium-molybdenum alloys are of value thanks to their in-pile behaviour but serious disadvantages arise in connection with the storing of fission products resulting from the processing of these alloys. Because of the insolubility of molybdenum it is impossible to concentrate a solution of fission products by evaporation, and for this reason we have directed our efforts towards the solubilization of molybdenum through the addition of reagents such as iron or phosphoric ions. In this way one can obtain final solutions of 60 g/l Mo with Fe 100 g/l Mo with PO4H3. The volumes to be stored are still considerable (especially with Fe) and the possibility of nitrate calcination in a fluidized bed was considered. The reaction takes place at about 400°C. The behaviour of the ruthenium and the friability of the calcined solid (formation of considerable amounts of fine material) have led us to abandon this process in favour of the preparation of phosphate glasses. (author)

  5. Application of comprehensive geophysical and geochemical survey method in the exploration of uranium-molybdenum deposit 460

    This paper summarized the application effect of geophysical and geochemical survey method in uranium-molybdenum deposit 460. It stress on illustrating the effects of induced current middle gradient, high precision magnetic survey and gravity survey method to identify the distribution features of fracture, volcano structure and sub-rhyolite porphyry. Through verifying the mineralization caused anomaly which measured by activated charcoal, gamma, uranium content and secondary halo in soil with borehole, good prospecting result was achieved. Based on the above application effect, the paper presented some helpful prospection method combination. (authors)

  6. Nuclear fuel alloys or mixtures and method of making thereof

    Mariani, Robert Dominick; Porter, Douglas Lloyd

    2016-04-05

    Nuclear fuel alloys or mixtures and methods of making nuclear fuel mixtures are provided. Pseudo-binary actinide-M fuel mixtures form alloys and exhibit: body-centered cubic solid phases at low temperatures; high solidus temperatures; and/or minimal or no reaction or inter-diffusion with steel and other cladding materials. Methods described herein through metallurgical and thermodynamics advancements guide the selection of amounts of fuel mixture components by use of phase diagrams. Weight percentages for components of a metallic additive to an actinide fuel are selected in a solid phase region of an isothermal phase diagram taken at a temperature below an upper temperature limit for the resulting fuel mixture in reactor use. Fuel mixtures include uranium-molybdenum-tungsten, uranium-molybdenum-tantalum, molybdenum-titanium-zirconium, and uranium-molybdenum-titanium systems.

  7. UPDATE ON MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION METHODS

    C. R. Clark; J. F. Jue; G. A. Moore; N. P. Hallinan; B. H. Park; D. E. Burkes

    2006-10-01

    Efforts to develop a viable monolithic research reactor fuel plate have continued at Idaho National Laboratory. These efforts have concentrated on both fabrication process refinement and scale-up to produce full sized fuel plates. Progress at INL has led to fabrication of hot isostatic pressed uranium-molybdenum bearing monolithic fuel plates. These miniplates are part of the RERTR-8 miniplate irradiation test. Further progress has also been made on friction stir weld processing which has been used to fabricate full size fuel plates which will be irradiated in the ATR and OSIRIS reactors.

  8. Update on fuel fabrication development and testing at Argonne National Laboratory

    In its effort to develop research reactor fuel with a high fissile loading, Argonne National Laboratory has continued its advanced fuel development efforts. Monolithic fuel, where the fuel is in the form of a single fuel foil, is being developed as the ultimate in fuel loading capacity. Work has been done on different monolithic fabrication methods that have resulted in process refinements. Effort is also underway to develop a uranium-molybdenum dispersion fuel plate that will be resistant to the irradiation shortcomings noted in previous tests. Alloying additions to the aluminum matrix are being investigated. These fuels are being fabricated for use in irradiation experiments scheduled for insertion in 2005. (author)

  9. Study of the quenching and subsequent return to room temperature of uranium-chromium, uranium-iron, and uranium-molybdenum alloys containing only small amounts of the alloying element

    By means of an apparatus which makes possible thermal pre-treatments in vacuo, quenching carried out in a high purity argon atmosphere, and simultaneous recording of time temperature cooling and thermal contraction curves, the author has examined the transformations which occur in uranium-chromium, uranium-iron and uranium-molybdenum alloys during their quenching and subsequent return to room temperature. For uranium-chromium and uranium-iron alloys, the temperature at which the γ → β transformation starts varies very little with the rate of cooling. For uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 atom per cent of Mo, this temperature is lowered by 120 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn. The temperature at which the β → α transformation starts is lowered by 170 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn in the case of uranium-chromium alloy containing 0,37 atom per cent of Cr. The temperature is little affected in the case of uranium-iron alloys. The addition of chromium or iron makes it possible to conserve the form β at ordinary temperatures after quenching from the β and γ regions. The β phase is particularly unstable and changes into needles of the α form even at room temperatures according to an autocatalytic transformation law similar to the austenitic-martensitic transformation law in the case of iron. The β phase obtained by quenching from the β phase region is more stable than that obtained by quenching from the γ region. Chromium is a more effective stabiliser of the β phase than is iron. Unfortunately it causes serious surface cracking. The β → α transformation in uranium-chromium alloys has been followed at room temperature by means of micro-cinematography. The author has not observed the direct γ → α transformation in uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 per cent of molybdenum even for cooling rates of up to 2000 deg. C/s. He has however observed the formation of several martensitic structures. (author)

  10. Development and validation of capabilities to measure thermal properties of layered monolithic U-Mo alloy plate-type fuel

    Burkes, Douglas; Casella, Andrew M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Edwards, Matthew K.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Pool, Karl N.; Smith, Frances N.; Steen, Franciska H.

    2014-07-19

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world’s highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of thermal conductivity behavior of the fuel system as a function of temperature and expected irradiation conditions. The purpose of this paper is to verify and validate the functionality of equipment methods installed in hot cells for eventual measurements on irradiated uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) monolithic fuel specimens, procedures to operate the equipment, and models to extract the desired thermal properties. The results presented here demonstrate the adequacy of the equipment, procedures and models that have been developed for this purpose based on measurements conducted on surrogate depleted uranium-molybdenum (DU-Mo) alloy samples containing a zirconium diffusion barrier and clad in aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061). The results are in excellent agreement with thermal property data reported in the literature for similar U-Mo alloys as a function of temperature.

  11. Recent Accomplishments in the Irradiation Testing of Engineering-Scale Monolithic Fuel Specimens

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; D.M. Wachs; M.K. Meyer; H.W. Glunz; R.B. Nielson

    2012-10-01

    The US fuel development team is focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum monolithic fuel including irradiation testing of engineering-scale specimens. The team has recently accomplished the successful irradiation of the first monolithic multi-plate fuel element assembly within the AFIP-7 campaign. The AFIP-6 MKII campaign, while somewhat truncated by hardware challenges, exhibited successful irradiation of a large-scale monolithic specimen under extreme irradiation conditions. The channel gap and ultrasonic data are presented for AFIP-7 and AFIP-6 MKII, respectively. Finally, design concepts are summarized for future irradiations such as the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiment campaigns.

  12. Corrosion report for the U-Mo fuel concept

    Henager, Charles H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bennett, Wendy D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Doherty, Ann L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fuller, E. S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hardy, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Omberg, Ronald P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-08-28

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) has implemented a program to develop a Uranium-Molybdenum (U-Mo) metal fuel for Light Water Reactors (LWR)s. Uranium-Molybdenum fuel has the potential to provide superior performance based on its thermo-physical properties, which includes high thermal conductivity for less stored heat energy. With sufficient development, it may be able to provide the Light Water industry with a melt-resistant accident tolerant fuel with improved safety response. However, the corrosion of this fuel in reactor water environments needs to be further explored and optimized by additional alloying. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been tasked with performing ex-reactor corrosion testing to characterize the performance of U-Mo fuel. This report documents the results of the effort to characterize and develop the U-Mo metal fuel concept for LWRs with regard to corrosion testing. The results of a simple screening test in buffered water at 30°C using surface alloyed U-10Mo is documented and discussed. The screening test was used to guide the selection of several potential alloy improvements that were found and are recommended for further testing in autoclaves to simulate PWR water conditions more closely.

  13. A new fuel for research reactors

    The Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) to be constructed at Lucas Heights will use fuel containing low enriched uranium (LEU), 235U, whereas its predecessor HIFAR operates with fuel fabricated from high-enriched uranium (HEU). The fuel will be based on uranium silicide (U3Si2) with a density of 4.8 g U/cm3. This fuel has been qualified and in use in 20 research reactors worldwide for over 12 years A brief description is given of the metallurgy, behaviour under irradiation, and fabrication methods, all of which are well-understood Progress on development of new, higher density LEU fuel based on uranium molybdenum alloys is also described and the implications for the RRR discussed briefly

  14. Investigations of a reduced enrichment dispersion fuel (U-Mo alloy in aluminium matrix) for research reactor fuel pins

    Russia possesses considerable experience in utilisation of uranium-molybdenum alloys containing in dispersion fuel composition no more than 6 g/cm3 uranium. The feasibility of utilising the U-9 mass.% Mo alloy with reduced enrichment uranium (< 20%) in research reactor dispersion fuel pins has been analysed in the IPPE. Specimens with the 40 vol.% (U-9 mass. % Mo) + 60 vol.% Al fuel have been fabricated by hot pressing. Investigations of thermal physical properties of this fuel as well as tests for compatibility of U-Mo alloy with Al have been carried out in a wide temperature range. Corrosive tests of dispersion fuel have been realised in water. A flow chart of reproducing wastes from fuel pin production has been considered. The results of works carried out enable to hope on successful solution of the problem of utilisation high-density U-Mo fuel in research reactors. (author)

  15. Fuel Thermo-physical Characterization Project: Evaluation of Models to Calculate Thermal Diffusivity of Layered Composites

    Burkes, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gardner, Levi D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Andrew M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Huber, Tanja K. [Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Breitkreutz, Harald [Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany)

    2015-02-11

    The Office of Material Management and Minimization Fuel Thermo-physical Characterization Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is tasked with using PNNL facilities and processes to receive irradiated low enriched uranium-molybdenum fuel plate samples and perform analyses in support of the Office of Material Management and Minimization Reactor Conversion Program. This work is in support of the Fuel Development Pillar that is managed by Idaho National Laboratory. A key portion of the scope associated with this project was to measure the thermal properties of fuel segments harvested from plates that were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor. Thermal diffusivity of samples prepared from the fuel segments was measured using laser flash analysis. Two models, one developed by PNNL and the other developed by the Technische Universität München (TUM), were evaluated to extract the thermal diffusivity of the uranium-molybdenum alloy from measurements made on the irradiated, layered composites. The experimental data of the “TC” irradiated fuel segment was evaluated using both models considering a three-layer and five-layer system. Both models are in acceptable agreement with one another and indicate that the zirconium diffusion barrier has a minimal impact on the overall thermal diffusivity of the monolithic U-Mo fuel.

  16. A study of phase transformations processes in 0,5 to 4% mo uranium-molybdenum alloys; Etude des processus des transformations dans les alliages uranium-molybdene de teneur 0,5 a 4% en poids de molybdene

    Lehmann, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-06-15

    Isothermal and continuous cooling transformations process have been established on uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 0,5 to 4 w% Mo. Transformations process of the {beta} and {gamma} solid solutions are described. These processes depend upon molybdenum concentration. Out of the {beta} solid solution phase appears an eutectoid decomposition of {beta} to ({alpha} + {gamma}) or the formation of a martensitic phase {alpha}''. The {gamma} solid solution shows a decomposition of {gamma} to ({alpha} + {gamma}) or ({alpha} + {gamma}'), or a formation of martensitic phases a' or a'{sub b}. The U-Mo equilibrium diagram is discussed, particularly in low concentrations zones. Limits between domains ({alpha} + {gamma}) and ({beta} + {gamma}), ({beta} + {gamma}) and {gamma}, ({beta} + {gamma}) and {beta}, have been determined. (author) [French] Les processus des transformations isothermes, et au cours de refroidissements continus ont ete etablis sur les alliages uranium-molybdene de 0,5 a 4 % en poids de Mo. Ceci a permis de mettre en evidence les processus des transformations de solutions solides {beta} et {gamma}, differents suivant la teneur en molybdene de l'alliage. Dans le premier cas il y a decomposition eutectoide de {beta} en ({alpha} + {gamma}) ou formations d'une phase martensitique {alpha}''. Dans le second cas il y a decomposition de {gamma} soit en ({alpha} + {gamma}) soit en ({alpha} + {gamma}') suivant la temperature, ou bien formation des phases martensitiques {alpha}' ou {alpha}'{sub b}. Le diagramme d'equilibre, uranium-molybdene est sujet a de nombreuses controverses, en particulier dans la zone des faibles concentrations. Les limites entre les domaines ({alpha} + {gamma}) et ({beta} + {gamma}), ({beta} + {gamma}) et {gamma}, ({beta} + {gamma}) et {beta}, ont ete determinees. (auteur)

  17. Contribution to the study of remedy solutions to uranium(molybdenum)/aluminium interactions: role of silicon addition to aluminium, study of coupled effects

    In the project development and qualification program of a nuclear fuel with Low Enriched Uranium for Materials Testing Reactors, the dispersed U(Mo)/Al fuel is being developed due to its excellent stability during irradiation. However, in pile experiments showed that depending on the irradiation conditions (e.g. high burnup or high heat flux), an extensive interaction occurs between the fissile element U(Mo) and the Al based matrix resulting in swelling, which could eventually lead to a fuel plate failure. Among the ways to improve the behavior of the dispersed U(Mo) fuel, the solution now seen as the reference remedy by the entire scientific community is the addition of silicon into the aluminum matrix. In order to provide some understanding and optimizing the solution 'Si additions into Al matrix' under neutron irradiation, an out of pile study is performed on (i) the interaction mechanisms involved in the U(Mo)/Al (Si) system and (ii) the impact of the Si additions into the Al matrix on alternative solutions to the U(Mo)/Al interactions, namely the modification of the γ-U(Mo) fissile compound by adding a third element and/or modifying the interface between the γ-U(Mo) fissile compound and the matrix. This document provides a mechanistic description of the U(7Mo)/Al(Si) interaction for a range of Si content in Al between 2 and 10 wt.%, based on the multi-scale characterization of diffusion couples. The location of the Mo and its role in the reaction mechanisms are demonstrated. The influence of elements X = Y, Cu, Zr, Ti, Cr, on the U (Mo)/Al and U (Mo)/Al (Si) interactions mechanisms was then studied. It is shown that adding a third element to the U(Mo) alloy acts on the second order on diffusion kinetics and (micro)structure of the interaction layer compared to the addition of Si into Al. Finally, an alumina coating which shows a potential interest to improve the performance of the fuel has been developed. (author)

  18. Design and Testing of Prototypic Elements Containing Monolithic Fuel

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; M.K. Meyer; D.M. Wachs

    2011-10-01

    The US fuel development team has performed numerous irradiation tests on small to medium sized specimens containing low enriched uranium fuel designs. The team is now focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum Base Monolithic Design and has entered the next generation of testing with the design and irradiation of prototypic elements which contain this fuel. The designs of fuel elements containing monolithic fuel, such as AFIP-7 (which is currently under irradiation) and RERTR-FE (which is currently under fabrication), are appropriate progressions relative to the technology life cycle. The culmination of this testing program will occur with the design, fabrication, and irradiation of demonstration products to include the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiments. Future plans show that design, fabrication, and testing activities will apply the rigor needed for a demonstration campaign.

  19. Analysis of irradiated U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel microstructures using automated image processing

    Collette, R.; King, J.; Buesch, C.; Keiser, D. D.; Williams, W.; Miller, B. D.; Schulthess, J.

    2016-07-01

    The High Performance Research Reactor Fuel Development (HPPRFD) program is responsible for developing low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel substitutes for high performance reactors fueled with highly enriched uranium (HEU) that have not yet been converted to LEU. The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel system was selected for this effort. In this study, fission gas pore segmentation was performed on U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel samples at three separate fission densities using an automated image processing interface developed in MATLAB. Pore size distributions were attained that showed both expected and unexpected fission gas behavior. In general, it proved challenging to identify any dominant trends when comparing fission bubble data across samples from different fuel plates due to varying compositions and fabrication techniques. The results exhibited fair agreement with the fission density vs. porosity correlation developed by the Russian reactor conversion program.

  20. Hot rolling of thick uranium molybdenum alloys

    DeMint, Amy L.; Gooch, Jack G.

    2015-11-17

    Disclosed herein are processes for hot rolling billets of uranium that have been alloyed with about ten weight percent molybdenum to produce cold-rollable sheets that are about one hundred mils thick. In certain embodiments, the billets have a thickness of about 7/8 inch or greater. Disclosed processes typically involve a rolling schedule that includes a light rolling pass and at least one medium rolling pass. Processes may also include reheating the rolling stock and using one or more heavy rolling passes, and may include an annealing step.

  1. The reprocessing of irradiated fuels improvement and extension of the solvent extraction process

    Improvements made in the conventional tri-butylphosphate process are described, in particular. the concentration and the purification of plutonium by one extraction cycle using tri-butyl-phosphate with reflux; and the use of an apparatus working continuously for precipitating plutonium oxalate, for calcining the oxalate, and for fluorinating the oxide. The modifications proposed for the treatment of irradiated uranium - molybdenum alloys are described, in particular, the dissolution of the fuel, and the concentration of the fission product solutions. The solvent extraction treatment is used also for the plutonium fuels utilized for the fast breeder reactor (Rapsodie) An outline of the process is presented and discussed, as well as the first experimental results and the plans for a pilot plant having a capacity of 1 kg/day. The possible use of tn-lauryl-amine in the plutonium purification cycle is now under consideration for the processing plant at La Hague. The flowsheet for this process and its performance are presented. The possibility of vitrification is considered for the final treatment of the concentrated radioactive wastes from the Marcoule (irradiated uranium) and La Hague (irradiated uranium-molybdenum) Centers. Three possible processes are described and discussed, as well as the results obtained from the operation of the corresponding experimental units using tracers. (authors)

  2. BWXT commercialization activities for GTRI LEU U-Mo fuels

    BWX Technologies (BWXT), the United States' research reactor fuel supplier for plate type fuel, has been contracted to provide commercialization support activities under the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program to develop and qualify low enrichment uranium (LEU), high density fuels suitable for most of the world's research reactors by the end of 2010. The program's main effort has been testing of uranium-molybdenum alloy fuels (U-Mo), and in light of recent fuel failures with dispersion type fuels, emphasis has now been placed on developing modified and alternative fuels. BWXT's contract scope entails identifying requirements and planning the transition to the new LEU fuels. As there is no clearly preferred fuel technology at this point, multiple commercialization paths must be evaluated. Our baseline approach assumes the fuel is monolithic U-10Mo, and the fuel meat and aluminum alloy plate are hot isostatic pressed (HIP) together. Preliminary results are supportive of this method, however, there is potential for significant interaction between the fuel meat and aluminum alloy plate during the HIP process. Alternative bonding methods, e.g. friction stir welding are being evaluated, as well as modifying the baseline HIP parameters. Additionally, modified dispersed fuel systems are considered. Aspects of each fuel technology and their manufacturing impact are presented and discussed. (author)

  3. Selenium fuel: Surface engineering of U(Mo) particles to optimise fuel performance

    Recent developments on the stabilisation of U(Mo) in-pile behaviour in plate-type fuel have focussed almost exclusively on the addition of Si to the Al matrix of the fuel. This has now culminated in a qualification effort in the form of the European LEONIDAS initiative for which irradiations will start in 2010. In this framework, many discussions have been held on the Si content of the matrix needed for stabilisation of the interaction phase and the requirement for the formation of Si-rich layers around the particles during the fabrication steps. However, it is clear that the Si needs to be incorporated in the interaction phase for it to be effective, for which the currently proposed methods depend on a diffusion mechanism, which is difficult to control. This has lead to the concept of a Si coated particle as a more efficient way of incorporating the Si in the fuel by putting it immediately where it will be required : at the fuel-matrix interface. As part of the SELENIUM (Surface Engineered Low ENrIched Uranium-Molybdenum fuel) project, SCK CEN has built a sputter coater for PVD magnetron sputter coating of particles in collaboration with the University of Ghent. The coater is equipped with three 3 inch magnetron sputter heads, allowing deposition of 3 different elements or a single element at high deposition speed. The particles are slowly rotated in a drum to produce homogeneous layer thicknesses. (author)

  4. Study of the quenching and subsequent return to room temperature of uranium-chromium, uranium-iron, and uranium-molybdenum alloys containing only small amounts of the alloying element; Etude de la trempe et du revenu a la temperature ordinaire d'alliages uranium-chrome, uranium-fer et uranium-molybdene, a faible teneur en element d'alliage

    Delaplace, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-09-15

    By means of an apparatus which makes possible thermal pre-treatments in vacuo, quenching carried out in a high purity argon atmosphere, and simultaneous recording of time temperature cooling and thermal contraction curves, the author has examined the transformations which occur in uranium-chromium, uranium-iron and uranium-molybdenum alloys during their quenching and subsequent return to room temperature. For uranium-chromium and uranium-iron alloys, the temperature at which the {gamma} {yields} {beta} transformation starts varies very little with the rate of cooling. For uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 atom per cent of Mo, this temperature is lowered by 120 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn. The temperature at which the {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation starts is lowered by 170 deg. C for a cooling rate of 500 deg. C/mn in the case of uranium-chromium alloy containing 0,37 atom per cent of Cr. The temperature is little affected in the case of uranium-iron alloys. The addition of chromium or iron makes it possible to conserve the form {beta} at ordinary temperatures after quenching from the {beta} and {gamma} regions. The {beta} phase is particularly unstable and changes into needles of the {alpha} form even at room temperatures according to an autocatalytic transformation law similar to the austenitic-martensitic transformation law in the case of iron. The {beta} phase obtained by quenching from the {beta} phase region is more stable than that obtained by quenching from the {gamma} region. Chromium is a more effective stabiliser of the {beta} phase than is iron. Unfortunately it causes serious surface cracking. The {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-chromium alloys has been followed at room temperature by means of micro-cinematography. The author has not observed the direct {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation in uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 2,8 per cent of molybdenum even for cooling rates of up to 2000 deg. C

  5. Neutronic comparison of the nuclear fuels U3Si2/Al and U-Mo/Al

    The search for materials that allow the fabrication of nuclear fuels with higher uranium densities comes from the mid 50s. Today, a high density and low enriched nuclear fuel based on γ-UMo alloys is the most promising fuel to replace the U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel used worldwide in research and material test reactors. Alloys of uranium-molybdenum are prepared with 6 to 10% Mo addition and can be manufactured as dispersion or monolithic fuels. The aim of this paper is to compare the infinite multiplication factor (K∞), obtained through neutronic calculation with the code Scale 6, for aluminum coated plates reflected in all directions containing U3Si2/Al and U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels. The U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel used in the calculation has an uranium density of 4 gU/cm3 and the U-Mo-Al dispersion fuels have densities ranging from 4 to 7.52 gU/cm3 and 7 and 10% Mo addition. The results show that the K∞ calculated for U-Mo/Al fuels is lower than that for U3Si2/Al fuel and increases between the uranium densities of 4 and 5 gU/cm3 and decreases for higher uranium densities. (author)

  6. Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    Primm, R.T., III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N. (U. of Cincinnati)

    2006-02-01

    A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties.

  7. Improving the performance of the performance of U-Mo fuels

    Full text: Recent developments showed that uranium-molybdenum nuclear fuel particles dispersed in an aluminum matrix had misbehavior when irradiated at high neutron fluxes. The appearance of a third phase, with the presence of great porosity in the interaction zone of the Al/U-Mo interface, conditions severely the performance of this fuel. At the light of the resolution of this limitation, UMo monolithic fuel achieves a greater importance, since there is some expectation that in this bulk geometry the problem will not be present. From the simplest point of view, the addition of extra alloys to the aluminum matrix or to the nuclear fuel can be an alternative to reduce the interface growing kinetics and thereafter the appearance of the problematic third phase. The kinetics reduction would be a quantitative effect controlling chemical potentials (diffusion driving force) and barely will avoid the problem. Similar considerations can be attributed to the monolithic fuel if only quantitative solutions are proposed. In this paper are presented two drastical alternatives, from the point of view of qualitative metallurgy, for increasing the performance of U-Mo fuels. The first one is related with the coverage of the fuel particles with compound diffusion barriers to avoid the transportation of uranium and aluminum threw them. The second alternative is a monolithic fuel with zircaloy cladding where the interaction is much smaller than with aluminum. (author)

  8. Aluminum cladding oxidation of prefilmed in-pile fueled experiments

    Marcum, W. R.; Wachs, D. M.; Robinson, A. B.; Lillo, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    A series of fueled irradiation experiments were recently completed within the Advanced Test Reactor Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) and Gas Test Loop (GTL) campaigns. The conduct of the AFIP experiments supports ongoing efforts within the global threat reduction initiative (GTRI) to qualify a new ultra-high loading density low enriched uranium-molybdenum fuel. This study details the characterization of oxide growth on the fueled AFIP experiments and cross-correlates the empirically measured oxide thickness values to existing oxide growth correlations and convective heat transfer correlations that have traditionally been utilized for such an application. This study adds new and valuable empirical data to the scientific community with respect to oxide growth measurements of highly irradiated experiments, of which there is presently very limited data. Additionally, the predicted oxide thickness values are reconstructed to produce an oxide thickness distribution across the length of each fueled experiment (a new application and presentation of information that has not previously been obtainable in open literature); the predicted distributions are compared against experimental data and in general agree well with the exception of select outliers.

  9. Criticality safety evaluation for the Advanced Test Reactor enhanced low enriched uranium fuel elements

    Montierth, Leland M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-07-19

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) convert program is developing a high uranium density fuel based on a low enriched uranium (LEU) uranium-molybdenum alloy. Testing of prototypic GTRI fuel elements is necessary to demonstrate integrated fuel performance behavior and scale-up of fabrication techniques. GTRI Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) elements based on the ATR-Standard Size elements (all plates fueled) are to be fabricated for testing in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). While a specific ELF element design will eventually be provided for detailed analyses and in-core testing, this criticality safety evaluation (CSE) is intended to evaluate a hypothetical ELF element design for criticality safety purposes. Existing criticality analyses have analyzed Standard (HEU) ATR elements from which controls have been derived. This CSE documents analysis that determines the reactivity of the hypothetical ELF fuel elements relative to HEU ATR elements and whether the existing HEU ATR element controls bound the ELF element. The initial calculations presented in this CSE analyzed the original ELF design, now referred to as Mod 0.1. In addition as part of a fuel meat thickness optimization effort for reactor performance other designs have been evaluated. As of early 2014 the most current conceptual designs are Mk1A and Mk1B that were previously referred to as conceptual designs Mod 0.10 and Mod 0.11, respectively. Revision 1 evaluates the reactivity of the ATR HEU Mark IV elements for a comparison with the Mark VII elements.

  10. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011

    Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

    2012-03-01

    This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

  11. Uranium-Molybdenum particles produced by electro-erosion

    We have produced spheroidal U-Mo particles by the electro-erosion method using pure water as dielectric. The particles were characterised by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS-EDAX) and X-ray diffraction. Spheroidal UO2 particles with a peculiar distribution size were obtained with two distribution centred at 10 and 70 μm. The obtained particles have central inclusions of U and Mo compounds. (author)

  12. Fabrication and characterisation of uranium, molybdenum, chromium, niobium and aluminium

    This paper describes fabrication of binary uranium alloys by melting and casting. The following alloys with nominal composition were obtained by melting in the vacuum furnace: uranium with niobium contents from 0.5%- 4.0% and uranium with molybdenum contents from 0.4% - 1.2%. Uranium alloys with chromium content from 0.4% - 1.2% and uranium alloy with 0.12% of aluminium were obtained by vacuum induction furnace (electric arc melting)

  13. SOLVENT EXTRACTION FOR URANIUM MOLYBDENUM ALLOY DISSOLUTION FLOWSHEET

    Visser, A; Robert Pierce, R

    2007-06-07

    H-Canyon Engineering requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to perform two solvent extraction experiments using dissolved Super Kukla (SK) material. The SK material is an uranium (U)-molybdenum (Mo) alloy material of 90% U/10% Mo by weight with 20% 235U enrichment. The first series of solvent extraction tests involved a series of batch distribution coefficient measurements with 7.5 vol % tributylphosphate (TBP)/n-paraffin for extraction from 4-5 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), using 4 M HNO{sub 3}-0.02 M ferrous sulfamate (Fe(SO3NH2)2) scrub, 0.01 M HNO3 strip steps with particular emphasis on the distribution of U and Mo in each step. The second set of solvent extraction tests determined whether the 2.5 wt % sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) solvent wash change frequency would need to be modified for the processing of the SK material. The batch distribution coefficient measurements were performed using dissolved SK material diluted to 20 g/L (U + Mo) in 4 M HNO{sub 3} and 5 M HNO{sub 3}. In these experiments, U had a distribution coefficient greater than 2.5 while at least 99% of the nickel (Ni) and greater than 99.9% of the Mo remained in the aqueous phase. After extraction, scrub, and strip steps, the aqueous U product from the strip contains nominally 7.48 {micro}g Mo/g U, significantly less than the maximum allowable limit of 800 {micro}g Mo/g U. Solvent washing experiments were performed to expose a 2.5 wt % Na2CO3 solvent wash solution to the equivalent of 37 solvent wash cycles. The low Mo batch distribution coefficient in this solvent extraction system yields only 0.001-0.005 g/L Mo extracted to the organic. During the solvent washing experiments, the Mo appears to wash from the organic.

  14. Material test reactor fuel research at the BR2 reactor

    The construction of new, high performance material test reactor or the conversion of such reactors' core from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel requires several fuel qualification steps. For the conversion of high performance reactors, high density dispersion or monolithic fuel types are being developed. The Uranium-Molybdenum fuel system has been selected as reference system for the qualification of LEU fuels. For reactors with lower performance characteristics, or as medium enriched fuel for high performance reactors, uranium silicide dispersion fuel is applied. However, on the longer term, the U-Mo based fuel types may offer a more efficient fuel alternative and-or an easier back-end solution with respect to the silicide based fuels. At the BR2 reactor of the Belgian nuclear research center, SCK-CEN in Mol, several types of fuel testing opportunities are present to contribute to such qualification process. A generic validation test for a selected fuel system is the irradiation of flat plates with representative dimensions for a fuel element. By flexible positioning and core loading, bounding irradiation conditions for fuel elements can be performed in a standard device in the BR2. For fuel element designs with curved plates, the element fabrication method compatibility of the fuel type can be addressed by incorporating a set of prototype fuel plates in a mixed driver fuel element of the BR2 reactor. These generic types of tests are performed directly in the primary coolant flow conditions of the BR2 reactor. The experiment control and interpretation is supported by detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic modeling of the experiments. Finally, the BR2 reactor offers the flexibility for irradiation of full size prototype fuel elements, as 200mm diameter irradiation channels are available. These channels allow the accommodation of various types of prototype fuel elements, eventually using a dedicated cooling loop to provide the

  15. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated Usbnd Mo dispersion fuel samples

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-09-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (Usbnd Mo) alloy dispersed in an Alsbnd Si matrix has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world's highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. In this paper, two irradiated samples containing 53.9 vol% U-7wt% Mo fuel particles dispersed in an Al-2wt% Si matrix were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Measurements revealed three distinct fission gas release events for the samples from 400 to 700 °C, as well as a number of minor fission gas releases below and above this temperature range. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in the literature with exceptional agreement.

  16. Contribution to the study of the fission-gas release in metallic nuclear fuels

    In order to study the effect of an external pressure on the limitation of swelling due to fission-gas precipitation, some irradiations have been carried out at burn-ups of about 35.000 MWd/ton, and at average sample temperatures of 575 Celsius degrees, of non-alloyed uranium and uranium 8 per cent molybdenum gained in a thick stainless steel can. A cylindrical central hole allows a fuel swelling from 20 to 33 per cent according to the experiment. After irradiation, the uranium samples showed two types of can rupture: one is due to the fuel swelling, and the other, to the pressure of the fission gases, released through a network of microcracks. The cans of the uranium-molybdenum samples are all undamaged and it is shown that the gas release occurs by interconnection of the bubbles for swelling values higher than those obtained in the case of uranium. For each type of fuel, a swelling-fission gas release relationship is established. The results suggest that good performances with a metallic fuel intended for use in fast reactor conditions can be obtained. (author)

  17. Conceptual Design Parameters for HFIR LEU U-Mo Fuel Conversion Experimental Irradiations

    Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL

    2013-03-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a versatile research reactor that is operated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The HFIR core is loaded with high-enriched uranium (HEU) and operates at a power level of 85 MW. The primary scientific missions of the HFIR include cold and thermal neutron scattering, materials irradiation, and isotope production. An engineering design study of the conversion of the HFIR from HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is ongoing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The LEU fuel considered is based on a uranium-molybdenum alloy that is 10 percent by weight molybdenum (U-10Mo) with a 235U enrichment of 19.75 wt %. The LEU core design discussed in this report is based on the design documented in ORNL/TM-2010/318. Much of the data reported in Sections 1 and 2 of this document was derived from or taken directly out of ORNL/TM-2010/318. The purpose of this report is to document the design parameters for and the anticipated normal operating conditions of the conceptual HFIR LEU fuel to aid in developing requirements for HFIR irradiation experiments.

  18. A physical description of fission product behavior fuels for advanced power reactors.

    Kaganas, G.; Rest, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Florida International Univ.

    2007-10-18

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is considering a list of reactors and nuclear fuels as part of its chartered initiative. Because many of the candidate materials have not been explored experimentally under the conditions of interest, and in order to economize on program costs, analytical support in the form of combined first principle and mechanistic modeling is highly desirable. The present work is a compilation of mechanistic models developed in order to describe the fission product behavior of irradiated nuclear fuel. The mechanistic nature of the model development allows for the possibility of describing a range of nuclear fuels under varying operating conditions. Key sources include the FASTGRASS code with an application to UO{sub 2} power reactor fuel and the Dispersion Analysis Research Tool (DART ) with an application to uranium-silicide and uranium-molybdenum research reactor fuel. Described behavior mechanisms are divided into subdivisions treating fundamental materials processes under normal operation as well as the effect of transient heating conditions on these processes. Model topics discussed include intra- and intergranular gas-atom and bubble diffusion, bubble nucleation and growth, gas-atom re-solution, fuel swelling and ?scion gas release. In addition, the effect of an evolving microstructure on these processes (e.g., irradiation-induced recrystallization) is considered. The uranium-alloy fuel, U-xPu-Zr, is investigated and behavior mechanisms are proposed for swelling in the {alpha}-, intermediate- and {gamma}-uranium zones of this fuel. The work reviews the FASTGRASS kinetic/mechanistic description of volatile ?scion products and, separately, the basis for the DART calculation of bubble behavior in amorphous fuels. Development areas and applications for physical nuclear fuel models are identified.

  19. A model to predict thermal conductivity of irradiated U-Mo dispersion fuel

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Huber, Tanja K.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-05-01

    Numerous global programs are focused on the continued development of existing and new research and test reactor fuels to achieve maximum attainable uranium loadings to support the conversion of a number of the world's remaining high-enriched uranium fueled reactors to low-enriched uranium fuel. Some of these programs are focused on assisting with the development and qualification of a fuel design that consists of a uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy dispersed in an aluminum matrix as one option for reactor conversion. Thermal conductivity is an important consideration in determining the operational temperature of the fuel and can be influenced by interaction layer formation between the dispersed phase and matrix and upon the concentration of the dispersed phase within the matrix. This paper extends the use of a simple model developed previously to study the influence of interaction layer formation as well as the size and volume fraction of fuel particles dispersed in the matrix, Si additions to the matrix, and Mo concentration in the fuel particles on the effective thermal conductivity of the U-Mo/Al composite during irradiation. The model has been compared to experimental measurements recently conducted on U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels at two different fission densities with acceptable agreement. Observations of the modeled results indicate that formation of an interaction layer and subsequent consumption of the matrix reveals a rather significant effect on effective thermal conductivity. The modeled interaction layer formation and subsequent consumption of the high thermal conductivity matrix was sensitive to the average dispersed fuel particle size, suggesting this parameter as one of the most effective in minimizing thermal conductivity degradation of the composite, while the influence of Si additions to the matrix in the model was highly dependent upon irradiation conditions.

  20. A Model to Predict Thermal Conductivity of Irradiated U-Mo Dispersion Fuel

    Burkes, Douglas; Huber, Tanja K.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-05-01

    The Office of Materials Management and Minimization Reactor Conversion Program continues to develop existing and new research and test reactor fuels to achieve maximum attainable uranium loadings to support the conversion of a number of the world’s remaining high-enriched uranium fueled reactors to low-enriched uranium fuel. The program is focused on assisting with the development and qualification of a fuel design that consists of a uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy dispersed in an aluminum matrix as one option for reactor conversion. Thermal conductivity is an important consideration in determining the operational temperature of the fuel and can be influenced by interaction layer formation between the dispersed phase and matrix and upon the concentration of the dispersed phase within the matrix. This paper extends the use of a simple model developed previously to study the influence of interaction layer formation as well as the size and volume fraction of fuel particles dispersed in the matrix, Si additions to the matrix, and Mo concentration in the fuel particles on the effective thermal conductivity of the U-Mo/Al composite during irradiation. The model has been compared to experimental measurements recently conducted on U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels at two different fission densities with acceptable agreement. Observations of the modeled results indicate that formation of an interaction layer and subsequent consumption of the matrix reveals a rather significant effect on effective thermal conductivity. The modeled interaction layer formation and subsequent consumption of the high thermal conductivity matrix was sensitive to the average dispersed fuel particle size, suggesting this parameter as one of the most effective in minimizing thermal conductivity degradation of the composite, while the influence of Si additions to the matrix in the model was highly dependent upon irradiation conditions.

  1. Swelling of U-7Mo/Al-Si dispersion fuel plates under irradiation - Non-destructive analysis of the AFIP-1 fuel plates

    Wachs, D. M.; Robinson, A. B.; Rice, F. J.; Kraft, N. C.; Taylor, S. C.; Lillo, M.; Woolstenhulme, N.; Roth, G. A.

    2016-08-01

    Extensive fuel-matrix interactions leading to plate pillowing have proven to be a significant impediment to the development of a suitable high density low-enriched uranium molybdenum alloy (U-Mo) based dispersion fuel for high power applications in research reactors. The addition of silicon to the aluminum matrix was previously demonstrated to reduce interaction layer growth in mini-plate experiments. The AFIP-1 project involved the irradiation, in-canal examination, and post-irradiation examination of two fuel plates. The irradiation of two distinct full size, flat fuel plates (one using an Al-2wt%Si matrix and the other an Al-4043 (∼4.8 wt% Si) matrix) was performed in the INL ATR reactor in 2008-2009. The irradiation conditions were: ∼250 W/cm2 peak Beginning Of Life (BOL) power, with a ∼3.5e21 f/cm3 peak burnup. The plates were successfully irradiated and did not show any pillowing at the end of the irradiation. This paper reports the results and interpretation of the in-canal and post-irradiation non-destructive examinations that were performed on these fuel plates. It further compares additional PIE results obtained on fuel plates irradiated in contemporary campaigns in order to allow a complete comparison with all results obtained under similar conditions. Except for a brief indication of accelerated swelling early in the irradiation of the Al-2Si plate, the fuel swelling is shown to evolve linearly with the fission density through the maximum burnup.

  2. Advanced research reactor fuel development

    compacts with a uranium density of 8 gU/cc consist of 7 different atomized uranium-molybdenum alloy powders. The tensile strength increased and the elongation decreased with increasing the volume fraction of U-10Mo powders in dispersion fuel. The tensile strength was lower and elongation was larger in dispersion fuel using atomized U-10Mo powders than that using comminuted fuel powders. The green strength of the comminuted powder compacts was about twice as large as that of the atomized powder compacts. It is suggested that the compacting condition required to fabricate the atomized powder compacts is over the 350MPa. The comminuted irregular shaped particles and smaller particle size of fuel powders showed improved homogeneity of powder mixture. The homogeneity of powder mixtures increased to a minimum at approximately 0.10 wt% moisture and then decreased with moisture content

  3. Advanced research reactor fuel development

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Pak, H. D.; Kim, K. H. [and others

    2000-05-01

    -plates will be conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor(ATR). 49 compacts with a uranium density of 8 gU/cc consist of 7 different atomized uranium-molybdenum alloy powders. The tensile strength increased and the elongation decreased with increasing the volume fraction of U-10Mo powders in dispersion fuel. The tensile strength was lower and elongation was larger in dispersion fuel using atomized U-10Mo powders than that using comminuted fuel powders. The green strength of the comminuted powder compacts was about twice as large as that of the atomized powder compacts. It is suggested that the compacting condition required to fabricate the atomized powder compacts is over the 350MPa. The comminuted irregular shaped particles and smaller particle size of fuel powders showed improved homogeneity of powder mixture. The homogeneity of powder mixtures increased to a minimum at approximately 0.10 wt% moisture and then decreased with moisture content.

  4. Study of the transformation of uranium-niobium alloys with low niobium concentrations, tempered from the gamma and beta + gamma 1 regions and then annealed at different temperatures. Comparison with uranium-molybdenum alloys (1963); Etude des transformations des alliages uranium-niobium a faible teneur en niobium trempes depuis les domaines gamma et beta + gamma 1 puis revenus a differentes temperatures. Comparaison avec les alliages uranium-molybdene (1963)

    Collot, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-09-15

    The author shows that uranium-niobium alloys, like uranium-molybdenum alloys, tempered from the gamma region, give a martensitic phase with a structure deriving from that of alpha uranium by a slight contraction parallel to the axis [001], The critical cooling rate allowing the formation of this martensite is 80 deg. C/s at 750 deg. C. Retention of the beta phase of uranium-niobium alloys is particularly difficult, the critical retention rate being 700 deg. C/s at 668 deg. C for an alloy containing 2.5 at. per cent of Nb. This beta phase is completely converted to the alpha phase at room temperature in about 6 hours. The TTT curves of this beta alloy are effectively reduced to the lower branch of the lower 'C'. The beta phase conversion law is expressed as: 1-x = exp. (kt){sup n} x being the degree of progression of the conversion, t the time, n an exponent no-varying with temperature and having approximately the value 2 for the alloy considered, k an increasing function of temperature. The activation energy of conversion is of the order of 14,600 cal/mole. Niobium is much less active than molybdenum as a stabiliser of beta uranium. (author) [French] Dans ce travail l'auteur montre que les alliages uranium-niobium, comme d'ailleurs les alliages uranium-molybdene, trempes depuis le domaine gamma, donnent une phase martensitique dont la structure derive de celle de l'uranium alpha par une legere contraction parallele de l'axe [001]. La vitesse critique de refroidissement permettant la formation de cette martensite est de 80 deg. C/s a 750 deg. C. La retention de la phase beta des alliages uranium-niobium est particulierement delicate car la vitesse critique de retention est de 700 deg. C/s a 668 deg. C pour l'alliage a 2,5 at. pour cent de Nb. Cette phase beta se transforme completement en phase alpha a la temperature ordinaire en 6 heures environ. Les courbes TTT de cet alliage de structure beta se reduisent pratiquement a la

  5. Experiments in anodic film effects during electrorefining of scrap U-10Mo fuels in support of modeling efforts

    A monolithic uranium molybdenum alloy clad in zirconium has been proposed as a low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel option for research and test reactors, as part of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program. Scrap from the fuel's manufacture will contain a significant portion of recoverable LEU. Pyroprocessing has been identified as an option to perform this recovery. A model of a pyroprocessing recovery procedure has been developed to assist in refining the LEU recovery process and designing the facility. Corrosion theory and a two mechanism transport model were implemented on a Mat-Lab platform to perform the modeling. In developing this model, improved anodic behavior prediction became necessary since a dense uranium-rich salt film was observed at the anode surface during electrorefining experiments. Experiments were conducted on uranium metal to determine the film's character and the conditions under which it forms. The electro-refiner salt used in all the experiments was eutectic LiCl/KCl containing UCl3. The anodic film material was analyzed with ICP-OES to determine its composition. Both cyclic voltammetry and potentiodynamic scans were conducted at operating temperatures between 475 and 575 C. degrees to interrogate the electrochemical behavior of the uranium. The results show that an anodic film was produced on the uranium electrode. The film initially passivated the surface of the uranium on the working electrode. At high over potentials after a trans-passive region, the current observed was nearly equal to the current observed at the initial active level. Analytical results support the presence of K2UCl6 at the uranium surface, within the error of the analytical method

  6. Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual report for FY 2009

    Chandler, David [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    This report documents progress made during FY 2009 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Studies are reported of the application of a silicon coating to surrogates for spheres of uranium-molybdenum alloy. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. A description of the progress in developing a finite element thermal hydraulics model of the LEU core is provided.

