WorldWideScience

Sample records for tsunami event generated

  1. Significant Tsunami Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Furtney, M.; McLean, S. J.; Sweeney, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Tsunamis have inflicted death and destruction on the coastlines of the world throughout history. The occurrence of tsunamis and the resulting effects have been collected and studied as far back as the second millennium B.C. The knowledge gained from cataloging and examining these events has led to significant changes in our understanding of tsunamis, tsunami sources, and methods to mitigate the effects of tsunamis. The most significant, not surprisingly, are often the most devastating, such as the 2011 Tohoku, Japan earthquake and tsunami. The goal of this poster is to give a brief overview of the occurrence of tsunamis and then focus specifically on several significant tsunamis. There are various criteria to determine the most significant tsunamis: the number of deaths, amount of damage, maximum runup height, had a major impact on tsunami science or policy, etc. As a result, descriptions will include some of the most costly (2011 Tohoku, Japan), the most deadly (2004 Sumatra, 1883 Krakatau), and the highest runup ever observed (1958 Lituya Bay, Alaska). The discovery of the Cascadia subduction zone as the source of the 1700 Japanese "Orphan" tsunami and a future tsunami threat to the U.S. northwest coast, contributed to the decision to form the U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program. The great Lisbon earthquake of 1755 marked the beginning of the modern era of seismology. Knowledge gained from the 1964 Alaska earthquake and tsunami helped confirm the theory of plate tectonics. The 1946 Alaska, 1952 Kuril Islands, 1960 Chile, 1964 Alaska, and the 2004 Banda Aceh, tsunamis all resulted in warning centers or systems being established.The data descriptions on this poster were extracted from NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) global historical tsunami database. Additional information about these tsunamis, as well as water level data can be found by accessing the NGDC website www.ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard/

  2. Landslide-generated tsunamis in a perialpine lake: Historical events and numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbe, Michael; Anselmetti, Flavio S.

    2014-05-01

    Many of the perialpine lakes in Central Europe - the large, glacier-carved basins formed during the Pleistocene glaciations of the Alps - have proven to be environments prone to subaquatic landsliding. Among these, Lake Lucerne (Switzerland) has a particularly well-established record of subaquatic landslides and related tsunamis. Its sedimentary archive documents numerous landslides over the entire Holocene, which have either been triggered by earthquakes, or which occurred apparently spontaneously, possibly due to rapid sediment accumulation on delta slopes. Due to their controlled boundary conditions and the possibility to be investigated on a complete basinal scale, such lacustrine tsunamis may be used as textbook analogons for their marine counterparts. Two events in the 17th century illustrate these processes and their consequences: In AD 1601, an earthquake (Mw ~ 5.9) led to widespread failure of the sediment drape covering the lateral slopes in several basins. The resulting landslides generated tsunami waves that reached a runup of several metres, as reported in historical accounts. The waves caused widespread damage as well as loss of lives in communities along the shores. In AD 1687, the apparently spontaneous collapse of a river delta in the lake led to similar waves that damaged nearby villages. Based on detailed information on topography, bathymetry and the geometry of the landslide deposits, numerical simulations combining two-dimensional, depth-averaged models for landslide propagation, as well as for tsunami generation, propagation and inundation, are able to reproduce most of the reported tsunami effects for these events. Calculated maximum runup of the waves is 6 to >10 m in the directly affected lake basins, but significantly less in neighbouring basins. Flat alluvial plains adjacent to the most heavily affected areas are inundated over distances of several hundred metres. Taken as scenarios for possible future events, these past events suggest that tsunami hazard in these lake should not be neglected, although they are infrequent and the effects are naturally limited to the immediate surroundings of the affected basins. The shores of Lake Lucerne, as well as of many other perialpine lakes, are nowadays densely inhabited and host considerable infrastructure, so that events similar to those reported may have serious consequences. Identification and mapping of possible subaquatic landslide source areas, the inclusion of geotechnical data on potentially mobile sediments, as well as numerical modelling of tsunamis are thus important components of a proper hazard assessment for these lakes.

  3. Integrated Historical Tsunami Event and Deposit Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, P. K.; McCullough, H. L.

    2010-12-01

    The National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) provides integrated access to historical tsunami event, deposit, and proxy data. The NGDC tsunami archive initially listed tsunami sources and locations with observed tsunami effects. Tsunami frequency and intensity are important for understanding tsunami hazards. Unfortunately, tsunami recurrence intervals often exceed the historic record. As a result, NGDC expanded the archive to include the Global Tsunami Deposits Database (GTD_DB). Tsunami deposits are the physical evidence left behind when a tsunami impacts a shoreline or affects submarine sediments. Proxies include co-seismic subsidence, turbidite deposits, changes in biota following an influx of marine water in a freshwater environment, etc. By adding past tsunami data inferred from the geologic record, the GTD_DB extends the record of tsunamis backward in time. Although the best methods for identifying tsunami deposits and proxies in the geologic record remain under discussion, developing an overall picture of where tsunamis have affected coasts, calculating recurrence intervals, and approximating runup height and inundation distance provides a better estimate of a region’s true tsunami hazard. Tsunami deposit and proxy descriptions in the GTD_DB were compiled from published data found in journal articles, conference proceedings, theses, books, conference abstracts, posters, web sites, etc. The database now includes over 1,200 descriptions compiled from over 1,100 citations. Each record in the GTD_DB is linked to its bibliographic citation where more information on the deposit can be found. The GTD_DB includes data for over 50 variables such as: event description (e.g., 2010 Chile Tsunami), geologic time period, year, deposit location name, latitude, longitude, country, associated body of water, setting during the event (e.g., beach, lake, river, deep sea), upper and lower contacts, underlying and overlying material, etc. If known, the tsunami source mechanism (e.g., earthquake, landslide, volcanic eruption, asteroid impact) is also specified. Observations (grain size, sedimentary structure, bed thickness, number of layers, etc.) are stored along with the conclusions drawn from the evidence by the author (wave height, flow depth, flow velocity, number of waves, etc.). Geologic time periods in the GTD_DB range from Precambrian to Quaternary, but the majority (70%) are from the Quaternary period. This period includes events such as: the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the Cascadia subduction zone earthquakes and tsunamis, the 1755 Lisbon tsunami, the A.D. 79 Vesuvius tsunami, the 3500 BP Santorini caldera collapse and tsunami, and the 7000 BP Storegga landslide-generated tsunami. Prior to the Quaternary period, the majority of the paleotsunamis are due to impact events such as: the Tertiary Chesapeake Bay Bolide, Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) Boundary, Cretaceous Manson, and Devonian Alamo. The tsunami deposits are integrated with the historical tsunami event database where applicable. For example, users can search for articles describing deposits related to the 1755 Lisbon tsunami and view those records, as well as link to the related historic event record. The data and information may be viewed using tools designed to extract and display data (selection forms, Web Map Services, and Web Feature Services).

  4. Mass transport events and their tsunami hazard

    OpenAIRE

    Tappin, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    Mass transport events, such as those from submarine landslides, volcanic flank collapse at convergent margins and on oceanic islands, and subaerial failure are reviewed and found to be all potential tsunami sources. The intensity and frequency of the tsunamis resulting is dependent upon the source. Most historical records are of devastating tsunamis from volcanic collapse at convergent margins. Although the database is limited, tsunamis sourced from submarine landslides and collapse on oceani...

  5. Tsunami Source Identification on the 1867 Tsunami Event Based on the Impact Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    The 1867 Keelung tsunami event has drawn significant attention from people in Taiwan. Not only because the location was very close to the 3 nuclear power plants which are only about 20km away from the Taipei city but also because of the ambiguous on the tsunami sources. This event is unique in terms of many aspects. First, it was documented on many literatures with many languages and with similar descriptions. Second, the tsunami deposit was discovered recently. Based on the literatures, earthquake, 7-meter tsunami height, volcanic smoke, and oceanic smoke were observed. Previous studies concluded that this tsunami was generated by an earthquake with a magnitude around Mw7.0 along the Shanchiao Fault. However, numerical results showed that even a Mw 8.0 earthquake was not able to generate a 7-meter tsunami. Considering the steep bathymetry and intense volcanic activities along the Keelung coast, one reasonable hypothesis is that different types of tsunami sources were existed, such as the submarine landslide or volcanic eruption. In order to confirm this scenario, last year we proposed the Tsunami Reverse Tracing Method (TRTM) to find the possible locations of the tsunami sources. This method helped us ruling out the impossible far-field tsunami sources. However, the near-field sources are still remain unclear. This year, we further developed a new method named 'Impact Intensity Analysis' (IIA). In the IIA method, the study area is divided into a sequence of tsunami sources, and the numerical simulations of each source is conducted by COMCOT (Cornell Multi-grid Coupled Tsunami Model) tsunami model. After that, the resulting wave height from each source to the study site is collected and plotted. This method successfully helped us to identify the impact factor from the near-field potential sources. The IIA result (Fig. 1) shows that the 1867 tsunami event was a multi-source event. A mild tsunami was trigged by a Mw7.0 earthquake, and then followed by the submarine landslide or volcanic events. A near-field submarine landslide and landslide at Mien-Hwa Canyon were the most possible scenarios. As for the volcano scenarios, the volcanic eruption located about 10 km away from Keelung with 2.5x108 m3 disturbed water volume might be a candidate. The detailed scenario results will be presented in the full paper.

  6. Advanced Simulation of Coupled Earthquake and Tsunami Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Joern

    2013-04-01

    Tsunami-Earthquakes represent natural catastrophes threatening lives and well-being of societies in a solitary and unexpected extreme event as tragically demonstrated in Sumatra (2004), Samoa (2009), Chile (2010), or Japan (2011). Both phenomena are consequences of the complex system of interactions of tectonic stress, fracture mechanics, rock friction, rupture dynamics, fault geometry, ocean bathymetry, and coastline geometry. The ASCETE project forms an interdisciplinary research consortium that couples the most advanced simulation technologies for earthquake rupture dynamics and tsunami propagation to understand the fundamental conditions of tsunami generation. We report on the latest research results in physics-based dynamic rupture and tsunami wave propagation simulation, using unstructured and adaptive meshes with continuous and discontinuous Galerkin discretization approaches. Coupling both simulation tools - the physics-based dynamic rupture simulation and the hydrodynamic tsunami wave propagation - will give us the possibility to conduct highly realistic studies of the interaction of rupture dynamics and tsunami impact characteristics.

  7. Tsunami!

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Department of Geophysics at University of Washington provides the Tsunami! Website. An excellent general resource about tsunamis (large water waves), this site provides information about the "mechanisms of tsunami generation and propagation, the impact of tsunamis on humankind, and the Tsunami Warning System." Sections included at the site are General Tsunami Information, Tsunami Survey and Research Information, Miscellaneous Information (links to related sites), and Background on the Development of Tsunami!.

  8. Tsunami Generation Above a Sill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanakis, Themistoklis S.; Dias, Frédéric; Synolakis, Costas

    2015-03-01

    The generation of surface waves by seafloor displacement is a classic problem that arises in the study of tsunamis. The generation of waves in a two-dimensional domain of uniform depth by uplift or subsidence of a portion of a flat bottom boundary has been elegantly studied by Hammack (Tsunamis: a model of their generation and propagation, Ph.D. thesis, California Institute of Technology, 1972), for idealized motions. The physical problem of tsunami generation is more complex; even when the final displacement is known from seismic analysis, the deforming seafloor includes relief features such as mounts and trenches. Here, following Kajiura (J Oceanogr Soc Jpn 28:260-277, 1972), we investigate analytically the effect of bathymetry on the surface wave generation, by solving the forced linear shallow water equation. While Kajiura's geometry consisted of a step-type bottom bathymetry with a rectangular uplift to understand the effect of the continental shelf on tsunami generation, our model bathymetry consists of an uplifting cylindrical sill initially resting on a flat bottom, a geometry which helps evaluate the effect of seamounts on tsunami generation. We find that as the sill height increases, partial wave trapping reduces the wave height in the far field, while amplifying it above the sill.

  9. Generating Real-Time Tsunami Forecast Animations for Tsunami Warning Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, N. C.; Wang, D.; Fryer, G. J.; Weinstein, S.

    2012-12-01

    The complex calculations inherent in tsunami forecast models once required supercomputers to solve and could only be deployed in an operational setting as a database of precomputed best-guess solutions for likely future tsunamis. More recently scientists at the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) developed a tsunami forecast model, RIFT, that takes an earthquake's centroid moment tensor solution—either from nearby historic events or rapidly determined by W-phase analysis—and solves the linear shallow water equations in real time with commercial off-the-shelf computer servers and open-source software tools (Wang et al., 2009). RIFT not only rapidly calculates tsunami forecasts in real time, but also generates and archives data grids easily ingested by other software packages to generate maps and animations in a variety of image, video, and geobrowser file formats (e.g., KML). These graphical products aid both operational and outreach efforts as they help PTWC scientists to rapidly ingest and comprehend large, complex data sets, to share these data with emergency managers, and to educate the general public about the behavior of tsunamis. Prior to developing animation capability PTWC used tsunami travel time contour maps to show expected arrival times of the first tsunami waves. Though useful to expert users, such maps can mislead a nonexpert as they do not show amplitude information and give the impression that tsunami waves have constant amplitudes throughout an ocean basin. A tsunami forecast "energy map" improves tsunami hazard communication by showing the variability in maximum wave heights, but does not show the timing of the maximum wave arrivals. A tsunami forecast animation, however, shows both how fast the tsunami will move and the distribution of its amplitudes over time, thus communicating key concepts about tsunami behavior such as reflection and refraction of waves, that the first arriving wave is not necessarily the largest wave, and that tsunami wave oscillations can last for hours or days. Tsunami wave propagation animations are not new, but the speed of the RIFT calculations and modern computer hardware allow PTWC to generate a global-domain animation with 4-arc-minute resolution in less than two hours of real time, fast enough to provide decision support in tsunami warning operations and to share these animations with emergency managers and the public before the tsunami impacts threatened coastlines in the far field.

  10. On the modelling of tsunami generation and tsunami inundation

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Frédéric; Dutykh, Denys; O'Brien, Laura; Renzi, Emiliano; Stefanakis, Themistoklis

    2012-01-01

    While the propagation of tsunamis is well understood and well simulated by numerical models, there are still a number of unanswered questions related to the generation of tsunamis or the subsequent inundation. We review some of the basic generation mechanisms as well as their simulation. In particular, we present a simple and computationally inexpensive model that describes the seabed displacement during an underwater earthquake. This model is based on the finite fault solut...

  11. On the modelling of tsunami generation and tsunami inundation

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, Frédéric; O'Brien, Laura; Renzi, Emiliano; Stefanakis, Themistoklis

    2012-01-01

    While the propagation of tsunamis is well understood and well simulated by numerical models, there are still a number of unanswered questions related to the generation of tsunamis or the subsequent inundation. We review some of the basic generation mechanisms as well as their simulation. In particular, we present a simple and computationally inexpensive model that describes the seabed displacement during an underwater earthquake. This model is based on the finite fault solution for the slip distribution under some assumptions on the kinematics of the rupturing process. We also consider an unusual source for tsunami generation: the sinking of a cruise ship. Then we review some aspects of tsunami run-up. In particular, we explain why the first wave of a tsunami is sometimes less devastating than the subsequent waves. A resonance effect can boost the waves that come later. We also look at a particular feature of the 11 March 2011 tsunami in Japan - the formation of macro-scale vortices - and show that these macr...

  12. An innovative tsunami detector operating in tsunami generation environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chierici, F.; Beranzoli, L.; Embriaco, D.; Favali, P.; Marinaro, G.; Monna, S.; Pignagnoli, L.; Zitellini, N.; Bruni, F.; Furlan, F.; Gasparoni, F.

    2007-12-01

    On August 25th 2007 a tsunami detector installed onboard the multi-parameter observatory GEOSTAR was successfully deployed at 3200 b. s. l. in the Gulf of Cadiz, Portugal. This activity is within the NEAREST EC Project (http://nearest.bo.ismar.cnr.it/ ). Among other deliverables, the NEAREST project will produce and test the basic parts of an operational prototype of a near field tsunami warning system. This system includes an onshore warning centre, based on the geophysical monitoring networks which are already operating, and a tsunami detector deployed on board GEOSTAR at the sea bottom. On land the warning centre is in charge of collecting, integrating, and evaluating data recorded at sea. At the sea bottom data is recorded and processed by an advanced type of tsunami detector which includes: a pressure sensor, a seismometer and two accelerometers. The detector communicates acoustically with a surface buoy in two-way mode. The buoy is equipped with meteo station, GPS and tiltmeter and is connected to a shore station via satellite link. The prototype is designed to operate in tsunami generation areas for detection-warning purpose as well as for scientific measurements. The tsunami detector sends a near real time automatic alert message when a seismic or pressure threshold are exceeded. Pressure signals are processed by the tsunami detection algorithm and the water pressure perturbation caused by the seafloor motion is taken into account. The algorithm is designed to detect small tsunami waves, less than one centimetre, in a very noisy environment. Our objective is to combine a novel approach to the tsunami warning problem, with a study of the coupling between the water column perturbations and sea floor motion, together with the long term monitoring of geophysical, geochemical and oceanographic parameters.

  13. VOLCANIC TSUNAMI GENERATING SOURCE MECHANISMS IN THE EASTERN CARIBBEAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, volcanic island flank failures and underwater slides have generated numerous destructive tsunamis in the Caribbean region. Convergent, compressional and collisional tectonic activity caused primarily from the eastward movement of the Caribbean Plate in relation to the North American, Atlantic and South American Plates, is responsible for zones of subduction in the region, the formation of island arcs and the evolution of particular volcanic centers on the overlying plate. The inter-plate tectonic interaction and deformation along these marginal boundaries result in moderate seismic and volcanic events that can generate tsunamis by a number of different mechanisms. The active geo-dynamic processes have created the Lesser Antilles, an arc of small islands with volcanoes characterized by both effusive and explosive activity. Eruption mechanisms of these Caribbean volcanoes are complex and often anomalous. Collapses of lava domes often precede major eruptions, which may vary in intensity from Strombolian to Plinian. Locally catastrophic, short-period tsunami-like waves can be generated directly by lateral, direct or channelized volcanic blast episodes, or in combination with collateral air pressure perturbations, nuéss ardentes, pyroclastic flows, lahars, or cascading debris avalanches. Submarine volcanic caldera collapses can also generate locally destructive tsunami waves. Volcanoes in the Eastern Caribbean Region have unstable flanks. Destructive local tsunamis may be generated from aerial and submarine volcanic edifice mass edifice flank failures, which may be triggered by volcanic episodes, lava dome collapses, or simply by gravitational instabilities. The present report evaluates volcanic mechanisms, resulting flank failure processes and their potential for tsunami generation. More specifically, the report evaluates recent volcanic eruption mechanisms of the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat, of Mt. Pelée on Martinique, of Soufriere on St. Vincent and of the Kick’em Jenny underwater volcano near Grenada and provides an overall risk assessment of tsunami generation from volcanic sources in the Caribbean region.

  14. Landslide-generated tsunami geomorphology at Chehalis Lake, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, N. J.; McKillop, R.; Clague, J. J.; Lawrence, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    The 2007 Chehalis Lake tsunami in the southern Coast Mountains of British Columbia is one of the most comprehensively described landslide-generated tsunamis in the world. We use field observations and remotely sensed data collected during the two years following the tsunami to characterize its geomorphic impact and propose a suite of geomorphic features characteristic of tsunamis generated by subaerial landslides. On December 4, 2007, a highly fragmented 3 Mm3 rockslide entered the north end of Chehalis Lake and generated a tsunami that drastically altered much of the shore of the 8.5-km-long lake, with local run-up exceeding 35 m. The tsunami continued as a surge down lower Chehalis River, at the south end of the lake. We characterized geomorphic features produced by the tsunami by collecting multi-scale data, starting immediately after the event. Data included reconnaissance helicopter and ground observations, low-altitude aerial digital photography and aerial LiDAR survey, detailed GPS-controlled field traverses, and an underwater survey using side-scan sonar and swath bathymetric sounding. The impact of the tsunami was greatest on low-gradient shores and the shoreline nearest the landslide. Erosional features include wave-cut scarps, soil erosion, and complete removal of forest, leaving sharp trimlines. Debris transported by the tsunami stripped bark from standing trees, left impact marks on them, and embedded gravel in them. Depositional features include imbricated cobbles and boulders, ripples in sand and gravel, pebble lags, rip-up clasts of glaciolacustrine silt, and trash lines of woody debris in forest at and near the limit of tsunami run-up. Similar features have been reported at sites of landslide-triggered tsunamis, notably in Alaska, Chile, Norway, and elsewhere in Canada. We grouped geomorphic features at Chehalis Lake on the basis of their areal distribution and their inferred formative energy. The geomorphic groups form a continuum, reflecting shoreline wave energy controlled primarily by distance from the landslide and elevation above the lake surface. They are further affected by shoreline gradient, orientation, and substrate. Vegetation trimlines are the most obvious evidence of landslide-generated tsunamis, but they persist only until mature forest becomes reestablished. Erosional scarps in coarse-grained unconsolidated sediments may persist longer, but after lakeshores become revegetated can be detected only with appropriately processed LiDAR data or detailed field surveys. Our observations at Chehalis Lake provide insight into landslide-generated tsunami hazards. Shoreline geomorphic evidence, in conjunction with lake-side landslide scars, facilitates identification of water bodies that have been affected by landslide-generated tsunamis in recent centuries. Geomorphic mapping such as that completed at Chehalis Lake may help identify potential landslide sources and improve understanding of nearshore tsunami hydrodynamics, thus aiding in site-specific hazard analysis. It also provides detailed data for calibrating and validating landslide-generated tsunami models.

  15. A Reverse Tracking Method to Analyze the 1867 Keelung Tsunami Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.; Wu, T.; Tsai, Y.; KO, L.; Chuang, M.

    2013-12-01

    The 1867 Keelung tsunami is the only tsunami event verified by Taiwan government. This event caused serious damage and hundreds death toll in northern Taiwan, including the Keelung city, Jinshan and Patoutzu areas (Fig. 1). This event is not only recorded in many literatures, but also unveiled by sedimentary evidence. In addition, this event also indicates that the three nuclear power plants nearby are prone to tsunami attacks (Fig. 1). The previous studies consider that this tsunami might be generated by a Mw 7.0 earthquake which might occur along the Shanchiao Fault (Zheng et al, 2011). However, there is no evidence showing the relationship between these geological activities and the tsunami event. In this study, we intend to find the potential tsunami source through numerical analysis. We conducted series of numerical experiments by using sets of fault parameters from Mw 7.0 to Mw 8.0. However, none of them was able to explain the 7 m tsunami height observed in history and the sedimentary evidence found on the Hoping Island. Considering the steep bathymetry and intense volcanic activity along the Keelung coast, one reasonable hypothesis is that the earthquake or volcanic eruption triggered a submarine landslide which increased the tsunami height dramatically. In order to confirm this scenario, we performed the Reverse Tracking Method (RTM), based on the linear hypothesis of tsunami wave propagation, to find the possible locations of the tsunami sources (Fig. 1). The Cornell Multi-grid Coupled Tsunami Model (COMCOT) was then used to perform the tsunami simulations. We followed the Mw 7.0 earthquake proposed by Lin et al. (2006) and added the landslide disturbance (Watts et al., 2005). The source-scaling relationship proposed by Yen and Ma (2011) was used to determine the fault parameters. In addition to the Shanchiao Fault, five submarine volcanos and three submarine canyons were considered as the potential tsunami sources. The result shows that the 1867 tsunami event was most likely triggered by a near-field submarine landslide just outside the Keelung harbor. The potential tsunami sources from Mien-Hwa Canyon and submarine volcanos should also be noted. The result of this study is important not only for densely populated cities in northern Taiwan, but also for the three nuclear power plants nearby. The detailed scenario results will be presented in the full paper. Fig. 1. The map of Reverse Tracking Method (RTM) in northern Taiwan. Black dots show the relative location between Keelung city, Jinshan and Patouzu areas. Red dots present the nuclear power plants (NPP1, NPP2, and NPP4). Green dots present the sedimentary evidence discovered on Hoping Island. Color indicates the maximum flux of tsunami propagation.

  16. Detailed analysis of tsunami waveforms generated by the 1946 Aleutian tsunami earthquake

    OpenAIRE

    Tanioka, Y.; Seno, T

    2001-01-01

    The 1946 Aleutian earthquake was a typical tsunami earthquake which generated abnormally larger tsunami than expected from its seismic waves. Previously, Johnson and Satake (1997) estimated the fault model of this earthquake using the tsunami waveforms observed at tide gauges. However, they did not model the second pulse of the tsunami at Honolulu although that was much larger than the first pulse. In this paper, we numerically computed the tsunami waveforms using the linear Boussinesq...

  17. Characteristics of tsunamis generated by 3D deformable granular landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, F.; Fritz, H. M.; McFall, B.

    2010-12-01

    Landslides can trigger tsunamis with locally high amplitudes and runup, which can cause devastating effects in the near field region. The events of 1958 Lituya Bay, 1998 Papua New Guinea and 2006 Java tsunamis are reminders of the hazards associated with impulse waves. Tsunamis generated by granular landslides were studied in the three dimensional NEES tsunami wave basin (TWB) at Oregon State University (OSU) based on the generalized Froude similarity. A novel pneumatic landslide generator was deployed to simulate landslides with varying geometry and kinematics. Granular materials were used to model deformable landslides. Measurement techniques such as particle image velocimetry (PIV), multiple above and underwater video cameras, multiple acoustic transducer arrays (MTA), as well as resistance wave and runup gauges were applied. Tsunami wave generation and propagation is studied off a hill slope, in fjords and around curved headlands. The wave generation was characterized by an extremely unsteady three phase flow consisting of the slide granulate, water and air entrained into the flow. Landslide deformation is quantified and the slide kinematics with reference to slide surface velocity distribution and slide front velocity is obtained. Empirical equations for predicting the wave amplitude, period and wavelength are obtained. The generated waves depend on determined non-dimensional landslide and water body parameters such as the slide Froude number and relative slide shape at impact, among others. Attenuation functions of the leading wave crest amplitude, the lateral wave runup on the hill slope, the wave length and the time period were obtained to describe the wave behavior in the near field and to quantify the wave amplitude decay away from the landslide source. The measured wave celerity of the leading wave corresponds well to the solitary wave speed while the trailing waves are considerably slower in propagation. The individual waves in the wave train span from shallow to deep water depth regime. The energy conversion between landslide and waves is lower compared with 2D and solid block landslides due to radial spread of unidirectional landslide energy by the wave front. The slide characteristics measured in the experiment provide the landslide source for numerical landslide tsunami modeling. The measured landslide and tsunami data serve the validation and advancement of 3-dimensional numerical landslide tsunami and prediction models. Landslide impact and tsunami generation (Photo credit: Devin K. Daniels)

  18. Advanced Simulation of Coupled Earthquake and Tsunami Events (ASCETE) - Simulation Techniques for Realistic Tsunami Process Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Joern; Bader, Michael; Breuer, Alexander N.; van Dinther, Ylona; Gabriel, Alice-A.; Galvez Barron, Percy E.; Rahnema, Kaveh; Vater, Stefan; Wollherr, Stephanie

    2015-04-01

    At the End of phase 1 of the ASCETE project a simulation framework for coupled physics-based rupture generation with tsunami propagation and inundation is available. Adaptive mesh tsunami propagation and inundation by discontinuous Galerkin Runge-Kutta methods allows for accurate and conservative inundation schemes. Combined with a tree-based refinement strategy to highly optimize the code for high-performance computing architectures, a modeling tool for high fidelity tsunami simulations has been constructed. Validation results demonstrate the capacity of the software. Rupture simulation is performed by an unstructured tetrahedral discontinuous Galerking ADER discretization, which allows for accurate representation of complex geometries. The implemented code was nominated for and was selected as a finalist for the Gordon Bell award in high-performance computing. Highly realistic rupture events can be simulated with this modeling tool. The coupling of rupture induced wave activity and displacement with hydrodynamic equations still poses a major problem due to diverging time and spatial scales. Some insight from the ASCETE set-up could be gained and the presentation will focus on the coupled behavior of the simulation system. Finally, an outlook to phase 2 of the ASCETE project will be given in which further development of detailed physical processes as well as near-realistic scenario computations are planned. ASCETE is funded by the Volkswagen Foundation.

  19. Tsunami Research Status in IAEA after Fukushima Event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On March 11th, 2011, a tremendous earthquake and tsunami occurred on the east coast of Japan. This 9.0 magnitude earthquake was the fifth greatest earthquake ever experienced on the planet. The most remarkable problem was that the Fukishima NPP sites. After Japan earthquake, many international researches about tsunami and earthquake event were started or revised. Especially, the most remarkable point of the great earthquake in east coast of Japan was tsunami event. Before this earthquake, the Niigata earthquake occurred in 2007 and the Kashiwazaki Kariwa nuclear power plant had little damaged. The research about the safety of nuclear power plant against earthquake events was activated by 2007 Niigata earthquake. However, the researches about a tsunami event were very few and only tsunami simulation was only focused. After the Fukushima accident, the international society became very interested in tsunami event as a major external event. Therefore in this study, the tsunami research status in IAEA after Fukushima event and the role of Korea are introduced

  20. Tsunami Research Status in IAEA after Fukushima Event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Kyu; Choi, In Kil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    On March 11{sup th}, 2011, a tremendous earthquake and tsunami occurred on the east coast of Japan. This 9.0 magnitude earthquake was the fifth greatest earthquake ever experienced on the planet. The most remarkable problem was that the Fukishima NPP sites. After Japan earthquake, many international researches about tsunami and earthquake event were started or revised. Especially, the most remarkable point of the great earthquake in east coast of Japan was tsunami event. Before this earthquake, the Niigata earthquake occurred in 2007 and the Kashiwazaki Kariwa nuclear power plant had little damaged. The research about the safety of nuclear power plant against earthquake events was activated by 2007 Niigata earthquake. However, the researches about a tsunami event were very few and only tsunami simulation was only focused. After the Fukushima accident, the international society became very interested in tsunami event as a major external event. Therefore in this study, the tsunami research status in IAEA after Fukushima event and the role of Korea are introduced

  1. Influence of sedimentary layering on tsunami generation

    CERN Document Server

    Dutykh, Denys

    2008-01-01

    The present article is devoted to the influence of sediment layers on the process of tsunami generation. The main scope here is to demonstrate and especially quantify the effect of sedimentation on seabed vertical displacements due to an underwater earthquake. The fault is modelled as a Volterra-type dislocation in an elastic half-space. The elastodynamics equations are integrated with a finite element method. A comparison between two cases is performed. The first one corresponds to the classical situation of an elastic homogeneous and isotropic half-space, which is traditionally used for the generation of tsunamis. The second test case takes into account the presence of a sediment layer separating the oceanic column from the hard rock. Some important differences are revealed. The results of the present study may partially explain why the great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of 26 December 2004 produced such a big tsunami. More precisely, we conjecture that the wave amplitude in the generation region may have bee...

  2. Numerical modelling of historical landslide-generated tsunamis in the French Lesser Antilles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Poisson

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Two historical landslide-induced tsunamis that reached the coasts of the French Lesser Antilles are studied. First, the Martinique coast was hit by a tsunami down the western flank of Montagne Pelée at the beginning of the big eruption of May 1902. More recently, the northeastern coast of Guadeloupe was affected by a tsunami that had been generated around Montserrat by pyroclastic flows entering the sea, during the July 2003 eruption of the Soufrière Hills volcano. We use a modified version of the GEOWAVE model to compute numerical simulations of both events. Two source hypotheses are considered for each tsunami. The comparison of the simulation results with reported tsunami height data helps to discriminate between the tested source decriptions. In the Martinique case, we obtain a better fit to data when considering three successive lahars entering the sea, as a simplified single source leads to an overstimation of the tsunami wave heights at the coast. In the Montserrat case, the best model uses a unique source which volume corresponds to published data concerning the peak volume flow. These findings emphasize the importance of an accurate description of the relevant volume as well as the timing sequence of the source event in landslide-generated tsunami modelling. They also show that considering far-field effects in addition to near-field effects may significantly improve tsunami modelling.

  3. Tsunami generation by ocean floor rupture front propagation: Hamiltonian description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Pavlov

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The Hamiltonian method is applied to the problem of tsunami generation caused by a propagating rupture front and deformation of the ocean floor. The method establishes an alternative framework for analyzing the tsunami generation process and produces analytical expressions for the power and directivity of tsunami radiation (in the far-field for two illustrative cases, with constant and gradually varying speeds of rupture front propagation.

  4. Tsunami Generation and Propagation by 3D deformable Landslides and Application to Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, Brian C.; Fritz, Hermann M.

    2014-05-01

    Tsunamis generated by landslides and volcano flank collapse account for some of the most catastrophic natural disasters recorded and can be particularly devastative in the near field region due to locally high wave amplitudes and runup. The events of 1958 Lituya Bay, 1963 Vajont reservoir, 1980 Spirit Lake, 2002 Stromboli and 2010 Haiti demonstrate the danger of tsunamis generated by landslides or volcano flank collapses. Unfortunately critical field data from these events is lacking. Source and runup scenarios based on real world events are physically modeled using generalized Froude similarity in the three dimensional NEES tsunami wave basin at Oregon State University. A novel pneumatic landslide tsunami generator (LTG) was deployed to simulate landslides with varying geometry and kinematics. The bathymetric and topographic scenarios tested with the LTG are the basin-wide propagation and runup, fjord, curved headland fjord and a conical island setting representing a landslide off an island or a volcano flank collapse. The LTG consists of a sliding box filled with 1,350 kg of landslide material which is accelerated by means of four pneumatic pistons down a 2H:1V slope. The landslide is launched from the sliding box and continues to accelerate by gravitational forces up to velocities of 5 m/s. The landslide Froude number at impact with the water is in the range 1 tsunami data serve to validate and advance three-dimensional numerical landslide tsunami prediction models.

  5. Characterizing Mega-Earthquake Related Tsunami on Subduction Zones without Large Historical Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C. R.; Lee, R.; Astill, S.; Farahani, R.; Wilson, P. S.; Mohammed, F.

    2014-12-01

    Due to recent large tsunami events (e.g., Chile 2010 and Japan 2011), the insurance industry is very aware of the importance of managing its exposure to tsunami risk. There are currently few tools available to help establish policies for managing and pricing tsunami risk globally. As a starting point and to help address this issue, Risk Management Solutions Inc. (RMS) is developing a global suite of tsunami inundation footprints. This dataset will include both representations of historical events as well as a series of M9 scenarios on subductions zones that have not historical generated mega earthquakes. The latter set is included to address concerns about the completeness of the historical record for mega earthquakes. This concern stems from the fact that the Tohoku Japan earthquake was considerably larger than had been observed in the historical record. Characterizing the source and rupture pattern for the subduction zones without historical events is a poorly constrained process. In many case, the subduction zones can be segmented based on changes in the characteristics of the subducting slab or major ridge systems. For this project, the unit sources from the NOAA propagation database are utilized to leverage the basin wide modeling included in this dataset. The length of the rupture is characterized based on subduction zone segmentation and the slip per unit source can be determined based on the event magnitude (i.e., M9) and moment balancing. As these events have not occurred historically, there is little to constrain the slip distribution. Sensitivity tests on the potential rupture pattern have been undertaken comparing uniform slip to higher shallow slip and tapered slip models. Subduction zones examined include the Makran Trench, the Lesser Antilles and the Hikurangi Trench. The ultimate goal is to create a series of tsunami footprints to help insurers understand their exposures at risk to tsunami inundation around the world.

  6. The November 15, 2006 Kuril Islands-Generated Tsunami in Crescent City, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, L.; Uslu, B.; Barberopoulou, A.; Yim, S. C.; Kelly, A.

    2009-02-01

    On November 15, 2006, Crescent City in Del Norte County, California was hit by a tsunami generated by a M w 8.3 earthquake in the central Kuril Islands. Strong currents that persisted over an eight-hour period damaged floating docks and several boats and caused an estimated 9.2 million in losses. Initial tsunami alert bulletins issued by the West Coast Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC) in Palmer, Alaska were cancelled about three and a half hours after the earthquake, nearly five hours before the first surges reached Crescent City. The largest amplitude wave, 1.76-meter peak to trough, was the sixth cycle and arrived over two hours after the first wave. Strong currents estimated at over 10 knots, damaged or destroyed three docks and caused cracks in most of the remaining docks. As a result of the November 15 event, WCATWC changed the definition of Advisory from a region-wide alert bulletin meaning that a potential tsunami is 6 hours or further away to a localized alert that tsunami water heights may approach warning- level thresholds in specific, vulnerable locations like Crescent City. On January 13, 2007 a similar Kuril event occurred and hourly conferences between the warning center and regional weather forecasts were held with a considerable improvement in the flow of information to local coastal jurisdictions. The event highlighted the vulnerability of harbors from a relatively modest tsunami and underscored the need to improve public education regarding the duration of the tsunami hazards, improve dialog between tsunami warning centers and local jurisdictions, and better understand the currents produced by tsunamis in harbors.

  7. A parametric study of tsunamis generated by submarine slides off western Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvholt, F.; Harbitz, C. B.; Haugen, K. B.; Bondevik, S.

    2003-04-01

    The Storegga slide is one of the largest submarine slides in the world, and occurred about 8000 calendar years BP. Evidence of a tsunami generated by this slide event have been found along the coast of Norway, Scotland and the Faeroe Islands. Based on the reconstructed bathymetry of the sediments before slide release, the Storegga slide tsunami has been simulated and compared with observed run-up heights along the coastline of Norway. For assessment of possible future tsunamis in the slide area, a parametric study of tsunamis generated by smaller slides has been performed. The surface elevation is analysed along the coastline of Norway, and presented as function of the slide dynamics, the volume and configuration of the slide as well as the position in the bathymetry. Recent observations and analysis have indicated strongly that the Storegga slide was a continuos retrogressive slide process. An assessment of the effects of a retrogressive slide movement on the wave structure is finally presented.

  8. Tsunamis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links MMWR Bibliography CDC's Program Floods Flood Readiness Personal Hygiene After a Disaster Cleanup of Flood Water After ... American Red Cross) World Health Organization (WHO) South Asia earthquake and tsunamis website Tsunamis (FEMA) U.S. Pacific Command: Tsunami Relief Effort Tsunami.Gov Health and ...

  9. Nonlinear mechanism of tsunami wave generation by atmospheric disturbances

    OpenAIRE

    Pelinovsky, E.; Talipova, T.; Kurkin, A.; Kharif, C.

    2001-01-01

    The problem of tsunami wave generation by variable meteo-conditions is discussed. The simplified linear and nonlinear shallow water models are derived, and their analytical solutions for a basin of constant depth are discussed. The shallow-water model describes well the properties of the generated tsunami waves for all regimes, except the resonance case. The nonlinear-dispersive model based on the forced Korteweg-de Vries equation is developed to describe the resonant mechanism of the ...

  10. Tsunami hazard in La Réunion island from numerical modeling of historical events

    OpenAIRE

    Quentel, E.; Loevenbruck, A.; He?bert, H.; Allgeyer, S.

    2013-01-01

    Whereas major tsunamis have recently affected the southwest Indian Ocean, tsunami hazard in this basin has never been thoroughly examined. Our study contributes to fill in this lack and focuses on La Réunion island for which tsunami hazard related to great earthquakes is evaluated by modeling the scenarios of major historical events. Then, our numerical modeling allow us to compare the tsunami impact at regional scale according to the seismic sources; we thus identify earth...

  11. Tsunami Modeling from Submarine Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenji Satake

    This paper describes a kinematic model that computes tsunamis generated from submarine landslides. The model is based on bathymetric (ocean floor modeling) data and historical tsunami data. The papers' main focus is the application of the model to the 1741 Oshima-Oshima Tsunami in Japan and landslide events around the Hawaiian Islands. This paper was presented at the U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program Review and International Tsunami Symposium in Seattle, Washington on August 10, 2001.

  12. Tsunami Generation from the 2004 M=9.2 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    NOAA

    The pages on this web site (listed in the Table of Contents) provide a brief overview of the tectonic setting and seismological characteristics of the earthquake, as well as a summary of tsunami generation modeling for this event and the March 28, 2005 M=8.6 northern Sumatra earthquake. Supplemental images and diagrams are provided within this collection of pages.

  13. Preliminary Analysis of the Tsunami Generated by the 23 June 2001 Peru Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    USGS

    This animation shows a model of the tsunami generated by the June 23, 2001 Peru earthquake. The first 33 minutes of tsunami propagation are shown. The tsunami is generated very near the coast and propagates outward to the Pacific Basin and along the coastline to the north and south. Largest offshore tsunami amplitudes are in the Chala-Camaná region of southern Peru.

  14. Modeling tools for the real-time evaluation and historical reconstruction of tsunami events in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrero, J. C.; Greer, D.; Goring, D. G. G.; Power, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    We assess tsunami hazards in New Zealand through a review of historical accounts, analysis of water level and current speed data and detailed numerical modeling. The tsunamis of 2010 (Chile) and 2011 (Japan) were recorded on tide gauges throughout New Zealand, providing a rich water level data set for model comparison and calibration. Furthermore, a current meter at the entrance to Tauranga Harbor also captured these tsunamis providing a unique current speed data set augmented by several concurrent water level records. Analysis of the current data from 2011 shows that although port operations were not adversely affected, tsunami currents may have exceeded thresholds for the navigation of large vessels through the narrow harbor entrance. Harmonic analysis of the current speed data also illustrates the effect of tidal flows on tsunami currents. This information was then used to calibrate numerical models using the ComMIT modeling tool. A sensitivity study for tsunamis generated from around the Pacific Rim indicates the relative hazards from different source regions. Deterministic scenario modeling of significant historical tsunamis provides a quantitative estimate of the expected effects from possible future great earthquakes. These models were tested in April 2014 after the Mw 8.2 earthquake offshore of Iquique, Chile - an event of particular concern given that the August 1868 Arica earthquake generated a tsunami of ~7 m in Lyttelton Harbor as well as runup of up to 10 m in the Chatham Islands. As the April 2014 event unfolded, it was initially unclear if an evacuation or other emergency response would be necessary in New Zealand given that a tsunami was observed and recorded on tide gauges and deep ocean tsunameters close to the source region. Models run in real time, using sources based on inverted tsunameter data and finite fault solutions of the earthquake, suggested that a damaging far-field tsunami was not expected. As a result, emergency response teams and port authorities were advised that is was safe to stand down. These results were ultimately confirmed when the tsunami was recorded in Lyttelton Harbor with a maximum amplitude of ~15 cm. Nevertheless, this event reminded us of New Zealand's far-field tsunami exposure as well as the hazard from sources in South America and the Peru/Chile border region in particular.

  15. Contribution of nonlinearity in tsunami generated by submarine earthquake

    OpenAIRE

    Nosov, M. A.; Kolesov, S. V.; Denisova, A. V.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid co-seismic bottom displacements during strong submarine earthquake give rise to intensive low-frequency elastic oscillations of water layer. Nonlinear energy transfer from the elastic oscillations to long gravitational waves may provide an additional contribution to tsunami. The nonlinear tsunami generation mechanism is examined analytically. Finiteness of bottom elasticity is taken into account. General parameters responsible for amplitude and energy of the nonlinear contribution to ts...

  16. Sedimentary Record and Morphological Effects of a Landslide-Generated Tsunami in a Polar Region: The 2000 AD Tsunami in Vaigat Strait, West Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczucinski, W.; Rosser, N. J.; Strzelecki, M. C.; Long, A. J.; Lawrence, T.; Buchwal, A.; Chague-Goff, C.; Woodroffe, S.

    2012-12-01

    To date, the effects of tsunami erosion and deposition have mainly been reported from tropical and temperate climatic zones yet tsunamis are also frequent in polar zones, particularly in fjord settings where they can be generated by landslides. Here we report the geological effects of a landslide-triggered tsunami that occurred on 21st November 2000 in Vaigat, northern Disko Bugt in west Greenland. To characterise the typical features of this tsunami we completed twelve detailed coastal transects in a range of depositional settings: cliff coasts, narrow to moderate width coastal plains, lagoons and a coastal lake. At each setting we completed a detailed map using a laser scanner and DGPS survey. The tsunami deposits were described from closely spaced trenches and, from the lake, by a series of sediment cores . At each setting we examined the sedimentological properties of the deposits, as well as their bulk geochemistry and diatom content. Selected specimens of arctic willow from inundated and non-inundated areas were collected to assess the impact of the event in their growth ring records. Samples of sediments beneath the AD 2000 deposit were studied for 137Cs to confirm the age of the tsunami and to assess the extent of erosion. Offshore sediment samples, modern beach and soils/sediments underlying the AD 2000 tsunami deposits were sampled to determine tsunami deposit sources. The observed tsunami run-up exceeded 20 m next to the tsunami trigger - a rock avalanche at Paatuut - and up to 10 m on the opposite coast of the fjord. The inland inundation distance ranged from several tens of meters to over 300 m. The wave was recorded as far as 180 km away from the source. The tsunami inundated the coast obliquely to the shoreline in all locations studied. The tsunami frequently caused erosion of existing beach ridges whilst erosional niches were formed inland. The tsunami deposits mainly comprise gravels and very coarse sand. They are over 30 cm thick close to the coast and in front of inland scarps. In the most inland parts of the inundation they are often marked only by patches of coarse sand left on the pre-tsunami soil. At several sites we observed boulder deposits, although in many cases they were likely transported as boulders in icebergs. A characteristic feature related to tsunami deposits were "mud pats" - up to 1 m in diameter and about 20 cm thick silty deposits with occasional gravels - which cover the tsunami deposit. They are interpreted as the result of melting of icebergs washed inland by the tsunami. They often occur close to the inundation limit. The mud pats are a characteristic feature for the tsunami deposits in iceberg dominated settings and are unlikely to be left by storms. The results of this study will serve as a guide for further studies of palaeotsunami in the Vaigat region and elsewhere in polar regions. The study was funded by Polish National Science Centre grant No. 2011/01/B/ST10/01553. Fieldwork was supported by the Arctic Station, Disko (Danish Polar Centre). The police at Ilulissat is acknowledged for providing photographic documentation of the tsunami taken one day after the event.

  17. Tsunami Event - March 11, 2011 Honshu (northeastern Taiheiyou)

    Science.gov (United States)

    NOAA

    This website, from NOAA, hosts a collection of links to images, animations, and videos related to the 2011 tsunami in Japan. The graphics display forecast results, showing qualitative and quantitative information about the tsunami, including tsunami wave interaction with ocean floor bathymetric features, and neighboring coastlines. Tsunami model amplitude information is shown color-coded according the scale bar.

  18. Comparison between three-dimensional linear and nonlinear tsunami generation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kervella, Youen [IFREMER, Laboratoire DYNECO/PHYSED, BP 70, Plouzane (France); Dutykh, Denys; Dias, Frederic [CNRS, PRES UniverSud, CMLA, ENS Cachan, Cachan (France)

    2007-07-15

    The modeling of tsunami generation is an essential phase in understanding tsunamis. For tsunamis generated by underwater earthquakes, it involves the modeling of the sea bottom motion as well as the resulting motion of the water above. A comparison between various models for three-dimensional water motion, ranging from linear theory to fully nonlinear theory, is performed. It is found that for most events the linear theory is sufficient. However, in some cases, more-sophisticated theories are needed. Moreover, it is shown that the passive approach in which the seafloor deformation is simply translated to the ocean surface is not always equivalent to the active approach in which the bottom motion is taken into account, even if the deformation is supposed to be instantaneous. (orig.)

  19. Comparison between three-dimensional linear and nonlinear tsunami generation models

    CERN Document Server

    Kervella, Y; Dutykh, D; Dias, Fr\\'ed\\'eric; Dutykh, Denys; Kervella, Youen

    2006-01-01

    The modeling of tsunami generation is an essential phase in understanding tsunamis. For tsunamis generated by underwater earthquakes, it involves the modeling of the sea bottom motion as well as the resulting motion of the water above it. A comparison between various models for three-dimensional water motion, ranging from linear theory to fully nonlinear theory, is performed. It is found that for most events the linear theory is sufficient. However, in some cases, more sophisticated theories are needed. Moreover, it is shown that the passive approach in which the seafloor deformation is simply translated to the ocean surface is not always equivalent to the active approach in which the bottom motion is taken into account, even if the deformation is supposed to be instantaneous.

  20. Tsunami generation, propagation, and run-up with a high-order Boussinesq model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we extend a high-order Boussinesq-type (finite difference) model, capable of simulating waves out to wavenumber times depth kh <25, to include a moving sea-bed, for the simulation of earthquake- and landslide-induced tsunamis. The extension is straight forward, requiring only an additional term within the kinematic bottom condition. As first test cases we simulate linear and nonlinear surface waves generated from both positive and negative impulsive bottom movements. The computed results compare well against earlier theoretical, numerical, and experimental values. Additionally, we show that the long-time (fully nonlinear) evolution of waves resulting from an upthrusted bottom can eventually result in true solitary waves, consistent with theoretical predictions. It is stressed, however, that the nonlinearity used far exceeds that typical of geophysical tsunamis in the open ocean. The Boussinesq-type model is then used to simulate numerous tsunami-type events generated from submerged landslides, inboth one and two horizontal dimensions. The results again compare well against previous experiments and/or numerical simulations. The new extension compliments recently developed run-up capabilities within this approach, and as demonstrated, the model can therefore treat tsunami events from their initial generation, through their later propagation, and final run-up phases. The developed model is shown to maintain reasonable computational efficiency, and is therefore attractive for the simulation of such events, especially in cases where dispersion is important.

  1. Issues in Indonesia's tsunami disaster management system revealed after the 2004 Sumatra event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, M.; Koyama, A.; Sun, H.; Kang, I.; Arakawa, T.; Kobayashi, J.; Nagata, M.; Nakanishi, R.; Nakano, M.; Noguchi, S.

    2014-12-01

    During the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, Indonesia had the largest number of casualties around 170,000. International society has supported tsunami early warning system, disaster management and disaster education for Indonesia. The past ten years saw several tsunamis in Indonesia after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Construction of tsunami early warning system was not in time the 2006 Pangandaran tsunami in Jawa Island. On the other hand, tsunami science has been developed for this decade. Tsunami early warning system has been developed by deep ocean pressure gauges (DART system), coastal tide gauges, GPS buoys and so on. Tsunami folklore has been collected and used education and connected with tsunami deposit. However, the tsunami early warning system and other science application were not widely used at once in Indonesia. GPS buoys were stolen by fishery people. One tsunami evacuation building are not used for evacuation by local people in Aceh Sumatra Island in 2012 though locations of the buildings were selected by scientific numerical simulation. Big panic and trafic accidents occurred by M8.6 earthquake in Aceh in April 2012 and reveal lack of disaster management planning in urban planning during reconstruction (Fig.1: Trafic jam in Banda Aceh, source MSN news photo). In addition to this, the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami reveal fragilities tsunami preparedness. How should we decide to use the tsunami science? We research field situation in Aceh the after 10 years past from the 2004 Sumatra event. This presentation discusses issues of the gap between tsunami science and operations through field research in Aceh now.

  2. Widespread tsunami-like waves of 23-27 June in the Mediterranean and Black Seas generated by high-altitude atmospheric forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šepi?, Jadranka; Vilibi?, Ivica; Rabinovich, Alexander B; Monserrat, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    A series of tsunami-like waves of non-seismic origin struck several southern European countries during the period of 23 to 27 June 2014. The event caused considerable damage from Spain to Ukraine. Here, we show that these waves were long-period ocean oscillations known as meteorological tsunamis which are generated by intense small-scale air pressure disturbances. An unique atmospheric synoptic pattern was tracked propagating eastward over the Mediterranean and the Black seas in synchrony with onset times of observed tsunami waves. This pattern favoured generation and propagation of atmospheric gravity waves that induced pronounced tsunami-like waves through the Proudman resonance mechanism. This is the first documented case of a chain of destructive meteorological tsunamis occurring over a distance of thousands of kilometres. Our findings further demonstrate that these events represent potentially dangerous regional phenomena and should be included in tsunami warning systems. PMID:26119833

  3. Numerical Modeling of Six Historical Transoceanic Tsunami Events Using a Robust Finite Volume Method on GPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali Farahani, R.; Li, S.; Mohammed, F.; Astill, S.; Williams, C. R.; Lee, R.; Wilson, P. S.; Srinvias, B.

    2014-12-01

    Six transoceanic historical tsunami events including Japan Tohoku tsunami (2011), Chile Maule tsunami (2010), Indian Ocean tsunami (2004), Japan Nankai tsunami (1946), Chile Valdivia tsunami (1960), and Alaska tsunami (1964) have been modeled using a 2D well-balanced shallow water numerical model. The model solves the nonlinear 2D shallow water equations using an upwind finite volume method and is shown in this study to be capable of modeling the tsunami waves and resulting inundations over complex topography and bathymetry. The finite volume method is capable of modeling the wetting and drying of the bed surface at the coastline with no numerical instabilities and the inundation is modeled by allowing the computational cells to dynamically change from dry to wet. The numerical model implements parallel computations on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), which enables the model to implement detailed modeling of inundation of small-scale coastal regions in a short simulation time. The slip distribution and seismic moment of the six earthquake driven tsunami events are introduced to the model as the initial condition including coastal uplift and subsidence. Both local regions and far-field regions affected by these tsunami waves are numerically studied and the resulting run-up and tsunami inundations are compared with the recorded observation data provided by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) including coastal tide gauges and eyewitness observation data. The GPU-based finite volume model indicates accuracy and robustness as well as short simulation time that can be used for transoceanic tsunami waves modeling including real-time numerical modeling of tsunami events and their inland inundations.

  4. PREDICTING TSUNAMIS GENERATED BY 3D GRANULAR LANDSLIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, F.; Fritz, H. M.

    2009-12-01

    Landslides can trigger tsunamis with locally high amplitudes and runup, which can cause devastating effects in the near field region such as at Lituya Bay (1958), Papua New Guinea (1998) and Java (2006). Tsunamis generated by granular landslides were studied in the three dimensional NEES tsunami wave basin (TWB) at Oregon State University (OSU) based on the generalized Froude similarity. A novel pneumatic landslide generator was deployed to simulate deformable granular landslides with varying geometry and kinematics. Measurement techniques such as particle image velocimetry (PIV), multiple above and underwater video cameras, multiple acoustic transducer arrays (MTA), as well as resistance wave and runup gauges were applied. The wave generation was characterized by an extremely unsteady three phase flow consisting of the slide granulate, water and air entrained into the flow. The landslide deformation during the impact and the subsequent underwater motion was studied by underwater cameras while the MTA provided the shapes of the slide deposits on the basin bottom. The generated waves depend on determined non-dimensional landslide and water body parameters such as the slide Froude number and relative slide shape at impact, among others. The experimental data was used to obtain predictive equations for the wave amplitudes and time periods based on landslide characteristics at impact. The partition between wave crests and troughs departed from equipartition with wave profiles dominated either by a trough or a crest depending on the source. Attenuation functions of the leading wave crest amplitude, the lateral wave runup on the hill slope, the wave length and the time period were obtained to describe the wave behavior in the near field and to quantify the wave amplitude decay away from the landslide source. The measured wave celerity of the leading wave corresponds well to the theoretical approximation of the solitary wave speed while the trailing waves are considerably slower in propagation. Energy conversion rates between the slide motions and the generated wave trains were quantified. PIV provided instantaneous surface velocity vector fields, which gave insight into the kinematics of the landslide and wave generation process. At high impact velocities flow separation occurred on the slide shoulder resulting in a hydrodynamic impact crater. The slide characteristics measured in the experiment provide the landslide source for numerical landslide tsunami modeling. The measured landslide and tsunami data serve the validation and advancement of 3-dimensional numerical landslide tsunami and prediction models. Granular landslide tsunami generator deployed in the 3-dimensional NEES Tsunami Wave Basin at OSU.

  5. Physical Modeling of Tsunamis Generated By 3D Deformable Landslides in Various Scenarios From Fjords to Conical Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, B. C.; Fritz, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Tsunamis generated by landslides and volcano flank collapse can be particularly devastative in the near field region due to locally high wave amplitudes and runup. The events of 1958 Lituya Bay, 1963 Vajont reservoir, 1980 Spirit Lake, 2002 Stromboli and 2010 Haiti demonstrate the danger of tsunamis generated by landslides or volcano flank collapses. Unfortunately critical field data from these events is lacking. Source and runup scenarios based on real world events are physically modeled using generalized Froude similarity in the three dimensional NEES tsunami wave basin at Oregon State University. A novel pneumatic landslide tsunami generator (LTG) was deployed to simulate landslides with varying geometry and kinematics. Two different materials are used to simulate landslides to study the granulometry effects: naturally rounded river gravel and cobble mixtures. The LTG consists of a sliding box filled with 1,350 kg of landslide material which is accelerated by means of four pneumatic pistons down a 2H:1V slope. The landslide is launched from the sliding box and continues to accelerate by gravitational forces up to velocities of 5 m/s. The landslide Froude number at impact with the water is in the range 1 tsunami data serve to validate and advance three-dimensional numerical landslide tsunami prediction models.

  6. Identification of elements at risk for a credible tsunami event for Istanbul

    OpenAIRE

    Hancilar, U.

    2012-01-01

    Physical and social elements at risk are identified for a credible tsunami event for Istanbul. For this purpose, inundation maps resulting from probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis for a 10% probability of exceedance in 50 yr are utilised in combination with the geo-coded inventories of building stock, lifeline systems and demographic data. The built environment on Istanbul's shorelines that is exposed to tsunami inundation comprises residential, commercial, industrial, public (governmental/...

  7. The Papua New Guinea tsunami of 17 July 1998: anatomy of a catastrophic event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Tappin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The Papua New Guinea (PNG tsunami of July 1998 was a seminal event because it demonstrated that relatively small and relatively deepwater Submarine Mass Failures (SMFs can cause devastating local tsunamis that strike without warning. There is a comprehensive data set that proves this event was caused by a submarine slump. Yet, the source of the tsunami has remained controversial. This controversy is attributed to several causes. Before the PNG event, it was questionable as to whether SMFs could cause devastating tsunamis. As a result, only limited modelling of SMFs as tsunami sources had been undertaken, and these excluded slumps. The results of these models were that SMFs in general were not considered to be a potential source of catastrophic tsunamis. To effectively model a SMF requires fairly detailed geological data, and these too had been lacking. In addition, qualitative data, such as evidence from survivors, tended to be disregarded in assessing alternative tsunami sources. The use of marine geological data to identify areas of recent submarine failure was not widely applied.

    The disastrous loss of life caused by the PNG tsunami resulted in a major investigation into the area offshore of the devastated coastline, with five marine expeditions taking place. This was the first time that a focussed, large-scale, international programme of marine surveying had taken place so soon after a major tsunami. It was also the first time that such a comprehensive data set became the basis for tsunami simulations. The use of marine mapping subsequently led to a larger involvement of marine geologists in the study of tsunamis, expanding the knowledge base of those studying the threat from SMF hazards. This paper provides an overview of the PNG tsunami and its impact on tsunami science. It presents revised interpretations of the slump architecture based on new seabed relief images and, using these, the most comprehensive tsunami simulation of the PNG event to date. Simulation results explain the measured runups to a high degree. The PNG tsunami has made a major impact on tsunami science. It is one of the most studied SMF tsunamis, yet it remains the only one known of its type: a slump.

  8. Earthquake off Japan could generate strong tsunami arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shu-Kun; Sibuet, Jean-Claude

    The 26 December 2004 earthquake off Sumatra induced a disastrous tsunami that struck in South Asian countries. In a similar context, a potential great earthquake off Japan might occur and generate a strong tsunami in East Asia.The 2004 Sumatra earthquake is the second biggest earthquake (Mw = 9.3) recorded during the last century. It occurred at a depth of 20-30 km, close to an indentation of the Indonesian forearc (Figure l). The rupture propagated about 1200 km northward and terminated north of Andaman Islands.

  9. Coastal vegetation and its influence on the 2004 tsunami event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laso Bayas, J. C.; Marohn, C.; Dercon, G.; Dewi, S.; Piepho, H. P.; Joshi, L.; van Noordwijk, M.; Cadisch, G.

    2012-04-01

    A tsunami event has several effects once it reaches the shore. Infrastructure damage and casualties are two of its most dire consequences. The intensity of these damages is related to the wave force, which in turn is mostly determined by seaquake intensity and offshore properties. Nevertheless, once on land, the energy of the wave is attenuated by gravity (elevation) and friction (land cover). Despite being promoted as 'bio-shields' against wave impact, tree-belts lack quantitative evidence of their performance in such extreme events, and have been criticized for creating a false sense of security. We have studied some of the land uses in sites affected by the 2004 tsunami event, especially in coastal areas close to the coast of Indonesia, more specifically in the west coast of Aceh, Sumatra. Using transects perpendicular to the coast we analyzed the influence of coastal vegetation, particularly cultivated trees, on the impact of the 2004 tsunami. We developed a spatial statistical model that uses a land cover roughness coefficient to account for the resistance offered by different land uses to the wave advance. The coefficient was built using satellite imagery, land cover maps, land use characteristics such as stem diameter, height, and planting density, as well as a literature review. The spatial generalized linear mixed models used determined that while distance to coast was the dominant determinant of impact (casualties and infrastructure damage), the existing coastal vegetation in front of settlements also significantly reduced casualties by an average of 5%. Despite this positive effect of coastal vegetation in front of a settlement, we also found out that dense vegetation behind villages endangered human lives and increased structural damage. We believe that possibly debris carried by the backwash may have contributed to these dissimilar effects of land cover. The models developed in Indonesia are currently being adapted and tested for the effects that the same tsunami event caused in the Seychelles, where the intensity of the wave was a tenth of that in Aceh. On the Seychelles, our current work suggests that no direct effect of coastal vegetation existed. At the same time, our results indicate that vegetation maintained dunes seemed to offer a decrease of the probability of structural damage. We believe that instead of advocating for or against tree belts, a sustainable and effective coastal risk management should be promoted. This should include smart planning for the location (relative to the sea) of settlements but also consider the possible roles of coastal vegetation, as determined by its spatial arrangement. Overall, for any of these planning measures to be sustainable, coastal vegetation must be regarded as an important livelihood provider rather than just as a bio-shield. Consequently, it should be adapted to local customs as well as provide tangible short and mid-term benefits for local communities.

  10. Current issues on PRA regarding seismic and tsunami events at multiunits and sites based on lessons leaned from Tohoku earthquake/tsunami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebisawa, Katsumi; Fujita, Masatoshi; Iwabuchi, Yoko; Sugino, Hideharu [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    The Tohoku earthquake (Mw9.0) occurred on March 11, 2011 and caused a large tsunami. The Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP (F1-NPP) were overwhelmed by the tsunami and core damage occurred. This paper describes the overview of F1-NPP accident and the usability of tsunami PRA at Tohoku earthquake. The paper makes reference to the following current issues: influence on seismic hazard of gigantic aftershocks and triggered earthquakes, concepts for evaluating core damage frequency considering common cause failure with correlation coefficient against seismic event at multi units and sites, and concepts of 'seismic-tsunami PSA' considering a combination of seismic motion and tsunami effects.

  11. Current issues on PRA regarding seismic and tsunami events at multiunits and sites based on lessons leaned from Tohoku earthquake/tsunami

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tohoku earthquake (Mw9.0) occurred on March 11, 2011 and caused a large tsunami. The Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP (F1-NPP) were overwhelmed by the tsunami and core damage occurred. This paper describes the overview of F1-NPP accident and the usability of tsunami PRA at Tohoku earthquake. The paper makes reference to the following current issues: influence on seismic hazard of gigantic aftershocks and triggered earthquakes, concepts for evaluating core damage frequency considering common cause failure with correlation coefficient against seismic event at multi units and sites, and concepts of 'seismic-tsunami PSA' considering a combination of seismic motion and tsunami effects.

  12. Tsunamis generated by 3D granular landslides in various scenarios from fjords to conical islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, Brian C.; Fritz, Hermann M.

    2015-04-01

    Landslide generated tsunamis such as in Lituya Bay, Alaska 1958 account for some of the highest recorded tsunami runup heights. Source and runup scenarios based on real world events are physically modeled using generalized Froude similarity in the three dimensional NEES tsunami wave basin at Oregon State University. A novel pneumatic landslide tsunami generator (LTG) was deployed to simulate landslides with varying geometry and kinematics. The bathymetric and topographic scenarios tested with the LTG are the basin-wide propagation and runup, fjord, curved headland fjord and a conical island setting representing a landslide off an island or a volcano flank collapse. The LTG consists of a sliding box filled with 1,350 kg of landslide material which is accelerated by pneumatic pistons down slope. Two different landslide materials are used to study the granulometry effects: naturally rounded river gravel and cobble mixtures. Water surface elevations are recorded by an array of resistance wave gauges. The landslide deformation is measured from above and underwater camera recordings. The landslide deposit is measured on the basin floor with a multiple transducer acoustic array (MTA). Landslide surface reconstruction and kinematics are determined with a stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. Wave runup is recorded with resistance wave gauges along the slope and verified with video image processing. The measured landslide and wave parameters are compared between the planar hill slope used in various scenarios and the convex hill slope of the conical island. The energy conversion rates from the landslide motion to the wave train is quantified for the planar and convex hill slopes. The wave runup data on the opposing headland is analyzed and evaluated with wave theories. The measured landslide and tsunami data serve to validate and advance three-dimensional numerical landslide tsunami prediction models.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIAL TSUNAMI GENERATION IN CHINA'S BOHAI SEA FROM DIRECT GEOTECTONIC AND COLLATERAL SOURCE MECHANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pararas Carayannis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Bohai Sea borders northeastern China's most populous and highest economic valuecoastal areas where several megacities are located. Critical infrastructure facilities exist or areunder construction, including a nuclear power plant and super port facilities. Large reserves of oilhave been discovered and a number of offshore oil platforms have been built. The extent ofdevelopment along coastal areas requires a better assessment of potential tsunami risks. Althoughtsunamis do not pose as much of a threat as earthquakes in this region, locally destructive tsunamishave been generated in the past and future events could have significant impacts on coastalpopulations and China's economy, particularly because most of the development has taken place inlow-lying regions, including river deltas. The present study examines the geotectonics of the Bohaibasin region, the impact of past historical events, and the potential for local tsunami generationfrom a variety of direct and collateral source mechanisms triggered by intra plate earthquakes.More specifically, the present study examines: amajor active faults bounding the Bohai Basin; bthe resulting crustal deformation patterns of tectonic structures that have resulted in catastrophicearthquakes in recent years; c the basin-wide extension - with local inversion - extending into theBohai Sea that generated tsunamigenic earthquakes in 1888 and 1969; and d deformational futureseismic events with the potential to generate local tsunamis directly or by collateral mechanisms offolding, en-echelon bookshelf failures, or from destabilization/dissociation of structuralaccumulations of gas hydrate deposits within the basin's thick sedimentary stratigraphic layers.

  14. Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlumberger Excellence in Educational Development, Inc.

    This page from the Seed Project contains information on the Indian Ocean Tsunami as well as 2 new visualizations. The first shows the main wave's progress across the ocean in hour increments. The second shows a hypothetical tsunami in profile as it travels across open water and then encounters a land mass. (Both of these links are images on the right hand side of the page.)

  15. ASSESSMENT OF TSUNAMI GENERATION POTENTIAL THROUGH RAPID ANALYSIS OF SEISMIC PARAMETERS Case study: Comparison of the Sumatra Earthquakes of 6 April and 25 October 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madlazim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to estimate P-wave rupture durations (Tdur, dominant periods (Td and rupture durations greater than 50 seconds (T50Ex for two large, shallow earthquakes, which occurred off the coast of Sumatra on 6 April and 25 October 2010. Although both earthquakes had similar parameters of magnitude and focal depth, the 25 October event (Mw=7.8 generated a tsunami while the 6 April event (Mw=7.8 did not. Analysis of the above stated parameters helped understand the mechanisms of tsunami generation of these two earthquakes. Measurements from vertical component broadband P-wave quake velocity records and determination of the above stated parameters could provide a direct procedure for assessing rapidly the potential for tsunami generation. The results of the present study and the analysis of the seismic parameters helped explain why one event generated a tsunami, while the other one did not.

  16. Tsunami Generated by a Two-Phase Submarine Debris Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudasaini, S. P.

    2012-04-01

    The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini (2011) is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model includes several essential physical aspects, including Mohr-Coulomb plasticity for the solid stress, while the fluid stress is modelled as a solid volume fraction gradient enhanced non-Newtonian viscous stress. The generalized interfacial momentum transfer includes the viscous drag, buoyancy, and the virtual mass. The generalized drag covers both the solid-like and fluid-like contributions, and can be applied to linear to quadratic drags. Strong couplings exist between the solid and the fluid momentum transfer. The advantage of the real two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase or quasi-two-phase models is that by considering the solid (and/or the fluid) volume fraction appropriately, the initial mass can be divided into several (even mutually disjoint) parts; a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This offers a unique and innovative opportunity within a single framework to simultaneously simulate (a) the sliding debris (or landslide), (b) the water lake or ocean, (c) the debris impact at the lake or ocean, (d) tsunami generation and propagation, (e) mixing and separation between the solid and the fluid phases, and (f) sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. The new model is applied to two-phase subaerial and submarine debris flows. Benchmark numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of the debris impact induced tsunamis are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanche and landslides. Special attention is paid to study the basic features of the debris impact to the mountain lakes or oceans. This includes the generation, amplification and propagation of the multiple strong and bore-type tsunami waves and run-ups in the coastal lines, and debris slide and deposition at the bottom floor. Strong debris shock waves are generated that travel upstream. Once the debris supply ceases, the shock front is diffused. The model analysis also includes mixing and separation of phases, including inter-phase mass and momentum exchanges and generation and interactions of solid and fluid waves. The state of the solid volume fraction governs the evolution of the fluid extra stress and thus effectively dominates the entire flow dynamics. So, the actual knowledge of the solid volume fraction is essential for the prediction of the turbidity currents, sediment transport and deposition in the subaerial and submarine environments. Applications of this model include (i) the sediment transport on hill slopes, river streams, hydraulic channels (e.g., hydropower dams and plants); lakes, fjords, coastal lines, and aquatic ecology; and (ii) submarine debris impact and the rupture of fiber optic, submarine cables and pipelines in ocean floor, and damage to offshore drilling platforms. The Phase-Froude numbers (the solid and fluid Froude numbers) are introduced that change drastically as the debris mass hits the fluid dam. The Phase-Froude numbers can be subcritical or super-critical, suggesting that the tsunami may be following or preceding the wave generating submarine slide and thus enhancing or reducing the tsunami waves. It is observed that the submarine debris front speed can be faster than the tsunami wave speed. This information can be useful for the early warning strategy in the coastal regions. These findings substantially increase the dynamical understanding of complex multi-phase systems and flows, allowing proper modeling of landslide and debris induced tsunami, the dynamics of turbidity currents and sediment transport, with associated applications in hazard mitigation, geomorphology and sedimentology.

  17. Wroclaw neutrino event generator

    OpenAIRE

    Nowak, Jaroslaw A.

    2006-01-01

    A neutrino event generator developed by the Wroclaw Neutrino Group is described. The physical models included in the generator are discussed and illustrated with the results of simulations. The considered processes are quasi-elastic scattering and pion production modelled by combining the $\\Delta$ resonance excitation and deep inelastic scattering.

  18. Physical Modeling of Landslide Generated Tsunamis in Fjords and around Conical Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, B. C.; Fritz, H. M.

    2012-12-01

    Tsunamis generated by landslides and volcanic island collapses account for some of the most extreme events recorded in history (Lituya Bay, Alaska, 1958) and can be particularly catastrophic in the near field region. Source and runup scenarios based on real world events using generalized Froude similarity are physically modeled in the three dimensional NEES tsunami wave basin (TWB) at Oregon State University. A novel pneumatic landslide tsunami generator (LTG) was deployed to simulate landslides with varying geometry and kinematics. The LTG consists of a sliding box filled with up to 1,350 kg of naturally rounded river gravel which is accelerated by means of four pneumatic pistons down the 2H: 1V slope. The granular landslides are launched towards the water surface at velocities of up to 5 m/s resulting in corresponding landslide Froude numbers at impact in the range 1 cameras, a stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) setup and a multi-transducer acoustic array (MTA). Three-dimensional landslide surfaces are reconstructed and the instantaneous landslide surface kinematics measured using the stereo PIV setup. Above and underwater cameras measure the slide deformation at impact and underwater runout, while the slide deposit is measured with the MTA on the basin floor. Runup wave gauges along with overlapping video cameras record the onshore and offshore runup. Empirical equations for predicting wave amplitude, wave period, wave length and near-source runup are obtained. The generated waves are primarily dependent on non-dimensional landslide and water body parameters such as the impact landslide Froude number and relative landslide shape among others. Energy conversion rates between the landslide motion and the generated wave train are quantified. The lateral edge wave and offshore wave propagation velocities are compared against wave theories. Unique characteristics in the wave and runup data caused by topographic and bathymetric features are analyzed. A localized amplification of the runup was observed on the lee-side of the conical island due to the collision effects of the lateral edge waves propagating around both sides of the island. The measured landslide and tsunami data serve to validate and advance 3-dimensional numerical landslide tsunami prediction models.; Tsunami generation by landslide (Photo credit: Stephanie Lopez)

  19. Simulation of tsunami generation, propagation and coastal inundation in the Eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, A. G.; Karambas, T. V.; Archetti, R.

    2015-05-01

    In the present work, an advanced tsunami generation, propagation and coastal inundation 2-DH model (i.e. 2-D Horizontal model) based on the higher-order Boussinesq equations - developed by the authors - is applied to simulate representative earthquake-induced tsunami scenarios in the Eastern Mediterranean. Two areas of interest were selected after evaluating tsunamigenic zones and possible sources in the region: one at the Southwest of the island of Crete in Greece and one at the East of the island of Sicily in Italy. Model results are presented in the form of extreme water elevation maps, sequences of snapshots of water elevation during the propagation of the tsunamis, and inundation maps of the studied low-lying coastal areas. This work marks one of the first successful applications of a fully nonlinear model for the 2-DH simulation of tsunami-induced coastal inundation; acquired results are indicative of the model's capabilities, as well of how areas in the Eastern Mediterranean would be affected by eventual larger events.

  20. Properties of electromagnetic fields generated by tsunami first arrivals: Classification based on the ocean depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Takuto; Toh, Hiroaki; Tyler, Robert H.

    2015-04-01

    Tsunami flow coupled with the geomagnetic field generates electric currents and associated magnetic fields. Although electromagnetic (EM) tsunami signals can be used for analysis and even forecasting tsunami propagation, the dynamically self-consistent effect of shoaling water depth on the fluid + electrodynamics has not been adequately clarified. In this study, we classify tsunami EM phenomena into three cases based on the ocean depth and find that the deeper ocean results in stronger self-induction due to the increase in both tsunami phase velocity and ocean conductance. In this deep-ocean case, the phase lead of the vertical magnetic variation relative to the sea surface elevation is smaller, while an initial rise in the horizontal magnetic component becomes observable prior to tsunami arrival. Furthermore, we confirm that the enhancement of tsunami height in shallower oceans shifts the ocean depth supplying maximum amplitudes of tsunami magnetic fields from approximately 2.0 km to 1.5 km.

  1. Multi-scale modelling of submarine landslide-generated tsunamis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J.; Piggott, M. D.; Collins, G. S.; Smith, R. C.; Allison, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Submarine landslides can be far larger than terrestrial landslides and many generate destructive tsunamis. The Storegga Slide, offshore Norway, covers an area larger than Scotland and contains 3,000 km3 of material (enough to cover Scotland to a depth of 80 m). This huge slide occurred at 8.2 ka and extends for 800 km down slope. It produced a tsunami with >20 m run-up around the Norwegian Sea, including the Shetlands, and run-ups were typically 3-4 m along the mainland coast of Scotland. The tsunami propagated as far as East Greenland. Northern Europe faces few, if any, other natural hazards that could cause damage on the scale of a repeat Storegga Slide tsunami. Modelling such vast natural disasters is not straightforward. In order to achieve accurate run-up, high resolution is required near the coastlines, but entire oceans must be modelled to account for the vast distances travelled by the wave. Here, we use the open-source, three-dimensional CFD model, Fluidity, to simulate the Storegga landslide-generated tsunami. Fluidity's unstructured meshing allows resolution to vary by orders of magnitude within a single numerical simulation. We present results from multi-scale simulations that capture fine-scale coastal details and at the same time cover a domain spanning the Arctic ocean to capture run-ups on the East Greenland coast. We also compare the effects of modern vs palaeo-bathymetry, which has been neglected in previous numerical modelling studies. Future work will include assessing other potential landslide sites and how landslide dynamics affect the resulting tsunami wave to be used in hazard assessment for Northern Europe. Close-up of the computational mesh around the UK coast, western Norway and as far east as Iceland. The shift in resolution from 750m at the coast to over 20km in open water is clearly visible. Note the high resolution area to the top left which is the Storegga Landslide region.

  2. Tsunami hazard in La Réunion island from numerical modeling of historical events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quentel, E.; Loevenbruck, A.; Hébert, H.; Allgeyer, S.

    2013-05-01

    Whereas major tsunamis have recently affected the southwest Indian Ocean, tsunami hazard in this basin has never been thoroughly examined. Our study contributes to fill in this lack and focuses on La Réunion island for which tsunami hazard related to great earthquakes is evaluated by modeling the scenarios of major historical events. Then, our numerical modeling allow us to compare the tsunami impact at regional scale according to the seismic sources; we thus identify earthquakes locations which most affect the island and describe the impact distribution along its coastline. Thirdly, detailed models are performed for selected sites based on high resolution bathymetric and topographic data; they provide estimations of the water currents, wave heights and potential inundations. When available, field measurements and tide records allow testing our models. Arrival time, amplitude of the first wave and impact on the tide gauge time series are well reproduced. Models are consistent with the observations. The west coast of La Réunion is the most affected (to 2.7 m in the harbour of Le Port Est for 2004 event) by transoceanic tsunamis. Numerical modeling has been performed at Saint-Paul for the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman event and 1833 Sumatra event; the low topography of this town could make it vulnerable to tsunami waves. Harbours, particularly prone to undergo significant damages, are also examined. Outside the harbours as well as at Saint-Paul, inundations are predicted along the coastline due to important local wave heights (> 2.5 m).

  3. Identification of earthquakes that generate tsunamis in Java and Nusa Tenggara using rupture duration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Java and Nusa Tenggara are the tectonically active of Sunda arc. This study discuss the rupture duration as a manifestation of the power of earthquake-generated tsunami. We use the teleseismic (30° - 90°) body waves with high-frequency energy Seismometer is from IRIS network as amount 206 broadband units. We applied the Butterworth high bandpass (1 - 2 Hz) filtered. The arrival and travel times started from wave phase of P - PP which based on Jeffrey Bullens table with TauP program. The results are that the June 2, 1994 Banyuwangi and the July 17, 2006 Pangandaran earthquakes identified as tsunami earthquakes with long rupture duration (To > 100 second), medium magnitude (7.6 50 second which depend on its magnitude. Those events are located far from the trench

  4. Identification of earthquakes that generate tsunamis in Java and Nusa Tenggara using rupture duration analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribadi, S.; Puspito, N. T.; Yudistira, T.; Afnimar, Ibrahim, G.; Laksono, B. I.; Adnan, Z.

    2014-09-01

    Java and Nusa Tenggara are the tectonically active of Sunda arc. This study discuss the rupture duration as a manifestation of the power of earthquake-generated tsunami. We use the teleseismic (30° - 90°) body waves with high-frequency energy Seismometer is from IRIS network as amount 206 broadband units. We applied the Butterworth high bandpass (1 - 2 Hz) filtered. The arrival and travel times started from wave phase of P - PP which based on Jeffrey Bullens table with TauP program. The results are that the June 2, 1994 Banyuwangi and the July 17, 2006 Pangandaran earthquakes identified as tsunami earthquakes with long rupture duration (To > 100 second), medium magnitude (7.6 50 second which depend on its magnitude. Those events are located far from the trench.

  5. Identification of earthquakes that generate tsunamis in Java and Nusa Tenggara using rupture duration analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pribadi, S., E-mail: sugengpribadimsc@gmail.com [Tsunami Warning Information Division, Indonesian Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (BMKG), Jalan Angkasa I No. 2, Jakarta13920 and Graduate Student of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology, Bandung Institute of T (Indonesia); Puspito, N. T.; Yudistira, T.; Afnimar,; Ibrahim, G. [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Laksono, B. I. [Database Maintenance Division, Indonesian Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (BMKG), Jalan Angkasa I No.2, Jakarta 13920 (Indonesia); Adnan, Z. [Database Maintenance Division, Indonesian Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (BMKG), Jalan Angkasa I No. 2, Jakarta 13920 and Graduate Student of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology, Bandung Institute of Technol (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    Java and Nusa Tenggara are the tectonically active of Sunda arc. This study discuss the rupture duration as a manifestation of the power of earthquake-generated tsunami. We use the teleseismic (30° - 90°) body waves with high-frequency energy Seismometer is from IRIS network as amount 206 broadband units. We applied the Butterworth high bandpass (1 - 2 Hz) filtered. The arrival and travel times started from wave phase of P - PP which based on Jeffrey Bullens table with TauP program. The results are that the June 2, 1994 Banyuwangi and the July 17, 2006 Pangandaran earthquakes identified as tsunami earthquakes with long rupture duration (To > 100 second), medium magnitude (7.6 < Mw < 7.9) and located near the trench. The others are 4 tsunamigenic earthquakes and 3 inland earthquakes with short rupture duration start from To > 50 second which depend on its magnitude. Those events are located far from the trench.

  6. THE POTENTIAL OF TSUNAMI GENERATION ALONG THE MAKRAN SUBDUCTION ZONE IN THE NORTHERN ARABIAN SEA. CASE STUDY: THE EARTHQUAKE AND TSUNAMI OF NOVEMBER 28, 1945

    OpenAIRE

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2006-01-01

    Although large earthquakes along the Makran Subduction Zone are infrequent, the potential for the generation of destructive tsunamis in the Northern Arabian Sea cannot be overlooked. It is quite possible that historical tsunamis in this region have not been properly reported or documented. Such past tsunamis must have affected Southern Pakistan, India, Iran, Oman, the Maldives and other countries bordering the Indian Ocean.The best known of the historical tsunamis in the region is the one gen...

  7. The 30 December 2002 landslide-induced tsunamis in Stromboli: sequence of the events reconstructed from the eyewitness accounts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tinti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available On 30 December 2002 the coast of the volcanic island of Stromboli, in the Tyrrhenian sea, Italy, was attacked by two tsunamis generated by landslides that took place on the north-west flank of the volcano. The landslides and the tsunamis represented the most impressive and threatening episodes of a strong effusive eruption, started on 28 December from a new vent which opened close to the north-east crater of the volcano. In spite of the intensified monitoring carried out in response to the eruption, the landslides and the ensuing tsunamis were not foreseen, and the available instrumental data are insufficient to allow a precise reconstruction of the sequence of the events. The seismic network recorded two main landslides along the steep slope of Sciara del Fuoco, with onset around 13:15 and 13:23 local time (GMT+1. The tsunamis were the direct consequence of the mass movements. Three main post-event surveys helped make assessment on the wave impact on the coast. In this paper the attention is focussed on the accounts of the eye-witnesses, that help us clarify and understand what happened. People in the source area (Sciara del Fuoco reported a small-volume subaerial slide taking place first, then a sharp cut forming in the sea water down to the sea floor (about 10–20 m deep and propagating almost parallel to the coastline, be concomitantly associated with a sea retreat and a subsequent sea advance. It is suggested here that the cut was the effect of a large submarine landslide that detached from very close to the coast and produced the 13:15 signal in the recorded seismograms. The second, mostly subaerial, slump was observed to slide down 7–8 min later and to excite a train of waves some distance offshore. Not all the witnesses realised that two distinct tsunamis occurred. The tsunami period was probably in the order of 100 s, but shorter period crests were seen to travel on the top of the long-period waves by several persons. The duration of each tsunami was appreciated to be around 5–7 min. It is difficult to ascertain which tsunami was the largest, since there is no full agreement among the observers, but certainly by accounts both were characterised by large destructive waves.

  8. TSUNAMIS AND TSUNAMI-LIKE WAVES OF THE EASTERN UNITED STATES

    OpenAIRE

    James F. Lander; Lowell S. Whiteside; Patricia A. Lockridge

    2002-01-01

    The threat of tsunamis and tsunami-like waves hitting the eastern United States is very real despite a general impression to the contrary. We have cataloged 40 tsunamis and tsunami-like waves that have occurred in the eastern United States since 1600. Tsunamis were generated from such events as the 1755 Queen Anne’s earthquake, the Grand Banks event of 1929, the Charleston earthquake of 1886, and the New Madrid earthquakes of 1811-1812. The Queen Anne tsunami was observed as far away as St....

  9. Displaced Water Volume, Potential Energy of Initial Elevation, and Tsunami Intensity: Analysis of Recent Tsunami Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosov, Mikhail A.; Bolshakova, Anna V.; Kolesov, Sergey V.

    2014-12-01

    We consider recent ocean-bottom earthquakes for which detailed slip distribution data are available. Using these data and the Okada formulae, we calculate the vector fields of co-seismic bottom deformations, which allow us to determine the displaced water volume and the potential energy of initial elevation of the tsunami source. It is shown that, in the majority of cases, the horizontal components of bottom deformation provide an additional contribution to the displaced water volume and virtually never diminish the contribution of the vertical component. The absolute value of the relative contribution of the horizontal components of bottom deformation to the displaced volume varies from 0.07 to 55 %, on average amounting to 14 %. The displaced volume and the energy of initial elevation (tsunami energy) are examined as functions of the moment magnitude, and the relevant regressions (least-squares fits) are derived. The obtained relationships exhibit good correspondence with the theoretical upper limits that had been obtained under the assumption of uniform slip distribution along a rectangular fault. Tsunami energy calculated on the basis of finite fault model data is compared with the earthquake energy determined from the energy-magnitude relationship by Kanamori. It is shown that tsunami takes from 0.001 to 0.34 % of the earthquake energy, and on average 0.04 %. Finally, we analyze the Soloviev-Imamura tsunami intensity as a function of the following three quantities: (1) the moment magnitude, (2) the decimal logarithm of the absolute value of displaced volume, and (3) the decimal logarithm of the potential energy of initial elevation. The first dependence exhibits rather poor correlation, whereas the second and third dependences demonstrate noticeably higher correlation coefficients. This gives us grounds to suggest considering the displaced volume and the energy of initial elevation as measures of the tsunamigenic potential of an earthquake.

  10. Boussinesq systems in two space dimensions over a variable bottom for the generation and propagation of tsunami waves

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsotakis, Dimitrios

    2009-01-01

    Considered here are Boussinesq systems of equations of surface water wave theory over a variable bottom. A simplified such Boussinesq system is derived and solved numerically by the standard Galerkin-finite element method. We study by numerical means the generation of tsunami waves due to bottom deformation and we compare the results with analytical solutions of the linearized Euler equations. Moreover, we study tsunami wave propagation in the case of the Java 2006 event, comparing the results of the Boussinesq model with those produced by the finite difference code MOST, that solves the shallow water wave equations.

  11. OCEAN-WIDE TSUNAMIS, MAGNITUDE THRESHOLDS, AND 1946 TYPE EVENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Daniel A.

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of magnitudes and runups in Hawaii for more than 200 tsunamigenic earthquakes along the margins of the Pacific reveals that all of the earthquakes with moment magnitudes of 8.6 or greater produced significant Pacific-wide tsunamis. Such findings can be used as a basis for early warnings of significant ocean-wide tsunamis as a supplement to, or in the absence of, more comprehensive data from other sources. Additional analysis of magnitude and runup data suggests that 1946 type eart...

  12. Monte Carlo Event Generators

    OpenAIRE

    Seymour, Michael H.; Marx, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    Monte Carlo event generators are essential components of almost all experimental analyses and are also widely used by theorists and experiments to make predictions and preparations for future experiments. They are all too often used as "black boxes", without sufficient consideration of their component models or their reliability. In this set of three lectures we hope to open the box and explain the physical bases behind the models they use. We focus primarily on the general ...

  13. The BABAYAGA event generator

    OpenAIRE

    Calame, C. M. Carloni; Montagna, G.; Nicrosini, O.; Piccinini, F.

    2003-01-01

    The program BABAYAGA is an event generator for QED processes at flavour factories, mainly intended for luminosity measurement of e+ e- colliders in the center of mass range 1-10 GeV. Recently, the pi+ pi- channel has been added as well. The relevant (photonic) radiative corrections are simulated by means of a Parton Shower in QED. The theoretical precision of the approach is estimated and some phenomenological results are discussed.

  14. The BABAYAGA event generator

    CERN Document Server

    Carloni-Calame, C M; Nicrosini, O; Piccinini, F

    2004-01-01

    The program BABAYAGA is an event generator for QED processes at flavour factories, mainly intended for luminosity measurement of e+ e- colliders in the center of mass range 1-10 GeV. Recently, the pi+ pi- channel has been added as well. The relevant (photonic) radiative corrections are simulated by means of a Parton Shower in QED. The theoretical precision of the approach is estimated and some phenomenological results are discussed.

  15. The BABAYAGA event generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carloni Calame, C.M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pavia, Via A. Bassi, 6 - 27100 Pavia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Via A. Bassi, 6 - 27100 Pavia (Italy); Montagna, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Via A. Bassi, 6 - 27100 Pavia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pavia, Via A. Bassi, 6 - 27100 Pavia (Italy); Nicrosini, O. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pavia, Via A. Bassi, 6 - 27100 Pavia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Via A. Bassi, 6 - 27100 Pavia (Italy); Piccinini, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pavia, Via A. Bassi, 6 - 27100 Pavia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Via A. Bassi, 6 - 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2004-04-15

    The program BABAYAGA is an event generator for QED processes at flavour factories, mainly intended for luminosity measurement of e {sup +} e {sup -} colliders in the center of mass range 1-10 GeV. Recently, the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} channel has been added as well. The relevant (photonic) radiative corrections are simulated by means of a Parton Shower in QED. The theoretical precision of the approach is estimated and some phenomenological results are discussed.

  16. Earthquake and tsunami forecasts: Relation of slow slip events to subsequent earthquake rupture

    OpenAIRE

    Dixon, Timothy H.; Jiang, Yan; Malservisi, Rocco; Mccaffrey, Robert; Voss, Nicholas; Protti, Marino; Gonzalez, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Recent destructive megathrust earthquakes and tsunamis in Japan and Sumatra indicate the difficulty of forecasting these events. Geodetic monitoring of the offshore regions of the subduction zones where these events occur has been suggested as a useful tool, but its potential has never been conclusively demonstrated. Here we show that slow slip events, nondestructive events that release energy slowly over weeks or months, are important mechanisms for releasing seismic strain in subduction zon...

  17. Differences in tsunami generation between the December 26, 2004 and March 28, 2005 Sumatra earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, E.L.; Bilek, S.L.; Arcas, D.; Titov, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    Source parameters affecting tsunami generation and propagation for the Mw > 9.0 December 26, 2004 and the Mw = 8.6 March 28, 2005 earthquakes are examined to explain the dramatic difference in tsunami observations. We evaluate both scalar measures (seismic moment, maximum slip, potential energy) and finite-source repre-sentations (distributed slip and far-field beaming from finite source dimensions) of tsunami generation potential. There exists significant variability in local tsunami runup with respect to the most readily available measure, seismic moment. The local tsunami intensity for the December 2004 earthquake is similar to other tsunamigenic earthquakes of comparable magnitude. In contrast, the March 2005 local tsunami was deficient relative to its earthquake magnitude. Tsunami potential energy calculations more accurately reflect the difference in tsunami severity, although these calculations are dependent on knowledge of the slip distribution and therefore difficult to implement in a real-time system. A significant factor affecting tsunami generation unaccounted for in these scalar measures is the location of regions of seafloor displacement relative to the overlying water depth. The deficiency of the March 2005 tsunami seems to be related to concentration of slip in the down-dip part of the rupture zone and the fact that a substantial portion of the vertical displacement field occurred in shallow water or on land. The comparison of the December 2004 and March 2005 Sumatra earthquakes presented in this study is analogous to previous studies comparing the 1952 and 2003 Tokachi-Oki earthquakes and tsunamis, in terms of the effect slip distribution has on local tsunamis. Results from these studies indicate the difficulty in rapidly assessing local tsunami runup from magnitude and epicentral location information alone.

  18. Tsunami Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Tsunami Database is a global digital database containing information on more than 2000 tsunamis maintained by the National Geophysical Data Center. This is an interactive site; the user is asked to enter search parameters such as date, latitude and longitude, cause of the tsunami - earthquake, landslide, volcano, or all combined - magnitude, and death. Information is then generated on tsunamis that match that data. The National Geophysical Data Center also maintains an historic slide set collection of tsunami damage.

  19. Three-dimensional splay fault geometry and implications for tsunami generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, G F; Bangs, N L; Taira, A; Kuramoto, S; Pangborn, E; Tobin, H J

    2007-11-16

    Megasplay faults, very long thrust faults that rise from the subduction plate boundary megathrust and intersect the sea floor at the landward edge of the accretionary prism, are thought to play a role in tsunami genesis. We imaged a megasplay thrust system along the Nankai Trough in three dimensions, which allowed us to map the splay fault geometry and its lateral continuity. The megasplay is continuous from the main plate interface fault upwards to the sea floor, where it cuts older thrust slices of the frontal accretionary prism. The thrust geometry and evidence of large-scale slumping of surficial sediments show that the fault is active and that the activity has evolved toward the landward direction with time, contrary to the usual seaward progression of accretionary thrusts. The megasplay fault has progressively steepened, substantially increasing the potential for vertical uplift of the sea floor with slip. We conclude that slip on the megasplay fault most likely contributed to generating devastating historic tsunamis, such as the 1944 moment magnitude 8.1 Tonankai event, and it is this geometry that makes this margin and others like it particularly prone to tsunami genesis. PMID:18006743

  20. A Hybrid Tsunami Risk Model for Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseemkunju, A. V.; Smith, D. F.; Khater, M.; Khemici, O.; Betov, B.; Scott, J.

    2014-12-01

    Around the margins of the Pacific Ocean, denser oceanic plates slipping under continental plates cause subduction earthquakes generating large tsunami waves. The subducting Pacific and Philippine Sea plates create damaging interplate earthquakes followed by huge tsunami waves. It was a rupture of the Japan Trench subduction zone (JTSZ) and the resultant M9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake that caused the unprecedented tsunami along the Pacific coast of Japan on March 11, 2011. EQECAT's Japan Earthquake model is a fully probabilistic model which includes a seismo-tectonic model describing the geometries, magnitudes, and frequencies of all potential earthquake events; a ground motion model; and a tsunami model. Within the much larger set of all modeled earthquake events, fault rupture parameters for about 24000 stochastic and 25 historical tsunamigenic earthquake events are defined to simulate tsunami footprints using the numerical tsunami model COMCOT. A hybrid approach using COMCOT simulated tsunami waves is used to generate inundation footprints, including the impact of tides and flood defenses. Modeled tsunami waves of major historical events are validated against observed data. Modeled tsunami flood depths on 30 m grids together with tsunami vulnerability and financial models are then used to estimate insured loss in Japan from the 2011 tsunami. The primary direct report of damage from the 2011 tsunami is in terms of the number of buildings damaged by municipality in the tsunami affected area. Modeled loss in Japan from the 2011 tsunami is proportional to the number of buildings damaged. A 1000-year return period map of tsunami waves shows high hazard along the west coast of southern Honshu, on the Pacific coast of Shikoku, and on the east coast of Kyushu, primarily associated with major earthquake events on the Nankai Trough subduction zone (NTSZ). The highest tsunami hazard of more than 20m is seen on the Sanriku coast in northern Honshu, associated with the JTSZ.

  1. Identification of elements at risk for a credible tsunami event for Istanbul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancilar, U.

    2012-01-01

    Physical and social elements at risk are identified for a credible tsunami event for Istanbul. For this purpose, inundation maps resulting from probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis for a 10% probability of exceedance in 50 yr are utilised in combination with the geo-coded inventories of building stock, lifeline systems and demographic data. The built environment on Istanbul's shorelines that is exposed to tsunami inundation comprises residential, commercial, industrial, public (governmental/municipal, schools, hospitals, sports and religious), infrastructure (car parks, garages, fuel stations, electricity transformer buildings) and military buildings, as well as piers and ports, gas tanks and stations and other urban elements (e.g., recreational facilities). Along the Marmara Sea shore, Tuzla shipyards and important port and petrochemical facilities at Ambarl? are expected to be exposed to tsunami hazard. Significant lifeline systems of the city of Istanbul such as natural gas, electricity, telecommunication and sanitary and waste-water transmission, are also under the threat of tsunamis. In terms of social risk, it is estimated that there are about 32 000 inhabitants exposed to tsunami hazard.

  2. The exposure of Sydney (Australia) to earthquake-generated tsunamis, storms and sea level rise: a probabilistic multi-hazard approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osso, F; Dominey-Howes, D; Moore, C; Summerhayes, S; Withycombe, G

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 85% of Australia's population live along the coastal fringe, an area with high exposure to extreme inundations such as tsunamis. However, to date, no Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessments (PTHA) that include inundation have been published for Australia. This limits the development of appropriate risk reduction measures by decision and policy makers. We describe our PTHA undertaken for the Sydney metropolitan area. Using the NOAA NCTR model MOST (Method for Splitting Tsunamis), we simulate 36 earthquake-generated tsunamis with annual probabilities of 1:100, 1:1,000 and 1:10,000, occurring under present and future predicted sea level conditions. For each tsunami scenario we generate a high-resolution inundation map of the maximum water level and flow velocity, and we calculate the exposure of buildings and critical infrastructure. Results indicate that exposure to earthquake-generated tsunamis is relatively low for present events, but increases significantly with higher sea level conditions. The probabilistic approach allowed us to undertake a comparison with an existing storm surge hazard assessment. Interestingly, the exposure to all the simulated tsunamis is significantly lower than that for the 1:100 storm surge scenarios, under the same initial sea level conditions. The results have significant implications for multi-risk and emergency management in Sydney. PMID:25492514

  3. The exposure of Sydney (Australia) to earthquake-generated tsunamis, storms and sea level rise: a probabilistic multi-hazard approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osso, F.; Dominey-Howes, D.; Moore, C.; Summerhayes, S.; Withycombe, G.

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 85% of Australia's population live along the coastal fringe, an area with high exposure to extreme inundations such as tsunamis. However, to date, no Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessments (PTHA) that include inundation have been published for Australia. This limits the development of appropriate risk reduction measures by decision and policy makers. We describe our PTHA undertaken for the Sydney metropolitan area. Using the NOAA NCTR model MOST (Method for Splitting Tsunamis), we simulate 36 earthquake-generated tsunamis with annual probabilities of 1:100, 1:1,000 and 1:10,000, occurring under present and future predicted sea level conditions. For each tsunami scenario we generate a high-resolution inundation map of the maximum water level and flow velocity, and we calculate the exposure of buildings and critical infrastructure. Results indicate that exposure to earthquake-generated tsunamis is relatively low for present events, but increases significantly with higher sea level conditions. The probabilistic approach allowed us to undertake a comparison with an existing storm surge hazard assessment. Interestingly, the exposure to all the simulated tsunamis is significantly lower than that for the 1:100 storm surge scenarios, under the same initial sea level conditions. The results have significant implications for multi-risk and emergency management in Sydney.

  4. The human impact of tsunamis: a historical review of events 1900-2009 and systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doocy, Shannon; Daniels, Amy; Dick, Anna; Kirsch, Thomas D

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Although rare, tsunamis have the potential to cause considerable loss of life and injury as well as widespread damage to the natural and built environments. The objectives of this review were to describe the impact of tsunamis on human populations in terms of mortality, injury, and displacement and, to the extent possible, identify risk factors associated with these outcomes. This is one of five reviews on the human impact of natural disasters. Methods. Data on the impact of tsunamis were compiled using two methods, a historical review from 1900 to mid 2009 of tsunami events from multiple databases and a systematic literature review to October 2012 of publications. Analysis included descriptive statistics and bivariate tests for associations between tsunami mortality and characteristics using STATA 11. Findings. There were 255,195 deaths (range 252,619-275,784) and 48,462 injuries (range 45,466-51,457) as a result of tsunamis from 1900 to 2009. The majority of deaths (89%) and injuries reported during this time period were attributed to a single event -the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Findings from the systematic literature review indicate that the primary cause of tsunami-related mortality is drowning, and that females, children and the elderly are at increased mortality risk. The few studies that reported on tsunami-related injury suggest that males and young adults are at increased injury-risk. Conclusions. Early warning systems may help mitigate tsunami-related loss of life. PMID:23857277

  5. Physical Modeling of Landslide Generated Tsunamis and the 50th Anniversary of the Vajont Dam Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, Brian C.; Mohammed, Fahad; Fritz, Hermann M.

    2013-04-01

    The Vajont river is an affluent of the Piave River located in the Dolomite Alps of the Veneto Region, about 100km north of Venice. A 265.5 m high double curved arch dam was built across a V-shaped gorge creating a reservoir with a maximum storage capacity of 0.169 km3. A maximum water depth of 250 m was reached by early September 1963 during the third filling attempt of the reservoir, but as creeping on the southern flank increased the third reservoir draw down was initiated. By October 9, 1963 the water depth was lowered to 240m as the southern flank of Vajont reservoir catastrophically collapsed on a length of more than 2km. Collapse occurred during reservoir drawdown in a final attempt to reduce flank creeping and the reservoir was only about two-thirds full. The partially submerged rockslide with a volume of 0.24 km3 penetrated into the reservoir at velocities up to 30 m/s. The wave runup in direct prolongation of slide axis reached the lowest houses of Casso 270m above reservoir level before impact corresponding to 245m above dam crest (Müller, 1964). The rockslide deposit came within 50m of the left abutment and towers up to 140m above the dam crest. The lateral spreading of the surge overtopped the dam crest by more than 100m. The thin arch dam withstood the overtopping and sustained no damage to the structural shell and the abutments. The flood wave dropped more than 500m down the Vajont gorge and into the Piave Valley causing utter destruction to the villages of Longarone, Pirago, Villanova, Rivalta and Fae. More than 2000 persons perished. The Vajont disaster highlights an extreme landslide tsunami event in the narrowly confined water body of a reservoir. Landslide tsunami hazards exist even in areas not exposed to tectonic tsunamis. Source and runup scenarios based on real world events are physically modeled in the three dimensional NEES tsunami wave basin (TWB) at Oregon State University (OSU). A novel pneumatic landslide tsunami generator (LTG) was deployed to simulate landslides with varying geometry and kinematics. The LTG consists of a sliding box filled with up to 1,350 kg of naturally rounded river gravel which is accelerated by means of four pneumatic pistons down the 2H: 1V slope, launching the granular landslide towards the water at velocities of up to 5 m/s. Topographical and bathymetric features can greatly affect wave characteristics and runup heights. Landslide tsunamis are studied in different topographic and bathymetric configurations: far field propagation and runup, a narrow fjord and curved headland configurations, and a conical island setting representing landslides off an island or a volcanic flank collapse. Water surface elevations were measured using an array of resistance wave gauges. The granulate landslide shape and front velocity were measured using above and underwater cameras. Three-dimensional landslide surfaces with surface velocities were reconstruction using a stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) setup. The speckled pattern on the surface of the granular landslide allows for cross-correlation based PIV analysis. Wave runup was measured with resistance wave gauges along the slope and verified with video image processing. The measured landslide and tsunami data serve to validate and advance 3-dimensional numerical landslide tsunami and prediction models.

  6. The Pluto event generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluto is a Monte-Carlo event generator designed for hadronic interactions from close-to-threshold to intermediate energies, as well as for studies of heavy ion reactions. The package is entirely based on Root, without the need of additional packages, and uses the embedded C++ interpreter of root to control the event production. The package includes realistic models of resonance production by using mass-dependent Breit-Wigner sampling. The calculation of partial and total widths for resonances is taken into account. Particular attention is paid to the electromagnetic decays, motivated by the physics program of HADES. For elementary reactions, angular distributions (e.g. for the primary meson emission) can be attached by the user in a very simple way as well as multi-particle correlations. Hand-made models (which may change all decay parameters) can be included by the user without recompilation using the CINT interpreter. This contribution gives an overview of the technical implementation of the framework and presents examples of the included physics

  7. Introduction to "Tsunami Science: Ten Years After the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami. Volume I"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Geist, Eric L.; Fritz, Hermann M.; Borrero, Jose C.

    2015-03-01

    Twenty-two papers on the study of tsunamis are included in Volume I of the PAGEOPH topical issue "Tsunami Science: Ten Years after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami." Eight papers examine various aspects of past events with an emphasis on case and regional studies. Five papers are on tsunami warning and forecast, including the improvement of existing tsunami warning systems and the development of new warning systems in the northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean region. Three more papers present the results of analytical studies and discuss benchmark problems. Four papers report the impacts of tsunamis, including the detailed calculation of inundation onshore and into rivers and probabilistic analysis for engineering purposes. The final two papers relate to important investigations of the source and tsunami generation. Overall, the volume not only addresses the pivotal 2004 Indian Ocean (Sumatra) and 2011 Japan (Tohoku) tsunamis, but also examines the tsunami hazard posed to other critical coasts in the world.

  8. POTENTIAL OF TSUNAMI GENERATION ALONG THE COLOMBIA/ECUADOR SUBDUCTION MARGIN AND THE DOLORES-GUAYAQUIL MEGA-THRUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Colombia/Ecuador subduction zone is a region where high seismic stress is presently accumulating. Statistical probability studies and GPS measurements of crustal deformation indicate that the region has an increased potential to generate in the near future a major or great tsunamigenic earthquake similar to the 1979 or 1906. Although most of the major earthquakes along this margin usually generate local tsunamis, the recurrence of a great mega-thrust, inter-plate earthquake, similar in magnitude and rupture to the 1906 event (Mw=8.8, rupture 600 km., can generate a tsunami with destructive near and far-field impacts. To understand the potential for such destructive tsunami generation in this region, the present study examines and evaluates: a the controlling inter-plate coupling mechanisms of the tectonic regime of the margin – including lithospheric structure deformation, sea-floor relief and the subduction or accretion of highly folded, hydrated sediments along the seismogenic zone of southern Colombia/North Ecuador; b the seismo-dynamics and role in tsunami generation as affected by the Carnegie Ridge’s oblique subduction beneath the South American continent; and c the seismotectonic extensional processes in the vicinity of the Gulf of Guayaquil-Tumbes Basin and how the northwestward movement of the North Andes block away from the South American continent along the Dolores Guayaquil mega-thrust and the resulting strain rotation may cause sudden detachment, décollement and deformation, with the potential for local tsunami generation that may affect the Gulf of Guayaquil and other coastal areas along southern Ecuador.

  9. Catalogue of reported tsunami events in the Adriatic Sea (from 58 B.C. to 1979 A.D.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This catalogue furnishes a collection of the reported tsunamis within the Adriatic, i.e. Italian coasts from the Strait of Otranto to the gulf of Trieste, the coasts of Slovenia, Croatia, Serbia, Montenegro and Albania. The events are obtained by the cross-comparison between many existing catalogues, in order to extract all the available reported ones. For each tsunamigenic event, when available in a catalogue, we report: origin time, location, macroseismic intensity, magnitude and the areas (within Adriatic basin) where tsunamis have been reported. In the last column of the table, all the catalogues in which some information of the event (earthquake and tsunami) has been found, are listed; bold letters indicate the basic catalogue for that event (i.e. the catalogue where the origin time has been taken from). Since in the present catalogue more attention is paid to the tsunamis than to the seismic events, the bold reference indicates always the tsunami-catalogue, and not the seismic ones, when contemporarily available. For some events there are no records of a related tsunami (they are labelled as N.A.T.R.= not available tsunami report) but they are included since their location and magnitude suggest a tsunamigenic potential. (author)

  10. Prediction of Tsunami Waves and Runup Generated by 3d Granular Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, F.; Fritz, H. M.

    2008-12-01

    Subaerial and submarine landslides can trigger tsunamis with locally high amplitudes and runup, which can cause devastating effects in the near field region. The 50th anniversary of the Lituya Bay 1958 landslide impact generated mega tsunami recalls the largest tsunami runup of 524m in recorded history. In contrast to earthquake generated tsunamis, landslide generated tsunami sources are not confined to active tectonic regions and therefore are of particular importance for the Atlantic Ocean. Landslide generated tsunamis were studied in the three dimensional NEES tsunami wave basin TWB at OSU based on the generalized Froude similarity. A novel pneumatic landslide generator was deployed to control the landslide geometry and kinematics. Granular materials were used to model deformable landslides. Measurement techniques such as particle image velocimetry (PIV), multiple above and underwater video cameras, multiple acoustic transducer arrays (MTA), as well as resistance wave and runup gauges were applied. The wave generation was characterized by an extremely unsteady three phase flow consisting of the slide granulate, water and air entrained into the flow. The underwater cameras and the MTA provide data on the landslide deformation as it impacts the water surface, penetrates the water and finally deposits on the bottom of the basin. The influence of the landslide volume, shape and the impact speed on the generated tsunami wave characteristics were extensively studied. The experimental data provides prediction models for the generated tsunami wave characteristics based on the initial landslide characteristics and the final slide deposits. PIV provided instantaneous surface velocity vector fields, which gave insight into the kinematics of the landslide and wave generation process. At high impact velocities flow separation occurred on the slide shoulder resulting in a hydrodynamic impact crater. The recorded wave profiles yielded information on the wave propagation and attenuation. The measured wave speed of the leading wave corresponds well to the theoretical approximation of the solitary wave speed while the trailing waves are considerably slower in nature. Attenuation functions of the leading wave crest amplitude, the wave length and the time period were obtained to study the wave behavior in the near field and far field regions. The experimental data also provided the energy conversion rate between the landslide source and the generated tsunami waves. The slide characteristics measured in the experiment provides the landslide source for numerically modeling these landslide tsunamis. The measured wave data serves the validation and advancement of 3-dimensional numerical landslide tsunami and prediction models.

  11. New evidence for the Storegga tsunami event in lake basins systems: western Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, N.; Vasskog, K.; Nesje, A.; Chapron, E.; Ariztegui, D.; Bondevik, S.

    2012-12-01

    Between 8180 and 8070 years ago, one of the largest known submarine slides occurred off the coast of mid-Norway. This event displaced about 3500 km3 of sediment, affected an area of 95,000 km2 and triggered a large tsunami that inundated coastal areas around the North Atlantic and the North Sea. In this contribution, we present first geological evidence from a high resolution geophysical survey and shallow sediment coring for the presence of a large tsunamite related to the Storegga event, in shallow lacustrine basins of Western Norway. A unique Rapidly Deposited Layer (RDL) discovered in the sedimentary infill of the lakes Nerfloen and Oppstrynsvatnet (29 m a.s.l.) is interpreted as a deposit from this tsunami. Two radiocarbon dates from within the deposit itself yield a combined age estimate of 8180-8030 cal a BP (2?) for the RDL, which is in agreement with robust age-depth modelling of the overlying sediments and strongly supporting the correlation with the Storegga event. In the outer lake basins, where both high-resolution seismic profiles and sediment cores are available, the up to 3.5 m thick RDL covers an area of ~1.1 km2 and features an estimated sediment volume of ~1.2x106 m3. More tentatively we suggest that a ~5x106 m3 semi-transparent seismic unit in the main Oppstrynsvatnet basin could also be connected to the tsunami. Tsunami deposits of this magnitude have not been documented previously in Norwegian lakes, suggesting that the physiographic setting of the study area may have significantly amplified the tsunami wave.

  12. THE POTENTIAL OF TSUNAMI GENERATION ALONG THE MAKRAN SUBDUCTION ZONE IN THE NORTHERN ARABIAN SEA. CASE STUDY: THE EARTHQUAKE AND TSUNAMI OF NOVEMBER 28, 1945

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Although large earthquakes along the Makran Subduction Zone are infrequent, the potential for the generation of destructive tsunamis in the Northern Arabian Sea cannot be overlooked. It is quite possible that historical tsunamis in this region have not been properly reported or documented. Such past tsunamis must have affected Southern Pakistan, India, Iran, Oman, the Maldives and other countries bordering the Indian Ocean.The best known of the historical tsunamis in the region is the one generated by the great earthquake of November 28, 1945 off Pakistan's Makran Coast (Balochistan in the Northern Arabian Sea. The destructive tsunami killed more than 4,000 people in Southern Pakistan but also caused great loss of life and devastation along the coasts of Western India, Iran, Oman and possibly elsewhere.The seismotectonics of the Makran subduction zone, historical earthquakes in the region, the recent earthquake of October 8, 2005 in Northern Pakistan, and the great tsunamigenic earthquakes of December 26, 2004 and March 28, 2005, are indicative of the active tectonic collision process that is taking place along the entire southern and southeastern boundary of the Eurasian plate as it collides with the Indian plate and adjacent microplates. Tectonic stress transference to other, stress loaded tectonic regions could trigger tsunamigenic earthquakes in the Northern Arabian Sea in the future.The northward movement and subduction of the Oman oceanic lithosphere beneath the Iranian micro-plate at a very shallow angle and at the high rate is responsible for active orogenesis and uplift that has created a belt of highly folded and densely faulted coastal mountain ridges along the coastal region of Makran, in both the Balochistan and Sindh provinces. The same tectonic collision process has created offshore thrust faults. As in the past, large destructive tsunamigenic earthquakes can occur along major faults in the east Makran region, near Karachi, as well as along the western end of the subduction zone. In fact, recent seismic activity indicates that a large earthquake is possible in the region west of the 1945 event. Such an earthquake can be expected to generate a destructive tsunami.Additionally, the on-going subduction of the two micro-plates has dragged tertiary marine sediments into an accretionary prism - thus forming the Makran coastal region, Thick sediments, that have accumulated along the deltaic coastlines from the erosion of the Himalayas, particularly along the eastern Sindh region near the Indus River delta, have the potential to fail and cause large underwater tsunamigenic slides. Even smaller magnitude earthquakes could trigger such underwater landslides. Finally, an earthquake similar to that of 1945 in the Makran zone of subduction, has the potential of generating a bookshelf type of failure within the compacted sediments – as that associated with the “silent” and slow 1992 Nicaragua earthquake – thus contributing to a more destructive tsunami. In conclusion, the Makran subduction zone has a relatively high potential for large tsunamigenic earthquakes.

  13. Evaluation of tsunami risk in the Lesser Antilles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Zahibo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study is to give the preliminary estimates of the tsunami risks for the Lesser Antilles. We investigated the available data of the tsunamis in the French West Indies using the historical data and catalogue of the tsunamis in the Lesser Antilles. In total, twenty-four (24 tsunamis were recorded in this area for last 400 years; sixteen (16 events of the seismic origin, five (5 events of volcanic origin and three (3 events of unknown source. Most of the tsunamigenic earthquakes (13 occurred in the Caribbean, and three tsunamis were generated during far away earthquakes (near the coasts of Portugal and Costa Rica. The estimates of tsunami risk are based on a preliminary analysis of the seismicity of the Caribbean area and the historical data of tsunamis. In particular, we investigate the occurrence of historical extreme runup tsunami data on Guadeloupe, and these data are revised after a survey in Guadeloupe.

  14. The Tohoku Tsunami of 11 March 2011: The Key Event to Understanding Tsunami Sedimentation on the Coasts of Closed Bays of the Lesser Kuril Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razjigaeva, N. G.; Ganzey, L. A.; Grebennikova, T. A.; Ivanova, E. D.; Kharlamov, A. A.; Kaistrenko, V. M.; Arslanov, Kh. A.; Chernov, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    The Tohoku tsunami of 11 March 2011 manifested in the region of the South Kuril Islands, although, as a rule, the run-up heights in this region did not exceed 3 m. In closed bays that were covered with ice before the tsunami, the eroding capacity of tsunami waves was aggravated by the ice fragments they carried. Here, mud sheets formed, reaching up to 106 m inland. The 2012 studies have shown well-preserved tsunami deposits, evident 1.5 years after the event. A comparative analysis of tsunami deposits from the periphery and from the near-field area close to the tsunami source was performed; this was important for understanding the deposition mechanism during the event, as it had different strengths on different shores. The difference in run-up heights determined the considerable differences in erosion, sedimentation, distribution of tsunami deposits, the formation of sedimentary structures, grain-size composition, and diatom and foraminifera assemblages. The sources of the material also varied significantly from each other: the material came from offshore in closed bays located in the tsunami source periphery, while in the near-field region close to the epicenter, the most active erosion occurred in the inundation area. In the latter area, the main sources of sand were beaches and dunes, while soil erosion was the source of mud. Studies of the Tohoku tsunami on the coasts of the Lesser Kuril Islands demonstrated that mud layers in the sections of coastal lowlands in closed bays could contain preserved detailed geological records of paleotsunamis, even those with a small-height run-up. In the sections of coastal peatlands of closed bays on Shikotan Island, up to 7-9 layers of mud and silty sands were found, these can easily be traced for more than 500 m inland. The grain-size composition of the mud is similar to the deposits of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami. The marine origin of these deposits is confirmed by the diatom analysis data.

  15. Advances in Tsunami Hazard Mitigation in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, M.; Arenas, F.; Lillo, I.; Tamburini, L.

    2012-12-01

    Chile has records of recurring tsunamis. This is confirmed by its geological evidences, long historical records and instrumental data. However, tsunamis were always an underestimated hazard. In 2010 its coasts were affected by a large near-field tsunami and in 2011 for a far-field tsunami generated in Japan, confirming the high vulnerability of coastal communities. Both events had different magnitudes and impacts on coastal areas. The near-field tsunami was generated by an earthquake (Mw 8.8) that occurred on the 27th of February 2010, the waves arrived at the coast in a few minutes and mostly impacted small coastal communities located within the rupture area, there were 156 victims and 25 missing. While the far-field tsunami was generated by a giant earthquake (Mw 9) that occurred on the 11th of March 2011 in Japan, arriving their first waves on the coast of Chile twenty one hours later, displacing thousands of people to high ground. These two recent events have resulted in advances in tsunami hazard mitigation, mainly in the localities that were affected by both events, incorporating the tsunami risk and the emergency management in territorial planning. Example of this is the consideration of risk based on worst case scenarios, design and assessment of mitigation scenarios (e.g. tsunami forest, mitigation parks, dikes and fills) using tsunami modeling and land use policies more rigorous. This research is supported by Fondecyt 11090210.

  16. FIRST EVIDENCE OF PALEO-TSUNAMI DEPOSITS OF A MAJOR HISTORIC EVENT IN ECUADOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kervin Chunga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ecuadorian shoreline is considered highly susceptible by impacts of tsunamis triggered by marine quakes or submarine landslides occurring close or nearby the subduction zone between the Nazca, Caribbean and South American plates. Since 1877 one dozen known tsunamis have been witnessed along this coast, mostly related to short-distanced seismic activities (earthquakes between Mw 6.9 to 8.8. However, no evidence of these impacts has been recorded in the sedimentary stratigraphy on the Ecuadorian platform so far. Nonetheless, in the southwestern part of the Gulf of Guayaquil, due to a biological, chemical, stratigraphic and geochronologic study of a few cored samples an anomalous horizon to the other sedimentary layers has been identified and recognized as a paleo-tsunami deposit. This layer having a thickness of up to 10 cm and up to 1100 meters away from the actual shore, demonstrates various criteria which confirm its origin such as deep sea foraminifera like Pullenia bulloides, run-up and backwash features, fragments of molluscs, which are absent in other sedimentary levels, matrix of weathered chlorite potentially originated by glauconite besides other. Geocronologic evidence together with the calculated sedimentation rate, implies that a the tsunami surged the coastal lowlands around Villamil Playas about 1250 ± 50 yrs ago and must have been a major event originated from the western or northwestern direction.

  17. NUMERICAL MODEL STUDY OF TSUNAMI GENERATED BY POTENTIAL EARTHQUAKE WITHIN THE KOMANDORSKY SEISMIC GAP IN THE WESTERN ALEUTIAN ISLAND ARC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kh. Mazova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Komandorsky seismic gap has distinctive boundaries and a length of 650 km. Its period of “seismic silence” comes close to the maximum recurrence interval for great earthquakes in the Aleutian Island Arc - the stress concentration here probably having reached the critical value. So, estimation of possible earthquake and tsunami characteristics within this gap becomes a significant problem. The closest analog of a similar gap is the area where the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman catastrophic event occurred. Thus, for the present study we used the same modeling scheme as we used for that event. It was assumed that a source length of 650 km, consisting of 9 blocks, and an earthquake with a moment magnitude MW=8.5. Several block motion scenarios were considered. The tsunami generation and propagation in the Pacific Ocean and the possible wave characteristics on near and far-field coasts were estimated. Modeling of such an event showed that the wave heights on different Pacific coasts will vary from 3 to 9 meters. A tsunami wave with a 9-meter height is capable in causing significant loss of human life and economic damage.

  18. Landslide generated tsunamis : numerical modeling and real-time prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Brune, Sascha

    2009-01-01

    Submarine Erdrutsche können lokale Tsunamis auslösen und stellen somit eine Gefahr für Siedlungen an der Küste und deren Einwohner dar. Zwei Hauptprobleme sind (i) die quantitative Abschätzung der Gefahr, die von einem Tsunami ausgeht und (ii) das schnelle Erkennen von gefährlichen Rutschungsereignissen. In dieser Doktorarbeit beschäftige ich mich mit beiden Problemen, indem ich Erdrutschtsunamis numerisch modelliere und eine neue Methode vorstelle, in der submarine Erdrutsche mit H...