  7. Fuel cycle. Fuel reprocessing

    Reprocessing includes mechanical and chemical operations on spent fuel for extraction of valuable materials. These operations are a part of the fuel cycle. In this paper are given technical data on spent fuels, transport, storage, decladding, dissolution, Purex process, elaboration of U and Pu and reprocessing engineering. This article is completed by 106 references

  8. Fuel assembly

    Purpose: To improve the thermal and mechanical safety of fuel rods and structural components by making the local power coefficient of jointed fuel rods greater than that of other fuel rods in a fuel assembly. Constitution: In a fuel assembly comprising a plurality of fuel rods bundled by a spacer and held at the upper and the lower positions with tie plates for insertion into a channel, the degree of enrichment of uranium 235 for uranium dioxide fuel pellets charged in jointed fuel rods is adjusted such that the local power coefficient of the jointed fuel rods is made greater than that of the other fuel rods. In the case if the upper tie plate is moved upwardly by the extension of the jointed fuel rods, other fuel rods axially free from the upper tie plate receives no tension, whereby the safety of the fuel assembly can be improved. (Moriyama, K.)

  9. Alcohol fuels

    1980-01-01

    This issue is devoted almost entirely to alcohol fuels, the following topics being presented: A History of Alcohol Fuels; In the Midwest - Focus on Alcohol Fuels; Gasohol - A DOE Priority; Alcohol Fuels Potential; Gasohol - The Nutritious Fuel; Energy from Agriculture; Alcohol and the Price of Food; A New Look at Economics and Energy Balance in Alcohol Production; Economics of small-scale alcohol producers; Get the Lead Out with Alcohol; Biomass and the Carbon Dioxide Buildup; Federal Agency Activity in Alcohol Fuels; Congressional Activity in Alchol Fuels; Licensing a Small Still; Funding Sources for Alcohol Facilities; Safety in Alcohol Production; Alcohol Fuels Information; State-by-State Guide to Alcohol Activity; Alcohol Fuels Glossary; Alcohol Fuels and Your Car; Alcohol Fuels Training Grants Progam; Citizen Action Plan for Gasohol; and Alcohol Fuels - a Path to Reconciliation.

  10. Contribution to the study of the fission-gas release in metallic nuclear fuels; Contribution a l'etude du degagement des gaz de fission dans les combustibles nucleaires metalliques

    Kryger, B. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-10-01

    In order to study the effect of an external pressure on the limitation of swelling due to fission-gas precipitation, some irradiations have been carried out at burn-ups of about 35.000 MWd/ton, and at average sample temperatures of 575 Celsius degrees, of non-alloyed uranium and uranium 8 per cent molybdenum gained in a thick stainless steel can. A cylindrical central hole allows a fuel swelling from 20 to 33 per cent according to the experiment. After irradiation, the uranium samples showed two types of can rupture: one is due to the fuel swelling, and the other, to the pressure of the fission gases, released through a network of microcracks. The cans of the uranium-molybdenum samples are all undamaged and it is shown that the gas release occurs by interconnection of the bubbles for swelling values higher than those obtained in the case of uranium. For each type of fuel, a swelling-fission gas release relationship is established. The results suggest that good performances with a metallic fuel intended for use in fast reactor conditions can be obtained. (author) [French] Afin d'etudier l'effet d'une pression exterieure sur la limitation du gonflement due a la precipitation des gaz de fission, on a irradie a des taux de combustion d'environ 35.000 MWj/t et a des temperatures moyennes de 575 degres des echantillons d'uranium non allie et d'uranium-molybdene 8 pour cent contenus dans une gaine en acier inoxydable epaisse. Un trou cylindrique central permet au combustible de gonfler librement de 20 a 33 pour cent suivant les cas. Apres irradiation les echantillons d'uranium presentent deux types de ruptures de gaine: l'une due au gonflement du combustible, l'autre a la pression des gaz degages, ce degagement des gaz etant provoque par un reseau de micro-fissures. Les gaines des echantillons d'alliage uranium-molybdene sont toutes intactes et l'on montre que le relachement des gaz opere par interconnexion des bulles

  11. Fuel assembly

    A fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor comprises a rectangular parallelopiped channel box and fuel bundles contained in the channel box. The fuel bundle comprises an upper tie plate, a lower tie plate, a plurality of spacers a plurality of fuel rods and a water rod. In each fuel rod, the amount of fission products is reduced at upper and lower end regions of an effective fuel portion than that in other regions of the effective fuel region. In a portion of the fuel rods, fuel pellets containing burnable poisons are disposed at the upper and lower end regions. In addition, the upper and lower portions are constituted with natural uranium. Each of the upper and lower end regions is not greater than 15% of the effective fuel length. Since this can enhance reactivity control effect without worsening fuel economy, the control amount for excess reactivity upon long-term cycle operation can be increased. (I.N.)

  12. Study of equilibrium complexing reactions of 3d-elements with uranium-molybdenum heteropolyanions in aqueous solutions

    The method of mathematical simulation was used for quantitative description of equilibria in systems H+-M2+-(UMo12O42)8- (M=Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) studied by pH-metric titration. It is shown that the system studied is described best of all by the model containing complexes (M2UMA)4- (1) and (MHUMA)5-(2) (UMA-uranomolybdenum anion). Distribution diagram of complex forms depending on pH are presented and it is shown that with an increase in the ratio of components M:UMa ≥ 2 the equilibrium shifts to the side of direct reactions of metal ion substitution for heteropolyacid protons. Stability of complexes 1 is practically similar for all metals and exceeds stability of protonated complexes 2. Conditions of isolation of the complexes studied in solid form are described

  13. Fuel assembly

    Object: To divide fuel rods into several blocks so that fuels may be reversed vertically every block to leave sufficient allowance for reactor stoppage, thus enhancing taking-out combustion quality. Structure: A fuel inserting portion in upper and lower tie plates is designed so that a vertically symmetrical fuel may be inserted. That is, the construction of the fuel rod itself is entirely vertically symmetrical. Fuel regions are symmetrically arranged on uppper and lower ends, and expansion springs are also inserted at upper and lower parts. Outer springs of the fuel rods are always retained at plug portions on upper and lower ends. The fuel rods are of the sub-channel construction consisting of several rods, the fuel rods being separable from one another every sub-channel. Accordingly, the fuel may be reversed every sub-channel. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Nuclear fuels

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2009-07-01

    Fuel is one of the essential components in a reactor. It is within that fuel that nuclear reactions take place, i.e. fission of heavy atoms, uranium and plutonium. Fuel is at the core of the reactor, but equally at the core of the nuclear system as a whole. Fuel design and properties influence reactor behavior, performance, and safety. Even though it only accounts for a small part of the cost per kilowatt-hour of power provided by current nuclear power plants, good utilization of fuel is a major economic issue. Major advances have yet to be achieved, to ensure longer in-reactor dwell-time, thus enabling fuel to yield more energy; and improve ruggedness. Aside from economics, and safety, such strategic issues as use of plutonium, conservation of resources, and nuclear waste management have to be addressed, and true technological challenges arise. This Monograph surveys current knowledge regarding in-reactor behavior, operating limits, and avenues for R and D. It also provides illustrations of ongoing research work, setting out a few noteworthy results recently achieved. Content: 1 - Introduction; 2 - Water reactor fuel: What are the features of water reactor fuel? 9 (What is the purpose of a nuclear fuel?, Ceramic fuel, Fuel rods, PWR fuel assemblies, BWR fuel assemblies); Fabrication of water reactor fuels (Fabrication of UO{sub 2} pellets, Fabrication of MOX (mixed uranium-plutonium oxide) pellets, Fabrication of claddings); In-reactor behavior of UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels (Irradiation conditions during nominal operation, Heat generation, and removal, The processes involved at the start of irradiation, Fission gas behavior, Microstructural changes); Water reactor fuel behavior in loss of tightness conditions (Cladding, the first containment barrier, Causes of failure, Consequences of a failure); Microscopic morphology of fuel ceramic and its evolution under irradiation; Migration and localization of fission products in UOX and MOX matrices (The ceramic under

  15. Fuel cycles

    AECL publications, from the open literature, on fuels and fuel cycles used in CANDU reactors are listed in this bibliography. The accompanying index is by subject. The bibliography will be brought up to date periodically

  16. Fossil Fuels.

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with fossil fuels. Some topics covered are historic facts, development of fuels, history of oil production, current and future trends of the oil industry, refining fossil fuels, and environmental problems. Material in each unit may…

  17. Fuel distribution

    Tison, R.R.; Baker, N.R.; Blazek, C.F.

    1979-07-01

    Distribution of fuel is considered from a supply point to the secondary conversion sites and ultimate end users. All distribution is intracity with the maximum distance between the supply point and end-use site generally considered to be 15 mi. The fuels discussed are: coal or coal-like solids, methanol, No. 2 fuel oil, No. 6 fuel oil, high-Btu gas, medium-Btu gas, and low-Btu gas. Although the fuel state, i.e., gas, liquid, etc., can have a major impact on the distribution system, the source of these fuels (e.g., naturally-occurring or coal-derived) does not. Single-source, single-termination point and single-source, multi-termination point systems for liquid, gaseous, and solid fuel distribution are considered. Transport modes and the fuels associated with each mode are: by truck - coal, methanol, No. 2 fuel oil, and No. 6 fuel oil; and by pipeline - coal, methane, No. 2 fuel oil, No. 6 oil, high-Btu gas, medium-Btu gas, and low-Btu gas. Data provided for each distribution system include component makeup and initial costs.

  18. Fuel assembly

    A fuel assembly is composed of a fuel bundle surrounded by a channel box. The fuel bundle comprises a large number of fuel rods and a water rod secured to upper and lower tie plate by way of a plurality of fuel spacers. Grooves (libretti) are formed in the direction along the flowing direction of coolants to at least one of the surface of the fuel rods, the inner surface of the channel box, the surface of the water rod and spacer constituting components. In this case, the lateral width of the libretto in the flowing direction is determined as the minimum thickness of the bottom layer of a layered flow determined by a coolant flow rate. With such a constitution, abrasion resistance relative to coolants is reduced to reduce the pressure loss of fuel assemblies. (I.N.)

  19. Fuel cycle

    The situation of the nuclear fuel cycle for LWR type reactors in France and in the Federal Republic of Germany was presented in 14 lectures with the aim to compare the state-of-the-art in both countries. In addition to the momentarily changing fuilds of fuel element development and fueling strategies, the situation of reprocessing, made interesting by some recent developmnts, was portrayed and differences in ultimate waste disposal elucidated. (orig.)

  20. Fuel Cells

    Smith, Anders; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cells have been the subject of intense research and development efforts for the past decades. Even so, the technology has not had its commercial breakthrough yet. This entry gives an overview of the technological challenges and status of fuel cells and discusses the most promising applications...... of the different types of fuel cells. Finally, their role in a future energy supply with a large share of fluctuating sustainable power sources, e.g., solar or wind, is surveyed....

  1. Candu fuel and fuel cycles

    A primary rationale for Indonesia to proceed with a nuclear power program is to diversity its energy sources and achieve freedom from future resource constraints. While other considerations, such as economy of power supply, hedging against potential future increases in the price of fossil fuels, fostering the technological development of the Indonesia economy and minimizing greenhouse and other gaseous emissions are important, the strategic resource issue is key. In considering candidate nuclear power technologies upon which to base such a program, a major consideration will be the potential for those technologies to be economically sustained in the face of large future increases in demand for nuclear fuels. The technology or technologies selected should be amenable to evaluation in a rapidly changing technical, economic, resource and environmental policy. The world's proven uranium resources which can be economically recovered represent a fairly modest energy resource if utilization is based on the currently commercialized fuel cycles, even with the use of recovered plutonium in mixed oxide fuels. In the long term, fuel cycles relying solely on the use of light water reactors will encounter increasing fuel supply constraints. Because of its outstanding neutron economy and the flexibility of on-power refueling, CANDU reactors are the most fuel resource efficient commercial reactors and offer the potential for accommodating an almost unlimited variety of advanced and even more fuel efficient cycles. Most of these cycles utilize nuclear fuels which are too low grade to be used in light water reactors, including many products now considered to be waste, such as spent light water reactor fuel and reprocessing products such as recovered uranium. The fuel-cycle flexibility of the CANDU reactor provides a ready path to sustainable energy development in both the short and the long terms. Most of the potential CANDU fuel cycle developments can be accommodated in existing

  2. Nuclear fuel

    All stages of nuclear fuel cycle are analysed with respect to the present situation and future perspectives of supply and demand of services; the prices and the unitary cost estimation of these stages for the international fuel market are also mentioned. From the world resources and projections of uranium consumption, medium-and long term analyses are made of fuel availability for several strategies of use of different reactor types. Finally, the cost of nuclear fuel in the generation of electric energy is calculated to be used in the energetic planning of the electric sector. (M.A.)

  3. Fuel assembly

    Fuel rods enriched with plutonium and fuel rods formed by incorporating combustible poisons in enriched uranium are arranged in square lattice like structure. MOX fuel pellets comprise PuO2 as a fuel material and contain 239Pu, 241Pu as fission products. The gadolinia-incorporated uranium fuel pellets comprise UO2 as a fuel material and gadolinia as a burnable poison incorporated therein and contains 235U as a fuel material. The axial distribution of the concentration of gadolinia contained in the uranium fuel rods is axially divided into three regions in a region less than 1/2 of a fuel effective length, and the concentration of gadolinia is highest at the lowest region, and the concentration of gadolinia is made lower toward the upper regions. With such a constitution, the degree of downward distortion of the axial power distribution is suppressed in a reactor core of a BWR type reactor having a large MOX loading rate. (I.N.)

  4. Fuel assembly

    Izutsu, Sadayuki; Fujita, Satoshi [Hitachi Engineering Co. Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan); Fujimaki, Shingo; Sasagawa, Masaru; Kaneto, Kunikazu; Mochida, Takaaki; Aoyama, Motoo; Shimada, Hidemitsu

    1997-09-09

    Fuel rods enriched with plutonium and fuel rods formed by incorporating combustible poisons in enriched uranium are arranged in square lattice like structure. MOX fuel pellets comprise PuO{sub 2} as a fuel material and contain {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu as fission products. The gadolinia-incorporated uranium fuel pellets comprise UO{sub 2} as a fuel material and gadolinia as a burnable poison incorporated therein and contains {sup 235}U as a fuel material. The axial distribution of the concentration of gadolinia contained in the uranium fuel rods is axially divided into three regions in a region less than 1/2 of a fuel effective length, and the concentration of gadolinia is highest at the lowest region, and the concentration of gadolinia is made lower toward the upper regions. With such a constitution, the degree of downward distortion of the axial power distribution is suppressed in a reactor core of a BWR type reactor having a large MOX loading rate. (I.N.)

  5. DESIGN STUDY FOR A LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM CORE FOR THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR, ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY 2010

    Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL

    2011-02-01

    This report documents progress made during FY 2010 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current level. Studies are reported of support to a thermal hydraulic test loop design, the implementation of finite element, thermal hydraulic analysis capability, and infrastructure tasks at HFIR to upgrade the facility for operation at 100 MW. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. Continuing development in the definition of the fuel fabrication process is described.

  6. Nuclear fuel

    It is expected that nuclear power generation will reach 49 million kW in 1985 and 129 million kW in 1995, and the nuclear fuel having to be supplied and processed will increase in proportion to these values. The technical problems concerning nuclear fuel are presented on the basis of the balance between the benefit for human beings and the burden on the human beings. Recently, especially the downstream of nuclear fuel attracts public attention. Enriched uranium as the raw material for light water reactor fuel is almost monopolized by the U.S., and the technical information has not been published for fear of the diversion to nuclear weapons. In this paper, the present situations of uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, transportation, reprocessing and waste disposal and the future problems are described according to the path of nuclear fuel cycle. The demand and supply of enriched uranium in Japan will be balanced up to about 1988, but afterwards, the supply must rely upon the early establishment of the domestic technology by centrifugal separation method. No problem remains in the fabrication of light water reactor fuel, but for the fabrication of mixed oxide fuel, the mechanization of the production facility and labor saving are necessary. The solution of the capital risk for the construction of the second reprocessing plant is the main problem. Japan must develop waste disposal techniques with all-out efforts. (Kako, I.)

  7. Fuel cells:

    Sørensen, Bent

    2013-01-01

    A brief overview of the progress in fuel cell applications and basic technology development is presented, as a backdrop for discussing readiness for penetration into the marketplace as a solution to problems of depletion, safety, climate or environmental impact from currently used fossil and...... nuclear fuel-based energy technologies....

  8. Fuel cells

    D. N. Srivastava

    1962-05-01

    Full Text Available The current state of development of fuel cells as potential power sources is reviewed. Applications in special fields with particular reference to military requirements are pointed out.

  9. Fuel assembly

    Purpose: To reconstruct a BWR type reactor into a high conversion reactor with no substantial changes for the reactor inner structure such as control rod structure. Constitution: The horizontal cross sectional shape of a channel box is reformed into a square configuration and the arrangement of fuel rods is formed as a trigonal lattice-like configuration. As a method of improving the conversion ratio, there is considered to use a dense lattice by narrowing the distance between fuel rods and trigonal lattice arrangement for fuel rod is advantageous therefor. A square shape cross sectional configuration having equal length both in the lateral and longitudinal directions is suitable for the channel box as a guide upon movement of the control rod. Fuel rods can be arranged with no loss by the trigonal lattice configuration, by which it is possible to improve the neutron moderation, increase the reactor core reactivity and conduct effective fuel combustion. In this way, it is possible to attain the object by inserting the follower portion of the control rod at the earier half and extracting the same at the latter half during the operation period in the reactor core comprising fuel assemblies suitable to a high conversion BWR type reactor having average conversion ratio of about 0.8. (Kamimura, M.)

  10. Fuel assembly

    The object of the present invention is to improve the hydrodynamic stability in the fuel channels of BWR type reactors and effectively utilize the coolant driving power corresponding to the reduction due to pressure loss. That is, in a fuel assembly having usual fuel rods and, in addition, water rods and short fuel rods, the structures of water rods, upper tie plates and the spacers are designed from a hydrodynamic point of view, to reduce the pressure loss. On the other hand, a lattice-like flow channel resistance member is disposed to a lower tie plate. The bundle flow rate is made uniform by the flow channel resistance member, and the pressure loss of the tie plate is increased by the reduction of the pressure loss by the arrangement of the short fuel rod and the reduction of the pressure loss described above. Since this increases the ratio of the single phase stream pressure loss in the total reactor core pressure loss, the hydrodynamic stability in the fuel channel is improved. (I.J.)

  11. Fuel assembly

    Since the neutron flux distribution and the power distribution of a fuel assembly in which short fuel rods vary greatly in the vicinity of a boundary where the distribution of uranium amount is different, the reading value of local power range monitors, having the detectors positioned in the vicinity of the boundary is varied. Then in the present invention, the upper end of the effective axial length of fuel rod is so made as not approaching with the detection position of the local power range monitor in a reactor core. Further, the upper end of the effective axial length of fuel rods in a 4 x 4 fuel rod lattice positioned at the corner on the side of the local power range monitor is so made as not approaching the detection position of the local power range monitor. As a result, the change of the neutron flux distribution and power distribution in the vicinity of the position where the detector of the local power range monitor is situated can be extremely reduced. Accordingly, there is no scattering and fluctuation for the reading value by the local power range monitor, to improve the monitoring performance for thermal characteristics in the reactor core. (N.H.)

  12. Canadian power reactor fuel

    The following subjects are covered: the basic CANDU fuel design, the history of the bundle design, the significant differences between CANDU and LWR fuel, bundle manufacture, fissile and structural materials and coolants used in the CANDU fuel program, fuel and material behaviour, and performance under irradiation, fuel physics and management, booster rods and reactivity mechanisms, fuel procurement, organization and industry, and fuel costs. (author)

  13. Fuel bundle

    This patent describes a method of forming a fuel bundle of a nuclear reactor. The method consists of positioning the fuel rods in the bottom plate, positioning the tie rod in the bottom plate with the key passed through the receptacle to the underside of the bottom plate and, after the tie rod is so positioned, turning the tie rod so that the key is in engagement with the underside of the bottom plate. Thereafter mounting the top plate is mounted in engagement with the fuel rods with the upper end of the tie rod extending through the opening in the top plate and extending above the top plate, and the tie rod is secured to the upper side of sid top plate thus simultaneously securing the key to the underside of the bottom plate

  14. Fuel flowmeters - measurements of fuel consumption

    Nešpor, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This work is devoted to measuring the fuel consumption. Generally deals with factors affecting consumption and fuels. Furthermore, it describes methods of measuring fuel consumption under the driving modes. Finally, the paper deals with the calculations, the actual selection of fuel gauge, economy and efficiency evaluation of fuel consumption. The conclusion of this work summarizes the above findings.

  15. Transport fuel

    Ronsse, Frederik; Jørgensen, Henning; Schüßler, Ingmar;

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, the use of transport fuel derived from biomass increased four-fold between 2003 and 2012. Mainly based on food resources, these conventional biofuels did not achieve the expected emission savings and contributed to higher prices for food commod - ities, especially maize and oilseeds...

  16. Fuel assembly

    Fuel rods are arranged in a lattice-like structure by way of a plurality of spacers and the lower ends thereof are fixed to a lower tie plate for assembling a fuel rod bundle. The outer circumference is surrounded by a basket having a plurality of openings and the basket is surrounded by a channel box. The basket is connected to a handle at the upper end and to a lower tie plate at the lower end and, further, defined with a scraper at each of openings. Coolants flown from the lower tie plate to the channel box flow the channels between the channel box and the basket and a fuel rod bundle, uprise while forming a two-phase flow and flow out from the upper end of the channel box. Since no upper tie plate is present, pressure loss of coolants flow is reduced, and liquid membranes of coolants are peeled off by the scraper disposed at the opening of the basket, which contributes to the improvement of the limit power. In addition, fuel rods are inspected and cleaned easily. (N.H.)

  17. Fuel cells technologies for fuel processing

    Shekhawat, Dushyant, II; Berry, David A, I

    2014-01-01

    Fuel Cells: Technologies for Fuel Processing provides an overview of the most important aspects of fuel reforming to the generally interested reader, researcher, technologist, teacher, student, or engineer. The topics covered include all aspects of fuel reforming: fundamental chemistry, different modes of reforming, catalysts, catalyst deactivation, fuel desulfurization, reaction engineering, novel reforming concepts, thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer issues, system design, and recent research and development. While no attempt is made to describe the fuel cell itself, there is sufficient

  18. Abstracts and papers of the 1999 International RERTR Meeting

    The papers presented at the 22nd International RERTR Meeting dealt with the following topics: development and testing of new fuel elements (uranium-molybdenum alloys); research reactors core conversion studies (change from highly to moderately or slightly enriched uranium), including both measurements and calculations: spent fuel storage and transportation; production of 99Mo from low enriched uranium. A number of papers were devoted to the status and future of national RERTR programs

  19. Fuel review: fuel design data

    Tables of data are provided which give the specifications of fuel designs from a number of fabricators. The reactor types covered are: PWR; VVER; BWR; and Heavy Water. One or two illustrations of representative designs for each manufacturer are included. An address list of suppliers is appended. (UK)

  20. Fuel trading

    A first part of this report proposes an overview of trends and predictions. After a synthesis on the sector changes and trends, it indicates and comments the most recent predictions for the consumption of refined oil products and for the turnover of the fuel wholesale market, reports the main highlights concerning the sector's life, and gives a dashboard of the sector activity. The second part proposes the annual report on trends and competition. It presents the main operator profiles and fuel categories, the main determining factors of the activity, the evolution of the sector context between 2005 and 2015 (consumptions, prices, temperature evolution). It analyses the evolution of the sector activity and indicators (sales, turnovers, prices, imports). Financial performances of enterprises are presented. The economic structure of the sector is described (evolution of the economic fabric, structural characteristics, French foreign trade). Actors are then presented and ranked in terms of turnover, of added value, and of result

  1. Fuel assembly

    The cross section of a fuel assembly is divided to a first region containing corner portions at which channel fasteners are situated and a second region not containing corner portions. The average enrichment degree of plutonium in the first region is decreased than that of the second region, and the number of fuel rods containing burnable poisons is increased at the first region than that of the second region. In the first region of the fuel assembly, the effect of moderating neutrons is enhanced since the cross section of a moderator flow channel at the outer side of the channel box is large. Therefore, local power peaking is increased in the first region while it is decreased in the second region that opposes to a narrow gap. The average enrichment degree of plutonium in the first region is decreased and that in the second region is increased by so much, to flatten the power distribution. Then, the reduction of the reactivity worth of gadolinia, as burnable poisons, can be suppressed. (N.H.)

  2. Fuel assembly

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor, and prevents aging change of flow rate of coolants leaked from a gap between a lower tie plate and a channel box. That is, in the fuel assembly, a great number of fuel rods and a plurality of water rods are bundled by a plurality of spacers, the upper and the lower ends thereof are supported by upper and lower tie plates, and they are contained in a channel box. Plate-like protrusions are disposed rotatably to the lower tie plate at a position corresponding to the lower end of the channel box. In addition, through holes are disposed on the side wall of the lower tie plate. With such a constitution, the protrusions rotate at a connection portion by hydraulic pressure of leaking coolants, and urge the channel box by the other end to control leakage of coolants. Further, since the through holes are disposed on the side wall of the lower tie plate, pressure difference is caused between the upper and the lower surfaces of the plate of the protrusion, to rotate the protrusions at the connection portion, and the other end of the protrusions presses the channel box to obtain the same effect. (I.S.)

  3. Fuel rod

    The present invention provide a fuel rod used in a BWR type reactor, preventing the occurrence of defects of weld portions and improving the operationability of test and assembling operation to improve the quality of weld portions. Namely, the fuel rod is formed by loading a plurality of fuel pellets in a cladding tube. The outer diameter of a groove portion of a tightly sealing end plug to be inserted and welded to the open end of the cladding tube is made substantially identical with the inner diameter of the cladding tube. A neck portion having a diameter smaller than the outer diameter of the groove portion is disposed between an end plug main body and the groove portion. As a result, since the outer diameter of the groove portion is substantially identical with the inner diameter of the cladding tube, the positioning is facilitated. Since the neck portion having a smaller diameter than the outer diameter of the groove portion is disposed in the groove portion, a gap is formed in the welded portion thereby enabling to facilitate the confirmation of weld sag for confirming integrity of the weld by a non-destructive test. (I.S.)

  4. LMFBR fuel component costs

    A significant portion of the cost of fabricating LMFBR fuels is in the non-fuel components such as fuel pin cladding, fuel assembly ducts and end fittings. The contribution of these to fuel fabrication costs, based on FFTF experience and extrapolated to large LMFBR fuel loadings, is discussed. The extrapolation considers the expected effects of LMFBR development programs in progress on non-fuel component costs

  5. Fuel-cycle costs for alternative fuels

    This paper compares the fuel cycle cost and fresh fuel requirements for a range of nuclear reactor systems including the present day LWR without fuel recycle, an LWR modified to obtain a higher fuel burnup, an LWR using recycle uranium and plutonium fuel, an LWR using a proliferation resistant 233U-Th cycle, a heavy water reactor, a couple of HTGRs, a GCFR, and several LMFBRs. These reactor systems were selected from a set of 26 developed for the NASAP study and represent a wide range of fuel cycle requirements

  6. Maps showing distribution of pH, copper, zinc, fluoride, uranium, molybdenum, arsenic, and sulfate in water, Richfield 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Utah

    McHugh, J.B.; Miller, W.R.; Ficklin, W.H.

    1984-01-01

    These maps show the regional distribution of copper, zinc, arsenic, molybdenum, uranium, fluoride, sulfate, and pH in surface and ground water from the Richfield 1° x 2° quadrangle. This study supplements (Miller and others, 1984a-j) the regional drainage geochemical study done for the Richfield quadrangle under the U.S. Geological Survey’s Conterminuous United States Mineral Assessment Program (CUSMAP). Regional sampling was designed to define broad geochemical patterns and trends which can be used, along with geologic and geophysical data, to assess the mineral resource potential of the Richfield quadrangle. Analytical data used in compiling this report were published previously (McHugh and others, 1981). The Richfield quadrangle in west-central Utah covers the eastern part of the Pioche-Marysvale igneous and mineral belt that extends from the vicinity of Pioche in southeastern Nevada, east-northeastward for 250 km into central Utah. The western two-thirds of the Richfield quadrangle is in the Basin and Range Province, and the eastern third in the High Plateaus of Utah subprovince of the Colorado Plateau. Bedrock in the northern part of the Richfield quadrangle consists predominantly of latest Precambrian and Paleozoic sedimentary strata that were thrust eastward during the Sevier orogeny in Cretaceous time onto an autochthon of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The southern part of the quadrangle is largely underlain by Oligocene and younger volcanic rocks and related intrusions. Extensional tectonism in late Cenozoic time broke the bedrock terrane into a series of north-trending fault blocks; the uplifted mountain areas were deeply eroded and the resulting debris deposited in the adjacent basins. Most of the mineral deposits in the Pioche-Marysvale mineral belt were formed during igneous activity in the middle and late Cenozoic time.

  7. Cryogenic fuel tank

    A fuel tank is provided for the automotive transport of a cryogenic liquid fuel which in the course of transport is being consumed by an engine or the like. The fuel tank consists essentially of two containers, one for the cryogenic fuel and the other for a secondary cryogenic liquid which is used to cool the fuel during storage when no fuel is being consumed. By the method of the invention the build up of fuel vapor pressure during storage is avoided and the vapor pressure maintained at a predetermined level. The fuel tank described herein was two distinct modes of operation, namely, the fuel storage mode and the fuel supply mode. In the fuel storage mode the cryogenic fuel is being stored for later use while the secondary fluid is being used as a heat sink for the heat absorbed by the tank from the environment. In the fuel supply mode fuel is being supplied by the tank for consumption both as a liquid and as a gas while the secondary fluid is being restored to its initial state of lower temperature by the use of a refrigerator which employs the fuel as a heat sink. The two containers are thermally insulated from the outside environment as well as from each other. The fuel container and the secondary fluid container are connected by a heat transfer bridge which permits heat flow from the fuel to the secondary fluid only during the storage mode of operation. The fuel container has two fuel discharge connections, one carrying the liquid fuel the other carrying gaseous fuel which is vaporized within the fuel container. The pressure in the fuel container is maintained at an adequate level for the fuel supply to proceed without the need for a fuel pump

  8. Fuel processors for fuel cell APU applications

    Aicher, T.; Lenz, B.; Gschnell, F.; Groos, U.; Federici, F.; Caprile, L.; Parodi, L.

    The conversion of liquid hydrocarbons to a hydrogen rich product gas is a central process step in fuel processors for auxiliary power units (APUs) for vehicles of all kinds. The selection of the reforming process depends on the fuel and the type of the fuel cell. For vehicle power trains, liquid hydrocarbons like gasoline, kerosene, and diesel are utilized and, therefore, they will also be the fuel for the respective APU systems. The fuel cells commonly envisioned for mobile APU applications are molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC), solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), and proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). Since high-temperature fuel cells, e.g. MCFCs or SOFCs, can be supplied with a feed gas that contains carbon monoxide (CO) their fuel processor does not require reactors for CO reduction and removal. For PEMFCs on the other hand, CO concentrations in the feed gas must not exceed 50 ppm, better 20 ppm, which requires additional reactors downstream of the reforming reactor. This paper gives an overview of the current state of the fuel processor development for APU applications and APU system developments. Furthermore, it will present the latest developments at Fraunhofer ISE regarding fuel processors for high-temperature fuel cell APU systems on board of ships and aircrafts.

  9. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    An improved nuclear power reactor fuel element is described which consists of fuel rods, rod guide tubes and an end plate. The system allows direct access to an end of each fuel rod for inspection purposes. (U.K.)

  10. GSPEL - Fuel Cell Laboratory

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fuel Cell Lab (FCL) Provides testing for technology readiness of fuel cell systems The FCL investigates, tests and verifies the performance of fuel-cell systems...

  11. KMRR fuel design

    KMRR fuel rod design criteria on fuel swelling, blistering and oxide spallation have been reexamined. Fuel centerline temperature limit of 250deg C in normal operation condition and fuel swelling limit of 12 % at the end of life have been proposed to prevent fuel failure due to excessive fuel swelling. Fuel temperature limit of 485deg C has been proposed to exclude the possibility of fuel failures during transients or under accident condition. Further analyses are needed to decide the fuel cladding temperature limit to preclude the oxide spallation. Design changes in fuel assembly structure and their effects on related systems have been reviewed from a structural integrity viewpoint. The remained works in fuel mechanical design area have been identified and further efforts of fuel design group will be focused on these aspects. (Author)

  12. Fuel processor for fuel cell power system

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E.; Springer, Thomas E.; Huff, James R.

    1987-01-01

    A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

  13. Powder production of U-Mo alloy, HMD process (Hydriding- Milling- Dehydriding)

    Uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloys can be hydrided massively in metastable γ (gamma) phase. The brittle hydride can be milled and dehydrided to acquire the desired size distributions needed for dispersion nuclear fuels. The developments of the different steps of this process called hydriding-milling- dehydriding (HMD Process) are described. Powder production scales for industrial fabrication is easily achieved with conventional equipment, small man-power and low investment. (author)

  14. Nuclear fuel element

    Purpose: To reduce the probability of stress corrosion cracks in a zirconium alloy fuel can even when tensile stresses are resulted to the fuel can. Constitution: Sintered nuclear fuel pellets composed of uranium dioxide or a solid solution of gadolinium as a burnable poison in uranium dioxide are charged in a tightly sealed zirconium alloy fuel can. The nuclear fuel pellets for the nuclear fuel element are heat-treated in a gas mixture of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. Further, a charging gas containing a mixture of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide is charged within a zirconium alloy fuel can packed with the nuclear fuel pellets and tightly sealed. (Aizawa, K.)

  15. Fuel manufacturing and utilization

    The efficient utilisation of nuclear fuel requires manufacturing facilities capable of making advanced fuel types, with appropriate quality control. Once made, the use of such fuels requires a proper understanding of their behaviour in the reactor environment, so that safe operation for the design life can be achieved. The International Atomic Energy Agency supports Member States to improve in-pile fuel performance and management of materials; and to develop advanced fuel technologies for ensuring reliability and economic efficiency of the nuclear fuel cycle. It provides assistance to Member States to support fuel-manufacturing capability, including quality assurance techniques, optimization of manufacturing parameters and radiation protection. The IAEA supports the development fuel modelling expertise in Member States, covering both normal operation and postulated and severe accident conditions. It provides information and support for the operation of Nuclear Power Plant to ensure that the environment and water chemistry is appropriate for fuel operation. The IAEA supports fuel failure investigations, including equipment for failed fuel detection and for post-irradiation examination and inspection, as well as fuel repair, it provides information and support research into the basic properties of fuel materials, including UO2, MOX and zirconium alloys. It further offers guidance on the relationship with back-end requirement (interim storage, transport, reprocessing, disposal), fuel utilization and management, MOX fuels, alternative fuels and advanced fuel technology

  16. Instrumentation of fuel elements and fuel plates

    When controlling the behaviour of a reactor or developing a new fuel concept, it is of utmost interest to have the possibility to confirm the thermohydraulic calculations by actual measurements in the fuel elements or in the fuel plates. For years, CERCA has developed the technology and supplied its customers with fuel elements equipped with pressure or temperature measuring devices according to the requirements. Recent customer projects have lead to the development of a new method to introduce thermocouples directly into the fuel plate meat instead of the cladding. The purpose of this paper is to review the various instrumentation possibilities available at CERCA. (author)

  17. Instrumentation of fuel elements and fuel plates

    When controlling the behaviour of a reactor or developing a new fuel concept, it is of utmost interest to have the possibility to confirm the thermohydraulic calculations by actual measurements in the fuel elements or in the fuel plates. For years, CERCA has developed the technology and supplied its customers with fuel elements equipped with pressure or temperature measuring devices according to the requirements. Recent customer projects have led to the development of a new method to introduce thermocouples directly into the fuel plate meat instead of the cladding. The purpose of this paper is to review the various instrumentation possibilities available at CERCA. (author)

  18. Nuclear fuel activities in Canada

    Nuclear fuel activities in Canada are considered in the presentation on the following directions: Canadian utility fuel performance; CANDU owner's group fuel programs; AECL advanced fuel program (high burnup fuel behaviour and development); Pu dispositioning (MOX) activities. 1 tab

  19. Spent fuel management strategies

    Nuclear fuel cycle is divided into two sections; front end and back end of the fuel cycle. Front end of the fuel cycle, which covers all the activities of the fuel cycle before the fuel goes into the reactor has better developed and well-defined technologies. For storage of the spent fuel which are subjects of the back end of the fuel cycle, the waste management policies are not so well defined. There are three approaches that exist today for management of spent fuel. 1. For once through or open fuel cycles direct disposal of spent fuel in a deep geological repository, 2. For closed fuel cycles reprocessing of spent fuel and recycling of the recovered plutonium and uranium in new mixed oxide (MOX) fuels, 3. The spent fuel is placed in long term interim storage pending a decision as to its ultimate reprocessing or disposal. There are so large scale geological repositories for the final disposal of spent fuel in operation. Studies on suitable site selection, design, construction and licensing take about 30-40 years. Reprocessing, on the other hand, produces plutonium and is therefore under close inspection because of the Non Proliferation Treaty. Today more countries are delaying their final decision about the spent fuel management approach and using the long term interim storage approach

  20. Fuel element design handbook

    Merckx, K.R.

    1958-09-01

    The economic development of nuclear reactors depends upon the integrated progress in the fields of reactor design, fuel element design, reactor operation, and fuel production and separation. Broad criteria, which restrict the fuel element design, are determined by the mutual consideration of the problems encountered in all the above fields. Hence, no stage of reactor design or operation is independent of the fuel element problem, nor can the fuel element designer disregard the interest of any one field. As an introduction to the fuel element design problem, this chapter describes how the general criteria for a fuel element are determined.

  1. Nuclear fuel structure and fuel behaviour

    The aim of the research has been to produce information on structural properties of nuclear fuel and their effects on the fuel behaviour. The research subjects were new fuel fabrication and quality control methods, the effects of as-fabricated pellets properties on the behaviour of fuel rods, behaviour of cladding materials and irradiated cladding and structural materials. At the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) the nuclear fuel structure and behaviour programme has produced data which have been utilized in procurement, behavioural analysis and surveillance of the fuel used in the Finnish nuclear power stations. In addition to our own research, data on fuel behaviour have been received by participating in the international cooperation projects, such as OECD/Halden, Studsvik-Ramp-programmes, IAEA/BEFAST II and VVER-fuel research projects. The volume of the research work financed by the Finnish Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM) and the Technical Research Centre of Finland in the years 1987-1989 has been about 8 man years. The report is the summary report of the research work conducted in the KTM-financed nuclear fuel structure and fuel behaviour programme in the years 1987-1989

  2. HTGR Fuel performance basis

    The safety characteristics of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) during normal and accident conditions are determined in part by HTGR fuel performance. During normal operation, less than 0.1% fuel failure occurs, primarily from defective particles. This low fuel failure fraction limits circulating activity to acceptable levels. During severe accidents, the radiological consequence is influenced by high-temperature fuel particle behavior. An empirical fuel failure model, supported by recent experimental data, is presented. The onset of significant fuel particle failure occurs at temperatures in excess of 16000C, and complete fuel failure occurs at 26600C. This indicates that the fuel is more retentive at higher temperatures than previously assumed. The more retentive nature of the fuel coupled with the high thermal capacitance of the core results in slow release of fission products from the core during severe accidents

  3. BWR fuel performance

    The General Electric experience base on BWR fuel includes over 29,000 fuel assemblies which contain 1,600,000 fuel rods. Over the last five years, design, process and operating changes have been introduced which have had major effects in improving fuel performance. Monitoring this fuel performance in BWRs has been accomplished through cooperative programs between GE and utilities. Activities such as plant fission product monitoring, fuel sipping and fuel and channel surveillance programs have jointly contributed to the value of this extensive experience base. The systematic evaluation of this data has established well-defined fuel performance trends which provide the assurance and confidence in fuel reliability that only actual operating experience can provide

  4. MOX fuel assembly

    The fuel assembly of the present invention comprises at least one water rod, first fuel rods filled with uranium/plutonium mixed oxide fuels, second fuel rods having axial length shorter than that of the first fuel rods and third fuel rods containing burnable poisons. If the third fuel rods are arranged on the same row and adjacent columns or on the same column and adjacent row relative to the positions where the second fuel rods are arranged or the position of the water rod replacing fuel rods, in other words, at a position extremely close to them, neutron spectrum is made softer and the neutron flux distribution is made higher. As a result, negative reactivity worth of the burnable poisons contained in the third fuel rods is enhanced, accordingly, a reactivity suppression effect comparable with that in conventional cases can be obtained by so much even if the number of the third fuel rods is reduced. The number of the MOX fuel rods is increased than a conventional case by so much as replacing the third fuel rods with the MOX fuel rods by the reduced amount thereby enabling to improve the efficiency using plutonium. (N.H.)

  5. DUPIC fuel compatibility assessment

    The purpose of this study is to assess the compatibility of DUPIC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU Reactors) fuel with the current CANDU 6 reactor, which is one of the technology being developed to utilize the spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors. The Phase II study of this project includes the analysis of impact on the reactor safety, the development of core design technology, the development of fuel supply technology of optimal composition, and feasibility analysis on localization and license of DUPIC fuel. From the reactor safety analysis results, it is known that DUPIC fuel satisfies the safety limit of reactor containment and public dose for single failure. But, the safety limit may be exceeded for dual failure. Therefore, more analysis is needed for the removal of excessive conservatism in accident analysis methodology and modification of transient fuel behavior analysis methodology. The results of the validation calculations of core design methodology have confirmed that the current core analysis system is acceptable for the feasibility study of the DUPIC fuel compatibility analysis. The results of compatibility and fuel fabrication have shown that DUPIC fuel is technically feasible. For practical use and licensing, however, more research items required in the practical use, fuel rod and bundle design and fuel loading are should be performed. When these items are performed and resolved, the compatibility of the DUPIC fuel is achieved, and, eventually, the possibility of DUPIC fuel licensing can be confirmed

  6. Nuclear fuel storage

    A method and apparatus for the storage of fuel in a stainless steel egg crate structure within a storage pool are described. Fuel is initially stored in a checkerboard pattern or in each opening if the fuel is of low enrichment. Additional fuel (or fuel of higher enrichment) is later stored by adding stainless steel angled plates within each opening, thereby forming flux traps between the openings. Still higher enrichment fuel is later stored by adding poison plates either with or without the stainless steel angles. 8 claims

  7. Materials for fuel cells

    Sossina M Haile

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Because of their potential to reduce the environmental impact and geopolitical consequences of the use of fossil fuels, fuel cells have emerged as tantalizing alternatives to combustion engines. Like a combustion engine, a fuel cell uses some sort of chemical fuel as its energy source but, like a battery, the chemical energy is directly converted to electrical energy, without an often messy and relatively inefficient combustion step. In addition to high efficiency and low emissions, fuel cells are attractive for their modular and distributed nature, and zero noise pollution. They will also play an essential role in any future hydrogen fuel economy.

  8. Advanced fuel development at AECL: What does the future hold for CANDU fuels/fuel cycles?

    This paper outlines advanced fuel development at AECL. It discusses expanding the limits of fuel utilization, deploy alternate fuel cycles, increase fuel flexibility, employ recycled fuels; increase safety and reliability, decrease environmental impact and develop proliferation resistant fuel and fuel cycle.

  9. DUPIC fuel compatibility assessment

    The purpose of this study is to assess the compatibility of DUPIC(Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU Reactors) fuel with the current CANDU 6 reactor, which is one of the technology being developed to utilize the spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors. The phase 1 study of this project includes the feasibility analysis on applicability of the current core design method, the feasibility analysis on operation of the DUPIC fuel core, the compatibility analysis on individual reactor system, the sensitivity analysis on the fuel composition, and the economic analysis on DUPIC fuel cycle. The results of the validation calculations have confirmed that the current core analysis system is acceptable for the feasibility study of the DUPIC fuel compatibility analysis. The results of core simulations have shown that both natural uranium and DUPIC fuel cores are almost the same from the viewpoint of the operational performance. For individual reactor system including reactively devices, the functional requirements of each system are satisfied in general. However, because of the pronounced power flattening in the DUPIC core, the radiation damage on the critical components increases, which should be investigated more in the future. The DUPIC fuel composition heterogeneity dose not to impose any serious effect on the reactor operation if the fuel composition is adjusted. The economics analysis has been performed through conceptual design studies on the DUPIC fuel fabrication, fuel handling in a plant, and spent fuel disposal, which has shown that the DUPIC fuel cycle is comparable to the once-trough fuel cycle considering uncertainties associated with unit costs of the fuel cycle components. The results of Phase 1 study have shown that it is feasible to use the DUPIC fuel in CANDU reactors without major changes in hardware. However further studies are required to confirm the safety of the reactor under accident condition

  10. DUPIC fuel compatibility assessment

    Choi, Hang Bok; Rho, G. H.; Park, J. W. [and others

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the compatibility of DUPIC(Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU Reactors) fuel with the current CANDU 6 reactor, which is one of the technology being developed to utilize the spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors. The phase 1 study of this project includes the feasibility analysis on applicability of the current core design method, the feasibility analysis on operation of the DUPIC fuel core, the compatibility analysis on individual reactor system, the sensitivity analysis on the fuel composition, and the economic analysis on DUPIC fuel cycle. The results of the validation calculations have confirmed that the current core analysis system is acceptable for the feasibility study of the DUPIC fuel compatibility analysis. The results of core simulations have shown that both natural uranium and DUPIC fuel cores are almost the same from the viewpoint of the operational performance. For individual reactor system including reactively devices, the functional requirements of each system are satisfied in general. However, because of the pronounced power flattening in the DUPIC core, the radiation damage on the critical components increases, which should be investigated more in the future. The DUPIC fuel composition heterogeneity dose not to impose any serious effect on the reactor operation if the fuel composition is adjusted. The economics analysis has been performed through conceptual design studies on the DUPIC fuel fabrication, fuel handling in a plant, and spent fuel disposal, which has shown that the DUPIC fuel cycle is comparable to the once-trough fuel cycle considering uncertainties associated with unit costs of the fuel cycle components. The results of Phase 1 study have shown that it is feasible to use the DUPIC fuel in CANDU reactors without major changes in hardware. However further studies are required to confirm the safety of the reactor under accident condition.

  11. Electronuclear fissile fuel production

    A linear accelerator fuel generator is proposed to enrich naturally occurring fertile U-238 or thorium 232 with fissile Pu-239 or U-233 for use in LWR power reactors. High energy proton beams in the range of 1 to 3 GeV energy are made to impinge on a centrally located dispersed liquid lead target producing spallation neutrons which are then absorbed by a surrounding assembly of fabricated LWR fuel elements. The accelerator-target design is reviewed and a typical fuel cycle system and economic analysis is presented. One 300 MW beam (300 ma-1 GeV) linear accelerator fuel regenerator can provide fuel for three 1000 MW(e) LWR power reactors overs its 30-year lifetime. There is a significant saving in natural uranium requirement which is a factor of 4.5 over the present LWR fuel requirement assuming the restraint of no fissile fuel recovery by reprocessing. A modest increase (approximately 10%) in fuel cycle and power production cost is incurred over the present LWR fuel cycle cost. The linear accelerator fuel regenerator and producer assures a long-term supply of fuel for the LWR power economy even with the restraint of the non-proliferation policy of no reprocessing. It can also supply hot-denatured thorium U-233 fuel operating in a secured reprocessing fuel center. (orig.)

  12. Fuel Assembly Damping Summary

    This paper summary the fuel assembly damping data in air/in still water/under flow, released from foreign fuel vendors, compared our data with the published data. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping measurement testing are also briefly discussed. Understanding of each fuel assembly damping mechanisms according to the surrounding medium and flow velocity can support the fuel design improvement in fuel assembly dynamics and structural integrity aspect. Because the upgraded requirements of the newly-developed advanced reactor system will demands to minimize fuel design margin in integrity evaluation, reduction in conservatism of fuel assembly damping can contribute to alleviate the fuel design margin for sure. Damping is an energy dissipation mechanism in a vibrating mechanical structure and prevents a resonant structure from having infinite vibration amplitudes. The sources of fuel assembly damping are various from support friction to flow contribution, and it can be increased by the viscosity or drag of surrounding fluid medium or the average velocity of water flowing. Fuel licensing requires fuel design evaluation in transient or accidental condition. Dynamic response analysis of fuel assembly is to show fuel integrity and requires information on assembly-wise damping in dry condition and under wet or water flowing condition. However, damping measurement test for the full-scale fuel assembly prototype is not easy to carry out because of the scale (fuel prototype, test facility), unsteadiness of test data (scattering, random sampling and processing), instrumentation under water flowing (water-proof response measurement), and noise. LWR fuel technology division in KAERI is preparing the infra structure for damping measurement test of full-scale fuel assembly, to support fuel industries and related research activities. Here is a preliminary summary of fuel assembly damping, published in the literature. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping

  13. Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels

    Toftegaard, Maja Bøg; Brix, Jacob; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    2010-01-01

    temperature. The flue gas produced thus consists primarily of carbon dioxide and water. Much research on the different aspects of an oxy-fuel power plant has been performed during the last decade. Focus has mainly been on retrofits of existing pulverized-coal-fired power plant units. Green-field plants which......Oxy-fuel combustion is suggested as one of the possible, promising technologies for capturing CO2 from power plants. The concept of oxy-fuel combustion is removal of nitrogen from the oxidizer to carry out the combustion process in oxygen and, in most concepts, recycled flue gas to lower the flame......-fuel process and focuses particularly on the combustion fundamentals, i.e. flame temperatures and heat transfer, ignition and burnout, emissions, and fly ash characteristics. Knowledge is currently available regarding both an entire oxy-fuel power plant and the combustion fundamentals. However, several...

  14. Nuclear fuel transporting container

    Purpose: To prevent the failure of nuclear fuel rods constituting a nuclear fuel assembly contained to the inside of a container upon fire accidents or the likes. Constitution: The nuclear fuel transportation container comprises a tightly sealed inner vessel made of steels for containing a nuclear fuel assembly consisting of bundled nuclear fuel rods, a heat shielding material surrounding the inner vessel, shock absorber and an outer vessel. A relief safety valve is disposed to the inner vessel that actuates at a specific pressure higher than the normal inner pressure for the nuclear fuel rods of the fuel assembly and lower than the allowable inner pressure of the inner vessel. The inside of the inner vessel is pressurized by way of the safety valve such that the normal inner pressure in the inner vessel is substantially equal to the normal inner pressure for the nuclear fuel rods. (Aizawa, K.)

  15. Fuel cycle data survey

    A survey of the fuel cycle cost data published during 1977 and 1978 is presented in tabular and graphical form. Cost trends for the period 1965 onwards are presented for yellow cake, conversion, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication and reprocessing

  16. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  17. Fakir fuel pump

    1922-01-01

    In designing the Fakir fuel pump, the fundamental idea was to obtain a simple and reliable method of conveying the fuel from a low tank to the carburetor, with the avoidance of the faults of all former methods and the simultaneous warming of the fuel by means of the heat of compression generated. The principle of the Fakir fuel pump rests on the well-known principle of the diaphragm pump, which must be suitably adapted to the present purpose.

  18. Control of Fuel Cells

    ZENITH, Federico

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with control of fuel cells, focusing on high-temperature proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells. Fuel cells are devices that convert the chemical energy of hydrogen, methanol or other chemical compounds directly into electricity, without combustion or thermal cycles. They are efficient, scalable and silent devices that can provide power to a wide variety of utilities, from portable electronics to vehicles, to nation-wide electric grids. Whereas studies about the design of fuel ...

  19. Control of Fuel Cells

    ZENITH, Federico

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with control of fuel cells, focusing on high-temperature proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells.Fuel cells are devices that convert the chemical energy of hydrogen, methanol or other chemical compounds directly into electricity, without combustion or thermal cycles. They are efficient, scalable and silent devices that can provide power to a wide variety of utilities, from portable electronics to vehicles, to nation-wide electric grids.Whereas studies about the design of fuel ce...

  20. Reactor fuel assemblies

    A description is given of an improved spacer grid for a nuclear fuel assembly comprising fuel rods in a matrix wherein each rod is adapted to be enclosed by a spacer ''cell'' for positioning thereof relative to adjacent rods in the fuel assembly. 7 claims, 12 drawing figures

  1. Plutonium fuel program

    1975 was the first of two years planned to allow the fuel development project to move from lab-scale fuel production and scouting irradiation tests to larger scale production supplying fuel for parameter testing. The first stages of this re-direction are reported. (Auth.)

  2. Cracked fuel mechanics

    Fuel pellets undergo thermally induced cracking during normal reactor operation. Some fuel performance codes have included models that address the effects of fuel cracking on fuel rod thermal and mechanical behavior. However, models that rely too heavily on continuum mechanics formulations (annular gaps and solid cylindrical pellets) characteristically do not adequately predict cladding axial elongations. Calculations of bamboo ridging generally require many assumptions concerning fuel geometry, and some of the methods used are too complex and expensive to employ on a routine basis. Some of these difficulties originate from a lack of definition of suitable parameters which describe the cracked fuel medium. The methodology is being improved by models that describe cracked fuel behavior utilizing parameters with stronger physical foundations instead of classical continuum formulations. This paper presents a modelling concept and a set of measurable parameters that have been shown to improve the prediction of the mechanical behavior of cracked fuel/cladding systems without added computational expense. The transition from classical annular gap/cylindrical pellet models to modified bulk properties and further to local behavior for cracked fuel systems is discussed. The results of laboratory experiments to verify these modelling parameters are shown. Data are also presented from laboratory experiments on unirradiated and irradiated rods which show that fuel rod mechanical response depends on fuel fragment size. The impact of these data on cracked fuel behavior and failure modelling is also discussed. (author)

  3. Nuclear fuel assembly spacer

    In a fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor a fuel element spacer formed of an array of laterally positioned cojoined tubular ferrules each providing a passage for one of the fuel elements, the elements being laterally supported in the ferrules between slender spring members and laterally oriented rigid stops

  4. CANDU fuel performance

    The paper presents a review of CANDU fuel performance including a 28-element bundle for Pickering reactors, a 37-element bundle for the Bruce and Darlington reactors, and a 37-element bundle for the CANDU-6 reactors. Special emphasis is given to the analysis of fuel defect formation and propagation and definition of fuel element operating thresholds for normal operation and accident conditions. (author)

  5. Plutonium fuel program

    A review is presented of the development of the (UPu)C sphere-pac fuel project during 1978. In particular, the problems encountered in obtaining good fuel quality in the fabrication process and their solution is discussed. The development of a fabrication pilot plant is considered, and the post-irradiation examination of fuel pins is presented. (Auth.)

  6. Modeling: driving fuel cells

    Michael Francis

    2002-05-01

    Fuel cells were invented in 1839 by Sir William Grove, a Welsh judge and gentleman scientist, as a result of his experiments on the electrolysis of water. To put it simply, fuel cells are electrochemical devices that take hydrogen gas from fuel, combine it with oxygen from the air, and generate electricity and heat, with water as the only by-product.

  7. Fuel and fuel cycles with high burnup for WWER reactors

    The paper discusses the status and trends in development of nuclear fuel and fuel cycles for WWER reactors. Parameters and main stages of implementation of new fuel cycles will be presented. At present, these new fuel cycles are offered to NPPs. Development of new fuel and fuel cycles based on the following principles: profiling fuel enrichment in a cross section of fuel assemblies; increase of average fuel enrichment in fuel assemblies; use of refuelling schemes with lower neutron leakage ('in-in-out'); use of integrated fuel gadolinium-based burnable absorber (for a five-year fuel cycle); increase of fuel burnup in fuel assemblies; improving the neutron balance by using structural materials with low neutron absorption; use of zirconium alloy claddings which are highly resistant to irradiation and corrosion. The paper also presents the results of fuel operation. (author)

  8. Nuclear fuel assembly

    A nuclear fuel assembly includes and upper yoke, a base, an elongated, outer flow channel disposed substantially along the entire length of the fuel assembly and an elongated, internal, central water cross, formed by four, elongated metal angles, that divides the nuclear fuel assembly into four, separate, elongated fuel sections and that provides a centrally disposed path for the flow of subcooled neutron moderator along the length of the fuel assembly. A separate fuel bundle is located in each of the four fuel sections and includes an upper tie plate, a lower tie plate and a plurality of elongated fuel rods disposed therebetween. Preferably, each upper tie plate is formed from a plurality of interconnected thin metal bars and includes an elongated, axially extending pin that is received by the upper yoke of the fuel assembly for restraining lateral motion of the fuel bundle while permitting axial movement of the fuel bundle with respect to the outer flow channel. The outer flow channel is fixedly secured at its opposite longitudinal ends to the upper yoke and to the base to permit the fuel assembly to be lifted and handled in a vertical position without placing lifting loads or stresses on the fuel rods. The yoke, removably attached at the upper end of the fuel assembly to four structural ribs secured to the inner walls of the outer flow channel, includes, as integrally formed components, a lifting bail or handle, laterally extending bumpers, a mounting post for a spring assembly, four elongated apertures for receiving with a slip fit the axially extending pins mounted on the upper tie plates and slots for receiving the structural ribs secured to the outer flow channel. Locking pins securely attach the yoke to the structural ribs enabling the fuel assembly to be lifted as an entity

  9. Transportation of nuclear fuel

    Shipment of used fuel from nuclear reactors to a central fuel management facility is discussed with particular emphasis on the assessment of the risk to the public due to these shipments. The methods of transporting used fuel in large shipping containers is reviewed. In terms of an accident scenario, it is demonstrated that the primary risk of transport of used fuel is due to injury and death in common road accidents. The radiological nature of the used fuel cargo is, for all practical purposes, an insignificant factor in the total risk to the public. (author)

  10. Nuclear fuel lease accounting

    The subject of nuclear fuel lease accounting is a controversial one that has received much attention over the years. This has occurred during a period when increasing numbers of utilities, seeking alternatives to traditional financing methods, have turned to leasing their nuclear fuel inventories. The purpose of this paper is to examine the current accounting treatment of nuclear fuel leases as prescribed by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC's) Uniform System of Accounts. Cost accounting for leased nuclear fuel during the fuel cycle is also discussed

  11. Plutonium fuel program

    The work of the project Fuel Development in 1976 was marked by three important developments. Firstly, the reproduceability of the process to produce sphere pac carbide fuel by a gelation process was established. Secondly, in the post irradiation examination of the fuel pins from the BR-2 reactor, the fuel reached approximately 5.5% FIMA without failure. Thirdly, outside interest in sphere pac material became more apparent. These developments are discussed, and plans to construct a fuel pilot plant to go into operation in the 1980's are revealed. (Auth.)

  12. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    Wheelock, C.W.; Baumeister, E.B.

    1961-09-01

    A reactor fuel element utilizing fissionable fuel materials in plate form is described. This fuel element consists of bundles of fuel-bearing plates. The bundles are stacked inside of a tube which forms the shell of the fuel element. The plates each have longitudinal fins running parallel to the direction of coolant flow, and interspersed among and parallel to the fins are ribs which position the plates relative to each other and to the fuel element shell. The plate bundles are held together by thin bands or wires. The ex tended surface increases the heat transfer capabilities of a fuel element by a factor of 3 or more over those of a simple flat plate.

  13. Fuel nozzle assembly

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Lacey, Benjamin Paul; York, William David; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2011-08-30

    A fuel nozzle assembly is provided. The assembly includes an outer nozzle body having a first end and a second end and at least one inner nozzle tube having a first end and a second end. One of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel plenum and a fuel passage extending therefrom, while the other of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel injection hole slidably aligned with the fuel passage to form a fuel flow path therebetween at an interface between the body and the tube. The nozzle body and the nozzle tube are fixed against relative movement at the first ends of the nozzle body and nozzle tube, enabling the fuel flow path to close at the interface due to thermal growth after a flame enters the nozzle tube.

  14. Nuclear fuel cycles

    The source of energy in the nuclear reactors in fission if a heavy nuclei by absorbing a neutron and giving fission products, few neutrons and gamma radiation. The Nuclear Fuel Cycle may be broadly defined as the set of process and operations needed to manufacture nuclear fuels, to irradiate them in nuclear reactors and to treat and store them, temporarily or permanently, after irradiation. Several nuclear fuel cycles may be considered, depending on the type of reactor and the type of fuel used and whether or not the irradiated fuel will be reprocessed. The nuclear fuel cycle starts with uranium exploration and ends with final disposal of the material used and generated during the cycle. For practical reasons the process has been further subdivided into the front-end and the back-end. The front-end of the cycle occurs before irradiation and the back-end begins with the discharge of spent fuel from the reactor

  15. BN-600 fuel elements and fuel assemblies operating experience

    Consideration is given to the data on fuel burnup of standard fuel assemblies of the BN-600 reactor first core charge and that for modified core; data on operation ability of fuel assemblies of the first charge type are given. Data on main results of primary post-irradiation examination of fuel assemblies and fuel elements and maximal values of fuel burnup, achieved in particular fuel assemblies of BN-600 reactor are presented. 4 figs.; 1 tab

  16. Diesel fuel filtration system

    The American nuclear utility industry is subject to tight regulations on the quality of diesel fuel that is stored at nuclear generating stations. This fuel is required to supply safety-related emergency diesel generators--the backup power systems associated with the safe shutdown of reactors. One important parameter being regulated is the level of particulate contamination in the diesel fuel. Carbon particulate is a natural byproduct of aging diesel fuel. Carbon particulate precipitates from the fuel's hydrocarbons, then remains suspended or settles to the bottom of fuel oil storage tanks. If the carbon particulate is not removed, unacceptable levels of particulate contamination will eventually occur. The oil must be discarded or filtered. Having an outside contractor come to the plant to filter the diesel fuel can be costly and time consuming. Time is an even more critical factor if a nuclear plant is in a Limiting Condition of Operation (LCO) situation. A most effective way to reduce both cost and risk is for a utility to build and install its own diesel fuel filtration system. The cost savings associated with designing, fabricating and operating the system inhouse can be significant, and the value of reducing the risk of reactor shutdown because of uncertified diesel fuel may be even higher. This article describes such a fuel filtering system

  17. Fuel safety research 1999

    In April 1999, the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory was newly established as a result of reorganization of the Nuclear Safety Research Center, JAERI. The laboratory was organized by combining three laboratories, the Reactivity Accident Laboratory, the Fuel Reliability Laboratory, and a part of the Sever Accident Research Laboratory. Consequently, the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory is now in charge of all the fuel safety research in JAERI. Various types of experimental and analytical researches are conducted in the laboratory by using the unique facilities such as the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR), the Japan Research Reactor 3 (JRR-3) and hot cells in JAERI. The laboratory consists of five research groups corresponding to each research fields. They are; (a) Research group of fuel behavior under the reactivity initiated accident conditions (RIA group). (b) Research group of fuel behavior under the loss-of-coolant accident conditions (LOCA group). (c) Research group of fuel behavior under the normal operation conditions (JMTR/BOCA group). (d) Research group of fuel behavior analysis (FEMAXI group). (e) Research group of FP release/transport behavior from irradiated fuel (VEGA group). This report summarizes the outline of research activities and major outcomes of the research executed in 1999 in the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory. (author)

  18. Fuel safety research 1999

    Uetsuka, Hiroshi (ed.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-07-01

    In April 1999, the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory was newly established as a result of reorganization of the Nuclear Safety Research Center, JAERI. The laboratory was organized by combining three laboratories, the Reactivity Accident Laboratory, the Fuel Reliability Laboratory, and a part of the Sever Accident Research Laboratory. Consequently, the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory is now in charge of all the fuel safety research in JAERI. Various types of experimental and analytical researches are conducted in the laboratory by using the unique facilities such as the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR), the Japan Research Reactor 3 (JRR-3) and hot cells in JAERI. The laboratory consists of five research groups corresponding to each research fields. They are; (a) Research group of fuel behavior under the reactivity initiated accident conditions (RIA group). (b) Research group of fuel behavior under the loss-of-coolant accident conditions (LOCA group). (c) Research group of fuel behavior under the normal operation conditions (JMTR/BOCA group). (d) Research group of fuel behavior analysis (FEMAXI group). (e) Research group of FP release/transport behavior from irradiated fuel (VEGA group). This report summarizes the outline of research activities and major outcomes of the research executed in 1999 in the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory. (author)

  19. Fuel related risks; Braenslerisker

    Englund, Jessica; Sernhed, Kerstin; Nystroem, Olle; Graveus, Frank (Grontmij AB, (Sweden))

    2012-02-15

    The project, within which this work report was prepared, aimed to complement the Vaermeforsk publication 'Handbook of fuels' on fuel related risks and measures to reduce the risks. The fuels examined in this project where the fuels included in the first version of the handbook from 2005 plus four additional fuels that will be included in the second and next edition of the handbook. Following fuels were included: woodfuels (sawdust, wood chips, powder, briquettes), slash, recycled wood, salix, bark, hardwood, stumps, straw, reed canary grass, hemp, cereal, cereal waste, olive waste, cocoa beans, citrus waste, shea, sludge, forest industrial sludge, manure, Paper Wood Plastic, tyre, leather waste, cardboard rejects, meat and bone meal, liquid animal and vegetable wastes, tall oil pitch, peat, residues from food industry, biomal (including slaughterhouse waste) and lignin. The report includes two main chapters; a general risk chapter and a chapter of fuel specific risks. The first one deals with the general concept of risk, it highlights laws and rules relevant for risk management and it discuss general risks that are related to the different steps of fuel handling, i.e. unloading, storing, processing the fuel, transportation within the facility, combustion and handling of ashes. The information that was used to produce this chapter was gathered through a literature review, site visits, and the project group's experience from risk management. The other main chapter deals with fuel-specific risks and the measures to reduce the risks for the steps of unloading, storing, processing the fuel, internal transportation, combustion and handling of the ashes. Risks and measures were considered for all the biofuels included in the second version in the handbook of fuels. Information about the risks and risk management was gathered through interviews with people working with different kinds of fuels in electricity and heat plants in Sweden. The information from

  20. CANDU fuel cycle flexibility

    High neutron economy, on-power refuelling, and a simple bundle design provide a high degree of flexibility that enables CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium; registered trademark) reactors to be fuelled with a wide variety of fuel types. Near-term applications include the use of slightly enriched uranium (SEU), and recovered uranium (RU) from reprocessed spent Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel. Plutonium and other actinides arising from various sources, including spent LWR fuel, can be accommodated, and weapons-origin plutonium could be destroyed by burning in CANDU. In the DUPIC fuel cycle, a dry processing method would convert spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel to CANDU fuel. The thorium cycle remains of strategic interest in CANDU to ensure long-term resource availability, and would be of specific interest to those countries possessing large thorium reserves, but limited uranium resources. (author). 21 refs

  1. HTR fuel manufacturing experience

    The development of the HTR line promises the availability of a number of technologies which can be used in many area of energy supply. Special properties of nuclear energy exploitation in high-temperature reactors include economical uranium consumption and lower pollution of the environment. Fuel cycle, design and irradiation performance requirements impose restraints on the fuel elements fabrication processes. Both kernel and coating fabrication processes are flexible enough to adapt to the needs of the various existing and proposed high temperature gas-cooled reactors. Extensive experience has demonstrated that fuel kernels with excellent sphericity and uniformity can be produced by wet chemical processes. Similarly experience has shown that the various multilayer coatings can be produced to fully meet design and specification requirements. In a comprehensive qualification program for fuel elements the low failure fraction of coated fuel particles, optimal matrix behavior and the required fission product retention of integral fuel elements was successfully demonstrated

  2. HTPEM Fuel Cell Impedance

    Vang, Jakob Rabjerg

    As part of the process to create a fossil free Denmark by 2050, there is a need for the development of new energy technologies with higher efficiencies than the current technologies. Fuel cells, that can generate electricity at higher efficiencies than conventional combustion engines, can...... potentially play an important role in the energy system of the future. One of the fuel cell technologies, that receives much attention from the Danish scientific community is high temperature proton exchange membrane (HTPEM) fuel cells based on polybenzimidazole (PBI) with phosphoric acid as proton conductor....... This type of fuel cell operates at higher temperature than comparable fuel cell types and they distinguish themselves by high CO tolerance. Platinum based catalysts have their efficiency reduced by CO and the effect is more pronounced at low temperature. This Ph.D. Thesis investigates this type of fuel...

  3. Spent fuel assembly hardware

    When spent nuclear fuel is disposed of in a repository, the waste package will include the spent fuel assembly hardware, the structural portion of the fuel assembly, and the fuel pins. The spent fuel assembly hardware is the subject of this paper. The basic constituent parts of the fuel assembly will be described with particular attention on the materials used in their construction. The results of laboratory analyses performed to determine radionuclide inventories and trace impurities also will be described. Much of this work has been incorporated into a US Department of Energy (DOE) database maintained by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This database is documented in DOE/RW-0184 and can be obtained from Karl Notz at ORNL. The database provides a single source for information regarding wastes that may be sent to the repository

  4. Spiral cooled fuel nozzle

    Fox, Timothy; Schilp, Reinhard

    2012-09-25

    A fuel nozzle for delivery of fuel to a gas turbine engine. The fuel nozzle includes an outer nozzle wall and a center body located centrally within the nozzle wall. A gap is defined between an inner wall surface of the nozzle wall and an outer body surface of the center body for providing fuel flow in a longitudinal direction from an inlet end to an outlet end of the fuel nozzle. A turbulating feature is defined on at least one of the central body and the inner wall for causing at least a portion of the fuel flow in the gap to flow transverse to the longitudinal direction. The gap is effective to provide a substantially uniform temperature distribution along the nozzle wall in the circumferential direction.

  5. candu fuel bundle fabrication

    This paper describes works on CANDU fuel bundle fabrication in the Fuel Fabrication Development and Testing Section (FFDT) of AECL's Chalk River Laboratories. This work does not cover fuel design, pellet manufacturing, Zircaloy material manufacturing, but cover the joining of appendages to sheath tube, endcap preparation and welding, UO2 loading, end plate preparation and welding, and all inspections required in these steps. Materials used in the fabrication of CANDU fuel bundle are: 1)Ceramic UO2 Pellet 2)Zircaloy -4. Fuel Bundle Structural Material 3) Others (Zinc stearate, Colloidal graphite, Beryllium and Heium). Th fabrication of fuel element consist of three process: 1)pellet loading into the sheats, 2) endcap welding, and 3) the element profiling. Endcap welds is tested by metallography and He leak test. The endcaps of the elements are welded to the end plates to form the 37- element bundle assembly

  6. Failed fuel degradation

    Failed fuel degradation is the term used to describe the post-defect deterioration of a fuel rod which can occur under continued operation in certain circumstances. Two mechanisms are generally postulated for failed fuel degradation in light water reactors. The first of these attributes degradation susceptibility (axial split formation) to the inherently low fracture toughness of the zircaloy cladding exacerbated by hydrogen embrittlement. The second mechanism attributes the degradation to the reduced relative corrosion resistance of the zirconium liner present in barrier fuel. This leads to a greater fuel rod internal inventory of embrittling hydrogen in conjunction with increased cladding stresses caused by closure of the pellet-cladding gap due to liner corrosion. Key observations relating to these mechanisms are reviewed and the development of mitigating actions to address them described. Commercial irradiation experience gained with subsequently improved fuel designs is discussed. (5 figures; 7 references) (UK)

  7. An intelligent spent fuel database for BWR fuels

    The present aim is to establish an intelligent database of Spent Fuel Data (including physical fuel data and reactor operating history information) to support burnup credit analyses for Boiling Water Reactor Fuel. At a later date, information of Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel and existing Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) data for benchmarking fuel composition calculations may be integrated into the database. (author)

  8. Fuel cell generator with fuel electrodes that control on-cell fuel reformation

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Basel, Richard A.; Zhang, Gong

    2011-10-25

    A fuel cell for a fuel cell generator including a housing including a gas flow path for receiving a fuel from a fuel source and directing the fuel across the fuel cell. The fuel cell includes an elongate member including opposing first and second ends and defining an interior cathode portion and an exterior anode portion. The interior cathode portion includes an electrode in contact with an oxidant flow path. The exterior anode portion includes an electrode in contact with the fuel in the gas flow path. The anode portion includes a catalyst material for effecting fuel reformation along the fuel cell between the opposing ends. A fuel reformation control layer is applied over the catalyst material for reducing a rate of fuel reformation on the fuel cell. The control layer effects a variable reformation rate along the length of the fuel cell.

  9. Microbial fuel cells

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC) are a promising technology for sustainable production of alternative energy and waste treatment. A microbial fuel cell transformation chemical energy in the chemical bonds in organic compounds to electrical energy through catalytic reactions of microorganisms under anaerobic conditions. It has been known for many years that it is possible to generate electricity directly by using bacteria to break down organic substrates. Key words: microbial fuel cells (MFC), biosensor, wastewater treatment

  10. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising a column of vibration compacted fuel which is retained in consolidated condition by a thimble shaped plug. The plug is wedged into gripping engagement with the wall of the sheath by a wedge. The wedge material has a lower coefficient of expansion than the sheath material so that at reactor operating temperature the retainer can relax sufficient to accommodate thermal expansion of the column of fuel. (author)

  11. Nuclear fuel assembly

    A nuclear fuel assembly comprises a cluster of elongated fuel, retained parallel and at the nodal points of a square network by a bottom supporting plate and by spacing grids. The supporting plate is connected to a top end plate via tie-rods which replace fuel pins at certain of the nodal points of the network. The diameter of the tie-rods is equal to that of the pins and both are slidably received in the grids

  12. Plutonium fuel program

    The project is concerned with developing an advanced method to produce nuclear reactor fuels. Since 1968 EIR has worked successfully on the production of uranium-plutonium mixed carbide using wet gelation chemistry. An important part of the development is irradiating the fuel in materials test reactors and evaluating its performance. During 1979 the programme continued with principal activities of fuel fabrication development, preparation for irradiation testing, performance evaluation, and modelling and plant engineering. (Auth.)

  13. Spent fuel storage

    To begin with, the author explains the reasons for intermediate storage of fuel elements in nuclear power stations and in a reprocessing plant and gives the temperature and radioactivity curves of LWR fuel elements after removal from the reactor. This is followed by a description of the facilities for fuel element storage in a reprocessing plant and of their functions. Futher topics are criticality and activity control, the problem of cooling time and safety systems. (HR)

  14. Fuel safety research 2001

    Uetsuka, Hiroshi (ed.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    The Fuel Safety Research Laboratory is in charge of research activity which covers almost research items related to fuel safety of water reactor in JAERI. Various types of experimental and analytical researches are being conducted by using some unique facilities such as the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR), the Japan Research Reactor 3 (JRR-3) and the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF) of JAERI. The research to confirm the safety of high burn-up fuel and MOX fuel under accident conditions is the most important item among them. The laboratory consists of following five research groups corresponding to each research fields; Research group of fuel behavior under the reactivity initiated accident conditions (RIA group). Research group of fuel behavior under the loss-of-coolant accident conditions (LOCA group). Research group of fuel behavior under the normal operation conditions (JMTR/BOCA group). Research group of fuel behavior analysis (FEMAXI group). Research group of radionuclides release and transport behavior from irradiated fuel under severe accident conditions (VEGA group). The research conducted in the year 2001 produced many important data and information. They are, for example, the fuel behavior data under BWR power oscillation conditions in the NSRR, the data on failure-bearing capability of hydrided cladding under LOCA conditions and the FP release data at very high temperature in steam which simulate the reactor core condition during severe accidents. This report summarizes the outline of research activities and major outcomes of the research executed in 2001 in the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory. (author)

  15. Transport of MOX fuel

    The regulatory framework which governs the transport of MOX fuel is set out, including packages, transport modes and security requirements. Technical requirements for the packages are reviewed and BNFL's experience in plutonium and MOX fuel transport is described. The safety of such operations and the public perception of safety are described and the question of gaining public acceptance for MOX fuel transport is addressed. The paper concludes by emphasising the need for proactive programmes to improve the public acceptance of these operations. (Author)

  16. AFIP-4 Irradiation Summary Report

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-4 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. The AFIP-4 test further examine the fuel/clad interface and its behavior under extreme conditions. After irradiation, fission gas retention measurements will be performed during post irradiation (PIE). The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-4 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results.

  17. A perfect fuel supplier

    WWER fuel market is dominated by the Russian fuel vendor JSC TVEL. There have been attempts to open up the market also for other suppliers, such as BNFL/Westinghouse for Finland, Czech Republic, and Ukraine. However, at the moment it seems that JSC TVEL is the only real alternative to supply fuel to WWER reactors. All existing fuel suppliers have certified quality management systems which put a special emphasis on the customer satisfaction. This paper attempts to define from the customer's point of view, what are the important issues concerning the customer satisfaction. (author)

  18. ITER fuel cycle

    Resulting from the Conceptual Design Activities (1988-1990) by the parties involved in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project, this document summarizes the design requirements and the Conceptual Design Descriptions for each of the principal subsystems and design options of the ITER Fuel Cycle conceptual design. The ITER Fuel Cycle system provides for the handling of all tritiated water and gas mixtures on ITER. The system is subdivided into subsystems for fuelling, primary (torus) vacuum pumping, fuel processing, blanket tritium recovery, and common processes (including isotopic separation, fuel management and storage, and processes for detritiation of solid, liquid, and gaseous wastes). After an introduction describing system function and conceptual design procedure, a summary of the design is presented including a discussion of scope and main parameters, and the fuel design options for fuelling, plasma chamber vacuum pumping, fuel cleanup, blanket tritium recovery, and auxiliary and common processes. Design requirements are defined and design descriptions are given for the various subsystems (fuelling, plasma vacuum pumping, fuel cleanup, blanket tritium recovery, and auxiliary/common processes). The document ends with sections on fuel cycle design integration, fuel cycle building layout, safety considerations, a summary of the research and development programme, costing, and conclusions. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Fuel assembly reconstitution

    Fuel failures have been happened in Nuclear Power Plants worldwide, without lost of integrity and safety, mainly for the public, environment and power plants workers. The most common causes of these events are corrosion (CRUD), fretting and pellet cladding interaction. These failures are identified by increasing the activity of fission products, verified by chemical analyses of reactor coolant. Through these analyses, during the fourth operation cycle of Angra 2 Nuclear Power Plant, was possible to observe fuel failure indication. This indication was confirmed in the end of the cycle during the unloading of reactor core through leakage tests of fuel assembly, using the equipment called 'In Mast Sipping' and 'Box Sipping'. After confirmed, the fuel assembly reconstitution was scheduled, and happened in April, 2007, where was identified the cause and the fuel rod failure, which was substitute by dummy rods (zircaloy). The cause was fretting by 'debris'. The actions to avoid and prevent fuel assemblies failures are important. The goals of this work are to describe the methodology of fuel assembly reconstitution using the FARE (Fuel Assembly Reconstitution Equipment) system, to describe the results of this task in economic and security factors of the company and show how the fuel assembly failures are identified during operation and during the outage. (author)

  20. HTGR fuel performance basis

    The safety characteristics of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) during normal and accident conditions are determined in part by HTGR fuel performance. During normal operation, less than 0.1% fuel failure occurs, primarily from defective particles. This low fuel failure fraction limits circulating activity to acceptable levels. During severe accidents, the radiological consequence is influenced by high-temperature fuel particle behavior. An empirical fuel failure model, supported by recent experimental data, is presented. The onset of significant fuel particle failure occurs at temperatures in excess of 16000C, and complete fuel failure occurs at 26600C. This indicates that the fuel is more retentive at higher temperatures than previously assumed. The more retentive nature of the fuel coupled with the high thermal capacitance of the core results in slow release of fission products from the core during severe accidents. The slow release of fission products over hundreds of hours allows for decay of short-lived isotopes. The slow and limited release of fission products under HTGR accident conditions results in very low off-site doses. The slow nature of the accident provides more time for operator action to mitigate the accident and for local and state authorities to respond. These features can be used to take advantage of close-in siting for process applications, flexibility in site selection, and emergency planning

  1. Data feature: Fuel procurement

    This document is a review of the effect of fuel costs on the procurement strategies of a utility and a conjecture that the same strategies may have an effect on the price of fuel. Factors affecting fuel costs are reviewed, and a number of procurement strategies taken to trim fuel costs are reviewed. The major trend is away from long-term enrichment contracts and into such strategies as: (1) Spot market purchases, (2) Inventory reduction, (3) Purchase of CIS material, and (4) Market-related contracts instead of base-escalated contracts

  2. Fuels Processing Laboratory

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Fuels Processing Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, provides researchers with the equipment they need to thoroughly explore the catalytic issues associated with...

  3. Fuel cell systems

    Fuel cell systems are an entirely different approach to the production of electricity than traditional technologies. They are similar to the batteries in that both produce direct current through electrochemical process. There are six types of fuel cells each with a different type of electrolyte, but they all share certain important characteristics: high electrical efficiency, low environmental impact and fuel flexibility. Fuel cells serve a variety of applications: stationary power plants, transport vehicles and portable power. That is why world wide efforts are addressed to improvement of this technology. (Original)

  4. Reprocessing RERTR silicide fuels

    The Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program is one element of the United States Government's nonproliferation effort. High-density, low-enrichment, aluminum-clad uranium silicide fuels may be substituted for the highly enriched aluminum-clad alloy fuels now in use. Savannah River Laboratory has performed studies which demonstrate reprocessability of spent RERTR silicide fuels at Savannah River Plant. Results of dissolution and feed preparation tests and solvent extraction processing demonstrations with both unirradiated and irradiated uranium silicide fuels are presented

  5. The nuclear fuel cycle

    After a short introduction about nuclear power in the world, fission physics and the French nuclear power plants, this brochure describes in a digest way the different steps of the nuclear fuel cycle: uranium prospecting, mining activity, processing of uranium ores and production of uranium concentrates (yellow cake), uranium chemistry (conversion of the yellow cake into uranium hexafluoride), fabrication of nuclear fuels, use of fuels, reprocessing of spent fuels (uranium, plutonium and fission products), recycling of energetic materials, and storage of radioactive wastes. (J.S.)

  6. FUEL ASSAY REACTOR

    Spinrad, B.I.; Sandmeier, H.A.; Martens, F.H.

    1962-12-25

    A reactor having maximum sensitivity to perturbations is described comprising a core consisting of a horizontally disposed, rectangular, annular fuel zone containing enriched uranium dioxide dispersed in graphite, the concentration of uranium dioxide increasing from the outside to the inside of the fuel zone, an internal reflector of graphite containing an axial test opening disposed within the fuel zone, an external graphite reflector, means for changing the neutron spectrum in the test opening, and means for measuring perturbations in the neutron flux caused by the introduction of different fuel elements into the test opening. (AEC)

  7. Nuclear fuel assembly

    Purpose: To obtain a nuclear fuel assembly having a function of eliminating corrosion products exfoliating from the surface of a fuel can, thereby reduce the radioactive crud in primary sodium coolant during operation of a FBR type reactor. Constitution: Nickel plates or grids made of metal plate with a nickel coated on the surface thereof are inserted in the upper blanket of a nuclear fuel element and between nuclear fuel element corresponding to the gas plenum. The nickel becomes helpful at high temperature in adsorbing Mn-54 which accounts for a major portion of the corrosion products. (J.P.N.)

  8. Advanced fuel system technology for utilizing broadened property aircraft fuels

    Reck, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    Possible changes in fuel properties are identified based on current trends and projections. The effect of those changes with respect to the aircraft fuel system are examined and some technological approaches to utilizing those fuels are described.

  9. BEHAVE : Fire Behavior Prediction and Fuel Modeling System -- FUEL Subsystem

    Burgan, Robert E; Rothermel, Richard C

    1984-01-01

    This manual documents the fuel modeling procedures of BEHAVE - a state-of-the-art wildland fire behavior prediction system. Described are procedures for collecting fuel data, using the data with the program, and testing and adjusting the fuel model.

  10. Fuel safety research 2000

    In April 1999, the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory was newly established as a part of reorganization of the Nuclear Safety Research Center, JAERI. The new laboratory was organized by combining three pre-existing laboratories, Reactivity Accident Laboratory, Fuel Reliability Laboratory, and a part of Severe Accident Research Laboratory. The Fuel Safety Research Laboratory becomes to be in charge of all fuel safety research in JAERI. Various experimental and analytical researches are conducted in the laboratory by using the unique facilities such as the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR), the Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR), the Japan Research Reactor 3 (JRR-3) and hot cells in JAERI. The laboratory consists of following five research groups corresponding to each research fields; (a) Research group of fuel behavior under the reactivity initiated accident conditions (RIA group). (b) Research group of fuel behavior under the loss-of-coolant accident conditions (LOCA group). (c) Research group of fuel behavior under the normal operation conditions (JMTR/BOCA group). (d) Research group of fuel behavior analysis (FEMAXI group). (e) Research group of FP release/transport behavior from irradiated fuel (VEGA group). The research activities in year 2000 produced many important data and information. They are, for example, failure of high burnup BWR fuel rod under RIA conditions, data on the behavior of hydrided Zircaloy cladding under LOCA conditions and FP release data from VEGA experiments at very high temperature/pressure condition. This report summarizes the outline of research activities and major outcomes of the research executed in 2000 in the Fuel Safety Research Laboratory. (author)

  11. TRIGA low enrichment fuel

    Sixty TRIGA reactors have been sold and the earliest of these are now passing twenty years of operation. All of these reactors use the uranium-zirconium hydride fuel (UZrH) which provides certain unique advantages arising out of its large prompt negative temperature coefficient, very low fission product release, and high temperature capability. Eleven of these Sixty reactors are conversions from plate fuel to TRIGA fuel which were made as a result of these advantages. With only a few exceptions, TRIGA reactors have always used low-enriched-uranium (LEU) fuel with an enrichment of 19.9%. The exceptions have either been converted from the standard low-enriched fuel to the 70% enriched FLIP fuel in order to achieve extended lifetime, or are higher powered reactors which were designed for long life using 93%-enriched uranium during the time when the use and export of highly enriched uranium (HEU) was not restricted. The advent of international policies focusing attention on nonproliferation and safeguards made the HEU fuels obsolete. General Atomic immediately undertook a development effort (nearly two years ago) in order to be in a position to comply with these policies for all future export sales and also to provide a low-enriched alternative to fully enriched plate-type fuels. This important work was subsequently partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The laboratory and production tests have shown that higher uranium densities can be achieved to compensate for reducing the enrichment to 20%, and that the fuels maintain the characteristics of the very thoroughly proven standard TRIGA fuels. In May of 1978, General Atomic announced that these fuels were available for TRIGA reactors and for plate-type reactors with power levels up to 15 MW with GA's standard commercial warranty

  12. TRIGA low enrichment fuel

    Sixty TRIGA reactors have been sold and the earliest of these are now passing twenty years of operation. All of these reactors use the uranium zirconium hydride fuel (UZrH) which provides certain unique advantages arising out of its large prompt negative temperature coefficient, very low fission product release, and high temperature capability. Eleven of these Sixty reactors are conversions from plate fuel to TRIGA fuel which were made as a result of these advantages. With only a few exceptions, TRIGA reactors have always used low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel with an enrichment of 19.9%. The exceptions have either been converted from the standard low-enriched fuel to the 70% enriched FLIP fuel in order to achieve extended lifetime, or are higher powered reactors which were designed for long life using 93%-enriched uranium during the time when the use and export of highly enriched uranium (HEU) was not restricted. The advent of international policies focusing attention on nonproliferation and safeguards made the HEU fuels obsolete. General Atomic immediately undertook a development effort (nearly two years ago) in order to be in a position to comply with these policies for all future export sales and also to provide a low-enriched alternative to fully enriched plate-type fuels. This important work was subsequently partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The laboratory and production tests have shown that higher uranium densities can be achieved to compensate for reducing the enrichment to 20%, and that the fuels maintain the characteristics of the very thoroughly proven standard TRIGA fuels. In May of 1978, General Atomic announced that these fuels were available for TRIGA reactors and for plate-type reactors with power levels up to 15 MW with General Atomic's standard commercial warranty

  13. TRIGA spent fuel storage

    Storage of spent fuel elements is a step preliminary to final radioactive waste disposal operation. The spent fuel issue will have a common solution for both spent fuel from Cernavoda NPP and research TRIGA reactors currently operated in Romania. For the case of TRIGA reactor spent fuel this will be an alternative solution to the now functioning alternative of 'on site' storing solution adopted so far at INR Pitesti. For the time being the short term storage requirements for TRIGA spent fuel are adequately fulfilled by the pool of a multizonal reactor, the construction of which was definitively stopped. On the other hand the HEU - LEU conversion of the 14 MW TRIGA reactor which will be completed till May 2006, will pose not spent fuel problems as the TRIGA HEU fuel (612 elements) will be transferred in US (not later than May 2009). Consequently, the needs for intermediate storage will be associated only with the LEU spent fuel from TRIGA LEU-SSR and TRIGA LEU-ACPR reactors. In the latter case the maximum number of elements will be 167. For the stationary 14 MW (SSR) reactor but the amount of fuel elements to be stored on a intermediate term will be a function of service span of this reactor as well of the degree of request. Totally, some 1,750 SSR-LEU fuel elements will require intermediate storage. There is a preliminary agreement with 'NUCLEARELECTRICA -S.A.' Company regarding LEU TRIGA spent fuel storage at the intermediate storage facility for spent fuel of Cernavoda NPP.. A safety investigation is underway to determine the impact of LEU spent fuel upon the dry environment containing spent CANDU fuel. To fulfil the requirements imposed by CANDU storage technology the LEU spent fuel will be correspondingly conditioned. Then adequate containers will be used for transportation of fuel to Cernavoda's storage cell. Subcriticality condition in the storage cell loaded with LEU was checked by calculating the multiplication factor for an infinite lattice. The

  14. Fuel sorting evaluation

    An evaluation of functions and requirements associated with sorting fuel from the Hanford K Basins is presented to support design issue resolution decisions for achieving interim fuel storage. Potential requirements are recommended for implementation in design activities. The recommendations are provided as input to a management decision process where decisions are finalized and the sorting issue is closed

  15. Nuclear fuel manufacture

    The technologies used to manufacture nuclear fuel from uranium ore are outlined, with particular reference to the light water reactor fuel cycle. Capital and operating cost estimates for the processing stages are given, and the relevance to a developing uranium industry in Australia is discussed

  16. International fuel bank

    The working group discusses the establishment of an international bank for nuclear fuels. The statements by representatives of seven countries discuss the specific features of a bank of this kind which is set up to facilitate access to nuclear fuels but also to permit a more rigid control in the sense of the non-proliferation philosophy

  17. Alternative Fuels in Transportation

    Kouroussis, Denis; Karimi, Shahram

    2006-01-01

    The realization of dwindling fossil fuel supplies and their adverse environmental impacts has accelerated research and development activities in the domain of renewable energy sources and technologies. Global energy demand is expected to rise during the next few decades, and the majority of today's energy is based on fossil fuels. Alternative…

  18. PLATINUM AND FUEL CELLS

    Platinum requirements for fuel cell vehicles (FCVS) have been identified as a concern and possible problem with FCV market penetration. Platinum is a necessary component of the electrodes of fuel cell engines that power the vehicles. The platinum is deposited on porous electrodes...