  19. Tsunami wave generation by the eruption of underwater volcano

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Egorov

    2007-01-01

    Eruption of volcanoes represents one of important origins of tsunami waves and is responsible for most catastrophic tsunami (Krakatau, 1883; Thira, BC). The products of volcano eruption include solids, liquids (lava) and gases. The present article presents hydrodynamic model of relatively slow process of eruption, with domination of liquids. The process of underwater eruption of lava causes the disturbance of ocean free surface. The standard formulation of hydrodynamic problem for incompressi...

  20. Internal structure of event layers preserved on the Andaman Sea continental shelf, Thailand: tsunami vs. storm and flash flood deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuna-Schwartz, D.; Feldens, P.; Schwarzer, K.; Khokiattiwong, S.; Stattegger, K.

    2014-12-01

    Tsunami, storm and flash event layers, which have been deposited over the last century on the shelf offshore from Khao Lak (Thailand, Andaman Sea), are identified in sediment cores based on sedimentary structures, grain size compositions, Ti / Ca ratios and 210Pb activity. Individual offshore tsunami deposits are 12 to 30 cm in thickness and originate from the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. They are characterized by (1) the appearance of sand layers enriched in shells and shell debris, (2) cross lamination and (3) the appearance of rip-up clasts. Storm deposits found in core depths between 5 and 82 cm could be attributed to individual storm events by using 210Pb dating in conjunction with historical data of typhoons and tropical storms and could thus be securely differentiated from tsunami deposits. Massive sand layers enriched in shells and shell debris characterize the storm deposits. The last classified type of event layer represents flash floods, which is characterized by a fining-upward sequence of muddy sediment. The most distinct difference between the storm and tsunami deposits is the lack of rip-up clasts, mud, and terrigenous material within the storm deposits. Terrigenous material transported offshore during the tsunami backwash is therefore an important indicator to distinguish between offshore storm and tsunami deposits.

  1. Internal structure of event layers preserved on the Andaman Sea continental shelf, Thailand: tsunami vs. storm and flash flood deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sakuna-Schwartz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tsunami, storm and flash event layers, which have been deposited over the last century on the shelf offshore from Khao Lak (Thailand, Andaman Sea, are identified in sediment cores based on sedimentary structures, grain size compositions, Ti / Ca ratios and 210Pb activity. Individual offshore tsunami deposits are 12 to 30 cm in thickness and originate from the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. They are characterized by (1 the appearance of sand layers enriched in shells and shell debris, (2 cross lamination and (3 the appearance of rip-up clasts. Storm deposits found in core depths between 5 and 82 cm could be attributed to individual storm events by using 210Pb dating in conjunction with historical data of typhoons and tropical storms and could thus be securely differentiated from tsunami deposits. Massive sand layers enriched in shells and shell debris characterize the storm deposits. The last classified type of event layer represents flash floods, which is characterized by a fining-upward sequence of muddy sediment. The most distinct difference between the storm and tsunami deposits is the lack of rip-up clasts, mud, and terrigenous material within the storm deposits. Terrigenous material transported offshore during the tsunami backwash is therefore an important indicator to distinguish between offshore storm and tsunami deposits.

  2. On the use of finite fault solution for tsunami generation problems

    CERN Document Server

    Dutykh, Denys; Gardeil, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    The present study is devoted to the tsunami wave generation problem. The main goal of this work is two-fold. First of all, we propose a simple and computationally inexpensive model for the description of the sea bed displacement during an underwater earthquake, based on the finite fault solution for the slip distribution under some assumptions on the rupturing process dynamics. Once the bottom motion is reconstructed, we study waves induced on the free surface of the ocean. For this purpose we consider three different models approximating the Euler equations of the water wave theory. Namely, we deal with linearized Euler equations (also known as Cauchy-Poisson problem), a Boussinesq system and a weakly nonlinear model. An intercomparison of these approaches is performed. All developments in this study are illustrated on the real world example of the July 17, 2006 Java event.

  3. Development of a Tsunami Inundation Map in Detecting Tsunami Risk in Gulf of Fethiye, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilmen, Derya Itir; Kemec, Serkan; Yalciner, Ahmet Cevdet; Düzgün, Sebnem; Zaytsev, Andrey

    2015-03-01

    NAMIDANCE tsunami simulation and visualization tool is used to create tsunami inundation maps showing quantitative maximum tsunami flow depths in Fethiye. The risk of an extreme, but likely earthquake-generated tsunami is estimated at Fethiye Bay for 14 probabilistic earthquake scenarios. The bay is located 36°39'5?N 29°7'23?E, southwestern Turkey, which has coastline to the eastern Mediterranean Sea. The tsunami simulation and inundation assessment are performed in three stages: (1) formation of a digital elevation model of the region from the best available topography/bathymetry dataset, (2) estimation of a maximum credible tsunami scenario for the region and determination of related earthquake parameters, (3) high resolution tsunami simulation and computation of near shore and overland tsunami dynamics in the study area using tsunami simulation and visualization code NAMIDANCE, (4) determination of spatial distributions of tsunami characteristics (maximum water elevations, water velocities, flow depths) under the critical tsunami condition. The results are based on the most recent descriptions of potential tsunami sources, topographic and bathymetric databases, and tsunami numerical models. We present an innovative study concentrating on preparation of quantitative flow depths and inundation maps with a very high-resolution bathymetry/topographic dataset in the eastern Mediterranean. Inundation maps will be used to analyze the effects of possible tsunamis. The presented research is crucial to raising the awareness of government officials, the public, and other stake holders about the high probability of a tsunami event in Turkey. Moreover, the results of this study will help to plan for evacuation routes, establish safe zones, and assist in preparation for the tsunami, creating public awareness, and planning evacuation routes before the actual tsunami event happens.

  4. A BRIEF HISTORY OF TSUNAMIS IN THE CARIBBEAN SEA

    OpenAIRE

    Lockridge, Patricia A.; LowellS. Whiteside; Lander, James F.

    2002-01-01

    The area of the Caribbean Sea is geologically active. Earthquakes and volcanoes are common occurrences. These geologic events can generate powerful tsunamis some of which are more devastating than the earthquake or volcanic eruption itself. This document lists brief descriptions of 91 reported waves that might have been tsunamis within the Caribbean region. Of these, 27 are judged by the authors to be true, verified tsunamis and an additional nine are considered to be very likely true tsunami...

  5. Tsunami generation by paddle motion and its interaction with a beach: Lagrangian modelling and experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Buldakov, E.

    2013-01-01

    A 2D Lagrangian numerical wave model is presented and validated against a set of physical wave-flume experiments on interaction of tsunami waves with a sloping beach. An iterative methodology is proposed and applied for experimental generation of tsunami-like waves using a piston-type wavemaker with spectral control. Three distinct types of wave interaction with the beach are observed with forming of plunging or collapsing breaking waves. The Lagrangian model demonstrates good agreement with ...

  6. REASSESSMENT OF TSUNAMI HAZARD IN THE CITY OF IQUIQUE, CHILE, AFTER THE PISAGUA EARTHQUAKE OF APRIL 2014 In the present contribution, we will reassess the tsunami hazard for the North of Chile taking into account the occurrence of the recent events, focusing on the potential tsunami impact that a worse case scenario could produce in the city of Iquique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cienfuegos, R.; Suarez, L.; Aránguiz, R.; Gonzalez, G.; González-Carrasco, J. F.; Catalan, P. A.; Dominguez, J. C.; Tomita, T.

    2014-12-01

    On April 1st2014 a 8.1 Mw Earthquake occurred at 23:46:50 UTC (20:46:50 local time) with its epicenter located off the coast of Pisagua, 68 km north of the city of Iquique (An et al., 2014). The potential risk of earthquake and tsunami in this area was widely recognized by the scientific community (Chlieh et al., 2004). Nevertheless, the energy released by this earthquake and the associated slip distribution was much less than expected. In the present contribution, we will reassess the tsunami hazard for the North of Chile taking into account the occurrence of the recent events, focusing on the potential impact that a worse case scenario could produce in the city of Iquique. For that purpose, an updated tsunami source will be derived using updated information on the seismic and co-seismic tectonic displacements that is available from historical, geological information, and the dense GPS and seismometer networks available in the North of Chile. The updated tsunami source will be used to generate initial conditions for a tsunami and analyze the following aspects: i) large scale hydrodynamics, ii) arrival times, maximum flow depths, and inundation area, iii) potential impact on the port of Iquique, and more specifically on the container's drift that the tsunami could produce. This analysis is essential to reassess tsunami hazard in Iquique, evaluate evacuation plans and mitigation options regarding the port operation. Tsunami propagation and inundation will be conducted using the STOC model (Tomita and Honda, 2010), and a high resolution Lidar topographic database. ReferencesAn, C. et al. (2014). Tsunami source and its validation of the 2014 Iquique, Chile Earthquake, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, doi:10.1002/2014GL060567. Chlieh, et al. (2004). Crustal deformation and fault slip during the seismic cycle in the north Chile subduction zone, from GPS and INSAR observations, Geophys J. Int., 158(2), 695-711, 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2004.02326.x. Tomita, T., & Honda, K. (2010). Practical model to estimate drift motion of vessels by tsunami with consideration of colliding with structures and stranding. Proceedings of the 32nd Conference on Coastal Engineering. ASCE.

  7. Numerical simulation of the December 4, 2007 landslide-generated tsunami in Chehalis Lake, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajia; Ward, Steven N.; Xiao, Lili

    2015-04-01

    On December 4, 2007, a three million cubic metres landslide impacted Chehalis Lake, 80 km east of Vancouver, Canada. The failed mass rushed into the lake and parented a tsunami that ran up 38 m on the opposite shore, destroyed trees, roads and campsite facilities. Armed with field surveys and multihigh-tech observations from SONAR, LiDAR and orthophotographs, we apply the newly developed `Tsunami Squares' method to simulate the Chehalis Lake landslide and its generated tsunami. The landslide simulation shows a progressive failure, flow speeds up to ˜60 m s-1, and a slide mass stoppage with uniform repose angle on the lakebed. Tsunami products suggest that landslide velocity and spatial scale influence the initial wave size, while wave energy decay and inundation heights are affected by a combination of distance to the landslide, bathymetry and shoreline orientation relative to the wave direction.

  8. EDDE Monte Carlo event generator

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov, V. A.; Ryutin, R. A.; Sobol, A. E.; Guillaud, J. -p

    2004-01-01

    EDDE is a Monte Carlo event generator, under construction, for different Exclusive Double Diffractive Events. The program is based on the extended Regge-eikonal approach for "soft" processes. Standard Model and its extensions are used for "hard" fusion processes. An interface to PYTHIA, CMSJET and CMKIN is provided.

  9. Earthquake generation cycles and tsunami simulations providing possible scenarios for Turkey (Marmara sea) and Japan (Nankai trough and Japan trench)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Takane; Yalciner, Ahmet; Ozel, Nurcan; Kilic, Irfan; Miyazaki, Shin'ichi; Hyodo, Mamoru

    2015-04-01

    In order to obtain comprehensive earthquake and tsunami scenarios for disaster assessment, numerical simulations of earthquake generation cycles and resultant tsunami generations have been performed in Japan. The occurrence of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake has realized us the necessity to consider all the possible scenarios without preconceptions. We have performed large-scale numerical simulations using Earth Simulator and K-computer for earthquake generation cycles along the Nankai trough, southwest Japan, where megathrust earthquakes with some segments have sequentially occurred. We have succeeded to reproduce various rupture pattern seen in historical data and geological evidences (such as tsunami deposit) being consistent with GEONET data during interseismic period. Using the results of such earthquake generation cycle simulations, we performed tsunami generation, propagation and inundation simulation. In Turkey, tsunami simulation methods and tsunami scenario database have been developed. In the research project of SATREPS -Earthquake and tsunami disaster mitigation in the Marmara region and disaster education in Turkey, we are applying such earthquake generation cycle and tsunami simulations to the North Anatolian fault system to obtain possible earthquake scenarios and to improve tsunami scenario data base for Sea of Marmara. For the modeling of the fault system, we will use observation results by the earthquake source modeling group in this project to improve the existing models. The earthquake scenarios will be used also for strong motion predictions by the group of seismic characterization and damage prediction. We will visualize the simulation results for disaster education. Furthermore, we will contribute to improve semi-realtime earthquake analyses and tsunami forecasting. In the presentation, we will show some recent simulation results of earthquake generation cycles and tsunamis for Turkey (Marmara sea) and Japan (Nankai trough and Japan trench). Acknowledgements: Support by Japan-Turkey Joint Research Project by JICA and JST on earthquakes and tsunamis in Marmara Region (SATREPS) is acknowledged.

  10. Performance of coastal sea-defense infrastructure at El Jadida (Morocco) against tsunami threat: lessons learned from the Japanese 11 March 2011 tsunami

    OpenAIRE

    R. Omira; Baptista, M.A.; F. Leone; Matias, L.; S. Mellas; B. Zourarah; De Miranda, J. M.; Carrilho, F.; J.-P. Cherel

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks to investigate the effectiveness of sea-defense structures in preventing/reducing the tsunami overtopping as well as evaluating the resulting tsunami impact at El Jadida, Morocco. Different tsunami wave conditions are generated by considering various earthquake scenarios of magnitudes ranging from Mw = 8.0 to Mw = 8.6. These scenarios represent the main active earthquake faults in the SW Iberia margin and are consistent with two past events that generated tsunamis along the A...

  11. W Phase Inversion and Tsunami Inundation Modeling for Tsunami Early Warning: Case Study for the 2011 Tohoku Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusman, Aditya Riadi; Tanioka, Yuichiro

    2014-07-01

    Centroid moment tensor solutions for the 2011 Tohoku earthquake are determined by W phase inversions using 5 and 10 min data recorded by the Full Range Seismograph Network of Japan (F-net). By a scaling relation of moment magnitude to rupture area and an assumption of rigidity of 4 × 1010 N m-2, simple rectangular earthquake fault models are estimated from the solutions. Tsunami inundations in the Sendai Plain, Minamisanriku, Rikuzentakata, and Taro are simulated using the estimated fault models. Then the simulated tsunami inundation area and heights are compared with the observations. Even the simulated tsunami heights and inundations from the W phase solution that used only 5 min data are considerably similar to the observations. The results are improved when using 10 min of W phase data. These show that the W phase solutions are reliable to be used for tsunami inundation modeling. Furthermore, the technique that combines W phase inversion and tsunami inundation modeling can produce results that have sufficient accuracy for tsunami early warning purposes.

  12. Tsunami Squares Approach to Landslide-Generated Waves: Application to Gongjiafang Landslide, Three Gorges Reservoir, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lili; Ward, Steven N.; Wang, Jiajia

    2015-02-01

    We have developed a new method, named "Tsunami Squares", for modeling of landslides and landslide-generated waves. The approach has the advantages of the previous "Tsunami Ball" method, for example, separate, special treatment for dry and wet cells is not needed, but obviates the use of millions of individual particles. Simulations now can be expanded to spatial scales not previously possible. The new method accelerates and transports "squares" of material that are fractured into new squares in such a way as to conserve volume and linear momentum. The simulation first generates landslide motion as constrained by direct observation. It then computes induced water waves, given assumptions about energy and momentum transfer. We demonstrated and validated the Tsunami Squares method by modeling the 2008 Three Gorges Reservoir Gongjiafang landslide and river tsunami. The landslide's progressive failure, the wave generated, and its subsequent propagation and run-up are well reproduced. On a laptop computer Tsunami Square simulations flexibly handle a wide variety of waves and flows, and are excellent techniques for risk estimation.

  13. Tsunami generation due to submerged blocks and deformable landslides involving retrogression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvholt, Finn; Kim, Jihwan; Harbitz, Carl; Pedersen, Geir

    2015-04-01

    Enormous, fully submerged submarine landslides exhibiting volumes ranging from a few to more than thousands of km3 may cause tsunamis with widespread effects, mobilizing their mass at large distance over a gently sloping seabed. During their long run-out, the landslides will deform, and commonly involve a time dependent mass mobilisation (retrogression). The size of the landslide will be of importance for the tsunami generation. Equally important however, is the landslide kinematics. Here, we first review how basic landslide kinematics such as velocity, run-out, and acceleration govern the tsunami generation for a block shaped landslide. Furthermore, we present simulations of tsunamis due to a series of blocks involving a retrogressive mass mobilisation, demonstrating how retrogression influence the wave-height and length for different parameter combinations such as the landslide volume and retrogressive release rate. Here, a retrogressive landslide model is to simulate the retrogressive landslide evolution. An example of tsunami generation due to a deformable landslide based on a fluid model is also given. In both cases, we demonstrate how the tsunamigenesis compares with simple block models that assume a simultaneous release, and discuss how sensitivity to landslide parameters may influence their tsunamigenic strength.

  14. Numerical simulations of tsunami generated by underwater volcanic explosions at Karymskoye lake (Kamchatka, Russia and Kolumbo volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ulvrová

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing human activities along the coasts of the world arise the necessity to assess tsunami hazard from different sources (earthquakes, landslides, volcanic activity. In this paper, we simulate tsunamis generated by underwater volcanic explosions from (1 a submerged vent in a shallow water lake (Karymskoye Lake, Kamchatka, and (2 from Kolumbo submarine volcano (7 km NE of Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece. The 1996 tsunami in Karymskoye lake is a well-documented example and thus serves as a case-study for validating the calculations. The numerical model reproduces realistically the tsunami runups measured onshore. Systematic numerical study of tsunamis generated by explosions of Kolumbo volcano is then conducted for a wide range of energies. Results show that in case of reawakening, Kolumbo volcano might represent a significant tsunami hazard for the northern, eastern and southern coasts of Santorini, even for small-power explosions.

  15. Numerical simulations of tsunami generated by underwater volcanic explosions at Karymskoye lake (Kamchatka, Russia) and Kolumbo volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvrová, M.; Paris, R.; Kelfoun, K.; Nomikou, P.

    2013-11-01

    Increasing human activities along the coasts of the world arise the necessity to assess tsunami hazard from different sources (earthquakes, landslides, volcanic activity). In this paper, we simulate tsunamis generated by underwater volcanic explosions from (1) a submerged vent in a shallow water lake (Karymskoye Lake, Kamchatka), and (2) from Kolumbo submarine volcano (7 km NE of Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece). The 1996 tsunami in Karymskoye lake is a well-documented example and thus serves as a case-study for validating the calculations. The numerical model reproduces realistically the tsunami runups measured onshore. Systematic numerical study of tsunamis generated by explosions of Kolumbo volcano is then conducted for a wide range of energies. Results show that in case of reawakening, Kolumbo volcano might represent a significant tsunami hazard for the northern, eastern and southern coasts of Santorini, even for small-power explosions.

  16. Numerical simulations of tsunamis generated by underwater volcanic explosions at Karymskoye lake (Kamchatka, Russia) and Kolumbo volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvrová, M.; Paris, R.; Kelfoun, K.; Nomikou, P.

    2014-02-01

    Increasing human activities along the coasts of the world provoke the necessity to assess tsunami hazard from different sources (earthquakes, landslides, volcanic activity). In this paper, we simulate tsunamis generated by underwater volcanic explosions from (1) a submerged vent in a shallow water lake (Karymskoye Lake, Kamchatka), and (2) from Kolumbo submarine volcano (7 km NE of Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece). The 1996 tsunami in Karymskoye lake is a well-documented example and thus serves as a case study for validating the calculations. The numerical model reproduces realistically the tsunami run-ups measured onshore. Systematic numerical study of tsunamis generated by explosions of the Kolumbo volcano is then conducted for a wide range of energies. Results show that in case of reawakening, the Kolumbo volcano might represent a significant tsunami hazard for the northern, eastern and southern coasts of Santorini, even for small-power explosions.

  17. TSUNAMIS AND TSUNAMI-LIKE WAVES OF THE EASTERN UNITED STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F. Lander

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The threat of tsunamis and tsunami-like waves hitting the eastern United States is very real despite a general impression to the contrary. We have cataloged 40 tsunamis and tsunami-like waves that have occurred in the eastern United States since 1600. Tsunamis were generated from such events as the 1755 Queen Anne’s earthquake, the Grand Banks event of 1929, the Charleston earthquake of 1886, and the New Madrid earthquakes of 1811-1812. The Queen Anne tsunami was observed as far away as St. Martin in the West Indies and is the only known teletsunami generated in this source region.Since subduction zones are absent around most of the Atlantic basin, tsunamis and tsunami-like waves along the United States East Coast are not generated from this traditional source, but appear, in most cases to be the result of slumping or landsliding associated with local earthquakes or with wave action associated with strong storms. Other sources of tsunamis and tsunami-like waves along the eastern seaboard have recently come to light including volcanic debris falls or catastrophic failure of volcanic slopes; explosive decompression of underwater methane deposits or oceanic meteor splashdowns. These sources are considered as well.

  18. Evidence of tsunami events in the Paleolimnological record of Lake Pátzcuaro, Michoacán, Mexico

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Victor Hugo, Garduño-Monroy; Diana Cinthia, Soria-Caballero; Isabel, Israde-Alcántara; Víctor Manuel, Hernández Madrigal; Alejandro, Rodríguez-Ramírez; Mikhail, Ostroumov; Miguel Ángel, Rodríguez-Pascua; Arturo, Chacon-Torres; Juan Carlos, Mora-Chaparro.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El actual lago de Pátzcuaro tiene una elevación de 2035 m sobre el nivel del mar. Históricamente, ha alcanzado una elevación de 2041 m, lo cual aislaba una porción de la isla cerca de la población de Jarácuaro en la parte sureste del lago. Dos trincheras realizadas en la antigua isla revelan secuenc [...] ias estratigráficas tripartitas similares. En una trinchera de 3.1 m de profundidad, la secuencia de la base a la cima está formada por la Unidad A que comprende arcillas y limos ricos en diatomeas plegados y fallados con capas de arena volcánica. Estos depósitos están fechados entre 24 y 10 mil años BP. Unidad B que comprende una mezcla caótica de arenas volcánicas y lapilli, con abundantes restos de peces, bivalvos, gasterópodos y ostrácodos, de 10 cm de espesor con un contacto erosivo sobre la Unidad A. Los ostrácodos incluyen valvas articuladas con una mezcla de especies pelágicas de agua profunda y especies litorales. Los fragmentos de artefactos cerámicos pertenecientes al Período Post-Clásico (900 a 1520 AD) son abundantes. La Unidad C comprende una unidad de 20 cm de espesor de limo arcilloso rico en materia orgánica con restos de gasterópodos, semillas, líticos angulares y fragmentos de piezas cerámicas del Post-Clásico. La Unidad B sugiere una resedimentación catastrófica de los depósitos del piso del lago atribuidos a un tsunami. La Unidad C es consistente con condiciones sublacustres que están históricamente documentadas de 1858 a 1947. Un tsunami en el Lago de Pátzcuaro en 1858 ha sido registrado históricamente. El tsunami pudo haber sido creado por movimientos de falla o colapso del flanco suroeste de la isla de Janitzio. La ola del tsunami pudo haber contribuido al rápido aumento del lago de Pátzcuaro después del evento sísmico de 1858. Abstract in english Modern Lake Pátzcuaro has a surface elevation of 2035 m a.s.l. Historically, it reached an elevation of 2041 m a.s.l., which isolated a portion of the island near the town of Jarácuaro in the southeastern part of the lake. Two trenches in the former island reveal similar tripartite stratigraphic seq [...] uences. In a 3.1 m deep trench, the sequence from bottom to top comprises Unit A constituted by folded and faulted diatom-rich clay and silt with beds of volcanic sand. These deposits are dated between 24 and 10 ky BP; Unit B constituted by a 10 of cm chaotic mixture of volcanic sand and lapilli with abundant remains of fish, bivalves, gastropods and ostracodes that is rests on above an erosional unconformity. The ostracodes include articulated valves with a mixture of deep-water pelagic species and attached littoral species. Highly fractured diatom shows a mixture of planktonic and benthic habitats. Fragments of ceramic artifacts dated to the Post-Classic Period (900 to 1520 AD) are abundant; Unit Cconstituted by a 20 cm thick unit of organic-rich argillaceous silt with remains of gastropods, seeds, angular lithoclasts and fragments of Post-Classic ceramic artifacts. Unit B suggests a catastrophic resedi mentation of lake floor deposits attributed to a tsunami. Unit C is consistent with sublacustrine conditions that are historically documented from 1858 to 1947. A tsunami in Lake Pátzcuaro in 1858 has been historically recorded. The tsunami was created either by fault movement or collapse of the SW flank of the island of Janitzio. The tsunami wave may have contributed to the rapid rise of Lake Pátzcuaro following the 1858 seismic event.

  19. The El Asnam 1980 October 10 inland earthquake: a new hypothesis of tsunami generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, J.; Hébert, H.; Ruegg, J.-C.; Briole, P.

    2011-06-01

    The Western Mediterranean Sea is not considered as a high seismic region. Only several earthquakes with magnitude above five occur each year and only a handful have consequences on human beings and infrastructure. The El Asnam (Algeria) earthquake of 1980 October 10 with an estimated magnitude Ms= 7.3 is one of the most destructive earthquakes recorded in northern Africa and more largely in the Western Mediterranean Basin. Although it is located inland, it is known to have been followed by a small tsunami recorded on several tide gauges along the southeastern Spanish Coast. In 1954, a similar earthquake having occurred at the same location induced a turbidity current associated to a submarine landslide, which is widely known to have cut submarine phone cables far from the coast. This event was followed by a small tsunami attributed to the landslide. Thus the origin of the tsunami of 1980 was promptly attributed to the same kind of submarine slide. As no evidence of such mass movement was highlighted, and because the tsunami wave periods does not match with a landslide origin in both cases (1954 and 1980), this study considers two rupture scenarios, that the coseismic deformation itself (of about 10 cm off the Algerian coast near Ténès) is sufficient to produce a low amplitude (several centimetres) tsunami able to reach the Spanish southeastern coast from Alicante to Algeciras (Gibraltar strait to the west). After a discussion concerning the proposed rupture scenarios and their respective parameters, numerical tsunami modelling is performed on a set of bathymetric grids. Then the results of wave propagation and amplification (maximum wave height maps) are discussed, with a special attention to Alicante (Spain) Harbour where the location of two historical tide gauges allows the comparison between synthetic mareograms and historical records showing sufficient signal amplitude. This study is part of the active tsunami hazard assessment in Mediterranean Sea especially concerning its occidental part, that is, the Algerian, Spanish and French coasts.

  20. THE MAY 17, 1992 EVENT: TSUNAMI AND COASTAL EFFECTS IN EASTERN MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES

    OpenAIRE

    Besana, Glenda M.; Masataka Ando; Ma. Hannah Mirabueno

    2004-01-01

    Tsunami invaded the eastern coastlines of Mindanao islands several minutes after the strong ground shaking of the May 17, 1992 quake. Recent field investigations showed that tsunami intensity generally decreases southwards and northwards relative to Bunga and Zaragoza areas. There was an unusually high tsunami wave height (~6m) at Bunga that was most probably due to local site effect. Tsunami waves were generally preceded by the lowering of sea water level while the tsunami arrival times have...

  1. The Tsunami Geology of the Bay of Bengal Shores and the Predecessors of the 2004 Indian Ocean Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, C.; Rajendran, K.; Seshachalam, S.; Andrade, V.

    2010-12-01

    The 2004 Aceh-Andaman earthquake exceeded the known Indian Ocean precedents by its 1,300-km long fault rupture and the height and reach of its tsunami. Literature of the ancient Chola dynasty (AD 9-11 centuries) of south India and the archeological excavations allude to a sea flood that crippled the historic port at Kaveripattinam, a trading hub for Southeast Asia. Here, we combine a variety of data from the rupture zone as well as the distant shores to build a tsunami history of the Bay of Bengal. A compelling set of geological proxies of possible tsunami inundation include boulder beds of Car Nicobar Island in the south and the East Island in the northernmost Andaman, a subsided fossil mangrove forest near Port Blair and a washover sedimentation identified in the Kaveripattinam coast of Tamil Nadu, south India. We have developed an extensive chronology for these geological proxies, and we analyze them in conjunction with the historical information culled from different sources for major sea surges along the Bay of Bengal shores. The age data and the depositional characteristics of these geological proxies suggest four major tsunamis in the last 2000 years in the Bay of Bengal, including the 1881 Car Nicobar tsunami. Among these, the evidence for the event of 800-1200 cal yr BP is fairly well represented on both sides of the Bay of Bengal shores. Thus, we surmise that the 800-1000-year old tsunami mimics the transoceanic reach of the 2004 Indian Ocean and the age constraints also agree with the sea surge during the Chola period. We also obtained clues for a possible medieval tsunami from the islands occurred probably a few hundred years after the Chola tsunami, but its size cannot constrained, nor its source. The convergence of ages and the multiplicity of sites would suggest at least one full size predecessor of the 2004 event 1000-800 years ago.

  2. Numerical simulations of tsunamis generated by underwater volcanic explosions at Karymskoye lake (Kamchatka, Russia) and Kolumbo volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ulvrová; Paris, R; Kelfoun, K.; Nomikou, P

    2014-01-01

    Increasing human activities along the coasts of the world provoke the necessity to assess tsunami hazard from different sources (earthquakes, landslides, volcanic activity). In this paper, we simulate tsunamis generated by underwater volcanic explosions from (1) a submerged vent in a shallow water lake (Karymskoye Lake, Kamchatka), and (2) from Kolumbo submarine volcano (7 km NE of Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece). The 1996 tsunami in Karymskoye lake is a well-documented examp...

  3. Numerical simulations of tsunami generated by underwater volcanic explosions at Karymskoye lake (Kamchatka, Russia) and Kolumbo volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ulvrová; Paris, R; Kelfoun, K.; Nomikou, P

    2013-01-01

    Increasing human activities along the coasts of the world arise the necessity to assess tsunami hazard from different sources (earthquakes, landslides, volcanic activity). In this paper, we simulate tsunamis generated by underwater volcanic explosions from (1) a submerged vent in a shallow water lake (Karymskoye Lake, Kamchatka), and (2) from Kolumbo submarine volcano (7 km NE of Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece). The 1996 tsunami in Karymskoye lake is a well-documented...

  4. Warning and prevention based on estimates with large uncertainties: the case of low-frequency and large-impact events like tsunamis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinti, Stefano; Armigliato, Alberto; Pagnoni, Gianluca; Zaniboni, Filippo

    2013-04-01

    Geoscientists deal often with hazardous processes like earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis, hurricanes, etc., and their research is aimed not only to a better understanding of the physical processes, but also to provide assessment of the space and temporal evolution of a given individual event (i.e. to provide short-term prediction) and of the expected evolution of a group of events (i.e. to provide statistical estimates referred to a given return period, and a given geographical area). One of the main issues of any scientific method is how to cope with measurement errors, a topic which in case of forecast of ongoing or of future events translates into how to deal with forecast uncertainties. In general, the more data are available and processed to make a prediction, the more accurate the prediction is expected to be if the scientific approach is sound, and the smaller the associated uncertainties are. However, there are several important cases where assessment is to be made with insufficient data or insufficient time for processing, which leads to large uncertainties. Two examples can be given taken from tsunami science, since tsunamis are rare events that may have destructive power and very large impact. One example is the case of warning for a tsunami generated by a near-coast earthquake, which is an issue at the focus of the European funded project NearToWarn. Warning has to be launched before tsunami hits the coast, that is in a few minutes after its generation. This may imply that data collected in such a short time are not yet enough for an accurate evaluation, also because the implemented monitoring system (if any) could be inadequate (f.i. one reason of inadequacy could be that implementing a dense instrumental network could be judged too expensive for rare events) The second case is the long term prevention from tsunami strikes. Tsunami infrequency may imply that the historical record for a given piece of coast is too short to capture a statistical sufficient number of large tsunamis, which entails that tsunami hazard has to be estimated by means of speculated worst-case scenarios, and their consequences are evaluated accordingly and usually result associated with large uncertainty bands. In case of large uncertainties, the main issues for geoscientists are how to communicate the information (prediction and uncertainties) to stakeholders and citizens and how to build and implement together responsive procedures that should be adequate. Usually there is a tradeoff between the cost of the countermeasure (warning and prevention) and its efficacy (i.e. its capability of minimizing the damage). The level of the acceptable tradeoff is an issue pertaining to decision makers and to local threatened communities. This paper, that represents a contribution from the European project TRIDEC on management of emergency crises, discusses the role of geoscientists in providing predictions and the related uncertainties. It is stressed that through academic education geoscientists are formed more to better their understanding of processes and the quantification of uncertainties, but are often unprepared to communicate their results in a way appropriate for society. Filling this gap is crucial for improving the way geoscience and society handle natural hazards and devise proper defense means.

  5. Tsunami generation by dynamic displacement of sea bed due to dip-slip faulting

    CERN Document Server

    Dutykh, Denys

    2007-01-01

    In classical tsunami-generation techniques, one neglects the dynamic sea bed displacement resulting from fracturing of a seismic fault. The present study takes into account these dynamic effects. Earth's crust is assumed to be a Kelvin-Voigt material. The seismic source is assumed to be a dislocation in a viscoelastic medium. The fluid motion is described by the classical nonlinear shallow water equations (NSWE) with time-dependent bathymetry. The viscoelastodynamic equations are solved by a finite-element method and the NSWE by a finite-volume scheme. A comparison between static and dynamic tsunami-generation approaches is performed. The results of the numerical computations show differences between the two approaches and the dynamic effects could explain the complicated shapes of tsunami wave trains.

  6. Tsunami generation in Stromboli island and impact on the south-east Tyrrhenian coasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tinti

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Stromboli is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aeolian island arc in south Tyrrhenian sea, Italy. In the last 100 years the most relevant volcanic eruptions have beenaccompanied by local tsunamis, that have caused damage and casualties. In some cases the direct mechanism of local tsunami generation is clear, i.e. pyroclastic flows entering the sea. In some others it is uncertain and some speculation concerning the collapse of the eruptive column on the sea surface or the failure of some underwater mass can be made. But the ordinary activity is unlikely to generate large regional tsunamis. These can be produced by the lateral collapse of the volcanic cone that geomorphological and volcanological  investigations have proven to have occurred repeatedly in the recent history of the volcano, with return period in the order of some thousands of years. The last episode is dated to less than 5 ka BP, and left the Sciara del Fuoco scar on the north-west flank of Stromboli. Based on previous studies, the possible collapse of the nortwestern sector of Stromboli and the consequent generation and propagation of a tsunami are explored. The impact on Stromboli and on the other islands of the Aeolian archipelago is estimated, as well as the impact on the coast of Sicily and the Tyrrhenian coasts of Calabria. The simulation is carried out by means of a double model: a Lagrangian block model to compute the motion of the collapsing mass, and a finite-element hydrodynamic model to compute the evolution of the tsunami. Two distinct tsunami simulations are carried out, one on a very fine grid around the source region to evaluate the tsunami near Stromboli, and one utilising a coarser grid covering the whole south-east Tyrrhenian sea to compute the tsunami propagation toward Sicily and Calabria. It is found that a huge-volume collapse of the north-western flank of the Stromboli cone is capable of producing a regional tsunami which is catastrophic at the source and devastating on long stretches of Tyrrhenian coasts, but particularly in the neighbouring islands of Panarea and Salina, and along the Calabria coasts around Capo Vaticano.

  7. Tsunami Attack!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

    Students learn about tsunamis, discovering what causes them and what makes them so dangerous. They learn that engineers design detection and warning equipment, as well as structures that that can survive the strong wave forces. In a hands-on activity, students use a table-top-sized tsunami generator to observe the formation and devastation of a tsunami. They see how a tsunami moves across the ocean and what happens when it reaches a coastline. They make villages of model houses to test how different material types are impacted by the huge waves.

  8. Model of tsunami generation from Bulgarian earthquake sources in the Black Sea area and prediction of their possible effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangelov, B.; Spassov, E.; Dotzev, N.

    1983-01-01

    A kinematic linear model for the travel-time of tsunami generated from the Bulgarian Black-Sea earthquake sources is built, taking into account the boundary cases for the epicentre situation of a possible earthquake with a magnitude between 7.1 and 8.0. It gives a real idea about the time field distribution, for which tsunami propagates and reaches the coast. The parameters of the strong wave which occurs after the tsunami transformation near the coast line are estimated. These parameters - velocity and maximal pressure are important for forecasting the consequences and eventual damages from tsunami. The possible boundary, subject to flooding from tsunami, at definite parameters of the wave is approximately constructed. First steps for tsunami-zoning are made for the Northern Bulgarian Black Sea coast.

  9. Modelling of tsunami generation from underwater landslides in the Storegga area, propagation and tide-tsunami interactions in the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androsov, A.; Behrens, J.; Danilov, S.

    2009-04-01

    The last known mega-tsunami to hit rim countries of the North Sea took place over 8,000 years ago. But coastal areas of the North Sea are vulnerable to damaging tsunamis caused by localized underwater landslides. Therefore, numerical simulations on the basis of a high-resolution multilayer model in curvilinear coordinates was performed to study generation and propagation of a tsunami wave in the Storegga area. Various scenarios of initial conditions for a landslide (Storegga, Storneset, Inner Scar) are considered. The estimation of accuracy of the model for various spatial resolutions was carried out. The slide model is coupled with a very high-resolution finite element model (TsunAWI) for simulation of the tsunami in the North Sea. The propagation of the tsunami wave in the North Sea was investigated without and with tidal forcing. Influence of the tidal wave on the tsunami wave is considered in various phases of tide. By this analysis the affected areas in the North Sea can be determined.

  10. Assessment of the safety of Ulchin nuclear power plant in the event of tsunami using parametric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Young; Kang, Keum Seok [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Previous evaluations of the safety of the Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant in the event of a tsunami have the shortcoming of uncertainty of the tsunami sources. To address this uncertainty, maximum and minimum wave heights at the intake of Ulchin NPP have been estimated through a parametric study, and then assessment of the safety margin for the intake has been carried out. From the simulation results for the Ulchin NPP site, it can be seen that the coefficient of eddy viscosity considerably affects wave height at the inside of the breakwater. In addition, assessment of the safety margin shows that almost all of the intake water pumps have a safety margin over 2 m, and Ulchin NPP site seems to be safe in the event of a tsunami according to this parametric study, although parts of the CWPs rarely have a margin for the minimum wave height

  11. Assessment of the safety of Ulchin nuclear power plant in the event of tsunami using parametric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous evaluations of the safety of the Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant in the event of a tsunami have the shortcoming of uncertainty of the tsunami sources. To address this uncertainty, maximum and minimum wave heights at the intake of Ulchin NPP have been estimated through a parametric study, and then assessment of the safety margin for the intake has been carried out. From the simulation results for the Ulchin NPP site, it can be seen that the coefficient of eddy viscosity considerably affects wave height at the inside of the breakwater. In addition, assessment of the safety margin shows that almost all of the intake water pumps have a safety margin over 2 m, and Ulchin NPP site seems to be safe in the event of a tsunami according to this parametric study, although parts of the CWPs rarely have a margin for the minimum wave height

  12. Potential predecessors of the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami — Sedimentary evidence of extreme wave events at Ban Bang Sak, SW Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, D.; Brückner, H.; Jankaew, K.; Kelletat, D.; Scheffers, A.; Scheffers, S.

    2011-08-01

    Where historical records are short and/or fragmentary, geological evidence is an important tool to reconstruct the recurrence rate of extreme wave events (tsunamis and/or storms). This is particularly true for those coastal zones around the Indian Ocean, where predecessors of similar magnitude as the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami (IOT) have not been reported by written sources. In this context, the sedimentary record of the Holocene coastal plain of Ban Bang Sak (Phang-nga province, Thailand) provides evidence of multiple prehistoric coastal flooding events in the form of allochthonous sand beds, which were radiocarbon dated to 700-500, 1350-1180, and younger than 2000 cal BP. The layers were assigned to high-energy events of marine origin, which could be either tsunamis or tropical storms, by means of granulometry, geochemistry, vertical structure, and macrofossil content. Although no landfall of a strong storm has occurred in the last 150 years of meteorological data recording, cyclones cannot be ruled out for the last centuries and millennia. However, discrimination between tsunami and storm origin was mainly based on the comparison of the palaeoevent beds with the local deposit of the IOT, which revealed similar characteristics in regard to spatial extend and sediment properties. Furthermore, the youngest palaeoevent correlates with contemporaneous deposits from Thailand and more distant coasts. Hence, we relate it to a basin wide tsunami which took place 700-500 years ago. For the sediments of older extreme events, deposited between 2000 and 1180 cal BP, we found no unambiguous counterparts at other sites; nevertheless, at least for now, they are treated as tsunami candidates.

  13. Inclusion of landslide tsunamis generation into a depth integrated wave model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cecioni

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model based on the mild slope equation, suitable to reproduce the propagation of small amplitude tsunamis in the far field, is extended to reproduce the generation and the propagation of waves generated by landslides. The wave generation is modeled through a forcing term included in the field equation, which reproduces the effects of the movement of a submerged landslide on the fluid. The measurements of three dimensional laboratory experiments, which simulate tsunamis generated by landslide sliding along the flank of a conical island, are compared with the theoretical calculation results. The present approach is also compared with the similar method of Tinti et al. (2006 used for the generation of these waves in depth integrated model, and the different behavior when using frequency-dispersive and non-dispersive equations is highlighted.

  14. Resolution analysis of the tsunami generated by the 2014 Mw 8.1 Pisagua earthquake using a simple slip model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J. A.; Riquelme, S.; Fuentes, M. A.; Arriola, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Schindelé, F.; Campos, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Northern Chile has been identified as a likely mature seismic gap that spans approximately from Mejillones peninsula to Ilo in southern Peru. The 2014 Mw 8.1 Pisagua earthquake broke the middle segment, and coseismic slip models show that the slipped zone occurred in the intermediate to deeper portion of the megathrust fault interface between the downgoing and overriding plate. The tsunami generated by the Pisagua earthquake caused minor impact along the Chile shore, and, for instance, at the Iquique tide gauge, the leading wave reached an elevation of about 1.8 m and a depression of ~2.5 m. In the present work, we would like to address the tsunami generation, propagation and runup associated to the 2014 Pisagua earthquake. This work aims to understand, from a numerical point of view, why this event did caused a minor tsunami, to test the feasibility to model correctly the sea water level at DART buoys and local tide gauges, and to estimate the sensitivity of the runup amplitudes to earthquake source parameters. We collect published coseismic slips for this earthquake and used a proposed coseismic slip model obtained using seismological data. Assuming an elastic halfspace and the linear superposition principle, the static displacement field from these earthquake slip models was computed using the Okada's formula for a point-source and we use the vertical displacement computed at the seafloor as initial condition to propagate the tsunami. Preliminary results shows that major differences are observed in the near-field. Obtaining the static seafloor deformation we can immediately obtain an estimation of the maximum runup by using a multisloping beach model which allow us to understand how well-conditioned is the zone for a large tsunami. In terms of earthquake source, most of slip models show a single asperity that one can model as an elliptical slip crack. To test the sensitivity of the runup and water elevation to earthquake source parameters, we use a simple earthquake model to describe the coseismic slip associated to the 2014 Pisagua earthquake. By varying the crack location and fault geometry, we are currently estimating the variability of runup distribution and seawater elevation in the near-field.

  15. Building Damage and Business Continuity Management in the Event of Natural Hazards: Case Study of the 2004 Tsunami in Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Masami Sugiura; Shengye Jin; Duminda Welikanna; Ranjith Disanayake; Abdul Bari; Chinthaka Premachandra; Masayuki Tamura; Chandana Dinesh Parape

    2013-01-01

    The Sumatra Earthquake and Indian Ocean Tsunami event on the 26 December 2004 has provided a unique and valuable opportunity to evaluate the performance of various structures, facilities and lifeline systems during the tsunami wave attacks. There are especially meaningful observations concerning the structural changes due to the tsunami forces, which open up a wide area of research to develop the mitigation procedure. The business restoration process of business companies in terms of building...

  16. A review on earthquake and tsunami hazards of the Sumatran plate boundary: Observing expected and unexpected events after the Aceh-Andaman Mw 9.15 event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natawidjaja, D.

    2013-12-01

    The 600-km Mentawai megathrust had produced two giant historical earthquakes generating big tsunamies in 1797 and 1833. The SuGAr (Sumatran GPS continuous Array) network, first deployed in 2002, shows that the subduction interface underlying Mentawai Islands and the neighboring Nias section in the north are fully locked, thus confirming their potential hazards. Outreach activities to warn people about earthquake and tsunamies had been started since 4 months prior to the 26 December 2004 in Aceh-Andaman earthquake (Mw 9.15). Later in March 2005, the expected megathrust earthquake (Mw 8.7) hit Nias-Simelue area and killed about 2000 people, releasing the accumulated strain since the previous 1861 event (~Mw 8.5). After then many Mw 7s and smaller events occured in Sumatra, filling areas between and around two giant ruptures and heighten seismicities in neighboring areas. In March 2007, the twin earthquake disaster (Mw 6.3 and Mw 6.4) broke two consecutive segments of the transcurrent Sumatran fault in the Singkarak lake area. Only six month later, in September 2007, the rapid-fire-failures of three consecutive megathrust patches (Mw 8.5, Mw 7.9 and Mw 7.0) ruptured a 250-km-section of the southern part of the Mentawai. It was a big surprise since this particular section is predicted as a very-low coupled section from modelling the SuGAr data, and hence, bypassing the more potential fully coupled section of the Mentawai in between the 2005 and 2007 ruptures. In September 2009, a rare unexpected event (Mw 7.6) suddenly ruptured an intracrustal fault in the subducted slab down under Padang City and killed about 500 people. Padang had been in preparation for the next tsunami but not for strong shakes from near by major earthquake. This event seems to have remotely triggered another Mw 6.7 on the Sumatran fault near kerinci Lake, a few hundred kilometers south of Padang, in less than a day. Just a year later, in November 2010, again an unexpected large slow-slip event of Mw 7.8 ruptured an up-dip section of the 2007 rupture, west of the South Pagai of Mentawai Islands. It shook the region only gently but woke deadly tsunami up to 14 meter heights and killed about 500 people. Despite it has been a bit quite in the past three years but the amount of strain left on the Mentawai segment, especially under Siberut, Sipora and North Pagai Islands is about Mw 8.8 still, waiting to be released sometime in the near future. Beside Mentawai, stydies on prehistorical earthquakes and mapping off strain budget and releases along the Aceh-Andaman indicates that a Mw 8 or greater earthquake is still possible to occur in the next decades. Moreover, the status and characteristics of the megathrust section south of the Mentawai, the Sunda Strait to south Java Ocean, is largely unknown so far. Nonetheless, we do know that this southernmost section has been quite for the past several hundreds years, suggesting a possible seismic gap, and it is close to dense population of industrial and urban areas. Learning from experience, we should not just prepare for the expected of well known sources but also the unexpected ones.

  17. Numerical modelling of potential submarine landslides and generated tsunami in Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Nieto, E.; Mangeney, A.; Singh, S. C.; Chauhan, A.; Bouchut, F.; Castro Díaz, M.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies suggests that tsunami risk along the SW coast of Sumatra could be due to co-seismic slip along a backthrust at the NE Margin of the Mentawai Island and associated landslides (Singh et al., 2010). Using a combination of high-resolution seismic reflection and bathymetry data, they observed deposits of large submarine landslides at the NE margin of Mentawai Island and suggest that the high wave that occurred in 1797 might have been enhanced by landslides, producing a large localised tsunami. Until now most of the work devoted to tsunami hazard assessment in the area of Sumatra Island focussed on megaearthquakes earthquakes generated tsunamis. Therefore, estimating the run up heights due to submarine landslides is essential for risk mitigation along the SW coast of Sumatra. A series of numerical scenarios are performed here to simulate potential submarine landslides and generated tsunamis in the area of Sumatra Island. The height and velocity of the water wave and the impact zones are calculated using a new numerical model solving the depth-averaged shallow water equations with high order finite volume methods. This model corresponds to the 2D extension of the model developed by Fernández-Nieto et al., 2008. The fluidized mass is modeled using a generalization of the Savage-Hutter model [Savage and Hutter, 1989] by including the role of buoyancy and fluid into the thin-layer equations with a Coulomb-type friction law. Our model takes into account the coupling between the fluid and the landslides and incorporates the rigorous description of topography effects that play a key role in the dynamics of landslides. We study the magnitude of variation of the wave expected depending on the location and volume released. These results shows that landslide generated tsunamis have to be taken into account for risk assessment in the area of Sumatra Island. E.D. Fernández-Nieto, F. Bouchut, D. Bresch, M.J. Castro, A. Mangeney, 2008. A new Savage-Hutter type model for submarine avalanches and generated tsunami, J. Comput. Physics 7720-7754, 227. S.B. Savage, K. Hutter. The dynamics of avalanches of granular materials frominitiation to run-out. Acta Mech. 86, 201-223 (1989) Singh, Satish C., Nugroho D. Hananto, Ajay P. S. Chauhan, H. Permana, Marine Denolle, Andri Hendriyana, Danny Natawidjaja, 2010. Evidence of active backthrusting at the NE Margin of Mentawai Islands, SW Sumatra, Geophys. J. Int., 180(2), 703-714, February 2010

  18. TSUNAMI INFORMATION SOURCES - PART 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Wiegel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available I have expanded substantially my list of information sources on: tsunami generation (sources, impulsive mechanisms, propagation, effects of nearshore bathymetry, and wave run-up on shore - including physical (hydraulic modeling and numerical modeling. This expanded list includes the subjects of field investigations of tsunamis soon after an event; damage effects in harbors on boats, ships, and facilities; tsunami wave-induced forces; damage by tsunami waves to structures on shore; scour/erosion; hazard mitigation; land use planning; zoning; siting, design, construction and maintenance of structures and infrastructure; public awareness and education; distant and local sources; tsunami warning and evacuation programs; tsunami probability and risk criteria. A few references are on "sedimentary signatures" useful in the study of historic and prehistoric tsunamis (paleo-tsunamis. In addition to references specifically on tsunamis, there are references on long water wave and solitary wave theory; wave refraction, diffraction, and reflection; shelf and basin free and forced oscillations (bay and harbor response; seiches; edge waves; Mach- reflection of long water waves ("stem waves"; wave run-up on shore; energy dissipation. All are important in understanding tsunamis, and in hazard mitigation. References are given on subaerial and submarine landslide (and rockfall generated waves in reservoirs, fjords, bays, and ocean; volcano explosive eruptions/collapse; underwater and surface explosions; asteroid impact. This report is in two parts: 1 Bibliographies, books and pamphlets, catalogs, collections, journals and newsletters, maps, organizations, proceedings, videos and photos; 2 Articles, papers, reports listed alphabetically by author.Many papers on the Indian Ocean (Sumatra tsunami of 26 December 2004, were given at the 22nd IUGG International Tsunami Symposium, Chania, Crete, 27-29 June 2005, but had not been published at the date of this report. For the program, see http://www.gein.noa.gr/English/tsunamis.htmThis list of tsunami information sources (115 pp, about 3,300 entries is also available on a diskette, at the Water Resources Center Archives, 410 O'Brien Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720-1718. Most of the publications are available in the Water Resources Center Archives or the Earth Sciences Library, University of California, Berkeley, CA.I wish to acknowledge my appreciation of the great help of the staff of the Water Resources Center Archives in finding some difficult to obtain publications; in particular Paul S. Atwood for his help for those on websites and other computer sources. I want to thank John M. Wiegel for his continuous help in searching for sources on websites via computer search-engines.

  19. Tsunami risk assessment in the Marquesas Islands (French Polynesia through numerical modeling of generic far-field events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hébert

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes occurring at the Pacific Rim can trigger tsunamis that propagate across the ocean and can produce significant damages far away from the source. In French Polynesia, the Marquesas Islands are the most exposed to the far-field tsunami hazards, since they are not protected by any outer coral reef and since submarine slopes are less steep than in other islands. Between 1994 and 1996, four tsunamis have reached the bays of the archipelago, among them, the tsunami initiated by the Chilean Mw 8.1 earthquake, produced up to 3 m high waves in Tahauku Bay. Numerical modeling of these recent events has already allowed us to validate our method of resolution of hydrodynamics laws through a finite-difference scheme that simulates the propagation of the tsunamis across the ocean and computes the inundation heights (run-up in remote bays. We present in this paper the simulations carried out to study potentially threatening areas located at the Pacific Rim, on the seismogenic Aleutian and Tonga subduction zones. We use a constant seismic moment source (that of the Mw 8.1 Chile 1995 earthquake, M0 = 1.2 1021 N.m located at several potential epicenters, with the fault strike adapted from the regional seismotectonics pattern. Our results show that the sources chosen in the Aleutian trench do not produce large inundations in the Marquesas bays, except for the easternmost source (longitude 194° E. Sources located in the Tonga trench do not produce high amplifications either, except for the northernmost one (latitude 16° S. We also discuss the behaviour of the tsunami waves within the archipelago, and evidence contrasting responses depending on the arrival azimuths. These results show that, for a given initial seismic energy, the tsunami amplification in remote bays is highly dependent on the source location and fault strike.

  20. Tsunami.gov: NOAA's Tsunami Information Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiro, B.; Carrick, J.; Hellman, S. B.; Bernard, M.; Dildine, W. P.

    2014-12-01

    We present the new Tsunami.gov website, which delivers a single authoritative source of tsunami information for the public and emergency management communities. The site efficiently merges information from NOAA's Tsunami Warning Centers (TWC's) by way of a comprehensive XML feed called Tsunami Event XML (TEX). The resulting unified view allows users to quickly see the latest tsunami alert status in geographic context without having to understand complex TWC areas of responsibility. The new site provides for the creation of a wide range of products beyond the traditional ASCII-based tsunami messages. The publication of modern formats such as Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) can drive geographically aware emergency alert systems like FEMA's Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS). Supported are other popular information delivery systems, including email, text messaging, and social media updates. The Tsunami.gov portal allows NOAA staff to easily edit content and provides the facility for users to customize their viewing experience. In addition to access by the public, emergency managers and government officials may be offered the capability to log into the portal for special access rights to decision-making and administrative resources relevant to their respective tsunami warning systems. The site follows modern HTML5 responsive design practices for optimized use on mobile as well as non-mobile platforms. It meets all federal security and accessibility standards. Moving forward, we hope to expand Tsunami.gov to encompass tsunami-related content currently offered on separate websites, including the NOAA Tsunami Website, National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program, NOAA Center for Tsunami Research, National Geophysical Data Center's Tsunami Database, and National Data Buoy Center's DART Program. This project is part of the larger Tsunami Information Technology Modernization Project, which is consolidating the software architectures of NOAA's existing TWC's into a single system. We welcome your feedback to help Tsunami.gov become an effective public resource for tsunami information and a medium to enable better global tsunami warning coordination.

  1. A Tsunami Fragility Assessment for Nuclear Power Plants in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although Tsunami events were defined as an external event in 'PRA Procedure Guide (NUREG/CR- 2300)'after 1982, a Tsunami event was not considered in a design and construction of NPP before the Sumatra earthquake in 2004. But the Madras Atomic Power Station, a commercial nuclear power plant owned and operated by the Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited (NPCIL), and located near Chennai, India, was affected by the tsunami generated by the 2004 Sumatra earthquake (USNRC 2008). The condenser cooling pumps of Unit 2 of the installation were affected due to flooding of the pump house and subsequent submergence of the seawater pumps by tsunami waves. The turbine was tripped and the reactor shut down. The unit was brought to a cold-shutdown state, and the shutdown-cooling systems were reported as operating safely. After this event, Tsunami hazards were considered as one of the major natural disasters which can affect the safety of Nuclear Power Plants. The IAEA performed an Extrabudgetary project for Tsunami Hazard Assessment and finally an International Seismic Safety Center (ISSC) established in IAEA for protection from natural disasters like earthquake, tsunami etc. For this reason, a tsunami hazard assessment method determined in this study. At first, a procedure for tsunami hazard assessment method was established, and second target equipment and structures for investigation of Tsunami Hazard assessment were selected. Finally, a sample fragility calculation was perly, a sample fragility calculation was performed for one of equipment in Nuclear Power Plant

  2. A Tsunami Fragility Assessment for Nuclear Power Plants in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Kyu; Choi, In Kil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Keum Seok [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Although Tsunami events were defined as an external event in 'PRA Procedure Guide (NUREG/CR- 2300)'after 1982, a Tsunami event was not considered in a design and construction of NPP before the Sumatra earthquake in 2004. But the Madras Atomic Power Station, a commercial nuclear power plant owned and operated by the Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited (NPCIL), and located near Chennai, India, was affected by the tsunami generated by the 2004 Sumatra earthquake (USNRC 2008). The condenser cooling pumps of Unit 2 of the installation were affected due to flooding of the pump house and subsequent submergence of the seawater pumps by tsunami waves. The turbine was tripped and the reactor shut down. The unit was brought to a cold-shutdown state, and the shutdown-cooling systems were reported as operating safely. After this event, Tsunami hazards were considered as one of the major natural disasters which can affect the safety of Nuclear Power Plants. The IAEA performed an Extrabudgetary project for Tsunami Hazard Assessment and finally an International Seismic Safety Center (ISSC) established in IAEA for protection from natural disasters like earthquake, tsunami etc. For this reason, a tsunami hazard assessment method determined in this study. At first, a procedure for tsunami hazard assessment method was established, and second target equipment and structures for investigation of Tsunami Hazard assessment were selected. Finally, a sample fragility calculation was performed for one of equipment in Nuclear Power Plant.

  3. Investigation of tsunami generated by the Mariana trench earthquake of April 6, 1990. 1990 nen 4 gatsu 6 ka Mariana kaiko jishin ni yoru tsunami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatori, T. (Saitama (Japan))

    1991-06-24

    There was an earthquake on April 6, 1990 whose epicenter was in the vicinity of the Mariana Trench, 170km to the east of Saipan island. The earthquake accompanied a tsunami which was observed in a wide area in Japan, and the tsunami were put on records at many tidal stations. The tidal records made by various stations were analyzed to study the scale and characteristics of the tsunami. Continuous 3 hour wave surface was observed along the island arc from the Kanto districts to the Ryukyu Islands with little difference in the propagation times. The wave was comparatively higher in the Shikoku districts with the height of 40cm, and the amplitude was larger at the point where initial wave period of 8 minutes was observed. The magnitude of the tsunami was estimated to be m=2, which is one grade higher than average for the scale of the earthquake. The reason can be considered as the concentration of energy in Japan by the effect of submarine topography and by the effect of a high-angle thrust fault. The Tsunami generated along Ogasahara and Mariana Trench has a larger scale than that of the average earthquake, and can be explained by the high-angle thrust of the plate near the trench. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Tsunamis - General

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tsunami is a Japanese word meaning harbor wave. It is a water wave or a series of waves generated by an impulsive vertical displacement of the surface of the ocean...

  5. Tsunami waves generated by submarine landslides of variable volume: analytical solutions for a basin of variable depth

    OpenAIRE

    Didenkulova, I.; Nikolkina, I.; Pelinovsky, E.; Zahibo, N.

    2010-01-01

    Tsunami wave generation by submarine landslides of a variable volume in a basin of variable depth is studied within the shallow-water theory. The problem of landslide induced tsunami wave generation and propagation is studied analytically for two specific convex bottom profiles (h ~ x4/3 and h ~ x4). In these cases the basic equations can be reduced to the constant-coeffic...

  6. Generation of surface waves by an underwater moving bottom: Experiments and application to tsunami modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Jamin, Timothée; Ruiz-Chavarría, Gerardo; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We report laboratory experiments on surface waves generated in a uniform fluid layer whose bottom undergoes a sudden upward motion. Simultaneous measurements of the free-surface deformation and the fluid velocity field are focused on the role of the bottom kinematics in wave generation. We observe that the fluid layer transfers bottom motion to the free surface as a temporal high-pass filter coupled with a spatial low-pass filter. Both filter effects are usually neglected in tsunami warning systems. Our results display good agreement with a prevailing linear theory without fitting parameter. Based on our experimental data, we provide a new theoretical approach for the rapid kinematics limit that is applicable even for non-flat bottoms: a key step since most approaches assume a uniform depth. This approach can be easily appended to tsunami simulations under arbitrary topography.