  19. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  20. Fuel particle coating data

    Development of coating on nuclear fuel particles for the High-Temperature Fuels Technology program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory included process studies for low-density porous and high-density isotropic carbon coats, and for ZrC and ''alloy'' C/ZrC coats. This report documents the data generated by these studies

  1. MICROBIAL FUEL CELL

    2008-01-01

    A novel microbial fuel cell construction for the generation of electrical energy. The microbial fuel cell comprises: (i) an anode electrode, (ii) a cathode chamber, said cathode chamber comprising an in let through which an influent enters the cathode chamber, an outlet through which an effluent...

  2. Nuclear fuel transportation containers

    The invention discloses an inner container for a nuclear fuel transportation flask for irradiated fuel elements comprising a cylindrical shell having a dished end closure with a drainage sump and means for flushing out solid matter by way of the sump prior to removing a cover

  3. Spent nuclear fuel storage

    When a country becomes self-sufficient in part of the nuclear cycle, as production of fuel that will be used in nuclear power plants for energy generation, it is necessary to pay attention for the best method of storing the spent fuel. Temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel is a necessary practice and is applied nowadays all over the world, so much in countries that have not been defined their plan for a definitive repository, as well for those that already put in practice such storage form. There are two main aspects that involve the spent fuels: one regarding the spent nuclear fuel storage intended to reprocessing and the other in which the spent fuel will be sent for final deposition when the definitive place is defined, correctly located, appropriately characterized as to several technical aspects, and licentiate. This last aspect can involve decades of studies because of the technical and normative definitions at a given country. In Brazil, the interest is linked with the storage of spent fuels that will not be reprocessed. This work analyses possible types of storage, the international panorama and a proposal for future construction of a spent nuclear fuel temporary storage place in the country. (author)

  4. Framing car fuel efficiency : linearity heuristic for fuel consumption and fuel-efficiency ratings

    Schouten, T.M.; Bolderdijk, J.W.; Steg, L.

    2014-01-01

    People are sensitive to the way information on fuel efficiency is conveyed. When the fuel efficiency of cars is framed in terms of fuel per distance (FPD; e.g. l/100 km), instead of distance per units of fuel (DPF; e.g. km/l), people have a more accurate perception of potential fuel savings. People

  5. Nondestructive measurements on spent fuel for the nuclear fuel cycle

    Nondestructive measurements on spent fuel are being developed to meet safeguards and materials managment requirements at nuclear facilities. Spent-fuel measurement technology and its applications are reviewed

  6. Fuel cycle economical improvement by reaching high fuel burnup

    Improvements of fuel utilization in the light water reactors, burnup increase have led to a necessity to revise strategic approaches of the fuel cycle development. Different trends of the fuel cycle development are necessary to consider in accordance with the type of reactors used, the uranium market and other features that correspond to the nuclear and economic aspects of the fuel cycle. The fuel burnup step-by-step extension Program that successfully are being realized by the leading, firms - fuel manufacturers and the research centres allow to say that there are no serious technical obstacles for licensing in the near future of water cooling reactors fuel rod burnup (average) limit to 65-70 MWd/kgU and fuel assembly (average) limit to (60-65) MWd/kgU. The operating experience of Ukrainian NPPs with WWER-1000 is 130 reactor * years. At the beginning of 1999, a total quantity of the fuel FA discharged during all time of operation of 11 reactors was 5819 (110 fuel cycles). Economical improvement is reached by increase of fuel burn-up by using of some FA of 3 fuel cycles design in 4th fuel loading cycle. Fuel reliability is satisfactory. The further improvement of FA is necessary, that will allow to reduce the front-end fuel cycle cost (specific natural uranium expenditure), to reduce spent fuel amount and, respectively, the fuel cycle back end costs, and to increase burn-up of the fuel. (author)

  7. Fuel cells: Problems and prospects

    Shukla, AK; Ramesh, KV; Kannan, AM

    1986-01-01

    n recent years, fuel cell technology has advanced significantly. Field trials on certain types of fuel cells have shown promise for electrical use. This article reviews the electrochemistry, problems and prospects of fuel cell systems.

  8. www.FuelEconomy.gov

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — FuelEconomy.gov provides comprehensive information about vehicles' fuel economy. The official U.S. government site for fuel economy information, it is operated by...

  9. Assessment of automotive fuels

    Energy demand all over the world increases steadily and, within the next decades, is almost completely met by fossil fuels. This poses increasing pressure on oil supply and reserves. Concomitant is the concern about environmental pollution, especially by carbon dioxide from fossil fuel combustion, with the risk of global warming. Environmental well-being requires a modified mix of energy sources to emit less carbon dioxide, starting with a move to natural gas and ending with the market penetration of renewable energies. Efforts should focus on advanced oil and gas production and processing technologies and on regeneratively produced fuels like hydrogen or bio-fuels as well. Within the framework of an industrial initiative in Germany, a process of defining one or two alternative fuels was started, to bring them into the market within the next years. (orig.)

  10. Nuclear reactor fuel element

    The grid-shaped spacer for PWR fuel elements consists of flat, upright metal bars at right angles to the fuel rods. In one corner of a grid mesh it has a spring with two end parts for the fuel rod. The cut-outs for the end parts start from an end edge of the metal bar parallel to the fuel rods. The transverse metal bar is one of four outer metal bars. Both end parts of the spring have an extension parallel to this outer metal arm, which grips a grid mesh adjacent to this grid mesh at the side in one corner of the spacer and forms an end part of a spring for the fuel rod there on the inside of the outer metal bar. (HP)

  11. Methanol commercial aviation fuel

    Southern California's heavy reliance on petroleum-fueled transportation has resulted in significant air pollution problems within the south Coast Air Basin (Basin) which stem directly from this near total dependence on fossil fuels. To deal with this pressing issue, recently enacted state legislation has proposed mandatory introduction of clean alternative fuels into ground transportation fleets operating within this area. The commercial air transportation sector, however, also exerts a significant impact on regional air quality which may exceed emission gains achieved in the ground transportation sector. This paper addresses the potential, through the implementation of methanol as a commercial aviation fuel, to improve regional air quality within the Basin and the need to flight test and demonstrate methanol as an environmentally preferable fuel in aircraft turbine engines

  12. Fuel cells : emerging markets

    This presentation highlighted the findings of the 2009 review of the fuel cell industry and emerging markets as they appeared in Fuel Cell Today (FCT), a benchmark document on global fuel cell activity. Since 2008, the industry has seen a 50 per cent increase in fuel cell systems shipped, from 12,000 units to 18,000 units. Applications have increased for backup power for datacentres, telecoms and light duty vehicles. The 2009 review focused on emerging markets which include non-traditional regions that may experience considerable diffusion of fuel cells within the next 5 year forecast period. The 2009 review included an analysis on the United Arab Emirates, Mexico, Brazil and India and reviewed primary drivers, likely applications for near-term adoption, and government and private sector activity in these regions. The presentation provided a forecast of the global state of the industry in terms of shipments as well as a forecast of countries with emerging markets

  13. Nuclear fuel assembly

    Purpose: To increase the fuel assembly rigidity while making balance in view of the dimension thereby improving the earthquake proofness. Constitution: In a nuclear fuel assembly having a control rod guide thimble tube, the gap between the thimble tube and fuel insert (inner diameter of the guiding thimble tube-outer diameter of the fuel insert) is made greater than 1.0 mm. Further, the wall thickness of the thimble tube is made to about 4 - 5 % of the outer diameter, while the flowing fluid pore cross section S in the thimble tube is set as: S = S0 x A0/A where S0: cross section of the present flowing fluid pore, A: effective cross section after improvement, = Π/4(d2 - D2) in which d is the thimble tube inner diameter and the D is the fuel insert outer diameter. A0: present effective cross section. (Seki, T.)

  14. Uranium plutonium oxide fuels

    Uranium plutonium oxide is the principal fuel material for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR's) throughout the world. Development of this material has been a reasonably straightforward evolution from the UO2 used routinely in the light water reactor (LWR's); but, because of the lower neutron capture cross sections and much lower coolant pressures in the sodium cooled LMFBR's, the fuel is operated to much higher discharge exposures than that of a LWR. A typical LMFBR fuel assembly is shown. Depending on the required power output and the configuration of the reactor, some 70 to 400 such fuel assemblies are clustered to form the core. There is a wide variation in cross section and length of the assemblies where the increasing size reflects a chronological increase in plant size and power output as well as considerations of decreasing the net fuel cycle cost. Design and performance characteristics are described

  15. Spent fuel management

    The production of nuclear electricity results in the generation of spent fuel that requires safe, secure and efficient management. Appropriate management of the resulting spent fuel is a key issue for the steady and sustainable growth of nuclear energy. Currently about 10,000 tonnes heavy metal (HM) of spent fuel are unloaded every year from nuclear power reactors worldwide, of which 8,500 t HM need to be stored (after accounting for reprocessed fuel). This is the largest continuous source of civil radioactive material generated, and needs to be managed appropriately. Member States have referred to storage periods of 100 years and even beyond, and as storage quantities and durations extend, new challenges arise in the institutional as well as in the technical area. The IAEA gives high priority to safe and effective spent fuel management. As an example of continuing efforts, the 2003 International Conference on Storage of Spent Fuel from Power Reactors gathered 125 participants from 35 member states to exchange information on this important subject. With its large number of Member States, the IAEA is well-positioned to gather and share information useful in addressing Member State priorities. IAEA activities on this topic include plans to produce technical documents as resources for a range of priority topics: spent fuel performance assessment and research, burnup credit applications, cask maintenance, cask loading optimization, long term storage requirements including records maintenance, economics, spent fuel treatment, remote technology, and influence of fuel design on spent fuel storage. In addition to broader topics, the IAEA supports coordinated research projects and technical cooperation projects focused on specific needs

  16. MOX fuel at BNFL

    In 1989, BNFL decided to use the expertise developed for the Fast Reactor project to enter the thermal MOX fuels market with the aim of becoming a world leader in thermal MOX supply and to return the products from its reprocessing business to its customers as MOX fuel. To reach this objective the company developed a two-stage strategy which involved: (a) Constructing a small-scale plant, the MOX Demonstration Facility (MDF), on a short time-scale to produce commercial quality fuel for irradiation in commercial reactors, and (b) Constructing a small-scale plant, the Sellafield MOX Plant (SMP), for bulk fuel supply. MOX production in the MOX Demonstration Facility at Sellafield began in October 1993 and, since that time, the plant has produced more than 10 tonnes of MOX for BNFL's customers. The MDF was constructed to produce LWR MOX fuel, using BNFL's patented Short Binderless Route (SBR) in order to gain operational and irradiation experience to support fuel supply from the 120te/yr Sellafield MOX Plant (SMP). The first fuel from MDF was loaded into the Nordostschweizerische Kraftwerke (NOK) Beznau 1 reactor in July 1994 and since that time the plant has been used continuously to provide more fuel for NOK and other customers. Construction of the SMP commenced in April 1994 against a fast-track programme designed to have the plant producing its first MOX fuel by the end of 1997. The SMP will be the most flexible MOX fabrication plant in the world, capable of producing PWR and BWR fuels using the SBR as the basis of the production process. (Author)

  17. Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    This is a submission for the Encyclopedia of Sustainable Technology on the subject of Reprocessing Spent Nuclear Fuel. Nuclear reprocessing is the chemical treatment of spent fuel involving separation of its various constituents. Principally, it is used to recover useful actinides from the spent fuel. Radioactive waste that cannot be re-used is separated into streams for consolidation into waste forms. The first known application of nuclear reprocessing was within the Manhattan Project to recover material for nuclear weapons. Currently, reprocessing has a peaceful application in the nuclear fuel cycle. A variety of chemical methods have been proposed and demonstrated for reprocessing of nuclear fuel. The two most widely investigated and implemented methods are generally referred to as aqueous reprocessing and pyroprocessing. Each of these technologies is described in detail in Section 3 with numerous references to published articles. Reprocessing of nuclear fuel as part of a fuel cycle can be used both to recover fissionable actinides and to stabilize radioactive fission products into durable waste forms. It can also be used as part of a breeder reactor fuel cycle that could result in a 14-fold or higher increase in energy utilization per unit of natural uranium. Reprocessing can also impact the need for geologic repositories for spent fuel. The volume of waste that needs to be sent to such a repository can be reduced by first subjecting the spent fuel to reprocessing. The extent to which volume reduction can occur is currently under study by the United States Department of Energy via research at various national laboratories and universities. Reprocessing can also separate fissile and non-fissile radioactive elements for transmutation.

  18. Rejuvenation of automotive fuel cells

    Kim, Yu Seung; Langlois, David A.

    2016-08-23

    A process for rejuvenating fuel cells has been demonstrated to improve the performance of polymer exchange membrane fuel cells with platinum/ionomer electrodes. The process involves dehydrating a fuel cell and exposing at least the cathode of the fuel cell to dry gas (nitrogen, for example) at a temperature higher than the operating temperature of the fuel cell. The process may be used to prolong the operating lifetime of an automotive fuel cell.

  19. Seasonality of Diesel Fuel Prices

    Ibendahl, Gregg

    2012-01-01

    Diesel fuel is a major expense for most farmers. Diesel fuel prices do exhibit some seasonality so farmers can try to lower their fuel expenses by buying their fuel in months when prices are lower. However, purchasing fuel before it is needed results in a carrying charge to the farmer. This paper examines the optimal purchase month for diesel fuel for both spring planting and fall harvest. Both risk neutral and risk-averse farmers are considered. Higher interest rates discourage advance purch...

  20. FUEL CELLS IN ENERGY PRODUCTION

    Huang, Xiaoyu

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study fuel cells. They convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy with high efficiency and low emmission of pollutants. This thesis provides an overview of fuel cell technology.The basic working principle of fuel cells and the basic fuel cell system components are introduced in this thesis. The properties, advantages, disadvantages and applications of six different kinds of fuel cells are introduced. Then the efficiency of each fuel cell is p...

  1. Spent fuel workshop'2002

    This document gathers the transparencies of the presentations given at the 2002 spent fuel workshop: Session 1 - Research Projects: Overview on the IN CAN PROCESSES European project (M. Cowper), Overview on the SPENT FUEL STABILITY European project (C. Poinssot), Overview on the French R and D project on spent fuel long term evolution, PRECCI (C. Poinssot); Session 2 - Spent Fuel Oxidation: Oxidation of uranium dioxide single crystals (F. Garrido), Experimental results on SF oxidation and new modeling approach (L. Desgranges), LWR spent fuel oxidation - effects of burn-up and humidity (B. Hanson), An approach to modeling CANDU fuel oxidation under dry storage conditions (P. Taylor); Session 3 - Spent Fuel Dissolution Experiments: Overview on high burnup spent fuel dissolution studies at FZK/INE (A. Loida), Results on the influence of hydrogen on spent fuel leaching (K. Spahiu), Leaching of spent UO2 fuel under inert and reducing conditions (Y. Albinsson), Fuel corrosion investigation by electrochemical techniques (D. Wegen), A reanalysis of LWR spent fuel flow through dissolution tests (B. Hanson), U-bearing secondary phases formed during fuel corrosion (R. Finch), The near-field chemical conditions and spent fuel leaching (D. Cui), The release of radionuclides from spent fuel in bentonite block (S.S. Kim), Trace actinide behavior in altered spent fuel (E. Buck, B. Hanson); Session 4 - Radiolysis Issues: The effect of radiolysis on UO2 dissolution determined from electrochemical experiments with 238Pu doped UO2 M. Stroess-Gascoyne (F. King, J.S. Betteridge, F. Garisto), doped UO2 studies (V. Rondinella), Preliminary results of static and dynamic dissolution tests with α doped UO2 in Boom clay conditions (K. Lemmens), Studies of the behavior of UO2 / water interfaces under He2+ beam (C. Corbel), Alpha and gamma radiolysis effects on UO2 alteration in water (C. Jegou), Behavior of Pu-doped pellets in brines (M. Kelm), On the potential catalytic behavior of UO2(s

  2. Low contaminant formic acid fuel for direct liquid fuel cell

    Masel, Richard I.; Zhu, Yimin; Kahn, Zakia; Man, Malcolm

    2009-11-17

    A low contaminant formic acid fuel is especially suited toward use in a direct organic liquid fuel cell. A fuel of the invention provides high power output that is maintained for a substantial time and the fuel is substantially non-flammable. Specific contaminants and contaminant levels have been identified as being deleterious to the performance of a formic acid fuel in a fuel cell, and embodiments of the invention provide low contaminant fuels that have improved performance compared to known commercial bulk grade and commercial purified grade formic acid fuels. Preferred embodiment fuels (and fuel cells containing such fuels) including low levels of a combination of key contaminants, including acetic acid, methyl formate, and methanol.

  3. Fuel development program of the nuclear fuel element centre

    Fuel technology development program pf the nuclear fuel element centre is still devised into two main pillars, namely the research reactors fuel technology and the power reactor fuel technology taking into account the strategic influencing environment such as better access to global market of fuel cycle services, the state of the art and the general trend of the fuel technology in the world. Embarking on the twenty first century the fuel development program has to be directed toward strengthening measure to acquire and self-reliance in the field of fuel technology in support to the national energy program as well as to the utilisation of research reactor. A more strengthened acquisition of fuel cycle technology, in general, and particularly of fuel technology would improve the bargaining power when negotiation the commercial fuel technology transfer in the future

  4. Alternate-Fueled Flight: Halophytes, Algae, Bio-, and Synthetic Fuels

    Hendricks, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic and biomass fueling are now considered to be near-term aviation alternate fueling. The major impediment is a secure sustainable supply of these fuels at reasonable cost. However, biomass fueling raises major concerns related to uses of common food crops and grasses (some also called "weeds") for processing into aviation fuels. These issues are addressed, and then halophytes and algae are shown to be better suited as sources of aerospace fuels and transportation fueling in general. Some of the history related to alternate fuels use is provided as a guideline for current and planned alternate fuels testing (ground and flight) with emphasis on biofuel blends. It is also noted that lessons learned from terrestrial fueling are applicable to space missions. These materials represent an update (to 2009) and additions to the Workshop on Alternate Fueling Sustainable Supply and Halophyte Summit at Twinsburg, Ohio, October 17 to 18, 2007.

  5. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC

    Amornpitoksuk, P.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC is a kind of fuel cell using methanol as a fuel for electric producing. Methanol is low cost chemical substance and it is less harmful than that of hydrogen fuel. From these reasons it can be commercial product. The electrocatalytic reaction of methanol fuel uses Pt-Ru metals as the most efficient catalyst. In addition, the property of membrane and system designation are also effect to the fuel cell efficient. Because of low power of methanol fuel cell therefore, direct methanol fuel cell is proper to use for the energy source of small electrical devices and vehicles etc.

  6. Nitride fuel development in Japan

    Nitride fuel for ADS has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) under a double strata fuel cycle concept. In this case the nitride fuel contains MA elements as a principal component and is diluted by inert materials in place of U, which is totally different from the fuel for power reactors. So the fuel fabrication manner, fuel properties and irradiation behaviour have to be investigated in detail as well as the treatment of spent fuel. Through the experimental R&D, technical feasibility of nitride fuel cycle for the transmutation of MA will be demonstrated

  7. Increased fuel column height for boiling water reactor fuel rods

    Matzner, B.

    1993-06-15

    Rods to maintain said fuel rods upstanding and permitting the exit of water and generated steam is described; a fuel bundle channel extending from said lower tie plate to the vicinity of said upper tie plate, and surrounding said fuel rods therebetween for producing an isolated flow region through said matrix of upstanding fuel rods for the generation of steam by nuclear reaction within said fuel rods; a first plurality of said fuel rods being full length fuel rods for extending fully between said upper and lower tie plates; and, a second plurality of said fuel rods being part length fuel rods for extending part way from a supported disposition on said lower tie plate to a point of fuel rod termination below said upper tie plate whereby a vacated vertical interval is defined between the upper end of said part length fuel rod and said upper tie plate; the improvement to said first plurality of full length fuel rods comprising in combination: said full length fuel rods including a first lower region having a first and smaller diameter containing said pellets of fissionable material; and, at least some of said full length fuel rods including an upper region containing said plenum which is devoid of fuel pellets having a second and larger diameter for providing to said plenum an expanded volume whereby the flow area overlying said part length fuel rods defines additional outflow area adjacent said plenums and the active length of fissionable pellets within said full length fuel rods can be increased.

  8. Increased fuel column height for boiling water reactor fuel rods

    Rods to maintain said fuel rods upstanding and permitting the exit of water and generated steam is described; a fuel bundle channel extending from said lower tie plate to the vicinity of said upper tie plate, and surrounding said fuel rods therebetween for producing an isolated flow region through said matrix of upstanding fuel rods for the generation of steam by nuclear reaction within said fuel rods; a first plurality of said fuel rods being full length fuel rods for extending fully between said upper and lower tie plates; and, a second plurality of said fuel rods being part length fuel rods for extending part way from a supported disposition on said lower tie plate to a point of fuel rod termination below said upper tie plate whereby a vacated vertical interval is defined between the upper end of said part length fuel rod and said upper tie plate; the improvement to said first plurality of full length fuel rods comprising in combination: said full length fuel rods including a first lower region having a first and smaller diameter containing said pellets of fissionable material; and, at least some of said full length fuel rods including an upper region containing said plenum which is devoid of fuel pellets having a second and larger diameter for providing to said plenum an expanded volume whereby the flow area overlying said part length fuel rods defines additional outflow area adjacent said plenums and the active length of fissionable pellets within said full length fuel rods can be increased

  9. Fuel element development

    In capsule irradiation tests the influence was studied which is exerted by high power densities on thin oxide fuel rods. Cladding expansions have been observed which are not attributable to creep but to plastic strains. Power jumps during load cycling resulted in stress to the cladding through fuel pressure due to thermal differential strain. - Changes in geometry of oxide fuel pellets during cycling were investigated theoretically using models. The test group 5b was also studied with a view to plutonium redistribution. A very high plutonium enrichment was found at the central channel, and outer zones nearly free from plutonium soon after the beginning of irradiation, which might be due to the high specific power and central temperature and the high PuO2-content (35%) of the fuel. Two contributions include as subjects the porosity of fuel in the context of structural analyses and creep caused by irradiation. The plutonium content itself does not seem to increase substantially the creep rate. Further results of post-examinations are available from the oxide irradiation tests Mol-7B and DFR-435. The zone of maximum damage of the Mol-7B-rods occurs at the upper end of the fuel column; even here the structure of the rod has essentially remained unchanged. The amount of fuel escaping is not as great as at the damaged points of DFR-435. (orig.)

  10. Nuclear fuel deformation phenomena

    Nuclear fuel encounters severe thermomechanical environments. Its mechanical response is profoundly influenced by an underlying heterogeneous microstructure but also inherently dependent on the temperature and stress level histories. The ability to adequately simulate the response of such microstructures, to elucidate the associated macroscopic response in such extreme environments is crucial for predicting both performance and transient fuel mechanical responses. This chapter discusses key physical phenomena and the status of current modelling techniques to evaluate and predict fuel deformations: creep, swelling, cracking and pellet-clad interaction. This chapter only deals with nuclear fuel; deformations of cladding materials are discussed elsewhere. An obvious need for a multi-physics and multi-scale approach to develop a fundamental understanding of properties of complex nuclear fuel materials is presented. The development of such advanced multi-scale mechanistic frameworks should include either an explicit (domain decomposition, homogenisation, etc.) or implicit (scaling laws, hand-shaking,...) linkage between the different time and length scales involved, in order to accurately predict the fuel thermomechanical response for a wide range of operating conditions and fuel types (including Gen-IV and TRU). (authors)

  11. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  12. Japan Nuclear Fuel, Ltd

    Just over a month ago, on July 1, Japan Nuclear Fuel Industries (JNFI) and Japan Nuclear Fuel Services (JNFS) merged to form the integrated nuclear fuel cycle company, Japan Nuclear Fuel, Ltd. (JNFL). The announcement in mid-January that the country's two major fuel cycle firms intended to merge had long been anticipated and represents one of the most significant restructuring events in Japan's nuclear industry. The merger forming JNFL was a logical progression in the evolution of Japan's fuel cycle, bringing complementary technologies together to encourage synergism, increased efficiency, and improved community relations. The main production facilities of both JNFI and JNFS were located near the village of Rokkashomura, on the northern end of the main island of Honshu, and their headquarters were in Tokyo. The former JNFS was responsible for spent fuel reprocessing and also was building a high-level waste (HLW) management facility. The former JNFI focused on uranium enrichment and low-level waste (LLW) disposal. It was operating the first stage of a centrifuge enrichment plant and continuing to construct additional capacity. These responsibilities and activities will be assumed by JNFL, which now will be responsible for all JNFI and JNFS operations, including those at Rokkashomura

  13. Evolution of nuclear fuels

    Nuclear fuel is the primary energy source for sustaining the nuclear fission chain reactions in a reactor. The fuels in the reactor cores are exposed to highly aggressive environment and varieties of advanced fuel materials with improved nuclear properties are continuously being developed to have optimum performance in the existing core conditions. Fabrications of varieties of nuclear fuels used in diverse forms of reactors are mainly based on two naturally occurring nuclear source elements, uranium as fissile 235U and fertile 238U, and thorium as fertile 232Th species. The two metals in the forms of alloys with specific elements, ceramic oxides like MOX and ceramic non-oxide as mixed carbide and nitride with suitable nuclear properties like higher metal density, thermal conductivity, etc. are used as fuels in different reactor designs. In addition, efficiency of various advanced fuels in the forms of dispersion, molten salt and other types are also under investigations. The countries which have large deposits of thorium but limited reserves of uranium, are trying to give special impetus on the development of thorium-based fuels for both thermal and fast reactors in harnessing nuclear energy for peaceful uses of atomic energy. (author)

  14. Fuel assembly supporting structure

    For use in forming the core of a pressurized-water reactor, a fuel assembly supporting structure for holding a bundle of interspaced fuel rods, is formed by interspaced end pieces having holes in which the end portions of control rod guide tubes are inserted, fuel rod spacer grids being positioned by these guide tubes between the end pieces. The end pieces are fastened to the end portions of the guide tubes, to integrate the supporting structure, and in the case of at least one of the end pieces, this is done by means which releases that end piece from the guide tubes when the end pieces receive an abnormal thrust force directed towards each other and which would otherwise place the guide tubes under a compressive stress that would cause them to buckle. The spacer grids normally hold the fuel rods interspaced by distances determined by nuclear physics, and buckling of the control rod guide tubes can distort the fuel rod spacer grids with consequent dearrangement of the fuel rod interspacing. A sudden loss of pressure in a pressurized-water reactor pressure vessel can result in the pressurized coolant in the vessel discharging from the vessel at such high velocity as to result in the abnormal thrust force on the end pieces of each fuel assembly, which could cause buckling of the control rod guide tubes when the end pieces are fixed to them in the normal rigid and unyielding manner

  15. Cermet fuel reactors

    Cermet fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high performance space power systems. The cermet fuel consists of tungsten-urania hexagonal fuel blocks characterized by high strength at elevated temperatures, a high thermal conductivity and resultant high thermal shock resistance. The concept evolved in the 1960's with the objective of developing a reactor design which could be used for a wide range of mobile power generation systems including both Brayton and Rankine power conversion cycles. High temperature thermal cycling tests and in-reactor irradiation tests using cermet fuel were carried out by General Electric in the 1960's as part of the 710 Development Program and by Argonne National laboratory in a subsequent activity. Cermet fuel development programs are currently underway at Argonne National laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Multi-Megawatt Space Power Program. Key features of the cermet fueled reactor design are 1) the ability to achieve very high coolant exit temperatures, and 2) thermal shock resistance during rapid power changes, and 3) two barriers to fission product release - the cermet matrix and the fuel element cladding. Additionally, there is a potential for achieving a long operating life because of 1) the neutronic insensitivity of the fast-spectrum core to the buildup of fission products and 2) the utilization of a high strength refractory metal matrix and structural materials. These materials also provide resistance against compression forces that potentially might compact and/or reconfigure the core

  16. Fuel performance and operation experience of WWER-440 fuel in improved fuel cycle

    The paper summarizes WWER-440 second-generation fuel operation experience in improved fuel cycles using the example of Kola NPP units 3 and 4. Basic parameters of fuel assemblies, fuel rods and uranium-gadolinium fuel rods, as well as the principal neutronic parameters and burn-up achieved in fuel assemblies are presented. The paper also contains some data concerning the activity of coolant during operation (Authors)

  17. Hydrogen vehicle fueling station

    Daney, D.E.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Daugherty, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen fueling stations are an essential element in the practical application of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology which is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle. Because most merchant hydrogen delivered in the US today (and in the near future) is in liquid form due to the overall economics of production and delivery, we believe a practical refueling station should be designed to receive liquid. Systems studies confirm this assumption for stations fueling up to about 300 vehicles. Our fueling station, aimed at refueling fleet vehicles, will receive hydrogen as a liquid and dispense it as either liquid, high pressure gas, or low pressure gas. Thus, it can refuel any of the three types of tanks proposed for hydrogen-powered vehicles -- liquid, gaseous, or hydride. The paper discusses the fueling station design. Results of a numerical model of liquid hydrogen vehicle tank filling, with emphasis on no vent filling, are presented to illustrate the usefulness of the model as a design tool. Results of our vehicle performance model illustrate our thesis that it is too early to judge what the preferred method of on-board vehicle fuel storage will be in practice -- thus our decision to accommodate all three methods.

  18. 2009 Fuel Cell Market Report

    Vincent, Bill [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States); Gangi, Jennifer [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States); Curtin, Sandra [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States); Delmont, Elizabeth [Breakthrough Technologies Inst., Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general.

  19. Developments in fuel manufacturing

    BNFL has a long tradition of willingness to embrace technological challenge and a dedication to quality. This paper describes advances in the overall manufacturing philosophy at BNFL's Fuel Business Group and then covers how some new technologies are currently being employed in BNFL Fuel Business Group's flagship oxide complex (OFC), which is currently in its final stages of commissioning. This plant represents a total investment of some Pound 200 million. This paper also describes how these technologies are also being deployed in BNFL's MOX plant now being built at Sellafield and, finally, covers some new processes being developed for advanced fuel manufacture. (author)

  20. Fuel for CAGR stations

    The design of the fuel stringer consisting of 8 elements and other components is described. The heat transfer performance of the 36 pin element was extensively studied in laboratory tests. Identical pins of stainless steel clad hollow UO2 pellets were irradiated in the prototype Windscale AGR in 9 pin elements: the programme included studies of the effect of rating changes. Extensive post-irradiation examination was made of a wide variety of properties. The behaviour of the complete fuel assembly for the commercial stations under handling and flow conditions has been studied in large gas loops. The early fuel history at Hinkley Point 'B' and Hunterston 'B' stations is summarised. (author)

  1. Finessing fuel fineness

    Storm, R.F. [Storm Technologies Inc. (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Most of today's operating coal plants began service at least a generation ago and were designed to burn eastern bituminous coal. A switch to Powder River Basin coal can stress those plants' boiler systems, especially the pulverisers, beyond their design limits and cause no end of operational and maintenance problems. Many of those problems are caused by failing to maintain good fuel fineness when increasing fuel throughput. This article concerns the proper management of the fuel component of the combustion equation in an eight step plan. 8 figs.

  2. Enigma fuel performance code

    The Enigma fuel performance code has been developed jointly by BNFL and the CEGB's Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories. Its development arose from the need for a code capable of analysing all aspects of light water reactor (LWR) fuel behaviour which would also provide a suitable framework for future submodel development. The submodels incorporated into Enigma reflect the significant progress which has been made in recent years in modelling the important physical processes which determine fuel behaviour. The Enigma code has been subjected to an extensive programme of validation which has demonstrated its suitability for LWR performance analysis. (author)

  3. Cermet fuel thermal conductivity

    Cermets have been proposed as a candidate fuel for space reactors for several reasons, including their potential for high thermal conductivity. However, there is currently no accepted model for cermet fuel thermal conductivity. The objective of the work reported in this paper was to (a) investigate the adequacy of existing models; (b) develop, if necessary, an improved model; and (c) provide recommendations for future work on cermet thermal conductivity. The results from this work indicate that further work is needed to accurately characterize cermet fuel thermal conductivity. It was determined that particle shape and orientation have a large impact on cermet thermal conductivity

  4. GENUSA Fuel Evolution

    GNF ENUSA Nuclear Fuel S.A. (GENUSA) was formed in Madrid in May 1996. GENUSA is a corporation organized and existing under the laws of Spain, jointly owned by GNF-A and ENUSA. GENUSA consolidates all European BWR fuel marketing activities of GNF-A and ENUSA, primarily providing marketing and project management. In its standard way of operating, it will obtain engineering, components and conversion from GNF-A and engineering, fabrication and fuel related services from ENUSA. GENUSA's development philosophy over the past decades has been to introduce evolutionary designs, supported by our global experience base, that deliver the performance needed by our customers to meet their operating strategies. GENUSA considers, as one of our strengths, the ever-increasing experience base that provides the foundation for such evolutionary changes. This experience is supported and complemented with an even greater GNF experience. Over the last 40 years, GNF and ENUSA have designed, fabricated, and placed in operation over 144,000 BWR fuel bundles containing over 9.7 million fuel rods. This experience base represents the widest range of operating conditions of any BWR fuel vendor, reflecting varying reactor power densities, operating strategies, and water chemistry environments. It covers operating periods of up to ∼10 years and bundle average exposures up to 68 MWd/kgU.. It provides the confirmation of our understanding and ability to model fuel performance behavior, and has been instrumental in the identification and characterization of each encountered failure mechanism. With the knowledge gained from this extensive experience base, mitigating actions have been developed and progressively implemented by GENUSA as part of a continuous program toward improved fuel reliability and performance. GENUSA's evolutionary product introduction strategy has been extremely successful. There has been a continuous stream of new products/processes that were developed to deliver improved

  5. Canadian CANDU fuel development programs and recent fuel operating experience

    This paper summarizes the performance and operating experience of CANDU fuel in Canadian CANDU reactors in 1999 and 2000. The extremely low rate of fuel defects continues to demonstrate that CANDU fuel is performing exceptionally well. Over the 2-year period, the fuel bundle defect rate for all bundles irradiated in Canadian CANDU reactors has remained very low, between 0.011% (suspected defects) and 0.007% (confirmed defects). On a fuel element basis, this represents a rate of confirmed defects of about 0.0002%; this rate is approaching 2 defects per million fuel elements! This successful performance is the result of a number of contributing factors, including a simple and robust fuel design with conservative design margins, reliable and specialized manufacturing processes that have been developed over the years, and fuel operations that conform to the fuel operating limits. Strong linkages between plant operation, designers, and Canadian fuel research and development programs also contribute to the high performance of the current CANDU fuel. The Fuel Design and Performance program, funded by the CANDU Owners Group, addresses licensing and operational issues that are common to the Canadian CANDU utilities. In addition, AECL's Fuel and Fuel Cycles working group directs R and D to support evolutionary improvements to the fuel products, as well as longer-term R and D for advanced fuel concepts. This paper describes the development programs in 1999/2000. (author)

  6. Canadian CANDU fuel development programs and recent fuel operating experience

    This paper summarizes the performance and operating experience of CANDU fuel in Canadian CANDU reactors in 1999 and 2000. The extremely low rate of fuel defects continues to demonstrate that CANDU fuel is performing exceptionally well. Over the 2-year period, the fuel bundle defect rate for all bundles irradiated in Canadian CANDU reactors has remained very low, between 0.011% (suspected defects) and 0.007% (confirmed defects). On a fuel element basis, this represents a rate of confirmed defects of about 0.0002%; this rate is approaching 2 defects per million fuel elements. This successful performance is the result of a number of contributing factors, including a simple and robust fuel design with conservative design margins, reliable and specialized manufacturing processes that have been developed over the years, and fuel operations that conform to the fuel operating limits. Strong linkages between plant operation, designers, and Canadian fuel research and development programs also contribute to the high performance of the current CANDU fuel. The Fuel Design and Performance program, funded by the CANDU Owners Group, addresses licensing and operational issues that are common to the Canadian CANDU utilities. In addition, AECL's Fuel and Fuel Cycles working group directs R and D to support evolutionary improvements to the fuel products, as well as long-term R and D for advanced fuel concepts. This paper describes the development programs in 1999/2000. (author)

  7. Design package for fuel retrieval system fuel handling tool modification

    This is a design package that contains the details for a modification to a tool used for moving fuel elements during loading of MCO Fuel Baskets for the Fuel Retrieval System. The tool is called the fuel handling tool (or stinger). This document contains requirements, development design information, tests, and test reports

  8. Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier

    Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2012-10-02

    A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

  9. Ammonia as a Suitable Fuel for Fuel Cells

    Lan, Rong; Tao, Shanwen

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia, an important basic chemical, is produced at a scale of 150 million tons per year. Half of hydrogen produced in chemical industry is used for ammonia production. Ammonia containing 17.5 wt% hydrogen is an ideal carbon-free fuel for fuel cells. Compared to hydrogen, ammonia has many advantages. In this mini-review, the suitability of ammonia as fuel for fuel cells, the development of different types of fuel cells using ammonia as the fuel and the potential applications of ammonia fuel ...

  10. Ammonia as a suitable fuel for fuel cells

    ShanwenTao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia, an important basic chemical, is produced at a scale of 150 million tons per year. Half of hydrogen produced in chemical industry is used for ammonia production. Ammonia containing 17.5wt% hydrogen is an ideal carbon-free fuel for fuel cells. Compared to hydrogen, ammonia has many advantages. In this mini-review, the suitability of ammonia as fuel for fuel cells, the development of different types of fuel cells using ammonia as the fuel and the potential applications of ammonia fuel cells are briefly reviewed.

  11. Features of fuel performance at high fuel burnups

    Some features of fuel behavior at high fuel burnups, in particular, initiation and development of rim-layer, increase in the rate of fission gas release from the fuel and increase in the inner gas pressure in the fuel rod are briefly described. Basing on the analysis of the data of post-irradiation examinations of fuel rods of WWER-440 working FA and CR fuel followers, that have been operated for five fuel cycles and got the average fuel burnup or varies as 50MW-day/kgU, a conclusion is made that the WWER-440 fuel burnup can be increased at least to average burnups of 55-58 MW-day/kgU per fuel assembly (Authors)

  12. Second International Conference on CANDU Fuel

    Thirty-four papers were presented at this conference in sessions dealing with international experience and programs relating to CANDU fuel; fuel manufacture; fuel behaviour; fuel handling, storage and disposal; and advanced CANDU fuel cycles. (L.L.)

  13. Nuclear fuel assembly

    A fuel assembly of PWR comprises a fuel bundle portion supported by a plurality of support lattices and an upper and lower nozzles each secured to the upper and lower portions. Leaf springs are attached to the four sides of the upper nozzle for preventing rising of the fuel assembly by streams of cooling water by the contact with an upper reactor core plate. The leaf springs are attached to the upper nozzle so that four leaf springs are laminated. The uppermost leaf spring is bent slightly upwardly from the mounted portion and the other leaf springs are extended linearly from the mounted portion without being bent. The mounted portions of the leaf springs are stacked and secured to the upper nozzle by a bolt obliquely relative to the axial line of the fuel assembly. (I.N.)

  14. PEM regenerative fuel cells

    Swette, Larry L.; Laconti, Anthony B.; McCatty, Stephen A.

    1993-11-01

    This paper will update the progress in developing electrocatalyst systems and electrode structures primarily for the positive electrode of single-unit solid polymer proton exchange membrane (PEM) regenerative fuel cells. The work was done with DuPont Nafion 117 in complete fuel cells (40 sq cm electrodes). The cells were operated alternately in fuel cell mode and electrolysis mode at 80 C. In fuel cell mode, humidified hydrogen and oxygen were supplied at 207 kPa (30 psi); in electrolysis mode, water was pumped over the positive electrode and the gases were evolved at ambient pressure. Cycling data will be presented for Pt-Ir catalysts and limited bifunctional data will be presented for Pt, Ir, Ru, Rh, and Na(x)Pt3O4 catalysts as well as for electrode structure variations.

  15. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    A fuel assembly construction for liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors is described in which the sub-assemblies carry a smaller proportion of parasitic material than do conventional sub-assemblies. (U.K.)

  16. Fuel cell cogeneration

    Wimer, J.G. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States); Archer, D.

    1995-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) sponsors the research and development of engineered systems which utilize domestic fuel supplies while achieving high standards of efficiency, economy, and environmental performance. Fuel cell systems are among the promising electric power generation systems that METC is currently developing. Buildings account for 36 percent of U.S. primary energy consumption. Cogeneration systems for commercial buildings represent an early market opportunity for fuel cells. Seventeen percent of all commercial buildings are office buildings, and large office buildings are projected to be one of the biggest, fastest-growing sectors in the commercial building cogeneration market. The main objective of this study is to explore the early market opportunity for fuel cells in large office buildings and determine the conditions in which they can compete with alternative systems. Some preliminary results and conclusions are presented, although the study is still in progress.

  17. Fuels and Lubricants Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Modern naval aircraft and turbine-powered craft require reliable and high-quality fuels and lubricants to satisfy the demands imposed upon them for top performance...

  18. Safety of fuel using

    The research reactor complex IR-100 comprises the 200 KW power nuclear reactor and critical assembly. The reactor fuel rods operate since 1967. The tightness of fuel rod casings now has been determined by using of the coolant radiochemical analysis. Prognosis of the casings tightness change has been carried out as well. The minimum and maximum periods of the fuel rods operation in the future has been determined by the graphic method. In the critical assembly fuel rods the long-lived radioactive fission products are accumulated with time. There is the risk of irradiation of IR-100 personnel and students. The prognosis of the long-lived radioactive isotopes accumulating and increase of emanation has been carried out by graphic-analytical method. (author)

  19. Wastes from fuel reprocessing

    Handling, treatment, and interim storage of radioactive waste, problems confronted with during the reprocessing of spent fuel elements from LWR's according to the Purex-type process, are dealt with in detail. (HR/LN)

  20. Alternative fuel information sources

    1994-06-01

    This short document contains a list of more than 200 US sources of information (Name, address, phone number, and sometimes contact) related to the use of alternative fuels in automobiles and trucks. Electric-powered cars are also included.

  1. Improved CANDU fuel performance

    The fuel defect rate in CANDU power reactors has been very low (0.06 percent) since 1972. Most defects were caused by power ramping. The two measures taken to reduce the defect rate, by about an order of magnitude, were changes in the fuelling schemes and the introduction of thin coatings of graphite on the inside surface of the Zircaloy fuel cladding. Power ramping tests have demonstrated that graphite layers, and also baked poly-dimethyl-siloxane layers, between the UO2 pellets and Zircaloy cladding increase the tolerance of fuel to power ramps. These designs are termed graphite CANLUB and siloxane CANLUB; fuel performance depends on coating parameters such as thickness and wear resistance and on environmental and thermal conditions during the curing of coatings. (author)

  2. All about nuclear fuel

    The demand for energy continues to rise while natural resources are depleted day after day and the planet chokes on greenhouse gas emissions. It is not easy to strike a balance, yet these issues must be resolved. The nuclear revival in a number of countries may be the beginning of a solution. This is a good time to take a closer look at this industry and learn about the different 'lives' of nuclear fuel: uranium mining and conversion (new deposits to be mined, evenly distributed reserves), uranium enrichment and fuel fabrication: continually evolving technologies), recycling, waste management: multiple solutions. In an inset, Dr Dorothy R. Davidson, nuclear fuel specialist, presents her expert opinion on the future of the fuel cycle in the United States

  3. Consolidated fuel shielding calculations

    Irradiated fuel radiation dose rate and radiation shielding requirements are calculated using a validated ISOSHLD-II model. Comparisons are made to experimental measurements. ISOSHLD-11 calculations are documented

  4. Fuel cycle studies

    Programs are being conducted in the following areas: advanced solvent extraction techniques, accident consequences, fuel cycles for nonproliferation, pyrochemical and dry processes, waste encapsulation, radionuclide transport in geologic media, hull treatment, and analytical support for LWBR

  5. North Korea's corroding fuel

    The roughly 8,000 irradiated or open-quotes spentclose quotes fuel rods recently discharged from the North Korean 25 megawatt (thermal) reactor are difficult to store safely under the conditions in the spent fuel ponds near the reactor. The magnesium alloy jacket, or open-quotes cladding,close quotes around the fuel elements is corroding. If the corrosion creates holes in the cladding, radionuclides may be released. In addition, the uranium metal underneath the cladding may begin to corrode, possibly creating uranium hydride which can spontaneously ignite in air. Unless the storage conditions are improved, North Korea may use the risk posed by the corrosion as an argument for reprocessing this fuel, a violation of its June 1994 pledge to the United States to freeze its nuclear program. North Korea, however, can take several steps to slow dramatically the rate of corrosion. Using available techniques, it can extend safe storage times by months or even years

  6. Nuclear reactor fuel element

    The fuel element for a BWR known from the patent application DE 2824265 is developed so that the screw only breaks on the expansion shank with reduced diameter if the expansion forces are too great. (HP)

  7. Spent fuel reprocessing options

    The objective of this publication is to provide an update on the latest developments in nuclear reprocessing technologies in the light of new developments on the global nuclear scene. The background information on spent fuel reprocessing is provided in Section One. Substantial global growth of nuclear electricity generation is expected to occur during this century, in response to environmental issues and to assure the sustainability of the electrical energy supply in both industrial and less-developed countries. This growth carries with it an increasing responsibility to ensure that nuclear fuel cycle technologies are used only for peaceful purposes. In Section Two, an overview of the options for spent fuel reprocessing and their level of development are provided. A number of options exist for the treatment of spent fuel. Some, including those that avoid separation of a pure plutonium stream, are at an advanced level of technological maturity. These could be deployed in the next generation of industrial-scale reprocessing plants, while others (such as dry methods) are at a pilot scale, laboratory scale or conceptual stage of development. In Section Three, research and development in support of advanced reprocessing options is described. Next-generation spent fuel reprocessing plants are likely to be based on aqueous extraction processes that can be designed to a country specific set of spent fuel partitioning criteria for recycling of fissile materials to advanced light water reactors or fast spectrum reactors. The physical design of these plants must incorporate effective means for materials accountancy, safeguards and physical protection. Section four deals with issues and challenges related to spent fuel reprocessing. The spent fuel reprocessing options assessment of economics, proliferation resistance, and environmental impact are discussed. The importance of public acceptance for a reprocessing strategy is discussed. A review of modelling tools to support the

  8. Fuel Prices and New Vehicle Fuel Economy in Europe

    Klier, Thomas; Linn, joshua

    2011-01-01

    This paper evaluates the effect of fuel prices on new vehicle fuel economy in the eight largest European markets. The analysis spans the years 2002–2007 and uses detailed vehicle registration and specification data to control for policies, consumer preferences, and other potentially confounding factors. Fuel prices have a statistically significant effect on new vehicle fuel economy in Europe, but this estimated effect is much smaller than that for the United States. Within Europe, fuel econom...

  9. Organic fuel cells and fuel cell conducting sheets

    Masel, Richard I.; Ha, Su; Adams, Brian

    2007-10-16

    A passive direct organic fuel cell includes an organic fuel solution and is operative to produce at least 15 mW/cm.sup.2 when operating at room temperature. In additional aspects of the invention, fuel cells can include a gas remover configured to promote circulation of an organic fuel solution when gas passes through the solution, a modified carbon cloth, one or more sealants, and a replaceable fuel cartridge.

  10. Fast breeder fuel cycle

    Basic elements of the ex-reactor part of the fuel cycle (reprocessing, fabrication, waste handling and transportation) are described. Possible technical and proliferation measures are evaluated, including current methods of accountability, surveillance and protection. The reference oxide based cycle and advanced cycles based on carbide and metallic fuels are considered utilizing conventional processes; advanced nonaqueous reprocessing is also considered. This contribution provides a comprehensive data base for evaluation of proliferation risks

  11. Fuel for thought

    The outstanding performance of CANDU fuel is attributed to a well-rounded development program that combined sound science with excellent engineering. Economic analysis and technology transfer were integrated into the program to ensure successful commercialization. The CANDU fuel program provides useful lessons that are being ignored by policy-makers in their desire to exploit our world-class resources in science and technology to benefit the Canadian economy

  12. Fuel gas conditioning process

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2000-01-01

    A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

  13. Spent fuel storage rack

    Constitution: A square cylinder for containing spent fuels is made of hafnium plates. Welding for the hafnium plates are conducted under vacuum or in inert gases by using electron beams or laser beams. By using hafnium as described above, neutron absorption is improved and square cylinders incorporating the spent fuels can be accumulated at a high density. Furthermore, by welding the hafnium plates under vacuum, embrittlement of the welded portions can be prevented. (Ikeda, J.)

  14. Fuel supply security

    Stable fuel supply is a prerequisite for any nuclear power program including ISER-PIUS. It encompasses procurement of uranium ore, enriched uranium and fuel elements. Uranium is different from oil in that it can be stockpiled for more than a decade besides the fact that the core residence time is as long as six years, for example in the case of ISER-PIUS. These basic fuel characteristics are favoring nuclear fuel over others in terms of supply security. The central concern will be a gradual increase in prices of uranium and enrichment. Under the present glut situation with the worldwide prevalence of LWRs, fuel supply security seems ensured for the time being till the middle of 21st century. It is estimated that by the turn of the century, the free world will have roughly 450 GWe capacity of nuclear power. If 10 % is supplied for ISER-PIUS, more than 200 modules of 200 MWe ISER-PIUS may be deployed all over the world probably starting around 2000. As part of the fuel supply security consideration, heavy water reactor (HWR) may seem interesting to such a country as Indonesia where there is uranium resources but no enrichment capability. But it needs heavy water instead and the operation is not so easy as of LWR, because of the positive void coefficient as was seen at the Chernobyl-4. Safeguarding of the fuel is also difficult, because it lends itself to on line refueling. The current and future situation of the fuel supply security for LWR seem well founded and established long into the future. (Nogami, K.)

  15. Advanced Fuels Campaign 2012 Accomplishments

    Not Listed

    2012-11-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is responsible for developing fuels technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the DOE Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. The fiscal year 2012 (FY 2012) accomplishments are highlighted below. Kemal Pasamehmetoglu is the National Technical Director for AFC.

  16. Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook

    NETL

    2004-11-01

    Provides an overview of fuel cell technology and research projects. Discusses the basic workings of fuel cells and their system components, main fuel cell types, their characteristics, and their development status, as well as a discussion of potential fuel cell applications.

  17. Fuel cell; Nenryo denchi

    Nakayama, T. [New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-07-20

    More than 100 sets of phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC) have been installed by now, and accumulated operation performance exceeding 40 thousand hours, which is regarded as a development target, has been achieved. Further, there are also PAFCs that have achieved continuous operation performance exceeding 9,000 hours, thus being most approachable to practical use. On the other hand, developments of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and the molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC), which operate at high temperatures, have high power generation efficiencies due to the capability of operating associatively with gas turbines or vapor turbines, and may use coal gasified gases as fuels, are carried out for an aim of realizing the practical use at the begging of the 21st century. Further, in recent years, researches and developments of the polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) have been accelerated mainly in vehicle business for the purpose of using PEFC as power sources for movable bodies, and researches and development for accelerative development of cell stacks and power generation systems are executed. In this paper, situations of the researches and developments in respect to the above-mentioned four kinds of fuel cells are summarily introduced. (NEDO)

  18. Motor Fuel Excise Taxes

    2015-09-01

    A new report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) explores the role of alternative fuels and energy efficient vehicles in motor fuel taxes. Throughout the United States, it is common practice for federal, state, and local governments to tax motor fuels on a per gallon basis to fund construction and maintenance of our transportation infrastructure. In recent years, however, expenses have outpaced revenues creating substantial funding shortfalls that have required supplemental funding sources. While rising infrastructure costs and the decreasing purchasing power of the gas tax are significant factors contributing to the shortfall, the increased use of alternative fuels and more stringent fuel economy standards are also exacerbating revenue shortfalls. The current dynamic places vehicle efficiency and petroleum use reduction polices at direct odds with policies promoting robust transportation infrastructure. Understanding the energy, transportation, and environmental tradeoffs of motor fuel tax policies can be complicated, but recent experiences at the state level are helping policymakers align their energy and environmental priorities with highway funding requirements.

  19. Fuel rod plugs

    Purpose: To prevent the formation of voids to the inside of welded portion in fuel rod plugs. Constitution: A fuel rod is tightly sealed by welding end plugs at both ends of a fuel can charged with nuclear fuel material. For the welding of the end plug, laser welding has now been employed with the reason of increasing the welding efficiency and reducing the welding heat distortion. However, if the end plug is laser-welded to the end of the fuel can in the conventional form, there is a problem that voids are liable to be formed near the deepest penetration in the welding portion. That is, gases evolved near the deepest penetration remains in a key-hole like welded metal portion to result in voids there. Accordingly, grooves capable of passing the laser beam key hole therethrough are disposed along the circumferential direction of the pipe at the end plug welded portion in the fuel can. In this way, since gases generating near the deepest penetration are discharged into the grooves, the key hole-like welded metal is completely filled and voids are not formed. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. Alternative Fuels: Research Progress

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chapter 1: Pollutant Emissions and Combustion Characteristics of Biofuels and Biofuel/Diesel Blends in Laminar and Turbulent Gas Jet Flames. R. N. Parthasarathy, S. R. Gollahalli Chapter 2: Sustainable Routes for The Production of Oxygenated High-Energy Density Biofuels from Lignocellulosic Biomass. Juan A. Melero, Jose Iglesias, Gabriel Morales, Marta Paniagua Chapter 3: Optical Investigations of Alternative-Fuel Combustion in an HSDI Diesel Engine. T. Huelser, M. Jakob, G. Gruenefeld, P. Adomeit, S. Pischinger Chapter 4: An Insight into Biodiesel Physico-Chemical Properties and Exhaust Emissions Based on Statistical Elaboration of Experimental Data. Evangelos G. Giakoumis Chapter 5: Biodiesel: A Promising Alternative Energy Resource. A.E. Atabani Chapter 6: Alternative Fuels for Internal Combustion Engines: An Overview of the Current Research. Ahmed A. Taha, Tarek M. Abdel-Salam, Madhu Vellakal Chapter 7: Investigating the Hydrogen-Natural Gas Blends as a Fuel in Internal Combustion Engine. ?lker YILMAZ Chapter 8: Conversion of Bus Diesel Engine into LPG Gaseous Engine; Method and Experiments Validation. M. A. Jemni , G. Kantchev , Z. Driss , R. Saaidia , M. S. Abid Chapter 9: Predicting the Combustion Performance of Different Vegetable Oils-Derived Biodiesel Fuels. Qing Shu, ChangLin Yu Chapter 10: Production of Gasoline, Naphtha, Kerosene, Diesel, and Fuel Oil Range Fuels from Polypropylene and Polystyrene Waste Plastics Mixture by Two-Stage Catalytic Degradation using ZnO. Moinuddin Sarker, Mohammad Mamunor Rashid

  1. Cermet fuel reactors

    Cowan, C.L.; Palmer, R.S.; Van Hoomissen, J.E.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Barner, J.O.

    1987-09-01

    Cermet fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high performance space power systems. The cermet fuel consists of tungsten-urania hexagonal fuel blocks characterized by high strength at elevated temperatures, a high thermal conductivity and resultant high thermal shock resistance. Key features of the cermet fueled reactor design are (1) the ability to achieve very high coolant exit temperatures, and (2) thermal shock resistance during rapid power changes, and (3) two barriers to fission product release - the cermet matrix and the fuel element cladding. Additionally, thre is a potential for achieving a long operating life because of (1) the neutronic insensitivity of the fast-spectrum core to the buildup of fission products and (2) the utilization of a high strength refractory metal matrix and structural materials. These materials also provide resistance against compression forces that potentially might compact and/or reconfigure the core. In addition, the neutronic properties of the refractory materials assure that the reactor remains substantially subcritical under conditions of water immersion. It is concluded that cermet fueled reactors can be utilized to meet the power requirements for a broad range of advanced space applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Cermet fuel reactors

    Cermet fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high performance space power systems. The cermet fuel consists of tungsten-urania hexagonal fuel blocks characterized by high strength at elevated temperatures, a high thermal conductivity and resultant high thermal shock resistance. Key features of the cermet fueled reactor design are (1) the ability to achieve very high coolant exit temperatures, and (2) thermal shock resistance during rapid power changes, and (3) two barriers to fission product release - the cermet matrix and the fuel element cladding. Additionally, thre is a potential for achieving a long operating life because of (1) the neutronic insensitivity of the fast-spectrum core to the buildup of fission products and (2) the utilization of a high strength refractory metal matrix and structural materials. These materials also provide resistance against compression forces that potentially might compact and/or reconfigure the core. In addition, the neutronic properties of the refractory materials assure that the reactor remains substantially subcritical under conditions of water immersion. It is concluded that cermet fueled reactors can be utilized to meet the power requirements for a broad range of advanced space applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Nalco Fuel Tech

    Michalak, S.

    1995-12-31

    The Nalco Fuel Tech with its seat at Naperville (near Chicago), Illinois, is an engineering company working in the field of technology and equipment for environmental protection. A major portion of NALCO products constitute chemical materials and additives used in environmental protection technologies (waste-water treatment plants, water treatment, fuel modifiers, etc.). Basing in part on the experience, laboratories and RD potential of the mother company, the Nalco Fuel Tech Company developed and implemented in the power industry a series of technologies aimed at the reduction of environment-polluting products of fuel combustion. The engineering solution of Nalco Fuel Tech belong to a new generation of environmental protection techniques developed in the USA. They consist in actions focused on the sources of pollutants, i.e., in upgrading the combustion chambers of power engineering plants, e.g., boilers or communal and/or industrial waste combustion units. The Nalco Fuel Tech development and research group cooperates with leading US investigation and research institutes.

  4. Canadian fuel development program

    CANDU power reactor fuel has demonstrated an enviable operational record. More than 99.9% of the bundles irradiated have provided defect-free service. Defect excursions are responsible for the majority of reported defects. In some cases research and development effort is necessary to resolve these problems. In addition, development initiatives are also directed at improvements of the current design or reduction of fueling cost. The majority of the funding for this effort has been provided by COG (CANDU Owners' Group) over the past 10 to 15 years. This paper contains an overview of some key fuel technology programs within COG. The CANDU reactor is unique among the world's power reactors in its flexibility and its ability to use a number of different fuel cycles. An active program of analysis and development, to demonstrate the viability of different fuel cycles in CANDU, has been funded by AECL in parallel with the work on the natural uranium cycle. Market forces and advances in technology have obliged us to reassess and refocus some parts of our effort in this area, and significant success has been achieved in integrating all the Canadian efforts in this area. This paper contains a brief summary of some key components of the advanced fuel cycle program. (Author) 4 figs., tab., 18 refs

  5. Overview of fuel conversion

    The conversion of solid fuels to cleaner-burning and more user-friendly solid liquid or gaseous fuels spans many technologies. In this paper, the authors consider coal, residual oil, oil shale, tar sends tires, municipal oil waste and biomass as feedstocks and examine the processes which can be used in the production of synthetic fuels for the transportation sector. The products of mechanical processing to potentially usable fuels include coal slurries, micronized coal, solvent refined coal, vegetable oil and powdered biomall. The thermochemical and biochemical processes considered include high temperature carbide production, liquefaction, gasification, pyrolysis, hydrolysis-fermentation and anaerobic digestion. The products include syngas, synthetic natural gas, methanol, ethanol and other hydrocarbon oxygenates synthetic gasoline and diesel and jet engine oils. The authors discuss technical and economic aspects of synthetic fuel production giving particular attention and literature references to technologies not discussed in the five chapters which follow. Finally the authors discuss economic energy, and environmental aspects of synthetic fuels and their relationship to the price of imported oil

  6. Fuel system design concepts for broad property fuels

    Versaw, E. F.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a study assessing the impact of using jet fuel with relaxed specification properties on an aircraft fuel system are given. The study objectives were to identify credible values for specific fuel properties which might be relaxed, to evolve advanced fuel system designs for airframe and engines which would permit use of the specified relaxed properties fuels, and to evaluate performance of the candidate advanced fuel systems and the relaxed property fuels in a typical transport aircraft. The study used, as a baseline, the fuel system incorporated in the Lockheed Tristar. This aircraft is powered by three RB.211-524 Rolls-Royce engines and incorporates a Pratt and Whitney ST6C-421 auxiliary power unit for engine starting and inflight emergency electrical power. The fuel property limits examined are compared with commercial Jet A kerosene and the NASA RFP fuel properties. A screening of these properties established that a higher freezing point and a lower thermal stability would impact fuel system design more significantly than any of the other property changes. Three candidate fuel systems which combine the ability to operate with fuels having both a high freeze point and a low thermal stability are described. All candidates employ bleed air to melt fuel freeze-out prior to starting the APU or an inoperable engine. The effects of incorporating these systems on aircraft weight and engine specific fuel consumption are given.

  7. Fuel rod behaviour at high burnup WWER fuel cycles

    The modernisation of WWER fuel cycles is carried out on the base of complete modelling and experimental justification of fuel rods up to 70 MWd/kgU. The modelling justification of the reliability of fuel rod and fuel rod with gadolinium is carried out with the use of certified START-3 code. START-3 code has a continuous experimental support. The thermophysical and strength reliability of WWER-440 fuel is justified for fuel rod and pellet burnups 65 MWd/kgU and 74 MWd/U, accordingly. Results of analysis are demonstrated by the example of uranium-gadolinium fuel assemblies of second generation under 5-year cycle with a portion of 6-year assemblies and by the example of successfully completed pilot operation of 5-year cycle fuel assemblies during 6 years at unit 3 of Kolskaja NPP. The thermophysical and strength reliability of WWER-1000 fuel is justified for a fuel rod burnup 66 MWd/kgU by the example of fuel operation under 4-year cycles and 6-year test operation of fuel assemblies at unit 1 of Kalininskaya NPP. By the example of 5-year cycle at Dukovany NPP Unit 2 it was demonstrated that WWER fuel rod of a burnup 58 MWd/kgU ensure reliable operation under load following conditions. The analysis has confirmed sufficient reserves of Russian fuel to implement program of JSC 'TVEL' in order to improve technical and economical parameters of WWER fuel cycles

  8. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC

    Amornpitoksuk, P.

    2003-01-01

    Direct Methanol Fuel Cell, DMFC is a kind of fuel cell using methanol as a fuel for electric producing. Methanol is low cost chemical substance and it is less harmful than that of hydrogen fuel. From these reasons it can be commercial product. The electrocatalytic reaction of methanol fuel uses Pt-Ru metals as the most efficient catalyst. In addition, the property of membrane and system designation are also effect to the fuel cell efficient. Because of low power of methanol fuel cell therefor...

  9. WWER-1000 fuel cycle improvement

    The problems of organization of fuel cycles with different operation time of stationary load for the reactor WWER-1000 are considered. The outcomes of matching of the characteristics for stationary load constructed on fuel cells of existing and improved designs are presented. Improved designs of a fuel cell are include increase of an altitude of a fuel stake, change of outside and axial diameters of a fuel pellet, change thickness of a cladding of a fuel cell. Effect of the layout solutions on improving of a fuel cycle WWER-1000 also considered (Authors)

  10. EPRI fuel cladding integrity program

    Yang, R. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the EPRI fuel program is to supplement the fuel vendor research to assure that utility economic and operational interests are met. To accomplish such objectives, EPRI has conducted research and development efforts to (1) reduce fuel failure rates and mitigate the impact of fuel failures on plant operation, (2) provide technology to extend burnup and reduce fuel cycle cost. The scope of R&D includes fuel and cladding. In this paper, only R&D related to cladding integrity will be covered. Specific areas aimed at improving fuel cladding integrity include: (1) Fuel Reliability Data Base; (2) Operational Guidance for Defective Fuel; (3) Impact of Water Chemistry on Cladding Integrity; (4) Cladding Corrosion Data and Model; (5) Cladding Mechanical Properties; and (6) Transient Fuel Cladding Response.

  11. Automotive Fuel Processor Development and Demonstration with Fuel Cell Systems

    Nuvera Fuel Cells

    2005-04-15

    The potential for fuel cell systems to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions over conventional power systems has generated significant interest in fuel cell technologies. While fuel cells are being investigated for use in many applications such as stationary power generation and small portable devices, transportation applications present some unique challenges for fuel cell technology. Due to their lower operating temperature and non-brittle materials, most transportation work is focusing on fuel cells using proton exchange membrane (PEM) technology. Since PEM fuel cells are fueled by hydrogen, major obstacles to their widespread use are the lack of an available hydrogen fueling infrastructure and hydrogen's relatively low energy storage density, which leads to a much lower driving range than conventional vehicles. One potential solution to the hydrogen infrastructure and storage density issues is to convert a conventional fuel such as gasoline into hydrogen onboard the vehicle using a fuel processor. Figure 2 shows that gasoline stores roughly 7 times more energy per volume than pressurized hydrogen gas at 700 bar and 4 times more than liquid hydrogen. If integrated properly, the fuel processor/fuel cell system would also be more efficient than traditional engines and would give a fuel economy benefit while hydrogen storage and distribution issues are being investigated. Widespread implementation of fuel processor/fuel cell systems requires improvements in several aspects of the technology, including size, startup time, transient response time, and cost. In addition, the ability to operate on a number of hydrocarbon fuels that are available through the existing infrastructure is a key enabler for commercializing these systems. In this program, Nuvera Fuel Cells collaborated with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop efficient, low-emission, multi-fuel processors for transportation applications. Nuvera's focus was on (1) developing fuel

  12. Spent-fuel-storage alternatives

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed

  13. Outlook for alternative transportation fuels

    Gushee, D.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This presentation provides a brief review of regulatory issues and Federal programs regarding alternative fuel use in automobiles. A number of U.S. DOE initiatives and studies aimed at increasing alternative fuels are outlined, and tax incentives in effect at the state and Federal levels are discussed. Data on alternative fuel consumption and alternative fuel vehicle use are also presented. Despite mandates, tax incentives, and programs, it is concluded alternative fuels will have minimal market penetration. 7 refs., 5 tabs.

  14. Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels

    Song, Chunshan; Ma, Xiaoliang; Sprague, Michael J.; Subramani, Velu

    2012-04-17

    The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

  15. Fuel Cell Testing - Degradation of Fuel Cells and its Impact on Fuel Cell Applications

    Pfrang, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Fuel cells are expected to play a major role in the future energy supply, especially polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells could become an integral part in future cars. Reduction of degradation of fuel cell performance while keeping fuel cell cost under control is the key for an introduction into mass markets.

  16. Fuel performance in water storage

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company operates the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Department of Energy (DOE). A variety of different types of fuels have been stored there since the 1950's prior to reprocessing for uranium recovery. In April of 1992, the DOE decided to end fuel reprocessing, changing the mission at ICPP. Fuel integrity in storage is now viewed as long term until final disposition is defined and implemented. Thus, the condition of fuel and storage equipment is being closely monitored and evaluated to ensure continued safe storage. There are four main areas of fuel storage at ICPP: an original underwater storage facility (CPP-603), a modern underwater storage facility (CPP-666), and two dry fuel storage facilities. The fuels in storage are from the US Navy, DOE (and its predecessors the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Atomic Energy Commission), and other research programs. Fuel matrices include uranium oxide, hydride, carbide, metal, and alloy fuels. In the underwater storage basins, fuels are clad with stainless steel, zirconium, and aluminum. Also included in the basin inventory is canned scrap material. The dry fuel storage contains primarily graphite and aluminum type fuels. A total of 55 different fuel types are currently stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The corrosion resistance of the barrier material is of primary concern in evaluating the integrity of the fuel in long term water storage. The barrier material is either the fuel cladding (if not canned) or the can material

  17. Advanced fuels for fast reactors

    Full text: In addition to traditional fast reactor fuels that contain Uranium and Plutonium, the advanced fast reactor fuels are likely to include the minor actinides [Neptunium (Np), Americium (Am) and Curium (Cm)]. Such fuels are also referred to as transmutation fuels. The goal of transmutation fuel development programs is to develop and qualify a nuclear fuel system that performs all of the functions of a traditional fast spectrum nuclear fuel while destroying recycled actinides. Oxide, metal, nitride, and carbide fuels are candidates under consideration for this application, based on historical knowledge of fast reactor fuel development and specific fuel tests currently being conducted in international transmutation fuel development programs. Early fast reactor developers originally favored metal alloy fuel due to its high density and potential for breeder operation. The focus of pressurized water reactor development on oxide fuel and the subsequent adoption by the commercial nuclear power industry, however, along with early issues with low burnup potential of metal fuel (now resolved), led later fast reactor development programs to favor oxide fuels. Carbide and nitride fuels have also been investigated but are at a much lower state of development than metal and oxide fuels, with limited large scale reactor irradiation experience. Experience with both metal and oxide fuels has established that either fuel type will meet performance and reliability goals for a plutonium fueled fast spectrum test reactor, both demonstrating burnup capability of up to 20 at.% under normal operating conditions, when clad with modified austenitic or ferritic martensitic stainless steel alloys. Both metal and oxide fuels have been shown to exhibit sufficient margin to failure under transient conditions for successful reactor operation. Summary of selected fuel material properties taken are provided in the paper. The main challenge for the development of transmutation fast reactor

  18. Fuel thermal behaviour

    The interest in the thermal behaviour of the fuel mainly comes from the safety criterion which prohibit any fuel melting in the pins. Due to the gap lying between fuel and cladding, the highest temperatures are most probably occurring at Beginning Of Life (BOL) before completion of the central hole formation and before any substantial gap closure has taken place. However it cannot be ruled out that after some burn up the thermal transfer between fuel and cladding becomes worse than it was at BOL Then if the power does not decrease the maximum temperature might become higher than at (BOL). In order to get an overall experimental validation of our thermal calculations we need to cover the entire range of the pin life. Actually the method cannot be the same for BOL and end of life (EOL). For BOL it is possible to get a direct thermal measure through thermocouples, but this method is no longer practical after some days due to the failure of the thermocouples under neutrons flux at the temperatures of interest. This failure may happen before or after complete gap closure is reached and the rate of gap closure is especially meaningful for the BOL thermal behaviour. Another aspect of the thermal behaviour is the statistical one which may be obtained by the post-irradiation examination of the fuel microstructure, although it is not a proper way to get the absolute temperatures in the fuel, it is one of the most direct ones to have an insight in fuel thermal dispersion at BOL and over-heating at EOL

  19. Hydrogen-enriched fuels

    Roser, R. [NRG Technologies, Inc., Reno, NV (United States)

    1998-08-01

    NRG Technologies, Inc. is attempting to develop hardware and infrastructure that will allow mixtures of hydrogen and conventional fuels to become viable alternatives to conventional fuels alone. This commercialization can be successful if the authors are able to achieve exhaust emission levels of less than 0.03 g/kw-hr NOx and CO; and 0.15 g/kw-hr NMHC at full engine power without the use of exhaust catalysts. The major barriers to achieving these goals are that the lean burn regimes required to meet exhaust emissions goals reduce engine output substantially and tend to exhibit higher-than-normal total hydrocarbon emissions. Also, hydrogen addition to conventional fuels increases fuel cost, and reduces both vehicle range and engine output power. Maintaining low emissions during transient driving cycles has not been demonstrated. A three year test plan has been developed to perform the investigations into the issues described above. During this initial year of funding research has progressed in the following areas: (a) a cost effective single-cylinder research platform was constructed; (b) exhaust gas speciation was performed to characterize the nature of hydrocarbon emissions from hydrogen-enriched natural gas fuels; (c) three H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} fuel compositions were analyzed using spark timing and equivalence ratio sweeping procedures and finally; (d) a full size pick-up truck platform was converted to run on HCNG fuels. The testing performed in year one of the three year plan represents a baseline from which to assess options for overcoming the stated barriers to success.

  20. Biodegradation of biodiesel fuels

    Biodiesel fuel test substances Rape Ethyl Ester (REE), Rape Methyl Ester (RME), Neat Rape Oil (NR), Say Methyl Ester (SME), Soy Ethyl Ester (SEE), Neat Soy Oil (NS), and proportionate combinations of RME/diesel and REE/diesel were studied to test the biodegradability of the test substances in an aerobic aquatic environment using the EPA 560/6-82-003 Shake Flask Test Method. A concurrent analysis of Phillips D-2 Reference Diesel was also performed for comparison with a conventional fuel. The highest rates of percent CO2 evolution were seen in the esterified fuels, although no significant difference was noted between them. Ranges of percent CO2 evolution for esterified fuels were from 77% to 91%. The neat rape and neat soy oils exhibited 70% to 78% CO2 evolution. These rates were all significantly higher than those of the Phillips D-2 reference fuel which evolved from 7% to 26% of the organic carbon to CO2. The test substances were examined for BOD5 and COD values as a relative measure of biodegradability. Water Accommodated Fraction (WAF) was experimentally derived and BOD5 and COD analyses were carried out with a diluted concentration at or below the WAF. The results of analysis at WAF were then converted to pure substance values. The pure substance BOD5 and COD values for test substances were then compared to a control substance, Phillips D-2 Reference fuel. No significant difference was noted for COD values between test substances and the control fuel. (p > 0.20). The D-2 control substance was significantly lower than all test substances for BCD, values at p 5 value

  1. NASA Alternative Aviation Fuel Research

    Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Moore, R.; Shook, M.; Winstead, E.; Ziemba, L. D.; Crumeyrolle, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present an overview of research conducted by NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate to evaluate the performance and emissions of "drop-in" alternative jet fuels, highlighting experiment design and results from the Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiments (AAFEX-I & -II) and Alternative Fuel-Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions flight series (ACCESS-I & II). These projects included almost 100 hours of sampling exhaust emissions from the NASA DC-8 aircraft in both ground and airborne operation and at idle to takeoff thrust settings. Tested fuels included Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthetic kerosenes manufactured from coal and natural-gas feedstocks; Hydro-treated Esters and Fatty-Acids (HEFA) fuels made from beef-tallow and camelina-plant oil; and 50:50 blends of these alternative fuels with Jet A. Experiments were also conducted with FT and Jet A fuels doped with tetrahydrothiophene to examine the effects of fuel sulfur on volatile aerosol and contrail formation and microphysical properties. Results indicate that although the absence of aromatic compounds in the alternative fuels caused DC-8 fuel-system leaks, the fuels did not compromise engine performance or combustion efficiency. And whereas the alternative fuels produced only slightly different gas-phase emissions, dramatic reductions in non-volatile particulate matter (nvPM) emissions were observed when burning the pure alternative fuels, particularly at low thrust settings where particle number and mass emissions were an order of magnitude lower than measured from standard jet fuel combustion; 50:50 blends of Jet A and alternative fuels typically reduced nvPM emissions by ~50% across all thrust settings. Alternative fuels with the highest hydrogen content produced the greatest nvPM reductions. For Jet A and fuel blends, nvPM emissions were positively correlated with fuel aromatic and naphthalene content. Fuel sulfur content regulated nucleation mode aerosol number and mass concentrations within aging

  2. Reformer Fuel Injector

    Suder, Jennifer L.

    2004-01-01

    Today's form of jet engine power comes from what is called a gas turbine engine. This engine is on average 14% efficient and emits great quantities of green house gas carbon dioxide and air pollutants, Le. nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides. The alternate method being researched involves a reformer and a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Reformers are becoming a popular area of research within the industry scale. NASA Glenn Research Center's approach is based on modifying the large aspects of industry reforming processes into a smaller jet fuel reformer. This process must not only be scaled down in size, but also decrease in weight and increase in efficiency. In comparison to today's method, the Jet A fuel reformer will be more efficient as well as reduce the amount of air pollutants discharged. The intent is to develop a 10kW process that can be used to satisfy the needs of commercial jet engines. Presently, commercial jets use Jet-A fuel, which is a kerosene based hydrocarbon fuel. Hydrocarbon fuels cannot be directly fed into a SOFC for the reason that the high temperature causes it to decompose into solid carbon and Hz. A reforming process converts fuel into hydrogen and supplies it to a fuel cell for power, as well as eliminating sulfur compounds. The SOFC produces electricity by converting H2 and CO2. The reformer contains a catalyst which is used to speed up the reaction rate and overall conversion. An outside company will perform a catalyst screening with our baseline Jet-A fuel to determine the most durable catalyst for this application. Our project team is focusing on the overall research of the reforming process. Eventually we will do a component evaluation on the different reformer designs and catalysts. The current status of the project is the completion of buildup in the test rig and check outs on all equipment and electronic signals to our data system. The objective is to test various reformer designs and catalysts in our test rig to determine the most

  3. Development of PEM fuel cell technology at international fuel cells

    Wheeler, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    The PEM technology has not developed to the level of phosphoric acid fuel cells. Several factors have held the technology development back such as high membrane cost, sensitivity of PEM fuel cells to low level of carbon monoxide impurities, the requirement to maintain full humidification of the cell, and the need to pressurize the fuel cell in order to achieve the performance targets. International Fuel Cells has identified a hydrogen fueled PEM fuel cell concept that leverages recent research advances to overcome major economic and technical obstacles.

  4. Bio-fuels

    This report presents an overview of the technologies which are currently used or presently developed for the production of bio-fuels in Europe and more particularly in France. After a brief history of this production since the beginning of the 20. century, the authors describe the support to agriculture and the influence of the Common Agricultural Policy, outline the influence of the present context of struggle against the greenhouse effect, and present the European legislative context. Data on the bio-fuels consumption in the European Union in 2006 are discussed. An overview of the evolution of the activity related to bio-fuels in France, indicating the locations of ethanol and bio-diesel production facilities, and the evolution of bio-fuel consumption, is given. The German situation is briefly presented. Production of ethanol by fermentation, the manufacturing of ETBE, the bio-diesel production from vegetable oils are discussed. Second generation bio-fuels are then presented (cellulose enzymatic processing), together with studies on thermochemical processes and available biomass resources

  5. Liquid fuel from biomass

    Various options for Danish production of liquid motor fuels from biomass have been studied in the context of the impact of EEC new common agricultural policy on prices and production quantities of crops, processes and production economy, restraints concerning present and future markets in Denmark, environmental aspects, in particular substitution of fossil fuels in the overall production and end-use, revenue loss required to assure competition with fossil fuels and national competence in business, industry and research. The options studied are rapeseed oil and derivates, ethanol, methanol and other thermo-chemical conversion products. The study shows that the combination of fuel production and co-generation of heat and electricity carried out with energy efficiency and utilization of surplus electricity is important for the economics under Danish conditions. Considering all aspects, ethanol production seems most favorable but in the long term, pyrolyses with catalytic cracking could be an interesting option. The cheapest source of biomass in Denmark is straw, where a considerable amount of the surplus could be used. Whole crop harvested wheat on land otherwise set aside to be fallow could also be an important source for ethanol production. Most of the options contribute favorably to reductions of fossil fuel consumption, but variations are large and the substitution factor is to a great extent dependent on the individual case. (AB) (32 refs.)

  6. Vegetation Fuel Mapping

    A. V. Volokitina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available All vegetation sites as objects of burning are structural complexes of various fuels. Especially complex are forest biogeoceonoses. For practical use, pyrological characteristics of vegetation are reflected on plans and maps showing both general one-sided estimations with site descriptions (for example, their fire hazard and detailed multi-sided characteristics of all compounds in the vegetation fuel complexes. The latter become basic maps for obtaining various pyrological estimations and are called vegetation fuel maps. Vegetation fuel (VF mapping can be made using two methodological approaches: first, by distinguishing pyrological vegetation categories as standard complexes; second, by individually characterizing each vegetation site in terms of VF. Obviously, the standard VF characteristic of sites can be only approximate and rough, since the possible number of studied site categories is limited. For large-scale mapping, the detailed individual characteristic of vegetation sites in terms of VF is more preferable and precise but more expensive. Therefore, historically, the first approach to VF mapping got its development, i. e. distinguishing and mapping of certain vegetation categories with standard characteristics. Foreign and Russian methodical approaches to vegetation fuel (VF classification and mapping are considered. Examples of VF mapping at different scales and guidelines for their use are given.

  7. VVER-1000 at KNPP - nuclear fuel cycle

    Information about the realized fuel cycles in the Kozloduy NPP units 5 and 6 is presented - fuel assemblies, fuel maps, transition from 2 years fuel cycle to 3 years fuel cycle, main characteristics of the fueling, combustion depth. Some possibilities for improvements of the campaigns and usage of fuels are discussed

  8. Fuel Pumping System And Method

    Shafer, Scott F.; Wang, Lifeng

    2005-12-13

    A fuel pumping system that includes a pump drive is provided. A first pumping element is operatively connected to the pump drive and is operable to generate a first flow of pressurized fuel. A second pumping element is operatively connected to the pump drive and is operable to generate a second flow of pressurized fuel. A first solenoid is operatively connected to the first pumping element and is operable to vary at least one of a fuel pressure and a fuel flow rate of the first flow of pressurized fuel. A second solenoid is operatively connected to the second pumping element and is operable to vary at least one of a fuel pressure and a fuel flow rate of the second flow of pressurized fuel.

  9. Dry Process Fuel Performance Evaluation

    Yang, Myung Seung; Song, K. C.; Moon, J. S. and others

    2005-04-15

    The objective of the project is to establish the performance evaluation system of DUPIC fuel during the Phase II R and D. In order to fulfil this objectives, irradiation test of DUPIC fuel was carried out in HANARO using the non-instrumented and SPND-instrumented rig. Also, the analysis on the in-reactor behavior analysis of DUPIC fuel, out-pile test using simulated DUPIC fuel as well as performance and integrity assessment in a commercial reactor were performed during this Phase. The R and D results of the Phase II are summarized as follows : - Performance evaluation of DUPIC fuel via irradiation test in HANARO - Post irradiation examination of irradiated fuel and performance analysis - Development of DUPIC fuel performance code (modified ELESTRES) considering material properties of DUPIC fuel - Irradiation behavior and integrity assessment under the design power envelope of DUPIC fuel - Foundamental technology development of thermal/mechanical performance evaluation using ANSYS (FEM package)

  10. Advanced Fuel Bundles for PHWRS

    The fuel used by NPCIL presently is natural uranium dioxide in the form of 19- element fuel bundles for 220 MWe PHWRs and 37-element fuel bundles for the TAPP-3&4 540 MWe units. The new 700 MWe PHWRs also use 37-element fuel bundles. These bundles are of short 0.5 m length of circular geometry. The cladding is of collapsible type made of Zircaloy-4 material. PHWRs containing a string of short length fuel bundles and the on-power refueling permit flexibility in using different advanced fuel designs and in core fuel management schemes. Using this flexibility, alternative fuel concepts are tried in Indian PHWRs. The advances in PHWR fuel designs are governed by the desire to use resources other than uranium, improve fuel economics by increasing fuel burnup and reduce overall spent nuclear fuel waste and improve reactor safety. The rising uranium prices are leading to a relook into the Thorium based fuel designs and reprocessed Uranium based and Plutonium based MOX designs and are expected to play a major role in future. The requirement of synergism between different type of reactors also plays a role. Increase in fuel burnup beyond 15 000 MW∙d/TeU in PHWRs, using higher fissile content materials like slightly enriched uranium, Mixed Oxide and Thorium Oxide in place of natural uranium in fuel elements, was studied many PHWR operating countries. The work includes reactor physics studies and test irradiation in research reactors and power reactors. Due to higher fissile content these bundles will be capable of delivering higher burnup than the natural uranium bundles. In India the fuel cycle flexibility of PHWRs is demonstrated by converting this type of technical flexibility to the real economy by irradiating these different types of advanced fuel materials namely Thorium, MOX, SEU, etc. The paper gives a review of the different advanced fuel design concepts studied for Indian PHWRs. (author)

  11. Fuel cells in transportation

    Erdmann, G. [Technische Univ., Berlin (Germany); Hoehlein, B. [Research Center Juelich (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    A promising new power source for electric drive systems is the fuel cell technology with hydrogen as energy input. The worldwide fuel cell development concentrates on basic research efforts aiming at improving this new technology and at developing applications that might reach market maturity in the very near future. Due to the progress achieved, the interest is now steadily turning to the development of overall systems such as demonstration plants for different purposes: electricity generation, drive systems for road vehicles, ships and railroads. This paper does not present results concerning the market potential of fuel cells in transportation but rather addresses some questions and reflections that are subject to further research of both engineers and economists. Some joint effort of this research will be conducted under the umbrella of the IEA Implementing Agreement 026 - Annex X, but there is a lot more to be done in this challenging but also promising fields. (EG) 18 refs.

  12. Fuel-coolant interactions

    An important aspect of nuclear fuel behaviour that impacts on the fuel cycle is the interaction of the cladding with the coolant. In particular, the accumulation of deposited crud (corrosion products transported in the reactor coolant) on fuel element surfaces can severely hamper fuel performance by impeding heat transfer and promoting cladding corrosion, both of which may lead to fuel defects and the release of fission products and actinides to the primary coolant systems. Crud deposition is therefore an important consideration in reactor operation; it not only leads to poor performance and radiation field growth by exacerbating fuel defects but also serves as the source of radionuclides such as Co-60 which are major contaminants of out-reactor components. Furthermore, the sequestering of boron from the coolant by fuel deposits in PWRs can give rise to control problems as reactor flux characteristics are modified. As utilities apply the ALARA principle (As Low As Reasonably) to the management of occupational radiation doses and at the same time endeavour to optimise the fuel cycle, it becomes clear that an understanding of the mechanisms involved in coolant-cladding interactions is vital. There are several mechanisms of interest here. The source of crud is the fundamental corrosion process accruing on surfaces of the coolant system and the interaction of that process with local regimes of coolant flow. Accordingly, differences in the chemical and physical condition of the coolant across the reactor core and the steam generators are important factors in CANDUs and PWRs determining release of corrosion products from surfaces, while similar processes along the feedtrain influence crud levels in the reactor coolant in BWRs. The nature of suspended crud, which is determined by the materials of construction of the various components of the coolant system and the chemistry control of the coolant itself, determines the interaction with fuel cladding. Thus, crud in CANDUs

  13. Segment fuel rods

    Purpose: To maintain the integrity of segment fuel rods without causing power spikes in adjacent fuel rods. Constitution: Power spikes are generated in the portions in adjacent with end plugs of segment fuel elements shielded welding zircaloy end plugs, because water/uranium ratio is locally increased due to the absence of pellets at the bonding end plugs to increase the neutron moderating effect thereby increasing the thermal neutron fluxes to rise the reactivity. This can be prevented most effectively by absorbing excess neutron absorbers. In view of the above, the purpose can be attained either by incorporating high neutron absorbing material at the bonding end plug, or constituting the bonding end plug itself with neutron absorbing material. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Particle fuel bed tests

    Gas-cooled reactors, using packed beds of small diameter coated fuel particles have been proposed for compact, high-power systems. The particulate fuel used in the tests was 800 microns in diameter, consisting of a thoria kernel coated with 200 microns of pyrocarbon. Typically, the bed of fuel particles was contained in a ceramic cylinder with porous metallic frits at each end. A dc voltage was applied to the metallic frits and the resulting electric current heated the bed. Heat was removed by passing coolant (helium or hydrogen) through the bed. Candidate frit materials, rhenium, nickel, zirconium carbide, and zirconium oxide were unaffected, while tungsten and tungsten-rhenium lost weight and strength. Zirconium-carbide particles were tested at 2000 K in H2 for 12 hours with no visible reaction or weight loss

  15. Strategy of fuel management

    The management of nuclear fuels in PWR type reactors has been adapted to improve the safety and the competitiveness of brackets. The economic optimum, at the park level, depends on many parameters, variable with time and in function of them, we favour the annual campaigns and the economy won on the cost of cycle, or long campaigns with benefit on availability. The reduction of the number of stopping improves the availability, limits the doses integrated by the personnel of intervention and reduces the number of incidents during the stopping. An other determining factor is connected to the policy of closed cycle with the the principle of equality between the reprocessing flux and the valorization of reprocessed fuels: plutonium and reprocessed uranium. The progress of fuel have allowed significant improvements in the managements of cores. With the safety, the aim is also to keep if not improve the competitiveness of the Nuclear park by valorizing the matter coming from reprocessing. (N.C.)