  7. Green mosses date the Storegga tsunami to the chilliest decades of the 8.2 ka cold event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondevik, Stein; Stormo, Svein Kristian; Skjerdal, Gudrun

    2012-06-01

    Chlorophyll in dead plants ordinarily decomposes completely before permanent burial through exposure to light, water and oxygen. Here we describe 8000-year-old terrestrial mosses that retain several percent of its original chlorophyll. The mosses were ripped of the land surface, carried 50-100 m off the Norwegian coast of the time, and deposited in depressions on the sea floor by the Storegga tsunami. A little of the chlorophyll survived because, within hours after entraining it, the tsunami buried the mosses in shell-rich sediments. These sediments preserved the chlorophyll by keeping out light and oxygen, and by keeping the pH above 7—three factors known to favour chlorophyll's stability. Because the green mosses were buried alive, their radiocarbon clock started ticking within hours after the Storegga Slide had set off the tsunami. Radiocarbon measurement of the mosses therefore give slide ages of uncommon geological precision, and these, together with a sequence of ages above and below the boundary, date the Storegga Slide to the chilliest decades of the 8.2 ka cold event at 8120-8175 years before AD 1950. North Atlantic coastal- and fjord- climatic records claimed to show evidence of the 8.2 cold event should be carefully examined for possible contamination and disturbance from the Storegga tsunami.

  8. An approximate method of short-term tsunami forecast and the hindcasting of some recent events

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. P. Korolev

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a method for a short-term tsunami forecast based on sea level data from remote sites. This method is based on Green's function for the wave equation possessing the fundamental property of symmetry. This property is well known in acoustics and seismology as the reciprocity principle. Some applications of this principle on tsunami research are considered in the current study. Simple relationships and estimated transfer functions enabled us to simulate tsunami waveforms for an...

  9. Numerical simulation of tsunami generation by cold volcanic mass flows at Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Waythomas, C. F.; Watts, P; J. S. Walder

    2006-01-01

    Many of the world's active volcanoes are situated on or near coastlines. During eruptions, diverse geophysical mass flows, including pyroclastic flows, debris avalanches, and lahars, can deliver large volumes of unconsolidated debris to the ocean in a short period of time and thereby generate tsunamis. Deposits of both hot and cold volcanic mass flows produced by eruptions of Aleutian arc volcanoes are exposed at many locations along the coastlines of the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean, and ...

  10. Probability of marine invasion into the chicxulub crater and consequent generation of large tsunamis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, K.; Tada, R.; Bralower, T.; Tajika, E.; Matsui, T.

    2003-04-01

    A great number of Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary tsunami deposits around the Gulf of Mexico have been reported (e. g., Smit, 1999). However, the origin, propagation process and magnitude of tsunamis have been poorly understood. Although Matsui et al. (2002) suggested that the movement of water rushing into and receding from the Chicxulub crater have a potential to generate the largest tsunamis, no strong evidence to support this mechanism has been presented. In this study, samples from the YAX-1 site drilled by the Chicxulub Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP), were investigated to test the probability of the marine invasion into the crater and consequent generation of tsunamis. The impactite in the YAX-1 occurred between 794.60 (?) m and 894.94 m depth and is divided into two lithologic units: impact melt rock unit (822.86 m to 894.94 m) and suevite unit (794.60 (?) m to 822.86 m). The impact melt rock unit is mainly composed of infinite form of melt fragments with small amount of basement and carbonate rock fragments. The suevite unit overlies the impact melt breccia unit with irregular contact. The suevite unit is composed of fragments of rocks and minerals together with melt in a clastic matrix. Poorly-sorted, grain-supported fabric and intraclast-like nature suggest lower part of the suevite unit was re-deposited as a debris flow from the crater rim. On the other hand, normal grading, relatively well-sorting and “K/T boundary cocktail (Bralower et al., 1998)” nature of nannofossil assemblage in the upper part of the suevite unit suggest that this part was deposited from a dense sediment suspended cloud. Furthermore, compositional oscillations repeated by >5 times are observed in this part, similar compositional oscillations are observed in the K/T boundary deep-sea tsunami deposit in Cuba (Goto et al., 2002). The uppermost several tens centimeter of the suevite unit is composed of medium to coarse, greenish sandstone with parallel lamination, suggesting the influence of strong current during its deposition. The boundary cocktail nature of nannofossil assemblage, compositional oscillations and existence of parallel lamination in the upper part of the suevite unit is suggestive of the marine invasion into the crater cavity and potential generation of tsunamis. Further research is needed to confirm the timing of marine invasion, based on identification of iridium anomaly and the first appearance of Danian fossils.

  11. Detection of very long period seismic signals and acoustic gravity waves generated by large tsunamis : application to tsunami warning

    OpenAIRE

    Andriamiranto Raveloson

    2011-01-01

    [...] In this thesis, data from seismic and infrasound stations were analyzed in order to see effects of tsunamis of the great Sumatra-Andaman 2004 and Tohuku-Oki 2011 earthquakes. Data used are from seismic stations of the Global Seismic Network (GSN) around the Indian and Pacific oceans and from infrasound stations of the International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (IMS/CTBTO). In both data sets, seismic and infrasound, tsunami signals are observed in t...

  12. Replacement Sequence of Events Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Forest; Gladden, Daniel Wenkert Roy; Khanampompan, Teerpat

    2008-01-01

    The soeWINDOW program automates the generation of an ITAR (International Traffic in Arms Regulations)-compliant sub-RSOE (Replacement Sequence of Events) by extracting a specified temporal window from an RSOE while maintaining page header information. RSOEs contain a significant amount of information that is not ITAR-compliant, yet that foreign partners need to see for command details to their instrument, as well as the surrounding commands that provide context for validation. soeWINDOW can serve as an example of how command support products can be made ITAR-compliant for future missions. This software is a Perl script intended for use in the mission operations UNIX environment. It is designed for use to support the MRO (Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter) instrument team. The tool also provides automated DOM (Distributed Object Manager) storage into the special ITAR-okay DOM collection, and can be used for creating focused RSOEs for product review by any of the MRO teams.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF TSUNAMI GENERATION POTENTIAL THROUGH RAPID ANALYSIS OF SEISMIC PARAMETERS Case study: Comparison of the Sumatra Earthquakes of 6 April and 25 October 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Madlazim

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to estimate P-wave rupture durations (Tdur), dominant periods (Td) and rupture durations greater than 50 seconds (T50Ex) for two large, shallow earthquakes, which occurred off the coast of Sumatra on 6 April and 25 October 2010. Although both earthquakes had similar parameters of magnitude and focal depth, the 25 October event (Mw=7.8) generated a tsunami while the 6 April event (Mw=7.8) did not. Analysis of the above stated parameters helped understand the mec...

  14. Earthquake and tsunami forecasts: relation of slow slip events to subsequent earthquake rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Timothy H; Jiang, Yan; Malservisi, Rocco; McCaffrey, Robert; Voss, Nicholas; Protti, Marino; Gonzalez, Victor

    2014-12-01

    The 5 September 2012 M(w) 7.6 earthquake on the Costa Rica subduction plate boundary followed a 62-y interseismic period. High-precision GPS recorded numerous slow slip events (SSEs) in the decade leading up to the earthquake, both up-dip and down-dip of seismic rupture. Deeper SSEs were larger than shallower ones and, if characteristic of the interseismic period, release most locking down-dip of the earthquake, limiting down-dip rupture and earthquake magnitude. Shallower SSEs were smaller, accounting for some but not all interseismic locking. One SSE occurred several months before the earthquake, but changes in Mohr-Coulomb failure stress were probably too small to trigger the earthquake. Because many SSEs have occurred without subsequent rupture, their individual predictive value is limited, but taken together they released a significant amount of accumulated interseismic strain before the earthquake, effectively defining the area of subsequent seismic rupture (rupture did not occur where slow slip was common). Because earthquake magnitude depends on rupture area, this has important implications for earthquake hazard assessment. Specifically, if this behavior is representative of future earthquake cycles and other subduction zones, it implies that monitoring SSEs, including shallow up-dip events that lie offshore, could lead to accurate forecasts of earthquake magnitude and tsunami potential. PMID:25404327

  15. 3D numerical investigation on landslide generated tsunamis around a conical island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Francesca; Bellotti, Giorgio

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents numerical computations of tsunamis generated by subaerial and submerged landslides falling along the flank of a conical island. The study is inspired by the tsunamis that on 30th December 2002 attacked the coast of the volcanic island of Stromboli (South Tyrrhenian sea, Italy). In particular this paper analyzes the important feature of the lateral spreading of landside generated tsunamis and the associated flooding hazard. The numerical model used in this study is the full three dimensional commercial code FLOW-3D. The model has already been successfully used (Choi et al., 2007; 2008; Chopakatla et al, 2008) to study the interaction of waves and structures. In the simulations carried out in this work a particular feature of the code has been employed: the GMO (General Moving Object) algorithm. It allows to reproduce the interaction between moving objects, as a landslide, and the water. FLOW-3D has been firstly validated using available 3D experiments reproducing tsunamis generated by landslides at the flank of a conical island. The experiments have been carried out in the LIC laboratory of the Polytechnic of Bari, Italy (Di Risio et al., 2009). Numerical and experimental time series of run-up and sea level recorded at gauges located at the flanks of the island and offshore have been successfully compared. This analysis shows that the model can accurately represent the generation, the propagation and the inundation of landslide generated tsunamis and suggests the use of the numerical model as a tool for preparing inundation maps. At the conference we will present the validation of the model and parametric analyses aimed to investigate how wave properties depend on the landslide kinematic and on further parameters such as the landslide volume and shape, as well as the radius of the island. The expected final results of the research are precomputed inundation maps that depend on the characteristics of the landslide and of the island. Finally we will try to apply the code to a real life case i.e. the landslide tsunamis at the coast of the Stromboli island (Italy). SELECTED REFERENCES Choi, B.H. and D. C. Kim and E. Pelinovsky and S. B. Woo, 2007. Three dimensional simulation of tsunami run-up around conical island. Coastal Engineering 54,374 pp. 618-629. Chopakatla, S.C. and T.C. Lipmann and J.E. Richardson, 2008. Field verification of a computational fluid dynamics model for wave transformation and breaking in the surf zone. Journal of Waterway, Port, Coastal, and Ocean Engineering 134(2), pp. 71-80 Di Risio, M., P. De Girolamo, G. Bellotti, A. Panizzo, F. Aristodemo, M. G.Molfetta, and A. F. Petrillo (2009), Landslidegenerated tsunamis runup at the coast of a conical island: New physical model experiments. J. Geophys. Res., 114, C01009, doi:10.1029/2008JC004858 Flow Science, Inc, 2007. FLOW-3D User's Manual.

  16. Reconstruction of the sedimentological environment and paleo-tsunami events offshore Jisr Az-Zarka (central Israel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyuleneva, Natalia; Braun, Yael; Suchkov, Igor; Ben-Avraham, Zvi; Goodman-Tchernov, Beverly

    2015-04-01

    Previous research shows that cores retrieved offshore central Israel (Caesarea) have anomalous sedimentary sequences that correspond to at least three tsunami events. Identification of the tsunami horizons was carried out by quantifying the presence of a wide range of characteristics described in modern and paleotsunami analogs. In this study, a sediment core (219cm) was obtained from 15.3 m water depth, some 1.5 km to the south-west of the Crocodile River mouth, offshore the village of Jisr Az-Zarka, and ~4 km north of Caesarea. The core was sampled at 1 cm intervals for grain size and micropaleontological analyses. XRD and XRF analyses were also performed at coarser resolution. The aim of the study was to correlate anomalous layers in the core with previously identified tsunami layers off Caesarea and to test whether their expression differs, given the impact of the river runoff and land material input. An additional aim was to study the inter-event sediments to determine broader environmental changes. This is uniquely possible here because the maximum age of the deposits (<6yBP) and depth of the collection area negate the presence of sea-level change influence; and this portion of the coastline is considered tectonically quiet for at least 2000 years; thereby negating two possible effects on the sedimentological signatures. In this new core two tsunami horizons corresponding with known Caesarea events (~1200 yBP, perhaps 749 AD earthquake; and ~3500 yBP 'Santorini eruption') were recognized, and, one previously unidentified event, dated by 14C to 5.6-6 ka, was discerned as well. The Nile River has been the dominant and most stable source of terrigenous components in the study area, such as siliciclastic quartz for the sand fraction and smectite - for the clays. Thus, the prevailing marine settings are dominated by these two mineralogical components. XRD analysis of nine intervals in the core determined the following clay minerals: smectite, hydromica (illite), chlorite and kaolinite. Normal marine settings are characterized by the stable relative ratios between these minerals, while the contribution from the surrounding landmass here can be detected by increase of illite and smectite. The Santorini tsunami layer is characterized by an increment of high illite content (2.5 fold increase relative to the average content of this mineral in the core). The earliest tsunami interval is characterized by distinct increases of titanium and zirconium concentrations according to XRF analysis. New results from this study suggest that (1) relative to other tsunami events, the Santorini eruption-age tsunami waves caused more input of terrestrial material onto the upper shelf, as indicated by the content of illite; (2) the oldest tsunami event is characterized by a significant content of titanium and zirconium elements, which are the constituents of such minerals as rutile and zircon. This is probably the result of processes of concentration of heavy minerals; (3) the increment of smectite content found downcore, which lacks tsunamigenic indicators, between 4.5 and 3.5 ky, is attributed to increased input from the land and larger river runoff, possibly the result of a more humid climate.

  17. Predicting natural catastrophes tsunamis

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    1. Tsunamis - Introduction - Definition of phenomenon - basic properties of the waves Propagation and dispersion Interaction with coasts - Geological and societal effects Origin of tsunamis - natural sources Scientific activities in connection with tsunamis. Ideas about simulations 2. Tsunami generation - The earthquake source - conventional theory The earthquake source - normal mode theory The landslide source Near-field observation - The Plafker index Far-field observation - Directivity 3. Tsunami warning - General ideas - History of efforts Mantle magnitudes and TREMOR algorithms The challenge of "tsunami earthquakes" Energy-moment ratios and slow earthquakes Implementation and the components of warning centers 4. Tsunami surveys - Principles and methodologies Fifteen years of field surveys and related milestones. Reconstructing historical tsunamis: eyewitnesses and geological evidence 5. Lessons from the 2004 Indonesian tsunami - Lessons in seismology Lessons in Geology The new technologies Lessons in civ...

  18. Tsunami Run-up Heights at Imwon Port, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong-Sik; Cho, Jeong-Seon

    2015-04-01

    Tsunami Run-up Heights at Imwon Port, Korea Yong-Sik Cho and Jeong-Seon Cho Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hanyang University 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791, Korea. The Eastern Coast of the Korean Peninsula has been attacked frequently by a number of tsunamis causing severe damages during this century. Among them, 1983 Central East Sea and 1993 Hokkaido Tsunami events were recorded as the most devastating events in Korea. More recently, the Great East Japan Tsunami had also attacked the Korean Peninsula. The Eastern Coast of the Korean Peninsula is the terminal place where tsunamis climb up inland after it generated along the western coast of Japan. The central part of the coast, in special, is worried as a tsunami danger zone because much tsunami energy is concentrated on by a topographic condition of this region. Recently, several coastal facilities including harbors and breakwaters are built and operated along the Eastern Coast of the Korean Peninsula. Furthermore, several nuclear power plants are already operating and several more units are now under construction. Residents who lived alongside the coast want free from unexpected danger, so the tsunami hazard mitigation becomes an important issue of coastal problems in Korea. Through the historical tsunami events, the Imwon Port is known as the place where most severe damage occurred, especially in 1983. An effective and economic way for the tsunami hazard mitigation planning is to construct inundation maps along the coast vulnerable to tsunami flooding. These maps should be built based on the historical tsunami events and the projected scenarios. For this purpose, an accurate estimation of tsunami run-up height and inundation process through the numerical model is needed. As a first step to tsunami mitigation program, the maximum run-up heights at the Imwon Port are computed and compared with field observed data. For this, tsunami run-up heights in this region were filed surveyed again. The run-up heights for both 1983 and 1993 Tsunami events are computed along the Eastern Coastline of the Korean Peninsula. Finally, a tsunami hazard map is generated based on the computed and observed run-up heights. Significant information such as proper evacuation routes, shelters and hot lines are included in the map. Acknowledgements The research described in this publication was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (Reference No. 2010-0022337).

  19. Simulación de tsunamis generados por deslizamientos de terreno en el talud insular de Cuba / Simulation of tsunamis on the banks of the island of Cuba, generated by landslides

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luis Fermín, Córdova-López; Yoany, Sánchez-Cruz; Enrique, Castellano-Abella.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Los tsunamis son ocasionados generalmente por terremotos. Se revela que alrededor del 30% de las máximas crestas de tsunamis es probable que haya tenido relación con masas de terreno que fallaron (Watts et al., 2005). El presente trabajo desarrolla tres casos de estudio a modo de prueba de posible d [...] eslizamiento submarino y subaéreo en diferentes lugares del talud insular de Cuba. Tomando los parámetros de estos deslizamientos se hace la generación y propagación de la ola provocada por los deslizamientos, para conocer sus efectos sobre la línea de costa. Los resultados obtenidos permiten definir la altura de ola creada, comportamiento de la misma a lo largo del perfil, trepada y efecto en el interior de una bahía, elementos necesarios para el cálculo del impacto en zonas costeras. Abstract in english While tsunamis are generally caused by earthquakes, it has been shown that around 30% of maximum tsunami crests are most likely related to land masses that have broken away (Watts et al., 2005). The present work developed three case studies to test possible submarine and subaerial landslides in diff [...] erent locations on the banks of the island of Cuba. Based on the parameters of these landslides, the resultant wave was generated and propagated to identify effects on the coastline. The results made it possible to define the height of the wave created, its behaviour throughout the profile, its rise and the effects inside a bay-necessary elements for calculating impact on coastal zones.

  20. Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory across Generations (RK and M). Markers - Reflections on Inter-generational Warnings in the Form of Japanese Tsunami Stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As states with nuclear power programmes are, or intend to become, engaged in planning the disposal of their high-level and/or long-lived radioactive waste in deep geological repositories, means to ensure that future generations will be aware of these repositories and not disturb them are being studied. Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) across Generations, launched in March 2010, is the relevant initiative under the NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee in this area. Its several years of work and findings are documented online at www.oecdnea. org/rwm/rkm. A strategy of communicating important information to future generations must be based on several complementary means and approaches. Markers placed in the vicinity of closed repositories represent one potential component of this strategy. The RK and M initiative's glossary defines a marker as 'a long-lasting object that indicates an area of influence, power or danger. It is placed strategically at or near the site for immediate recognition or for discovery at a later time'. Markers are meant to reach future generations in the medium (a few hundred years) to long term (hundred thousand of years) and are conceived to be immobile (that is, in permanent association with a site), robust (in order to maximize survivability on its own) and provide messages that are likely to be understandable across generations. A marking system can range from a simple stone to a contrived and monumental multi-component system. The present report seeks to develop the understanding of the potential effectiveness of makers drawing from the study of the role that stone markers played in Japan during the Tohoku tsunami event of 2011. There are hundreds such markers placed at various epochs on Japan's north-eastern coast to warn future generations about the dangers of tsunamis. The existence of markers for recurrent, destructive events may help save lives, as in the case of the villages of Murohama and Aneyoshi. However, in most other cases, the markers did not help protect the population from the March 2011 tsunami. The villages of Murohama and Aneyoshi have shown interest in passing on the messages through oral history and in school education. However, it is worth asking whether these villages would have heeded the messages of the stone markers if the rest of society had given them other forms of assurance against tsunamis besides their own vigilance, for instance, if they had a tsunami wall or a functioning modern tsunami warning systems. This historical example illustrates that, over the course of several generations, markers informing and warning about disasters are of limited effectiveness for local protection. Despite the historical record and the widespread awareness of the danger that has materialised on a recurrent basis, the local population has, by and large, taken risks with or without the presence of markers. Reliance on new technologies, deferring responsibility to the authorities, and pursuit of short-term economic interests are three potential reasons for this behaviour. On the other hand, the March 2011 tsunami was a thousand-year event; it is questionable whether the population can be asked to live in the constant fear of and preparation for such a rare event, in Japan and in similarly latently dangerous areas around the world. The Japanese tsunami stones provide a rare example of warning markers and allow a number of considerations to be made for markers in the context of repository projects: - The longevity of stone markers in Japan - up to one thousand years - illustrates the possibility of survival of markers over similar timescales, especially in regions that are not subject to devastations from natural catastrophes. - Visible markers contribute to keeping memory alive. - Memory does not guarantee safety. The current international position that a geological repository should be safe by itself is confirmed by this study. - Memory may save lives under special circumstances and it should be fostered. - More than memory, knowledge saves lives. Markers

  1. Adaptive triangular discontinuous Galerkin schemes for tsunami propagation and inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Stefan; Behrens, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    A tsunami simulation framework is presented, which is based on adaptive triangular meshes and a finite element discontiuous Galerkin discretization. This approach allows for high local resolution and geometric accuracy, while maintaining the opportunity to simulate large spatial domains. The dynamically adaptive mesh is generated by the grid library amatos, which is based on a conforming tree based refinement strategy. While the tsunami propagation in the deep ocean is well represented by the nonlinear shallow water equations, special interest is given to the near-shore characteristics of the flow. For this purpose a new mass-conservative well-balanced inundation scheme is developed. This work is part of the ASCETE (Advanced Simulation of Coupled Earthquake and Tsunami Events) project, which aims to better understand the generation of tsunami events. In this course, a simulation framework is developed which couples physics-based rupture generation with hydrodynamic tsunami propagation and inundation.

  2. Mega Tsunamis of the World Ocean and Their Implication for the Tsunami Hazard Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusiakov, V. K.

    2014-12-01

    Mega tsunamis are the strongest tsunamigenic events of tectonic origin that are characterized by run-up heights up to 40-50 m measured along a considerable part of the coastline (up to 1000 km). One of the most important features of mega-tsunamis is their ability to cross the entire oceanic basin and to cause an essential damage to its opposite coast. Another important feature is their ability to penetrate into the marginal seas (like the Sea of Okhotsk, the Bering Sea) and cause dangerous water level oscillations along the parts of the coast, which are largely protected by island arcs against the impact of the strongest regional tsunamis. Among all known historical tsunamis (nearly 2250 events during the last 4000 years) they represent only a small fraction (less than 1%) however they are responsible for more than half the total tsunami fatalities and a considerable part of the overall tsunami damage. The source of all known mega tsunamis is subduction submarine earthquakes with magnitude 9.0 or higher having a return period from 200-300 years to 1000-1200 years. The paper presents a list of 15 mega tsunami events identified so far in historical catalogs with their basic source parameters, near-field and far-field impact effects and their generation and propagation features. The far-field impact of mega tsunamis is largely controlled by location and orientation of their earthquake source as well as by deep ocean bathymetry features. We also discuss the problem of the long-term tsunami hazard assessment when the occurrence of mega tsunamis is taken into account.

  3. The VOLNA code for the numerical modelling of tsunami waves: generation, propagation and inundation

    CERN Document Server

    Dutykh, Denys; Dias, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    A novel tool for tsunami wave modelling is presented. This tool has the potential of being used for operational purposes: indeed, the numerical VOLNA code is able to handle the complete life-cycle of a tsunami (generation, propagation and run-up along the coast). The algorithm works on unstructured triangular meshes and, thus, can be run in arbitrary complex domains. It is often the case since natural coasts tend to be of fractal shape [Sapoval et al, 2004]. This paper contains the detailed description of the finite volume scheme implemented in the code. We explain the numerical treatment of the wet/dry transition. This point is crucial for accurate run-up computation. Most existing tsunami codes use semi-empirical techniques at this stage, which are not always sufficient. The main reason is that people evacuation is decided on the base of inundation maps which are produced with this type of numerical tools. Finally we present several realistic test cases that partially validate our algorithm. Comparisons wit...

  4. Tsunami vulnerability assessment mapping for the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia using a geographical information system (GIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najihah, R.; Effendi, D. M.; Hairunnisa, M. A.; Masiri, K.

    2014-02-01

    The catastrophic Indian Ocean tsunami of 26 December 2004 raised a number of questions for scientist and politicians on how to deal with the tsunami risk and assessment in coastal regions. This paper discusses the challenges in tsunami vulnerability assessment and presents the result of tsunami disaster mapping and vulnerability assessment study for West Coast of Peninsular Malaysia. The spatial analysis was carried out using Geographical Information System (GIS) technology to demarcate spatially the tsunami affected village's boundary and suitable disaster management program can be quickly and easily developed. In combination with other thematic maps such as road maps, rail maps, school maps, and topographic map sheets it was possible to plan the accessibility and shelter to the affected people. The tsunami vulnerability map was used to identify the vulnerability of villages/village population to tsunami. In the tsunami vulnerability map, the intensity of the tsunami was classified as hazard zones based on the inundation level in meter (contour). The approach produced a tsunami vulnerability assessment map consists of considering scenarios of plausible extreme, tsunami-generating events, computing the tsunami inundation levels caused by different events and scenarios and estimating the possible range of casualties for computing inundation levels. The study provides an interactive means to identify the tsunami affected areas after the disaster and mapping the tsunami vulnerable village before for planning purpose were the essential exercises for managing future disasters.

  5. Landslide tsunami hazard in the Indonesian Sunda Arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Brune

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Indonesian archipelago is known for the occurrence of catastrophic earthquake-generated tsunamis along the Sunda Arc. The tsunami hazard associated with submarine landslides however has not been fully addressed. In this paper, we compile the known tsunamigenic events where landslide involvement is certain and summarize the properties of published landslides that were identified with geophysical methods. We depict novel mass movements, found in newly available bathymetry, and determine their key parameters. Using numerical modeling, we compute possible tsunami scenarios. Furthermore, we propose a way of identifying landslide tsunamis using an array of few buoys with bottom pressure units.

  6. Tsunami Warning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    COMET

    2010-10-12

    Tsunami Warning Systems describes the processes involved in anticipating, detecting, and warning for a tsunami by summarizing data collection, modeling, analysis, and alert procedures used at NOAA's Tsunami Warning Centers. A simulated event and past tsunami occurrences are used to highlight warning system processes for determining the tsunami threat based on seismic and sea level data and tsunami forecast models. Message communication and local response are also addressed as final components of any warning system. The module is intended for Weather Forecast Office staff and emergency managers who require a better understanding of the technical aspects of tsunami warning delivery. The module will also benefit anyone wanting to learn more about the components of tsunami warning systems.

  7. Tsunami Casualty Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, H.

    2007-12-01

    More than 4500 deaths by tsunamis were recorded in the decade of 1990. For example, the 1992 Flores Tsunami in Indonesia took away at least 1712 lives, and more than 2182 people were victimized by the 1998 Papua New Guinea Tsunami. Such staggering death toll has been totally overshadowed by the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami that claimed more than 220,000 lives. Unlike hurricanes that are often evaluated by economic losses, death count is the primary measure for tsunami hazard. It is partly because tsunamis kill more people owing to its short lead- time for warning. Although exact death tallies are not available for most of the tsunami events, there exist gender and age discriminations in tsunami casualties. Significant gender difference in the victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami was attributed to women's social norms and role behavior, as well as cultural bias toward women's inability to swim. Here we develop a rational casualty model based on humans' limit to withstand the tsunami flows. The application to simple tsunami runup cases demonstrates that biological and physiological disadvantages also make a significant difference in casualty rate. It further demonstrates that the gender and age discriminations in casualties become most pronounced when tsunami is marginally strong and the difference tends to diminish as tsunami strength increases.

  8. Developing Tsunami fragility curves using remote sensing and survey data of the 2010 Chilean Tsunami in Dichato

    OpenAIRE

    Mas, E; Koshimura, S.; Suppasri, A.; Matsuoka, M.; Matsuyama, M.; Yoshii, T.; Jimenez, C.; Yamazaki, F.; Imamura, F.

    2012-01-01

    On 27 February 2010, a megathrust earthquake of Mw = 8.8 generated a destructive tsunami in Chile. It struck not only Chilean coast but propagated all the way to Japan. After the event occurred, the post-tsunami survey team was assembled, funded by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), to survey the area severely affected by the tsunami. The tsunami damaged and destroyed numerous houses, especially in the town of Dichato. In order to estimate...

  9. The Generation of a Tsunami from the Impact of a Massive Comet Impact in the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, R.; Pritchett, L.; Masse, B.; Gisler, G.; Gittings, M.

    Calculations with the LANL multiphysics hydrocode SAGE of tsunamis produced by a massive Comet impact in the Indian Ocean is studied with 2D and 3D simulations. We examine the extent of the ejected material from the initial impact and whether that ejecta could be entrained in a distant tsunami, such as the one that left crescents on Madagascar. Current astrophysical models indicate that globally catastrophic cosmic impacts occur on the average of once per million years, and suggest that no human has been demonstrably killed by impact during recorded history. A review of data from the Quaternary period of the past 2.6 million years indicates instead that several cosmic impacts had significant consequences for ancestral human populations, including during the past 5,000 years. Regrettably, the study of recent impacts is obfuscated by questionable methodologies and poor reporting, and by neglect from archaeologists and anthropologists. One of us (BM) provides in a separate paper an anthropological and geomythology perspective by noting that mythology contains structured observations of major witnessed natural processes and events, including possible impacts, which may be amenable to detailed environmental analysis and chronometric reconstruction. According to the authors' interpretation of mythology, airbursts in South America apparently generated lethal mass fires, and details contained in worldwide "great flood" myths may relate to a catastrophic oceanic comet impact 4,813 years ago. Reasons are provided for why these modeled impact events have not been previously recognized. If these interpretations are confirmed by future archaeological and geological research, then current models of hazards and risks are based on an incomplete understanding of the cosmic impact record.

  10. 2011 Tsunami Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julie Martin

    This activity uses data collected from DART (Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis) stations in the Pacific following the 2011 tsunami generated off the coast of Japan. Students are required to map the wave front after 5, 10, and 15 hours to better understand the speed and propagation of the tsunami wave.

  11. Tsunami Propagation Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    NOAA Center for Tsunami Research

    This visualization of the Tsunami generated by the 2010 Chile earthquake shows the spread of the tsunami waves across the pacific. The animation was computed with the MOST tsunami model. Across the bottom of the visualization is a comparison of the MOST predictions to actual data collected by a sensor buoy (denoted by the solid yellow square on the map).

  12. MODELING THE ASIAN TSUNAMI EVOLUTION AND PROPAGATION WITH A NEW GENERATION MECHANISM AND A NON-LINEAR DISPERSIVE WAVE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. Rivera

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A common approach in modeling the generation and propagation of tsunami is based on the assumption of a kinematic vertical displacement of ocean water that is analogous to the ocean bottom displacement during a submarine earthquake and the use of a non-dispersive long-wave model to simulate its physical transformation as it radiates outward from the source region. In this study, a new generation mechanism and the use of a highly-dispersive wave model to simulate tsunami inception, propagation and transformation are proposed. The new generation model assumes that transient ground motion during the earthquake can accelerate horizontal currents with opposing directions near the fault line whose successive convergence and divergence generate a series of potentially destructive oceanic waves. The new dynamic model incorporates the effects of earthquake moment magnitude, ocean compressibility through the buoyancy frequency, the effects of focal and water depths, and the orientation of ruptured fault line in the tsunami magnitude and directivity.For tsunami wave simulation, the nonlinear momentum-based wave model includes important wave propagation and transformation mechanisms such as refraction, diffraction, shoaling, partial reflection and transmission, back-scattering, frequency dispersion, and resonant wave-wave interaction. Using this model and a coarse-resolution bathymetry, the new mechanism is tested for the Indian Ocean tsunami of December 26, 2004. A new flooding and drying algorithm that consider waves coming from every direction is also proposed for simulation of inundation of low-lying coastal regions.It is shown in the present study that with the proposed generation model, the observed features of the Asian tsunami such as the initial drying of areas east of the source region and the initial flooding of western coasts are correctly simulated. The formation of a series of tsunami waves with periods and lengths comparable to observations are also well simulated with the new generation model. Furthermore, the shoaling behavior of the tsunami waves during flooding of dry land was also simulated by the new run-up algorithm. Finally, the new generation and propagation models can explain the combined and independent effects of various factors in tsunami generation and transformation taking into consideration the properties of the ocean and the geologic disturbance.

  13. Recent advancements towards the re-establishment of optical telecommunications sites in response to catastrophic tsunami events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, R. S.; Shiraiwa, M.; Xu, S.; Awaji, Y.; Wada, N.

    2014-12-01

    Communications support for disaster relief and reconstruction teams in the field as well as for providing information to the public through radio and television media during the immediate aftermath of catastrophic tsunami events has been a significant concern after the 2011 Great East Japan Tsunami. In particular, the restoration of optical fiber based telecommunications sites is crucial to re-establish the backbone of communications networks in affected areas. This work reviews a set of novel technologies and approaches that have been developed to enable fast re-establishment of optical telecommunications sites. Specifically, the development of portable battery-powered optical amplifiers, which can replace permanent infrastructure during short periods; novel ultra-sound based optical cable interconnection check-up sub-systems, to support the complex recabling of partially destroyed optical interconnect nodes; and optical networking protocols that allow establishing communications coverage over affected areas by implementing collaboration between different vendors.

  14. Modeling of the near-resonant scenarios of the submarine landslide tsunami generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchuk, Andrei; Maximov, Vasily; Nudner, Igor

    2010-05-01

    The problem of the tsunami wave generation by the submarine landslide, which is moving along the bottom slope, was studied. The necessary conditions (geometry of a slope and sliding body density) for a resonance are defined. A number of numerical experiments were carried out for a model submarine landslide. The maximum amplitude and the wave length were defined for various landslide profiles and their moving rates. As expected, the highest waves are generated when the velocity of the submarine mudslide is equal to the long wave propagation velocity. The landslides, which are moving slower and faster than the resonant one, generate waves with lower amplitude and a bigger wave length. The generated waves have a fairly expressed directivity of radiation. Some peculiarities of the Ugamak tsunami of April 1, 1946 were studied. A number of experiments in the hydro-wave flume (2D) and in the wave basin (3D) were carried out. Various bottom slopes and sliding body shapes were used. The comparison of the theoretical, numerical results and the experimental data is performed.

  15. Learning from the victims: New physical and social science information about tsunamis from victims of the September 29, 2009 event in Samoa and American Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Walter C.; Whitney, Rosy; Faasisila, Jackie; Fonolua, Sharon; Jowitt, Angela; Chan-Kau, Marie

    2011-07-01

    Thirty-one video interviews were carried out on the islands of Tutuila, American Samoa and Upolu, Samoa with survivors of, and responders to, the September 29, 2009 tsunami event. Those interviewed included local residents caught by the waves while attempting to flee to higher ground, those who intentionally ran into the water to save others, individuals who recognized the potential tsunami hazard due to the severity of the earthquake and attempted to warn others, aid workers, tourism managers, and others. The frank, often emotional, responses provide unfiltered insight into their level of understanding of the tsunami phenomenon, the level of preparedness of local residents, and challenges faced by aid workers.

  16. Joko Tingkir program for estimating tsunami potential rapidly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madlazim,, E-mail: m-lazim@physics.its.ac.id; Hariyono, E., E-mail: m-lazim@physics.its.ac.id [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Negeri Surabaya (UNESA) , Jl. Ketintang, Surabaya 60231 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    The purpose of the study was to estimate P-wave rupture durations (T{sub dur}), dominant periods (T{sub d}) and exceeds duration (T{sub 50Ex}) simultaneously for local events, shallow earthquakes which occurred off the coast of Indonesia. Although the all earthquakes had parameters of magnitude more than 6,3 and depth less than 70 km, part of the earthquakes generated a tsunami while the other events (Mw=7.8) did not. Analysis using Joko Tingkir of the above stated parameters helped understand the tsunami generation of these earthquakes. Measurements from vertical component broadband P-wave quake velocity records and determination of the above stated parameters can provide a direct procedure for assessing rapidly the potential for tsunami generation. The results of the present study and the analysis of the seismic parameters helped explain why the events generated a tsunami, while the others did not.

  17. Joko Tingkir program for estimating tsunami potential rapidly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to estimate P-wave rupture durations (Tdur), dominant periods (Td) and exceeds duration (T50Ex) simultaneously for local events, shallow earthquakes which occurred off the coast of Indonesia. Although the all earthquakes had parameters of magnitude more than 6,3 and depth less than 70 km, part of the earthquakes generated a tsunami while the other events (Mw=7.8) did not. Analysis using Joko Tingkir of the above stated parameters helped understand the tsunami generation of these earthquakes. Measurements from vertical component broadband P-wave quake velocity records and determination of the above stated parameters can provide a direct procedure for assessing rapidly the potential for tsunami generation. The results of the present study and the analysis of the seismic parameters helped explain why the events generated a tsunami, while the others did not

  18. Observations and Modeling of the August 27, 2012 Earthquake and Tsunami affecting El Salvador and Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrero, Jose C.; Kalligeris, Nikos; Lynett, Patrick J.; Fritz, Hermann M.; Newman, Andrew V.; Convers, Jaime A.

    2014-12-01

    On 27 August 2012 (04:37 UTC, 26 August 10:37 p.m. local time) a magnitude M w = 7.3 earthquake occurred off the coast of El Salvador and generated surprisingly large local tsunami. Following the event, local and international tsunami teams surveyed the tsunami effects in El Salvador and northern Nicaragua. The tsunami reached a maximum height of ~6 m with inundation of up to 340 m inland along a 25 km section of coastline in eastern El Salvador. Less severe inundation was reported in northern Nicaragua. In the far-field, the tsunami was recorded by a DART buoy and tide gauges in several locations of the eastern Pacific Ocean but did not cause any damage. The field measurements and recordings are compared to numerical modeling results using initial conditions of tsunami generation based on finite-fault earthquake and tsunami inversions and a uniform slip model.

  19. Sensitivity Analysis and Bayesian Inference of Manning's N Friction Coefficient during a Tsunami Event Using Polynomial Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sraj, Ihab; Mandli, Kyle; Dawson, Clint; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2014-05-01

    We present an efficient method to perform a sensitivity analysis of the Manning's N friction coefficient in the event of tsunamis. We also infer Manning's N friction coefficient using water surface elevation data obtained during Tohoku tsunami. We characterize the Manning's friction coefficient by three different parameters assumed constant in three regions: N1 on-shore, N2 near-shore and N3 deep-water. The efficiency of our approach stems from the use of polynomial chaos expansions to build an inexpensive surrogate for the numerical tsunami GeoClaw model that can be used to perform the sensitivity analysis. The surrogate also reduces the computational burden of the Markov Chain Monte-Carlo sampling needed for the Bayesian inference. Our objective is to sharpen three initial estimates of the three uncertain parameters. Our results indicate that Manning's N friction coefficients have a Maximum-A-Posteriori (MAP) values of N2=0.011 and N3=0.185 while for N1 no meaningful MAP value can be determined using the available data.

  20. Lake dwellers occupation gap in Lake Geneva (France-Switzerland) possibly explained by an earthquake-mass movement-tsunami event during Early Bronze Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Katrina; Marillier, François; Hilbe, Michael; Simpson, Guy; Dupuy, David; Yrro, Ble J. F.; Rachoud-Schneider, Anne-Marie; Corboud, Pierre; Bellwald, Benjamin; Wildi, Walter; Girardclos, Stéphanie

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution seismic and sediment core data from the ‘Grand Lac’ basin of Lake Geneva reveal traces of repeated slope instabilities with one main slide-evolved mass-flow (minimum volume 0.13 km3) that originated from the northern lateral slope of the lake near the city of Lausanne. Radiocarbon dating of organic remains sampled from the top of the main deposit gives an age interval of 1865-1608 BC. This date coincides with the age interval for a mass movement event described in the ‘Petit Lac’ basin of Lake Geneva (1872-1622 BC). Because multiple mass movements took place at the same time in different parts of the lake, we consider the most likely trigger mechanism to be a strong earthquake (Mw 6) that occurred in the period between 1872 and 1608 BC. Based on numerical simulations, we show the major deposit near Lausanne would have generated a tsunami with local wave heights of up to 6 m. The combined effects of the earthquake and the following tsunami provide a possible explanation for a gap in lake dwellers occupation along the shores of Lake Geneva revealed by dendrochronological dating of two palafitte archaeological sites.

  1. Numerical study of tsunami generated by multiple submarine slope failures in Resurrection Bay, Alaska, during the MW 9.2 1964 earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleimani, E.; Hansen, R.; Haeussler, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    We use a viscous slide model of Jiang and LeBlond (1994) coupled with nonlinear shallow water equations to study tsunami waves in Resurrection Bay, in south-central Alaska. The town of Seward, located at the head of Resurrection Bay, was hit hard by both tectonic and local landslide-generated tsunami waves during the MW 9.2 1964 earthquake with an epicenter located about 150 km northeast of Seward. Recent studies have estimated the total volume of underwater slide material that moved in Resurrection Bay during the earthquake to be about 211 million m3. Resurrection Bay is a glacial fjord with large tidal ranges and sediments accumulating on steep underwater slopes at a high rate. Also, it is located in a seismically active region above the Aleutian megathrust. All these factors make the town vulnerable to locally generated waves produced by underwater slope failures. Therefore it is crucial to assess the tsunami hazard related to local landslide-generated tsunamis in Resurrection Bay in order to conduct comprehensive tsunami inundation mapping at Seward. We use numerical modeling to recreate the landslides and tsunami waves of the 1964 earthquake to test the hypothesis that the local tsunami in Resurrection Bay has been produced by a number of different slope failures. We find that numerical results are in good agreement with the observational data, and the model could be employed to evaluate landslide tsunami hazard in Alaska fjords for the purposes of tsunami hazard mitigation. ?? Birkh??user Verlag, Basel 2009.

  2. Evaluation on coolability of the reactor core in Monju by natural circulation under earthquake and subsequent tsunami event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conclusion: ? This study clarified that the decay heat of the core can be safely removed in Monju by the natural circulations of the coolant sodium even during an SBO event induced by an earthquake and a subsequent tsunami, as far as the sodium coolant flow circuits are intact and secured. ? Moreover parametric numerical simulations revealed that the natural circulations will be maintained for a sufficiently long period of time and the safety of the reactor will be ensured even under wide range of varied conditions

  3. Preservation of submarine event deposits: Where is the most preferable area to reconstruct the past earthquake/tsunami events from marine sediment records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, K.; Kanamatsu, T.; Ashi, J.; Strasser, M.; Usami, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Kodaira, S.

    2014-12-01

    Large earthquakes and their related tsunami impact submarine geological processes that can form specific submarine event deposits. Most of widely distributed event beds are typically fine-grained turbidites. Examples from the Nankai Trough and the Beppu Bay suggest that a terminal isolated depression is area with the highest potential for the deposition of fine-grained turbidites. The 2004 off the Kii Peninsula earthquakes caused a fine-grained turbidite deposited in a small basin on the Nankai accretionary prism slope, and formed a thick acoustically transparent layer. Off Sanriku thickness of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake and tsunami event beds was usually a few-several cm, but was highest in the Japan Trench with several tens cm. The Japan Trench floor is the deepest and terminal basin. The terminal basin is a potential area for marine paleoseismology. Preservation potential is a factor for usage of submarine event beds as paleoseimsological tool. Repeated sampling of surface sediments from off Sanriku after the 2011 event suggests that the preservation potential of fine-grained event bed is low in the strong benthos activity zone. Sedimentation rate is another factor on the preservation potential. Quick and high sediment accumulation after the event bed deposition diminishes the pressure for the destruction of the event beds by benthos activity. Thus, a small basin covered by the bottom water with low dissolved oxygen concentration, and occurred under the high primary productivity areas is a good example of basins with high preservation potential of event beds. High resolution seismic profiles in the central Japan Trench indicate that occurrence of the well-stratified strata filling the trench and subducting graben depressions. These strata have high potential for seismo-turbidite deposition. Thus, small basins on the mid-slope terrace and the trench floor of the central Japan Trench are most preferable and potential candidates for submarine paleoseismology.

  4. Hazard assessment for a submarine landslide generated local-source tsunami from Kaikoura Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, J.

    2012-04-01

    The Kaikoura Canyon, sediment sink for the Canterbury rivers north of Christchurch, comes to within 500 meters of shore at Goose Bay and accumulates approximately 1.5x106 m3 of sediment each year (Lewis and Barnes, 1999). This sediment, which has accumulated to about seventy meters in thickness (Walters et al., 2006), exhibits tensional fractures, is located in a tectonically active area and could result in catastrophic failure and potentially a local-source tsunami (Lewis and Banes, 1999; Lewis, 1998; Walters et al, 2006). Evidence suggests that this may have happened in the last two hundred years (Lewis, 1998; Lewis and Barnes 1999) and with a return period on the nearby Alpine and Hope faults also in the range of a one to two hundred years (Walters et al, 2006) could happen again relatively soon. A review of the historical record and oral traditions for Kaikoura shows that historically Kaikoura has been affected by 11 events of which 10 are from distant sources and one, though debatable, is possibly from a local source. There are some preserved traditions for the Kaikoura area. These taniwha stories from near Oaro and from the Lyell Creek have been repeated and changed though time though the general essence remains the same. These taniwha legends, though not conclusive, indicate a dangerous shoreline where people have been killed in the past, possibly by flooding or tsunami. Archaeological investigations at Kaikoura found evidence of a Maori occupational layers interrupted by water-worn stones, a "lens of clean gravel between occupation layers" and in other areas of the excavation, the gravels separate discontinuous periods of occupation (Fomison 1963; Foster, 2006). Additionally "pea-gravel" sized greywacke pebbles were found dispersed throughout sections of the South Bay shore platforms, though they were attributesd to slopewash (Duckmanton, 1974) this is less likely since the nearby hills are limestone. A geological investigation along the Kaikoura Coast, at five sites from South Bay to Oara, corroborates this. At four of the sites a similar greywacke pebble bearing layer was found which was not present at test sites to the North and South of the peninsula (Kiwa Rd Campsites and Claverly respectively). These deposits contain diatoms indicating marine provenance. Surveys of Kaikoura peninsula households and businesses showed low levels of preparedness for a local source event. In regards to local-source tsunamis the district council has indicated that they "are unpredictable [and] it is impractical to include rules to mitigate their effects. Instead, the Council is committed to a Civil Defence network which provides an educative role and which sets in place a process for dealing with the results of any tsunami" (Kaikoura District Plan, 2010). Plans and an education strategy need to be formulated and implemented. They need to address considerations such as the fact that about 60% of those surveyed expect some sort of siren warning and the limitations inherent in such a warning system along with signage and public tsunami hazard maps and evacuation zones.

  5. A fast global tsunami modeling suite as a trans-oceanic tsunami hazard prediction and mitigation tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, F.; Li, S.; Jalali Farahani, R.; Williams, C. R.; Astill, S.; Wilson, P. S.; B, S.; Lee, R.

    2014-12-01

    The past decade has been witness to two mega-tsunami events, 2004 Indian ocean tsunami and 2011 Japan tsunami and multiple major tsunami events; 2006 Java, Kuril Islands, 2007 Solomon Islands, 2009 Samoa and 2010 Chile, to name a few. These events generated both local and far field tsunami inundations with runup ranging from a few meters to around 40 m in the coastal impact regions. With a majority of the coastal population at risk, there is need for a sophisticated outlook towards catastrophe risk estimation and a quick mitigation response. At the same time tools and information are needed to aid advanced tsunami hazard prediction. There is an increased need for insurers, reinsurers and Federal hazard management agencies to quantify coastal inundations and vulnerability of coastal habitat to tsunami inundations. A novel tool is developed to model local and far-field tsunami generation, propagation and inundation to estimate tsunami hazards. The tool is a combination of the NOAA MOST propagation database and an efficient and fast GPU (Graphical Processing Unit)-based non-linear shallow water wave model solver. The tsunamigenic seismic sources are mapped on to the NOAA unit source distribution along subduction zones in the ocean basin. Slip models are defined for tsunamigenic seismic sources through a slip distribution on the unit sources while maintaining limits of fault areas. A GPU based finite volume solver is used to simulate non-linear shallow water wave propagation, inundation and runup. Deformation on the unit sources provide initial conditions for modeling local impacts, while the wave history from propagation database provides boundary conditions for far field impacts. The modeling suite provides good agreement with basins for basin wide tsunami propagation to validate local and far field tsunami inundations.

  6. Tsunami-HySEA: A GPU based model for the Italian candidate Tsunami Service Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Vida, Jose Manuel; Macias, Jorge; Castro, Manuel; de la Asuncion, Marc; Melini, Daniele; Romano, Fabrizio; Tonini, Roberto; Lorito, Stefano; Piatanesi, Alessio; Molinari, Irene

    2015-04-01

    Tsunami Service Providers (TSP), providing tsunami warnings in the framework of the systems coordinated by IOC/UNESCO worldwide, and other national tsunami warning centers, are striving to complement, or replace, decision matrices and pre-calculated tsunami scenario databases with FTRT (Faster Than Real Time) tsunami simulations. The aim is to increase the accuracy of tsunami forecast by assimilating the largest possible amount of data in quasi real time, and performing simulations in a few minutes wall-clock time, possibly including the coastal inundation stage. This strategy of direct real time computation, that could seem unfeasible a decade ago, it is now foreseeable thanks to the astonishingly recent increase in the computational power and bandwidth evolution of modern GPUs. The INGV in collaboration with the EDANYA Group (University of Málaga) are developing and implementing a FTRT Tsunami Simulation approach for the Italian candidate TSP, namely the Centro Allerta Tsunami (CAT), which is in pre-operational stage starting from 1 October 2014, in the 24/7 seismic monitoring room at INGV. The mandate of CAT is to provide warnings for potential tsunamis within the Mediterranean basin to its subscribers, in the framework of NEAMTWS (http://www.ioc-tsunami.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=70:neamtws-home&catid=9&Itemid=14&lang=es). CAT also performs global monitoring, for continuous testing, training, and validation purposes. The tsunami-HySEA model, developed by EDANYA Group, implements in the same code the three phases of an earthquake generated tsunami: generation, propagation and coastal inundation. At the same time it is implemented in nested meshes with different resolution and multi-GPU environment, which allows much faster than real time simulations. The challenge set by the Italian TSP for warning in the NEAMTWS region is twofold: to be able to reasonably constrain the earthquake source in the absence of deep sea tsunami sensors, and to be able to compute the generation, propagation and a first inundation stage of a seismically generated in the Mediterranean Sea, within a few minutes after the earthquake origin time. The approach will then be extensively tested with past tsunamis worldwide, as well as with any future event in the framework of CAT global monitoring training mode.

  7. Tsunamigenic Ratio of the Pacific Ocean earthquakes and a proposal for a Tsunami Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Suppasri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pacific Ocean is the location where two-thirds of tsunamis have occurred, resulting in a great number of casualties. Once information on an earthquake has been issued, it is important to understand if there is a tsunami generation risk in relation with a specific earthquake magnitude or focal depth. This study proposes a Tsunamigenic Ratio (TR that is defined as the ratio between the number of earthquake-generated tsunamis and the total number of earthquakes. Earthquake and tsunami data used in this study were selected from a database containing tsunamigenic earthquakes from prior 1900 to 2011. The TR is calculated from earthquake events with a magnitude greater than 5.0, a focal depth shallower than 200 km and a sea depth less than 7 km. The results suggest that a great earthquake magnitude and a shallow focal depth have a high potential to generate tsunamis with a large tsunami height. The average TR in the Pacific Ocean is 0.4, whereas the TR for specific regions of the Pacific Ocean varies from 0.3 to 0.7. The TR calculated for each region shows the relationship between three influential parameters: earthquake magnitude, focal depth and sea depth. The three parameters were combined and proposed as a dimensionless parameter called the Tsunami Index (TI. TI can express better relationship with the TR and with maximum tsunami height, while the three parameters mentioned above cannot. The results show that recent submarine earthquakes had a higher potential to generate a tsunami with a larger tsunami height than during the last century. A tsunami is definitely generated if the TI is larger than 7.0. The proposed TR and TI will help ascertain the tsunami generation risk of each earthquake event based on a statistical analysis of the historical data and could be an important decision support tool during the early tsunami warning stage.

  8. Source Processes for the Probabilistic Assessment of Tsunami Hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric L. Geist

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of tsunami hazard assessment has increased in recent years as a result of catastrophic consequences from events such as the 2004 Indian Ocean and 2011 Japan tsunamis. In particular, probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment (PTHA methods have been emphasized to include all possible ways a tsunami could be generated. Owing to the scarcity of tsunami observations, a computational approach is used to define the hazard. This approach includes all relevant sources that may cause a tsunami to impact a site and all quantifiable uncertainty. Although only earthquakes were initially considered for PTHA, recent efforts have also attempted to include landslide tsunami sources. Including these sources into PTHA is considerably more difficult because of a general lack of information on relating landslide area and volume to mean return period. The large variety of failure types and rheologies associated with submarine landslides translates to considerable uncertainty in determining the efficiency of tsunami generation. Resolution of these and several other outstanding problems are described that will further advance PTHA methodologies leading to a more accurate understanding of tsunami hazard.

  9. Inversion of tsunami height using ionospheric observations. The case of the 2012 Haida Gwaii tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakoto, V.; Lognonne, P. H.; Rolland, L.

    2014-12-01

    Large and moderate tsunamis generate atmospheric internal gravity waves that are detectable using ionospheric monitoring. Indeed tsunamis of height 2cm and more in open ocean were detected with GPS (Rolland et al. 2010). We present a new method to retrieve the tsunami height from GPS-derived Total Electron Content observations. We present the case of the Mw 7.8 Haida Gwaii earthquake that occured the 28 october 2012 offshore the Queen Charlotte island near the canadian west coast. This event created a moderate tsunami of 4cm offshore the Hawaii archipelago. Equipped with more than 50 receivers it was possible to image the tsunami-induced ionospheric perturbation. First, our forward model leading to the TEC perturbation follows three steps : (1) 3D modeling of the neutral atmosphere perturbation by summation of tsunami-induced gravity waves normal modes. (2) Coupling of the neutral atmosphere perturbation with the ionosphere to retrieve the electron density perturbation. (3) Integration of the electron density perturbation along each satellite-station ray path. Then we compare this results to the data acquired by the Hawaiian GPS network. Finally, we examine the possibility to invert the TEC data in order to retrieve the tsunami height and waveform. For this we investigate the link between the height of tsunamis and the perturbed TEC in the ionosphere.

  10. Development of an online tool for tsunami inundation simulation and tsunami loss estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivihok, P.; Honda, K.; Ruangrassamee, A.; Muangsin, V.; Naparat, P.; Foytong, P.; Promdumrong, N.; Aphimaeteethomrong, P.; Intavee, A.; Layug, J. E.; Kosin, T.

    2014-05-01

    The devastating impacts of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami highlighted the need for an effective end-to-end tsunami early warning system in the region that connects the scientific components of warning with preparedness of institutions and communities to respond to an emergency. Essential to preparedness planning is knowledge of tsunami risks. In this study, development of an online tool named “INSPIRE” for tsunami inundation simulation and tsunami loss estimation is presented. The tool is designed to accommodate various accuracy levels of tsunami exposure data which will support the users to undertake preliminary tsunami risk assessment from the existing data with progressive improvement with the use of more detailed and accurate datasets. Sampling survey technique is introduced to improve the local vulnerability data with lower cost and manpower. The performance of the proposed methodology and the INSPIRE tool were tested against the dataset in Kamala and Patong municipalities, Phuket province, Thailand. The estimated building type ratios from the sampling survey show the satisfactory agreement with the actual building data at the test sites. Sub-area classification by land use can improve the accuracy of the building type ratio estimation. For the resulting loss estimation, the exposure data generated from detailed field survey can provide the agreeable results when comparing to the actual building damage recorded for the Indian Ocean tsunami event in 2004. However, lower accuracy exposure data derived from sampling survey and remote sensing can still provide a comparative overview of estimated loss.

  11. Hydromagnetic simulation of the ionospheric disturbances generated by the 2011 Tohoku-oki tsunami and associated acoustic-gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kherani, E. A.; Lognonne, P. H.; Paula, E. R.; Rolland, L. M.

    2013-05-01

    Owing to the natural disturbances such as Earth quake/tsunami and tropospheric convection, Acosutic gravity waves (AGWs) are excited in the troposphere. These AGWs propagates upward to the thermosphere, attain large amplitude therein and subsequently dissipate, leading to the excitation of secondary AGWs which mainly propagate horizontally. Both primary and secondary AGWs significantly modify the ionosphere, leading to the Total electron Content disturances, current and magnetic disturbances. Focus of the present work is the recent Japan tsunami that occurred on 11 March 2011 over Tohoku-Oki and caused enormous damage in terms of human life and infrastructures. Moreover, it triggered nuclear catastrophe that makes it a global disaster and much more alarming. The growing concern is towards failure of short-term forecasting of this event in spite that the Japan is densely populated with the various ground based seismic instrument as well with the GPS receivers that may detect the activities in the space related to the tsunami. However, owing to these dense networks, this event is examined much more thoroughly than other big events in the past, leading to the knowledge of various interesting aspects that may be helpful in the future for the short-term forecasting of such event. One such aspect is that the effects of the seismic activities occurring deep into the ocean, are detected much more efficiently and in varieties in space (in the overlying atmosphere and ionosphere) than over the ocean or Earth's surface. In the present work, hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic simulations of the atmospheric and ionospheric anomalies are performed for the Tohoku-Oki tsunami (11 March 2011). The Tsunami-Atmosphere-Ionosphere (TAI) coupling mechanism via AGWs is explored theoretically using the TAI coupled model. In this mechanism, tsunami in the ocean excites the AGWs in the atmosphere owing to the vertical uplift which subsequently interact with the ionosphere to gives rise density, electric and magnetic field disturbances or anomalies. For the modeled tsunami wave as an input, the coupled model simulates the wind, density and temperature disturbances or anomalies in the atmosphere and electron density/magnetic anomalies in the F region of the ionosphere. Also presented are the GPS-TEC and ground-based magnetometer measurements during first hour of tsunami and good agreements are found between modeled and observed anomalies. The high frequency component ˜10 minutes of the simulated wind, TEC and magnetic anomalies in the F region develops within 6-7 minutes after the initiation of the tsunami, suggesting the importance of monitoring the high-frequency atmospheric/ionospheric anomalies for the early warning. These anomalies are found to maximize across the epicenter in the direction opposite to the tsunami propagation suggesting that the large atmospheric/ionospheric disturbances are excited in the region where tsunami does not travel.

  12. CHARYBDIS: A Black Hole Event Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Chris M; Richardson, P; Webber, Bryan R

    2003-01-01

    CHARYBDIS is an event generator which simulates the production and decay of miniature black holes at hadronic colliders as might be possible in certain extra dimension models. It interfaces via the Les Houches accord to general purpose Monte Carlo programs like HERWIG and PYTHIA which then perform the parton evolution and hadronization. The event generator includes the extra-dimensional `grey-body' effects as well as the change in the temperature of the black hole as the dec...

  13. Paleo-tsunami deposits since ca. 5 ka in Koyadori and Onuma on the Sanriku Coast, northeast Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimura, D.; Miyauchi, T.

    2014-12-01

    Large tsunamis since the last about one hundred years along the Sanriku Coast on the Pacific Coast of northeast Japan were well documented and observed. Additionally, many historical records described about tsunamis during recent several hundreds years. However, we cannot expect the latest large tsunami generated by the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake because previous studies of paleo-tsunami deposits were not efficient and geological evidences of paleo-tsunamis were not obtained on the coast. Thus, we conducted excavating surveys on coastal marshes to identify paleo-tsunami deposits and correlate to historical tsunami events. In laboratory, we revealed physico-chemical sediment property and performed radiocarbon dating and tephra analysis for establishing their geochronology. As a result, we referred to eleven tsunami deposits including 2011 tsunami deposits since ca. 3000-4000 Cal BP and correlated them with historical tsunamis (1896 Meiji Sanriku tsunami, 1611 Keicho Sanriku tsunami, 869 Jogan tsunami) in Koyadori. In Onuma, we identified six tsunami deposits since ca. 5000 Cal BP and younger two deposits of them are possibly corresponding to historical tsunamis. This is the first report of identifying onshore paleo-tsunami deposits correlating to historical tsunamis on the Sanriku Coast based on sediment property, many radiocarbon dating, and tephra correlation. As these results were derived from only two sites, we need many solid data in other sites to confirm our correlations. In the future, these data are linked to researches for establishing the earthquake cycle model along the Japan Trench and evaluating the magnitude of paleo-tsunamis and paleo-earthquakes.

  14. Towards operational tsunami modeling with adaptive triangular discontinuous Galerkin schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Stefan; Behrens, Jörn

    2015-04-01

    We present a tsunami simulation framework, which is based on depth-integrated hydrodynamic model equations. The governing equations are discretized on an adaptive triangular mesh with a Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) scheme. This approach allows for high local resolution and geometric accuracy, while maintaining the opportunity to simulate large spatial domains. While the specific components of the modelling framework have been numerically validated, in this study the applicability of the tsunami model to realistic scenarios is considered. We compute well-known benchmark problems and compare simulation results to recent tsunami events. Special interest is given to the near-shore characteristics of the flow. For this purpose a new mass-conservative well-balanced inundation scheme is applied, which enables a stable computation of wetting and drying processes during the arrival of the tsunami at the coast. The dynamically adaptive mesh is generated by the grid library amatos, which is based on a conforming tree based refinement strategy. This work is part of the ASCETE (Advanced Simulation of Coupled Earthquake and Tsunami Events) project, which aims to better understand the generation of tsunami events. In this course, a simulation framework has been developed which couples physics-based rupture generation with hydrodynamic tsunami propagation and inundation.