  16. Optimal fuel inventory strategies

    In an effort to maintain their competitive edge, most utilities are reevaluating many of their conventional practices and policies in an effort to further minimize customer revenue requirements without sacrificing system reliability. Over the past several years, Illinois Power has been rethinking its traditional fuel inventory strategies, recognizing that coal supplies are competitive and plentiful and that carrying charges on inventory are expensive. To help the Company achieve one of its strategic corporate goals, an optimal fuel inventory study was performed for its five major coal-fired generating stations. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe Illinois Power's system and past practices concerning coal inventories, highlight the analytical process behind the optimal fuel inventory study, and discuss some of the recent experiences affecting coal deliveries and economic dispatch

  17. HTGR fuel cycle

    In the spring of 1987, the HTGR fuel cycle project has been existing for ten years, and for this reason a status seminar has been held on May 12, 1987 in the Juelich Nuclear Research Center, that gathered the participants in this project for a discussion on the state of the art in HTGR fuel element development, graphite development, and waste management. The papers present an overview of work performed so far and an outlook on future tasks and goals, and on taking stock one can say that the project has been very successful so far: The HTGR fuel element now available meets highest requirements and forms the basis of today's HTGR safety philosophy; research work on graphite behaviour in a high-temperature reactor has led to complete knowledge of the temperature or neutron-induced effects, and with the concept of direct ultimate waste disposal, the waste management problem has found a feasible solution. (orig./GL)

  18. Fuel assemblies chemical cleaning

    NPP Paks found a thermal-hydraulic anomaly in the reactor core during cycle 14 that was caused by corrosion product deposits on fuel assemblies (FAs) that increased the hydraulic resistance of the FAs. Consequently, the coolant flow through the FAs was insufficient resulting in a temperature asymmetry inside the reactor core. Based on this fact NPP Paks performed differential pressure measurements of all fuel assemblies in order to determine the hydraulic resistance and subsequently the limit values for the hydraulic acceptance of FAs to be used. Based on the hydraulic investigations a total number of 170 FAs was selected for cleaning. The necessity for cleaning the FAs was explained by the fact that the FAs were subjected to a short term usage in the reactor core only maximum of 1,5 years and had still a capacity for additional 2 fuel cycles. (authors)

  19. Fuel Element Technical Manual

    Burley, H.H. [ed.

    1956-08-01

    It is the purpose of the Fuel Element Technical Manual to Provide a single document describing the fabrication processes used in the manufacture of the fuel element as well as the technical bases for these processes. The manual will be instrumental in the indoctrination of personnel new to the field and will provide a single data reference for all personnel involved in the design or manufacture of the fuel element. The material contained in this manual was assembled by members of the Engineering Department and the Manufacturing Department at the Hanford Atomic Products Operation between the dates October, 1955 and June, 1956. Arrangement of the manual. The manual is divided into six parts: Part I--introduction; Part II--technical bases; Part III--process; Part IV--plant and equipment; Part V--process control and improvement; and VI--safety.

  20. Spent Fuel in Chile

    The government has made a complete and serious study of many different aspects and possible road maps for nuclear electric power with strong emphasis on safety and energy independence. In the study, the chapter of SFM has not been a relevant issue at this early stage due to the fact that it has been left for later implementation stage. This paper deals with the options Chile might consider in managing its Spent Fuel taking into account foreign experience and factors related to safety, economics, public acceptance and possible novel approaches in spent fuel treatment. The country’s distinctiveness and past experience in this area taking into account that Chile has two research reactors which will have an influence in the design of the Spent Fuel option. (author)

  1. Fuel rod bowing

    The purpose of this investigation was to quantify the extent of fuel rod bowing in Westinghouse pressurized water reactors and to assess the effects of fuel rod bowing on plant safety and reliability. An empirical bow correlation was developed based on data from irradiated assemblies. Analyses conducted with these conservative empirical predictions show that: (1) generically identified DNBR margins are adequate to offset DNBR reductions due to rod bow, (2) the present design practice of increasing the highest calculated core peaking factor is sufficient to account for all deviations, including the effects of rod bow, and (3) fretting and corrosion of bowed rods are negligible. These conclusions indicate that fuel rod bowing results in no impact on plant safety or reliability

  2. Spent fuel pyroprocessing demonstration

    A major element of the shutdown of the US liquid metal reactor development program is managing the sodium-bonded spent metallic fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II to meet US environmental laws. Argonne National Laboratory has refurbished and equipped an existing hot cell facility for treating the spent fuel by a high-temperature electrochemical process commonly called pyroprocessing. Four products will be produced for storage and disposal. Two high-level waste forms will be produced and qualified for disposal of the fission and activation products. Uranium and transuranium alloys will be produced for storage pending a decision by the US Department of Energy on the fate of its plutonium and enriched uranium. Together these activities will demonstrate a unique electrochemical treatment technology for spent nuclear fuel. This technology potentially has significant economic and technical advantages over either conventional reprocessing or direct disposal as a high-level waste option

  3. Taxing carbon in fuels

    It is argued that both the Climate Change Levy and the fuel duty tax are outdated even before they are implemented. Apparently, the real problems are not in the bringing of road fuels into the scope of the Climate Change Levy but in introducing reforms to improve integration of greenhouse gases and taxation. Both fuel duty and the Levy are aimed at maximising efficiency and reducing air pollution. The system as it stands does not take into account the development of a market where the management and trading of carbon and greenhouse gases may jeopardise the competitiveness of UK businesses. It is argued that an overhaul of climate and emissions-related law is necessary. The paper is presented under the sub-headings of (i) a fixation on energy; (ii) no focus on CO2; (iii) carbon markets - beyond the levy and (iv) tax structure. (UK)

  4. Transfer of fuel assemblies

    Fuel assemblies of a nuclear reactor are transferred during fueling or refueling or the like by a crane. The work-engaging fixture of the crane picks up an assembly, removes it from this slot, transfers it to the deposit site and deposits it in its slot at the deposit site. The control for the crane includes a strain gauge connected to the crane line which raises and lowers the load. The strain gauge senses the load on the crane. The signal from the strain gauge is compared with setpoints; a high-level setpoint, a low-level setpoint and a slack-line setpoint. If the strain gauge signal exceeds the high-level setpoint, the line drive is disabled. This event may occur during raising of a fuel assembly which encounters resistance. The high-level setpoint may be overridden under proper precautions. The line drive is also disabled if the strain gauge signal is less than the low-level setpoint. This event occurs when a fuel assembly being deposited contacts the bottom of its slot or an obstruction in, or at the entry to the slot. To preclude lateral movement and possible damage to a fuel assembly suspended from the crane line, the traverse drive of the crane is disabled once the strain-gauge exceets the lov-level setpoint. The traverse drive can only be enabled after the strain-gauge signal is less than the slack-line set-point. This occurs when the lines has been set in slack-line setting. When the line is tensioned after slack-li ne setting, the traverse drive remains enabled only if the line has been disconnected from the fuel assembly

  5. Low enriched fuels for NRU

    Low enriched uranium silicide dispersion fuels are under development for use in Canadian test reactors. These 20% enriched dispersion fuels are to replace the current 93% enriched uranium-aluminum alloy driver fuels. The reduced enrichment is intended to reduce the risk of illegal diversion for weapons proliferation. Developments in uranium silicide dispersion manufacturing technology have proven the production viability of the fuel. Success in the irradiation testing of the dispersion fuels in mini-element form has led to the irradiation of seven full-size fuel assemblies

  6. Device for locating defective fuel

    A method and apparatus for locating defective nuclear fuel elements is disclosed. Fuel elements that are to be tested are enclosed in a test chamber, filled with water. Air is pumped or pulled into the chamber, entering through a gas sparger at the bottom of the chamber and displacing a portion of the water above the fuel element. This reduces the pressure in the vessel, forms an air pocket above the fuel element and purges the water surrounding the fuel element of fission gases released from defective fuel elements. The activity of sample gas drawn from the chamber is continuously monitored to indicate fission gas content

  7. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  8. Fuel buyers guide: company data

    Four major listings relating to nuclear fuel services are provided. 1. A fuel buyer's guide listing companies under alphabetical order of country and giving addresses and an indication of the services offered. 2. A fuel buyers guide classifying companies in alphabetical order of the services offered. 3. A fuel and front end facility listing subdivided into companies involved in: uranium ore processing; uranium refining and conversion; enrichment; fuel fabrication; heavy water production; zirconium metal production; and zirconium tube production. 4. A fuel and front end facilities listing giving operators' addresses under alphabetical order of country. (UK)

  9. Fuels from renewable resources

    Hoffmann, L.; Schnell, C.; Gieseler, G.

    Consideration is given to fuel substitution based on regenerative plants. Methanol can be produced from regenerative plants by gasification followed by the catalytic hydration of carbon oxides. Ethanol can be used as a replacement fuel in gasoline and diesel engines and its high-knock rating allows it to be mixed with lead-free gasoline. Due to the depletion of oil and gas reserves, fermentation alcohol is being considered. The raw materials for the fermentation process can potentially include: (1) sugar (such as yeasts, beet or cane sugar); (2) starch (from potatoes or grain) and (3) cellulose which can be hydrolized into glucose for fermentation.

  10. Fuel cell engineering

    Sundmacher

    2012-01-01

    Fuel cells are attractive electrochemical energy converters featuring potentially very high thermodynamic efficiency factors. The focus of this volume of Advances in Chemical Engineering is on quantitative approaches, particularly based on chemical engineering principles, to analyze, control and optimize the steady state and dynamic behavior of low and high temperature fuel cells (PEMFC, DMFC, SOFC) to be applied in mobile and stationary systems. * Updates and informs the reader on the latest research findings using original reviews * Written by leading industry experts and scholars * Review

  11. Fuel cells; Brennstoffzellen

    Friedrich, K. Andreas [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Thermodynamik

    2012-07-01

    In Germany, the fuel cell technology is characterized by projects and demonstration activities within the National Innovation Programme. Above all, the field tests for fuel cell vehicles under the Clean Energy Partnership, and the field tests for domestic power systems within the project Callux stand out in public. The subsidized market launch of home energy systems in Japan received a great encouragement. Technologically further progresses in the field of reliability and durability were achieved. This is confirmed by the successful and highly publicized trip of three B-Class F-Cell vehicles around the world. In the next few years, the hydrogen infrastructure increasingly becomes important.

  12. Fuel channel refilling

    Analysis of existing data on fuel channel refilling is presented. The analysis focuses on the data obtained using the Stern Laboratories Cold Water Injection Test (CWIT) Facility. The two-fluid model thermal-hydraulics computer code CATHENA is also used to simulate experimental results on fuel channel refilling from both the CWIT and RD-14 facilities. Conclusions related to single and double break tests, including the effect of non-condensible gases, are presented. A set of recommendations is given for further analysis and separate effect experiments. (67 figs., 5 tabs., 24 refs.)

  13. Clean fuels from biomass

    Hsu, Y.-Y.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses the U.S. resources to provide fuels from agricultural products, the present status of conversion technology of clean fuels from biomass, and a system study directed to determine the energy budget, and environmental and socioeconomic impacts. Conversion processes are discussed relative to pyrolysis and anaerobic fermentation. Pyrolysis breaks the cellulose molecules to smaller molecules under high temperature in the absence of oxygen, wheras anaerobic fermentation is used to convert biomass to methane by means of bacteria. Cost optimization and energy utilization are also discussed.

  14. Plutonium fuel program

    The work of the Project-Fuel Development reached the apex of its current programme during the course of the year. Notable success was recorded in the area of irradiation testing with the completion of the examination of the MFBS-7 irradiation. The irradiation group also prepared the seventh Filos experiment and this, as well as the DIDO-III test, began irradiation at the end of the year. Consideration was given and plans prepared for a revised pin filling line for bundle tests. Work also began on the conceptual design study for a pilot production line having a nominal capacity of 500 kg fuel per year. (Auth.)

  15. Fuels for Transportation

    Fredholm, Bertil B.; Nordén, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    There is a need to reduce the amount of fossil energy used for transport, both because of the easily available fossil fuel is becoming sparser and because of climate concerns. In this article, the concept of “peak oil” is briefly presented. Second, a practical approach to reduction of fossil fuel use for transport elaborated by two British commissions is presented. A key feature is the introduction of electric cars. This raises the third issue covered in this article: namely, how battery tech...

  16. Bioethanol: fuel or feedstock?

    Rass-Hansen, Jeppe; Falsig, Hanne; Jørgensen, Betina;

    2007-01-01

    Increasing amounts of bioethanol are being produced from fermentation of biomass, mainly to counteract the continuing depletion of fossil resources and the consequential escalation of oil prices. Today, bioethanol is mainly utilized as a fuel or fuel additive in motor vehicles, but it could also be...... used as a versatile feedstock in the chemical industry. Currently the production of carbon-containing commodity chemicals is dependent on fossil resources, and more than 95% of these chemicals are produced from non-renewable carbon resources. The question is: what will be the optimal use of bioethanol...

  17. Hydraulic fuel hold down

    A method of holding down fuel assemblies in pressurized water reactors is described which minimizes flow restrictions, compensates for variations in primary coolant flow, and provides a steam release path through the reactor in the event of a loss of coolant accident. A pressure vessel is divided by a seal plate structure into a high-pressure and a low-pressure plenum. A piston in sliding relationship with the seal has push rods attached which hold down the fuel asemblies of the core. (LL)

  18. Nuclear fuel element cladding

    Composite cladding for a nuclear fuel element containing fuel pellets is formed with a zirconium metal barrier layer bonded to the inside surface of a zirconium alloy tube. The composite tube is sized by a cold working tube reduction process and is heat treated after final reduction to provide complete recrystallization of the zirconium metal barrier layer and a fine-grained microstructure. The zirconium alloy tube is stress-relieved but is not fully recrystallized. The crystallographic structure of the zirconium metal barrier layer may be improved by compressive deformation such as shot-peening. (author)

  19. Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    Harold F. McFarlane; Terry Todd

    2013-11-01

    Reprocessing is essential to closing nuclear fuel cycle. Natural uranium contains only 0.7 percent 235U, the fissile (see glossary for technical terms) isotope that produces most of the fission energy in a nuclear power plant. Prior to being used in commercial nuclear fuel, uranium is typically enriched to 3–5% in 235U. If the enrichment process discards depleted uranium at 0.2 percent 235U, it takes more than seven tonnes of uranium feed to produce one tonne of 4%-enriched uranium. Nuclear fuel discharged at the end of its economic lifetime contains less one percent 235U, but still more than the natural ore. Less than one percent of the uranium that enters the fuel cycle is actually used in a single pass through the reactor. The other naturally occurring isotope, 238U, directly contributes in a minor way to power generation. However, its main role is to transmute into plutoniumby neutron capture and subsequent radioactive decay of unstable uraniumand neptuniumisotopes. 239Pu and 241Pu are fissile isotopes that produce more than 40% of the fission energy in commercially deployed reactors. It is recovery of the plutonium (and to a lesser extent the uranium) for use in recycled nuclear fuel that has been the primary focus of commercial reprocessing. Uraniumtargets irradiated in special purpose reactors are also reprocessed to obtain the fission product 99Mo, the parent isotope of technetium, which is widely used inmedical procedures. Among the fission products, recovery of such expensive metals as platinum and rhodium is technically achievable, but not economically viable in current market and regulatory conditions. During the past 60 years, many different techniques for reprocessing used nuclear fuel have been proposed and tested in the laboratory. However, commercial reprocessing has been implemented along a single line of aqueous solvent extraction technology called plutonium uranium reduction extraction process (PUREX). Similarly, hundreds of types of reactor

  20. Linseed as renewable fuel

    The cultivation of renewable fuels is a way of reducing excess food production and of opening up alternatives of labour and income on the agricultural sector. Industry takes an interest in renewable fuels because of the ecological aspect. Vegetable oils may be used as lubricants (e.g. for chainsaws, hydraulic systems and two-stroke engines), while starck may be utilized as biodegradable packaging material. The report therefore investigates the chances for linseed production in Germany. The economic efficiency of linseed production may be improved by utilizing the slow-degradable linseed stran as mulding material in gardening and landscaping and for erosion protection. (orig.)

  1. Emergency fuels utilization guidebook. Alternative Fuels Utilization Program

    1980-08-01

    The basic concept of an emergency fuel is to safely and effectively use blends of specification fuels and hydrocarbon liquids which are free in the sense that they have been commandeered or volunteered from lower priority uses to provide critical transportation services for short-duration emergencies on the order of weeks, or perhaps months. A wide variety of liquid hydrocarbons not normally used as fuels for internal combustion engines have been categorized generically, including limited information on physical characteristics and chemical composition which might prove useful and instructive to fleet operators. Fuels covered are: gasoline and diesel fuel; alcohols; solvents; jet fuels; kerosene; heating oils; residual fuels; crude oils; vegetable oils; gaseous fuels.

  2. HTGR fuel and fuel cycle experience in the United States

    In the United States, fuel and fuel cycle development for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR's) has been concentrated on variations of the uranium-thorium fuel cycle. The most efficient cycle utilizes highly enriched U-235 and bred U-233. A fuel cycle utilizing a lower enrichment of about 20% fissile in U-238 also performs well and offers a high degree of protection against proliferation of potential weapons materials. Operating experience in the Peach Bottom Unit 1 and Fort St. Vrain HTGR's has demonstrated very favorable retention of fission products and a high integrity of the fuel element assemblies. Capsule irradiation tests of 20%-enriched fuels for later reactor designs have shown equally good fuel performance. A comprehensive program for developing shipping, storage, and reprocessing technology for HTGR fuel cycles is being carried out cooperatively by the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany

  3. Preliminary Neutronics Analysis Of Fuel Pebble With Thorium Fuel Cycle

    A new fuel pebble was designed based on Thorium fuel cycle. 231Pa has been added into fuel pebble for obtaining the minimum reactivity swing. The results show that the new designed pebble fuel with 7.0 % 233U enrichment adding 3.2% 231Pa, the keff is to be controlled up to 65 GWd/t; the other design with 8.0 % 233U enrichment requires 3.9% 231Pa, the keff therefore is remain up to 80 GWd/t. About 95% of loaded 231Pa in fuel pebble is depleted after 120 GWd/t. The results imply that it is optimistic to design the fuel pebble with 233U, 231Pa and 232Th; but some effects such as fuel temperature effect, distribution of TRISO particle in pebble fuel, etc. are required to investigate. (author)

  4. High-burnup fuel and the impact on fuel management

    Competition in the electric utility industry has forced utilities to reduce cost. For a nuclear utility, this means a reduction of both the nuclear fuel cost and the operating and maintenance cost. To this extent, utilities are pursuing longer cycles. To reduce the nuclear fuel cost, utilities are trying to reduce batch size while increasing cycle length. Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed a number of fuel cycle studies to optimize both batch size and cycle length; however, certain burnup-related constraints are encountered. As a result of these circumstances, longer fuel cycles make it increasingly difficult to simultaneously meet the burnup-related fuel design constraints and the technical specification limits. Longer cycles require fuel assemblies to operate for longer times at relatively high power. If utilities continue to pursue longer cycles to help reduce nuclear fuel cost, changes may need to be made to existing fuel burnup limits

  5. Fuel and fuel blending components from biomass derived pyrolysis oil

    McCall, Michael J.; Brandvold, Timothy A.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2012-12-11

    A process for the conversion of biomass derived pyrolysis oil to liquid fuel components is presented. The process includes the production of diesel, aviation, and naphtha boiling point range fuels or fuel blending components by two-stage deoxygenation of the pyrolysis oil and separation of the products.

  6. Blending biodiesel in fishing boat fuels for improved fuel characteristics

    Cherng-Yuan eLin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a renewable, clean, alternative energy source with advantages such as excellent lubricity, superior biodegradability and high combustion efficiency. Biodiesel is considered for mixing with fishing boat fuels to adjust their fuel characteristics so that toxic pollutants and greenhouse-effect gas emissions from such shipping might be reduced. The effects of blending fishing boat fuels A and B with various weight proportions of biodiesel are experimentally investigated in this study. The results show that biodiesel blending can significantly improve the inferior fuel properties of both fishing boat fuels and particularly fuel B. The flash points of both of these fuels increases significantly with the addition of biodiesel and thus enhances the safety of transporting and storing these blended fuels. The flash point of fishing boat fuel B even increases by 16% with 25 wt% biodiesel blending. The blending of biodiesel with no sulfur content is found to be one of the most effective ways to reduce the high sulfur content of fishing boat fuel, resulting in a reduction in the emission of sulfur oxides. The addition of only 25 wt% biodiesel decreased the sulfur content of the fishing boat fuel by 37%. The high kinematic viscosity of fishing boat fuel B was also observed to be reduced by 63% with the blending of just 25 wt% biodiesel. However, biodiesel blending caused a slight decrease in heating value around 1% to 4.5%.

  7. Advanced fuel cycles and burnup increase of WWER-440 fuel

    Analyses of operational experience of 4.4% enriched fuel in the 5-year fuel cycle at Kola NPP Unit 3 and fuel assemblies with Uranium-Gadolinium fuel at Kola NPP Unit 4 are made. The operability of WWER-440 fuel under high burnup is studied. The obtained results indicate that the fuel rods of WWER-440 assemblies intended for operation within six years of the reviewed fuel cycle totally preserve their operability. Performed analyses have demonstrated the possibility of the fuel rod operability during the fuel cycle. 12 assemblies were loaded into the reactor unit of Kola 3 in 2001. The predicted burnup in six assemblies was 59.2 MWd/kgU. Calculated values of the burnup after operation for working fuel assemblies were ∼57 MWd/kgU, for fuel rods - up to ∼61 MWd/kgU. Data on the coolant activity, specific activity of the benchmark iodine radionuclides of the reactor primary circuit, control of the integrity of fuel rods of the assemblies that were operated for six years indicate that not a single assembly has reached the criterion for the early discharge

  8. Integrated fuel processor development challenges

    In the absence of a hydrogen-refueling infrastructure, the success of the fuel cell system in the market will depend on fuel processors to enable the use of available fuels, such as gasoline, natural gas, etc. The fuel processor includes several catalytic reactors, scrubbers to remove chemical species that can poison downstream catalysts or the fuel cell electrocatalyst, and heat exchangers. Most fuel cell power applications seek compact, lightweight hardware with rapid-start and load- following capabilities. Although packaging can partially address the size and volume, balancing the performance parameters while maintaining the fuel conversion (to hydrogen) efficiency requires careful integration of the unit operations and processes. Argonne National Laboratory has developed integrated fuel processors that are compact and light, and that operate efficiently. This paper discusses some of the difficulties encountered in the development process, focusing on the factors/components that constrain performance, and areas that need further research and development

  9. Fuel-cladding chemical interaction

    The chemistry of the nuclear fuel is very complex. Its chemical composition changes with time due to the formation of fission products and depends on the temperature level history within the fuel pellet and the clad during operation. Firstly, in thermal reactors, zircaloy oxidation from reaction with UO2 fuel under high-temperature conditions will be addressed. Then other fuel-cladding interaction phenomena occurring in fast reactors will be described. Large thermal gradients existing between the centre and the periphery of the pellet induce the radial redistribution of the fuel constituents. The fuel pellet can react with the clad by different corrosion processes which can involve actinide and/or fission product transport via gas, liquid or/and solid phases. All these phenomena are briefly described in the case of different kinds of fuels (oxide, carbide, nitride, metallic) to be used in fast reactors. The way these phenomena are taken into account in fuel performance codes is presented. (authors)

  10. Fuel Cell Technical Team Roadmap

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Fuel Cell Technical Team promotes the development of a fuel cell power system for an automotive powertrain that meets the U.S. DRIVE Partnership (United States Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) goals.

  11. Alternative Fuels in Cement Production

    Larsen, Morten Boberg

    The substitution of alternative for fossil fuels in cement production has increased significantly in the last decade. Of these new alternative fuels, solid state fuels presently account for the largest part, and in particular, meat and bone meal, plastics and tyre derived fuels (TDF) accounted for...... the most significant alternative fuel energy contributors in the German cement industry. Solid alternative fuels are typically high in volatile content and they may differ significantly in physical and chemical properties compared to traditional solid fossil fuels. From the process point of view......, considering a modern kiln system for cement production, the use of alternative fuels mainly influences 1) kiln process stability (may accelerate build up of blockages preventing gas and/or solids flow), 2) cement clinker quality, 3) emissions, and 4) decreased production capacity. Kiln process stability in...

  12. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard; Delaforce, Philip Mark

    2016-03-08

    The present invention includes a fuel cell system having an interconnect that reduces or eliminates diffusion (leakage) of fuel and oxidant by providing an increased densification, by forming the interconnect as a ceramic/metal composite.

  13. Spent fuel management in Argentina

    The general program on Argentinian Spent Fuel Management has been informed in previous meetings and IAEA publications. This presentation includes an updating of the programs and a short description of the dry storage of Embalse NPP spent fuel. (author)

  14. SRE fuel decladding. Final report

    This report summarizes the task of decladding the SRE fuel assemblies, and shipment of the fuel to Savannah River for eventual reprocessing. The disposition of 16 unidentified RMDF storage canisters is also covered

  15. Experience on fuel recycling

    The plutonium of the second generation out of the KNK-reactor will be converted at the fuel fabrication by ALKEM by the Au/PuC process. The preliminary tests for the fabrication have been finished and two batches were converted. Up to now the results show no principal difficulties. (orig.)

  16. Nuclear fuel cycle studies

    For the metal-matrix encapsulation of radioactive waste, brittle-fracture, leach-rate, and migration studies are being conducted. For fuel reprocessing, annular and centrifugal contactors are being tested and modeled. For the LWBR proof-of-breeding project, the full-scale shear and the prototype dissolver were procured and tested. 5 figures

  17. Contracting for nuclear fuels

    This paper deals with uranium sales contracts, i.e. with contractual arrangements in the first steps of the fuel cycle, which cover uranium production and conversion. The various types of contract are described and, where appropriate, their underlying business philosophy and their main terms and conditions. Finally, the specific common features of such contracts are reviewed. (NEA)

  18. Residential fuel quality

    Santa, T. [Santa Fuel, Inc., Bridgeport, CT (United States)

    1997-09-01

    This report details progress made in improving the performance of No. 2 heating oil in residential applications. Previous research in this area is documented in papers published in the Brookhaven Oil Heat Technology Conference Proceedings in 1993, 1994 and 1996. By way of review we have investigated a number of variables in the search for improved fuel system performance. These include the effect of various additives designed to address stability, dispersion, biotics, corrosion and reaction with metals. We have also investigated delivery methods, filtration, piping arrangements and the influence of storage tank size and location. As a result of this work Santa Fuel Inc. in conjunction with Mobile Oil Corporation have identified an additive package which shows strong evidence of dramatically reducing the occurrence of fuel system failures in residential oil burners. In a broad market roll-out of the additized product we have experienced a 29% reduction in fuel related service calls when comparing the 5 months ending January 1997 to the same period ending January 1996.

  19. WWER spent fuel storage

    Selection criteria for PAKS NPP dry storage system are outlined. They include the following: fuel temperature in storage; sub-criticality assurance (avoidance of criticality for fuel in the unirradiated condition without having to take credit for burn-up); assurance of decay heat removal; dose uptake to the operators and public; protection of environment; volume of waste produced during operation and decommissioning; physical protection of stored irradiated fuel assemblies; IAEA safeguards assurance; storage system versus final disposal route; cost of construction and extent of technology transfer to Hungarian industry. Several available systems are evaluated against these criteria, and as a result the GEC ALSTHOM Modular Vault Dry Store (MVDS) system has been selected. The MVDS is a passively cooled dry storage facility. Its most important technical, safety, licensing and technology transfer characteristics are outlined. On the basis of the experience gained some key questions and considerations related to the East European perspective in the field of spent fuel storage are discussed. 8 figs

  20. Hydrogen as automotive fuel

    An assessment of the technical/economic feasibility of the use of hydrogen as an automotive fuel is made based on analyses of the following: the chemical- physical properties of hydrogen in relation to its use in internal combustion engines; the modifications necessary to adapt internal combustion engines to hydrogen use; hydrogen fuel injection systems - with water vapour injection, cryogenic injection, and the low or high pressure injection of hydrogen directly into the combustion chamber; the current commercialization status of hydrogen automotive fuels; energy efficiency ratings; environmental impacts; in-vehicle storage systems - involving the use of hydrides, high pressure systems and liquid hydrogen storage systems; performance in terms of pay-load ratio; autonomous operation; and operating costs. The paper concludes that, considering current costs for hydrogen fuel production, distribution and use, at present, the employment of hydrogen fuelled vehicles is feasible only in highly polluted urban environments where the innovative vehicle's air pollution abatement characteristics would justify its high operating costs as compared with those of conventional automotive alternatives

  1. ITER fuel cycle systems

    This document records the assumptions under which the ITER Fuel Systems cost estimates were prepared. These are order of magnitude estimates, obtained without flow sheet or detailed equipment analysis by applying factors, ratios, and escalation to the known cost of an installation considered to be similar. The estimates include equipment and installation costs for each component. (5 figs., 16 refs.)

  2. Jet Fuel Burns Profits

    WANUXIN

    2005-01-01

    Last month, China's National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) raised the price of jet fuel to 4,620 yuan (US$513) per ton, a 10.3 percent rise over the 4,190 yuan (US$505) per ton rate set in August last year, itself a 10.6 percent mark-up. This is the third rise since 2003.

  3. Uruguay minerals fuels

    In this report the bases for the development of the necessary works of prospection are exposed on mineral fuels of Uruguay. We have taken the set from: coal, lutitas bituminous, uranium, petroleum and disturbs. In all the cases we have talked about to the present state of the knowledge and to the works that we considered necessary to develop in each case

  4. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    2010-01-01

    The solid oxide fuel cell comprising a metallic support material, an active anode layer consisting of a good hydrocarbon cracking catalyst, an electrolyte layer, an active cathode layer, and a transition layer consisting of preferably a mixture of LSM and a ferrite to the cathode current collector...

  5. The closed fuel cycle

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The fast growth of the world's economy coupled with the need for optimizing use of natural resources, for energy security and for climate change mitigation make energy supply one of the 21. century most daring challenges. The high reliability and efficiency of nuclear energy, its competitiveness in an energy market undergoing a new oil shock are as many factors in favor of the 'renaissance' of this greenhouse gas free energy. Over 160,000 tHM of LWR1 and AGR2 Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) have already been unloaded from the reactor cores corresponding to 7,000 tons discharged per year worldwide. By 2030, this amount could exceed 400,000 tHM and annual unloading 14,000 tHM/year. AREVA believes that closing the nuclear fuel cycle through the treatment and recycling of Used Nuclear Fuel sustains the worldwide nuclear power expansion. It is an economically sound and environmentally responsible choice, based on the preservation of natural resources through the recycling of used fuel. It furthermore provides a safe and secure management of wastes while significantly minimizing the burden left to future generations. (authors)

  6. Hydrogen Fuel Energy

    Koryagin, A. A.; Vorobyeva, Viktoriya Vladimirovna

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays there are many environmental problems in the world. Atmosphericpollution is one of the major issues. Much pollution comes fromdifferent engines and vehicles. The solution lies in discovering of either anew energy resource or form of energy and this will lead to a new technologicalstage. This paper deals with issues facing hydrogen fuel as an alternativesource of energy, its advantages and disadvantages.

  7. Nuclear fuel rods

    Purpose: To enable a tight seal in fuel rods while keeping the sealing gas pressure at an exact predetermined pressure in fuel rods. Constitution: A vent aperture and a valve are provided to the upper end plug of a cladding tube. At first, the valve is opened to fill gas at a predetermined pressure in the fuel can. Then, a conical valve body is closely fitted to a valve seat by the rotation of a needle valve to eliminate the gap in the engaging thread portion and close the vent aperture. After conducting the reduced pressure test for the fuel rod in a water tank, welding joints are formed between the valve and the end plug through welding to completely seal the cladding tube. Since the welding is conducted after the can has been closed by the valve, the predetermined gas pressure can be maintained at an exact level with no efforts from welding heat and with effective gas leak prevention by the double sealing. (Kawakami, Y.)

  8. Liquid Fuels from Microalgae

    Johnson, D. A.; Sprague, S.

    1987-08-01

    The goal of the DOE/SERI Aquatic Species Program is to develop the technology to produce gasoline and diesel fuels from microalgae. Microalgae can accumulate large quantities of lipids and can thrive in high salinity water, which currently has no other use.

  9. Fuel cladding tubes and fuel elements

    Purpose: To enable non-destructive measurement for the thickness of zirconium barriers. Constitution: Regions capable of non-destructive inspection are provided at the boundary between a fuel cladding tube made of zirconium alloy and the zirconium barrier lined to the inner circumference surface of the tube. As the regions being capable of distinguishing by ultrasonic wave reflection, solid materials, for example, non-metal materials different from that for the tube and the barrier are placed or gaps are provided at the boundary between the zirconium alloy cladding tube and the zirconium barrier. Since ultrasonic waves are reflected at each of the boundaries by the presence of these regions, thickness of the zirconium barrier can be measured in a non-destructive manner from either the inner or the outer surface of the tube. (Yoshino, Y.)

  10. Nuclear reactor fuel element splitter

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for removing nuclear fuel from a clad fuel element. The fuel element is power driven past laser beams which simultaneously cut the cladding lengthwise into at least two longitudinal pieces. The axially cut lengths of cladding are then separated, causing the nuclear fuel contained therein to drop into a receptacle for later disposition. The cut lengths of cladding comprise nuclear waste which is disposed of in a suitable manner. 6 claims, 10 drawing figures

  11. Improved fuel rod support means

    A fuel bundle for a nuclear reactor having a plurality of fuel rods supported between spaced tie plates, wherein coolant flows through said tie plates and past said fuel rods, characterized by: an end plug disposed between an end of each fuel rod and the adjacent tie plate, and means defining a passage for the flow of coolant through the interface between said end plug and said tie plates to minimize crud buildup at said interface

  12. Purchase, circulation and fuel taxation

    Potter, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade, the UK and many other developed nations have reformed existing forms of road transport taxation to address a number of transport policy goals. This has involved modifying the design of purchase, circulation and fuel taxation to promote: • More fuel efficient vehicles • Alternative fuel vehicles • Cleaner fuels (lower emissions and/or low carbon) • Modal shift and traffic volume • Congestion reduction This chapter particularly explores the use of...

  13. Fuel cell based hybrid systems

    Davat, B.; Astier, S.; Bethoux, O.; CANDUSSO,D; Coquery, G.; DE-BERNARDINIS, A; DRUART, F; Francois, M; GARCIA ARREGUI, F; Harel, F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents different works which are currently developed in the field of fuel cell hybrid systems indifferent public laboratories in France. These works are presented in three sections corresponding to: 1. Hybrid fuel cell/battery or supercapacitor power sources; 2. Fuel cell multistack power sources; 3. Fuel cell in hybrid power systems for distributed generation. The presented works combine simulation and experimental results.

  14. Fuel Handbook[Wood and other renewable fuels

    Stroemberg, Birgitta [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (SE)] (ed.)

    2006-03-15

    This handbook on renewable fuels is intended for power and heat producers in Sweden. This fuel handbook provides, from a plant owner's perspective, a method to evaluate different fuels on the market. The fuel handbook concerns renewable fuels (but does not include household waste) that are available on the Swedish market today or fuels that have potential to be available within the next ten years. The handbook covers 26 different fuels. Analysis data, special properties, operating experiences and literature references are outlined for each fuel. [Special properties, operating experiences and literature references are not included in this English version] The handbook also contains: A proposed methodology for introduction of new fuels. A recommendation of analyses and tests to perform in order to reduce the risk of problems is presented. [The recommendation of analyses and tests is not included in the English version] A summary of relevant laws and taxes for energy production, with references to relevant documentation. [Only laws and taxes regarding EU are included] Theory and background to evaluate a fuel with respect to combustion, ash and corrosion properties and methods that can be used for such evaluations. Summary of standards, databases and handbooks on biomass fuels and other solid fuels, and links to web sites where further information about the fuels can be found. The appendices includes: A methodology for trial firing of fuels. Calculations procedures for, amongst others, heating value, flue gas composition, key number and free fall velocity [Free fall velocity is not included in the English version]. In addition, conversion routines between different units for a number of different applications are provided. Fuel analyses are presented in the appendix. (The report is a translation of parts of the report VARMEFORSK--911 published in 2005)

  15. Advanced fuel developments to improve fuel cycle cost in PWR

    Increasingly lower fuel cycle costs and higher plant availability factors have been two crucial components in keeping the overall cost of electricity produced by nuclear low and competitive with respect to other energy sources. The continuous quest to reduce fuel cycle cost has resulted in some consolidated trends in LWR fuel management schemes: smaller number of feed fuel assemblies with longer residence time; longer cycles, with 18-month cycle as the predominant option, and some plants already operating on, or considering, 24-month refueling intervals; higher power ratings with many plants undergoing power uprates. In order to maintain or improve fuel utilization for the longer cycles and/or higher power ratings, the licensed limits in fuel fissile content (5.0 w/o U235 enrichment) and discharge burnup (62 GWd/tHM for the peak pin) have been approached. In addition, Zr-based fuel cladding materials are also being challenged by the resulting increased duty. For the above reasons further improvements in fuel cycle cost have to overcome one or more of the current limits. This paper discusses an option to break through this 'stalemate', i.e. uranium nitride (UN) fuel with SiC clad. In UN the higher density of the nitride with respect to the oxide fuel leads to higher fissile content and reduction in the number of feed assemblies, improved fuel utilization and potentially higher specific powers. The SiC clad, among other benefits, enables higher clad irradiation, thereby exploiting the full potential of UN fuel. An alternative to employing UN fuel is to maintain UO2 fuel but boost the fissile content increasing the U235 enrichment beyond the 5 w/o limit. The paper describes and compares the potential benefits on fuel cycle cost of either option using realistic full-core calculations and ensuing economic analysis performed using Westinghouse in-house reactor physics tools and methodologies. (author)

  16. Fuel switching or multiple cooking fuels? Understanding inter-fuel substitution patterns in rural Mexican households

    Masera, O.R. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Centro de Ecologia, Michoacan (Mexico); Navia, Jaime [Grupo Interdisciplinario de Tecnologia Rural Apropiada (GIRA), Michoacan (Mexico)

    1997-12-01

    Ninety-one per cent of Mexican rural households and 11% of urban households cook with fuel wood. Fuel wood represents 50% of total residential energy use in the country. This paper presents the results of a detailed study of the patterns of household fuel wood use and inter-fuel substitution in three villages of rural Mexico. All residents in the three villages cook with fuel wood, and between 20 and 43% of them also use LPG (liquefied petroleum gas) for this task, depending on the village. Average household fuel wood demand ranges between 53 and 60 Gj/yr for fuel wood only users and from 40 to 57 GJ/yr for mixed fuel wood-LPG users, depending on the village. Cooking practices are described together with their energy use. Kitchen performance tests and controlled cooking tests (CCT) were applied in two villages to measure savings in household fuel wood use from partially switching to LPG. The analysis shows that energy and fuel wood savings are much lower than those that may be expected on a purely technical basis. In fact, fuel wood is very seldom replaced entirely, even in households that have been using LPG for many years. Rather than switching households follow a multiple fuel strategy which gives them the advantages of both fuels. There is a strong pattern of fuel preferences by type of dish and cooking task. Fuel wood is seen as a fuel with advantages that go beyond price and include cultural considerations. Lorena-type improved woodburning cookstoves might prove particularly useful for multiple fuel users as they show savings of up to 50% for tortilla-making compared with the traditional stoves in CCT. (Author)

  17. Fuel switching or multiple cooking fuels? Understanding inter-fuel substitution patterns in rural Mexican households

    Ninety-one per cent of Mexican rural households and 11% of urban households cook with fuel wood. Fuel wood represents 50% of total residential energy use in the country. This paper presents the results of a detailed study of the patterns of household fuel wood use and inter-fuel substitution in three villages of rural Mexico. All residents in the three villages cook with fuel wood, and between 20 and 43% of them also use LPG (liquefied petroleum gas) for this task, depending on the village. Average household fuel wood demand ranges between 53 and 60 Gj/yr for fuel wood only users and from 40 to 57 GJ/yr for mixed fuel wood-LPG users, depending on the village. Cooking practices are described together with their energy use. Kitchen performance tests and controlled cooking tests (CCT) were applied in two villages to measure savings in household fuel wood use from partially switching to LPG. The analysis shows that energy and fuel wood savings are much lower than those that may be expected on a purely technical basis. In fact, fuel wood is very seldom replaced entirely, even in households that have been using LPG for many years. Rather than switching households follow a multiple fuel strategy which gives them the advantages of both fuels. There is a strong pattern of fuel preferences by type of dish and cooking task. Fuel wood is seen as a fuel with advantages that go beyond price and include cultural considerations. Lorena-type improved woodburning cookstoves might prove particularly useful for multiple fuel users as they show savings of up to 50% for tortilla-making compared with the traditional stoves in CCT. (Author)

  18. Bio-fuels - biohazard

    Politicians have a clear explanation for growing commodity prices. It is all the fault of speculators. It is easy to point the finger at an imaginary enemy. It is more difficult and from the point of view of a political career suicidal to admit one's mistakes. And there are reasons for remorse. According to studies prepared by the OECD and the World Bank bio-fuels are to be blame for high food prices. The bio-fuel boom that increases the demand for agro-commodities has been created by politicians offering generous subsidies. And so farming products do not end up on the table, but in the fuel tanks of cars in the form of additives. And their only efficiency is that they make food more expensive. The first relevant indication that environmentalist tendencies in global politics have resulted in shortages and food price increases can be found in a confidential report prepared by the World Bank. Parts of the report were leaked to the media last month. According to this information growing bio-fuel production has resulted in a food price increase by 75%. The theory that this development was caused by speculators and Chinese and Indian demand received a serious blow. And the OECD report definitely contradicted the excuse used by the politicians. According to the report one of the main reasons for growing food prices are generously subsidized bio-fuels. Their share of the increase of demand for agro-commodities in 2005 -2007 was 60% according to the study. (author)

  19. Winters fuels report

    The outlook for distillate fuel oil this winter is for increased demand and a return to normal inventory patterns, assuming a resumption of normal, cooler weather than last winter. With industrial production expected to grow slightly from last winter's pace, overall consumption is projected to increase 3 percent from last winter, to 3.4 million barrels per day during the heating season (October 1, 1995-March 31, 1996). Much of the supply win come from stock drawdowns and refinery production. Estimates for the winter are from the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 4th Quarter 1995 Short-Tenn Energy Outlook (STEO) Mid-World Oil Price Case forecast. Inventories in place on September 30, 1995, of 132 million barrels were 9 percent below the unusually high year-earlier level. Inventories of high-sulfur distillate fuel oil, the principal type used for heating, were 13 percent lower than a year earlier. Supply problems are not anticipated because refinery production and the ready availability of imports should be adequate to meet demand. Residential heating off prices are expected to be somewhat higher than last winter's, as the effects of lower crude oil prices are offset by lower distillate inventories. Heating oil is forecast to average $0.92 per gallon, the highest price since the winter of 1992-93. Diesel fuel (including tax) is predicted to be slightly higher than last year at $1.13 per gallon. This article focuses on the winter assessment for distillate fuel oil, how well last year's STEO winter outlook compared to actual events, and expectations for the coming winter. Additional analyses include regional low-sulfur and high-sulfur distillate supply, demand, and prices, and recent trends in distillate fuel oil inventories

  20. Future fuel cycles

    A fuel cycle must offer both financial and resource savings if it is to be considered for introduction into Ontario's nuclear system. The most promising alternative CANDU fuel cycles are examined in the context of both of these factors over a wide range of installed capacity growth rates and economic assumptions, in order to determine which fuel cycle, or cycles, should be introduced, and when. It is concluded that the optimum path for the long term begins with the prompt introduction of the low-enriched-uranium fuel cycle. For a wide range of conditions, this cycle remains the optimum throughout the very long term. Conditions of rapid nuclear growth and very high uranium price escalation rates warrant the supersedure of the low-enriched-uranium cycle by either a plutonium-topped thorium cycle or plutonium recycle, beginning between 2010 and 2025. It is also found that the uranium resource position is sound in terms of both known resources and production capability. Moreover, introduction of the low-enriched-uranium fuel cycle and 1250 MWe reactor units will assure the economic viability of nuclear power until at least 2020, even if uranium prices increase at a rate of 3.5% above inflation. The interrelationship between these two conclusions lies in the tremendous incentive for exploration which will occur if the real uranium price escalation rate is high. From a competitive viewpoint, nuclear power can withstand increases in the price of uranium. However, such increases will likely further expand the resource base, making nuclear an even more reliable energy source. (auth)

  1. Specialists' meeting on gas-cooled reactor fuel development and spent fuel treatment

    Topics covered during the 'Specialists' meeting on gas-cooled reactor fuel development and spent fuel treatment' were as follows: Selection of constructions and materials, fuel element development concepts; Fabrication of spherical coated fuel particles and fuel element on their base; investigation of fuel properties; Spent fuel treatment and storage; Head-end processing of HTGR fuel elements; investigation of HTGR fuel regeneration process; applicability of gas-fluorine technology of regeneration of spent HTGR fuel elements

  2. LIGHTBRIDGE corporation advanced metallic fuel

    Lightbridge Corporation is developing a metallic nuclear fuel which utilizes an innovative fuel rod geometry and composition to improve power plant economics and enhance the performance and safety of commercial light water reactors. The versatile fuel can utilize uranium or plutonium as the fissile component. The fuel is fully compatible with existing light water reactor designs and requires no major changes to reactor operations. The metallic fuel provides a durable solution that is also capable of operating at higher power density than existing fuels allowing for increased power output and cycle length compared to conventional oxide fuels. Lightbridge patented nuclear fuel technologies are designed to significantly enhance nuclear power industry economics and increase power output by: 1) extending fuel cycle length to 24 months or longer while simultaneously increasing power output by 10% or increasing power output by up to 17% with 18-month fuel cycles in existing pressurized water reactors (PWRs); 2) enabling increased reactor power output of up to 30% without changing core size in new build PWRs; and 3) reducing the volume of used fuel per kilowatt-hour as well as enhancing proliferation resistance of spent fuel. (author)

  3. Fuel cell report to congress

    None, None

    2003-02-28

    This report describes the status of fuel cells for Congressional committees. It focuses on the technical and economic barriers to the use of fuel cells in transportation, portable power, stationary, and distributed power generation applications, and describes the need for public-private cooperative programs to demonstrate the use of fuel cells in commercial-scale applications by 2012. (Department of Energy, February 2003).