  15. Building Damage and Business Continuity Management in the Event of Natural Hazards: Case Study of the 2004 Tsunami in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Sugiura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Sumatra Earthquake and Indian Ocean Tsunami event on the 26 December 2004 has provided a unique and valuable opportunity to evaluate the performance of various structures, facilities and lifeline systems during the tsunami wave attacks. There are especially meaningful observations concerning the structural changes due to the tsunami forces, which open up a wide area of research to develop the mitigation procedure. The business restoration process of business companies in terms of buildings, facilities and lifelines have shown greater research interest. In this study, we investigated the restoration process of business sectors in East and South coastal region in Sri Lanka after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami. A field survey was conducted in East and South coast of Sri Lanka, in order to study the affecting parameters to damage assessment in the restoration process of the business companies. The results of the questionnaire-based field survey are then compared with the statistical analysis results. Finally, the factors affecting the restoration process after the tsunami are identified. As a main conclusion, financial support could be the most important reason for delays in restoration. Moreover, it has been observed that the tsunami inundation level of higher than one meter may have had more effect concerning the damage to the structures and requires additional time for restoration than other areas.

  16. ALGERIA’S VULNERABILITY TO TSUNAMIS FROM NEAR-FIELD SEISMIC SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALGERIA’S VULNERABILITY TO TSUNAMIS FROM NEAR-FIELD SEISMIC SOURCES

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the effects of tsunami damage relative to earthquake damage may help to identify critical coastal zone structures and exposed populations for near field tsunami risk. In this work, we propose to define the ratio between tsunami intensity and earthquake intensity as a measure of near field tsunami vulnerability for coastal communities. This parameter is estimated for 13 tsunami events reported in North Algeria from the 14th century to present. Although the results show that there are no tsunamis that are unusually large for the size of the earthquake that generated them, coastal communities remain at risk from these periodic hazards.We also use tsunami modelling and published information to estimate maximum inundation in Northern Algeria. Then, we generate a flooding map, which reveals the communities, buildings and infrastructure that are exposed to the tsunami hazard. This map shows that the majority of the people in Algiers and Oran live above 5 meters in elevation, and are hence not exposed to the hazard. Despite this, the coastline remains vulnerable to tsunami as earthquakes can damage poorly constructed buildings and other infrastructure, weakening it prior to the arrival of the tsunami. To increase resilience in the coastal zone, tsunami and earthquake awareness, education and preparedness must become a priority in the context of regional early warning programs.

  17. South American Tsunamis in Lyttelton Harbor, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrero, Jose C.; Goring, Derek G.

    2015-03-01

    At 2347 UTC on April 1, 2014 (12:47 pm April 2, 2014 NZDT) an earthquake with a moment magnitude of 8.2 occurred offshore of Iquique in northern Chile. The temblor generated a tsunami that was observed locally and recorded on tide gauges and deep ocean tsunameters close to the source region. While real time modeling based on inverted tsunameter data and finite fault solutions of the earthquake rupture suggested that a damaging far-field tsunami was not expected (and later confirmed), this event nevertheless reminded us of the threat posed to New Zealand by tsunami generated along the west coast of South America and from the Peru/Chile border region in particular. In this paper we quantitatively assess the tsunami hazard at Lyttelton Harbor from South American tsunamis through a review of historical accounts, numerical modeling of past events and analysis of water level records. A sensitivity study for tsunamis generated along the length of the South American Subduction Zone is used to illustrate which section of the subduction zone would generate the strongest response at Lyttelton while deterministic scenario modeling of significant historical South American tsunamis (i.e. 1868, 1877 and 1960) provide a quantitative estimate of the expected effects from possible future great earthquakes along the coast of South America.

  18. A New Proposal for Tsunami Hazard Map Explicitly Indicating Uncertainty of Tsunami Hazard Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutani, Y.; Suppasri, A.; Imamura, F.

    2014-12-01

    The tsunami caused by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake mainly inundated the Tohoku coastal areas, most of which exceeded inundation area specified in tsunami hazard maps. A report by the Japanese government for the IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety clearly stated that there is difficulty of quantitatively assessing natural disaster risk associated with a rare event such as tsunami because of uncertainty, and sufficient efforts have not been made so far to enhance the public confidence in the risk assessment by explicitly indicating the uncertinty of the assessment. Based on the statement, we propose a new method for explicitly indicating the uncertainty of tsunami hazard assessment in the tsunami hazard map. Firstly, we estimated stochastic wave height along the Tohoku coastal areas using a method for probabilistic tsuami hazard assessment in order to quantitatively assess the uncertainty of coastal wave heights. We selected eleven earthquake-generic areas along the Japan trench as the areas that could generate tsunamis. Secondly, in order to calculate tsunami inundation area due to the average coastal wave height for one return period, we identified the earthquake fault that generate the target wave height and conducted numerical simulation using non-linear long-wave equations with inputting their fault parameters. On the other hand, in order to calculate tsunami inundation area due to fractile coastal wave height that consider the uncertainty of the assessment, we generated a hypothetical earthquake fault that the dislocation of which was uniformly increased or decreased by multiplying a constant number according to the change of each fractile wave height, and conducted numerical simulation in the same way. As a result, there were big differences among tsunami inudation areas due to 0.05 fractile, simple average and 0.95 fractile wave height at coastal points even though the assumed wave height generate by one target return period. A preliminary assessment of tsunami hazard includes large uncertainty. Therefore, we expected that what we quantitatively assessed how much the tsunami hazard assessment includes the uncertaity and clearly show the uncertainty in the tsunami hazard map leads to a proper undrstainding of users such as regional regidents who utilize the tsunami hazard maps.

  19. Numerical simulation of a tsunami event during the 1996 volcanic eruption in Karymskoye lake, Kamchatka, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Torsvik

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Karymskoye caldera lake is a nearly circular body of water with a diameter of approximately 4 km and a depth of up to 60 m. The sublacustrine, Surtseyan-type eruption in the lake on 2–3 January 1996 included a series of underwater explosions. A field survey conducted the following summer showed signs of tsunami wave runup around the entire coastline of the lake, with a maximum of 29 m runup at the north shore near the source of the eruption, and 2–5 m runup at locations on the east and south shore far away from the source.

    The tsunami has been simulated using the numerical long wave model COULWAVE, with input from reconstructed realistic pre-eruption bathymetry. The tsunami source was chosen as suggested by Le Mehaute (1971 and Mirchina and Pelinovsky (1988. The initial wave was prescribed by a parabolic shape depression with a radius of R=200 m, and a height of 23 m at the rim of the parabola. Simulations were conducted to show principle directions for wave propagation, wave speed and arrival time for the leading wave group at the shore, and the distribution of wave height throughout the lake. Estimated result for wave runup are of the same order of magnitude as field measurements, except near the source of the eruption and at a few locations where analysis show significant wave breaking.

  20. The 2010 Mw 7.8 Mentawai earthquake: Very shallow source of a rare tsunami earthquake determined from tsunami field survey and near-field GPS data

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Emma M.; Elosegui, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    The M w 7.8 October 2010 Mentawai, Indonesia, earthquake was a >tsunami earthquake,> a rare type of earthquake that generates a tsunami much larger than expected based on the seismic magnitude. It produced a locally devastating tsunami, with runup commonly in excess of 6m. We examine this event using a combination of high-rate GPS data, from instruments located on the nearby islands, and a tsunami field survey. The GPS displacement time series are deficient in high-frequency energy, and show ...

  1. Boulder Deposits on the Southern Spanish Atlantic Coast: Possible Evidence for the 1755 AD Lisbon Tsunami?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Kelletat

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Field evidence of visible tsunami impacts in Europe is scarce. This research focused on an analysis of large littoral debris and accompanying geomorphic features and their rela- tionship to a tsunami event at Cabo de Trafalgar, located on the southern Spanish Atlantic coast. Relative dating of weathering features as well as minor bioconstructive forms in the littoral zone suggest the Lisbon tsunami of 1755 AD as the event responsible for the large deposits described. This tsunami had run up heights of more than 19 m and was generated at the Gorringe Bank, located 500 km west off the Cape. Tsunami deposits at Cabo de Tra- falgar are the first boulder deposits identified on the southern Spanish Atlantic coast and are located approximately 250 km southeast of the Algarve coast (Portugal, where other geo- morphic evidence for the Lisbon tsunami has been reported.

  2. Optical dating of clastic deposits generated by an extreme marine coastal flood: The 1755 tsunami deposits in the Algarve (Portugal)

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, P.

    2010-01-01

    Identification of past tsunamis is important for risk assessment and management of coastal areas. Obtaining accurate and precise ages of sediments originating from such extreme marine coastal floods is crucial for a reliable estimation of the recurrence interval of these often devastating events. We present here the results of quartz optical dating and 14C dating of two sites (Boca do Rio and Martinhal) on the Algarve coast (southern Portugal). These sites contain deposits of the ...

  3. NUMERICAL MODEL STUDY OF TSUNAMI GENERATED BY POTENTIAL EARTHQUAKE WITHIN THE KOMANDORSKY SEISMIC GAP IN THE WESTERN ALEUTIAN ISLAND ARC

    OpenAIRE

    Kh Mazova, R.; Baranov, B. V.; Lobkovsky, L. I.; Baranova, N. A.; Dozorova, K. A.; Chaykina, O. N.

    2013-01-01

    The Komandorsky seismic gap has distinctive boundaries and a length of 650 km. Its period of “seismic silence” comes close to the maximum recurrence interval for great earthquakes in the Aleutian Island Arc - the stress concentration here probably having reached the critical value. So, estimation of possible earthquake and tsunami characteristics within this gap becomes a significant problem. The closest analog of a similar gap is the area where the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman catastrophic event...

  4. Tsunami Strike! Pacific Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    COMET

    2011-08-23

    Tsunami Strike! Pacific Edition is a scenario-based learning experience for kids from middle school through high school (approximate ages 13-17). The scenario tells the story of four main characters at different locations in the Pacific basin who are each impacted by a major tsunami that originates in Alaska’s Aleutian Islands. Over the course of the story, learners not only view the unfolding events and how each of the characters responds, but also observe how warning scientists analyze and communicate the tsunami threat. Fourteen short lessons provide interactive instruction focused on the science, safety, and history of tsunamis.

  5. Pacific Tsunami Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Pacific Tsunami Museum is dedicated to promoting public education about tsunamis for citizens of Hawaii and the Pacific Region, as well as preserving the social and cultural history of Hawaii. Materials available at the museum's site include a listing of exhibits, a link to a webcam overlooking Hilo Bay, and event announcements. There is also a listing of programs sponsored by the museum, including class visits, a tsunami observer program and evacuation notification team, and a walking tour of historical tsunami sites. The students' page features games and puzzles, a frequently-asked-questions feature, links to related websites, and an online collection of tsunami warning signs. Other materials include a collection of tsunami-related art, interviews with survivors, and an archive of photographs.

  6. Detection of very long period seismic signals and acoustic gravity waves generated by large tsunamis

    OpenAIRE

    Raveloson, Andriamiranto

    2011-01-01

    Tsunamis sind Naturereignisse, die zu den verheerendsten weltweiten Katastrophen gehören, obwohl sie relativ selten auftreten. Da Tsunamis in letzter Zeit zahlreiche Opfer und schwere Zerstörungen in grossen Küstenregionen verursacht haben, sind sie Ziel intensivierter Forschungen geworden. Die Grundlage zur Reduzierung von Tsunamiopfern ist ein kontinuierliches Monitoring der Seismizität. Da eine Erdbebenvorhersage nicht möglich ist, sind Tsunamifrühwarnungen das primäre Ziel der Forschungen...

  7. CHARYBDIS: A Black Hole Event Generator

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, C M; Webber, Bryan R

    2003-01-01

    CHARYBDIS is an event generator which simulates the production and decay of miniature black holes at hadronic colliders as might be possible in certain extra dimension models. It interfaces via the Les Houches accord to general purpose Monte Carlo programs like HERWIG and PYTHIA which then perform the parton evolution and hadronization. The event generator includes the extra-dimensional `grey-body' effects as well as the change in the temperature of the black hole as the decay progresses. Various options for modelling the Planck-scale terminal decay are provided.

  8. CHARYBDIS: a black hole event generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHARYBDIS is an event generator which simulates the production and decay of miniature black holes at hadronic colliders as might be possible in certain extra dimension models. It interfaces via the Les Houches accord to general purpose Monte Carlo programs like HERWIG and PYTHIA which then perform the parton evolution and hadronization. The event generator includes the extra-dimensional 'grey-body' effects as well as the change in the temperature of the black hole as the decay progresses. Various options for modelling the Planck-scale terminal decay are provided. (author)

  9. On the moroccan tsunami catalogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Kaabouben

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A primary tool for regional tsunami hazard assessment is a reliable historical and instrumental catalogue of events. Morocco by its geographical situation, with two marine sides, stretching along the Atlantic coast to the west and along the Mediterranean coast to the north, is the country of Western Africa most exposed to the risk of tsunamis. Previous information on tsunami events affecting Morocco are included in the Iberian and/or the Mediterranean lists of tsunami events, as it is the case of the European GITEC Tsunami Catalogue, but there is a need to organize this information in a dataset and to assess the likelihood of claimed historical tsunamis in Morocco. Due to the fact that Moroccan sources are scarce, this compilation rely on historical documentation from neighbouring countries (Portugal and Spain and so the compatibility between the new tsunami catalogue presented here and those that correspond to the same source areas is also discussed.

  10. Numerical simulation of a tsunami event during the 1996 volcanic eruption in Karymskoye lake, Kamchatka, Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Torsvik, T; Paris, R.; Didenkulova, I.; Pelinovsky, E.; Belousov, A; Belousova, M.

    2010-01-01

    Karymskoye caldera lake is a nearly circular body of water with a diameter of approximately 4 km and a depth of up to 60 m. The sublacustrine, Surtseyan-type eruption in the lake on 2–3 January 1996 included a series of underwater explosions. A field survey conducted the following summer showed signs of tsunami wave runup around the entire coastline of the lake, with a maximum of 29 m runup at the north shore near the source of the eruption, and 2–5 m runup at locations on the east and south ...

  11. SAGE CALCULATIONS OF THE TSUNAMI THREAT FROM LA PALMA

    OpenAIRE

    Galen Gisler; Robert Weaver; Michael L. Gittings

    2006-01-01

    With the LANL multiphysics hydrocode SAGE, we have performed several two-dimensional calculations and one three-dimensional calculation using the full Navier-Stokes equations, of a hypothetical landslide resembling the event posited by Ward and Day (2001), a lateral flank collapse of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano on La Palma that would produce a tsunami. The SAGE code has previously been used to model the Lituya Bay landslide-generated tsunami (Mader & Gittings, 2002), and has also been used to ex...

  12. Does MoSE cope with inland tsunamis hazard?

    CERN Document Server

    Panza, Giuliano Francesco; Romanelli, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In this work we use morphostructural zonation and pattern recognition techniques to identify a potential seismic source located inland very near Venice, and then we evaluate how a tsunami wave generated from this source can affect the MoSE gates if they are standing up (closed) during the tsunami event. From our simulation we get both peaks and troughs as first arrivals: the behavior of the barriers in these two situations could be a very important design matter.

  13. Dispersion of tsunamis: does it really matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Glimsdal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the effect of dispersion in the field of tsunami modeling. Frequency dispersion in the linear long-wave limit is first briefly discussed from a theoretical point of view. A single parameter, denoted as "dispersion time", for the integrated effect of frequency dispersion is identified. This parameter depends on the wavelength, the water depth during propagation, and the propagation distance or time. Also the role of long-time asymptotes is discussed in this context. The wave generation by the two main tsunami sources, namely earthquakes and landslides, are briefly discussed with formulas for the surface response to the bottom sources. Dispersive effects are then exemplified through a semi-idealized study of a moderate-strength inverse thrust fault. Emphasis is put on the directivity, the role of the "dispersion time", the significance of the Boussinesq model employed (dispersive effect, and the effects of the transfer from bottom sources to initial surface elevation. Finally, the experience from a series of case studies, including earthquake- and landslide-generated tsunamis, is presented. The examples are taken from both historical (e.g. the 2011 Japan tsunami and the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and potential tsunamis (e.g. the tsunami after the potential La Palma volcanic flank collapse. Attention is mainly given to the role of dispersion during propagation in the deep ocean and the way the accumulation of this effect relates to the "dispersion time". It turns out that this parameter is useful as a first indication as to when frequency dispersion is important, even though ambiguity with respect to the definition of the wavelength may be a problem for complex cases. Tsunamis from most landslides and moderate earthquakes tend to display dispersive behavior, at least in some directions. On the other hand, for the mega events of the last decade dispersion during deep water propagation is mostly noticeable for transoceanic propagation.

  14. EVENT GENERATOR FOR RHIC SPIN PHYSICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume archives the reports from the RIKEN BNL Research Center workshop on ''Event Generator for RHIC Spin Physics II'' held during the week March 15, 1999 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It was the second meeting on the subject following a first one in last September. This workshop has been initiated to establish a firm collaboration between theorists and experimentalists involved in RHIC spin physics with the aim of developing a reliable, high-precision event generator for RHIC spin physics. Needless to say, adequate event generators are indispensable tools for high energy physics programs in general, especially in the process of: planning the experimental programs; developing algorithms to extract the physics signals of interest; estimating the background in the extracted results, and connecting the final particle kinematics to the fundamental i.e. partonic level processes. Since RHIC is the first polarized collider, dedicated efforts are required to obtain a full-fledged event generator which describes spin dependent reactions in great detail

  15. THE TSUNAMI HISTORY OF GUAM: 1849-1993

    OpenAIRE

    Lander, James F.; Whiteside, Lowell S.; Paul Hattori

    2002-01-01

    The great (Mw 8.1) tsunamigenic earthquake of August 8, 1993, about 50 km to the east of Guam, has created renewed interest in the tsunami hazard for the island of Guam. We examine this hazard from two perspectives--historical and mechanistic. Guam has had only three tsunamis causing damage at more than one location--in 1849, 1892, and in 1993, and only two to six other locally-generated tsunamis which were observed on the island in the past 200 years. Five of these six events have low validi...

  16. Survive That Tsunami!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

    Students use a table-top-sized tsunami generator to observe the formation and devastation of a tsunami. They see how a tsunami moves across the ocean and what happens when it reaches the continental shelf. Students make villages of model houses and buildings to test how different material types are impacted by the huge waves. They further discuss how engineers design buildings to survive tsunamis. Much of this activity setup is the same as for the Mini-Landscape activity in Lesson 4 of the Natural Disasters unit.

  17. Performance of coastal sea-defense infrastructure at El Jadida (Morocco against tsunami threat: lessons learned from the Japanese 11 March 2011 tsunami

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Omira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to investigate the effectiveness of sea-defense structures in preventing/reducing the tsunami overtopping as well as evaluating the resulting tsunami impact at El Jadida, Morocco. Different tsunami wave conditions are generated by considering various earthquake scenarios of magnitudes ranging from Mw = 8.0 to Mw = 8.6. These scenarios represent the main active earthquake faults in the SW Iberia margin and are consistent with two past events that generated tsunamis along the Atlantic coast of Morocco. The behaviour of incident tsunami waves when interacting with coastal infrastructures is analysed on the basis of numerical simulations of near-shore tsunami waves' propagation. Tsunami impact at the affected site is assessed through computing inundation and current velocity using a high-resolution digital terrain model that incorporates bathymetric, topographic and coastal structures data. Results, in terms of near-shore tsunami propagation snapshots, waves' interaction with coastal barriers, and spatial distributions of flow depths and speeds, are presented and discussed in light of what was observed during the 2011 Tohoku-oki tsunami. Predicted results show different levels of impact that different tsunami wave conditions could generate in the region. Existing coastal barriers around the El Jadida harbour succeeded in reflecting relatively small waves generated by some scenarios, but failed in preventing the overtopping caused by waves from others. Considering the scenario highly impacting the El Jadida coast, significant inundations are computed at the sandy beach and unprotected areas. The modelled dramatic tsunami impact in the region shows the need for additional tsunami standards not only for sea-defense structures but also for the coastal dwellings and houses to provide potential in-place evacuation.

  18. Interdisciplinary approach for Tsunami Hazard Mitigation in Algeria (West Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, L. A.; Cisternas, A.; Vigneresse, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    Numerous tsunamis occurred in the West Mediterranean with magnitudes ranging from m=-1 to m=2 (Imamura-Iida scale). In Algeria, tsunamis are reported from the 14th century to 2003. Northern Algeria is located at the border between the African and the Eurasian plate. Destructive earthquakes with magnitude greater than 6.7 occurred 3 times in the last century. The North Algeria western region is characterized by the Murdjadjo anticline. A destructive earthquake hit Oran city on October 1790 (Intensity: X, West of Algeria). A tsunami was triggered in the Alboran sea. The Spanish and North Africa coasts were flooded. Run-up’s of 2 meters in height are reported in historical documents (Lopez Marinas and Salord, 1990). Here, the 1790 Alboran tsunami is studied from a modelling approach. The tsunami source is determined from the Okada equations and the tsunami propagation is estimated from the SWAN code (Mader, 2004). Results show that active thrust faulting related to the Murdjadjo structure is responsible for the tsunami. In the central part of Algeria, the Algiers city (capital of Algeria) was the location of destructive earthquakes (Intensity: X) that were followed by tsunamis in 1365 and in 1773. Flooding and run-up’s of 2 meters in height are reported in historical documents for the 1365 event. The central part of Algeria is the site of the Sahel anticline. A tsunami modelling is also performed considering the Sahel fault system as a potential tsunami source. Results show that it takes less than 15 minutes for the tsunami waves to reach the Spanish coast. Run-up’s are estimated lower than 2 meters in height. Discrepancies are attributed to the resolution of the bathymetry and the limits of the modelling. In the eastern region, historical reports also reveal run-up’s up to 5 meters in height after a tsunami triggered by a destructive earthquake in 1856 in Jijel city (intensity: VIII). From tsunami catalogs, seismic and tsunami data are plotted using a tsunami vulnerability parameter. The vulnerability index is estimated from the tsunami intensity and the seismic intensity using the Papadopoulos and the EMS scale. Results show that in Algeria, tsunami damages are minor relative to seismic damages. Since the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman tsunami, intergovernmental coordinated groups are working on an Indian and a Mediterranean tsunami alert system. To reduce vulnerability and increase resilience, it is very important to implement an efficiency warning system and a communication policy for fast urbanized coastal cities. In that context, lessons from the pacific case study are of major interest. Chile is marked by a very high seismic and tsunami hazard. The Iquique area is a threaten zone for a potential earthquake of magnitude greater than 8 and a local tsunami that could generate run-up’s up to 20 meters in height. In addition to the Pacific Tsunami Warning centre based in Hawaii, the Chile has elaborated a local tsunami warning centre. The Chilean case study is presented in discussion to highlight some lessons that may serve as an example for fast urbanized coastal cities that have to face local tsunamis.

  19. Response of Coastal Structures against Earthquake Forces Considering Soil-Structure Interaction and Tsunami Run-Up Forces

    OpenAIRE

    Prof.P.Kodanda Ramarao,; Dr.U.Ranga Raju,; Dr.K.Rama Mohan Rao; Dr.S.R.K.Reddy

    2013-01-01

    The catastrophic tsunamis generated by the great Indonesia earthquake triggered on December 26th, 2004, warned the coastal community on preparedness and constructing safe structures to resist against such events. Earthquake occurs suddenly without warning and bulk of destruction takes place within a short period of time. Similarly, when tsunami strikes, there will be a tremendous loss and damage in coastal regions. Apart from having a sound warning system in case of tsunamis, it is necessary ...

  20. Tsunamis from nature to physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helal, M.A. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, University of Cairo, Giza, Cairo (Egypt)], E-mail: mahelal@yahoo.com; Mehanna, M.S. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, University of Cairo, Giza, Cairo (Egypt)

    2008-05-15

    Tsunamis are gravity waves that propagate near the ocean surface. They belong to the same family as common sea waves that we enjoy at the beach; however, tsunamis are distinct in their mode of generation and in their characteristic period, wavelength, and velocity. The type of tsunamis that induce widespread damage number about one or two per decade. Thus 'killer tsunamis' although fearful, are a relatively rare phenomenon.

  1. Tsunamis from nature to physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunamis are gravity waves that propagate near the ocean surface. They belong to the same family as common sea waves that we enjoy at the beach; however, tsunamis are distinct in their mode of generation and in their characteristic period, wavelength, and velocity. The type of tsunamis that induce widespread damage number about one or two per decade. Thus 'killer tsunamis' although fearful, are a relatively rare phenomenon

  2. Comparison of the 2010 and 2007 Solomon Island Tsunamis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalligeris, N.; Fritz, H.; Newman, A. V.; Feng, L.; Lifton, Z. M.; Wei, Y.; Titov, V. V.; Uslu, B. U.

    2010-12-01

    The 3 January 2010 Mw 7.1 earthquake off Rendova and Tetepare Islands, Western Province, Solomon Islands, generated surprisingly large tsunami waves, completely destroying Retavo village at Rendova Island’s south shore, located approximately 15 km from the trench. A reconnaissance team was deployed within a week, measuring local tsunami heights, maximum tsunami runup/inundation, coastal subsidence, co-seismic offset and afterslip, and interviewed eyewitnesses per established methods. This event occurred three years after the 1 April 2007 Mw 8.1 megathrust earthquake that generated a wide-spread tsunami across the Western Province Islands, causing 52 human casualties (Fritz and Kalligeris 2008). Although much smaller in magnitude than the 2007 event (below the assumed tsunamigenic magnitude threshold of ~Mw 7.5), the 2010 event produced a larger localized flow depth, and only moderately smaller runup, reaching a maximum value of 7 m on the southern shore of Rendova Isl. Observations of widespread subsidence on the south coasts of Rendova and Tetepare Islands ruled out the most probable shallow-dipping megathrust model of earthquake rupture. Instead, a high-angle conjugate intraslab thrust within the down going plate is preferred, agreeing with the seismically defined moment tensor, the observed coseismic subsidence, and enhanced tsunami excitation. The two events showed that SI population is very aware of its vulnerability to tsunamis, which we attribute to ancestral tsunami knowledge. Similar observations were made in Chile this year, where residents in most areas self-evacuated, significantly containing human casualties. We will compare the two Solomon Island events, in terms of our field findings, the source deformation models that best fit the observations, and present preliminary tsunami modeling results. Inundation in Tapurai village, Simbo Island in 2007 (left), and in Retavo village, Rendova Island in 2010 (right).

  3. NOAA/WEST COAST AND ALASKA TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER PACIFIC OCEAN RESPONSE CRITERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Rogers

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available New West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC response criteria for earthquakes occurring in the Pacific basin are presented. Initial warning decisions are based on earthquake location, magnitude, depth, and - dependent on magnitude - either distance from source or pre- computed threat estimates generated from tsunami models. The new criteria will help limit the geographical extent of warnings and advisories to threatened regions, and complement the new operational tsunami product suite.Changes to the previous criteria include: adding hypocentral depth dependence, reducing geographical warning extent for the lower magnitude ranges, setting special criteria for areas not well-connected to the open ocean, basing warning extent on pre-computed threat levels versus tsunami travel time for very large events, including the new advisory product, using the advisory product for far-offshore events in the lower magnitude ranges, and specifying distances from the coast for on-shore events which may be tsunamigenic.This report sets a baseline for response criteria used by the WCATWC considering its processing and observational data capabilities as well as its organizational requirements. Criteria are set for tsunamis generated by earthquakes, which are by far the main cause of tsunami generation (either directly through sea floor displacement or indirectly by triggering of slumps. As further research and development provides better tsunami source definition, observational data streams, and improved analysis tools, the criteria will continue to adjust. Future lines of research and development capable of providing operational tsunami warning centers with better tools are discussed.

  4. Tsunami and Earthquake Research at the USGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This portal provides access to information on United States Geological Survey (USGS) research and resources on tsunamis and earthquakes. Materials include news and events in USGS tsunami research, an overview of the program, and basic information on the life of a tsunami. There are also links to individual research projects. The site also features an extensive set of tsunami animations of real and hypothetical events, and links to VRML models of real and hypothetical events.

  5. The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami: Description of the event and estimation of length of the tsunami source region based on data from Indian tide gauge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, I.; Neetu, S.; Shankar, D.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Shetye, S.R.; Sundar, D.

    2006-01-01

    . All these tide gauges are to the west of the earthquake zone and the detided sea levels show first a rise in sea level with the arrival of the tsunami, and then a sharp decrease. Spectral and wavelet analysis of the residuals shows that the maximum...

  6. Simulation of the trans-oceanic tsunami propagation due to the 1883 Krakatau volcanic eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Choi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The 1883 Krakatau volcanic eruption has generated a destructive tsunami higher than 40 m on the Indonesian coast where more than 36 000 lives were lost. Sea level oscillations related with this event have been reported on significant distances from the source in the Indian, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Evidence of many manifestations of the Krakatau tsunami was a subject of the intense discussion, and it was suggested that some of them are not related with the direct propagation of the tsunami waves from the Krakatau volcanic eruption. Present paper analyzes the hydrodynamic part of the Krakatau event in details. The worldwide propagation of the tsunami waves generated by the Krakatau volcanic eruption is studied numerically using two conventional models: ray tracing method and two-dimensional linear shallow-water model. The results of the numerical simulations are compared with available data of the tsunami registration.

  7. Status of Monte-Carlo Event Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeche, Stefan; /SLAC

    2011-08-11

    Recent progress on general-purpose Monte-Carlo event generators is reviewed with emphasis on the simulation of hard QCD processes and subsequent parton cascades. Describing full final states of high-energy particle collisions in contemporary experiments is an intricate task. Hundreds of particles are typically produced, and the reactions involve both large and small momentum transfer. The high-dimensional phase space makes an exact solution of the problem impossible. Instead, one typically resorts to regarding events as factorized into different steps, ordered descending in the mass scales or invariant momentum transfers which are involved. In this picture, a hard interaction, described through fixed-order perturbation theory, is followed by multiple Bremsstrahlung emissions off initial- and final-state and, finally, by the hadronization process, which binds QCD partons into color-neutral hadrons. Each of these steps can be treated independently, which is the basic concept inherent to general-purpose event generators. Their development is nowadays often focused on an improved description of radiative corrections to hard processes through perturbative QCD. In this context, the concept of jets is introduced, which allows to relate sprays of hadronic particles in detectors to the partons in perturbation theory. In this talk, we briefly review recent progress on perturbative QCD in event generation. The main focus lies on the general-purpose Monte-Carlo programs HERWIG, PYTHIA and SHERPA, which will be the workhorses for LHC phenomenology. A detailed description of the physics models included in these generators can be found in [8]. We also discuss matrix-element generators, which provide the parton-level input for general-purpose Monte Carlo.

  8. Modeling the transport and accumulation floating debris generated by the 11 March 2011 Tohoku tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Laurent C-M; Borrero, Jose C

    2013-01-15

    A global ocean circulation model is coupled to a particle-tracking model to simulate the transport of floating debris washed into the North Pacific Ocean by the Tohoku tsunami. A release scenario for the tsunami debris is based on coastal population and measured tsunami runup. Archived 2011/2012 hindcast current data is used to model the transport of debris since the tsunami, while data from 2008 to 2012 is used to investigate the distribution of debris on timescales up to 4years. The vast amount of debris pushed into ocean likely represents thousands of years worth of 'normal' litter flux from Japan's urbanized coastline. This is important since a significant fraction of the debris will be comprised of plastics, some of which will degrade into tiny particles and be consumed by marine organisms, thereby allowing adsorbed organic pollutants to enter our food supply in quantities much higher than present. PMID:23219397

  9. Post Fukushima tsunami simulations for Malaysian coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hock Lye; Teh, Su Yean; Abas, Mohd Rosaidi Che

    2014-10-01

    The recent recurrences of mega tsunamis in the Asian region have rekindled concern regarding potential tsunamis that could inflict severe damage to affected coastal facilities and communities. The 11 March 2011 Fukushima tsunami that crippled nuclear power plants in Northern Japan has further raised the level of caution. The recent discovery of petroleum reserves in the coastal water surrounding Malaysia further ignites the concern regarding tsunami hazards to petroleum facilities located along affected coasts. Working in a group, federal government agencies seek to understand the dynamics of tsunami and their impacts under the coordination of the Malaysian National Centre for Tsunami Research, Malaysian Meteorological Department. Knowledge regarding the generation, propagation and runup of tsunami would provide the scientific basis to address safety issues. An in-house tsunami simulation models known as TUNA has been developed by the authors to assess tsunami hazards along affected beaches so that mitigation measures could be put in place. Capacity building on tsunami simulation plays a critical role in the development of tsunami resilience. This paper aims to first provide a simple introduction to tsunami simulation towards the achievement of tsunami simulation capacity building. The paper will also present several scenarios of tsunami dangers along affected Malaysia coastal regions via TUNA simulations to highlight tsunami threats. The choice of tsunami generation parameters reflects the concern following the Fukushima tsunami.

  10. Post Fukushima tsunami simulations for Malaysian coasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent recurrences of mega tsunamis in the Asian region have rekindled concern regarding potential tsunamis that could inflict severe damage to affected coastal facilities and communities. The 11 March 2011 Fukushima tsunami that crippled nuclear power plants in Northern Japan has further raised the level of caution. The recent discovery of petroleum reserves in the coastal water surrounding Malaysia further ignites the concern regarding tsunami hazards to petroleum facilities located along affected coasts. Working in a group, federal government agencies seek to understand the dynamics of tsunami and their impacts under the coordination of the Malaysian National Centre for Tsunami Research, Malaysian Meteorological Department. Knowledge regarding the generation, propagation and runup of tsunami would provide the scientific basis to address safety issues. An in-house tsunami simulation models known as TUNA has been developed by the authors to assess tsunami hazards along affected beaches so that mitigation measures could be put in place. Capacity building on tsunami simulation plays a critical role in the development of tsunami resilience. This paper aims to first provide a simple introduction to tsunami simulation towards the achievement of tsunami simulation capacity building. The paper will also present several scenarios of tsunami dangers along affected Malaysia coastal regions via TUNA simulations to highlight tsunami threats. The choice of tsunami generation parameters reflects the concern following the Fukushima tsunami

  11. Post Fukushima tsunami simulations for Malaysian coasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Hock Lye, E-mail: kohhl@ucsiuniversity.edu.my [Office of Deputy Vice Chancellor for Research and Post Graduate Studies, UCSI University, Jalan Menara Gading, 56000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Teh, Su Yean, E-mail: syteh@usm.my [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Abas, Mohd Rosaidi Che [Malaysian Meteorological Department, MOSTI, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    The recent recurrences of mega tsunamis in the Asian region have rekindled concern regarding potential tsunamis that could inflict severe damage to affected coastal facilities and communities. The 11 March 2011 Fukushima tsunami that crippled nuclear power plants in Northern Japan has further raised the level of caution. The recent discovery of petroleum reserves in the coastal water surrounding Malaysia further ignites the concern regarding tsunami hazards to petroleum facilities located along affected coasts. Working in a group, federal government agencies seek to understand the dynamics of tsunami and their impacts under the coordination of the Malaysian National Centre for Tsunami Research, Malaysian Meteorological Department. Knowledge regarding the generation, propagation and runup of tsunami would provide the scientific basis to address safety issues. An in-house tsunami simulation models known as TUNA has been developed by the authors to assess tsunami hazards along affected beaches so that mitigation measures could be put in place. Capacity building on tsunami simulation plays a critical role in the development of tsunami resilience. This paper aims to first provide a simple introduction to tsunami simulation towards the achievement of tsunami simulation capacity building. The paper will also present several scenarios of tsunami dangers along affected Malaysia coastal regions via TUNA simulations to highlight tsunami threats. The choice of tsunami generation parameters reflects the concern following the Fukushima tsunami.

  12. Developing Tsunami fragility curves using remote sensing and survey data of the 2010 Chilean Tsunami in Dichato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available On 27 February 2010, a megathrust earthquake of Mw = 8.8 generated a destructive tsunami in Chile. It struck not only Chilean coast but propagated all the way to Japan. After the event occurred, the post-tsunami survey team was assembled, funded by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST, to survey the area severely affected by the tsunami. The tsunami damaged and destroyed numerous houses, especially in the town of Dichato. In order to estimate the structural fragility against tsunami hazard in this area, tsunami fragility curves were developed. Surveyed data of inundation depth and visual inspection of satellite images of Dichato were used to classify the damage to housing. A practical method suitable when there are limitations on available data for numerical simulation or damage evaluation from surveys is presented here. This study is the first application of tsunami fragility curves on the South American Pacific coast and it might be of practical use for communities with similar characteristics along the west Pacific coast. The proposed curve suggests that structures in Dichato will be severely damaged – with a 68% probability – already at 2 m tsunami inundation depth.

  13. Field survey of the 1 April 2014 Iquique tsunami along the coasts of Chile and Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, M.; Fritz, H. M.

    2014-12-01

    On 1 April, 2014 a magnitude Mw 8.2 earthquake occurred off the coast of northern Chile less than 100 km NW of Iquique within a region of historic quiescence termed the northern Chile seismic gap. The ensuing tsunami inundation caused mostly minor damage centered in Iquique and neighbouring stretches of coastline. Fortunately, ancestral knowledge from the past 1868 and 1877 tsunamis in the region along with the recent 2010 Maule tsunami, as well as tsunami education and evacuation exercises prompted most coastal residents to spontaneously evacuate to high ground after the earthquake. There were no tsunami victims, while a handful of fatalities were associated to the earthquake and the tsunami evacuation. The local scientist deployed in the morning hours to start the tsunami survey in Iquique on the day after the earthquake. The international scientist joined the local effort from April 6 to 11. The international tsunami survey team (ITST) documented flow depths, runup heights, inundation distances, sediment deposition, damage patterns, performance of the navigation infrastructure and impact on the natural environment. The ITST covered a 700 km stretch of coastline from the Mejillones Peninsula (23.5° S) north of Antofagasta in Chile up to Vila Vila (18.1° S) in southern Peru. We surveyed 30 locations with differential GPS and laser range finders. The tsunami impact peaked in the vicinity of Iquique exceeding 4 m in tsunami height. A significant variation in tsunami impact was observed along the coastlines of Chile and Peru both at local and regional scales. The tsunami occurred in the evening hours limiting the availability of eyewitness video footages. Observations from the 2014 Chile tsunami are compared against the 1868, 1877 and 2010 Chile tsunamis. Given the magnitude of the 1 April 2014 earthquake the tsunami could have been significantly larger. However the absence of a massive tsunami may mislead residents in the future to believe another minor tsunami may be generated after an earthquake of similar magnitude. Hence the April fool's day event poses significant challenges to community-based education. The team interviewed numerous eyewitnesses and educated residents about tsunami hazards since awareness programs are essential to save lives in locales at risk from locally generated tsunamis.

  14. One year after the 1 April 2014 Iquique tsunami field survey along the coasts of Chile and Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, Marcelo; Fritz, Hermann M.

    2015-04-01

    One year ago on the evening of 1 April, 2014 a magnitude Mw 8.2 earthquake occurred off the coast of northern Chile off the coast of Pisagua within a region of historic quiescence termed the northern Chile seismic gap. The ensuing tsunami inundation caused mostly minor damage centered in Iquique and neighbouring stretches of coastline. Fortunately, ancestral knowledge from the past 1868 and 1877 tsunamis in the region along with the recent 2010 Maule tsunami, as well as tsunami education and evacuation exercises prompted most coastal residents to spontaneously evacuate to high ground after the earthquake. There were no tsunami victims; while a handful of fatalities were associated to earthquake induced building collapses and the physical stress of tsunami evacuation. The Arica native local scientist deployed overnight and started the tsunami survey in Iquique on the day after the earthquake. The international scientist joined the local effort from April 6 to 11, 2014. The international tsunami survey team (ITST) interviewed numerous eyewitnesses and documented flow depths, runup heights, inundation distances, sediment deposition, damage patterns, performance of the navigation infrastructure and impact on the natural environment. The ITST covered a 700 km stretch of coastline from the Mejillones Peninsula (23.5° S) north of Antofagasta in Chile up to Vila Vila (18.1° S) in southern Peru. We surveyed 30 locations with differential GPS and laser range finders. The tsunami impact peaked at Caleta Camarones exceeding 5 m in tsunami runup height. A significant variation in tsunami impact was observed along the coastlines of Chile and Peru both at local and regional scales. The tsunami occurred in the evening hours limiting the availability of eyewitness video footages. Observations from the 2014 Chile tsunami are compared against the 1868, 1877 and 2010 Chile tsunamis. Comparing to other similar magnitude events such as the 2007 Pisco tsunami in Peru the 1 April 2014 tsunami could have been significantly larger. The absence of a massive tsunami may mislead residents to believe another similarly minor tsunami may be generated after a potential future earthquake of similar magnitude. This April fool's day event poses significant challenges to community-based education raising tsunami awareness. The team educated residents about tsunami hazards since awareness programs are essential to save lives in locales at risk from near-field tsunamis.

  15. A mathematical model for Tsunami generation using a conservative velocity-pressure hyperbolic system

    CERN Document Server

    Roux, Alain-Yves Le

    2009-01-01

    By using the Hugoniot curve in detonics as a Riemann invariant of a velocity-pressure model, we get a conservative hyperbolic system similar to the Euler equations. The only differences are the larger value of the adiabatic constant (= 8.678 instead of 1.4 for gas dynamics) and the mass density replaced by a strain density depending on the pressure. The model is not homogeneous since it involves a gravity and a friction term. After the seismic wave reaches up the bottom of the ocean, one gets a pressure wave propagating toward the surface, which is made of a frontal shock wave followed by a regular decreasing profile. Since this regular profile propagates faster than the frontal shock waves, the amplitude of the pressure wave is strongly reduced when reaching the surface. Only in the case of a strong earth tremor the residual pressure wave is still sufficient to generate a water elevation with a sufficient wavelengths enable to propagate as a SaintVenant water wave and to become a tsunami when reaching the sh...

  16. New developments in event generator tuning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Buckley, Andy; Lacker, Heiko; Schulz, Holger; von Seggern, Jan Eike

    2010-01-01

    Data analyses in hadron collider physics depend on background simulations performed by Monte Carlo (MC) event generators. However, calculational limitations and non-perturbative effects require approximate models with adjustable parameters. In fact, we need to simultaneously tune many phenomenological parameters in a high-dimensional parameter-space in order to make the MC generator predictions fit the data. It is desirable to achieve this goal without spending too much time or computing resources iterating parameter settings and comparing the same set of plots over and over again. We present extensions and improvements to the MC tuning system, Professor, which addresses the aforementioned problems by constructing a fast analytic model of a MC generator which can then be easily fitted to data. Using this procedure it is for the first time possible to get a robust estimate of the uncertainty of generator tunings. Furthermore, we can use these uncertainty estimates to study the effect of new (pseudo-) data on t...

  17. MEtop – a top FCNC event generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we present a new Monte Carlo generator for Direct top and Single top production via flavour-changing neutral currents (FCNC). This new tool calculates the cross section and generates events with Next-to-Leading order precision for the Direct top process and Leading-Order precision for all other FCNC single top processes. A set of independent dimension six FCNC operators has been implemented – including four-fermion operators – where at least one top-quark is present in the interaction

  18. Tsunami waves generated by submarine landslides of variable volume: analytical solutions for a basin of variable depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Didenkulova

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Tsunami wave generation by submarine landslides of a variable volume in a basin of variable depth is studied within the shallow-water theory. The problem of landslide induced tsunami wave generation and propagation is studied analytically for two specific convex bottom profiles (h ~ x4/3 and h ~ x4. In these cases the basic equations can be reduced to the constant-coefficient wave equation with the forcing determined by the landslide motion. For certain conditions on the landslide characteristics (speed and volume per unit cross-section the wave field can be described explicitly. It is represented by one forced wave propagating with the speed of the landslide and following its offshore direction, and two free waves propagating in opposite directions with the wave celerity. For the case of a near-resonant motion of the landslide along the power bottom profile h ~ x? the dynamics of the waves propagating offshore is studied using the asymptotic approach. If the landslide is moving in the fully resonant regime the explicit formula for the amplitude of the wave can be derived. It is demonstrated that generally tsunami wave amplitude varies non-monotonically with distance.

  19. Update of the U.S. States and Territories National Tsunami Hazard Assessment: Historical Record and Sources for Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Goldfinger, C.

    2013-12-01

    The NOAA-National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collaborated to conduct the first qualitative United States tsunami hazard assessment, published in 2008 by the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP). Since that time, significant events such as the 2009 Samoa and 2011 Tohoku tsunamis have affected the U.S. and reinforced the importance of considering all of the evidence when conducting an assessment. In addition, there has been progress in tsunami research that reduces some of the earlier uncertainties. In 2011, the National Academies released their assessment of the U.S. Tsunami Program recommending that NOAA and its NTHMP partners, in collaboration with researchers in social and physical sciences, should complete an initial national assessment of tsunami risk and should institute a periodic assessment of the sources of tsunamis that threaten the United States. Therefore, the NTHMP is updating the national tsunami hazard assessment. Although the second assessment will not be a national probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment, areas where there is progress in this methodology will be presented. As a result, a national tsunami vulnerability and risk assessment is not possible at this time, but examples of ongoing work will be presented. This paper looks at the data sources in the first report, including an examination of the NGDC historical tsunami database that resulted in a qualitative assessment based on the distribution of runup heights and the frequency of tsunami runups. Although tsunami deaths are a measure of risk rather than hazard, the known tsunami deaths were compared with the qualitative assessments based on frequency and amplitude. The 2009 American Samoa tsunami resulted in a change for the U.S. Pacific island territories qualitative tsunami hazard assessment from 'Moderate' to 'High'. The NGDC tsunami database contains reported tsunamis and is therefore limited to written records existing for an area. Some of the uncertainty in the completeness of the written record has been reduced by investigating the history of tide gauges in the different regions. The first tsunami hazard assessment also used the USGS National Seismic Hazard Map (NSHM) databases to partially extend the time interval. These databases are primarily meant to assess earthquakes affecting U.S. possessions and do not include all possible seismogenic tsunami sources in the Pacific and Atlantic Basins. However, the databases make it possible to estimate the rate of occurrence of larger magnitude earthquakes that could generate a tsunami. The USGS NSHM databases are based on tectonic models, and paleoseismic and paleotsunami data. These databases are periodically updated with new research. Inclusion of updated information can reduce uncertainties in tsunami sources such as the Cascadia subduction zone and others.

  20. Development of tsunami early warning systems and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wächter

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Fostered by and embedded in the general development of information and communications technology (ICT, the evolution of tsunami warning systems (TWS shows a significant development from seismic-centred to multi-sensor system architectures using additional sensors (e.g. tide gauges and buoys for the detection of tsunami waves in the ocean.

    Currently, the beginning implementation of regional tsunami warning infrastructures indicates a new phase in the development of TWS. A new generation of TWS should not only be able to realise multi-sensor monitoring for tsunami detection. Moreover, these systems have to be capable to form a collaborative communication infrastructure of distributed tsunami warning systems in order to implement regional, ocean-wide monitoring and warning strategies.

    In the context of the development of the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS and in the EU-funded FP6 project Distant Early Warning System (DEWS, a service platform for both sensor integration and warning dissemination has been newly developed and demonstrated. In particular, standards of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC and the Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards (OASIS have been successfully incorporated.

    In the FP7 project Collaborative, Complex and Critical Decision-Support in Evolving Crises (TRIDEC, new developments in ICT (e.g. complex event processing (CEP and event-driven architecture (EDA are used to extend the existing platform to realise a component-based technology framework for building distributed tsunami warning systems.

  1. NOAA's Integrated Tsunami Database: Data for improved forecasts, warnings, research, and risk assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroker, Kelly; Dunbar, Paula; Mungov, George; Sweeney, Aaron; McCullough, Heather; Carignan, Kelly

    2015-04-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has primary responsibility in the United States for tsunami forecast, warning, research, and supports community resiliency. NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and co-located World Data Service for Geophysics provide a unique collection of data enabling communities to ensure preparedness and resilience to tsunami hazards. Immediately following a damaging or fatal tsunami event there is a need for authoritative data and information. The NGDC Global Historical Tsunami Database (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard/) includes all tsunami events, regardless of intensity, as well as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions that caused fatalities, moderate damage, or generated a tsunami. The long-term data from these events, including photographs of damage, provide clues to what might happen in the future. NGDC catalogs the information on global historical tsunamis and uses these data to produce qualitative tsunami hazard assessments at regional levels. In addition to the socioeconomic effects of a tsunami, NGDC also obtains water level data from the coasts and the deep-ocean at stations operated by the NOAA/NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services, the NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers, and the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) and produces research-quality data to isolate seismic waves (in the case of the deep-ocean sites) and the tsunami signal. These water-level data provide evidence of sea-level fluctuation and possible inundation events. NGDC is also building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to support real-time forecasts, implemented at 75 US coastal communities. After a damaging or fatal event NGDC begins to collect and integrate data and information from many organizations into the hazards databases. Sources of data include our NOAA partners, the U.S. Geological Survey, the UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) and International Tsunami Information Center, Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Program, news organizations, etc. NGDC assesses the data and then works to promptly distribute the data and information. For example, when a major tsunami occurs, all of the related tsunami data are combined into one timely resource, posted in an online report, which includes: 1) event summary; 2) eyewitness and instrumental recordings from preliminary field surveys; 3) regional historical observations including similar past events and effects; 4) observed water heights and calculated tsunami travel times; and 5) near-field effects. This report is regularly updated to incorporate the most recent data and observations. Providing timely access to authoritative data and information ultimately benefits researchers, state officials, the media and the public. This paper will demonstrate the extensive collection of data and how it is used.

  2. Tsunami earthquakes and subduction processes near deep-sea trenches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukao, Y.

    1979-05-10

    A tsunami earthquake is defined as a shock which generates extensive tsunamis but relatively weak seismic waves. A comparative study is made for the two recent tsunami earthquakes, and a subduction mechanism near a deep-sea trench is discussed. These two earthquakes occurred at extremely shallow depths far off the coasts of the Kurile Islands and of eastern Hokkaido on October 20, 1963, and on June 10, 1975, respectively. Both can be regarded as aftershock. Their tsunami heights and seismic wave amplitudes are compared with those of the preceding events. The results show that the time constants involved in the tsunami earthquakes are relatively long but not long enough to explain the observed disproportionality between the tsunamis and the seismic waves. The process times are estimated to be less than 100 s. The spatio-temporal characteristics of the two events suggest that they represent a seaward and upward extension of the rupture associated with a great earthquake which did not break the free surface at the coseismic stage. The amplitude and phase spectra of long-period surface waves and the long-period P waveforms indicate that this extension of the rupture did not take place entirely along the lithospheric interface emerging as a trench axis. It rather branched upward from the interface in a complex way through the wedge portion at the leading edge of the continental lithosphere. This wedge portion consists in large part of thick deformable sediments. A large vertical deformation and hence extensive tsunamis result from such a branching process. A shallowest source depth, steepening of rupture surfaces, and a deformable nature of the source region all enhance generation of tsunamis. The wedge portion ruptured by a tsunami earthquake is usually characterized by a very low seismic activity which is presumably due to ductility of the sediments.

  3. Combined effects of tectonic and landslide-generated Tsunami Runup at Seward, Alaska during the Mw 9.2 1964 earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleimani, E.; Nicolsky, D.J.; Haeussler, P.J.; Hansen, R.

    2011-01-01

    We apply a recently developed and validated numerical model of tsunami propagation and runup to study the inundation of Resurrection Bay and the town of Seward by the 1964 Alaska tsunami. Seward was hit by both tectonic and landslide-generated tsunami waves during the Mw 9.2 1964 mega thrust earthquake. The earthquake triggered a series of submarine mass failures around the fjord, which resulted in land sliding of part of the coastline into the water, along with the loss of the port facilities. These submarine mass failures generated local waves in the bay within 5 min of the beginning of strong ground motion. Recent studies estimate the total volume of underwater slide material that moved in Resurrection Bay to be about 211 million m3 (Haeussler et al. in Submarine mass movements and their consequences, pp 269-278, 2007). The first tectonic tsunami wave arrived in Resurrection Bay about 30 min after the main shock and was about the same height as the local landslide-generated waves. Our previous numerical study, which focused only on the local land slide generated waves in Resurrection Bay, demonstrated that they were produced by a number of different slope failures, and estimated relative contributions of different submarine slide complexes into tsunami amplitudes (Suleimani et al. in Pure Appl Geophys 166:131-152, 2009). This work extends the previous study by calculating tsunami inundation in Resurrection Bay caused by the combined impact of landslide-generated waves and the tectonic tsunami, and comparing the composite inundation area with observations. To simulate landslide tsunami runup in Seward, we use a viscous slide model of Jiang and LeBlond (J Phys Oceanogr 24(3):559-572, 1994) coupled with nonlinear shallow water equations. The input data set includes a high resolution multibeam bathymetry and LIDAR topography grid of Resurrection Bay, and an initial thickness of slide material based on pre- and post-earthquake bathymetry difference maps. For simulation of tectonic tsunami runup, we derive the 1964 coseismic deformations from detailed slip distribution in the rupture area, and use them as an initial condition for propagation of the tectonic tsunami. The numerical model employs nonlinear shallow water equations formulated for depth-averaged water fluxes, and calculates a temporal position of the shoreline using a free-surface moving boundary algorithm. We find that the calculated tsunami runup in Seward caused first by local submarine landslide-generated waves, and later by a tectonic tsunami, is in good agreement with observations of the inundation zone. The analysis of inundation caused by two different tsunami sources improves our understanding of their relative contributions, and supports tsunami risk mitigation in south-central Alaska. The record of the 1964 earthquake, tsunami, and submarine landslides, combined with the high-resolution topography and bathymetry of Resurrection Bay make it an ideal location for studying tectonic tsunamis in coastal regions susceptible to underwater landslides. ?? 2010 Springer Basel AG.

  4. Generation and Propagation of Tsunami by a Moving Realistic Curvilinear Slide Shape with Variable Velocities in Linearized Shallow-Water Wave Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwat Nageeb Hanna

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The process of tsunami evolution during its generation under the effect of the variable velocities of realistic submarine landslides based on a two-dimensional curvilinear slide model is investigated. Tsunami generation from submarine gravity mass flows is described in three stages. The first stage represented by a rapid curvilinear down and uplift faulting with rise time. The second stage represented by a unilaterally propagation in the positive x direction to a significant length to produce curvilinear two-dimensional models represented by a depression slump, and a displaced accumulation slide model. The last stage represented by the time variation in the velocity of the accumulation slide (block slide. By using transforms method, Laplace in time and Fourier in space, tsunami waveforms within the frame of the linearized shallow water theory for constant water depth are analyzed analytically for the movable source model. Effect of the water depths on the amplification factor of the tsunami generation by the submarine slump and slide for different propagation lengths and widths has been studied and the results are plotted. Comparison of tsunami peak amplitudes is discussed for different propagation lengths, widths and water depths. In addition, we demonstrated the tsunami propagation waveforms after the slide stops moving at different propagation times.

  5. Probability-Based Design Criteria of the ASCE 7 Tsunami Loads and Effects Provisions (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chock, G.

    2013-12-01

    Mitigation of tsunami risk requires a combination of emergency preparedness for evacuation in addition to providing structural resilience of critical facilities, infrastructure, and key resources necessary for immediate response and economic and social recovery. Critical facilities would include emergency response, medical, tsunami refuges and shelters, ports and harbors, lifelines, transportation, telecommunications, power, financial institutions, and major industrial/commercial facilities. The Tsunami Loads and Effects Subcommittee of the ASCE/SEI 7 Standards Committee is developing a proposed new Chapter 6 - Tsunami Loads and Effects for the 2016 edition of the ASCE 7 Standard. ASCE 7 provides the minimum design loads and requirements for structures subject to building codes such as the International Building Code utilized in the USA. In this paper we will provide a review emphasizing the intent of these new code provisions and explain the design methodology. The ASCE 7 provisions for Tsunami Loads and Effects enables a set of analysis and design methodologies that are consistent with performance-based engineering based on probabilistic criteria. . The ASCE 7 Tsunami Loads and Effects chapter will be initially applicable only to the states of Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, and Hawaii. Ground shaking effects and subsidence from a preceding local offshore Maximum Considered Earthquake will also be considered prior to tsunami arrival for Alaska and states in the Pacific Northwest regions governed by nearby offshore subduction earthquakes. For national tsunami design provisions to achieve a consistent reliability standard of structural performance for community resilience, a new generation of tsunami inundation hazard maps for design is required. The lesson of recent tsunami is that historical records alone do not provide a sufficient measure of the potential heights of future tsunamis. Engineering design must consider the occurrence of events greater than scenarios in the historical record, and should properly be based on the underlying seismicity of subduction zones. Therefore, Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) consistent with source seismicity must be performed in addition to consideration of historical event scenarios. A method of Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis has been established that is generally consistent with Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis in the treatment of uncertainty. These new tsunami design zone maps will define the coastal zones where structures of greater importance would be designed for tsunami resistance and community resilience. Structural member acceptability criteria will be based on performance objectives for a 2,500-year Maximum Considered Tsunami. The approach developed by the ASCE Tsunami Loads and Effects Subcommittee of the ASCE 7 Standard would result in the first national unification of tsunami hazard criteria for design codes reflecting the modern approach of Performance-Based Engineering.

  6. Tsunamis in Cuba?; Tsunamis en Cuba?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotilla Rodriguez, M. O.

    2011-07-01

    Cuba as neo tectonics structure in the southern of the North American plate had three tsunamis. One of them [local] occurred in the Central-Northern region [1931.10.01, Nortecubana fault], the other was a tele tsunami [1755.11.01, in the SW of the Iberian Peninsula] that hit the Bay of Santiago de Cuba, and the third took place at 1867.11.18, by the regional source of Virgin Islands, which produced waves in the Eastern Cuban region. This tsunami originated to the NE of Puerto Rico in 1918.10.11, with another earthquake of equal magnitude and at similar coordinates, produced a tsunami that did not affect Cuba. Information on the influence of regional tsunami in 1946.08.08 of the NE of the Dominican Republic [Matanzas] in Northwestern Cuba [beaches Guanabo-Baracoa] is contrary to expectations with the waves propagation. The local event of 1939.08.15 attributed to Central- Northern Cuba [Cayo Frances with M = 8.1] does not correspond at all with the maximum magnitude of earthquakes in this region and the potential of the Nortecubana fault. Tsunamis attributed to events such as 1766.06.11 and 1932.02.03 in the Santiago de Cuba Bay are not reflected in the original documents from experts and eyewitnesses. Tsunamis from Jamaica have not affected the coasts of Cuba, despite its proximity. There is no influence in Cuba of tsunamigenic sources of the southern and western parts of the Caribbean, or the Gulf of Mexico. Set out the doubts as to the influence of tsunamis from Haiti and Dominican Republic at Guantanamo Bay which is closer to and on the same latitude, and spatial orientation than the counterpart of Santiago de Cuba, that had impact. The number of fatalities by authors in the Caribbean is different and contradictory. (Author) 76 refs.

  7. Firewaves: introducing a platform for modelling volcanic tsunamis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Raphaël; Ulvrova, Martina; Kelfoun, Karim; Giachetti, Thomas; Switzer, Adam

    2014-05-01

    When embracing all tsunamis generated by eruptive processes, rapid ground deformation and slope instability at volcanoes, "volcanic tsunamis" represent around 5 % of all tsunamis listed for the last four centuries (>130 events since 1600 AD). About 20-25 % of all fatalities directly attributable to volcanoes during the last 250 years have been caused by volcanic tsunamis (e.g. Krakatau 1883, Mayuyama 1792). Up to eight mechanisms are implied in the generation of volcanic tsunamis: underwater explosions, pyroclastic flows and lahars entering the water, earthquake preceding or during a volcanic eruption, and flank failure, collapse of coastal lava bench, caldera collapse, and shock wave produced by large explosion. It is unlikely that shock waves, lahars and collapses of lava bench can give birth to tsunamis with wave heights of more than 3 m. Pyroclastic flows, flank failures and caldera subsidence are the only source mechanisms likely to imply volumes larger than 1 km³. Volcanic tsunamis are characterised by short-period waves and greater dispersion compared to earthquake-generated tsunamis. With the exceptions of the 1888 Ritter Island and 1883 Krakatau tsunamis, 100 % of the victims of volcanic tsunamis in Southeast Asia were less than 20 km from the volcano. Travel time of the waves from the volcano to a distance of 20 km is typically less than 15 minutes (Paris et al. 2014). In this setting, priority are (1) to improve population's preparedness around highlighted volcanoes, (2) to monitor sea / lake around volcanoes, (3) and to build a database of numerical simulations based on different eruptive scenarios. The Firewaves platform, hosted at Magmas & Volcans laboratory in Clermont-Ferrand (FRance) is a numerical solution for modelling volcanic tsunamis of different sources. Tsunamis generated by volcanic mass flows (including pyroclastic flows, debris avalanches etc.) are simulated using VolcFlow code (Kelfoun et al. 2010), and underwater explosions and caldera subsidence using COMCOT (Liu et al. 1998). Three kinds of simulations are runned: (1) case-studies for calibrating the simulations (e.g. Stromboli 2002, Karymsky 1996, Mayuyama 1792), (2) comparisons of different scenarios for reconstructing past tsunamis (e.g. Kolumbo 1650), and (3) prospective scenarios from future eruptions at target volcanoes.

  8. Tsunami: Un problema matemáticamente interesante / Tsunami: An interesting mathematical problema

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Rodrigo, González González; Modesto, Ortiz Figueroa; José Miguel, Montoya Rodríguez.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan algunos aspectos fundamentales respecto a la matemática y la herramienta computacional que apoyan la compleja descripción del proceso físico tsunami desde dos enfoques específicos. En particular, se aborda analíticamente un modelo hidroelástico simple para el problema de generación de o [...] ndas tsunami, el cual permite obtener resultados en el área de ruptura. Por otra parte, el proceso de propagación de las ondas tsunami en el océano y el impacto a lo largo de la línea costera se analiza numéricamente utilizando el enfoque hidrodinámico, presentando en particular una aplicación directa sobre la predicción de tsunamis en México producidos por sismos potenciales en la trinchera Mesoamericana mediante el diseño de un “Módulo Sintetizador de Tsunamis” para simular tsunamis originados por sismos ocurridos en la zona de subducción de la costa occidental de México. Abstract in english We present some key aspects regarding the mathematics and the computational tool that support the complex description of the physical process tsunami from two specific approaches. In particular, it addresses analytically a simple hydroelastic model for the problem of tsunami wave generation, which p [...] rovides results in the rupture area. Moreover, the propagation of tsunami waves in the ocean and the impact along the coastline is analyzed numerically using the hydrodynamic approach, presenting in particular a direct application to the prediction of tsunamis in Mexico caused by potential earthquakes in the Mesoamerican trench through the design of a “Tsunami Toolbox” to simulate tsunamis caused by earthquakes in the subduction zone on the western coast of Mexico.

  9. Generating tsunami risk knowledge at community level as a base for planning and implementation of risk reduction strategies

    OpenAIRE

    S. Wegscheider; Post, J.; Zosseder, K.; M. Mück; Strunz, G.; Riedlinger, T.; MUHARI, A.; Anwar, H.Z.

    2011-01-01

    More than 4 million Indonesians live in tsunami-prone areas along the southern and western coasts of Sumatra, Java and Bali. Although a Tsunami Early Warning Center in Jakarta now exists, installed after the devastating 2004 tsunami, it is essential to develop tsunami risk knowledge within the exposed communities as a basis for tsunami disaster management. These communities need to implement risk reduction strategies to mitigate potential consequences.

    The major aims of t...

  10. Tsunami deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NSC (the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan) demand to survey on tsunami deposits by use of various technical methods (Dec. 2011), because tsunami deposits have useful information on tsunami activity, tsunami source etc. However, there are no guidelines on tsunami deposit survey in JAPAN. In order to prepare the guideline of tsunami deposits survey and evaluation and to develop the method of tsunami source estimation on the basis of tsunami deposits, JNES carried out the following issues; (1) organizing information of paleoseismological record and tsunami deposit by literature research, (2) field survey on tsunami deposit, and (3) designing the analysis code of sediment transport due to tsunami. As to (1), we organize the information gained about tsunami deposits in the database. As to (2), we consolidate methods for surveying and identifying tsunami deposits in the lake based on results of the field survey in Fukui Pref., carried out by JNES. In addition, as to (3), we design the experimental instrument for hydraulic experiment on sediment transport and sedimentation due to tsunamis. These results are reflected in the guideline on the tsunami deposits survey and evaluation. (author)

  11. Dynamic generation of accident progression event trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, the development and analysis of accident progression event trees (APETs) are performed in a manner that is computationally time consuming, difficult to reproduce and also can be phenomenologically inconsistent. A software tool is presented for automated APET generation using the concept of dynamic event trees. The tool determines the branching times from a severe accident analysis code based on user specified criteria for branching. It assigns user specified probabilities to every branch, tracks the total branch probability, and truncates branches based on the given pruning/truncation rules to avoid an unmanageable number of scenarios. While the software tool could be applied to any systems analysis code, the MELCOR code is used for this illustration. A case study is presented involving station blackout with the loss of auxiliary feedwater system for a pressurized water reactor

  12. Field survey of the March 28, 2005 Nias-Simeulue earthquake and Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrero, J.C.; McAdoo, B.; Jaffe, B.; Dengler, L.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Higman, B.; Hidayat, R.; Moore, A.; Kongko, W.; Lukijanto; Peters, R.; Prasetya, G.; Titov, V.; Yulianto, E.

    2011-01-01

    On the evening of March 28, 2005 at 11:09 p.m. local time (16:09 UTC), a large earthquake occurred offshore of West Sumatra, Indonesia. With a moment magnitude (Mw) of 8.6, the event caused substantial shaking damage and land level changes between Simeulue Island in the north and the Batu Islands in the south. The earthquake also generated a tsunami, which was observed throughout the source region as well as on distant tide gauges. While the tsunami was not as extreme as the tsunami of December 26th, 2004, it did cause significant flooding and damage at some locations. The spatial and temporal proximity of the two events led to a unique set of observational data from the earthquake and tsunami as well as insights relevant to tsunami hazard planning and education efforts. ?? 2010 Springer Basel AG.

  13. Analysis of the tsunami generated by the MW 7.8 1906 San Francisco earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, E.L.; Zoback, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    We examine possible sources of a small tsunami produced by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, recorded at a single tide gauge station situated at the opening to San Francisco Bay. Coseismic vertical displacement fields were calculated using elastic dislocation theory for geodetically constrained horizontal slip along a variety of offshore fault geometries. Propagation of the ensuing tsunami was calculated using a shallow-water hydrodynamic model that takes into account the effects of bottom friction. The observed amplitude and negative pulse of the first arrival are shown to be inconsistent with small vertical displacements (~4-6 cm) arising from pure horizontal slip along a continuous right bend in the San Andreas fault offshore. The primary source region of the tsunami was most likely a recently recognized 3 km right step in the San Andreas fault that is also the probable epicentral region for the 1906 earthquake. Tsunami models that include the 3 km right step with pure horizontal slip match the arrival time of the tsunami, but underestimate the amplitude of the negative first-arrival pulse. Both the amplitude and time of the first arrival are adequately matched by using a rupture geometry similar to that defined for the 1995 MW (moment magnitude) 6.9 Kobe earthquake: i.e., fault segments dipping toward each other within the stepover region (83??dip, intersecting at 10 km depth) and a small component of slip in the dip direction (rake=-172??). Analysis of the tsunami provides confirming evidence that the 1906 San Francisco earthquake initiated at a right step in a right-lateral fault and propagated bilaterally, suggesting a rupture initiation mechanism similar to that for the 1995 Kobe earthquake.

  14. Improved partonic event generators at lepton colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Giele, Walter T

    2015-01-01

    A method is detailed for the phase space integration of multi-jets cross sections at lepton colliders, applicable to parton level Monte Carlo's at any order in perturbation theory. Other non-jet objects, massless or massive, can be included in the phase space generation. We correlate the bremsstrahlung events in a manner that integrates out all partonic configurations leading to a fixed jet configuration, thereby improving convergence. This also allows the method to extend infra-red safety to the fully differential multi-jet cross section.

  15. A review of tsunami simulation activities for NPPs safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tsunami generated on December 26, 2004 due to Sumatra earthquake of magnitude 9.3 resulted in inundation at the various coastal sites of India. The site selection and design of Indian nuclear power plants demand the evaluation of run up and the structural barriers for the coastal plants: Besides it is also desirable to evaluate the early warning system for tsunamigenic earthquakes. The tsunamis originate from submarine faults, underwater volcanic activities, sub-aerial landslides impinging on the sea and submarine landslides. In case of a submarine earthquake-induced tsunami the wave is generated in the fluid domain due to displacement of the seabed. There are three phases of tsunami: generation, propagation, and run-up. Reactor Safety Division (RSD) of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay has initiated computational simulation for all the three phases of tsunami source generation, its propagation and finally run up evaluation for the protection of public life, property and various industrial infrastructures located on the coastal regions of India. These studies could be effectively utilized for design and implementation of early warning system for coastal region of the country apart from catering to the needs of Indian nuclear installations. This paper presents some results of tsunami waves based on finite difference numerical approaches with shallow water wave theory. The present paper evaluate the results of various simulation i.e. Single fault Sumatrarious simulation i.e. Single fault Sumatra model, four and five fault Sumatra Model, Nias insignificant tsunami and also some parametric studies results for tsunami waring system scenario generation. A study is carried for the tsunami due to Sumatra earthquake in 2004 with TUNAMI-N2 software. Bathymetry data available from the National Geophysical Data Center was used for this study. The single fault and detailed four and five fault data were used to calculate sea surface deformations which were subsequently used as initial conditions for Sumatra 2004 tsunami propagation simulation. The paper also presents a hypothetical study by assuming the earthquake rupture on northern fault only as compared to complete (northern and southern) rupture segment and the resulting tsunami propagation scenario. All of the studies provide the results in terms of wave heights and compare them with the reported simulation, satellite observation and field observed reported data. The paper includes the parametric studies on the possible fault line for Sumatra fault line for support for early tsunami warning. The various other events i.e Java, Nias, Makaran, Andaman etc are also discussed in the paper. (author)

  16. The 1755 Lisbon tsunami; evaluation of the tsunami parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, M. A.; Heitor, S.; Miranda, J. M.; Miranda, P.; Victor, L. Mendes

    1998-01-01

    The tsunami generated by the 1755.01.11 earthquake affected mainly the coasts of the Iberian Peninsula and Northwest Morocco and was observed all over the North Atlantic coasts. The catastrophic dimensions of that phenomenon had a tremendous impact on the city of Lisbon and on several villages along the south coast of Portugal. The earthquake was felt all over Europe and the seismic intensity was estimated as X-XI (Mercalli Intensity Scale) at Lisbon and Southwest Portugal (Cape S. Vicente). The most destructive waves were observed along the coast of Portugal, specially in Lisbon, in the area of the S. Vicente Cape, along the Gulf of Cadiz and Northwest Morocco. Throughout historic times, earthquakes have periodically affected the city of Lisbon causing severe damage and casualties. In spite of that, the city kept growing, so the extension of damage and the loss of human lives in 1755, was quite impressive. The down town of Lisbon was flooded by the rising of the waters of the river Tagus and most historical documents reported waves of 6 m height. At Cape S. Vicente (Southwest Portugal) the run-up height, evaluated from historical data, is greater than 15 m. The eye witness accounts from Spain and Morocco reported wave heights greater than 10 m and large flooded areas along the Gulf of Cadiz and in several harbours in Morocco, e.g. Safi and Agadir. In the city of Lisbon, the number of casualties due exclusively to the tsunami, is estimate around 900, and the penetration of the waters is evaluated to be 250 m. Most of the available literature concerning the 1755 earthquake is based on the compilation of Pereira de Sousa (1919) and, sometimes, incorporates both well established historical records and non reliable information. As the 1755 event evaluation is crucial to a quantitative approach of the tsunami hazard and risk assessment in Portugal, a new examination of the historical records was needed before the establishment of reliable tsunami parameters that can be used both in numerical models of tsunami propagation and in geodynamic studies. In this paper, we present a new compilation of almost all the available historical data from the countries affected by the tsunami. In the analysis of these records, the following tsunami parameters are inferred: travel time, polarity of the first movement, maximum run-up height, period, number of waves, duration of the sea disturbance and extent of flooding.

  17. Modelling of Tsunami Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazeeruddin Yaacob

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear dispersive model based on the forced Korteweg-de Vries equation (fKdV is developed from the approximation of Boussinesq shallow water type model. This provides the possibility of observing, in particular, the process of tsunami generation by atmospheric disturbances. The fKdV is then solved numerically via an explicit finite difference method. From the simulations, the roles of nonlinearity, dispersion and forcing terms in the process of tsunami generation are shown explicitly.

  18. O'Mega & WHIZARD: Monte Carlo Event Generator Generation For Future Colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Ohl, Thorsten

    2000-01-01

    I describe the optimizing matrix element generator O'Mega and Wolfgang Kilian's event generator generator WHIZARD. These tools cooperate in the automated production of efficient unweighted event generators for linear collider physics.

  19. Event generation with SHERPA 1.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleisberg, T.; Hoche, Stefan.; Krauss, F.; Schoenherr, M.; Schumann, S.; Siegert, F.; Winter, J.

    2008-12-18

    In this paper the current release of the Monte Carlo event generator Sherpa, version 1.1, is presented. Sherpa is a general-purpose tool for the simulation of particle collisions at high-energy colliders. It contains a very flexible tree-level matrix-element generator for the calculation of hard scattering processes within the Standard Model and various new physics models. The emission of additional QCD partons off the initial and final states is described through a parton-shower model. To consistently combine multi-parton matrix elements with the QCD parton cascades the approach of Catani, Krauss, Kuhn and Webber is employed. A simple model of multiple interactions is used to account for underlying events in hadron-hadron collisions. The fragmentation of partons into primary hadrons is described using a phenomenological cluster-hadronization model. A comprehensive library for simulating tau-lepton and hadron decays is provided. Where available form-factor models and matrix elements are used, allowing for the inclusion of spin correlations; effects of virtual and real QED corrections are included using the approach of Yennie, Frautschi and Suura.

  20. Tsunami Catalog in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sobeom; Hyun, Seung Gyu; Noh, Myunghyun

    2015-04-01

    Significant tsunamis are described in historic and instrumental earthquake sources for all regions around the Korean Peninsula. According to the low seismicity near the Peninsula, there are relatively few tsunami events in Korea. Most of the tsunami events are associated with big earthquakes at the eastern margin of the East Sea. One historical event is associated with a volcanic eruption. For that reason, the eastern coast of the Korean Peninsula is the affectable area for tsunami. One historical event at the Yellow Sea area is inferred a result from a big earthquake in China. And one plate boundary earthquake between the Philippine Plate and the Eurasian Plate affected to an island located in south of the Korean Peninsula. We confirmed the historic tsunami events by review the foreign literatures. More detailed information is presented for the instrumental earthquake source events. This work was supported by the Nuclear Safety Research Program through the Korea Radiation Safety Foundation (KORSAFe) and the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC), Republic of Korea (Grant No. 1305001).

  1. Tsunamis in Cuba?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuba as neo tectonics structure in the southern of the North American plate had three tsunamis. One of them [local] occurred in the Central-Northern region [1931.10.01, Nortecubana fault], the other was a tele tsunami [1755.11.01, in the SW of the Iberian Peninsula] that hit the Bay of Santiago de Cuba, and the third took place at 1867.11.18, by the regional source of Virgin Islands, which produced waves in the Eastern Cuban region. This tsunami originated to the NE of Puerto Rico in 1918.10.11, with another earthquake of equal magnitude and at similar coordinates, produced a tsunami that did not affect Cuba. Information on the influence of regional tsunami in 1946.08.08 of the NE of the Dominican Republic [Matanzas] in Northwestern Cuba [beaches Guanabo-Baracoa] is contrary to expectations with the waves propagation. The local event of 1939.08.15 attributed to Central- Northern Cuba [Cayo Frances with M = 8.1] does not correspond at all with the maximum magnitude of earthquakes in this region and the potential of the Nortecubana fault. Tsunamis attributed to events such as 1766.06.11 and 1932.02.03 in the Santiago de Cuba Bay are not reflected in the original documents from experts and eyewitnesses. Tsunamis from Jamaica have not affected the coasts of Cuba, despite its proximity. There is no influence in Cuba of tsunamigenic sources of the southern and western parts of the Caribbean, or the Gulf of Mexico. Set out the doubts as to the influence of tsunamis from Hait as to the influence of tsunamis from Haiti and Dominican Republic at Guantanamo Bay which is closer to and on the same latitude, and spatial orientation than the counterpart of Santiago de Cuba, that had impact. The number of fatalities by authors in the Caribbean is different and contradictory. (Author) 76 refs.

  2. Tsunami modeling Scenarios for the Western Black Sea, Shabla seismic area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partheniu, Raluca; Diaconescu, Mihai; Ioane, Dumitru; Ionescu, Constantin; Marmureanu, Alexandru

    2015-04-01

    Although a rare natural phenomenon, tsunami type events in the Black Sea had been generated, past studies showing more than twenty events (Altinok Y., 1999). The western Black Sea could mostly be affected by earthquakes generated in Shabla area, the most known event being generated on 31st of March 1901, when an earthquake with Mw = 7.2 triggered tsunami waves up to 5 m height (Papadopoulos et al., 2011). In order to generate a tsunami in the Black Sea area, earthquakes should mainly follow some conditions: a) to have a magnitude Mw > 6.5; b) to have a focal depth h TAT), developed by Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission. After analyzing and comparing the generated tsunami modeling scenarios, minimum values of magnitude for tsunami waves generation were evaluated for the Shabla seismic source. For some of the scenarios no tsunami waves were generated. The worst case scenario is for a depth of 5 km, a magnitude Mw = 8, the tsunami waves heights reaching 0.8 m in Kranevo (Bulgaria). The maximum wave heights and some of the affected locations for this scenario show that at Costinesti, Mangalia, Techirghiol cities the waves will reach 0.6 m height and respectively 0.5 m at Constanta city. According to these scenarios, the tsunami generated waves can vary as follows: increasing the depth from 5 to 10 and 30 km will lead to lower heights or no waves generation. Also a magnitude increase from 7 to 7.5 and then to 8 will lead to maximum waves generation.

  3. Sensitivity of tsunami wave profiles and inundation simulations to earthquake slip and fault geometry for the 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    KAUST Repository

    Goda, Katsuichiro

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we develop stochastic random-field slip models for the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and conduct a rigorous sensitivity analysis of tsunami hazards with respect to the uncertainty of earthquake slip and fault geometry. Synthetic earthquake slip distributions generated from the modified Mai-Beroza method captured key features of inversion-based source representations of the mega-thrust event, which were calibrated against rich geophysical observations of this event. Using original and synthesised earthquake source models (varied for strike, dip, and slip distributions), tsunami simulations were carried out and the resulting variability in tsunami hazard estimates was investigated. The results highlight significant sensitivity of the tsunami wave profiles and inundation heights to the coastal location and the slip characteristics, and indicate that earthquake slip characteristics are a major source of uncertainty in predicting tsunami risks due to future mega-thrust events.

  4. Sensitivity of tsunami wave profiles and inundation simulations to earthquake slip and fault geometry for the 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Katsuichiro; Mai, Paul Martin; Yasuda, Tomohiro; Mori, Nobuhito

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we develop stochastic random-field slip models for the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and conduct a rigorous sensitivity analysis of tsunami hazards with respect to the uncertainty of earthquake slip and fault geometry. Synthetic earthquake slip distributions generated from the modified Mai-Beroza method captured key features of inversion-based source representations of the mega-thrust event, which were calibrated against rich geophysical observations of this event. Using original and synthesised earthquake source models (varied for strike, dip, and slip distributions), tsunami simulations were carried out and the resulting variability in tsunami hazard estimates was investigated. The results highlight significant sensitivity of the tsunami wave profiles and inundation heights to the coastal location and the slip characteristics, and indicate that earthquake slip characteristics are a major source of uncertainty in predicting tsunami risks due to future mega-thrust events.

  5. Scientific Animations for Tsunami Hazard Mitigation: The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center's YouTube Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, N. C.; Wang, D.; Shiro, B.; Ward, B.

    2013-12-01

    Outreach and education save lives, and the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) has a new tool--a YouTube Channel--to advance its mission to protect lives and property from dangerous tsunamis. Such outreach and education is critical for coastal populations nearest an earthquake since they may not get an official warning before a tsunami reaches them and will need to know what to do when they feel strong shaking. Those who live far enough away to receive useful official warnings and react to them, however, can also benefit from PTWC's education and outreach efforts. They can better understand a tsunami warning message when they receive one, can better understand the danger facing them, and can better anticipate how events will unfold while the warning is in effect. The same holds true for emergency managers, who have the authority to evacuate the public they serve, and for the news media, critical partners in disseminating tsunami hazard information. PTWC's YouTube channel supplements its formal outreach and education efforts by making its computer animations available 24/7 to anyone with an Internet connection. Though the YouTube channel is only a month old (as of August 2013), it should rapidly develop a large global audience since similar videos on PTWC's Facebook page have reached over 70,000 viewers during organized media events, while PTWC's official web page has received tens of millions of hits during damaging tsunamis. These animations are not mere cartoons but use scientific data and calculations to render graphical depictions of real-world phenomena as accurately as possible. This practice holds true whether the animation is a simple comparison of historic earthquake magnitudes or a complex simulation cycling through thousands of high-resolution data grids to render tsunami waves propagating across an entire ocean basin. PTWC's animations fall into two broad categories. The first group illustrates concepts about seismology and how it is critical to tsunami warning operations, such as those about earthquake magnitudes, how earthquakes are located, where and how often earthquakes occur, and fault rupture length. The second group uses the PTWC-developed tsunami forecast model, RIFT (Wang et al., 2012), to show how various historic tsunamis propagated through the world's oceans. These animations illustrate important concepts about tsunami behavior such as their speed, how they bend around and bounce off of seafloor features, how their wave heights vary from place to place and in time, and how their behavior is strongly influenced by the type of earthquake that generated them. PTWC's YouTube channel also includes an animation that simulates both seismic and tsunami phenomena together as they occurred for the 2011 Japan tsunami including actual sea-level measurements and proper timing for tsunami alert status, thus serving as a video 'time line' for that event and showing the time scales involved in tsunami warning operations. Finally, PTWC's scientists can use their YouTube channel to communicate with their colleagues in the research community by supplementing their peer-reviewed papers with video 'figures' (e.g., Wang et al., 2012).

  6. Tsunami inundation scenarios and tsunami vulnerability assessment for the town of Alexandria, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinti, S.; Pagnoni, G.; Armigliato, A.; Tonini, R.

    2012-04-01

    Historical catalogues indicate that Alexandria was severely affected in the past by several tsunami events. The tsunami hazard in that area is mainly due to far-field tectonic sources. The two most famous earthquakes that generated tsunamis whose impact was experienced also by Alexandria and the surrounding area are the 365 AD and the 1303 earthquakes, whose sources are still a matter of debate but are frequently located in correspondence with the western and eastern sectors of the Hellenic Arc. Nowadays, Alexandria is the second biggest city in Egypt as regards population (3.9 million), it is a key economic area in northern Africa and it has a very important tourist activity. Hence the proper assessment of tsunami hazard-to-risk must be regarded as an important task, which was partially undertaken in the very recent past by projects such as TRANSFER (EU-FP6). It is also worth mentioning that the overall eastern Mediterranean is one of the areas chosen by the EU-FP7 Project TRIDEC to test a new generation Tsunami Early Warning Decision Support System. We assess the hazard by performing numerical simulations of tsunami impact in Alexandria through the worst-case scenario technique. We identify three main seismic sources: the western Hellenic Arc (reference event 365 AD, magnitude 8.3), the eastern Hellenic Arc (reference event 1303, magnitude 8.0) and the Cyprus arc (hypothetical scenario with magnitude 8.0, inferred from the tectonic setting and the historical seismic catalogues). All the simulations and the inundation maps are computed by means of the UBO-TSUFD code, developed and maintained by the Tsunami Research team of the University of Bologna, which solves the non-linear shallow-water equations allowing for the computation of run-up and inundation on nested grids. For each of the considered scenarios we compute all the relevant tsunami metrics, i.e. water elevation, current speed, flow depth and momentum flux. We find that the case that produces the most relevant flooding in Alexandria is the eastern Hellenic Arc scenario, with waves reaching heights up to 5 meters. We also prepare an aggregated field for each relevant physical parameter, by choosing for each parameter the highest value in each computational grid point. The aggregated fields are finally used for a preliminary tsunami vulnerability assessment based on a methodology developed by the EU-FP6 SCHEMA Project, based on the adoption of a suitable building damage matrix and on water inundation depth.

  7. Modern Particle Physics Event Generation with WHIZARD

    CERN Document Server

    Reuter, J; Nejad, B Chokoufe; Kilian, W; Ohl, T; Sekulla, M; Weiss, C

    2014-01-01

    We describe the multi-purpose Monte-Carlo event generator WHIZARD for the simulation of high-energy particle physics experiments. Besides the presentation of the general features of the program like SM physics, BSM physics, and QCD effects, special emphasis will be given to the support of the most accurate simulation of the collider environments at hadron colliders and especially at future linear lepton colliders. On the more technical side, the very recent code refactoring towards a completely object-oriented software package to improve maintainability, flexibility and code development will be discussed. Finally, we present ongoing work and future plans regarding higher-order corrections, more general model support including the setup to search for new physics in vector boson scattering at the LHC, as well as several lines of performance improvements.

  8. Modern Particle Physics Event Generation with WHIZARD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, J.; Bach, F.; Chokoufé, B.; Kilian, W.; Ohl, T.; Sekulla, M.; Weiss, C.

    2015-05-01

    We describe the multi-purpose Monte-Carlo event generator WHIZARD for the simulation of high-energy particle physics experiments. Besides the presentation of the general features of the program like SM physics, BSM physics, and QCD effects, special emphasis will be given to the support of the most accurate simulation of the collider environments at hadron colliders and especially at future linear lepton colliders. On the more technical side, the very recent code refactoring towards a completely object-oriented software package to improve maintainability, flexibility and code development will be discussed. Finally, we present ongoing work and future plans regarding higher-order corrections, more general model support including the setup to search for new physics in vector boson scattering at the LHC, as well as several lines of performance improvements.

  9. Precision event generation for the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeche, Stefan [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park (United States)

    2012-07-01

    In order to maximize the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider, precise predictions are needed for a multitude of Standard Model reactions. Signals for new physics may be hidden in overwhelming backgrounds, which have to be controlled in order to find anomalies withstanding detailed scrutiny. Tremendous progress was made in recent years to improve the theoretical description of these backgrounds using next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD. This talk reviews some of the essential aspects of modern multi-jet NLO calculations and presents results in comparison to recent LHC data. The need for theoretical predictions at the particle level has spurred the development of so-called matching algorithms, which connect NLO parton-level results and parton showers as part of general-purpose Monte-Carlo event generators. The theoretical challenges of these methods for large jet multiplicity are discussed with particular emphasis on the correct treatment of subleading colour and soft gluon effects.

  10. Elegent—An elastic event generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kašpar, J.

    2014-03-01

    Although elastic scattering of nucleons may look like a simple process, it presents a long-lasting challenge for theory. Due to missing hard energy scale, the perturbative QCD cannot be applied. Instead, many phenomenological/theoretical models have emerged. In this paper we present a unified implementation of some of the most prominent models in a C++ library, moreover extended to account for effects of the electromagnetic interaction. The library is complemented with a number of utilities. For instance, programs to sample many distributions of interest in four-momentum transfer squared, t, impact parameter, b, and collision energy ?{s}. These distributions at ISR, Spp¯S, RHIC, Tevatron and LHC energies are available for download from the project web site. Both in the form of ROOT files and PDF figures providing comparisons among the models. The package includes also a tool for Monte-Carlo generation of elastic scattering events, which can easily be embedded in any other program framework. Catalogue identifier: AERT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 10551 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 126316 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Any in principle, tested on x86-64 architecture. Operating system: Any in principle, tested on GNU/Linux. RAM: Strongly depends on the task, but typically below 20MB Classification: 11.6. External routines: ROOT, HepMC Nature of problem: Monte-Carlo simulation of elastic nucleon-nucleon collisions Solution method: Implementation of some of the most prominent phenomenological/theoretical models providing cumulative distribution function that is used for random event generation. Running time: Strongly depends on the task, but typically below 1 h.

  11. Modelling landslide-generated tsunami: from landslide propagation to downstream flood in dam context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Martin; Podladchikov, Yury; Humair, Florian; Matasci, Battista; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Alpine regions have a high density of dammed lakes, either natural or anthropogenic. Those are frequently surrounded by steep slopes and thus, are potentially affected by mass wasting processes. The penetration of landsliding material in the water body may lead to impulse waves that could overtop the dam and, in the worst case scenario, breach or break the latter. The possible resulting outburst flood is a serious threat for populated places, commonly concentrated downstream in the valleys. In order to assess the risk resulting from the succession of all phenomenon, a numerical model able to handle all of them is required. Although specific models of flooding simulation or wave propagation are efficient, there is currently no fully achieved model capable to integrate all the above-mentioned processes at the same time. In order to address this, we propose a new model capable to handle these difficult combinations and which is suitable for risk assessment in dam contexts. Our model is based on both the shallow water equations and viscous flow equations. The first ones are stabilised by the Lax-Friedrichs scheme and compute the wave propagation and the downstream flow, i.e. the wet state. The viscous flow equations are used for the dry state and to propagate the landslide body. The transition from one state to the other is ruled by a threshold based on the Reynolds number. First, in order to test the capacity of our model to endure critical situations, we conducted numerical sandbox tests such as Riemann problems, dam break, and landslide tsunami-related ones in 2 dimensions. In a second time, the model is applied on a real case study: the Oeschinen Lake (Switzerland). This naturally dammed lake is specifically selected since it is potentially affected by all above-mentioned phenomenon, including landsliding, wave generation, wave propagation in the water body and on the shore as well as the downstream flooding. Results show that the municipality of Kandersteg, located 3 km downstream the dam, is subject to catastrophic consequences in case of slope failure of large rock compartments from the slopes above the lake.

  12. Tsunami Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Web site assists the international Tsunami Society in its mission to distribute "knowledge about tsunamis to scientists, officials, and the public." In the first section of the site, scientists can download articles from the 2002 and 2003 issues of the journal Science of Tsunami Hazards. Visitors can also view footage from tsunamis around the world. The second section of the site discusses the details of the society including its origin, award recipients, and symposiums.

  13. NOAA Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Web site developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on issues surrounding tsunamis. It provides an extensive selection of links to information on how tsunamis are created, hazards associated with them, and how individuals and communities can prepare and respond to a tsunami. There is also information about the NOAA's role in tsunami warnings and preparedness, including locations of warning centers in the Pacific Ocean Basin, observations and data, forecasts, and hazard-assessment research and modeling.

  14. Evidence for a tsunami generated by the 1762 Great Arakan earthquake, Southeastern Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, D.; McHugh, C. M.; Mondal, D. R.; Seeber, L.; Steckler, M. S.; Bastas-Hernandez, A.; Akhter, S. H.; Mustaque, S.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    The devastating 2004 Sumatra earthquake and tsunami brought to the world's attention the possibility of large megathrust ruptures occurring along the heavily populated coast of Bangladesh. The Sunda-Andaman subduction arc continues into Bangladesh where oblique convergence of the Indian plate with the Burma segment of the arc was measured at GPS rates of 14 mm/yr. A long section of the megathurst ruptured during the 1762 Great Arakan earthquake along the Myanmar coast. A 1762 tsunami was reported from historic accounts and predicted from modelling, but geologic evidence for it was not previously reported. St Martin's Island and the Teknaf peninsula in SE Bangladesh are expressions of anticlines in the outer part of the accretionary prism of the Arakan subduction boundary. Our lithology, biostratigraphy and C-14 ages in this region provide evidence for a possible tsunami associated with the 1762 earthquake and validate the continuity of the rupture zone for as much as 700 km, from the Myanmar coast, Bay of Bengal shelf to the Sitakund anticline inland. In St. Martin's, ?70 km north of the shelf break, U-Th ages from ~2 m uplifted dead corals provide evidence for the 1762 rupture. The associated tsunami was dated from benthic foraminifers and marine molluscs obtained from a shell bed in a trench, and from the top of marine terraces possibly uplifted during 1762 or prior earthquakes. In Teknaf a chaotic bed containing benthic foraminifers, marine shells and cobble size rocks, extends for 100's of meters on top of the 2 m uplifted terrace. The marine molluscs were dated at 1695-1791 AD. The large ?2m uplift found in the region is likely to be deformation associated with the 1762 rupture and could also be partly related to anelastic growth of the accretion wedge and anticlines. It is likely now slowly subsiding due to continuing elastic loading of the megathrust. To produce that large coastal, presumably coseismic, uplift, the megathrust rupture must have reached at least that far updip (west). That uplift can be achieved by a large displacement on the megathrust below that coastline and/or by displacement along the steeper imbricate thrust faults responsible for the anticlines. Because the thrust front lies in shallow water a large tsunami would not be expected consistent with geological observations that point to low height tsunami waves.

  15. Tsunamis of the northeast Indian Ocean with a particular focus on the Bay of Bengal region—A synthesis and review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Edris; Dominey-Howes, Dale; Chagué-Goff, Catherine; Goff, James

    2012-08-01

    The 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami (2004 IOT) challenged assumptions about the level of regional hazard. Significantly, there has been some debate about the hypothesis that the northern Bay of Bengal may be capable of generating large tsunamis similar to the 2004 IOT. To test this hypothesis, we documented historical and palaeotsunamis in the northeast Indian Ocean. Using multiple sources, we identified 135 purported tsunamis. After completing a process of validity assessment, we categorised 31 definite tsunamis, 27 probable tsunamis, 51 doubtful tsunamis and 20 events that only caused a seiche or disturbance in an inland river. Six of the purported events were identified as either cyclones or earthquakes without any associated tsunamis. Using the reported list of 135 events, we identified different tsunamigenic regions and explored the temporal distribution of past events, with the oldest event dated to around 38,000BC (although the dated material is most likely reworked and this was probably a Holocene event). The second oldest event dated to 3000-2000BC. Historical records indicate that only one definite tsunami, occurring in AD1762, was generated in the northern Bay of Bengal. We encountered a number of significant challenges in reviewing and analysing data contained within the documents and sources we consulted. Statistical analysis of tsunami data from AD1710 to AD2010 suggests that the occurrence of a tsunami affecting the coasts of Bangladesh and Myanmar is 0.99% in any given year, and 63% in a century. We recognise that this incomplete tsunami dataset limits the capacity to fully quantify the hazard. As such, we recommend further 'deep' archival research coupled with regional palaeotsunami studies to gain a more sophisticated understanding of the hazard.

  16. 1854-2014: 160 years of far-field tsunami detection and warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okal, Emile

    2014-05-01

    The first scientific study of a tsunami as generated by a distant earthquake can be traced to Bache [1856] who correctly identified waves from the 1854 Nankai earthquake on California tidal gauges. We will review developments in the study of the relationship between earthquake source and far field tsunami, with their logical application to distant warning. Among the principal milestones, we discuss Hochstetter's [1869] work on the 1868 Arica tsunami, Jaggar's real-time, but ignored, warning of the 1923 Kamchatka tsunami in Hawaii, his much greater success with the 1933 Showa Sanriku event, the catastrophic 1946 Aleutian event, which led to the implementation of PTWC, the 1960 events in Hilo, and the 1964 Alaska tsunami, which led to the development of the A[now N]TWC. From the scientific standpoint, we will review the evolution of our attempts to measure the seismic source (in practice its seismic moment), always faster, and at always lower frequencies, culminating in the W-phase inversion, heralded by Kanamori and co-workers in the wake of the Sumatra disaster. Specific problems arise from events violating scaling laws, such as the so-called "tsunami earthquakes", and we will review methodologies to recognize them in real time, such as energy-to-moment ratios. Finally, we will discuss briefly modern technologies aimed at directly detecting the tsunami independently of the seismic source.

  17. Modeling of generation, propagation and runup of tsunami waves caused by oceanic impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Weiß, R.

    2005-01-01

    Die Modellierung von Bildung, Fortpflanzung und Auflaufen von impakt-generierten. Tsunami gibt Einsichten in die Bildungmechanismen dieser Wellen durch ozeanische Einschläge, ihre Fortpflanzung und ihr Auflaufen. Der SALE hydrocode wurde verwendet, um die Impaktprozesse zu simulieren. Ein neuentwickeltes 2D Fortpflanzungsmodell wird benutzt um die Fortpflanzung der Tsunamiwellen zu simulieren. Um den SALE code und das Wellenmodell miteinander zu verbinden, wurde als Zwischenschritt eine Ü...

  18. DSM GENERATION FROM STEREOSCOPIC IMAGERY FOR DAMAGE MAPPING, APPLICATION ON THE TOHOKU TSUNAMI

    OpenAIRE

    Gue?rin, Cyrielle; Binet, Renaud; Pierrot-deseilligny, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Change detection methods from remote sensing are largely investigated, especially for damage mapping after a disaster such as tsunami, earthquake, flood or landslide. In this context, a fast evaluation and localization of the inferred damages is essential for the rescue teams and the authorities [1], [2], [3], an automatic method is then particularly adapted. Today, most of the automatic or semi-automatic change detection methods are based on radiometric changes [2] but a significant amount t...

  19. Possible sources of the tsunami observed in the northwestern Indian Ocean following the 2013 September 24 Mw 7.7 Pakistan inland earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Satake, Kenji

    2014-11-01

    We report and analyse the tsunami recorded in the northwestern Indian Ocean at the Makran region following the Mw 7.7 Pakistan inland strike-slip earthquake on 2013 September 24. We analyse eleven tide gauge records as well as one DART record of this tsunami and perform numerical modelling of the tsunami that would be triggered by a range of possible sources. The tsunami registered a maximum wave height of 109 cm at the Qurayat tide gauge station (Oman). The dominant period of the tsunami was around 12 min, although wavelet analysis showed that parts of the tsunami energy were partitioned into a slightly wider period range of 7 and 16 min. Tsunami backward ray tracing showed that the tsunami source was possibly located offshore Jiwani (Pakistan) and that the tsunami was most likely triggered by the main shock. The aftershocks are distributed in the inland region and the coseismic vertical and horizontal displacements are also limited inland implying that the tsunami was generated by secondary sources triggered by the earthquake. Different possible tsunami sources including a mud volcano at the location of the newly generated island, and a mud volcano or diapir at offshore deep water were examined through numerical modelling and all failed to reproduce the observed waveforms. Numerical modelling showed that a submarine slump with a source dimension of about 10-15 km and a thickness of about 100 m located at 61.49°E and 24.62°N, that is, about 60-70 km off the Jiwani coast (Pakistan), seems capable of reasonably reproducing the wave amplitudes and periods of the observed tsunami waveforms. This event was the second instrumentally recorded tsunami in the region, after the Makran tsunami of 1945 November, and provides evidence for a hazard from landslide/slump-generated waves following seismic activity in the area.

  20. Tsunami Hazard Assessment along the Coast of Oman from Near- and Far-field Tectonic Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hussain, Issa; Baptista, Maria; Omira, Rachid; Al-Rawas, Ghazi; Deif, Ahmed; Al-Habsi, Zaid; Al-Jabri, Khalifa

    2014-05-01

    Coastal areas of Oman are exposed to tsunami threat associated with earthquakes generated in two major subduction zones, namely Makran and Sumatra. Both zones were responsible of triggering tsunamis that reached/impacted Oman coast. The Mw8.1 earthquake event of 1945, occurred in Makran zone, has caused a tsunami that was reported to affect the coast of Oman. The Mw9.2 Indian Ocean event of 2004 triggered a tsunami that was recorded in various tide-gauges stations of Oman with wave amplitude reaching ~1.7m in the port of Salalah. This work aims to assess tsunami hazard along the Oman coast considering both deterministic and probabilistic approaches. Deterministic approach uses particular source scenarios (most credible and/or worst case) from Makran and Sumatra subduction zones and computes the tsunami coastal impact through numerical modeling of expected waveforms, maximum wave heights distribution, and site-specific inundations. While, probabilistic approach includes the contribution of small and large sources and employs the probabilistic seismic hazard assessment together with the numerical modeling to evaluate the likelihood that a certain level of tsunami threat is exceeded at a certain location of Oman coast within a certain period of time. We present deterministic results in terms of regional scale distribution of maximum wave heights, tsunami waveforms computation, and inundation maps for a selected coastal area. For probabilistic assessment, we derive 250- and 500-years probability hazard exceedance maps and hazard curves for the Oman coast. The hazard maps consist of computing the likelihood that tsunami waves exceed a specific amplitude for the entire coast of Oman, and the hazard curves describe the variation of cumulative probabilities as function of wave amplitudes at some critical coastal points. Finally, we discuss the usefulness of obtained results for tsunami mitigation in Oman. Keywords: Tsunami, Oman, Deterministic approach, Probabilistic approach.

  1. Dynamics of tsunami waves

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Fre?de?ric; Dutykh, Denys

    2006-01-01

    The life of a tsunami is usually divided into three phases: the generation (tsunami source), the propagation and the inundation. Each phase is complex and often described separately. A brief description of each phase is given. Model problems are identified. Their formulation is given. While some of these problems can be solved analytically, most require numerical techniques. The inundation phase is less documented than the other phases. It is shown that methods based on Smoo...

  2. TSUNAMI CATALOG AND VULNERABILITY OF MARTINIQUE (LESSER ANTILLES, FRANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger, J.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to meteorological hazards (hurricanes, heavy rainfalls, long-period swells, etc., the Caribbean Islands are vulnerable to geological hazards such as earthquakes, landslides and volcanic eruptions caused by the complex tectonic activity and interactions in the region. Such events have generated frequently local or regional tsunamis, which often have affected the island of Martinique in the French West Indies. Over the past centuries, the island has been struck by destructive waves associated with local or regional events - such as those associated with the eruption of the Saint-Vincent volcano in 1902 and by tsunamis of distant origin as that generated by the 1755 Lisbon earthquake.The present study includes a classification of tsunamis that have affected Martinique since its discovery in 1502. It is based on international tsunami catalogs, historical accounts, and previous scientific studies and identifies tsunamigenic areas that could potentially generate destructive waves that could impact specific coastal areas of Martinique Island. The potential threat from tsunamis has been greatly increasing because of rapid urban expansion of coastal areas and development of tourism on the island.

  3. Sediment Transport, Mixing, and Erosion by an Impact Generated Tsunami: Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, D. H.; Tester, E. W.; Meyers, C. A.; Breger, D.; Chivas, A. R.

    2007-12-01

    The Gulf of Carpentaria contains two impact crater candidates, the 18 km Tabban and 12 km Kanmare craters. We have identified an impact ejecta layer in cores from the Gulf of Carpentaria containing probable shocked quartz, magnetic iron oxide impact spherules with a bimodal size distribution, vitreous Ca phosphate with a few percent Na2O and MgO(whitlockite?), lithified glauconite microfossil casts with partial calcite rims, and other impact ejecta. The quartz grains have at least 3 different orientations of closely spaced linear fractures only a few micrometers apart (probable planar deformation features). As we have imaged these planar features using a scanning electron microscope, the shocked nature of the grains must be confirmed by measuring crystallographic directions on conventional thin sections. We found impact ejecta at the deepest depth of our sampling in six different cores (Table 1). The ejecta layer extends up into the top 2 cm of every core. However, the thickness of the layer in cm (Obs) is much greater than that predicted by simple air fall models(1) (Calc) of ejecta thickness as a function of kilometers from the nearest crater candidate (Dist). The concentration of impact ejecta is much too high to explain the layer thicknesses by bioturbation of a formerly thin layer of ejecta. Thus, we interpret these layers as a megatsunami deposit from the impact event that formed Tabban and Kanmare craters. As supporting evidence, core MD31 (also from the Gulf of Carpentaria) has 14C ages in the top 70 cm that do not increase uniformly with increasing depth, but instead fluctuate in a random manner(2). Although the dominant ostracod assemblage is marine, MD32 has a large percentage of reworked lacustrine fossils and broken shell in the top 38 cm(3). Many Holocene marine sequences from the deepest part of the Gulf of Carpentaria contain reworked lacustrine fossils(4). Because the Gulf of Carpentaria was a lake until around 10,400 yr B.P., the mixture of fossil types is suggestive of erosion and redeposition by a tsunami or other means. Table 1. Impact Ejecta in Deep Sea Cores Latitude Long. Core Calc Obs Dist -16.850 139.885 VC01 232 >245 31 -16.501 139.890 VC23 052 >69 69 -15.659 138.010 BC48 7.4 >20 151 -12.313 138.979 MD32 0.3 >37 471 -10.789 138.719 MD29 0.1 >32 641 -9.8395 135.348 GC04 0.1 >61 846 References. 1. G. S. Collins, H. J. Melosh, R. A. Marcus, Meteoritics and Planetary Science (2004). 2. J. M. Reeves, A. R. Chivas, A. Garcia, P. D. Deckker, Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 246, 163 (2007). 3. J. M. Reeves, A. R. Chivas, S. Holt, M. J. J. Couapel, B. G. Jones, Quaternary International , (in press). 4. P. De Deckker, Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 62, 463 (1988).

  4. Tsunami effects at Korean Nuclear Power Plant Sites by Plate Boundary Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sobeom; Hyun, Seung Gyu; Bae, Jae Seok; Kim, Gun Hyeong; Yoon, Sung Bum

    2015-04-01

    Great earthquakes have occurred at the Nankai Trough due to the subduction of the Philippine Sea plate beneath Honshu, Japan. The 1707 Hoei tsunami associated with the Mw 8.7 earthquake, in particular, was the largest event generated in this area. The Nankai Trough is one of the most earthquake-prone area near Japan. And the tsunami affected to Korea according to a Korean historic literature. In this study, new hypothetical plate boundary earthquakes (Mw 9.6) ruptured simultaneously from the Nankai Trough to the Ryukyu Trench (NTRT) are proposed and applied to evaluate the tsunami effects at the Nuclear Power Plant Sites in Korea. In order to make reasonable tsunami sources the asperity model is adapted. The numerical model using the modified leap-frog finite difference scheme is employed to simulate the propagation of tsunami generated at NTRT. This numerical model considering the dispersion effect and inundation of tsunami is then employed to estimate the maximum tsunami heights. Predicted results will be used to make the measures against unexpected tsunami attacks.

  5. Design and Implementation of a C++ Software Package to scan for and parse Tsunami Messages issued by the Tsunami Warning Centers for Operational use at the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardina, V.

    2012-12-01

    The US Tsunami Warning Centers (TWCs) have traditionally generated their tsunami message products primarily as blocks of text then tagged with headers that identify them on each particular communications' (comms) circuit. Each warning center has a primary area of responsibility (AOR) within which it has an authoritative role regarding parameters such as earthquake location and magnitude. This means that when a major tsunamigenic event occurs the other warning centers need to quickly access the earthquake parameters issued by the authoritative warning center before issuing their message products intended for customers in their own AOR. Thus, within the operational context of the TWCs the scientists on duty have an operational need to access the information contained in the message products issued by other warning centers as quickly as possible. As a solution to this operational problem we designed and implemented a C++ software package that allows scanning for and parsing the entire suite of tsunami message products issued by the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC), the West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC), and the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). The scanning and parsing classes composing the resulting C++ software package allow parsing both non-official message products(observatory messages) routinely issued by the TWCs, and all official tsunami message products such as tsunami advisories, watches, and warnings. This software package currently allows scientists on duty at the PTWC to automatically retrieve the parameters contained in tsunami messages issued by WCATWC, JMA, or PTWC itself. Extension of the capabilities of the classes composing the software package would make it possible to generate XML and CAP compliant versions of the TWCs' message products until new messaging software natively adds this capabilities. Customers who receive the TWCs' tsunami message products could also use the package to automatically retrieve information from messages sent via any text-based communications' circuit currently used by the TWCs to disseminate their tsunami message products.

  6. A detail modeling of the 1960 and 2010 Chilean tsunami over French Polynesia: consequencies and improvements of the tsunami warning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Dominique; Jamelot, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    We present here a detail study of the last two major tsunami events of Chile that were observed significantly in Tahiti : the tsunami on May 22, 1960 of Valdivia generated by the strongest earthquake ever recorded (Mw=9.5) and the tsunami of the February 27, 2010 of Maule (Mw=8.8). In a first step, using numerical modeling, we will tune the seismic sources parameters to reproduce the tsunami heights given by the field-survey observations , testimonies and tide gages measurements made in Tahiti and Marquesas islands with the cartography of that time. Then from that validation, we are able to study these tsunamis more precisely to evaluate their coastal impacts on the actual shore of 2015 using recent tsunami inundation elevation models. We also study the sensibility of the tsunami height over the Polynesian coasts by modeling the impact of the tide (about 0.6 m in Tahiti and 1.30 m in Marquesas islands) but also punctual rises of the sea level induced by extreme meteorological phenomena like cyclonic waves, tropical storm or tropical rains that can each increase drastically the sea level of the lagoon around Tahiti by one meter or more. As a practical consequence of this study, the French Polynesia tsunami warning system could plan to take into account the tide in the warning context for a more accurate inundation forecast. Moreover, we can consider that a better understanding of catastrophic events that would combine a tsunami with an extreme meteorological phenomena will contribute to update the tsunami hazard knowledge of Tahiti.

  7. First applications of the HIPSE event generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The predictions of an event generator, HIPSE (Heavy-Ion Phase-Space Exploration), dedicated to the description of nuclear collisions in the intermediate energy range, are compared with experimental data collected by the INDRA and INDRA-ALADIN collaborations. Special emphasis is put on the kinematical characteristics of fragments and light particles at all impact parameters for the system Xe+Sn between 25 and 80 MeV/u. Considering the kinematical characteristics of the fragments, we have shown that the collective motion finds its origin both in the intrinsic motion of the nucleon and in the relative momentum between the two partners of the reaction suggesting a fragmentation process with a strong memory of the entrance channel. Moreover, the model gives information on the phase space explored during the collision as for example pre-equilibrium emission. It also allows a direct access of the partition at freeze-out (in terms of excitation energy, angular momentum, impact parameter...) before secondary decay

  8. A short history of tsunami research and countermeasures in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Shuto, Nobuo; Fujima, Koji

    2009-01-01

    The tsunami science and engineering began in Japan, the country the most frequently hit by local and distant tsunamis. The gate to the tsunami science was opened in 1896 by a giant local tsunami of the highest run-up height of 38 m that claimed 22,000 lives. The crucial key was a tide record to conclude that this tsunami was generated by a “tsunami earthquake”. In 1933, the same area was hit again by another giant tsunami. A total system of tsunami disaster mitigation including 10 “hard...

  9. Tsunami Research driven by Survivor Observations: Sumatra 2004, Tohoku 2011 and the Lituya Bay Landslide (Plinius Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Hermann M.

    2014-05-01

    The 10th anniversary of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami recalls the advent of tsunami video recordings by eyewitnesses. The tsunami of December 26, 2004 severely affected Banda Aceh along the North tip of Sumatra (Indonesia) at a distance of 250 km from the epicenter of the Magnitude 9.0 earthquake. The tsunami flow velocity analysis focused on two survivor videos recorded within Banda Aceh more than 3km from the open ocean. The exact locations of the tsunami eyewitness video recordings were revisited to record camera calibration ground control points. The motion of the camera during the recordings was determined. The individual video images were rectified with a direct linear transformation (DLT). Finally a cross-correlation based particle image velocimetry (PIV) analysis was applied to the rectified video images to determine instantaneous tsunami flow velocity fields. The measured overland tsunami flow velocities were within the range of 2 to 5 m/s in downtown Banda Aceh, Indonesia. The March 11, 2011, magnitude Mw 9.0 earthquake off the coast of Japan caused catastrophic damage and loss of life. Fortunately many survivors at evacuation sites recorded countless tsunami videos with unprecedented spatial and temporal coverage. Numerous tsunami reconnaissance trips were conducted in Japan. This report focuses on the surveys at selected tsunami eyewitness video recording locations along Japan's Sanriku coast and the subsequent tsunami video image analysis. Locations with high quality survivor videos were visited, eyewitnesses interviewed and detailed site topography scanned with a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). The analysis of the tsunami videos followed the four step procedure developed for the analysis of 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami videos at Banda Aceh. Tsunami currents up to 11 m/s were measured in Kesennuma Bay making navigation impossible. Further tsunami height and runup hydrographs are derived from the videos to discuss the complex effects of coastal structures on inundation and outflow flow velocities. Tsunamis generated by landslides and volcanic island collapses account for some of the most catastrophic events. On July 10, 1958, an earthquake Mw 8.3 along the Fairweather fault triggered a major subaerial landslide into Gilbert Inlet at the head of Lituya Bay on the south coast of Alaska. The landslide impacted the water at high speed generating a giant tsunami and the highest wave runup in recorded history. This event was observed by eyewitnesses on board the sole surviving fishing boat, which managed to ride the tsunami. The mega-tsunami runup to an elevation of 524 m caused total forest destruction and erosion down to bedrock on a spur ridge in direct prolongation of the slide axis. A cross-section of Gilbert Inlet was rebuilt in a two dimensional physical laboratory model. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) provided instantaneous velocity vector fields of decisive initial phase with landslide impact and wave generation as well as the runup on the headland. Three dimensional source and runup scenarios based on real world events are physically modeled in the NEES tsunami wave basin (TWB) at Oregon State University (OSU). The measured landslide and tsunami data serve to validate and advance numerical landslide tsunami models. This lecture encompasses multi-hazard aspects and implications of recent tsunami and cyclonic events around the world such as the November 2013 Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) in the Philippines.

  10. NEAR AND FAR-FIELD EFFECTS OF TSUNAMIS GENERATED BY THE PAROXYSMAL ERUPTIONS, EXPLOSIONS, CALDERA COLLAPSES AND MASSIVE SLOPE FAILURES OF THE KRAKATAU VOLCANO IN INDONESIA ON AUGUST 26-27, 1883

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The paroxysmal phases of Krakatau's volcanic activity on August 26-27, 1883, included numerous submarine Surtsean (phreatomagmatic eruptions, three sub air Plinian eruptions from the three main craters of Krakatau on Rakata island, followed by a fourth gigantic, sub air, Ultra-Plinian explosion. Landslides, flank failures, subsidences and a multiphase massive caldera collapse of the volcano - beginning near the Perbowetan crater on the northern portion of Rakata and followed by a collapse of the Danan crater - occurred over a period of at least 10 hours. The first of the three violent explosions occurred at 17: 07 Greenwich time (GMT on August 26.The second and third eruptions occurred at 05:30 GMT and at 06:44 GMT on August 27. Each of these events, as well as expanding gases from the submarine phreatomagmatic eruptions, lifted the water surrounding the island into domes or truncated cones that must have been about 100 meters or more in height. The height of the resulting waves attenuated rapidly away from the source because of their short periods and wavelengths. It was the fourth colossal explosion (VEI=6 and the subsequent massive f lank failure and caldera collapse of two thirds of Rakata Island, at 10:02 a.m., on August 27 that generated the most formidable of the destructive tsunami waves. A smaller fifth explosion, which occurred at 10:52 a.m., must have generated another large water cone and sizable waves. The final collapse of a still standing wall of Krakatau - which occurred several hours later at 16:38, generated additional waves.The near field effects of the main tsunami along the Sunda Strait in Western Java and Southern Sumatra, were devastating. Within an hour after the fourth explosion/caldera collapse, waves reaching heights of up to 37 m (120 feet destroyed 295 towns and villages and drowned a total of 36,417 people. Because of their short period and wavelength, the wave heights attenuated rapidly with distance away from the source region. It took approximately 2.5 hours for the tsunami waves to refract around Java and reach Batavia (Jakarta where the only operating tide gauge existed. Wavesof 2.4 meters in height were recorded - but with an unusually long period of 122 minutes. The long period is attributed to modification due to resonance effects and did not reflect source characteristics. The tsunami travel time to Surabaya at the eastern part of Java was 11.9 hours. The reported wave was only 0.2 meters.The far field effects of the tsunami were noticeable around the world, but insignificant. Small sea level oscillations were recorded by tide gauges at Port Blair in the Andaman Sea, at Port Elizabeth in South Africa, and as far away as Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Hawaii, Alaska, the North-American West Coast, South America, and even as far away as the English Channel. It took 12 hours for the tsunami to reach Aden on the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula, about 3800 nautical miles away. The wave reported at Aden, at Port Blair and at Port Elizabeth, represents the actual tsunami generated in the Sunda Strait. There were no land boundaries on the Indian Ocean side of Krakatau to prevent the tsunami energy from spreading in that direction. The tsunami travel time of a little over 300 nautical miles per hour to Aden appears reasonable. However, it is doubtful that the waves, which were reported at distant locations in the Pacific or in the Atlantic Ocean, represented the actual tsunami generated in the Sunda Strait. Very little, if any at all, of the tsunami energy could have escaped the surrounding inland seas to the east of the Sunda Strait. Most probably, the small waves that were observed in the Pacific as well as in the Atlantic were generated by the atmospheric pressure wave of the major Krakatoa explosion, and not from the actual tsunami generated in the Sunda Strait. The unusual flooding, which occurred at the Bay of Cardiff, in the U.K., was caused by atmospheric coupling of the pressure wave from the major Krakatau eruption.

  11. A case study of sanitary survey on community drinking water supplies after a severe (post-Tsunami) flooding event / Caso studio di sorveglianza sanitaria in una comunità per l'approvvigionamento di acque potabili dopo un maremoto post-Tsunami

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Emanuele, Ferretti; Lucia, Bonadonna; Luca, Lucentini; Simonetta, Della Libera; Maurizio, Semproni; Massimo, Ottaviani.

    Full Text Available This report presents a case study of a comprehensive sanitary survey on ca. 160 community drinking water supplies after a severe (post-Tsunami) flooding event in Sri Lanka. Sanitary inspection and microbiological and chemical water quality analyses were performed according to specifically-designed p [...] rocedures established on the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Significant hazards and critical points were identified in almost all the investigated water supplies. The overall results showed a significant level of microbiological and chemical risk associated with drinking water consumption within the investigated areas. The criteria and methods practised in this study are proposed as a model to assure an effective and reliable monitoring in post-emergencies involving possible deterioration of water quality and to identify health priorities related to water consumption.

  12. Numerical modeling of the 1964 Alaska tsunami in western Passage Canal and Whittier, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Nicolsky

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model of the wave dynamics in Passage Canal, Alaska during the Mw 9.2 megathrust earthquake is presented. During the earthquake, several types of waves were identified at the city of Whittier, located at the head of Passage Canal. The first wave is thought to have been a seiche, while the other two waves were probably triggered by submarine landslides. We model the seiche wave, landslide-generated tsunami, and tectonic tsunami in Passage Canal and compute inundation by each type of wave during the 1964 event. Modeled results are compared with eyewitness reports and an observed inundation line. Results of the numerical experiments let us identify where the submarine landslides might have occurred during the 1964 event. We identify regions at the head and along the northern shore of Passage Canal, where landslides triggered a wave that caused most of the damage in Whittier. An explanation of the fact that the 1964 tectonic tsunami in Whittier was unnoticed is presented as well. The simulated inundation by the seiche, landslide-generated tsunami, and tectonic tsunami can help to mitigate tsunami hazards and prepare Whittier for a potential tsunami.

  13. MadGraph/MadEvent. The new web generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new web-based version of the automatized process and event generator MadGraph/MadEvent is now available. Recent developments are: New models, notably MSSM, 2HDM and a framework for addition of user-defined models, inclusive sample generation and on-line hadronization and detector simulation. Event generation can be done on-line on any of our clusters. (author)

  14. What is the fault that has generated the earthquake on 8 September 1905 in Calabria, Italy? Source models compared by tsunami data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnoni, Gianluca; Armigliato, Alberto; Tinti, Stefano; Loreto, Maria Filomena; Facchin, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    The earthquake that the 8 September 1905 hit Calabria in southern Italy was the second Italian earthquake for magnitude in the last century. It destroyed many villages along the coast of the Gulf of Sant'Eufemia, caused more than 500 fatalities and has also generated a tsunami with non-destructive effects. The historical reports tell us that the tsunami caused major damage in the villages of Briatico, Bivona, Pizzo and Vibo Marina, located in the south part of the Sant'Eufemia gulf and minor damage to Tropea and to Scalea, this one being village located about 100 km far from the epicenter. Other reports include accounts of fishermen at sea during the tsunami. Further, the tsunami is visible on tide gauge records in Messina, Sicily, in Naples and in Civitavecchia, a harbour located to the north of Rome (Platania, 1907) In spite of the attention devoted by researchers to this case, until now, like for other tsunamigenic Italian earthquakes, the genetic structure of the earthquake is still not identified and debate is still open. In this context, tsunami simulations can provide contributions useful to find the source model more consistent with observational data. This approach was already followed by Piatanesi and Tinti (2002), who carried out numerical simulations of tsunamis from a number of local sources. In the last decade studies on this seismogenic area were int ensified resulting in new estimates for the 1905 earthquake magnitude (7.1 according to the CPTI11 catalogue) and in the suggestion of new source models. By using an improved tsunami simulation model, more accurate bathymetry data, this work tests the source models investigated by Piatanesi and Tinti (2002) and in addition the new fault models proposed by Cucci and Tertulliani (2010) and by Loreto et al. (2013). The simulations of the tsunami are calculated by means of the code, UBO-TSUFD, that solves the linear equations of Navier-Stokes in approximation of shallow water with the finite-difference technique, while the initial conditions are calculated via Okada's formula. The key-result used to test the models against the data is the maximum height of the tsunami calculated close to the shore at a minimum depth of 5m corrected using the values of the initial coseismic field deformation.