  4. ARPA advanced fuel cell development

    Dubois, L.H.

    1995-08-01

    Fuel cell technology is currently being developed at the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) for several Department of Defense applications where its inherent advantages such as environmental compatibility, high efficiency, and low noise and vibration are overwhelmingly important. These applications range from man-portable power systems of only a few watts output (e.g., for microclimate cooling and as direct battery replacements) to multimegawatt fixed base systems. The ultimate goal of the ARPA program is to develop an efficient, low-temperature fuel cell power system that operates directly on a military logistics fuel (e.g., DF-2 or JP-8). The absence of a fuel reformer will reduce the size, weight, cost, and complexity of such a unit as well as increase its reliability. In order to reach this goal, ARPA is taking a two-fold, intermediate time-frame approach to: (1) develop a viable, low-temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell that operates directly on a simple hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., methanol or trimethoxymethane) and (2) demonstrate a thermally integrated fuel processor/fuel cell power system operating on a military logistics fuel. This latter program involves solid oxide (SOFC), molten carbonate (MCFC), and phosphoric acid (PAFC) fuel cell technologies and concentrates on the development of efficient fuel processors, impurity scrubbers, and systems integration. A complementary program to develop high performance, light weight H{sub 2}/air PEM and SOFC fuel cell stacks is also underway. Several recent successes of these programs will be highlighted.

  5. VIRTUAL FUEL-PUMP DESIGN

    2002-01-01

    Some concepts of virtual product are discussed. The key technologies of virtual fuel-pump development are in detail analysed, which include virtual fuel-pump product modeling, intelligent simulation, distributed design environment, and virtual assembly. The virtual fuel-pump development prototype system considers requirement analysis, concept design, injection preferment analysis, detailed design, and assembly analysis.

  6. Spent fuel reprocessing. Main operations

    The behaviour of spent fuels from nuclear reactors is one of the major concern of the nuclear industry. Two alternatives exist: direct disposal or reprocessing, the choice between both strategies depends on political, economical and environmental stakes. This document is devoted to the description of the Purex process (plutonium uranium refining by extraction) used for the reprocessing of spent fuels from water cooled reactors: 1 - Stakes and strategies; 2 - characteristics of fuels: new fuels, conditions of irradiation, characteristics of irradiated fuels (PWR-type fuels, FBR-type fuels, GCR-type fuels, research and propulsion reactor fuels, amount of unloaded spent fuels); 3 - goals and specific constraints: technical goals (efficiency of uranium and plutonium recovery, specification of finite products, limitation of radioactive effluents, wastes conditioning), specific reprocessing constraints; 4 - general considerations about processes: evolution, principal steps; 5 - head-end operations: on reactor site, transport of spent fuel, unloading at the reprocessing plant, storage, mechanical treatments, dissolution (uranium oxide, mixed uranium-plutonium oxides, metal fuels), treatment of gaseous wastes (nitrogen oxides, iodine, filtering), clarifying of solutions (unsoluble particulates, apparatuses), evaluation of the nuclear materials content, adjustment of solutions; 6 - Separation and purification: chemistry (aqueous nitrous solutions, nitrogen compounds, actinides, fission products), extraction mechanisms (solvent properties, nitrogen compounds, actinides, fission products, solvent evolution), extraction cycles (first cycle, plutonium purification cycles, uranium purification cycles), solvent processing, apparatuses (mixers-settlers, pulsed columns, centrifugal extractors, modeling); 7 - Elaboration of finite products: uranium, plutonium (oxalate process, denitration), recycling of out-off specification plutonium oxides. (J.S.)

  7. ALTERNATIVE FUELS FOR DIESEL ENGINES

    Jacek Caban

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and genesis of the use of alternative fuels in internal combustion ignition engines. Based on the analysis of the literature, this article shows various alternative fuels used in Poland and all over the world. Furthermore, this article describes the research directions for alternative fuels use in road transport powered by diesel engines.

  8. ALTERNATIVE FUELS FOR DIESEL ENGINES

    Jacek Caban; Agata Gniecka; Lukáš Holeša

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the development and genesis of the use of alternative fuels in internal combustion ignition engines. Based on the analysis of the literature, this article shows various alternative fuels used in Poland and all over the world. Furthermore, this article describes the research directions for alternative fuels use in road transport powered by diesel engines.

  9. The alcohol fuels in Guatemala

    This presentation shows the antecedents of the production of alcohol fuel in Guatemala as an alternative to imported gasoline, also presents current statistics of consumption, importation of liquid fossil fuels, production of alcohol fuel, consumption, and trends of consumption mixed with gasoline and yield data

  10. Spent fuel management in Switzerland

    Switzerland currently has 3000 MWe being delivered from five nuclear power units. The current spent fuel management and waste disposal programme includes reprocessing of the spent fuel generated up to 1990. The plan for intermediate storage of spent fuel, high-level waste and low/medium level wastes is underway; the main features of the centralized storage facilities are given. (author). 1 fig

  11. Reactor Structure Materials: Nuclear Fuel

    Progress and achievements in 1999 in SCK-CEN's programme on applied and fundamental nuclear fuel research in 1999 are reported. Particular emphasis is on thermochemical fuel research, the modelling of fission gas release in LWR fuel as well as on integral experiments

  12. Impact Analysis for Fuel Assemblies in Spent Fuel Storage Rack

    The design and structural integrity evaluation of a spent fuel storage rack (SFSR) utilized for storing and protecting the spent fuel assemblies generated during the operation of a reactor are very important in terms of nuclear safety and waste management. The objective of this study is to show the validity of the SFSR design as well as fuel assembly through a structural integrity evaluation based on a numerical analysis. In particular, a dynamic time history analysis considering the gaps between the fuel assemblies and the walls of the storage cell pipes in the SFSR was performed to check the structural integrity of the fuel assembly and storage cell pipe

  13. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  14. Microbial fuel cell treatment of fuel process wastewater

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Tsouris, Constantino

    2013-12-03

    The present invention is directed to a method for cleansing fuel processing effluent containing carbonaceous compounds and inorganic salts, the method comprising contacting the fuel processing effluent with an anode of a microbial fuel ell, the anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of the carbonaceous compounds while producing electrical energy from the oxidative degradation, and directing the produced electrical energy to drive an electrosorption mechanism that operates to reduce the concentration of one or more inorganic salts in the fuel processing effluent, wherein the anode is in electrical communication with a cathode of the microbial fuel cell. The invention is also directed to an apparatus for practicing the method.

  15. LMFBR spent fuel and new fuel inspection and handling

    If the hot cells used for inspection and preparation of liquid metal fast breeder reactor fuel assemblies can be located so that the fuel assemblies can be moved directly to and from the sodium filled decay storage tank, the fuel handling problems can be simplified and a fuel handling machine may be eliminated. The hot cells can also serve as a transfer lock through the outer containment barrier, thereby permitting uninterrupted reactor operation during fuel transfer to and from the decay storage tank. 5 references

  16. Method of filling fuel pellets into a fuel can

    Purpose: To prevent a fuel can from deformation due to edges of pellets and occurrence of stress, by rearranging and filling fuel pellets of bad rectangularity into fuel cans. Methof: A plurality of fuel pellets of bad rectangularity are arranged on a arranging plate fitted with a vibrator, and are forced with springs at both ends. The vibrator is energized to vibrate and rotate the pellets so that they are regularly rearranged. Each fuel can is provided with X-Y lines to match the directions of pellets, and rearranged UO2 pellet stack is slided into the can with the directions matched. (Nakamura, S.)

  17. Methodology and results of operational calculations of fuel temperature in fuel elements of the BN-600 reactor fuel assemblies

    The article presents methodology of peak fuel temperature determination and computational investigations of fuel temperature condition in fuel elements of fuel assemblies of various types during the BN-600 reactor operation. The effect of sodium uranate in the gap between fuel and cladding of the fuel element on the heat transfer processes is considered

  18. Nuclear fuel elements design, fabrication and performance

    Frost, Brian R T

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Elements: Design, Fabrication and Performance is concerned with the design, fabrication, and performance of nuclear fuel elements, with emphasis on fast reactor fuel elements. Topics range from fuel types and the irradiation behavior of fuels to cladding and duct materials, fuel element design and modeling, fuel element performance testing and qualification, and the performance of water reactor fuels. Fast reactor fuel elements, research and test reactor fuel elements, and unconventional fuel elements are also covered. This volume consists of 12 chapters and begins with an overvie

  19. RERTR-12 Insertion 2 Irradiation Summary Report

    D. M. Perez; G. S. Chang; D. M. Wachs; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme

    2012-09-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-12 was designed to provide comprehensive information on the performance of uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) based monolithic fuels for research reactor applications.1 RERTR-12 insertion 2 includes the capsules irradiated during the last three irradiation cycles. These capsules include Z, Y1, Y2 and Y3 type capsules. The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-12 insertion 2 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis results, thermal analysis results and hydraulic testing results.

  20. Fuel Cell Handbook, Fifth Edition

    Energy and Environmental Solutions

    2000-10-31

    Progress continues in fuel cell technology since the previous edition of the Fuel Cell Handbook was published in November 1998. Uppermost, polymer electrolyte fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and solid oxide fuel cells have been demonstrated at commercial size in power plants. The previously demonstrated phosphoric acid fuel cells have entered the marketplace with more than 220 power plants delivered. Highlighting this commercial entry, the phosphoric acid power plant fleet has demonstrated 95+% availability and several units have passed 40,000 hours of operation. One unit has operated over 49,000 hours. Early expectations of very low emissions and relatively high efficiencies have been met in power plants with each type of fuel cell. Fuel flexibility has been demonstrated using natural gas, propane, landfill gas, anaerobic digester gas, military logistic fuels, and coal gas, greatly expanding market opportunities. Transportation markets worldwide have shown remarkable interest in fuel cells; nearly every major vehicle manufacturer in the U.S., Europe, and the Far East is supporting development. This Handbook provides a foundation in fuel cells for persons wanting a better understanding of the technology, its benefits, and the systems issues that influence its application. Trends in technology are discussed, including next-generation concepts that promise ultrahigh efficiency and low cost, while providing exceptionally clean power plant systems. Section 1 summarizes fuel cell progress since the last edition and includes existing power plant nameplate data. Section 2 addresses the thermodynamics of fuel cells to provide an understanding of fuel cell operation at two levels (basic and advanced). Sections 3 through 8 describe the six major fuel cell types and their performance based on cell operating conditions. Alkaline and intermediate solid state fuel cells were added to this edition of the Handbook. New information indicates that manufacturers have stayed

  1. UK experience on fuel and cladding interaction in oxide fuels

    The occurrence of fuel cladding interactions in fast reactor fuels has been observed in UK irradiations over a period of years. Chemical incompatibility between fuel and clad represents a potential source of failure and has, on this account, been studied using a variety of techniques. The principal fuel of interest to the UK for fast reactor application is mixed uranium plutonium oxide clad in stainless steel and it is in this field that the majority of work has been concentrated. Some consideration has been given to carbide fuels, because of their application as an advanced fuel. This experience is described in the accompanying paper. Several complementary initiatives have been followed to investigate the interactions in oxide fuel. The principal source of experimental information is from the experimental fuel irradiation programme in the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR). Supporting information has been obtained from irradiation programmes in Materials Testing Reactors (MTR). Conditions approaching those in a fast reactor are obtained and the effects of specific variables have been examined in specifically designed experiments. Out-of-reactor experiments have been used to determine the limits of fuel and cladding compatibility and also to give indications of corrosion The observations from all experiments have been examined in the light of thermo-dynamic predictions of fuel behaviour to assess the relative significance of various observations and operating conditions. An experimental programme to control and limit the interactions in oxide fuel is being followed

  2. Recent developments on fast reactor fuels and fuel cycle activities

    From the inception of nuclear energy, the important role of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) and its fuel cycle has been recognized for efficient utilization of natural uranium and thorium resources and long-term sustainability of nuclear power. The IAEA initiated International Project on Innovative Reactor and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) and the US-DOE initiated Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) have also identified the importance of SFR and its fuel cycle in the 21st Century. One of the key factors for making SFR economically competitive with light water reactors (LWR) and pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR) is to develop: i) a mixed uranium plutonium ceramic or metallic fuel, easy and economic to manufacture on an industrial scale, with high burn up (15-20,000 MWd/ton) and high breeding ratio and ii) a 'closed' fuel cycle where the spent fuel is subjected to efficient 'partitioning' process, based on either aqueous or pyro-electrolytic, for recovery of uranium, plutonium and minor actinides (Np, Am and Cm). The spent fuel and the actinides are highly radiotoxic and health hazardous and are required to be handled remotely inside alpha tight glove boxes or hot cells with beta-gamma and neutron shielding. The present paper summarizes the status of SFR fuels and fuel cycle activity all over the world highlighting the manufacturing technology of fuel and fuel structural materials and the different partitioning processes for separation of actinides

  3. Review of fuel and fuel safety analysis verification

    The CANDU industry in Canada is collaborating to prepare validation documentation to address the outstanding CANDU safety analysis issues in the validation of high temperature fuel and fuel channel behavior during a LOCA. The main issues being addressed are fuel channel integrity, fuel behavior during a power pulse, the source term for single channel events, flow blockage, accidents in the irradiated fuel port, and equipment qualification following a failure of emergency core cooling. The CANDU industry is combining its' plans for both fuel and fuel channels in a technical basis document, validation matrix, code validation plans, and code validation reports. Documentation, listed below, has been provided to the contractor for review with special emphasis on the validation of fuel behavior during a power pulse and pressure tube integrity during a large LOCA. The documents are: Draft Fuel and Fuel Channel Validation Matrix Report, 1996, June. SMARTT Validation Plan. Draft SMARTT Code Validation: Simulation of Pressure Tube Circumferential Temperature Distribution Experiments RSOAD report N-31 100-955015 September 1995. FACTAR Validation Plan. Draft FACTAR55 Module Validation Report. FACTAR 2.0 Module Validation, RSOAD report N-06631.01 P FACTAR. Validation QA Qualification Plan for Mini-SMARTT, Version 1.814. 'Fuel Channel Integrity Assessment' of Ontario Hydro RSOAD report N-03503.7-955045 R0, 1994 April. Emphasis on Appendix III. Draft SOURCE 2 Development Plan, 1996, February. (author)

  4. Solid fuels as engine fuels. Kiinteiden polttoaineiden kaeyttoemahdollisuudet moottoripolttoaineena

    Vakkilainen, A.; Nylund, N.-O.

    1986-07-01

    The use of solid fuels as engine fuels is discussed in this literature study. The present liquid fuel engines require extensive and expensive changes to overcome difficulties due to solid fuels. The solid particles result in increasing wear in the engine, in the fuel feed system and everywhere, where the particles come into touch with moving surfaces. The rate of wear has been as high as 100-fold compared to that caused by liquid fuels. Large medium-fast or slow diesel engines seem to meet best the requirements set by solid fuels. The experiment carried out by the Swiss Sulzer Engine Works are the most promising engine experiments carried out so far. In Sulzer's experiments, coal-water slurries containing 50-70 wt-% coal have been used as the fuel. Burning has been rather complete, but wear and the high price of the coal-water slurry seem to be unsolvable problems. The development work on enines is still at an early stage and a solid fuel engine will not be manufactured in series in the near future. The pulverous fuel of the future will be a mixture of some liquid and of some solid fuel powder, and hence the handling-technical problems will be considerably smaller than using powder only. Powder manufacture with the present techniques is energy-wasting. Most engine experiments have been carried out on on coal slurries with < 30 ..mu..m particle size. It is not economic to produce such powders at present.

  5. Development of DUPIC fuel cycle technology - Assessment of Wolsong NPP fuel handling system for DUPIC fuel

    Na, Bok Gyun; Nam, Gung Ihn [Korea Power Engineering Company, Taejon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    The DUPIC fuel loading and discharge path of Wolsong NPP is studied assuming that DUPIC fuel is used at Wolsong NPP. Spent DUPIC fuel discharge path is irrelevant, since it uses the same spent fuel discharge path. Number of factors such as safety, economics of design change, radiation exposure to operators, easy of operation and maintenance, etc, are considered in the evaluation of path. A more detailed analysis of cost estimation of the selected path is also carried out. The study shows that DUPIC fuel loading path following through Spent Fuel Storage Bay and Spent Fuel Discharge Port in reverse direction will minimize the design change and additional equipment and radiation exposure to operators. The estimated total cost of using DUPIC fuel in Wolsong NPP based on price index of year 2000 is around 4.5 billion won. 4 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs. (Author)

  6. Spent fuel storage system for LMFBR fuel experiments

    Fuel that had been irradiated in the Argonne National Laboratory Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) at Idaho Falls, Idaho, and examined at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory at Richland, Washington, was placed in long term retrievable storage utilizing a system designed at Hanford. The Spent Fuel Storage Cask system was designed for transport and storage of a large quantity of spent fuel at the Hanford 200 Area transuranic (TRU) asphalt storage pad. The entire system is designed for long term retrievable storage to allow future reprocessing of the fuel. The system was designed to meet the criticality, shielding, and thermal requirements for a maximum fuel load of four kilograms fissile. The Spent Fuel Storage Cask was built to transport and store the fuel from EBR-II on the TRU asphalt storage pad

  7. SEU43 fuel bundle shielding analysis during spent fuel transport

    Margeanu, C. A.; Ilie, P.; Olteanu, G. [Inst. for Nuclear Research Pitesti, No. 1 Campului Street, Mioveni 115400, Arges County (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    The basic task accomplished by the shielding calculations in a nuclear safety analysis consist in radiation doses calculation, in order to prevent any risks both for personnel protection and impact on the environment during the spent fuel manipulation, transport and storage. The paper investigates the effects induced by fuel bundle geometry modifications on the CANDU SEU spent fuel shielding analysis during transport. For this study, different CANDU-SEU43 fuel bundle projects, developed in INR Pitesti, have been considered. The spent fuel characteristics will be obtained by means of ORIGEN-S code. In order to estimate the corresponding radiation doses for different measuring points the Monte Carlo MORSE-SGC code will be used. Both codes are included in ORNL's SCALE 5 programs package. A comparison between the considered SEU43 fuel bundle projects will be also provided, with CANDU standard fuel bundle taken as reference. (authors)

  8. Fuel Cell Handbook, Fourth Edition

    Stauffer, D.B; Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Klett, M.G.; Engleman, R.R.

    1998-11-01

    Robust progress has been made in fuel cell technology since the previous edition of the Fuel Cell Handbook was published in January 1994. This Handbook provides a foundation in fuel cells for persons wanting a better understanding of the technology, its benefits, and the systems issues that influence its application. Trends in technology are discussed, including next-generation concepts that promise ultra high efficiency and low cost, while providing exceptionally clean power plant systems. Section 1 summarizes fuel cell progress since the last edition and includes existing power plant nameplate data. Section 2 addresses the thermodynamics of fuel cells to provide an understanding of fuel cell operation at two levels (basic and advanced). Sections 3 through 6 describe the four major fuel cell types and their performance based on cell operating conditions. The section on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells has been added to reflect their emergence as a significant fuel cell technology. Phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, and solid oxide fuel cell technology description sections have been updated from the previous edition. New information indicates that manufacturers have stayed with proven cell designs, focusing instead on advancing the system surrounding the fuel cell to lower life cycle costs. Section 7, Fuel Cell Systems, has been significantly revised to characterize near-term and next-generation fuel cell power plant systems at a conceptual level of detail. Section 8 provides examples of practical fuel cell system calculations. A list of fuel cell URLs is included in the Appendix. A new index assists the reader in locating specific information quickly.

  9. Fuel and control for an integrated fuel cell system

    The OS/IES (On-Site Integrated Energy System) comprises a phosphoric acid fuel cell driven total energy package that produces electrical energy in the form of AC power (when the DC voltage from the fuel cell is inverted), and heat energy in the form of hot water. The fuel cell prefers a fuel high in hydrogen therefore it becomes necessary to convert as much of the fuel, i.e. natural or pipeline gas into hydrogen as possible using a fuel reformer. Fuel reforming is an endothermic process and in this case waste energy in the form of ''spent'' fuel from the fuel cell is used to supply heat to the reformer. Fuel cell waste heat is also used to raise the steam used in the reforming process. The OS/IES fuel processing system comprises five interrelated subsystems. Each subsystem is controlled independently through a microprocessor but a change in any subsystem function could have an effect on the operation of any or several other subsystems. Thus the controller receives a signal indicating electrical demand and proceeds to balance the subsystems as well as the fuel and air flow to each of the fuel cells. The controller also responds to a number of alarm signals and is capable of starting and stopping the complete OS/IES. It is assisted by a tie to the utility line which can dispense electrical energy for startup or instantaneous load following and accept excess generated power in case of load loss. In this paper we review fuel cell operation and requirements, the components and interactions that make up the reformer system, and the microprocessor control required to integrate the OS/IES

  10. Sipping fuel and saving lives: increasing fuel economy withoutsacrificing safety

    Gordon, Deborah; Greene, David L.; Ross, Marc H.; Wenzel, Tom P.

    2007-06-11

    The public, automakers, and policymakers have long worried about trade-offs between increased fuel economy in motor vehicles and reduced safety. The conclusion of a broad group of experts on safety and fuel economy in the auto sector is that no trade-off is required. There are a wide variety of technologies and approaches available to advance vehicle fuel economy that have no effect on vehicle safety. Conversely, there are many technologies and approaches available to advance vehicle safety that are not detrimental to vehicle fuel economy. Congress is considering new policies to increase the fuel economy of new automobiles in order to reduce oil dependence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The findings reported here offer reassurance on an important dimension of that work: It is possible to significantly increase the fuel economy of motor vehicles without compromising their safety. Automobiles on the road today demonstrate that higher fuel economy and greater safety can co-exist. Some of the safest vehicles have higher fuel economy, while some of the least safe vehicles driven today--heavy, large trucks and SUVs--have the lowest fuel economy. At an October 3, 2006 workshop, leading researchers from national laboratories, academia, auto manufacturers, insurance research industry, consumer and environmental groups, material supply industries, and the federal government agreed that vehicles could be designed to simultaneously improve safety and fuel economy. The real question is not whether we can realize this goal, but the best path to get there. The experts' studies reveal important new conclusions about fuel economy and safety, including: (1) Vehicle fuel economy can be increased without affecting safety, and vice versa; (2) Reducing the weight and height of the heaviest SUVs and pickup trucks will simultaneously increase both their fuel economy and overall safety; and (3) Advanced materials can decouple size from mass, creating important new possibilities

  11. Checklist for transition to new highway fuel(s).

    Risch, C.; Santini, D.J. (Energy Systems)

    2011-12-15

    Transportation is vital to the U.S. economy and society. As such, U.S. Presidents have repeatedly stated that the nation needs to reduce dependence on petroleum, especially for the highway transportation sector. Throughout history, highway transportation fuel transitions have been completed successfully both in United States and abroad. Other attempts have failed, as described in Appendix A: Historical Highway Fuel Transitions. Planning for a transition is critical because the changes can affect our nation's ability to compete in the world market. A transition will take many years to complete. While it is tempting to make quick decisions about the new fuel(s) of choice, it is preferable and necessary to analyze all the pertinent criteria to ensure that correct decisions are made. Doing so will reduce the number of changes in highway fuel(s). Obviously, changes may become necessary because of occurrences such as significant technology breakthroughs or major world events. With any and all of the possible transitions to new fuel(s), the total replacement of gasoline and diesel fuels is not expected. These conventional fuels are envisioned to coexist with the new fuel(s) for decades, while the revised fuel and vehicle infrastructures are implemented. The transition process must analyze the needs of the primary 'players,' which consist of the customers, the government, the fuel industry, and the automotive industry. To maximize the probability of future successes, the prime considerations of these groups must be addressed. Section 2 presents a succinct outline of the Checklist. Section 3 provides a brief discussion about the groupings on the Checklist.

  12. Metallic fuel design development

    Hwang, Woan; Kang, H. Y.; Lee, B. O. and others

    1999-04-01

    This report describes the R and D results of the ''Metallic Fuel Design Development'' project that performed as a part of 'Nuclear Research and Development Program' during the '97 - '98 project years. The objectives of this project are to perform the analysis of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behaviors, and preliminary conceptual design for the fuel system of the KALIMER liquid metal reactor. The following are the major results that obtained through the project. The preliminary design requirements and design criteria which are necessary in conceptual design stage, are set up. In the field of fuel pin design, the pin behavior analysis, failure probability prediction, and sensitivity analysis are performed under the operation conditions of steady-state and transient accidents. In the area of assembly duct analysis; 1) KAFACON-2D program is developed to calculate an array configuration of inner shape of assembly duct, 2) Stress-strain analysis are performed for the components of assembly such as, handling socket, mounting rail and wire wrap, 3) The BDI program is developed to analyze mechanical interaction between pin bundle and duct, 4) a vibration analysis is performed to understand flow-induced vibration of assembly duct, 5) The NUBOW-2D, which is bowing and deformation analysis code for assembly duct, is modified to be operated in KALIMER circumstance, and integrity evaluation of KALIMER core assembly is carried out using the modified NUBOW-2D and the CRAMP code in U.K., and 6) The KALIMER assembly duct is manufactured to be used in flow test. In the area of non-fuel assembly, such as control, reflector, shielding, GEM and USS, the states-of-the-arts and the major considerations in designing are evaluated, and the design concepts are derived. The preliminary design description and their design drawing of KALIMER fuel system are prepared based upon the above mentioned evaluation and analysis. The achievement of conceptual

  13. Metallic fuel design development

    This report describes the R and D results of the ''Metallic Fuel Design Development'' project that performed as a part of 'Nuclear Research and Development Program' during the '97 - '98 project years. The objectives of this project are to perform the analysis of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behaviors, and preliminary conceptual design for the fuel system of the KALIMER liquid metal reactor. The following are the major results that obtained through the project. The preliminary design requirements and design criteria which are necessary in conceptual design stage, are set up. In the field of fuel pin design, the pin behavior analysis, failure probability prediction, and sensitivity analysis are performed under the operation conditions of steady-state and transient accidents. In the area of assembly duct analysis; 1) KAFACON-2D program is developed to calculate an array configuration of inner shape of assembly duct, 2) Stress-strain analysis are performed for the components of assembly such as, handling socket, mounting rail and wire wrap, 3) The BDI program is developed to analyze mechanical interaction between pin bundle and duct, 4) a vibration analysis is performed to understand flow-induced vibration of assembly duct, 5) The NUBOW-2D, which is bowing and deformation analysis code for assembly duct, is modified to be operated in KALIMER circumstance, and integrity evaluation of KALIMER core assembly is carried out using the modified NUBOW-2D and the CRAMP code in U.K., and 6) The KALIMER assembly duct is manufactured to be used in flow test. In the area of non-fuel assembly, such as control, reflector, shielding, GEM and USS, the states-of-the-arts and the major considerations in designing are evaluated, and the design concepts are derived. The preliminary design description and their design drawing of KALIMER fuel system are prepared based upon the above mentioned evaluation and analysis. The achievement of conceptual design technology on metallic fuel

  14. Fuel performance annual report for 1990

    This annual report, the thirteenth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1990 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience and trends, fuel problems high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided . References to additional, more detailed information, and related NRC evaluations are included where appropriate

  15. Third international conference on CANDU fuel

    These proceedings contain full texts of all 49 papers from the ten sessions and the banquet address. The sessions were on the following subjects: International experience and programs; Fuel behaviour and operating experience; Fuel modelling; Fuel design; Advanced fuel and fuel cycle technology; AECL's concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  16. 40 CFR 86.1513 - Fuel specifications.

    2010-07-01

    ... Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines, New Methanol-Fueled Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled Diesel-Cycle Heavy-Duty Engines, New Otto-Cycle Light-Duty Trucks, and New Methanol-Fueled Natural Gas-Fueled, and Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled Diesel-Cycle Light-Duty Trucks; Idle Test...

  17. Fuel Services Germany - AREVA NP

    AREVA NP has over 30 years of nuclear fuel inspection and repair experience. Our service staff is trained regularly and holds a long lasting experience in their field of work. Our services comprise all activities within examinations of lead test assemblies, all necessary inspections and tests of fuel assemblies and other core components during an outage, reconstitution of fuel assemblies for further use in the reactor and activities within the disposal of fuel assemblies and core components. Furthermore we deliver facilities and systems that are necessary for the above mentioned services. These are in particular facilities for inspections, sipping, repair and for disposal (e.g. conditioning equipment, facility for encapsulation of leaking fuel rods). Continuous research and development guarantee that the applied facilities always comply with the latest state of the art. They are suitable for a variety of fuel assembly designs of AREVA's and external supplier's latest and conventional technology. The facilities are applicable in different BWR-, PWR and VVER nuclear power plants. Inspections in PWR- and BWR Plants: - Measurements with contact and contact less measuring methods of fuel assemblies, fuel rods, fuel channels and other core components; - High-definition video inspections; - Mast-, In-core- and Box-sipping to detect defective fuel assemblies; - Support (e.g. measurements on site) for post irradiation examinations; - Sampling of material (e.g. taking CRUD or material probes) and fuel rod preparation for hot cell examination. Repair in PWR- and BWR Plants: - Exchange of defective fuel rods of a fuel assembly for further use in the reactor and preparation of the fuel assembly or defective fuel rod for disposal; - Reconstitution of fuel assemblies with damaged structure parts (spacer, springs, upper-and lower end fitting). We offer products that meet the requirements of pressure-tightness under water (e. g. for use in the fuel storage pool), that are

  18. Spacer for a fuel element

    Spacers for fuel pins arranged to form congish fuel elements can be shaped as plates with openings in accordance with the fuel pin grid. Such a plate that covers the cross section of a fuel element consists according to the invention of at least two parts that are offset in the fuel element's longitudinal direction and joint hinge-like in at least one grid position. Thus, one has smaller parts that are easier to work on with due accuracy. The invention is designed in particular for breeder reactors and high-conversion reactors. (orig.)

  19. Method of loading fuel assembly

    Purpose: To shorten the fuel assembly loading time by loading fuel assembly group as one body into the reactor core. Method: A fuel assembly is fed from an auxiliary reactor building via a pit crane into the reactor container, and is stood from lateral position to vertical position. Further, the fuel assemblies are moved laterallyiin a pool of the container, and every four assembly groups are formed by an aligning jig. These assembly groups are associated into one body and loaded into the container. Thus, the round trip time of the crane in the fuel assembly loading work can be shortened. (Yoshihara, H.)

  20. New technology and fuel cycles

    The means of improving uranium utilization in nuclear power reactors are reviewed with respect to economic considerations, assurance of adequate fuel supplies and risk of weapons proliferation. Reference is made to what can be done to improve fuel economy in existing reactor systems operating on a once-through fuel cycle and the potential for improvement offered by fuel recycle in those systems. The state of development of new reactor systems that offer significant savings in uranium utilization is also reviewed and conclusions are made respecting the policy implications of the search for fuel economy. (author)

  1. South Korea's nuclear fuel industry

    March 1990 marked a major milestone for South Korea's nuclear power program, as the country became self-sufficient in nuclear fuel fabrication. The reconversion line (UF6 to UO2) came into full operation at the Korea Nuclear Fuel Company's fabrication plant, as the last step in South Korea's program, initiated in the mid-1970s, to localize fuel fabrication. Thus, South Korea now has the capability to produce both CANDU and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. This article covers the nuclear fuel industry in South Korea-how it is structures, its current capabilities, and its outlook for the future

  2. Alcohol fuels for developing countries

    The importance of alcohol as an alternative fuel has been slowly established. In countries such as Brazil, they are already used in transport and other sectors of economy. Other developing countries are also trying out experiments with alcohol fuels. Chances of improving the economy of many developing nations depends to a large extent on the application of this fuel. The potential for alcohol fuels in developing countries should be considered as part of a general biomass-use strategy. The final strategies for the development of alcohol fuel will necessarily reflect the needs, values, and conditions of the individual nations, regions, and societies that develop them. (author). 5 refs

  3. Spent-fuel-storage alternatives

    1980-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

  4. 78 FR 14190 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Identification of Additional Qualifying Renewable Fuel...

    2013-03-05

    ...'') for the qualifying renewable fuels they produce through approved fuel pathways. See 75 FR 14670 (March 26, 2010); 75 FR 26026 (May 10, 2010); 75 FR 37733 (June 30, 2010); 75 FR 59622 (September 28, 2010... FR 74592 (December 17, 2012). By qualifying these new fuel pathways, this rule provides...

  5. KNFC Fuel cleaning technology development

    The filtration system to collect crud particles detached from the fuel assemblies was also developed. The fuel cleaning system connected with the filtration system was successfully demonstrated at Ulchin plant 2. Within several minutes detachable crud deposits were effectively removed from the clad surfaces of the fuel assembly. Also to characterize the crud particles for each fuel assembly, a small crud sampling device was connected with the filtration system during the cleaning operation. Crud samples were acquired from crud sampling device of fuel cleaning and fuel rod using sticky tape and steel knife analysis at two plants, respectively. Crud analysis in pie facility showed that 95wt% crud particles can be collected by a 0.5μm filtering system and major compositions were Ni, Fe, and Cr. KNFC constructed and qualified the complete fuel cleaning system

  6. Gas fuels in the world

    Gas fuels are the petroleum substitution fuels that have received the best agreement in most parts of the world. This success is due to the existence of natural gas fields or LPG reserves in several countries and to the possibility of fast development of these resources. Countries with various size and economic policy such as New Zealand, USA, Argentina, Japan or Italy have developed a very significant fleet of gas fuel vehicles. This paper summarizes the consumption of gas fuels, the number of gas fuel equipped vehicles and of gas fuel stations in the principal consuming countries. The size and composition of vehicle fleets varies from one country to the other and depends on the economical and environmental incitements and constraints from the governments. Details are given separately for LPG and natural gas vehicle fuels. (J.S.)

  7. Nuclear fuel irradiation in ACPR

    Ciocanescu, M.; Negut, G.; Costescu, C.; Georgescu, D.; Pop, I. (Institute for Nuclear Power Reactors, Pitesti (Romania))

    1984-07-01

    For our fuel program, experiments were proposed on CANDU fuel in ACPR in pulsing regimes. These experiments were intended to determine the fuel behavior during large deposition of heat, fuel-clad interaction mechanisms, and failure thresholds. The fuel is 159 mm long, 6.5% enriched UO{sub 2}. The capsule used for irradiation is an atmospheric capsule assembled in the central dry tube. The capsule is 1 m long, 12 cm i.d., and is locked on the lead ballast through a locking device. The fuel is instrumented with three thermocouples (for clad temperature) and a fission gas transducer. The coolant pressure and temperature are also measured. During irradiation, the data are recorded by a high-speed magnetic tape recorder. For the first campaign, three fuel elements will be irradiated. (orig.)

  8. Status of RERTR fuel demonstrations

    Snelgrove, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    The fuel demonstration activity of the US RERTR Program is moving ahead on several fronts with the active participation by European fuel fabricators and reactor operators. A number of fuel elements are currently being fabricated or will soon be fabricated for irradiation in several reactors in the US and Europe. A whole-core demonstration of the physics properties of LEU fuel is scheduled to begin in about half a year. The data from the irradiations and the whole-core demonstration are expected to show, by early 1983, that the near-term intermediate-density LEU fuels can indeed be used reliably and safely. A full demonstration of fuel-cycle economics must await, however, results of a second whole-core demonstration or the establishment of an equilibrium fuel cycle in the FNR. In either case several more years will have passed before such data is available.

  9. TACO: fuel pin performance analysis

    The thermal performance of fuel in an LWR during its operational lifetime must be described for LOCA analysis as well as for other safety analyses. The determination of stored energy in the LOCA analysis, for example, requires a conservative fuel pin thermal performance model that is capable of calculating fuel and cladding behavior, including the gap conductance between the fuel and cladding, as a function of burnup. The determination of parameters that affect the fuel and cladding performance, such as fuel densification, fission gas release, cladding dimensional changes, fuel relocation, and thermal expansion, should be accounted for in the model. Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) has submitted a topical report, BAW-10087P, December 1975, which describes their thermal performance model TACO. A summary of the elements that comprise the TACO model and an evaluation are presented

  10. Sensor system for fuel transport vehicle

    Earl, Dennis Duncan; McIntyre, Timothy J.; West, David L.

    2016-03-22

    An exemplary sensor system for a fuel transport vehicle can comprise a fuel marker sensor positioned between a fuel storage chamber of the vehicle and an access valve for the fuel storage chamber of the vehicle. The fuel marker sensor can be configured to measure one or more characteristics of one or more fuel markers present in the fuel adjacent the sensor, such as when the marked fuel is unloaded at a retail station. The one or more characteristics can comprise concentration and/or identity of the one or more fuel markers in the fuel. Based on the measured characteristics of the one or more fuel markers, the sensor system can identify the fuel and/or can determine whether the fuel has been adulterated after the marked fuel was last measured, such as when the marked fuel was loaded into the vehicle.

  11. Synthetic Fuels Program

    Studies on waste water derived from synthetic fuel processes included acute toxicity of coal conversion effluent components and acute toxicity of aqueous waste and wastewater components of the ORNL Bench-Scale hydrocarbonization process. The potential hazards of synthetic fuels technology development to terrestrial ecosystems were studied with regard to toxicity of PAH and azaarenes. Aquatic transport studies included the following: aquatic transport of PAH and rates of PAH photolysis at the Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, coking plant site; microbial transformations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water and sediment samples; persistence of azaarenes in aquatic systems; bioaccumulation of pathways of azaarenes; sorption of PAH to suspended particles in natural waters; and transport and fate of anthracene in pond microcosms. Studies were also conducted on environmental characterization of solid waste from a Lurgi facility

  12. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    The description is given of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising fuel elements arranged in a supporting frame composed of two end pieces, one at the top and the other at the bottom, on which are secured the ends of a number of vertical tubes, each end piece comprising a plane bottom on which two series of holes are made for holding the tubes and for the passage of the coolant. According to the invention, the bottom of each end piece is fixed to an internal plate fitted with the same series of holes for holding the tubes and for the fluid to pass through. These holes are of oblong section and are fitted with fixing elements cooperating with corresponding elements for securing these tubes by transversal movement of the inside plate

  13. Fuel rod attachment system

    A reusable system for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support member. A locking cap is secured to the fuel rod and a locking strip is fastened to the support member or vice versa. The locking cap has two opposing fingers and shaped to form a socket having a body portion. The locking strip has an extension shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion. The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip causing the extension to temporarily deflect open the fingers to engage the socket's body portion. For removal, the process is reversed. In an alternative embodiment, the cap is rigid and the strip is transversely resiliently compressible. (author)

  14. Winter fuels report

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD's I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD's, as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city

  15. Fuel formula for lighters

    Iwayama, I.; Iwayama, A.

    1982-04-10

    A fuel formula that includes a homogenous mixture of benzine, aromatic ether oils, perfume and other perfuming agents, as well as the lowest possible aliphatic alcohol as a component solvent, surfactant, and possibly, a soluble pigment that colors the formula an appropriate color. This formula is used as an aromatic fuel for cigarette lights. The ether oils can be musk, amber, camomille, lavender, mint, anise, rose, camphor, and other aromatic oils; the perfuming agents are: geraniol, linalool, menthol, camphor, benzyl or phenetyl alcohols, phenylacetaldehyde, vanillin, coumarin, and so forth; the pigments are: beta-carotene, sudan dyes, etc.; the low aliphatic alcohols are EtOH, iso-PrOH. Example: 70 parts benzine, 10 parts EtOH, 15 parts oxide mezithylene and 5 parts borneol form a clear liquid that has a camphor aroma when it is lit.

  16. Operando fuel cell spectroscopy

    Kendrick, Ian Michael

    The active state of a catalyst only exists during catalysis (1) provided the motivation for developing operando spectroscopic techniques. A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was designed to interface with commercially available instruments for acquisition of infrared spectra of the catalytic surface of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) during normal operation. This technique has provided insight of the complex processes occurring at the electrode surface. Nafion, the solid electrolyte used in most modern-day polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), serves many purposes in fuel cell operation. However, there is little known of the interface between Nafion and the electrode surface. Previous studies of complex Stark tuning curves of carbon monoxide on the surface of a platinum electrode were attributed the co-adsorption of bisulfite ions originating from the 0.5M H2SO4 electrolyte used in the study(2). Similar tuning curves obtained on a fuel cell MEA despite the absence of supplemental electrolytes suggest the adsorption of Nafion onto platinum (3). The correlation of spectra obtained using attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy (ATR) and polarization modulated IR reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) to a theoretical spectrum generated using density functional theory (DFT) lead to development of a model of Nafion and platinum interaction which identified participation of the SO3- and CF3 groups in Nafion adsorption. The use of ethanol as a fuel stream in proton exchange membrane fuel cells provides a promising alternative to methanol. Relative to methanol, ethanol has a greater energy density, lower toxicity and can be made from the fermentation of biomass(4). Operando IR spectroscopy was used to study the oxidation pathway of ethanol and Stark tuning behavior of carbon monoxide on Pt, Ru, and PtRu electrodes. Potential dependent products such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and carbon monoxide are identified as well as previously

  17. Fuel rod fixing system

    This is a reusable system for fixing a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support. An interlock cap is fixed to the fuel rod and an interlock strip is fixed to the support. The interlock cap has two opposed fingers, which are shaped so that a base is formed with a body part. The interlock strip has an extension, which is shaped so that this is rigidly fixed to the body part of the base. The fingers of the interlock cap are elastic in bending. To fix it, the interlock cap is pushed longitudinally on to the interlock strip, which causes the extension to bend the fingers open in order to engage with the body part of the base. To remove it, the procedure is reversed. (orig.)

  18. Nuclear fuel rod

    Purpose: To prevent eutectic reaction between coil spring material and end plug material at the welding work of fuel fabrication. Constitution: Close-contact windings are formed at the end of a coil spring, and base end of a stainless steel supporting member is screwed to the close-contact winding portion of the coil spring. The other end of the supporting member is formed in a conical shape whose apex is in contact with the center of the bottom surface of a zirconium alloy end plug of a cladding tube. In the fuel rod thus constructed, the heating temperature of the end contact portion of the supporting member, at the time of welding the end plug to the cladding tube, can be somewhat lower than the eutectic temperatures of iron, chromium, nickel (the main ingredients of the stainless steel) and zirconium (the main ingredient of the end plug), and accourdingly no eutectic reaction occurs. (Yoshihara, H.)

  19. Winter fuels report

    1995-02-17

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide consise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; Natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s as well as selected National average prices; Residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; Crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and A 6-10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree days by city.

  20. BIODIESEL – ALTERNATIVE FUEL

    Darko Kiš

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A limited quantity of oil, the purchase of which also involves major expenses has become an important factor for intensive search and use of alternative fuels. Biodiesel is used in diesel engines, and is manufactured from vegetable oils, animal fats and recycled edible oils. The production and use of biodiesel are very important not only because of its economic and strategic connotations but also because of its environmental advantages. Favourable conditions in Croatia give good opportunities for a self-sufficient oil rape production, possibility for its intensification and employment of a number of people in both the agricultural production and biodiesel production plants. This paper presents a survey of the biodiesel fuel production, the characteristics and impacts it has on the biodiesel engine features as well as its impact on the environment.

  1. Gaseous fuel reactor research

    Thom, K.; Schneider, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews studies dealing with the concept of a gaseous fuel reactor and describes the structure and plans of the current NASA research program of experiments on uranium hexafluoride systems and uranium plasma systems. Results of research into the basic properties of uranium plasmas and fissioning gases are reported. The nuclear pumped laser is described, and the main results of experiments with these devices are summarized.