  15. ASTARTE: Assessment Strategy and Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, M. A.; Yalciner, A. C.; Canals, M.

    2014-12-01

    Tsunamis are low frequency but high impact natural disasters. In 2004, the Boxing Day tsunami killed hundreds of thousands of people from many nations along the coastlines of the Indian Ocean. Tsunami run-up exceeded 35 m. Seven years later, and in spite of some of the best warning technologies and levels of preparedness in the world, the Tohoku-Oki tsunami in Japan dramatically showed the limitations of scientific knowledge on tsunami sources, coastal impacts and mitigation measures. The experience from Japan raised serious questions on how to improve the resilience of coastal communities, to upgrade the performance of coastal defenses, to adopt a better risk management, and also on the strategies and priorities for the reconstruction of damaged coastal areas. Societal resilience requires the reinforcement of capabilities to manage and reduce risk at national and local scales.ASTARTE (Assessment STrategy And Risk for Tsunami in Europe), a 36-month FP7 project, aims to develop a comprehensive strategy to mitigate tsunami impact in this region. To achieve this goal, an interdisciplinary consortium has been assembled. It includes all CTWPs of NEAM and expert institutions across Europe and worldwide. ASTARTE will improve i) basic knowledge of tsunami generation and recurrence going beyond simple catalogues, with novel empirical data and new statistical analyses for assessing long-term recurrence and hazards of large events in sensitive areas of NEAM, ii) numerical techniques for tsunami simulation, with focus on real-time codes and novel statistical emulation approaches, and iii) methods for assessment of hazard, vulnerability, and risk. ASTARTE will also provide i) guidelines for tsunami Eurocodes, ii) better tools for forecast and warning for CTWPs and NTWCs, and iii) guidelines for decision makers to increase sustainability and resilience of coastal communities. In summary, ASTARTE will develop basic scientific and technical elements allowing for a significant enhancement of the Tsunami Warning System in the NEAM region in terms of monitoring, early warning and forecast, governance and resilience. This work is funded by project ASTARTE - Assessment, STrategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe. Grant 603839, 7th FP (ENV.2013.6.4-3 ENV.2013.6.4-3)

  16. A Dozen Tsunamis from 2004 to 2014: Lessons and Revelations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okal, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    The past 10 years have witnessed two truly catastrophic tsunamis (2004 and2011), but also a dozen other ones, some significantlydamaging. Among the scientific lessons learnt from the Sumatra event, the mostimportant is the failure of the concept of maximum earthquake predictablefrom simple tectonic parameters, resulting in the precautionary suggestion thatall subduction zones may conceivably support a mega earthquake, as strikinglyillustrated by the 2011 Tohoku event. A critical analysis of tsunami warningstrategies and population response in the past decade revealsconsiderable progress in the far field (with only two or threepast-Sumatra casualties), but a relatively random record in the near field,where successes (Solomon Islands 2007; Bengkulu 2007) are overshadowed byoutright failures, notably during the 2010 Mentawai "tsunami earthquake".We review remaining challenges and progress towards their resolution, bothscientific (such as the real-time identification of "tsunami earthquakes" andthe understanding of wave sequencing in the far field), and societal (includinga post-mortem of the 2011 Fukushima disaster).The exceptional size of the 2004 Sumatra earthquake (and to someextent of following ones) has allowed the coupling of their tsunamis toboth the solid Earth and the atmosphere in non-traditional ways, offering thepossibility of detection by a remarkable variety of "incompetent" instrumentsranging from hydrophones to magnetometers and ionospheric probes. Beyondthe mere intellectual interest of these observations, they open the doorto possible applications towards a range of complementary methods of tsunamiwarning.Finally, the deep 2013 Okhotsk Sea earthquake has generated asmall but recordable tsunami, whose millimetric amplitude is correctlypredicted by a number of methodologies, suggesting that deep events maycontribute to tsunami hazard, if even larger-sized deep earthquakes couldoccur.

  17. Tsunami Surge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Tsunami Surge is a project for students in grades 6-12 that uses real-time data sources from the internet to help students answer these questions. They will be challenged to think critically and creatively in their efforts to understand, predict, and guard against this powerful force of nature. Students will learn to describe what a tsunami is and what causes it, explain how tsunamis are different from regular waves in the ocean, determine where tsunamis are most likely to originate, create a plan for a tsunami warning system, and explain how to prepare and protect an area that could be hit by a tsunami. There are many activities and helpful tools for the teachers, like a reference guide and teacher guide.

  18. Hydrodynamics of impact-induced tsunami over the Martian ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Yasutaka; Goto, Kazuhisa; Minoura, Koji; Komatsu, Goro; Imamura, Fumihiko

    2014-05-01

    Large bodies of liquid water ranging from lakes to oceans have been hypothesized to have occupied the surface of ancient Mars episodically. Such inferences have been founded largely on geomorphological observations of putative shoreline features during the period ranging from the 1980s to the early 2000s. High-resolution satellite images obtained during various Mars missions conducted since the early 2000s have enabled detailed sedimentological studies. One phenomenon that might leave sedimentological traces of the purported Martian paleo-oceans is a bolide impact and consequent generation of large tsunami waves. Numerical modeling of impact-induced tsunami waves on a hypothesized northern plains paleo-ocean was performed to elucidate their potential propagation characteristics on Mars, including the ranges of wave height and velocity. When considering a tsunami triggered by a 50 km-diameter impact cratering event, the offshore and shore-zone wave heights respectively reached 40-50 m and 120 m. In the same test scenario, the tsunami wave velocity reached 20 m/s near the crater and 16 m/s at the shore zone. The wave height and velocity in highly cratered regions, such as Arabia Terra, tend to be relatively low because tsunami inundation is diffused by impact crater rims existing along the tsunami passage.

  19. Automated Testing with Targeted Event Sequence Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Svenning; Prasad, Mukul R.

    2013-01-01

    Automated software testing aims to detect errors by producing test inputs that cover as much of the application source code as possible. Applications for mobile devices are typically event-driven, which raises the challenge of automatically producing event sequences that result in high coverage. Some existing approaches use random or model-based testing that largely treats the application as a black box. Other approaches use symbolic execution, either starting from the entry points of the applications or on specific event sequences. A common limitation of the existing approaches is that they often fail to reach the parts of the application code that require more complex event sequences. We propose a two-phase technique for automatically finding event sequences that reach a given target line in the application code. The first phase performs concolic execution to build summaries of the individual event handlers of the application. The second phase builds event sequences backward from the target, using the summaries together with a UI model of the application. Our experiments on a collection of open source Android applications show that this technique can successfully produce event sequences that reach challenging targets.

  20. Development of tsunami hazard maps for the Mentawai Islands, Indonesia, using heterogeneous slip models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, J.; Pranantyo, I. R.; Kongko, W.; Haunan, A.; Horspool, N.; Maemunah, I.; Natawidjaja, D.; Latief, H.; Cummins, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    Heterogeneous distribution of slip during megathrust earthquakes has been shown to significantly affect the spatial distribution of tsunami height in both numerical studies and field observations. This means that tsunami hazard maps generated using uniform slip distributions in their tsunami source models may underestimate tsunami inundation in some locations compared with real events of the same magnitude in the same location. In order to more completely define areas that may be inundated during a tsunami it is important to consider how different possible distributions of slip will impact different parts of the coastline. We generate tsunami inundation maps for the Mentawai Islands, West Sumatra, Indonesia, from a composite suite of possible source models that are consistent with current knowledge of the source region. First, a suite of earthquake source models with randomly distributed slip along the Mentawai Segment of the Sunda Subduction Zone are generated. From this suite we select source models that generate vertical deformation consistent with that observed in coral palaeogeodetic records of previous ruptures of the Mentawai Segment. Tsunami inundation is modelled using high resolution elevation data for selected source models and the results compiled to generate a maximum tsunami inundation zone. This allows us to constrain the slip distribution beneath the Mentawai Islands, where coral palaeogeodetic data is available, while allowing greater variation in the slip distribution away from the islands, in particular near the trench where large slip events can generate large tsunami. This method also allows us to consider high slip events on deeper portions of the megathrust between the Mentawai Islands and the Sumatran Mainland, which give greater tsunami inundation on the eastern part of the Mentawai Islands and the west coast of Sumatra compared with near-trench events. By accounting for uncertainty in slip distribution, the resulting hazard maps give a more complete picture of the areas that may be inundated compared with hazard maps derived from a single ';worst case' source model. These maps allow for more robust tsunami evacuation plans to be developed to support immediate community evacuation in response to strong or long-lasting earthquake ground shaking.

  1. New Measurements and Modeling Capability to Improve Real-time Forecast of Cascadia Tsunamis along U.S. West Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y.; Titov, V. V.; Bernard, E. N.; Spillane, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The tragedies of 2004 Sumatra and 2011 Tohoku tsunamis exposed the limits of our knowledge in preparing for devastating tsunamis, especially in the near field. The 1,100-km coastline of the Pacific coast of North America has tectonic and geological settings similar to Sumatra and Japan. The geological records unambiguously show that the Cascadia fault had caused devastating tsunamis in the past and this geological process will cause tsunamis in the future. Existing observational instruments along the Cascadia Subduction Zone are capable of providing tsunami data within minutes of tsunami generation. However, this strategy requires separation of the tsunami signals from the overwhelming high-frequency seismic waves produced during a strong earthquake- a real technical challenge for existing operational tsunami observational network. A new-generation of nano-resolution pressure sensors can provide high temporal resolution of the earthquake and tsunami signals without loosing precision. The nano-resolution pressure sensor offers a state-of the-science ability to separate earthquake vibrations and other oceanic noise from tsunami waveforms, paving the way for accurate, early warnings of local tsunamis. This breakthrough underwater technology has been tested and verified for a couple of micro-tsunami events (Paros et al., 2011). Real-time forecast of Cascadia tsunamis is becoming a possibility with the development of nano-tsunameter technology. The present study provides an investigation on optimizing the placement of these new sensors so that the forecast time can be shortened.. The presentation will cover the optimization of an observational array to quickly detect and forecast a tsunami generated by a strong Cascadia earthquake, including short and long rupture scenarios. Lessons learned from the 2011 Tohoku tsunami will be examined to demonstrate how we can improve the local forecast using the new technology We expect this study to provide useful guideline for future siting and deployment of the new-generation tsunameters. Driven by the new technology, we demonstrate scenarios of real-time forecast of Cascadia tsunami impact along the Pacific Northwest, as well as in the Puget Sound.

  2. Tsunami Forecast: Connecting Science with Warning Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V. V.

    2014-12-01

    Tsunami modeling capability had been rapidly developing even before the watershed event of the 2004 Sumatra tsunami. During 1990-2000, the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction, the tsunami scientific community took on the difficult task of developing the modeling capability that would provide accuracy needed for long-term tsunami forecast — tsunami hazard maps. After exhaustive field, laboratory and modeling efforts by the international scientific community, the modeling capability has been achieved with accuracy deemed sufficient for operational use. Several real-time model forecast tools started to be used at TWCs in the US and Japan. In parallel, the observational component of tsunami warning systems had been improving, including updated existing seismic and coastal sea-level stations array. New early detection and measurement system (DART) has been developed specifically for tsunami forecast applications. The 2004 Sumatra tsunami has triggered the efforts of intensive implementation of science results into operational tsunami warning capabilities. At present, several tsunami forecast systems, based on various modeling and detection capabilities, are operational. Since 2004, over 40 tsunamis, including the 2011 Japanese tsunami, provided real-time tests for the tsunami forecast system capabilities. Preliminary assessment of tsunami forecast performance will be presented based on the analysis of the U.S. operational tsunami inundation forecast. Assessing forecast performance is important to evaluate the needs for improvement and further research. Baseline of the tsunami forecast skills has now been established and will be presented based on the data from the tsunamis during the decade. Future improvements and future challenges will also be discussed.

  3. Tsunami hazard assessment along the U. S. East Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajalli Bakhsh, T.; Grilli, S. T.; Harris, J. C.; Kirby, J. T.; Shi, F.; Tehranirad, B.

    2012-12-01

    In 2005, the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) was tasked by Congress to develop tsunami inundation maps for the entire US coastline. This work provides an overview of the modeling work related to the development inundation maps along the US east coast. In this region the paucity of historical tsunami records and lack of paleotsunami observations yields a large uncertainty on the source and magnitude of potential extreme tsunami events, and their related coastal hazard. In the Atlantic Ocean basin significant tsunami hazard may result from far-field earthquakes, such as a repeat of the M8.9 Lisbon 1755 event in the Azores convergence zone, or a hypothetical extreme M9 earthquake in the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT). Additionally, it is believed that a repeat of one of the large historical collapses, identified at the toe of the Cumbre Vieja volcano on La Palma (Canary Islands; i.e., with a maximum volume of 450 km3), could pose a major tsunami hazard to the entire US east coast. Finally, in the near-field, large submarine mass failure (SMF) scars have been mapped by USGS, particularly North of the Carolinas (e.g., Currituck), which are believed to have caused past tsunamis. Large SMFs can be triggered by moderate seismicity (M7 or so), such as can occur on the east coast. In fact, one of the few historical tsunamis that significantly affected this region was caused by the 1929 Grand Bank underwater slide, which was triggered by a M7.2 earthquake. In this work we identify and parameterize all potential tsunami sources affecting the US east coast, and perform simulations of tsunami generation, propagation, and coastal impact in a series of increasingly resolved nested grids. Following this methodology, tsunami inundation maps are currently being developed for a few of the most affected areas. In simulations, we use a robust and well-validated Fully Nonlinear Boussinesq long-wave model (FUNWAVE-TVD), on Cartesian or spherical grids. Coseismic tsunami sources are modeled using the standard Okada method. For landslide tsunamis, we first generate tsunami sources using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes model (THETIS or NHWAVE). These models feature all relevant physical processes, such as frequency dispersion (very important for landslide sources), nonlinear wave effects during shoaling, and dissipation by bottom friction and wave breaking (via a shock-capturing TVD algorithm). In modeling coastal hazard from various sources, we find that tsunamigenic SMFs, which are the nearest tsunami sources and can potentially cause highly focused coastal runup, may control tsunami hazard for many east coast communities north of the Carolinas. In many cases, however, we find that a wide shallow continental shelf may cause significant dissipation of the shorter waves caused by SMFs and hence offer some protection. The accurate modeling of the delicate balance between nonlinear and dissipative processes governing such situations is currently being researched and will be the object of a separate presentation. Additionally, considerable efforts are being devoted to properly parameterizing extreme SMFs, which are also the object of collaborative work with geologists and marine geotechnical experts (reported independently).

  4. National Geophysical Data Center Historical Natural Hazard Event Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Stroker, K. J.

    2008-12-01

    After a major event such as the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami or the 2008 Chengdu earthquake, there is interest in knowing if similar events have occurred in the area in the past and how often they have occurred. The National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) historical natural hazard event databases can provide answers to these types of questions. For example, a search of the tsunami database reveals that over 100 tsunamis have occurred in the Indian Ocean since 416 A.D. Further analysis shows that there has never been such a deadly tsunami anywhere in the world. In fact, the 2004 event accounts for almost half of all the deaths caused by tsunamis in the database. A search of the earthquake database shows that since 193 B.C., China has experienced over 500 significant earthquakes that have caused over 2 million deaths and innumerable dollars in damages. The NGDC global historical tsunami, significant earthquake, and significant volcanic eruption databases include events that range in date from 4350 B.C. to the present. The database includes all tsunami events, regardless of magnitude or intensity; and all earthquakes and volcanic eruptions that either caused deaths, moderate damage, or generated a tsunami. Earthquakes are also included that were assigned either a magnitude >= 7.5 or Modified Mercalli Intensity >= X. The basic data in the historical event databases include the date, time, location of the event, magnitude of the phenomenon (tsunami or earthquake magnitude and/or intensity, or volcanic explosivity index), and socio-economic information such as the total number of deaths, injuries, houses damaged, and dollar damage. The tsunami database includes an additional table with information on the runups (locations where tsunami waves were observed by eyewitnesses, tide gauges, or deep ocean sensors). The volcanic eruptions database includes information on the volcano elevation and type. There are currently over 2000 tsunami source events, 12500 tsunami runup locations, 5700 earthquakes, and 460 volcanic eruptions in the databases. The natural hazard event databases are stored in a relational database management system (RDBMS) which facilitates the integration and access to these related databases. For example, users can search for destructive earthquakes that preceded a volcanic eruption that then generated a damaging tsunami. The databases are accessible over the Web as tables, reports, and interactive maps. The maps provide integrated web-based GIS access to individual GIS layers including the natural hazard events and various spatial reference layers such as topography, population density, and political boundaries.

  5. Scenarios for earthquake-generated tsunamis on a complex tectonic area of diffuse deformation and low velocity: The Alboran Sea, Western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Gomez, J. A.; Aniel-Quiroga, I.; Gonzalez, M.; Olabarrieta, M.; Carreno, E.

    2011-01-01

    The tsunami impact on the Spanish and North African coasts of the Alboran Sea generated by several reliable seismic tsunamigenic sources in this area was modeled. The tectonic setting is complex and a study of the potential sources from geological data is basic to obtain probable source characteristics. The tectonic structures considered in this study as potentially tsunamigenic are: the Alboran Ridge associated structures, the Carboneras Fault Zone and the Yusuf Fault Zone. We characterized 12 probable tsunamigenic seismic sources in the Alboran Basin based on the results of recent oceanographical studies. The strain rate in the area is low and therefore its seismicity is moderate and cannot be used to infer characteristics of the major seismic sources. These sources have been used as input for the numerical simulation of the wave propagation, based on the solution of the nonlinear shallow water equations through a finite-difference technique. We calculated the Maximum Wave Elevations, and Tsunami Travel Times using the numerical simulations. The results are shown as maps and profiles along the Spanish and African coasts. The sources associated with the Alboran Ridge show the maximum potential to generate damaging tsunamis, with maximum wave elevations in front of the coast exceeding 1.5. m. The Carboneras and Yusuf faults are not capable of generating disastrous tsunamis on their own, although their proximity to the coast could trigger landslides and associated sea disturbances. The areas which are more exposed to the impact of tsunamis generated in the Alboran Sea are the Spanish coast between Malaga and Adra, and the African coast between Alhoceima and Melilla. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Development of tsunami-seismic PSA software for nuclear power plants in multi-unit site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large tsunami induced by the Great East Japan earthquakes on March 11, 2011 triggered the accidents at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The earthquake caused loss of off-site power and the tsunami failed most of the ultimate heat sink of the seawater pumps and on-site diesel generators and eventually DC batteries, resulting in station blackout (SBO), loss of core cooling and loss of reactor control. Because of insufficient preparedness against such severe accidents, three reactor cores damaged and large amount of radioactivity released to the environment. The primary lessons learned are enhancement of protective measures against severe accidents by external events, especially tsunami-seismic events. This paper describes development of tsunami-seismic PSA methods and sample analysis to gain some of risk insights and directions of PSA technology improvement. (author)

  7. A standard event class for Monte Carlo generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    StdHepC++ is a CLHEP Monte Carlo event class library which provides a common interface to Monte Carlo event generators. This work is an extensive redesign of the StdHep Fortran interface to use the full power of object oriented design. A generated event maps naturally onto the Directed Acyclic Graph concept and we have used the HepMC classes to implement this. The full implementation allows the user to combine events to simulate beam pileup and access them transparently as though they were a single event

  8. SAFRR tsunami scenario: impacts on California ecosystems, species, marine natural resources, and fisheries: Chapter G in The SAFRR (Science Application for Risk Reduction) Tsunami Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Deborah; Wein, Anne; Wilson, Rick

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate the effects of the SAFRR Tsunami Scenario on California’s ecosystems, species, natural resources, and fisheries. We discuss mitigation and preparedness approaches that can be useful in Tsunami planning. The chapter provides an introduction to the role of ecosystems and natural resources in tsunami events (Section 1). A separate section focuses on specific impacts of the SAFRR Tsunami Scenario on California’s ecosystems and endangered species (Section 2). A section on commercial fisheries and the fishing fleet (Section 3) documents the plausible effects on California’s commercial fishery resources, fishing fleets, and communities. Sections 2 and 3 each include practical preparedness options for communities and suggestions on information needs or research. Our evaluation indicates that many low-lying coastal habitats, including beaches, marshes and sloughs, rivers and waterways connected to the sea, as well as nearshore submarine habitats will be damaged by the SAFRR Tsunami Scenario. Beach erosion and complex or high volumes of tsunami-generated debris would pose major challenges for ecological communities. Several endangered species and protected areas are at risk. Commercial fisheries and fishing fleets will be affected directly by the tsunami and indirectly by dependencies on infrastructure that is damaged. There is evidence that in some areas intact ecosystems, notably sand dunes, will act as natural defenses against the tsunami waves. However, ecosystems do not provide blanket protection against tsunami surge. The consequences of ecological and natural resource damage are estimated in the millions of dollars. These costs are driven partly by the loss of ecosystem services, as well as cumulative and follow-on impacts where, for example, increased erosion during the tsunami can in turn lead to subsequent damage and loss to coastal properties. Recovery of ecosystems, natural resources and fisheries is likely to be lengthy and expensive. Preparedness is key to enhancing resilience to ecological impacts.

  9. Tsunami observations in the open ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, A. B.

    2014-09-01

    Deep-sea tsunami measurements play a major role in understanding the physics of tsunami wave generation and propagation, and in the creation of an effective tsunami warning system. The paper provides an overview of the history of tsunami recording in the open ocean from the beginning (about 50 years ago) to the present day. It describes modern tsunami monitoring systems, including the Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART), innovative Japanese bottom cable projects, and the NEPTUNE-Canada geophysical bottom observatory. The specific peculiarities of seafloor longwave observations in the deep ocean are discussed and compared with those recorded in coastal regions. Tsunami detection in bottom presure observations is exemplified based on analysis of distant (22000 km) records of the 2004 Sumatra tsunami in the northeastern Pacific.

  10. Deep-Ocean Measurements of Tsunami Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Eblé, Marie C.

    2015-03-01

    Deep-ocean tsunami measurements play a major role in understanding the physics of tsunami wave generation and propagation, and in improving the effectiveness of tsunami warning systems. This paper provides an overview of the history of tsunami recording in the open ocean from the earliest days, approximately 50 years ago, to the present day. Modern tsunami monitoring systems such as the self-contained Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis and innovative cabled sensing networks, including, but not limited to, the Japanese bottom cable projects and the NEPTUNE-Canada geophysical bottom observatory, are highlighted. The specific peculiarities of seafloor longwave observations in the deep ocean are discussed and compared with observations recorded in coastal regions. Tsunami detection in bottom pressure observations is exemplified through analysis of distant (22,000 km from the source) records of the 2004 Sumatra tsunami in the northeastern Pacific.

  11. The STAR "plug and play" event generator framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, J.; Novak, J.; Lauret, J.; Perevoztchikov, V.

    2014-06-01

    The STAR experiment pursues a broad range of physics topics in pp,pA and AA collisions produced by the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Such a diverse experimental program demands a simulation framework capable of supporting an equally diverse set of event generators, and a flexible event record capable of storing the (common) particle-wise and (varied) event-wise information provided by the external generators. With planning underway for the next round of upgrades to exploit ep and eA collisions from the electron-ion collider (or eRHIC), these demands on the simulation infrastructure will only increase and requires a versatile framework. STAR has developed a new event-generator framework based on the best practices in the community (a survey of existing approach had been made and the "best of all worlds" kept in mind in our design). It provides a common set of base classes which establish the interface between event generators and the simulation and handles most of the bookkeeping associated with a simulation run. This streamlines the process of integrating and configuring an event generator within our software chain. Developers implement two classes: the interface for their event generator, and their event record. They only need to loop over all particles in their event and push them out into the event record. The framework is responsible for vertex assignment, stacking the particles out for simulation, and event persistency. Events from multiple generators can be merged together seamlessly, with an event record which is capable of tracing each particle back to its parent generator. We present our work and approach in detail and illustrate its usefulness by providing examples of event generators implemented within the STAR framework covering for very diverse physics topics. We will also discuss support for event filtering, allowing users to prune the event record of particles which are outside of our acceptance, and/or abort events prior to the more computationally expensive digitization and reconstruction phases. Event filtering has been supported in the previous framework and showed to save enormous amount of resources - the approach within the new framework is a generalization of filtering.

  12. Tsunami Simulations for Regional Sources in the South China and Adjoining Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalligeris, N.; Okal, E. A.; Synolakis, C. E.

    2009-04-01

    The tsunami potential from sources located in the South China Sea and its adjoining basins, Sulu and Sulawesi Seas, is examined. Tsunami numerical modeling was performed using the MOST code [Titov and Synolakis, 1998] for a number of possible earthquake scenarios at the various local subduction zones. For the Sulawesi Sea, we consider the events of 1918 at the Mindanao subduction zone, and the 1996 at the Northern end of the Makassar Strait. For the Sulu Sea, we consider a scenario inspired by the 1948 Panay earthquake (because of the fractured nature of the plate system in those areas, it is not feasible to consider much larger earthquakes). Tsunami simulations of these events show that the tsunami is contained within the relevant marginal seas and does not penetrate significantly the greater South China Basin. However, tsunami hazard that could cause significant damage was found for the Eastern coast of Borneo. Farther North, we consider as worst case scenarios events reaching 10**29 dyn*cm with rupture lengths of 400 km, both off Luzon Island and, under a slightly different geometry, off the Luzon Straits separating the Philippines and Taiwan. These scenarios show very significant hazard to all coastlines bordering the South China Sea, including Indochina and Borneo. Finally, two landslide-generated tsunami scenarios are presented, inspired from the event of 14 February 1934 off the Luzon Strait, and the presumably Holocene Brunei mega-slide.

  13. Tsunami wave energy

    CERN Document Server

    Dutykh, Denys

    2008-01-01

    In the vast literature on tsunami research, few articles have been devoted to energy issues. A theoretical investigation on the energy of waves generated by bottom motion is performed here. We start with the full incompressible Euler equations in the presence of a free surface and derive both dispersive and non-dispersive shallow-water equations with an energy equation. It is shown that dispersive effects only appear at higher order in the energy budget. Then we solve the Cauchy-Poisson problem of tsunami generation for the linearized water wave equations. Exchanges between potential and kinetic energies are clearly revealed.

  14. TSUNAMI HAZARD IN NORTHERN VENEZUELA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Theilen-Willige

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on LANDSAT ETM and Digital Elevation Model (DEM data derived by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM, 2000 of the coastal areas of Northern Venezuela were investigated in order to detect traces of earlier tsunami events. Digital image processing methods used to enhance LANDSAT ETM imageries and to produce morphometric maps (such as hillshade, slope, minimum and maximum curvature maps based on the SRTM DEM data contribute to the detection of morphologic traces that might be related to catastrophic tsunami events. These maps combined with various geodata such as seismotectonic data in a GIS environment allow the delineation of coastal regions with potential tsunami risk. The LANDSAT ETM imageries merged with digitally processed and enhanced SRTM data clearly indicate areas that might be prone by flooding in case of catastrophic tsunami events.

  15. Tsunami hazard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami on 11 March, 2011 has led the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant to a serious accident, which highlighted a variety of technical issues such as a very low design tsunami height and insufficient preparations in case a tsunami exceeding the design tsunami height. Lessons such as to take measures to be able to maintain the important safety features of the facility for tsunamis exceeding design height and to implement risk management utilizing Probabilistic Safety Assessment are shown. In order to implement the safety assessment on nuclear power plants across Japan accordingly to the back-fit rule, Nuclear Regulatory Commission will promulgate/execute the New Safety Design Criteria in July 2013. JNES has positioned the 'enhancement of probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment' as highest priority issue and implemented in order to support technically the Nuclear Regulatory Authority in formulating the new Safety Design Criteria. Findings of the research had reflected in the 'Technical Review Guidelines for Assessing Design Tsunami Height based on tsunami hazards'. (author)

  16. Generating tsunami risk knowledge at community level as a base for planning and implementation of risk reduction strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegscheider, S.; Post, J.; Zosseder, K.; Mück, M.; Strunz, G.; Riedlinger, T.; Muhari, A.; Anwar, H. Z.

    2011-02-01

    More than 4 million Indonesians live in tsunami-prone areas along the southern and western coasts of Sumatra, Java and Bali. Although a Tsunami Early Warning Center in Jakarta now exists, installed after the devastating 2004 tsunami, it is essential to develop tsunami risk knowledge within the exposed communities as a basis for tsunami disaster management. These communities need to implement risk reduction strategies to mitigate potential consequences. The major aims of this paper are to present a risk assessment methodology which (1) identifies areas of high tsunami risk in terms of potential loss of life, (2) bridges the gaps between research and practical application, and (3) can be implemented at community level. High risk areas have a great need for action to improve people's response capabilities towards a disaster, thus reducing the risk. The methodology developed here is based on a GIS approach and combines hazard probability, hazard intensity, population density and people's response capability to assess the risk. Within the framework of the GITEWS (German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System) project, the methodology was applied to three pilot areas, one of which is southern Bali. Bali's tourism is concentrated for a great part in the communities of Kuta, Legian and Seminyak. Here alone, about 20 000 people live in high and very high tsunami risk areas. The development of risk reduction strategies is therefore of significant interest. A risk map produced for the study area in Bali can be used for local planning activities and the development of risk reduction strategies.

  17. GPS-TEC of the Ionospheric Disturbances as a Tool for Early Tsunami Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunitsyn, Viacheslav E.; Nesterov, Ivan A.; Shalimov, Sergey L.; Krysanov, Boris Yu.; Padokhin, Artem M.; Rekenthaler, Douglas

    2013-04-01

    Recently, the GPS measurements were used for retrieving the information on the various types of ionospheric responses to seismic events (earthquakes, seismic Rayleigh waves, and tsunami) which generate atmospheric waves propagating up to the ionospheric altitudes where the collisions between the neutrals and charge particles give rise to the motion of the ionospheric plasma. These experimental results can well be used in architecture of the future tsunami warning system. The point is an earlier (in comparison with seismological methods) detection of the ionospheric signal that can indicate the moment of tsunami generation. As an example we consider the two-dimensional distributions of the vertical total electron content (TEC) variations in the ionosphere both close to and far from the epicenter of the Japan undersea earthquake of March 11, 2011 using radio tomographic (RT) reconstruction of high-temporal-resolution (2-minute) data from the Japan and the US GPS networks. Near-zone TEC variations shows a diverging ionospheric perturbation with multi-component spectral composition emerging after the main shock. The initial phase of the disturbance can be used as an indicator of the tsunami generation and subsequently for the tsunami early warning. Far-zone TEC variations reveals distinct wave train associated with gravity waves generated by tsunami. According to observations tsunami arrives at Hawaii and further at the coast of Southern California with delay relative to the gravity waves. Therefore the gravity wave pattern can be used in the early tsunami warning. We support this scenario by the results of modeling with the parameters of the ocean surface perturbation corresponding to the considered earthquake. In addition it was observed in the modeling that at long distance from the source the gravity wave can pass ahead of the tsunami. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants 11-05-01157 and 12-05-33065).

  18. Event Generator for Particle Production in High-Energy Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Schaelicke, A.; Gleisberg, T.; Hoeche, S.; Schumann, S.; Winter, J.; Krauss, F.; Soff, G.

    2003-01-01

    Event generators are an indispensable tool for the preparation and analysis of particle-physics experiments. In this contribution, physics principles underlying the construction of such computer programs are discussed. Results, within and beyond the Standard Model of particle physics, obtained with a new event generator are presented. This generator is capable to describe signal processes for exotic physics and their backgrounds at electron-positron and proton-(anti)proton c...

  19. Earthquake and Tsunami Potential of the Hikurangi Subduction Thrust, New Zealand: Insights from Paleoseismology, GPS, and Tsunami Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. Wallace

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Hikurangi subduction margin, where the Pacific Plate subducts beneath the North Island of New Zealand, poses a major seismic and tsunami hazard to the New Zealand region, but its seismic and tsunami potential is largely unknown because of New Zealand's short (< 170 years historical record of seismicity. This article discusses the implications of results from GPS, paleoseismology, and tsunami modeling studies for understanding Hikurangi subduction earthquake and tsunami potential. Paleoseismic and geodetic data indicate that earthquakes of MW 8.0 and larger are certainly plausible at the Hikurangi margin. Paleoseismic evidence for large megathrust earthquakes beneath Hawke Bay in central Hikurangi demonstrates that large seismic slip may occur within an area that currently slips in episodic slow slip events. This result has important implications for seismic hazards at subduction margins elsewhere. Strong similarities between the subduction zones of the Hikurangi margin and the Japan Trench suggest that a giant MW 9.0 earthquake similar to the 2011 T?hoku-Oki earthquake may be possible for the Hikurangi margin. Such an event would generate a large tsunami that would inundate much of the east coast of the North Island. Understanding of the earthquake potential of the Hikurangi megathrust is only in its infancy, and we recommend a number of studies to increase knowledge.

  20. Generation of deterministic tsunami hazard maps in the Bay of Cadiz, south-west Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Gómez, J. A.; Otero, L.; Olabarrieta, M.; González, M.; Carreño, E.; Baptista, M. A.; Miranda, J. M.; Medina, R.; Lima, V.

    2009-04-01

    The bay of Cádiz is a densely populated and industrialized area, and an important centre of tourism which multiplies its population in the summer months. This bay is situated in the Gulf of Cádiz, the south-west Atlantic margin of the Iberian Peninsula. From a tectonic point of view this area can be defined as a diffuse plate boundary, comprising the eastern edge of the Gloria and Tydeman transforms (where the deformation is mainly concentrated in these shear corridors), the Gorringe Bank, the Horseshoe Abyssal plain, the Portimao and Guadalquivir banks, and the western termination of the arcuated Gibraltar Arc. This deformation zone is the eastern edge of the Azores - Gibraltar seismic zone, being the present day boundary between the Eurasian and African plates. The motion between the plates is mainly convergent in the Gulf of Cádiz, but gradually changes to almost pure transcurrent along the Gloria Fault. The relative motion between the two plates is of the order of 4-5 mm/yr. In order to define the different tsunamigenic zones and to characterize its worst tsunamigenic source we have used seismic, structural and geological data. The numerical model used to simulate the wave propagation and coastal inundation is the C3 (Cantabria, COMCOT and Tsunami-Claw) model. C3 is a hybrid finite difference-finite volume method which balances between efficiency and accuracy. For offshore domain in deep waters the model applies an explicit finite difference scheme (FD), which is computationally fast and accurate in large grids. For near coast domains in coastal areas, it applies a finite volume scheme (VOF). It solves correctly the bore formation and the bore propagation. It is very effective solving the run-up and the run down. A set of five worst case tsunamigenic sources has been used with four different sea levels (minimum tide, most probable low tide, most probable high tide and maximum tide), in order to produce the following thematic maps with the C3 model: maximum free surface elevation, maximum water depth, maximum current speed, maximum Froude number and maximum impact forces (hydrostatic and dynamic forces). The fault rupture and sea bottom displacement has been computed by means of the Okada equations. As result, a set of more than 100 deterministic thematic maps have been created in a GIS environment incorporating geographical data and high resolution orthorectified satellite images. These thematic maps form an atlas of inundation maps that will be distributed to different government authorities and civil protection and emergency agencies. The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support provided by the EU under the frame of the European Project TRANSFER (Tsunami Risk And Strategies For the European Region), 6th Framework Programme.

  1. Observed and Modeled Tsunami Currents on California's North Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admire, A. R.; Dengler, L.; Crawford, G. B.; uslu, B. U.; Montoya, J.; Wilson, R. I.

    2011-12-01

    In 2009, a pilot project was implemented in Humboldt Bay, near Eureka, California to measure the currents produced by tsunamis. This area is susceptible to both near- and far-field tsunamis and has a historic record of damaging events. Crescent City Harbor, located about 100km north of Humboldt Bay, suffered 20 million in damages from strong currents produced by the 2006 Kuril Islands tsunami and an additional 16 million from the 2011 Tohoku-oki (Japan) tsunami. We deployed a Nortek Aquadopp 600kHz 2D Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) with a one-minute sampling interval in Humboldt Bay, near the NOAA tide gauge site. The instrument recorded the tsunami produced by the Mw 8.8 Chilean earthquake on February 27, 2010 as well as the Mw 9.0 Japanese earthquake on March 11, 2011. Currents from the 2010 tsunami persisted in Humboldt Bay for at least 30hrs with a peak current amplitude of 0.3m/s. The 2011 tsunami signal lasted for over 86hrs with a peak amplitude of 1.2m/s. Strongest currents corresponded to the maximum change in water level as recorded on the NOAA tide gauge, about 90min after the initial wave arrival. Tsunami currents associated with ebb tides (tidal currents flowing out of the bay) were about 25% larger than currents associated with flood tides. No damage was observed in Humboldt Bay for either event; the 2011 tsunami pulled one boat away from its moorings at the marina about six kilometers away from the instrument site. Although we have no instrument in Crescent City, we were able to estimate currents for the first three and a half hours of the Japan tsunami using security camera video footage from the Harbor Master building across from the entrance to the boat basin, about 70m away from the NOAA tide gauge site. Most of the damage occurred within this time window. The strongest currents reached 4.5m/s and six cycles exceeded 4m/s in the three and a half hours of data. We used the MOST (Method of Splitting Tsunamis) model to compare measured currents to numerical predictions. MOST does a reasonably good job of predicting peak amplitudes for the 2010 and 2011 events in Humboldt Bay and the 2011 tsunami in Crescent City. For Humboldt Bay, the model does a good job of replicating the first four hours of the signal although the ebb currents are slightly underestimated. The model predictions break down for the later part of the signal. This project shows that ADCPs can effectively record tsunami currents for small to moderate events. Data from this project will be used to validate and/or calibrate MOST so that realistic tsunami current hazard maps can be generated for California for use by harbor managers.

  2. Puerto Rico Tsunami Warning and Mitigation Program-LANTEX 09 Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, W.; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, C.

    2009-12-01

    Tsunami warning, assessment, education, mitigation and preparedness efforts seek to reduce losses related to tsunamis in Puerto Rico (PR). The PR Seismic Network (PRSN) works with governmental agencies and local communities to implement these tsunami hazard risk reduction programs. The Caribbean has a a history of destructive tsunamis such as Virgin Islands (1867), PR (1918) and Dominican Republic (1946). Tsunamis originating near PR are a near-field hazard for as they can reach coastal areas within minutes of a generating event. Sources for regional and tele tsunamis have been identified. To mitigate these risks to communities, the PR Tsunami Warning and Mitigation Program (PRTWMP) was established in 2000 with funding from FEMA, the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) and the PR State Emergency Management Agency (PRSEMA). With the support of NTHMP and TsunamiReady (TR), PR continues to seek to mitigate possible tsunami damages and increase community resilience by helping communities meet the TR guidelines by providing them inundation maps, helping them develop evacuation maps and emergency plans, assisting them with community outreach efforts and conducting evacuation drills. Currently 6 of 44 tsunami threatened communities in PR have been recognized as TsunamiReady. As part of this process, the PRSN, PRSEMA and various communities participated in the LANTEX 2009 tsunami exercise. This exercise took place on April 2, 2009 and was based on a scenario in which an earthquake northeast of PR generates a major tsunami which impacts PR and the USVI and threatens the states along the continental US eastern coast. The municipality of Mayagüez, a TsunamiReady community since 2006, participated in the exercise by activating its Emergency Operations Center , conducting evacuation drills in schools located within its tsunami exposed area, and activating its warning siren. This presentation highlights findings of UPRM social scientists collaborating with the PRTWMP who conducted a sample survey of residents of the Mayagüez tsunami evacuation area to serve as an assessment of the effectiveness of TsunamiReady outreach efforts and of the drill's warning efforts. 166 20-30 minute interviews were conducted during the month of April. Questions explored residents' perceptions of coastal hazards they may face; knowledge about tsunamis and how to react to them; use of mass media to obtain information about potential hazards; tsunami preparation efforts, including knowledge of the existence and location of assembly areas; and whether and how they received and understood the drill's warning messages. The sample's answers to the risk perception questions is compared to those obtained for the same questions from a sample of residents of storm surge areas in 8 municipalities along PR's west coast. This allows comparing tsunami hazard awareness among individuals exposed to the Tsunami Ready program efforts with that of residents of municipalities that are not part of it. This effort serves as an example of the multidisciplinary collaboration between physical and social scientists needed to increase the effectiveness and value of scientific knowledge as a tool to mitigate damages from natural hazards.

  3. Demo: Automatically generating interesting events with LifeJoin

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Alvin K.; Thiagarajan, Arvind; Madden, Samuel R.

    2011-01-01

    This demo will showcase LifeJoin, a system that collects raw sensor data from phones and laptop computers to generate interesting events. Given the raw sensor data, LifeJoin implements a number of activity recognition algorithms to generate higher-level events. Furthermore, it uses supervised learning techniques to learn from users' feedback to generate only events of interest. In this demo, the audience will get to interact with the LifeJoin system and be able to examine the internals of Lif...

  4. TSUNAMI HAZARD AND TOTAL RISK IN THE CARIBBEAN BASIN

    OpenAIRE

    X. William Proenza; George A. Maul

    2010-01-01

    Deadly western North Atlantic Ocean tsunami events in the last centuries have occurred along the east coast of Canada, the United States, most Caribbean islands, and the North Atlantic Coast of South America. The catastrophic Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004 reminded natural hazards managers that tsunami risk is endemic to all oceans. Total Risk is defined as hazard (frequency of tsunami events) times measures of elements at risk (human exposure) times measures of vulnerability (preparedness) in ...

  5. Tsunami Deposit Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, B. H.; Wanink, M.

    2007-05-01

    A digital database has been established describing tsunami deposits around the world (3 phases; 15 months). The projects involved the review and tabulation of data derived from books, catalogs, journals, preprints, citations and abstracts (currently 1000 references), into a database designed to provide a comprehensive review of the types of tsunami deposits, their geographic distribution and location, sedimentary characteristics, fossil content, age, preservation, run-up, wave height and inundation observations, etc. (34 parameters). The tsunami occurrences can be divided into many subjects, e.g., Volcanogenic (N=375), Seismites (N=49), Co-seismic (N=258), K/T Boundary Impact-triggered debris flows (N=97), Landslides (N=43), etc. Numerous publications compare tsunami deposits to storm deposits (N=38), or analyze the origin of megaboulders (N=22). Tsunami deposits occur throughout geologic time (Pre-Cambrian to present day), and because of plate tectonics, they occur along plate margins (primarily subduction zones) as well as interior to plates. In addition, they occur in epi-continental seas, fjords, etc. Few publications describe depositional processes. Deposits generated by tsunamis occur in multiple environments such as the marine, fresh water, and subaerial. Common characteristics of tsunami deposits include: 1) Deposition of thin sand sheets (can be normal, massive, inversely graded, chaotic or bimodal). 2) Erosional: basal uncomformity, mud balls, rip-up clasts, reworked fossils produced by scouring. 3) Lithology: Stacks of couplets reflecting marine incursions (often sands) into fresh water or subaerial environments (mud, soil, peat). 4) Fossil: Couplets reflects marine fossils, fresh water fossils or a mixed assemblage. 5) Geomorphology: The sand sheets taper landward and can rise in elevation. 6) Deformation: syn-depositional (soft sediments) and intraformational (stiff sediments).

  6. Observations of the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami on the Coast of British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, A.; Thomson, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Great Tohoku Earthquake (Mw 9.0) of 11 March 2011 generated highly catastrophic tsunami waves that reached runup heights of up to 40 m along the coast of Japan and were recorded by numerous coastal tide gauges and bottom pressure stations throughout the Pacific Ocean. Near the coast of British Columbia (BC), the tsunami was measured by 15 permanent tide gauges, including gauges located well inside the Strait of Georgia and at Patricia Bay in Saanich Inlet (the site of the Institute of Ocean Sciences, IOS). Tsunami waves were also recorded by 5 temporary tide gauges within Victoria Harbour waterways (Gorge and Portage inlets), by 4 NEPTUNE-Canada bottom cable observatories on the Vancouver Island shelf and by 3 VENUS bottom pressure recorders within Saanich Inlet. Maximum tsunami wave heights observed on the outer BC coast were 1.0-1.5 m, while those within the sheltered basins of the inner coast were about ten times lower. The tsunami wave signal was also observed in the temperature, salinity and current velocity records of CTDs and an ADCP installed in an anoxic Canadian fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island. The collected data enabled us to examine the statistical and spectral properties of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami on the coast of British Columbia and to estimate the relative tsunami risk for this coast from distant earthquakes. The tsunami record from the deepest NEPTUNE (CORK) station was used as the input function for the IOS regional tsunami forecast model. The computed and observed tsunami wave forms for this event were in good agreement.

  7. BRIDGE: Branching Ratio Inquiry/Decay Generated Events

    CERN Document Server

    Meade, P; Meade, Patrick; Reece, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    We present the manual for the program BRIDGE: Branching Ratio Inquiry/Decay Generated Events. The program is designed to operate with arbitrary models defined within matrix element generators, so that one can simulate events with small final-state multiplicities, decay them with BRIDGE, and then pass them to showering and hadronization programs. BRI can automatically calculate widths of two and three body decays. DGE can decay unstable particles in any Les Houches formatted event file. DGE is useful for the generation of event files with long decay chains, replacing large matrix elements by small matrix elements followed by sequences of decays. BRIDGE is currently designed to work with the MadGraph/MadEvent programs for implementing and simulating new physics models. In particular, it can operate with the MadGraph implementation of the MSSM. In this manual we describe how to use BRIDGE, and present a number of sample results to demonstrate its accuracy.

  8. State-of-the-Art in Tsunami Risk Modelling for a global perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Andreas; Daniell, James; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2015-04-01

    Tsunamis can be considered as the natural hazard with the largest global spread in terms of hazard distribution due to a single event with the exception of global extinction level events (volcanoes, meteor impacts). Multiple extreme events have occurred during the last decade, including the devastating 2004 Sumatra tsunami and the events in Japan and Chile in 2011. In general, the hazard and risk of tsunamis is investigated in regional or inter-regional projects like in Japan, Indonesia or New Zealand following different methodologies and investigating various source mechanisms. Thus, in this study, a review of the state-of-the-art in global tsunami risk modelling has been undertaken. The most recent and up-to-date methodologies and projects from all over the world have been assembled for a direct comparison to provide a global perspective into a hazard scenario that affects multiple countries at once to extreme magnitudes. The assemblage of these models provides an insight into the temporal and spatial development of tsunami risk research and how it was adopted by research institutes and combined into official hazard modelling. A global map is assembled, indicating local and international case studies and projects with respect to their source model and date of development. In addition, the study also covers the development of software packages used to set up hazard and risk models and it investigates the different source processes of tsunami generation and propagation. A comparison is made using a multicriteria approach to examine the physical models and capabilities of software packages as well as the source identification procedure in different hazard models. A complete and up-to-date overview of tsunami risk and hazard modelling is presented, compared and classified which has far-reaching uses for the preparation of a tsunami risk assessment at any point on the earth.

  9. A Tsunami PSA for Nuclear Power Plants in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the evaluation of safety of NPP caused by Tsunami event, probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) method was applied in this study. At first, an empirical tsunami hazard analysis performed for an evaluation of tsunami return period. A procedure for tsunami fragility methodology was established, and target equipment and structures for investigation of Tsunami Hazard assessment were selected. A several fragility calculations were performed for equipment in Nuclear Power Plant and finally accident scenario of tsunami event in NPP was presented. Finally, a system analysis performed in the case of tsunami event for an evaluation of a CDF of Ulchin 56 NPP site. For the evaluation of safety of NPP caused by Tsunami event, probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) method was applied. A procedure for tsunami fragility methodology was established, and target equipment and structures for investigation of Tsunami Hazard assessment were selected. A several fragility calculations were performed for equipment in Nuclear Power Plant and finally accident scenario of tsunami event in NPP was presented. As a result, in the case of tsunami event, functional failure is mostly governed total failure probability of facilities in NPP site

  10. A Tsunami PSA for Nuclear Power Plants in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Kyu; Choi, In Kil; Park, Jin Hee; Seo, Kyung Suk; Seo, Jeong Moon; Yang, Joon Eon

    2010-06-15

    For the evaluation of safety of NPP caused by Tsunami event, probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) method was applied in this study. At first, an empirical tsunami hazard analysis performed for an evaluation of tsunami return period. A procedure for tsunami fragility methodology was established, and target equipment and structures for investigation of Tsunami Hazard assessment were selected. A several fragility calculations were performed for equipment in Nuclear Power Plant and finally accident scenario of tsunami event in NPP was presented. Finally, a system analysis performed in the case of tsunami event for an evaluation of a CDF of Ulchin 56 NPP site. For the evaluation of safety of NPP caused by Tsunami event, probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) method was applied. A procedure for tsunami fragility methodology was established, and target equipment and structures for investigation of Tsunami Hazard assessment were selected. A several fragility calculations were performed for equipment in Nuclear Power Plant and finally accident scenario of tsunami event in NPP was presented. As a result, in the case of tsunami event, functional failure is mostly governed total failure probability of facilities in NPP site

  11. Introduction to "Tsunamis in the Pacific Ocean: 2011-2012"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Borrero, Jose C.; Fritz, Hermann M.

    2014-12-01

    With this volume of the Pure and Applied Geophysics (PAGEOPH) topical issue "Tsunamis in the Pacific Ocean: 2011-2012", we are pleased to present 21 new papers discussing tsunami events occurring in this two-year span. Owing to the profound impact resulting from the unique crossover of a natural and nuclear disaster, research into the 11 March 2011 Tohoku, Japan earthquake and tsunami continues; here we present 12 papers related to this event. Three papers report on detailed field survey results and updated analyses of the wave dynamics based on these surveys. Two papers explore the effects of the Tohoku tsunami on the coast of Russia. Three papers discuss the tsunami source mechanism, and four papers deal with tsunami hydrodynamics in the far field or over the wider Pacific basin. In addition, a series of five papers presents studies of four new tsunami and earthquake events occurring over this time period. This includes tsunamis in El Salvador, the Philippines, Japan and the west coast of British Columbia, Canada. Finally, we present four new papers on tsunami science, including discussions on tsunami event duration, tsunami wave amplitude, tsunami energy and tsunami recurrence.

  12. Dynamics of tsunami waves

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, F; Dias, Fr\\'ed\\'eric; Dutykh, Denys

    2006-01-01

    The life of a tsunami is usually divided into three phases: the generation (tsunami source), the propagation and the inundation. Each phase is complex and often described separately. A brief description of each phase is given. Model problems are identified. Their formulation is given. While some of these problems can be solved analytically, most require numerical techniques. The inundation phase is less documented than the other phases. It is shown that methods based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) are particularly well-suited for the inundation phase. Directions for future research are outlined.

  13. Rapid tsunami models and earthquake source parameters: Far-field and local applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, E.L.

    2005-01-01

    Rapid tsunami models have recently been developed to forecast far-field tsunami amplitudes from initial earthquake information (magnitude and hypocenter). Earthquake source parameters that directly affect tsunami generation as used in rapid tsunami models are examined, with particular attention to local versus far-field application of those models. First, validity of the assumption that the focal mechanism and type of faulting for tsunamigenic earthquakes is similar in a given region can be evaluated by measuring the seismic consistency of past events. Second, the assumption that slip occurs uniformly over an area of rupture will most often underestimate the amplitude and leading-wave steepness of the local tsunami. Third, sometimes large magnitude earthquakes will exhibit a high degree of spatial heterogeneity such that tsunami sources will be composed of distinct sub-events that can cause constructive and destructive interference in the wavefield away from the source. Using a stochastic source model, it is demonstrated that local tsunami amplitudes vary by as much as a factor of two or more, depending on the local bathymetry. If other earthquake source parameters such as focal depth or shear modulus are varied in addition to the slip distribution patterns, even greater uncertainty in local tsunami amplitude is expected for earthquakes of similar magnitude. Because of the short amount of time available to issue local warnings and because of the high degree of uncertainty associated with local, model-based forecasts as suggested by this study, direct wave height observations and a strong public education and preparedness program are critical for those regions near suspected tsunami sources.

  14. Computational Particle Physics for Event Generators and Data Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Perret-Gallix, Denis

    2013-01-01

    High-energy physics data analysis relies heavily on the comparison between experimental and simulated data as stressed lately by the Higgs search at LHC and the recent identification of a Higgs-like new boson. The first link in the full simulation chain is the event generation both for background and for expected signals. Nowadays event generators are based on the automatic computation of matrix element or amplitude for each process of interest. Moreover, recent analysis t...

  15. The Monte Carlo Event Generator DPMJET-III

    CERN Document Server

    Roesler, S; Ranft, J; Roesler, Stefan; Engel, Ralph; Ranft, Johannes

    2000-01-01

    A new version of the Monte Carlo event generator DPMJET is presented. It is a code system based on the Dual Parton Model and unifies all features of the DTUNUC-2, DPMJET-II and PHOJET 1.12 event generators. DPMJET-III allows the simulation of hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, nucleus-nucleus, photon-hadron, photon-photon and photon-nucleus interactions from a few GeV up to the highest cosmic ray energies.

  16. Properties of proton-proton collision and comparing event generators by multi-jet events

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Wai Ho

    2013-01-01

    There are many regimes to be deeply investigated in the field of high energy physics and particles physics. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, Switzerland is built to study those physics. A lot of Monte Carlo event generators are constructed to simulate the Standard Model. One of purposes of the LHC is obtaining data from real experiment to test the predictions of all Monte Carlo event generators. There are two main parts in this articles. First, the basic properties of proton-proton collision will be shown, with discussion of problems arose from jet algorithms. The second part compares different event generators with detailed discussion.

  17. Tsunami Research and Monitoring Enabled through Ocean Network Canada's NEPTUNE Cabled Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heesemann, M.; Insua, T. L.; Mihaly, S. F.; Thomson, R.; Rabinovich, A.; Fine, I.; Scherwath, M.; Moran, K.

    2014-12-01

    Ocean Networks Canada (ONC; http://www.oceannetworks.ca/) operates the multidisciplinary NEPTUNE and VENUS cabled ocean observatories off the west coast of Canada and an increasing number of miniature ocean observatories, such as in the Canadian Arctic. All data collected by these observatories are archived and publicly available through ONC's Oceans 2.0 data portal. Much of the data are related to marine geohazards, such as earthquakes, submarine landslides, and tsunamis and are delivered in real-time to various agencies, including early warning centers. The NEPTUNE and VENUS cabled observatories consist of over 850 km of cable deployed inshore and offshore off Vancouver Island and covers the coastal zones, the northern part of the Cascadia subduction zone, Cascadia Basin, and the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Geological evidence suggests that there is a 25-40% probability of a magnitude 8 or greater megathrust earthquake along the Cascadia subduction zone in the next 50 years and that the most recent great earthquake (estimated magnitude ~9.0) that occurred in 1700 caused widespread tsunami damage. However, most of the tsunamis that arrive in the area originate from distant sources around the Pacific. Over the last 100 years, numerous major tsunamis have occurred in the Pacific Ocean, killing many tens of thousands of people. The NEPTUNE observatory includes high-precision bottom pressure recorders (BPRs) at each major nodes and a tsunami meter consisting of three BPRs arranged on a ~20 km radius circle around the flat Cascadia Basin site. On September 30, 2009, just days after the first NEPTUNE instruments were installed, the first tsunami waves of 2.5-6.0 cm amplitude generated by the Mw 8.1 Samoa earthquake were recorded by six BPRs. The Samoan tsunami was followed by several other events recorded by the network, including the 2010 Chilean tsunami, the 2011 T?hoku-Oki earthquake and tsunami, and the 2012 Haida Gwaii tsunami. These open-ocean observations were uncontaminated by coastal effects, demonstrating that NEPTUNE records from future tsunami events can be effectively used as real-time input to regional numerical tsunami forecast models. In fact, real-time data from NEPTUNE seismometers and BPRs already feed into the NOAA operated tsunami early warning systems.

  18. Modelling tsunamis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We doubt the relevance of soliton theory to the modelling of tsunamis, and present a case in support of an alternative view. Although the shallow-water equations do provide, we believe, an appropriate basis for this phenomenon, an asymptotic analysis of the solution for realistic variable depths, and for suitable background flows, is essential for a complete understanding of this phenomenon. In particular we explain how a number of tsunami waves can arrive at a shoreline. (letter to the editor)

  19. Real-time forecasting of the April 11, 2012 Sumatra tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dailin; Becker, Nathan C.; Walsh, David; Fryer, Gerard J.; Weinstein, Stuart A.; McCreery, Charles S.; and others

    2012-01-01

    The April 11, 2012, magnitude 8.6 earthquake off the northern coast of Sumatra generated a tsunami that was recorded at sea-level stations as far as 4800 km from the epicenter and at four ocean bottom pressure sensors (DARTs) in the Indian Ocean. The governments of India, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Maldives issued tsunami warnings for their coastlines. The United States' Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC) issued an Indian Ocean-wide Tsunami Watch Bulletin in its role as an Interim Service Provider for the region. Using an experimental real-time tsunami forecast model (RIFT), PTWC produced a series of tsunami forecasts during the event that were based on rapidly derived earthquake parameters, including initial location and Mwp magnitude estimates and the W-phase centroid moment tensor solutions (W-phase CMTs) obtained at PTWC and at the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS). We discuss the real-time forecast methodology and how successive, real-time tsunami forecasts using the latest W-phase CMT solutions improved the accuracy of the forecast.

  20. Generating tsunami risk knowledge at community level as a base for planning and implementation of risk reduction strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wegscheider

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available More than 4 million Indonesians live in tsunami-prone areas along the southern and western coasts of Sumatra, Java and Bali. Although a Tsunami Early Warning Center in Jakarta now exists, installed after the devastating 2004 tsunami, it is essential to develop tsunami risk knowledge within the exposed communities as a basis for tsunami disaster management. These communities need to implement risk reduction strategies to mitigate potential consequences.

    The major aims of this paper are to present a risk assessment methodology which (1 identifies areas of high tsunami risk in terms of potential loss of life, (2 bridges the gaps between research and practical application, and (3 can be implemented at community level. High risk areas have a great need for action to improve people's response capabilities towards a disaster, thus reducing the risk. The methodology developed here is based on a GIS approach and combines hazard probability, hazard intensity, population density and people's response capability to assess the risk.

    Within the framework of the GITEWS (German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System project, the methodology was applied to three pilot areas, one of which is southern Bali. Bali's tourism is concentrated for a great part in the communities of Kuta, Legian and Seminyak. Here alone, about 20 000 people live in high and very high tsunami risk areas. The development of risk reduction strategies is therefore of significant interest. A risk map produced for the study area in Bali can be used for local planning activities and the development of risk reduction strategies.

  1. Simulation systems for tsunami wave propagation forecasting within the French tsunami warning center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailler, A.; Hébert, H.; Loevenbruck, A.; Hernandez, B.

    2012-04-01

    Improvements in the availability of sea-level observations and advances in numerical modeling techniques are increasing the potential for tsunami warnings to be based on numerical model forecasts. Numerical tsunami propagation and inundation models are well developed, but they present a challenge to run in real-time, partly due to computational limitations and also to a lack of detailed knowledge on the earthquake rupture parameters. A first generation model-based tsunami prediction system is being developed as part of the French Tsunami Warning Center that will be operational by mid 2012. It involves a pre-computed unit source functions database (i.e., a number of tsunami model runs that are calculated ahead of time and stored) corresponding to tsunami scenarios generated by a source of seismic moment 1.75E+19 N.m with a rectangular fault 25 km by 20 km in size and 1 m in slip. The faults of the unit functions are placed adjacent to each other, following the discretization of the main seismogenic faults bounding the western Mediterranean and North-East Atlantic basins. An authomatized composite scenarios calculation tool is implemented to allow the simulation of any tsunami propagation scenario (i.e., of any seismic moment). The strategy is based on linear combinations and scaling of a finite number of pre-computed unit source functions. The number of unit functions involved varies with the magnitude of the wanted composite solution and the combined wave heights are multiplied by a given scaling factor to produce the new arbitrary scenario. Uncertainty on the magnitude of the detected event and inaccuracy on the epicenter location are taken into account in the composite scenarios calculation. For one tsunamigenic event, the tool produces finally 3 warning maps (i.e., most likely, minimum and maximum scenarios) together with the rough decision matrix representation. A no-dimension code representation is chosen to show zones in the main axis of energy at the basin scale. This forecast system provides warning refinement compared to the rough tsunami risk map given by the decision matrix. Together with this forecasting system, another operational tool based on real time computing is implemented as part of the French Tsunami Warning Center. This second tsunami wave propagation simulation tool takes advantage of multi processor approaches and more realistic seismological parameters, once the focal mechanism is established. Example on 3 historical tsunamigenic earthquakes with comparison of the results obtained with the two tools are shown: (1) the 2003 Boumerdès earthquake (Mw=6.9, northeastern Algerian margin), (2) the 1887 Imperia earthquake (Mw=6.5, Ligurian margin), and (3) the 1969 Gorringe Bank earthquake (Mw=7.8, Azores-Gibraltar fracture zone). Calculations based on the real time computing are done using fault parameters derived from seismological studies on these events.