  2. Nuclear fuel reprocessing method

    In a nuclear fuel reprocessing method for supplying nitrogen oxides used for driving out iodine and for oxidizing plutonium, according to the present invention, nitric acid is decomposed in a nitrogen oxide production step to form nitrogen oxides. The nitrogen oxides formed are supplied to the reprocessing step described above. Excess nitric acid recovered from the reprocessing step is recycled to the nitrogen oxide production step. Accordingly, the amount of wastes discharged from the reprocessing step is remarkably reduced. (T.M.)

  3. Industrial Fuel Flexibility Workshop

    none,

    2006-09-01

    On September 28, 2006, in Washington, DC, ITP and Booz Allen Hamilton conducted a fuel flexibility workshop with attendance from various stakeholder groups. Workshop participants included representatives from the petrochemical, refining, food and beverage, steel and metals, pulp and paper, cement and glass manufacturing industries; as well as representatives from industrial boiler manufacturers, technology providers, energy and waste service providers, the federal government and national laboratories, and developers and financiers.

  4. Fuel storage systems

    Donakowski, T.D.; Tison, R.R.

    1979-08-01

    Storage technologies are characterized for solid, liquid, and gaseous fuels. Emphasis is placed on storage methods applicable to Integrated Community Energy Systems based on coal. Items discussed here include standard practice, materials and energy losses, environmental effects, operating requirements, maintenance and reliability, and cost considerations. All storage systems were found to be well-developed and to represent mature technologies; an exception may exist for low-Btu gas storage, which could have materials incompatability.

  5. Fuel for Economic Growth?

    Gars, Johan; Olovsson, Conny

    2015-01-01

    We set up an endogenous growth model in which the efficiency of both capital and fossil energy can be improved, whereas the efficiency of one alternative energy source is limited. With capital and energy as complements, there exist two steady states: one stagnant where energy is fully derived from the alternative energy source, and one with balanced growth where energy is fully sourced from fossil fuel. Heterogeneity in initial TFP levels can generate the Great Divergence. The demand for foss...

  6. Fuel for economic growth?

    Gars, Johan; Olovsson, Conny

    2015-01-01

    We set up an endogenous growth model in which the efficiency of both capital and fossil energy can be improved, whereas the efficiency of one alternative energy source is limited. With capital and energy as complements, there exist two steady states: one stagnant where energy is fully derived from the alternative energy source, and one with balanced growth where energy is fully sourced from fossil fuel. Heterogeneity in initial TFP levels can generate the Great Divergence. The demand for foss...

  7. Nuclear fuel assembly spacer

    A spacer for use in a fuel assembly of a nuclear reactor having thin, full-height divider members, slender spring members and laterally oriented rigid stops and wherein the total amount of spacer material, the amount of high neutron cross section material, the projected area of the spacer structure and changes in cross section area of the spacer structure are minimized whereby neutron absorption by the spacer and coolant flow resistance through the spacer are minimized

  8. Alternative fuel cycles

    Uranium resource utilization and economic considerations provide incentives to study alternative fuel cycles as future options to the PHWR natural uranium cycle. Preliminary studies to define the most favourable alternatives and their possible introduction dates are discussed. The important and uncertain components which influence option selection are reviewed, including nuclear capacity growth, uranium availability and demand, economic potential, and required technological developments. Finally, a summary of Ontario Hydro's program to further assess cycle selection and define development needs is given. (auth)

  9. Uranium dioxide Caramel fuel

    The work performed in France on Caramel fuels for research reactors reflects the reality of a program based on non proliferation criteria, as they have already appeared several years ago. This work actually includes the following different aspects: identification of the non proliferation criterion defining this action; determination of the economical and technical goals to be reached; realization of research and development studies finalized in a full scale demonstration; transposition to an industrial and commercial level

  10. Advanced coated particle fuels

    The coated particle fuel (cpf) has been developed for use in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors, but it may find applications in other types of reactors. In JAERI, besides the development of cpf for High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, conceptual studies of the cpf applications in actinide burner reactors and space reactors have been made. The conceptual design studies as well as the research and development of advanced coatings, ZrC and TiN, are reviewed. (author)

  11. Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Dale, Deborah J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-28

    These slides will be presented at the training course “International Training Course on Implementing State Systems of Accounting for and Control (SSAC) of Nuclear Material for States with Small Quantity Protocols (SQP),” on November 3-7, 2014 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The slides provide a basic overview of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. This is a joint training course provided by NNSA and IAEA.

  12. Road Transportation of Fuel

    Skopalová, Lenka

    2009-01-01

    The thesis is concerned with road transportation of fuel. In theoretical part there are described the legal clauses that are related to this issue. The most detailed regulations can be found in the European Agreement on the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (so called Agreement ADR). Hence the biggest part of the theoretical section is devoted to these regulations. Instructions for transportation of diesel and petrol have been chosen from this international agreement and expla...

  13. Project fuel development

    The activities continued on lab-scale production of uranium-plutonium carbide fuel for the fast reactor using gelation methods, irradiation testing and performance evaluation. Whereas in earlier years a balance was maintained between research and development or with emphasis on research, 1980 was marked by a concentrated equipment development effort for an increased throughput with improved process control and product reproducability and installation of new equipment for large pin fabrication. (Auth.)

  14. The nuclear fuel cycle

    The papers presented at the International Conference on The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, held at Stockholm, 28 to 31 October 1975, are reviewed. The meeting, organised by the U.S. Atomic Industrial Forum, and the Swedish Nuclear Forum, was concerned more particularly with economic, political, social and commercial aspects than with tecnology. The papers discussed were considered under the subject heading of current status, uranium resources, enrichment, and reprocessing. (U.K.)

  15. Nuclear fuel control in fuel fabrication plants

    The basic control problems of measuring uranium and of the environment inside and outside nuclear fuel fabrication plants are reviewed, excluding criticality prevention in case of submergence. The occurrence of loss scraps in fabrication and scrap-recycling, the measuring error, the uranium going cut of the system, the confirmation of the presence of lost uranium and the requirement of the measurement control for safeguard make the measurement control very complicated. The establishment of MBA (material balance area) and ICA (item control area) can make clearer the control of inventories, the control of loss scraps and the control of measuring points. Besides the above basic points, the following points are to be taken into account: 1) the method of confirmation of inventories, 2) the introduction of reliable NDT instruments for the rapid check system for enrichment and amount of uranium, 3) the introduction of real time system, and 4) the clarification of MUF analysis and its application to the reliability check of measurement control system. The environment control includes the controls of the uranium concentration in factory atmosphere, the surface contamination, the space dose rate, the uranium concentration in air and water discharged from factories, and the uranium in liquid wastes. The future problems are the practical restudy of measurement control under NPT, the definite plan of burglary protection and the realization of the disposal of solid wastes. (Iwakiri, K.)

  16. Motor fuel prices in Turkey

    The world's most expensive motor fuel (gasoline, diesel and LPG) is sold most likely in the Republic of Turkey. This paper investigates the key issues related to the motor fuel prices in Turkey. First of all, the paper analyses the main reason behind high prices, namely motor fuel taxes in Turkey. Then, it estimates the elasticity of motor fuel demand in Turkey using an econometric analysis. The findings indicate that motor fuel demand in Turkey is quite inelastic and, therefore, not responsive to price increases caused by an increase in either pre-tax prices or taxes. Therefore, fuel market in Turkey is open to opportunistic behavior by firms (through excessive profits) and the government (through excessive taxes). Besides, the paper focuses on the impact of high motor fuel prices on road transport associated activities, including the pattern of passenger transportation, motorization rate, fuel use, total kilometers traveled and CO2 emissions from road transportation. The impact of motor fuel prices on income distribution in Turkey and Turkish public opinion about high motor fuel prices are also among the subjects investigated in the course of the study. - Highlights: • The key issues (e.g. taxes) related to motor fuel prices in Turkey are explored. • Their impact on transport activities and income distribution is also investigated. • An econometric analysis is performed to estimate motor fuel demand in Turkey. • Motor fuel demand in Turkey is found to be quite inelastic. • Turkish fuel market is open to opportunistic behavior by firms and the government

  17. Proceedings of fuel strategies for conventional and unconventional fuels

    Fuel selection is a major decision for a power engineer. It is the single largest item in the power plant operating budget and has a major effect on power plant economics. Fuel determines plant design requirements and the types of systems that are provided. As a result, it affects capital budgets and financing requirements. In the last few decades, we have seen different fuels of choice at any one time. Coal has always been a staple for power generation. During the 1950s and 1960s, oil became an attractive alternative. Nuclear fuel became a popular choice due to its very low energy cost. After Three-Mile-Island, however, capital budgets went through the roof, resulting in severe financial constraints. Natural gas, which was rationed in some regions a few years ago, is now a popular choice. Some sources predict that its cost will increase faster than other fuels. To mitigate the relative variations in energy cost for different fuels, a balanced energy plan is required. A balanced power generation plan with fuel options provides the flexibility to react to unpredictable changes. The papers in this book are a continuation of the Fuel Strategies theme. Three technical topics are covered: Converting to Orimulsion, A Replacement Fuel for Heavy Oil; Innovations in Handling Conventional and Unconventional Fuels for Power Plants; and Pacific Rim Experience With Coal

  18. Fuel thermal behavior

    In order to get an overall experimental validation of our thermal calculations we need to cover the entire range of the pin life. Actually the method cannot be the same for the beginning of life (B.O.L.) and end of life. For B.O.L. it is possible to get a direct thermal measure through thermocouples, but this method is no longer practicable after some days due to the failure of the thermocouple under neutrons flux at the temperatures of interest. This failure may happen before or after complete gap closure is reached and the rate of gap closure is especially meaningful for the B.O.L. thermal behaviour. An other aspect of the thermal behaviour is the statistical one which may be got thanks to the post-irradiation examination of the fuel microstructure; although it is not a proper means to get the absolute temperatures in the fuel it is one of the most direct ones to have an insight in fuel thermal dispersion at B.O.L. and over-heating at end of live

  19. nuclear fuel design criteria

    Nuclear fuel design is strictly dependent on reactor type and experiences obtained from performance of nuclear fuels. The objectives of the design are reliability, and economy. Nuclear fuel design requires an interdisciplinary work which has to cover, at least nuclear design, thermalhydraulic design, mechanical design, and material properties.The procedure of design, as describe in the quality assurance, consist of a number of steps. The most important parts are: Design description or inputs, preliminary design, detailed design and design output, and design verification. The first step covers objectives and requirements, as defined by the customer and by the regulatory authority for product performance,environmental factors, safety, etc. The second describes assumptions and alternatives, safety, economy and engineering analyses. The third covers technical specifications, design drawings, selection of QA program category, etc. The most important form of design verification is design review by qualified independent internal or external reviewers. The scope of the review depends on the specific character of the design work. Personnel involved in verification and review do not assume prime responsibility for detecting errors. Responsibility for the design remains with the personnel involved in the design work

  20. Fuel cell generator

    A high temperature solid electrolyte fuel cell generator comprising a housing means defining a plurality of chambers including a generator chamber and a combustion products chamber, a porous barrier separating the generator and combustion product chambers, a plurality of elongated annular fuel cells each having a closed end and an open end with the open ends disposed within the combustion product chamber, the cells extending from the open end through the porous barrier and into the generator chamber, a conduit for each cell, each conduit extending into a portion of each cell disposed within the generator chamber, each conduit having means for discharging a first gaseous reactant within each fuel cell, exhaust means for exhausting the combustion product chamber, manifolding means for supplying the first gaseous reactant to the conduits with the manifolding means disposed within the combustion product chamber between the porous barrier and the exhaust means and the manifolding means further comprising support and bypass means for providing support of the manifolding means within the housing while allowing combustion products from the first and a second gaseous reactant to flow past the manifolding means to the exhaust means, and means for flowing the second gaseous reactant into the generator chamber

  1. Ethanol fuels in Brazil

    The largest alternative transportation fuels program in the world today is Brazil's Proalcool Program. About 6.0 million metric tons of oil equivalent (MTOE) of ethanol, derived mainly from sugar cane, were consumed as transportation fuels in 1991 (equivalent to 127,000 barrels of crude oil per day). Total primary energy consumed by the Brazilian economy in 1991 was 184.1 million MTOE, and approximately 4.3 million vehicles -- about one third of the total vehicle fleet or about 40 percent of the total car population -- run on hydrous or open-quotes neatclose quotes ethanol at the azeotropic composition (96 percent ethanol, 4 percent water, by volume). Additional transportation fuels available in the country are diesel and gasoline, the latter of which is defined by three grades. Gasoline A (regular, leaded gas)d has virtually been replaced by gasoline C, a blend of gasoline and up to 22 percent anhydrous ethanol by volume, and gasoline B (premium gasoline) has been discontinued as a result of neat ethanol market penetration

  2. Nuclear fuel assembly

    In a nuclear fuel assembly comprising a nuclear fuel bundle in which a plurality of nuclear rods are bond by an upper tie plate, spacers and lower tie plate and a channel box containing them, the inner surface of the channel box and the surface of the lower tie plate opposing thereto are fabricated into step-like configuration respectively and the two fabricated surfaces are opposed to each other to constitute a step-like labyrinth flow channel. With such a configuration, when a fluid flows from higher pressure to lower pressure side, pressure loss is caused due to fluid friction in proportion with the length of the flow channel, due to the change of the flowing direction and, further, in accordance with deceleration or acceleration at each of the stepped portions. The total for each of the pressure loses constitutes the total pressure loss in the labyrinth. That is, if the pressure difference between the inside and the outside of the channel box is identical, the amount of leakage is reduced by so much as the increase of the total pressure loss, to thereby improve the stability of the reactor core and fuel economy. (T.M.)

  3. Fuels from microalgae

    1989-06-01

    Many species of aquatic plants can provide a source of renewable energy. Some species of microalgae, in particular, produce lipids -- oils that can be extracted and converted to a diesel fuel substitute or to gasoline. Since 1979 the Aquatic Species Program element of the Biofuels Program, has supported fundamental and applied research to develop the technology for using this renewable energy resource. This document, produced by the Solar Technical Information Program, provides an overview of the DOE/SERI Aquatic Species Program element. Chapter 1 is an introduction to the program and to the microalgae. Chapter 2 is an overview of the general principles involved in making fuels from microalgae. It also outlines the technical challenges to producing economic, high-energy transportation fuels. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the Algal Production and Economic Model (APEM). This model was developed by researchers within the program to identify aspects of the process critical to performance with the greatest potential to reduce costs. The analysis using this model has helped direct research sponsored by the program. Finally, Chapter 4 provides an overview of the Aquatic Species Program and describes current research. 28 refs., 17 figs.

  4. Alternate fuels; Combustibles alternos

    Romero Paredes R, Hernando; Ambriz G, Juan Jose [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana. Iztapalapa (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In the definition and description of alternate fuels we must center ourselves in those technological alternatives that allow to obtain compounds that differ from the traditional ones, in their forms to be obtained. In this article it is tried to give an overview of alternate fuels to the conventional derivatives of petroleum and that allow to have a clear idea on the tendencies of modern investigation and the technological developments that can be implemented in the short term. It is not pretended to include all the tendencies and developments of the present world, but those that can hit in a relatively short term, in accordance with agreed with the average life of conventional fuels. Nevertheless, most of the conversion principles are applicable to the spectrum of carbonaceous or cellulosic materials which are in nature, are cultivated or wastes of organic origin. Thus one will approach them in a successive way, the physical, chemical and biological conversions that can take place in a production process of an alternate fuel or the same direct use of the fuel such as burning the sweepings derived from the forests. [Spanish] En la definicion y descripcion de combustibles alternos nos debemos centrar en aquellas alternativas tecnologicas que permitan obtener compuestos que difieren de los tradicionales, al menos en sus formas de ser obtenidos. En este articulo se pretende dar un panorama de los combustibles alternos a los convencionales derivados del petroleo y que permita tener una idea clara sobre las tendencias de la investigacion moderna y los desarrollos tecnologicos que puedan ser implementados en el corto plazo. No se pretende abarcar todas las tendencias y desarrollos del mundo actual, sino aquellas que pueden impactar en un plazo relativamente corto, acordes con la vida media de los combustibles convencionales. Sin embargo, la mayor parte de los principios de conversion son aplicables al espectro de materiales carbonaceos o celulosicos los cuales se

  5. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  6. Sustainability of Fossil Fuels

    Lackner, K. S.

    2002-05-01

    For a sustainable world economy, energy is a bottleneck. Energy is at the basis of a modern, technological society, but unlike materials it cannot be recycled. Energy or more precisely "negentropy" (the opposite of entropy) is always consumed. Thus, one either accepts the use of large but finite resources or must stay within the limits imposed by dilute but self-renewing resources like sunlight. The challenge of sustainable energy is exacerbated by likely growth in world energy demand due to increased population and increased wealth. Most of the world still has to undergo the transition to a wealthy, stable society with the near zero population growth that characterizes a modern industrial society. This represents a huge unmet demand. If ten billion people were to consume energy like North Americans do today, world energy demand would be ten times higher. In addition, technological advances while often improving energy efficiency tend to raise energy demand by offering more opportunity for consumption. Energy consumption still increases at close to the 2.3% per year that would lead to a tenfold increase over the course of the next century. Meeting future energy demands while phasing out fossil fuels appears extremely difficult. Instead, the world needs sustainable or nearly sustainable fossil fuels. I propose the following definition of sustainable under which fossil fuels would well qualify: The use of a technology or resource is sustainable if the intended and unintended consequences will not force its abandonment within a reasonable planning horizon. Of course sustainable technologies must not be limited by resource depletion but this is only one of many concerns. Environmental impacts, excessive land use, and other constraints can equally limit the use of a technology and thus render it unsustainable. In the foreseeable future, fossil fuels are not limited by resource depletion. However, environmental concerns based on climate change and other environmental

  7. Advances in ultrasonic fuel cleaning

    Ultrasonic fuel cleaning has been demonstrated to be effective for avoiding or postponing the axial offset anomaly (AOA) in high-duty PWRs. In addition, the reduction in corrosion product inventory achieved by this method of fuel cleaning has been shown to reduce ex-core dose rates, and hence reduce personnel exposure. Through laboratory mock-up tests as well as tests on discharged fuel in the Callaway spent fuel pool, the EPRI ultrasonic fuel cleaning system was demonstrated to clean crud from fuel rods throughout the assembly without deleterious effects on fuel integrity. This paper presents details of the evaluation tests at AmerenUE's Callaway PWR, as well as the full-reload ultrasonic cleaning for Cycle 12. Ninety-six once-burned fuel assemblies were cleaned via the EPRI ultrasonic process during refueling outage 11 in April 2001. Fuel cleaning activities presented no special problems in or around the fuel pool, neither in terms of activity nor in terms of turbidity of the pool water, nor were special radiological situations encountered by personnel working in the area. The corrosion products were captured on cartridge filters designed to avoid loss of material into the fuel pool water during interim storage. Activity levels on the cartridges were maintained sufficiently low for ease of handling, processing, and shipment in Radwaste. The fuel cleaning operation was completed within a time window of approximately 48 hours. The cleaned fuel was returned to service in May 2001 for Cycle 12. To date, this fuel cycle remains free of AOA (Axial Offset Anomaly). This result is in contrast to earlier cycles of similar design and power duty, but without reload fuel cleaning. These cycles were operated at a reduced TAVE in order to mitigate AOA. Nevertheless, Cycle 11 experienced AOA starting as early as 6 GWD/MTU. Based on the favorable Cycle 12 data, the utility intends to institute fuel cleaning as a routine outage activity, thus expecting to recover the TAVE

  8. Fuel property effects on Navy aircraft fuel systems

    Moses, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Problems of ensuring compatibility of Navy aircraft with fuels that may be different than the fuels for which the equipment was designed and qualified are discussed. To avoid expensive requalification of all the engines and airframe fuel systems, methodologies to qualify future fuels by using bench-scale and component testing are being sought. Fuel blends with increasing JP5-type aromatic concentration were seen to produce less volume swell than an equivalent aromatic concentration in the reference fuel. Futhermore, blends with naphthenes, decalin, tetralin, and naphthalenes do not deviate significantly from the correlation line of aromatic blends, Similar results are found with tensile strenth and elongation. Other elastomers, sealants, and adhesives are also being tested.

  9. Fuel miniplate thickness measurement system for dispersion fuel swelling evaluation

    This paper presents the commissioning test results of a system designed for fuel swelling evaluation, and constructed at IPEN-CNEN/SP. The system will be used in the qualification process of U3O8-Al and U3Si2-Al dispersion fuels with 3.0 gU/cm3 and 4.8 gU/cm3, respectively. The determination of the fuel swelling will be performed by means of fuel miniplate thickness measurements along the irradiation time, during the shutdown period between the operational cycles of the IEA-R1 reactor. The system will be located at the reactor pool fuel storage area and it will be operated from the reactor pool border, allowing the measurement of the fuel miniplate thickness along its surface by electronic probes (LVDT). The results will be obtained by the instrumentation connected to the probes. (author)

  10. Agro-fuels and environment

    The first contributions of this collective report are presenting the French first generation agro-fuel industry, its production, its usages, and its public incentives. Then, several authors comment the impacts of these first-generation agro-fuels on the environment: debate on the contribution of the nitrogen monoxide to the greenhouse gas emission assessment, question of the compatibility of the foreseen agro-fuel development with the French commitment of stopping the biodiversity erosion by 2010, contributions of engineering and chemical sciences to the assessment of agro-fuel environmental impact, methodology of assessment of energy, greenhouse emissions, and atmospheric pollutants related to first-generation agro-fuels. Land use by agro-fuels in France by 2015 is the next topic (impacts on agricultural land, relationship between breeding and agro-fuels). Some authors describe the global context: possible global interactions between agro-fuels and environment, sustainable certification of agro-fuels, analysis of the reasons for a world food crisis. The last contributions are dealing with second-generation agro-fuels: state of the art and perspectives, role in sustainable energy development

  11. Fuels Performance: Navigating the Intersection of Fuels and Combustion (Brochure)

    2014-12-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the only national laboratory dedicated 100% to renewable energy and energy efficiency, recognize that engine and infrastructure compatibility can make or break the impact of even the most promising fuel. NREL and its industry partners navigate the intersection of fuel chemistry, ignition kinetics, combustion, and emissions, with innovative approaches to engines and fuels that meet drivers' expectations, while minimizing petroleum use and GHGs.

  12. Palm oil and derivatives: fuels or potential fuels?

    Pioch Daniel; Vaitilingom Gilles

    2005-01-01

    Scientific and technical information including field trials about uses of palm oil as fuel has been available for more than half a century now. Several ways were investigated, from the simple mixture with petroleum Diesel fuel, to more sophisticated solutions. The quality of vegetable oils in natura as fuel is difficult to assess because of interferences between properties of the triacylglycerols – the main components – and those of the many minor components, their content varying significant...

  13. WWER-440 fuel cycles possibilities using improved fuel assemblies design

    Practically five years cycle has been achieved in the last years at NPP Dukovany. There are two principal means how it could be achieved. First, it is necessary to use fuel assemblies with higher fuel enrichment and second, to use fuel loading with very low leakage. Both these conditions are fulfilled at NPP Dukovany at this time. It is known, that the fuel cycle economy can be improved by increasing the fuel residence time in the core up to six years. There are at least two ways how this goal could be achieved. The simplest way is to increase enrichment in fuel. There exists a limit, which is 5.0 w % of 235U. Taking into account some uncertainty, the calculation maximum is 4.95 w % of 235U. The second way is to change fuel assembly design. There are several possibilities, which seem to be suitable from the neutron - physical point of view. The first one is higher mass content of uranium in a fuel assembly. The next possibility is to enlarge pin pitch. The last possibility is to 'omit' FA shroud. This is practically unrealistic; anyway, some other structural parts must be introduced. The basic neutron physical characteristics of these cycles for up-rated power are presented showing that the possibilities of fuel assemblies with this improved design in enlargement of fuel cycles are very promising. In the end, on the basis of neutron physical characteristics and necessary economical input parameters, a preliminary evaluation of economic contribution of proposals of advanced fuel assemblies on fuel cycle economy is presented (Authors)

  14. the effect of advanced fuel designs on fuel utilization

    Fuel management is one of the key topic in nuclear engineering. It is possible to increase fuel burnup and reactor lifetime by using advanced fuel management strategies. In order to increase the cycle lifetime, required amount of excess reactivity must be added to system. Burnable poisons can be used to compensate this excess reactivity. Usually gadolinium (Gd) is used as burnable poison. But the use of Gd presents some difficulties that have not been encountered with the use of boron

  15. Analysis of fuel system technology for broad property fuels

    Coffinberry, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical study was performed in order to assess relative performance and economic factors involved with alternative advanced fuel systems for future commercial aircraft operating with broad property fuels. Significant results, with emphasis on design practicality from the engine manufacturer' standpoint, are highlighted. Several advanced fuel systems were modeled to determine as accurately as possible the relative merits of each system from the standpoint of compatibility with broad property fuel. Freezing point, thermal stability, and lubricity were key property issues. A computer model was formulated to determine the investment incentive for each system. Results are given.

  16. Fuel economy and range estimates for fuel cell powered automobiles

    Steinbugler, M.; Ogden, J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1996-12-31

    While a number of automotive fuel cell applications have been demonstrated, including a golf cart, buses, and a van, these systems and others that have been proposed have utilized differing configurations ranging from direct hydrogen fuel cell-only power plants to fuel cell/battery hybrids operating on reformed methanol. To date there is no clear consensus on which configuration, from among the possible combinations of fuel cell, peaking device, and fuel type, is the most likely to be successfully commercialized. System simplicity favors direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, but infrastructure is lacking. Infrastructure favors a system using a liquid fuel with a fuel processor, but system integration and performance issues remain. A number of studies have analyzed particular configurations on either a system or vehicle scale. The objective of this work is to estimate, within a consistent framework, fuel economies and ranges for a variety of configurations using flexible models with the goal of identifying the most promising configurations and the most important areas for further research and development.

  17. Electric utilities, fuel use, and responsiveness to fuel prices

    This research tests the impact of changes in fuel price to explain fuel use by electric utilities. We employ a three-stage least squares model that explains changes in fuel use as a function of changes in three fuel prices. This model is repeated across sub-samples of data aggregated at the plant level and operating holding company level. We expect that plants and holding companies reduce fuel use when fuel prices rise. Several fuel substitution effects within and across plants and holding companies are demonstrated, as well as several frictions. At the plant level, higher prices of natural gas lead to less natural gas consumption, less coal consumption, and more fuel oil consumption. At the operating holding company level, results demonstrate the inelasticity of coal use and the increases of natural gas in response to higher coal prices. Subsamples demonstrate heterogeneity of results across different plants. Results emphasize that technological, market, and regulatory frictions may hinder the performance of energy policies. - Highlights: • Research updates literature on fuel switching with modern data and methods. • Power plants are responsive to changes in natural gas prices. • Holding companies less responsive to changes in coal prices. • Findings highlight frictions in markets, technology, and regulation

  18. Use of alternative fuels in solid oxide fuel cells

    NONE

    2007-05-15

    A future sustainable energy system will certainly be based on a variety of environmentally benign energy production technologies. Fuel cells can be a key element in this scenario. One of the fuel cells types the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) has a number of advantages that places them in a favorable position: high efficiency, parallel production of electricity and high value heat, prevention of NOx emission, flexibility regarding usable fuels, and certain tolerance towards impurities. It is thus a natural option, to combine such a highly efficient energy conversion tool with a sustainable fuel supply. In the present contribution, the use of alternative compared to conventional fuels in SOFCs was evaluated. Regarding carbon containing, biomass derived fuels, SOFCs showed excellent power output and stability behavior during long-term testing under technologically relevant conditions. Moreover, ammonia can be used directly as fuel. The chemical and structural properties of the SOFC anode makes it even possible, to combine a chemical conversion of the fuel, for example methane into synthesis gas via steam reforming and decomposition of ammonia into hydrogen and nitrogen, with the electrochemical production of electricity in one step. (au)

  19. Spacer for fuel rods in nuclear fuel elements

    Spacers for fuel rods in nuclear reactor fuel elements are described, especially for use aboard ships. Spacers are used in a grid formed by web plates orthogonally intersecting and assembled together in a tooth-comb fashion forming a plurality of channels. The web plates are joined together and each of the web plates includes apertures through which resilient and separator members are joined. The resilient and separator members are joined. The resilient and separator members are in adjacent channels and with other similar members in the same channel, contact a fuel rod in the channel. The contact pressure between the members and fuel rod is radially directed

  20. Fuel quality issues in stationary fuel cell systems.

    Papadias, D.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

    2012-02-07

    Fuel cell systems are being deployed in stationary applications for the generation of electricity, heat, and hydrogen. These systems use a variety of fuel cell types, ranging from the low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) to the high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Depending on the application and location, these systems are being designed to operate on reformate or syngas produced from various fuels that include natural gas, biogas, coal gas, etc. All of these fuels contain species that can potentially damage the fuel cell anode or other unit operations and processes that precede the fuel cell stack. These detrimental effects include loss in performance or durability, and attenuating these effects requires additional components to reduce the impurity concentrations to tolerable levels, if not eliminate the impurity entirely. These impurity management components increase the complexity of the fuel cell system, and they add to the system's capital and operating costs (such as regeneration, replacement and disposal of spent material and maintenance). This project reviewed the public domain information available on the impurities encountered in stationary fuel cell systems, and the effects of the impurities on the fuel cells. A database has been set up that classifies the impurities, especially in renewable fuels, such as landfill gas and anaerobic digester gas. It documents the known deleterious effects on fuel cells, and the maximum allowable concentrations of select impurities suggested by manufacturers and researchers. The literature review helped to identify the impurity removal strategies that are available, and their effectiveness, capacity, and cost. A generic model of a stationary fuel-cell based power plant operating on digester and landfill gas has been developed; it includes a gas processing unit, followed by a fuel cell system. The model includes the key impurity removal steps to enable predictions of impurity breakthrough

  1. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly with fuel rod removal means

    A fuel assembly is described for a nuclear reactor. The assembly has a bottom nozzle, at least one longitudinally extending control rod guide thimble attached to and projecting upwardly from the bottom nozzle and transverse grids spaced along the thimble. An organized array of elongated fuel rods are transversely spaced and supported by the grids and axially captured between the bottom nozzle and a top nozzle. The assembly comprises: (a) a transversely extending adapter plate formed by an arrangement of integral cross-laced ligaments defining a plurality of coolant flow openings; (b) means for mounting the adapter plate on an upper end portion of the thimble and spaced axially above and disposed transversely over the upper ends of all of the fuel rods present in the fuel assembly such that ones of the ligaments overlie corresponding ones of the fuel rods so as to prevent the fuel rods from moving upwardly through the coolant flow openings; and (c) removable plug means confined within the adapter plate and positioned over and spaced axially above selected ones of the fuel rods in providing access to at least one fuel rod for removal thereof upwardly through the axially spaced adapter plate without removing the top nozzle from the fuel assembly

  2. 1986 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts

    None

    1986-10-01

    Ninety nine brief papers are arranged under the following session headings: gas industry's 40 kw program, solid oxide fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell technology, molten carbonate fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell systems, power plants technology, fuel cell power plant designs, unconventional fuels, fuel cell application and economic assessments, and plans for commerical development. The papers are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  3. Biological fuel cells and their applications

    Shukla, AK; Suresh, P; Berchmans, S; Rajendran, A.

    2004-01-01

    One type of genuine fuel cell that does hold promise in the long-term is the biological fuel cell. Unlike conventional fuel cells, which employ hydrogen, ethanol and methanol as fuel, biological fuel cells use organic products produced by metabolic processes or use organic electron donors utilized in the growth processes as fuels for current generation. A distinctive feature of biological fuel cells is that the electrode reactions are controlled by biocatalysts, i.e. the biological redox-reac...

  4. Lignite Fuel Enhancement

    Charles Bullinger; Nenad Sarunac

    2010-03-31

    Pulverized coal power plants which fire lignites and other low-rank high-moisture coals generally operate with reduced efficiencies and increased stack emissions due to the impacts of high fuel moisture on stack heat loss and pulverizer and fan power. A process that uses plant waste heat sources to evaporate a portion of the fuel moisture from the lignite feedstock in a moving bed fluidized bed dryer (FBD) was developed in the U.S. by a team led by Great River Energy (GRE). The demonstration was conducted with Department of Energy (DOE) funding under DOE Award Number DE-FC26-04NT41763. The objectives of GRE's Lignite Fuel Enhancement project were to demonstrate reduction in lignite moisture content by using heat rejected from the power plant, apply technology at full scale at Coal Creek Station (CCS), and commercialize it. The Coal Creek Project has involved several stages, beginning with lignite drying tests in a laboratory-scale FBD at the Energy Research Center (ERC) and development of theoretical models for predicting dryer performance. Using results from these early stage research efforts, GRE built a 2 ton/hour pilot-scale dryer, and a 75 ton/hour prototype drying system at Coal Creek Station. Operated over a range of drying conditions, the results from the pilot-scale and prototype-scale dryers confirmed the performance of the basic dryer design concept and provided the knowledge base needed to scale the process up to commercial size. Phase 2 of the GRE's Lignite Fuel Enhancement project included design, construction and integration of a full-scale commercial coal drying system (four FBDs per unit) with Coal Creek Units 1 and 2 heat sources and coal handling system. Two series of controlled tests were conducted at Coal Creek Unit 1 with wet and dried lignite to determine effect of dried lignite on unit performance and emissions. Wet lignite was fired during the first, wet baseline, test series conducted in September 2009. The second test series was

  5. Advanced PWR fuel design concepts

    For nearly 15 years, Combustion Engineering has provided pressurized water reactor fuel with the features most suppliers are now introducing in their advanced fuel designs. Zircaloy grids, removable upper end fittings, large fission gas plenum, high burnup, integral burnable poisons and sophisticated analytical methods are all features of C-E standard fuel which have been well proven by reactor performance. C-E's next generation fuel for pressurized water reactors features 24-month operating cycles, optimal lattice burnable poisons, increased resistance to common industry fuel rod failure mechanisms, and hardware and methodology for operating margin improvements. Application of these various improvements offer continued improvement in fuel cycle economics, plant operation and maintenance. (author)

  6. Fuel alcohol opportunities for Indiana

    Greenglass, Bert

    1980-08-01

    Prepared at the request of US Senator Birch Bayh, Chairman of the National Alcohol Fuels Commission, this study may be best utilized as a guidebook and resource manual to foster the development of a statewide fuel alcohol plan. It examines sectors in Indiana which will impact or be impacted upon by the fuel alcohol industry. The study describes fuel alcohol technologies that could be pertinent to Indiana and also looks closely at how such a fuel alcohol industry may affect the economic and policy development of the State. Finally, the study presents options for Indiana, taking into account the national context of the developing fuel alcohol industry which, unlike many others, will be highly decentralized and more under the control of the lifeblood of our society - the agricultural community.

  7. Fuel reliability of Bohunice NPP

    Paper summarizes experience from last 15 years of operation at NPP Jaslovske Bohunice. During this period, leaking fuel assemblies have had been identified by in-core sipping method and verified by vendor specified canister sipping method. Methodology of operational and outage fuel integrity monitoring is described. Full survey of identified leaking assemblies is given. Fuel failure rates are calculated separately for V-1 (V-230 type) and V-2 (V-213 type) units. Systematic difference - significantly lower fuel failure rate at V-213 units exists for all period investigated. Analysis of potential fuel failure reasons and all related measures (planned and already implemented) are presented. Design, operation and fabrication features have been analyzed with the aim to identify dominant factors contributing to fuel failure. No unambiguous reasons have been found so far. It is believed that there is a superposition of several factors and differences causing higher failure rate at V-230 type units. (author)

  8. Mast sipping VVER-440 fuel

    A mast sipping method for detecting leaks in VVER-440 fuel assemblies reduces the amount of time taken because the leak testing is done during fuel handling operations. Safety is also improved because the fuel transfer to a spent fuel pond and the leak testing are done in a single grip of the assembly so that fewer handling operations are needed. The method is based on the temperature effect and the pressure effect. The extent to which fission products are released from the fuel rods depends on the temperature increase of the fuel. In leak testing the flow of coolant through the assembly is stopped by blocking one end. Details of the method are given. (UK)

  9. Fuel cycle of the AVR

    All the stages of development were secured by irradiation tests and by the use of the elements concerned in the AVR. Summarising, these were: The first charge with fuel elements from Union Carbide, with U-Th mixed carbide particles, wallpaper variants, U-Th mixed carbide particles, the pressed fuel element with U-Th mixed carbide particles, the pressed fuel element with U-Th mixed oxide particles, with an intermediate boundary layer; the present THTR element, the pressed fuel element with U-Th mixed oxide particles and low temperature PyC coating, the pressed fuel element with U-Th mixed oxide particles, with PyC and SiC layers, i.e.: TRISO particles, the pressed fuel element with pure uranium oxide particles for the low enrichment cycle, one coated only by 2 PyC layers, the other coated with PyC and SiC, i.e.: TRISO coating. (orig.)

  10. Locking means for fuels bundles

    A nuclear power reactor fuel bundle is described which has a plurality of fuel rods disposed between two end plates positioned by tie rods extending therebetween. The assembled bundle is secured by one or more locking forks which pass through slots in the tie rod ends. Springs mounted on the fuel rods and tie rods are compressed by assembling the bundle and forcing one end plate against the locking fork to maintain the fuel rods and tie rods in position between the end plates. Downward pressure on the end plate permits removal of the locking fork so that the end plates may be removed, thus giving access to the fuel rods. This construction facilitates disassembly of an irradiated fuel bundle under water

  11. Irradiation performance of metallic fuels

    Argonne National Laboratory has been working for the past five years to develop and demonstrate the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept. The concept involves a closed system for fast-reactor power generation and on-site fuel reprocessing, both designed specifically around the use of metallic fuel. The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) has used metallic fuel for all of its 25-year life. In 1985, tests were begun to examine the irradiation performance of advanced-design metallic fuel systems based on U-Zr or U-Pu-Zr fuels. These tests have demonstrated the viable performance of these fuel systems to high burnup. The initial testing program will be described in this paper. 2 figs

  12. Unitized regenerative fuel cell system

    Burke, Kenneth A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell system uses heat pipes to convey waste heat from the fuel cell stack to the reactant storage tanks. The storage tanks act as heat sinks/sources and as passive radiators of the waste heat from the fuel cell stack. During charge up, i.e., the electrolytic process, gases are conveyed to the reactant storage tanks by way of tubes that include dryers. Reactant gases moving through the dryers give up energy to the cold tanks, causing water vapor in with the gases to condense and freeze on the internal surfaces of the dryer. During operation in its fuel cell mode, the heat pipes convey waste heat from the fuel cell stack to the respective reactant storage tanks, thereby heating them such that the reactant gases, as they pass though the respective dryers on their way to the fuel cell stacks retrieve the water previously removed.

  13. Hybrid Fuel Cell Technology Overview

    None available

    2001-05-31

    For the purpose of this STI product and unless otherwise stated, hybrid fuel cell systems are power generation systems in which a high temperature fuel cell is combined with another power generating technology. The resulting system exhibits a synergism in which the combination performs with an efficiency far greater than can be provided by either system alone. Hybrid fuel cell designs under development include fuel cell with gas turbine, fuel cell with reciprocating (piston) engine, and designs that combine different fuel cell technologies. Hybrid systems have been extensively analyzed and studied over the past five years by the Department of Energy (DOE), industry, and others. These efforts have revealed that this combination is capable of providing remarkably high efficiencies. This attribute, combined with an inherent low level of pollutant emission, suggests that hybrid systems are likely to serve as the next generation of advanced power generation systems.

  14. Consolidated fuel decay heat calculations

    Wittekind, W.D.

    1994-06-24

    The radiological decay heat generated from all irradiated fuel presently in K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins was calculated in support of consolidated fuel storage. There are four sources of heat inflow into the fuel storage basins: (1) radiological decay heat from irradiated fuel; (2) mechanical heat from operating machinery (e.g., pumps); (3) heat flow from surroundings (mainly the ground through the concrete walls into the basin water if it is maintained below ambient); and (4) exothermic chemical reactions of uranium oxidation (although at basin temperatures this reaction rate is slow). This report details the radiological decay heat from irradiated fuel source in the K basins. Decay heat calculations using ORIGEN2 (Wittekind 1994 and Schmittroth 1993) for irradiated fuel presently (April 1994) in KE and KW Basins gave results for January 31 of each year.

  15. 40 CFR 86.1213-94 - Fuel specifications.

    2010-07-01

    ... Emission Test Procedures for New Gasoline-Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1213-94 Fuel specifications. Use the fuels specified in subpart...

  16. 40 CFR 86.1213-08 - Fuel specifications.

    2010-07-01

    ... Emission Test Procedures for New Gasoline-Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1213-08 Fuel specifications. The test fuels listed in 40 CFR...

  17. Sulphur-free Fuel

    The Mongstad refinery operated by Statoil will be able to produce petrol and diesel oil with virtually no sulphur in 2003. That is two years before such fuel becomes compulsory in the European Union. Work is already under way on the site of the new desulphurization plant. According to Statoil's plans the facility will be ready in the first quarter of 2003. Mongstad will then supply automotive fuels with a sulphur content of only 10 parts per million (ppm). Sulphur forms a natural component in crude oil feedstock, and current European standards permit petrol to contain 150 ppm of this substance. It will cost Statoil NOK 0.12-0.13 per litre to meet the 10 ppm requirement. The Norwegian government should reduce its environment duty by a corresponding amount from the first day the refinery can deliver to the new standard. Most petrol from Mongstad contains up to 150 ppm. The EU is expected to require that 10-ppm petrol should be available in 2005, and become the sole standard in 2008. Germany has approved a cut of DEM 0.03 (about NOK 0.13) per litre in excise duty on petrol and diesel oil containing 10 ppm sulphur from 1 January 2003. If no market develops for this type of petrol in Norway, it could be exported to Germany and other countries which have reduced excise duty. The Norwegian Minister for the Environment will look at ways to change the legislation so that a market for this cleaner fuel will develop also in Norway

  18. Electricity as Transportation ``Fuel''

    Tamor, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The personal automobile is a surprisingly efficient device, but its place in a sustainable transportation future hinges on its ability use a sustainable fuel. While electricity is widely expected to be such a ``fuel,'' the viability of electric vehicles rests on the validity of three assumptions. First, that the emissions from generation will be significantly lower than those from competing chemical fuels whether `renewable' or fossil. Second, that advances in battery technology will deliver adequate range and durability at an affordable cost. Third, that most customers will accept any functional limitations intrinsic to electrochemical energy storage. While the first two are subjects of active research and vigorous policy debate, the third is treated virtually as a given. Popular statements to the effect that ``because 70% of all daily travel is accomplished in less than 100 miles, mass deployment of 100 mile EVs will electrify 70% of all travel'' are based on collections of one-day travel reports such as the National Household Travel Survey, and so effectively ignore the complexities of individual needs. We have analyzed the day-to-day variations of individual vehicle usage in multiple regions and draw very different conclusions. Most significant is that limited EV range results in a level of inconvenience that is likely to be unacceptable to the vast majority of vehicle owners, and for those who would accept that inconvenience, battery costs must be absurdly low to achieve any economic payback. In contrast, the plug-in hybrid (PHEV) does not suffer range limitations and delivers economic payback for most users at realistic battery costs. More importantly, these findings appear to be universal in developed nations, with labor market population density being a powerful predictor of personal vehicle usage. This ``scalable city'' hypothesis may prove to a powerful predictor of the evolution of transportation in the large cities of the developing world.

  19. Fuel temperature characteristics of the 37-element and CANFLEX fuel bundle

    This report describes the fuel temperature characteristics of CANFLEX fuel bundles and 37-element fuel bundles for a different burnup of fuel. The program was consisted for seeking the fuel temperature of fuel bundles of CANFLEX fuel bundles and 37-element fuel bundles by using the method in NUCIRC. Fuel temperature has an increasing pattern with the burnup of fuel for CANFLEX fuel bundles and 37-element fuel bundles. For all the case of burnup, the fuel temperature of CANFLEX fuel bundles has a lower value than that of 37-element fuel bundles. Especially, for the high power channel, the CANFLEX fuel bundles show a lower fuel temperature as much as about 75 degree, and the core averaged fuel temperature has a lower fuel temperature of about 50 degree than that of 37-element fuel bundles. The lower fuel temperature of CANFLEX fuel bundles is expected to enhance the safety by reducing the fuel temperature coefficient. Finally, for each burnup of CANFLEX fuel bundles and 37-element fuel bundles, the equation was present for predicting the fuel temperature of a bundle in terms of a coolant temperature and bundle power

  20. Fuels for Thought!

    Clifford Louime

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available When it comes to the marketing of the bioenergy brand, one of the catchiest slogans out these days is “25 by ‘25”. Adopted and supported by industries, academia and government agencies alike, this organization simply aims to supply 25 percent of our energy from renewable resources by the year 2025. By focusing its future efforts on wind, solar and biomass resources, the “25 by 25” initiative is expected to create new jobs, develop novel technologies, help mitigate the effects of global warming and reduce our dependence on fossil fuels. [...