  2. Near-field tsunami edge waves and complex earthquake rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of distributed coseismic slip on progressive, near-field edge waves is examined for continental shelf tsunamis. Detailed observations of edge waves are difficult to separate from the other tsunami phases that are observed on tide gauge records. In this study, analytic methods are used to compute tsunami edge waves distributed over a finite number of modes and for uniformly sloping bathymetry. Coseismic displacements from static elastic theory are introduced as initial conditions in calculating the evolution of progressive edge-waves. Both simple crack representations (constant stress drop) and stochastic slip models (heterogeneous stress drop) are tested on a fault with geometry similar to that of the M w = 8.8 2010 Chile earthquake. Crack-like ruptures that are beneath or that span the shoreline result in similar longshore patterns of maximum edge-wave amplitude. Ruptures located farther offshore result in reduced edge-wave excitation, consistent with previous studies. Introduction of stress-drop heterogeneity by way of stochastic slip models results in significantly more variability in longshore edge-wave patterns compared to crack-like ruptures for the same offshore source position. In some cases, regions of high slip that are spatially distinct will yield sub-events, in terms of tsunami generation. Constructive interference of both non-trapped and trapped waves can yield significantly larger tsunamis than those that produced by simple earthquake characterizations.

  3. A tsunami PSA methodology and application for NPP site in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ? A methodology of tsunami PSA was developed in this study. ? Tsunami return period was evaluated by empirical method using historical tsunami record and tidal gauge record. ? Procedure of tsunami fragility analysis was established and target equipments and structures for investigation of tsunami fragility assessment were selected. ? A sample fragility calculation was performed for the equipment in Nuclear Power Plant. ? Accident sequence of tsunami event is developed by according to the tsunami run-up and draw down, and tsunami induced core damage frequency (CDF) is determined. - Abstract: A methodology of tsunami PSA was developed in this study. A tsunami PSA consists of tsunami hazard analysis, tsunami fragility analysis and system analysis. In the case of tsunami hazard analysis, evaluation of tsunami return period is a major task. For the evaluation of tsunami return period, numerical analysis and empirical method can be applied. In this study, tsunami return period was evaluated by empirical method using historical tsunami record and tidal gauge record. For the performing a tsunami fragility analysis, procedure of tsunami fragility analysis was established and target equipments and structures for investigation of tsunami fragility assessment were selected. A sample fragility calculation was performed for the equipment in Nuclear Power Plant. In the case of system analysis, accident sequence of tsunami event is developed by according to the s developed by according to the tsunami run-up and draw down, and tsunami induced core damage frequency (CDF) is determined. For the application to the real Nuclear Power Plant, the Ulchin 56 NPP which located in east coast of Korean peninsula was selected. Through this study, whole tsunami PSA working procedure was established and example calculation was performed for one of real Nuclear Power Plant in Korea. But for more accurate tsunami PSA result, there are many researches needed for evaluation of hydrodynamic force, effect of debris, structural failure probability of break water structure and intake structure, functional failure criteria for offsite power.

  4. The 1843 earthquake: a maximising scenario for tsunami hazard assessment in the Northern Lesser Antilles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Jean; Zahibo, Narcisse; Dudon, Bernard; Krien, Yann

    2013-04-01

    The French Caribbean Islands are located over the Lesser Antilles active subduction zone where a handful of earthquakes historically reached magnitude Mw=6.0 and more. According to available catalogs these earthquakes have been sometimes able to trigger devastating local or regional tsunamis, either directly by the shake or indirectly by induced landslides. For example, these islands have severely suffered during the Mw~7.5 Virgin Islands earthquake (1867) triggering several meters high waves in the whole Lesser Antilles Arc and, more recently, during the Mw=6.3 Les Saintes earthquake (2004) followed by a local 1 m high tsunami. However, in 1839 a Mw~7.5 subduction earthquake occured offshore Martinica followed a few years after by the more famous 1843 Mw~8.5 megathrust event, with an epicenter located approximately between Guadeloupe and Antigua, but both without any catastrophic tsunami being reported. In this study we discuss the potential impact of a maximum credible scenario of tsunami generation with such a Mw=8.5 rupture at the subduction interface using available geological information, numerical modeling of tsunami generation and propagation and high resolution bathymetric data within the framework of tsunami hazard assessment for the French West Indies. Despite the fact that the mystery remains unresolved concerning the lack of historical tsunami data especially for the 1843 event, modeling results show that the tsunami impact is not uniformly distributed in the whole archipelago and could show important heterogeneities in terms of maximum wave heights for specific places. This is easily explained by the bathymetry and the presence of several islands around the mainland leading to resonance phenomena, and because of the existence of a fringing coral reef surrounding partially those islands.

  5. Web-based Tsunami Early Warning System: a case study of the 2010 Kepulaunan Mentawai Earthquake and Tsunami

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ulutas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the response of the Global Disasters Alerts and Coordination System (GDACS in relation to a case study: the Kepulaunan Mentawai earthquake and related tsunami, which occurred on 25 October 2010. The GDACS, developed by the European Commission Joint Research Center, combines existing web-based disaster information management systems with the aim to alert the international community in case of major disasters. The tsunami simulation system is an integral part of the GDACS. In more detail, the study aims to assess the tsunami hazard on the Mentawai and Sumatra coasts: the tsunami heights and arrival times have been estimated employing three propagation models based on the long wave theory. The analysis was performed in three stages: (1 pre-calculated simulations by using the tsunami scenario database for that region, used by the GDACS system to estimate the alert level; (2 near-real-time simulated tsunami forecasts, automatically performed by the GDACS system whenever a new earthquake is detected by the seismological data providers; and (3 post-event tsunami calculations using GCMT (Global Centroid Moment Tensor fault mechanism solutions proposed by US Geological Survey (USGS for this event. The GDACS system estimates the alert level based on the first type of calculations and on that basis sends alert messages to its users; the second type of calculations is available within 30–40 min after the notification of the event but does not change the estimated alert level. The third type of calculations is performed to improve the initial estimations and to have a better understanding of the extent of the possible damage. The automatic alert level for the earthquake was given between Green and Orange Alert, which, in the logic of GDACS, means no need or moderate need of international humanitarian assistance; however, the earthquake generated 3 to 9 m tsunami run-up along southwestern coasts of the Pagai Islands where 431 people died. The post-event calculations indicated medium-high humanitarian impacts.

  6. Integrating Caribbean Seismic and Tsunami Hazard into Public Policy and Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hillebrandt-Andrade, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Caribbean has a long history of tsunamis and earthquakes. Over the past 500 years, more than 80 tsunamis have been documented in the region by the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center. Almost 90% of all these historical tsunamis have been associated with earthquakes. Just since 1842, 3510 lives have been lost to tsunamis; this is more than in the Northeastern Pacific for the same time period. With a population of almost 160 million and a heavy concentration of residents, tourists, businesses and critical infrastructure along the Caribbean shores (especially in the northern and eastern Caribbean), the risk to lives and livelihoods is greater than ever before. Most of the countries also have a very high exposure to earthquakes. Given the elevated vulnerability, it is imperative that government officials take steps to mitigate the potentially devastating effects of these events. Nevertheless, given the low frequency of high impact earthquakes and tsunamis, in comparison to hurricanes, combined with social and economic considerations, the needed investments are not made and disasters like the 2010 Haiti earthquake occur. In the absence of frequent significant events, an important driving force for public officials to take action, is the dissemination of scientific studies. When papers of this nature have been published and media advisories issued, public officials demonstrate heightened interest in the topic which in turn can lead to increased legislation and funding efforts. This is especially the case if the material can be easily understood by the stakeholders and there is a local contact. In addition, given the close link between earthquakes and tsunamis, in Puerto Rico alone, 50% of the high impact earthquakes have also generated destructive tsunamis, it is very important that earthquake and tsunami hazards studies demonstrate consistency. Traditionally in the region, earthquake and tsunami impacts have been considered independently in the emergency planning processes. For example, earthquake and tsunami exercises are conducted separately, without taking into consideration the compounding effects. Recognizing this deficiency, the UNESCO IOC Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (CARIBE EWS) which was established in 2005, decided to include the tsunami and earthquake impacts for the upcoming March 20, 2013 regional CARIBE WAVE/LANTEX tsunami exercise. In addition to the tsunami wave heights predicted by the National Weather Service Tsunami Warning Centers in Alaska and Hawaii, the USGS PAGER and SHAKE MAP results for the M8.5 scenario earthquake in the southern Caribbean were also integrated into the manual. Additionally, in recent catastrophic planning for Puerto Rico, FEMA did request the local researchers to determine both the earthquake and tsunami impacts for the same source. In the US, despite that the lead for earthquakes and tsunamis lies within two different agencies, USGS and NOAA/NWS, it has been very beneficial that the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program partnership includes both agencies. By working together, the seismic and tsunami communities can achieve an even better understanding of the hazards, but also foster more actions on behalf of government officials and the populations at risk.

  7. Concept study of radar sensors for near-field tsunami early warning

    OpenAIRE

    Börner, T; M. Galletti; N. P. Marquart; Krieger, G

    2010-01-01

    Off-shore detection of tsunami waves is a critical component of an effective tsunami early warning system (TEWS). Even more critical is the off-shore detection of local tsunamis, namely tsunamis that strike coastal areas within minutes after generation. In this paper we propose new concepts for near-field tsunami early detection, based on innovative and up-to-date microwave remote sensing techniques. We particularly introduce the NESTRAD (NEar-Space Tsunami RADar) concept, which consists of a...

  8. SEVERAL TSUNAMI SCENARIOS AT THE NORTH SEA AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES AT THE GERMAN BIGHT

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Chacón-Barrantes; Rangaswami Narayanan; Roberto Mayerle

    2013-01-01

    Tsunamis occurred in the past at the North Sea, but not frequently. There are historical and geological records of several tsunamis: the Storegga tsunami caused sediment deposits in Scotland 8,000 years ago and records of at least six earthquake-generated tsunamis exist from 842 to 1761 AC. The highest tsunami height witnessed at the German Bight is comparable to the maximum storm surge recorded and could thus cause similar or higher damage. However, there is little research on tsunami modeli...

  9. Reconnaissance Survey of the 29 September 2009 Tsunami on Tutuila Island, American Samoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, H. M.; Borrero, J. C.; Okal, E.; Synolakis, C.; Weiss, R.; Jaffe, B. E.; Lynett, P. J.; Titov, V. V.; Foteinis, S.; Chan, I.; Liu, P.

    2009-12-01

    On 29 September, 2009 a magnitude Mw 8.1 earthquake occurred 200 km southwest of American Samoa’s Capital of Pago Pago and triggered a tsunami which caused substantial damage and loss of life in Samoa, American Samoa and Tonga. The most recent estimate is that the tsunami caused 189 fatalities, including 34 in American Samoa. This is the highest tsunami death toll on US territory since the 1964 great Alaskan earthquake and tsunami. PTWC responded and issued warnings soon after the earthquake but, because the tsunami arrived within 15 minutes at many locations, was too late to trigger evacuations. Fortunately, the people of Samoa knew to go to high ground after an earthquake because of education and tsunami evacuation exercises initiated throughout the South Pacific after a similar magnitude earthquake and tsunami struck the nearby Solomon Islands in 2007. A multi-disciplinary reconnaissance survey team was deployed within days of the event to document flow depths, runup heights, inundation distances, sediment deposition, damage patterns at various scales, and performance of the man-made infrastructure and impact on the natural environment. The 4 to 11 October 2009 ITST circled American Samoa’s main island Tutuila and the small nearby island of Aunu’u. The American Samoa survey data includes nearly 200 runup and flow depth measurements on Tutuila Island. The tsunami impact peaked with maximum runup exceeding 17 m at Poloa located 1.5 km northeast of Cape Taputapu marking Tutuila’s west tip. A significant variation in tsunami impact was observed on Tutuila. The tsunami runup reached 12 m at Fagasa near the center of the Tutuila’s north coast and 9 m at Tula near Cape Matatula at the east end. Pago Pago, which is near the center of the south coast, represents an unfortunate example of a village and harbor that was located for protection from storm waves but is vulnerable to tsunami waves. The flow patterns inside Pago Pago harbor were characterized based on vessel motions. The runup was a few meters at the bay entrance and peaked at 8 m only a few kilometers away at the head of the bay. Inundation and damage occurred more than 500 m inland at Pago Pago along the Vaipito River. Similar inundation distances were observed along the river at Leone. Field observations, video recordings and satellite imagery are presented. The team interviewed numerous eyewitnesses and educated residents about the tsunami hazard. Community-based education and awareness programs are essential to save lives in locales at risk from locally generated tsunamis.

  10. MODELING THE 1958 LITUYA BAY MEGA-TSUNAMI, II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles L. Mader

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Lituya Bay, Alaska is a T-Shaped bay, 7 miles long and up to 2 miles wide. The two arms at the head of the bay, Gilbert and Crillon Inlets, are part of a trench along the Fairweather Fault. On July 8, 1958, an 7.5 Magnitude earthquake occurred along the Fairweather fault with an epicenter near Lituya Bay.A mega-tsunami wave was generated that washed out trees to a maximum altitude of 520 meters at the entrance of Gilbert Inlet. Much of the rest of the shoreline of the Bay was denuded by the tsunami from 30 to 200 meters altitude.In the previous study it was determined that if the 520 meter high run-up was 50 to 100 meters thick, the observed inundation in the rest of Lituya Bay could be numerically reproduced. It was also concluded that further studies would require full Navier-Stokes modeling similar to those required for asteroid generated tsunami waves.During the Summer of 2000, Hermann Fritz conducted experiments that reproduced the Lituya Bay 1958 event. The laboratory experiments indicated that the 1958 Lituya Bay 524 meter run-up on the spur ridge of Gilbert Inlet could be caused by a landslide impact.The Lituya Bay impact landslide generated tsunami was modeled with the full Navier- Stokes AMR Eulerian compressible hydrodynamic code called SAGE with includes the effect of gravity.

  11. Tsunami Hazard in the Algerian Coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, L. A.

    2008-05-01

    The Algerian coastline is located at the border between the African and the Eurasian tectonic plates. The collision between these two plates is approximately 4 to 7 mm/yr. The Alps and the tellian Atlas result from this convergence. Historical and present day data show the occurrence of earthquakes with magnitude up to 7 degrees on Richter scale in the northern part of the country. Cities were destroyed and the number of victims reached millions of people. Recently, small seismic waves generated by a destructive earthquake (Epicenter: 36.90N, 3.71E; Mw=6.8; Algeria, 2003, NEIC) were recorded in the French and Spanish coasts. This event raised again the issue of tsunami hazard in western Mediterranean region. For the Algerian study case, the assessment of seismic and tsunami hazard is a matter of great interest because of fast urban development of cities like Algiers. This study aims to provide scientific arguments to help in the elaboration of the Mediterranean tsunami alert program. This is a real complex issue because (1) the western part of the sea is narrow, (2) constructions on the Algerian coastline do not respect safety standards and (3) the seismic hazard is important. The present work is based on a numerical modeling approach. Firstly, a database is created to gather and list information related to seismology, tectonic, abnormal sea level's variations recorded/observed, submarine and coastal topographic data for the western part of the Mediterranean margin. This database helped to propose series of scenario that could trigger tsunami in the Mediterranean sea. Seismic moment, rake and focal depth are the major parameters that constrain the modeling input seismic data. Then, the undersea earthquakes modeling and the seabed deformations are computed with a program adapted from the rngchn code based on Okada's analytic equations. The last task of this work consisted to calculate the initial water surface displacement and simulate the triggered tsunami. Generation and propagation of induced seismic waves were estimated with another program adapted from the swan code for the resolution of the hydrodynamic shallow water equations. The results obtained will be firstly presented. Then, based on seismic waves travel times and run up height values, a large discussion will focus on the tsunami alert program for cities marked by fast urban development.

  12. TSUNAMI CATALOG AND VULNERABILITY OF MARTINIQUE (LESSER ANTILLES, FRANCE)

    OpenAIRE

    Roger, J.; Accary, F.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to meteorological hazards (hurricanes, heavy rainfalls, long-period swells, etc.), the Caribbean Islands are vulnerable to geological hazards such as earthquakes, landslides and volcanic eruptions caused by the complex tectonic activity and interactions in the region. Such events have generated frequently local or regional tsunamis, which often have affected the island of Martinique in the French West Indies. Over the past centuries, the island has been struck by destructive waves...

  13. Generating time series reference models based on event analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pe?rez Pe?rez, Aurora; Carac?a-valente Herna?ndez, Juan Pedro; Lara Torralbo, Juan Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    Creating a reference model that represents a given set of time series is a relevant problem as it can be applied to a wide range of tasks like diagnosis, decision support, fraud detection, etc. In some domains, like seismography or medicine, the relevant information contained in the time series is concentrated in short periods of time called events. In this paper, we propose a technique for generating time series reference models based on the analysis of the events they contain. The proposed ...

  14. Animation of the July 17, 1998, Papua New Guinea Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    On July 17, 1998, an earthquake registering 7.1 on the richter scale caused a tsunami along the coast of Papua New Guinea, wiping out two villages. The US Geological Survey (USGS) provides a model of the tsunami along with background information and news stories about the event. The animation is available in four formats and resolutions. Those who want to learn more about tsunamis can take advantage of the site's links under the heading General Information about Tsunamis.

  15. Evaluation of Indian nuclear coastal sites for tsunami hazard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents results of tsunami wave modelling based on different analytical/numerical approaches with shallow water wave theory. The results of in-house finite element code Tsunami Solution(TSUSOL) is highlighted through numerical simulation of Sumatra-2004 and Makran-1945 tsunami events. The TSUSOL code is shown to have special capability of coupled tsunami and acoustic wave simulation, which is an important feature for the early warning system

  16. Evaluation of Indian nuclear coastal sites for tsunami hazard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, R.K.; Kushwaha, H.S. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)), e-mail: rksingh@barc.gov.in

    2009-07-01

    The paper presents results of tsunami wave modelling based on different analytical/numerical approaches with shallow water wave theory. The results of in-house finite element code Tsunami Solution(TSUSOL) is highlighted through numerical simulation of Sumatra-2004 and Makran-1945 tsunami events. The TSUSOL code is shown to have special capability of coupled tsunami and acoustic wave simulation, which is an important feature for the early warning system

  17. ZONAS OSCURAS EN EL SISTEMA DE ALARMA DE ADVERTENCIA DE TSUNAMI EN CHILE / DARK ZONES IN ALARM SYSTEM OF TSUNAMI OF WARNING OF TSUNAMI IN CHILE

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Gabriel, Alvarez; Jorge, Ramirez; Lorena, Paredes; Miguel, Canales.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El territorio chileno cuenta con alrededor de 80.000 km de costa considerando el territorio insular, un dato relevante al momento de considerar la ocurrencia de un tsunami. Las autoridades chilenas, conscientes de este extenso territorio marítimo, han desarrollado un sistema de alerta de tsunami com [...] o una responsabilidad estatal y han depositado su control a la oficina nacional de emergencia – ministerio del interior (ONEMI) y en el servicio hidrográfico y oceanográfico de la armada de Chile (SHOA). En este artículo hemos realizado experiencias con el objetivo de activar los sistemas de advertencias generando eventos telúricos ficticios y/o eventos telúricos históricos capaces de desatar eventos de tsunami. También se ha propuesto una hipótesis de trabajo que permita, a través de los procedimientos establecidos por ley de la República de Chile, monitorear los tiempos de respuestas de los organismos estatales. Nuestro trabajo de investigación entrega resultados que nos permiten afirmar que existen zonas para eventos hipotéticos que podrían generar tsunamis a los cuales el sistema de alerta no sería eficiente en reaccionar. Para llevar a cabo esta investigación hemos utilizado un software llamado SLAT, basado en ecuaciones simplificadas de propagación de una onda de tsunami que nos permite obtener resultados rápidos y además hemos sometido a prueba el sistema con datos oficiales en los cuales se ha demostrado que el sistema de alerta no fue capaz de reaccionar al evento Atico 8,4 M. ocurrido en Perú. Abstract in english The Chilean territory has an extensive coastline -about 80.000 km of coast including the territory of its islands – which is an important fact to consider in the event of the occurrence of a tsunami. The Chilean authorities, fully aware of the vast maritime territory, have developed a tsunami warnin [...] g system. This system constitutes a state responsibility, and its control has been entrusted to the national emergency office - ministry of interior (ONEMI) and hydrographic and oceanographic service of Chilean navy (SHOA). This article deals with experiences carried out in order to activate the warning systems, generating fictional telluric events and / or historical telluric events capable of triggering tsunami occurrences. It also proposes a working hypothesis that will allow monitoring the response of the state agencies, through the procedures established by law in the Republic of Chile. Our research delivers results that allow us to affirm that there are areas for hypothetical events that could generate tsunamis in which the To carry out this research we have used a software called STLAT based on simplified equations of the propagation of a tsunami wave, which has allowed us to get quick results. We have also carried out tests with official data which have shown that the alarm system was not able to respond appropriately to the 8.4 M Atico event that occurred in Peru in 2001.

  18. ZONAS OSCURAS EN EL SISTEMA DE ALARMA DE ADVERTENCIA DE TSUNAMI EN CHILE DARK ZONES IN ALARM SYSTEM OF TSUNAMI OF WARNING OF TSUNAMI IN CHILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Alvarez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El territorio chileno cuenta con alrededor de 80.000 km de costa considerando el territorio insular, un dato relevante al momento de considerar la ocurrencia de un tsunami. Las autoridades chilenas, conscientes de este extenso territorio marítimo, han desarrollado un sistema de alerta de tsunami como una responsabilidad estatal y han depositado su control a la oficina nacional de emergencia – ministerio del interior (ONEMI) y en el servicio hidrográfico y oceanográfico de la armada de Chile (SHOA). En este artículo hemos realizado experiencias con el objetivo de activar los sistemas de advertencias generando eventos telúricos ficticios y/o eventos telúricos históricos capaces de desatar eventos de tsunami. También se ha propuesto una hipótesis de trabajo que permita, a través de los procedimientos establecidos por ley de la República de Chile, monitorear los tiempos de respuestas de los organismos estatales. Nuestro trabajo de investigación entrega resultados que nos permiten afirmar que existen zonas para eventos hipotéticos que podrían generar tsunamis a los cuales el sistema de alerta no sería eficiente en reaccionar. Para llevar a cabo esta investigación hemos utilizado un software llamado SLAT, basado en ecuaciones simplificadas de propagación de una onda de tsunami que nos permite obtener resultados rápidos y además hemos sometido a prueba el sistema con datos oficiales en los cuales se ha demostrado que el sistema de alerta no fue capaz de reaccionar al evento Atico 8,4 M. ocurrido en Perú.The Chilean territory has an extensive coastline -about 80.000 km of coast including the territory of its islands – which is an important fact to consider in the event of the occurrence of a tsunami. The Chilean authorities, fully aware of the vast maritime territory, have developed a tsunami warning system. This system constitutes a state responsibility, and its control has been entrusted to the national emergency office - ministry of interior (ONEMI and hydrographic and oceanographic service of Chilean navy (SHOA. This article deals with experiences carried out in order to activate the warning systems, generating fictional telluric events and / or historical telluric events capable of triggering tsunami occurrences. It also proposes a working hypothesis that will allow monitoring the response of the state agencies, through the procedures established by law in the Republic of Chile. Our research delivers results that allow us to affirm that there are areas for hypothetical events that could generate tsunamis in which the To carry out this research we have used a software called STLAT based on simplified equations of the propagation of a tsunami wave, which has allowed us to get quick results. We have also carried out tests with official data which have shown that the alarm system was not able to respond appropriately to the 8.4 M Atico event that occurred in Peru in 2001.

  19. The landslide tsunami at Statland, mid-Norway, January 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glimsdal, Sylfest; l'Heureux, Jean-Sebastien; Harbitz, Carl; Løvholt, Finn

    2015-04-01

    A coastal landslide occurred at Statland, Namdalseid county, on January 29th 2014, generating a local tsunami. Although the landslide and tsunami did not cause any human casualties, the induced tsunami gave rise to a considerable local run-up height up to 10 m and local damage to the Statland village. Here, we first present the results of the post-tsunami field survey. Secondly, a joint study of the modeled landslide dynamics, tsunami generation, and run-out is described. The modeling initially involved different hypotheses of the landslide evolution. However, comparing the simulated tsunami run-up for different scenarios with observations, we have attempted to reconstruct the most likely process for the landslide evolution and tsunami generation. To this end, observations of the landslide deposits as well as sea surface withdrawal and tsunami run-up heights are also utilized.

  20. West Coast Tsunami: Cascadia's Fault?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y.; Bernard, E. N.; Titov, V.

    2013-12-01

    The tragedies of 2004 Sumatra and 2011 Japan tsunamis exposed the limits of our knowledge in preparing for devastating tsunamis. The 1,100-km coastline of the Pacific coast of North America has tectonic and geological settings similar to Sumatra and Japan. The geological records unambiguously show that the Cascadia fault had caused devastating tsunamis in the past and this geological process will cause tsunamis in the future. Hypotheses of the rupture process of Cascadia fault include a long rupture (M9.1) along the entire fault line, short ruptures (M8.8 - M9.1) nucleating only a segment of the coastline, or a series of lesser events of M8+. Recent studies also indicate an increasing probability of small rupture occurring at the south end of the Cascadia fault. Some of these hypotheses were implemented in the development of tsunami evacuation maps in Washington and Oregon. However, the developed maps do not reflect the tsunami impact caused by the most recent updates regarding the Cascadia fault rupture process. The most recent study by Wang et al. (2013) suggests a rupture pattern of high- slip patches separated by low-slip areas constrained by estimates of coseismic subsidence based on microfossil analyses. Since this study infers that a Tokohu-type of earthquake could strike in the Cascadia subduction zone, how would such an tsunami affect the tsunami hazard assessment and planning along the Pacific Coast of North America? The rapid development of computing technology allowed us to look into the tsunami impact caused by above hypotheses using high-resolution models with large coverage of Pacific Northwest. With the slab model of MaCrory et al. (2012) (as part of the USGS slab 1.0 model) for the Cascadia earthquake, we tested the above hypotheses to assess the tsunami hazards along the entire U.S. West Coast. The modeled results indicate these hypothetical scenarios may cause runup heights very similar to those observed along Japan's coastline during the 2011 Japan tsunami,. Comparing to a long rupture, the Tohoku-type rupture may cause more serious impact at the adjacent coastline, independent of where it would occur in the Cascadia subduction zone. These findings imply that the Cascadia tsunami hazard may be greater than originally thought.

  1. General-purpose event generators for LHC physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, Andy; /Edinburgh U.; Butterworth, Jonathan; /University Coll. London; Gieseke, Stefan; /Karlsruhe U., ITP; Grellscheid, David; /Durham U., IPPP; Hoche, Stefan; /SLAC; Hoeth, Hendrik; Krauss, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Lonnblad, Leif; /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys. /CERN; Nurse, Emily; /University Coll. London; Richardson, Peter; /Durham U., IPPP; Schumann, Steffen; /Heidelberg U.; Seymour, Michael H.; /Manchester U.; Sjostrand, Torbjorn; /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Skands, Peter; /CERN; Webber, Bryan; /Cambridge U.

    2011-03-03

    We review the physics basis, main features and use of general-purpose Monte Carlo event generators for the simulation of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Topics included are: the generation of hard-scattering matrix elements for processes of interest, at both leading and next-to-leading QCD perturbative order; their matching to approximate treatments of higher orders based on the showering approximation; the parton and dipole shower formulations; parton distribution functions for event generators; non-perturbative aspects such as soft QCD collisions, the underlying event and diffractive processes; the string and cluster models for hadron formation; the treatment of hadron and tau decays; the inclusion of QED radiation and beyond-Standard-Model processes. We describe the principal features of the Ariadne, Herwig++, Pythia 8 and Sherpa generators, together with the Rivet and Professor validation and tuning tools, and discuss the physics philosophy behind the proper use of these generators and tools. This review is aimed at phenomenologists wishing to understand better how parton-level predictions are translated into hadron-level events as well as experimentalists wanting a deeper insight into the tools available for signal and background simulation at the LHC.

  2. General-purpose event generators for LHC physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, Andy [PPE Group, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, EH25 9PN (United Kingdom); Butterworth, Jonathan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Gieseke, Stefan [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Grellscheid, David [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham University, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Hoeche, Stefan [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Hoeth, Hendrik; Krauss, Frank [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham University, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Loennblad, Leif [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University (Sweden); PH Department, TH Unit, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Nurse, Emily [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Richardson, Peter [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham University, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Schumann, Steffen [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Seymour, Michael H. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Sjoestrand, Torbjoern [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University (Sweden); Skands, Peter [PH Department, TH Unit, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Webber, Bryan, E-mail: webber@hep.phy.cam.ac.uk [Cavendish Laboratory, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    We review the physics basis, main features and use of general-purpose Monte Carlo event generators for the simulation of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Topics included are: the generation of hard scattering matrix elements for processes of interest, at both leading and next-to-leading QCD perturbative order; their matching to approximate treatments of higher orders based on the showering approximation; the parton and dipole shower formulations; parton distribution functions for event generators; non-perturbative aspects such as soft QCD collisions, the underlying event and diffractive processes; the string and cluster models for hadron formation; the treatment of hadron and tau decays; the inclusion of QED radiation and beyond Standard Model processes. We describe the principal features of the ARIADNE, Herwig++, PYTHIA 8 and SHERPA generators, together with the Rivet and Professor validation and tuning tools, and discuss the physics philosophy behind the proper use of these generators and tools. This review is aimed at phenomenologists wishing to understand better how parton-level predictions are translated into hadron-level events as well as experimentalists seeking a deeper insight into the tools available for signal and background simulation at the LHC.

  3. New Approaches to Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Demonstrated in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, G. R.; Rizzo, A.; Madin, I.; Lyles Smith, R.; Stimely, L.

    2012-12-01

    Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries and Oregon Emergency Management collaborated over the last four years to increase tsunami preparedness for residents and visitors to the Oregon coast. Utilizing support from the National Tsunami Hazards Mitigation Program (NTHMP), new approaches to outreach and tsunami hazard assessment were developed and then applied. Hazard assessment was approached by first doing two pilot studies aimed at calibrating theoretical models to direct observations of tsunami inundation gleaned from the historical and prehistoric (paleoseismic/paleotsunami) data. The results of these studies were then submitted to peer-reviewed journals and translated into 1:10,000-12,000-scale inundation maps. The inundation maps utilize a powerful new tsunami model, SELFE, developed by Joseph Zhang at the Oregon Health & Science University. SELFE uses unstructured computational grids and parallel processing technique to achieve fast accurate simulation of tsunami interactions with fine-scale coastal morphology. The inundation maps were simplified into tsunami evacuation zones accessed as map brochures and an interactive mapping portal at http://www.oregongeology.org/tsuclearinghouse/. Unique in the world are new evacuation maps that show separate evacuation zones for distant versus locally generated tsunamis. The brochure maps explain that evacuation time is four hours or more for distant tsunamis but 15-20 minutes for local tsunamis that are invariably accompanied by strong ground shaking. Since distant tsunamis occur much more frequently than local tsunamis, the two-zone maps avoid needless over evacuation (and expense) caused by one-zone maps. Inundation mapping for the entire Oregon coast will be complete by ~2014. Educational outreach was accomplished first by doing a pilot study to measure effectiveness of various approaches using before and after polling and then applying the most effective methods. In descending order, the most effective methods were: (1) door-to-door (person-to-person) education, (2) evacuation drills, (3) outreach to K-12 schools, (4) media events, and (5) workshops targeted to key audiences (lodging facilities, teachers, and local officials). Community organizers were hired to apply these five methods to clusters of small communities, measuring performance by before and after polling. Organizers were encouraged to approach the top priority, person-to-person education, by developing Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT) or CERT-like organizations in each community, thereby leaving behind a functioning volunteer-based group that will continue the outreach program and build long term resiliency. One of the most effective person-to-person educational tools was the Map Your Neighborhood program that brings people together so they can sketch the basic layout of their neighborhoods to depict key earthquake and tsunami hazards and mitigation solutions. The various person-to-person volunteer efforts and supporting outreach activities are knitting communities together and creating a permanent culture of tsunami and earthquake preparedness. All major Oregon coastal population centers will have been covered by this intensive outreach program by ~2014.

  4. Assessment of Landslide-Tsunami Hazard for the Gulf of Mexico Using a Probabilistic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampell, A.; Horrillo, J. J.; Parambath, L.; Shigihara, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The devastating consequences of recent tsunami events in Indonesia (2004) and Japan (2011) have prompted a scientific response in assessing tsunami hazard even in regions where an apparent low risk or/and lack of complete historical tsunami record exists. Although a great uncertainty exists regarding the recurrence rate of large-scale tsunami events in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) due to sparsity of data, geological and historical evidences indicate that the most likely tsunami hazard could come from a submarine landslide triggered by a moderate earthquake. Under these circumstances, the assessment of the tsunami hazard in the region could be better accomplished by means of a probabilistic approach to identify tsunami sources. This study aims to customize for the GOM a probabilistic hazard assessment based on recurrence rates of tsunamigenic submarine mass failures (SMFs). The Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) technique is employed utilizing matrix correlations for landslide parameters to incorporate the uncertainty related to location/water-depth and landslide dimension based on lognormal/normal distributions obtained from observed data. Along fixed transects over the continental slope of the GOM, slide angle of failure, sediment properties and seismic peak horizontal accelerations (PHA) are determined by publicly available data. These parameter values are used to perform slope stability analyses in randomly generated translational SMFs obtained from the MCS technique. Once the SMF is identified as tsunamigenic for a given PHA recurrence rate, a preliminary tsunami amplitude can be estimated using empirical formulations. Thus, the annual probability of a tsunamigenic SMF is determined by the joint probability of failure with the annual PHA. By using the probabilistic approach, we identified tsunami sources with recurrence rates from few thousands to 10,000 years which produce extreme wave amplitudes for each transect. The most likely extreme tsunamigenic SMF events for a given transect are then modeled to determine hazard to specific coastal locations, including maximum runup heights, inundation depth/extent, and strong currents affecting communities and infrastructure, thus mitigating the impact of tsunamis according to the guidelines of the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program.

  5. ComMIT and Tweb Integration: Global Tsunami Modeling Done Locally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamb, L.; Moore, C. W.; Burger, E. F.

    2014-12-01

    Tweb is a web-based tsunami modeling research tool that was developed to provide distributed and remote access to the modeling and forecasting infrastructure developed for operational use at NOAA's Center for Tsunami Research (NCTR). ComMIT is a desktop application providing a powerful and fully functional, yet easy-to use graphical user interface to the NCTR-developed MOST tsunami forecasting model. ComMIT is a self-contained downloadable application available from NCTR for use by qualified and novice modelers alike. We have recently added functionality that allows ComMIT to retrieve the prefered model solution for tsunami events from the Tweb Web Service. A ComMIT user with access to high resolution coastal bathymetry can generate detailed inundation models for real or synthetic events for their areas of interest. Then with the push of a button, the ComMIT user can upload their model results to Tweb where a community of tsunami modelers and forecasters can see these model results displayed in Tweb, along with other operational and contributed inundation forecast models. Besides the crowdsourcing aspect of tsunami modeling that will allow tsunami forecasters to get inundation model inputs from areas they normally would not consider, these contributed flooding models could provide forecasters with an early model solution verification capability by allowing model result comparisons with local tide gauge data in areas where operational models have not been developed. In addition, with the proper training this tool is very useful for education and as a vehicle for community tsunami hazard assessment. We will illustrate the model solution and results interchange capabilities now possible with these two applications.

  6. Hadron level event generation at NLO accuracy with Sherpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherpa is a fully equipped tool for hadron level event generation for collider experiments. Using automated tree-level matrix element generators for the hard interaction and an automated matching with parton showers via the CKKW method, its accuracy is essentially limited to LO+NLL. Therefore, the next step is to extend the framework for computations at NLO accuracy in the hard interaction. While automatic generation of dipole subtraction terms is already available, the virtual contribution either is limited to a set of hard coded processes or needs to be fed in externally. Further, the parton showers need to be attached consistently, suitable also for multileg matching. In the talk a short review of the status of the framework for hadron level event generation at NLO+NLL accuracy will be given.

  7. Absolute GPS Time Event Generation and Capture for Remote Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIRES Collaboration

    The HiRes experiment operates fixed location and portable lasers at remote desert locations to generate calibration events. One physics goal of HiRes is to search for unusual showers. These may appear similar to upward or horizontally pointing laser tracks used for atmospheric calibration. It is therefore necessary to remove all of these calibration events from the HiRes detector data stream in a physics blind manner. A robust and convenient "tagging" method is to generate the calibration events at precisely known times. To facilitate this tagging method we have developed the GPSY (Global Positioning System YAG) module. It uses a GPS receiver, an embedded processor and additional timing logic to generate laser triggers at arbitrary programmed times and frequencies with better than 100nS accuracy. The GPSY module has two trigger outputs (one microsecond resolution) to trigger the laser flash-lamp and Q-switch and one event capture input (25nS resolution). The GPSY module can be programmed either by a front panel menu based interface or by a host computer via an RS232 serial interface. The latter also allows for computer logging of generated and captured event times. Details of the design and the implementation of these devices will be presented. 1 Motivation Air Showers represent a small fraction, much less than a percent, of the total High Resolution Fly's Eye data sample. The bulk of the sample is calibration data. Most of this calibration data is generated by two types of systems that use lasers. One type sends light directly to the detectors via optical fibers to monitor detector gains (Girard 2001). The other sends a beam of light into the sky and the scattered light that reaches the detectors is used to monitor atmospheric effects (Wiencke 1998). It is important that these calibration events be cleanly separated from the rest of the sample both to provide a complete set of monitoring information, and more

  8. The events associated with the great tsunami of 26 December, 2004 sea level variation and impact on coastal region of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    stream_size 9945 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Proc_Brain_Storming_Sess_Great_Tsunami_2004_57.pdf.txt stream_source_info Proc_Brain_Storming_Sess_Great_Tsunami_2004_57.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text...

  9. Tsunami generated by a granular collapse down a rough inclined plane

    CERN Document Server

    Viroulet, Sylvain; Kimmoun, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In this Letter, we experimentally investigate the collapse of initially dry granular media into water and the subsequent impulse waves. We systematically characterize the influence of the slope angle and the granular material on the initial amplitude of the generated leading wave and the evolution of its amplitude during the propagation. The experiments show that whereas the evolution of the leading wave during the propagation is well predicted by a solution of the linearized Korteweg-de Vries equation, the generation of the wave is more complicated to describe. Our results suggest that the internal properties of the granular media and the interplay with the surrounding fluid are important parameters for the generation of waves at low velocity impacts. Moreover, the amplitude of the leading wave reaches a maximum value at large slope angle. The runout distance of the collapse is also shown to be smaller in the presence of water than under totally dry conditions. This study provides a first insight into tsunam...

  10. Earthquake and Tsunami booklet based on two Indonesia earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Y.; Aci, M.

    2014-12-01

    Many destructive earthquakes occurred during the last decade in Indonesia. These experiences are very important precepts for the world people who live in earthquake and tsunami countries. We are collecting the testimonies of tsunami survivors to clarify successful evacuation process and to make clear the characteristic physical behaviors of tsunami near coast. We research 2 tsunami events, 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and 2010 Mentawai slow earthquake tsunami. Many video and photographs were taken by people at some places in 2004 Indian ocean tsunami disaster; nevertheless these were few restricted points. We didn't know the tsunami behavior in another place. In this study, we tried to collect extensive information about tsunami behavior not only in many places but also wide time range after the strong shake. In Mentawai case, the earthquake occurred in night, so there are no impressive photos. To collect detail information about evacuation process from tsunamis, we contrived the interview method. This method contains making pictures of tsunami experience from the scene of victims' stories. In 2004 Aceh case, all survivors didn't know tsunami phenomena. Because there were no big earthquakes with tsunami for one hundred years in Sumatra region, public people had no knowledge about tsunami. This situation was highly improved in 2010 Mentawai case. TV programs and NGO or governmental public education programs about tsunami evacuation are widespread in Indonesia. Many people know about fundamental knowledge of earthquake and tsunami disasters. We made drill book based on victim's stories and painted impressive scene of 2 events. We used the drill book in disaster education event in school committee of west Java. About 80 % students and teachers evaluated that the contents of the drill book are useful for correct understanding.

  11. Response of Coastal Structures against Earthquake Forces Considering Soil-Structure Interaction and Tsunami Run-Up Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof.P.Kodanda Ramarao,

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The catastrophic tsunamis generated by the great Indonesia earthquake triggered on December 26th, 2004, warned the coastal community on preparedness and constructing safe structures to resist against such events. Earthquake occurs suddenly without warning and bulk of destruction takes place within a short period of time. Similarly, when tsunami strikes, there will be a tremendous loss and damage in coastal regions. Apart from having a sound warning system in case of tsunamis, it is necessary to build Earthquake–Tsunami Resistant (ETR shelters, where residents living in coastal plain regions cannot move to farther distances before tsunami arrives the coast. Hence it is necessary to establish analytical methods for obtaining the response of coastal structures subjected to earthquake forces considering soil-structure interaction and also against tsunami run-up forces. A three storied shelter building with four different cases of structural configurations and another typical structure, an elevated water tank of 6 lakh liters capacity are chosen for the analysis. A comparative study is made on the response of these structures against earthquake forces, when they rest on different soil/rock media. In the analysis, IS 1893-2002 seismic code for determining the base shear values against earthquake loads and FEMA 55 to calculate hydrodynamic and impact forces against tsunami impact are used. From the results, it is observed that the refuge shelters that are chosen are more vulnerable to high tide tsunami loads compared to earthquake loads. In general, it is noticed that Base shears and Displacements increase with the decreases in stiffness of the soil and this increase attributes more due to rocking effect of the soil. Buildings with open storey at bottom and upper stories with heavy mass give significant rise to time period of these structures causing early failures during an earthquake before tsunami arrives. In this study, a useful guideline is evaluated demarcating the heights below which earthquake forces and above which tsunami forces are predominant in the structure.

  12. Monte Carlo event generators for hadron-hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of Monte Carlo event generators for simulating hadron-hadron collisions is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on comparisons of the approaches used to describe physics elements and identifying their relative merits and weaknesses. This review summarizes a more detailed report

  13. Matrix elements and Parton Shower in the event generator BABAYAGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new version of the event generator BABAYAGA is presented, which is based on an original matching of the Parton Shower approach with the complete exact O(?) matrix element for the inclusion of the QED radiative corrections to the Bhabha process at flavour factories. The theoretical accuracy of the improved generator is conservatively estimated to be 0.2%, by comparison with independent calculations. The generator is a useful tool for precise luminosity determination at flavour factories, for center-of-mass energies below 10 GeV

  14. What Is a Tsunami?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story Smile Style Game WHAT? What is a tsunami? Tsunamis are giant sea waves. They can be ... will destroy anything in their way. Why are tsunamis so destructive? During a normal storm or hurricane, ...

  15. Early Detection of Tsunami Scales using GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y.

    2013-12-01

    This talk reviews how tsunamis form from earthquakes and how GPS technologies can be used to detect tsunami energy scales in real time. Most tsunami fatalities occur in near-field communities of earthquakes at offshore faults. Tsunami early warning is key for reducing the number of fatalities. Unfortunately, an earthquake's magnitude often does not gauge the resulting tsunami power. Here we show that real-time GPS stations along coastlines are able to detect seafloor motions due to big earthquakes, and that the detected seafloor displacements are able to determine tsunami energy and scales instantaneously for early warnings. Our method focuses on estimating tsunami energy directly from seafloor motions because a tsunami's potential or scale, no matter how it is defined, has to be proportional to the tsunami energy. Since seafloor motions are the only source of a tsunami, their estimation directly relates to the mechanism that generates tsunamis; therefore, it is a proper way of identifying earthquakes that are capable of triggering tsunamis, while being able to discriminate those particular earthquakes from false alarms. Examples of detecting the tsunami energy scales for the 2004 Sumatra M9.1 earthquake, the 2005 Nias M8.7 earthquake, the 2010 M8.8 Chilean earthquake, and the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake will be presented. Related reference: 1. Xu, Z. and Y. T. Song (2013), Combining the all-source Green's functions and the GPS-derived source for fast tsunami prediction - illustrated by the March 2011 Japan tsunami, J. Atmos. Oceanic Tech., jtechD1200201. 2. Song, Y. T., I. Fukumori, C. K. Shum, and Y. Yi (2012), Merging tsunamis of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake detected over the open ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1029/2011GL050767. 3. Song, Y. T. and S.C. Han (2011) Satellite observations defying the long-held tsunami genesis theory, D.L. Tang (ed.), Remote Sensing of the Changing Oceans, DOI 10.1007/978-3-642-16541-2, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. 4. Song, Y. T. (2007) Detecting tsunami genesis and scales directly from coastal GPS stations, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L19602, doi:10.1029/2007GL031681.

  16. A Monte Carlo Approach for Estimating Tsunami Hazard from Submarine Mass Failure Along the U.S. East Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, C. D.; Krause, T.; Grilli, S. T.

    2011-12-01

    This work is being conducted as part of the development of tsunami inundation maps for the U.S. East Coast (USEC), as mandated by the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP). Along the USEC, which borders the Atlantic Ocean Basin, tsunami hazard may result from large distant co-seismic sources (e.g., in the Puerto Rico Trench or the Azores convergence zone) or volcanic flank collapse sources (e.g., in the Canary Islands). More importantly, however, tsunami hazard may result from Submarine Mass Failures (SMFs) occurring along the nearby continental shelf break and slope (e.g., 1929 Grand Bank). Indeed, potentially large tsunamigenic SMFs can be triggered by moderate seismic activity, such as could occur along the USEC, and cause large local tsunamis. While many past SMFs have been identified along the USEC and described in various publications (e.g., by USGS), due to the paucity of historical tsunami observations in this area, the associated tsunami hazard and its recurrence probability are largely unknown. To estimate the latter, in earlier work, we developed, validated with field data, and applied a Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) approach (Grilli et al., Marine Geology, vol. 264, p74, 2009) to the upper USEC (north of New Jersey). Here, a similar methodology is applied to the entire USEC. In the present MCSs, distributions of relevant parameters (e.g., seismicity, sediment properties, type and location, volume, and dimensions of slide, water depth) are used to perform large numbers (O(105)) of stochastic stability analyses of submerged slopes (along actual shelf transects), based on standard pseudo-static limit equilibrium methods. The predicted SMF types (i.e., translational or rotational), surface area, and slope angle are found to match published field data quite well along the USEC. For each parameter configuration found to be unstable under a specified ground acceleration (of given return period), the tsunami source characteristic height, and corresponding runup distribution on nearby shores, are calculated using empirical equations based on earlier numerical simulation work. A final statistical analysis of generated runup values yields estimates of overall coastal hazard, from 100 and 500-yr SMF tsunami events. The latter allows identifying regions of the USEC with elevated hazard (and related SMF parameters), where complete and detailed SMF tsunami simulations should be performed. The latter will be the object of the continuation of this NTHMP work, in which inundation from SMF tsunamis thus identified will be combined with that from other tsunami sources, to develop a series of tsunami inundation maps for areas of elevated tsunami hazard along the USEC.

  17. Measuring Possible Tsunami Currents from the April 1, 2014 Mw 8.2 Chile Earthquake in Crescent City, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admire, A. R.; Crawford, G. B.; Dengler, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Crescent City, California has a long history of damaging tsunamis. Thirty-nine tsunamis have been recorded since 1933, including five that caused damage. Crescent City's harbor and small boat basin are particularly vulnerable to strong currents. Humboldt State University has installed Acoustic Doppler Profilers (ADPs) in order to directly measure water pressure fluctuations and currents caused by tsunamis. An instrument in Humboldt Bay, ~100 km south of Crescent City, recorded tsunamis generated by the 2010 Mw 8.7 Chile and 2011 Mw 9.0 Japan earthquakes and demonstrated the usefulness of ADPs in measuring tsunami currents. In 2013, an ADP was deployed in Crescent City's harbor adjacent to the NOAA tide gauge. On April 1, 2014, a Mw 8.2 earthquake occurred in northern Chile, producing a modest Pacific-wide tsunami and a 16 cm peak amplitude on the Crescent City tide gauge. We analyze the ADP data before and during the expected arrival of the April 2 tsunami to see if a tsunami signal is present. Tidal currents are generally small (5 cm/s or less). For two months before the tsunami, intermittent, high-frequency variability is present in velocity and pressure at periods on the order of 20, 9 and 5 min, which compare favorably to modal periods predicted using some simplified models of open-ended basins. For several hours after the tsunami arrival on April 2, spectral power levels in velocity and pressure around the 20 min period are notably enhanced. These results suggest that: (1) the observed periods of enhanced variability represent the first three modes (n=0, 1 and 2) of free oscillations in the harbor, (2) the dominant period of (non-tidal) oscillations observed during the April 2, 2014 tsunami (~20 min) and during previous tsunamis (e.g., the water level record for the March 11, 2011 tsunami; also ~20 min) represents harbor resonance corresponding to the lowest order mode, and (3) this event is very near the ADP limit of detectability with peak tsunami currents of 5-10 cm/s and higher frequency variability and instrument noise root-mean-squared amplitude of 4-5 cm/s.

  18. Tsunami watch and warning in Fiji

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tsunami warning system needs further development in Fiji. The MRD earthquake and tsunami plan of action needs to be tested and appropriate authorities drilled in putting this plan into practice. It also needs to be supplemented with an alarm system such that people near the coasts, especially in built-up areas such as Suva can be made aware of impending tsunami danger. The plan of action becomes virtually ineffective when dealing with locally generated tsunamis and for this we have to rely on public education as it is not yet possible or practical to devise a warning system which can be activated within adequate time. 3 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  19. Source and progression of a submarine landslide and tsunami: The 1964 Great Alaska earthquake at Valdez

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Tom; Geist, Eric L.; Ryan, Holly F.; Lee, Homa J.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Lynett, Patrick; Hart, Patrick E.; Sliter, Ray; Roland, Emily

    2014-11-01

    Like many subduction zone earthquakes, the deadliest aspects of the 1964 M = 9.2 Alaska earthquake were the tsunamis it caused. The worst of these were generated by local submarine landslides induced by the earthquake. These caused high runups, engulfing several coastal towns in Prince William Sound. In this paper, we study one of these cases in detail, the Port Valdez submarine landslide and tsunami. We combine eyewitness reports, preserved film, and careful posttsunami surveys with new geophysical data to inform numerical models for landslide tsunami generation. We review the series of events as recorded at Valdez old town and then determine the corresponding subsurface events that led to the tsunami. We build digital elevation models of part of the pretsunami and posttsunami fjord-head delta. Comparing them reveals a ~1500 m long region that receded 150 m to the east, which we interpret as the primary delta landslide source. Multibeam imagery and high-resolution seismic reflection data identify a ~400 m wide chute with hummocky deposits at its terminus, which may define the primary slide path. Using these elements we run hydrodynamic models of the landslide-driven tsunamis that match observations of current direction, maximum inundation, and wave height at Valdez old town. We speculate that failure conditions at the delta front may have been influenced by manmade changes in drainage patterns as well as the fast retreat of Valdez and other glaciers during the past century.

  20. COMMENT ON: TSUNAMIS AND TSUNAMI-LIKE WAVES OF THE EASTERN UNITED STATES BY PATRICIA A. LOCKRIDGE, LOWELL S. WHITESIDE AND JAMES F. LANDER WITH RESPECT TO THE NOVEMBER 18, 1929 EARTHQUAKE AND ITS TSUNAMI

    OpenAIRE

    Alan Ruffman

    2005-01-01

    This most valuable compilation by Patricia Lockridge et al. (2002) covers a wide range of tsunamis and tsunami-like events ranging from marine tectonic, volcanic, and landslide tsunamis to possible meteorologic tsunami-like events. Lockridge et al.'s (2002) massive text table (pp. 124-141) entitled "Description of Events" covers events from 1668 to 1992. The 2002 paper in Science of Tsunami Hazards was clearly intended to be an update of, an extension to, and a sequel to, the first east coast...

  1. Tsunami-generated boulder ridges in Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.G.; Schweickert, R.A.; Robinson, J.E.; Lahren, M.M.; Kitts, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    An array of east-trending ridges 1-2 m high and up to 2 km long occurs on the Tahoe City shelf, a submerged wave-cut bench lake. The shelf is just north of the amphitheater of the giant subaqueous 10 km3 McKinney Bay landslide, which originated on the west wall of Lake Tahoe. Images from a submersible camera show that the ridges are composed of loose piles of boulders and cobbles that lie directly on poorly consolidated, fine-bedded lake beds deposited in an ancestral Lake Tahoe. Dredge hauls from landslide distal blocks, as well as from the walls of the re-entrant of the landslide, recovered similar lake sediments. The McKinney Bay landslide generated strong currents, which rearranged previous glacial-derived debris into giant ripples creating the boulder ridges. The uncollapsed part of the sediment bench, including the Tahoe City shelf, poses a hazard because it may fail again, producing a landslide and damaging waves. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  2. The Storegga Slide Tsunami - Deposits, Run-up Heights and Radiocarbon Dating of the 8000-Year-Old Tsunami in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondevik, S.; Lovholt, F.; Harbitz, C.; Stormo, S.; Skjerdal, G.

    2006-12-01

    One of the largest Holocene landslide mapped on Earth is the Storegga Slide offshore Norway. Between 2500 and 3400 km3 material were mobilized in a retrogressive process, generating a huge tsunami dated to about 7300 14C years BP, or ca 8100 calendar years BP. The tsunami is documented from onshore deposits along the entire Norwegian coast, on the Faeroe Islands, the Shetland Islands, in Scotland and possibly also on Greenland. Of these, the tsunami deposits in Shetland reach the highest elevation, indicating a run-up of at least 20 m. Coastal lakes have a high potential for preserving deposits from tsunamis and Storegga tsunami deposits are now documented from more than 40 lakes and submarine basins. Such deposits typically show an erosive, sharp, lower boundary against the underlying lake- or sea-floor mud. Coarse sand and fine gravel particles (2-6 mm) rest on this boundary. The sand often contains rip-up clasts of both gray silt and brown organic lake mud. Further up-core, the tsunami deposit is a mixture of plant fragments, twigs, bark, sand, and other re-deposited mud. The upper boundary is very gradual. The sand may contain marine diatoms, fragments of marine shells, and sea-urchins. This clearly demonstrates that material was brought into the fresh water lakes from the sea during the tsunami event. Based on these findings we have established a sedimentological model for tsunami deposits in lakes and shallow marine basins. Accurate radiocarbon dating of paleotsunamis are problematic because of erosion of the underlying strata, re- deposition of organic material within the tsunami deposit and also re-deposition of organic matter for many years after the tsunami event. Unexpectedly, we discovered plant material within the tsunami sand that is excellent for radiocarbon dating - these are green moss stems that we know were killed by the tsunami. The green color is analyzed to be chlorophyll. Chlorophyll in dead plants degrades rapidly with exposure to light and oxygen. The reason to why the chlorophyll is still present in these 8000-year-old moss stems is surprising. We think that the rapid burial of the plants within the shell-bearing sand provided a high pH, and that the tsunami deposit was subsequently sealed with marine silt preventing it from oxygen and light. The green-colored moss cannot have been re-deposited, but must have been alive when the tsunami struck the coast. Six different samples of such green-colored moss from different cores give an age of 7295±23 years BP, which calibrated to calendar years is 8030-8170 (2 ? range). We compared the field observations of run-up heights with maximum surface elevations from new numerical simulations of the Storegga slide generated tsunami. Such a comparison between observations and simulations help us to estimate important parameters for the slide; the initial acceleration, the maximum velocity, and the mass mobilization time during the slide process. Best fit between field observations and simulations is obtained for a retrogressive slide having a maximum velocity below 35 m/s, probably around 25- 30 m/s. The time lag between the individual slide blocks could not have been more than 15-20 seconds, indicating that the total mass was mobilized in approximately 40 - 60 minutes.

  3. Simulation of space-borne tsunami detection using GNSS-Reflectometry applied to tsunamis in the Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Stosius

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Within the German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System project GITEWS (Rudloff et al., 2009, a feasibility study on a future tsunami detection system from space has been carried out. The Global Navigation Satellite System Reflectometry (GNSS-R is an innovative way of using reflected GNSS signals for remote sensing, e.g. sea surface altimetry. In contrast to conventional satellite radar altimetry, multiple height measurements within a wide field of view can be made simultaneously. With a dedicated Low Earth Orbit (LEO constellation of satellites equipped with GNSS-R, densely spaced sea surface height measurements could be established to detect tsunamis. This simulation study compares the Walker and the meshed comb constellation with respect to their global reflection point distribution. The detection performance of various LEO constellation scenarios with GPS, GLONASS and Galileo as signal sources is investigated. The study concentrates on the detection performance for six historic tsunami events in the Indian Ocean generated by earthquakes of different magnitudes, as well as on different constellation types and orbit parameters. The GNSS-R carrier phase is compared with the PARIS or code altimetry approach. The study shows that Walker constellations have a much better reflection point distribution compared to the meshed comb constellation. Considering simulation assumptions and assuming technical feasibility it can be demonstrated that strong tsunamis with magnitudes (M ?8.5 can be detected with certainty from any orbit altitude within 15–25 min by a 48/8 or 81/9 Walker constellation if tsunami waves of 20 cm or higher can be detected by space-borne GNSS-R. The carrier phase approach outperforms the PARIS altimetry approach especially at low orbit altitudes and for a low number of LEO satellites.

  4. Simulation of space-borne tsunami detection using GNSS-Reflectometry applied to tsunamis in the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stosius, R.; Beyerle, G.; Helm, A.; Hoechner, A.; Wickert, J.

    2010-06-01

    Within the German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System project GITEWS (Rudloff et al., 2009), a feasibility study on a future tsunami detection system from space has been carried out. The Global Navigation Satellite System Reflectometry (GNSS-R) is an innovative way of using reflected GNSS signals for remote sensing, e.g. sea surface altimetry. In contrast to conventional satellite radar altimetry, multiple height measurements within a wide field of view can be made simultaneously. With a dedicated Low Earth Orbit (LEO) constellation of satellites equipped with GNSS-R, densely spaced sea surface height measurements could be established to detect tsunamis. This simulation study compares the Walker and the meshed comb constellation with respect to their global reflection point distribution. The detection performance of various LEO constellation scenarios with GPS, GLONASS and Galileo as signal sources is investigated. The study concentrates on the detection performance for six historic tsunami events in the Indian Ocean generated by earthquakes of different magnitudes, as well as on different constellation types and orbit parameters. The GNSS-R carrier phase is compared with the PARIS or code altimetry approach. The study shows that Walker constellations have a much better reflection point distribution compared to the meshed comb constellation. Considering simulation assumptions and assuming technical feasibility it can be demonstrated that strong tsunamis with magnitudes (M) ?8.5 can be detected with certainty from any orbit altitude within 15-25 min by a 48/8 or 81/9 Walker constellation if tsunami waves of 20 cm or higher can be detected by space-borne GNSS-R. The carrier phase approach outperforms the PARIS altimetry approach especially at low orbit altitudes and for a low number of LEO satellites.

  5. Modeling propagation and inundation of the 11 March 2011 Tohoku tsunami

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Løvholt

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available On 11 March 2011 the Tohoku tsunami devastated the east coast of Japan, claiming thousands of casualties and destroying coastal settlements and infrastructure. In this paper tsunami generation, propagation, and inundation are modeled to hindcast the event. Earthquake source models with heterogeneous slips are developed in order to match tsunami observations, including a best fit initial sea surface elevation with water levels up to 8 m. Tsunami simulations were compared to buoys in the Pacific, showing good agreement. In the far field the frequency dispersion provided a significant reduction even for the leading wave. Furthermore, inundation simulations were performed for ten different study areas. The results compared well with run-up measurements available and trim lines derived from satellite images, but with some overestimation of the modeled surface elevation in the northern part of the Sanriku coast. For inundation modeling this work aimed at using freely available, medium-resolution data for topography, bottom friction, and bathymetry, which are easily accessible in the framework of a rapid assessment. Although these data come along with some inaccuracies, the results of the tsunami simulations suggest that their use is feasible for application in rapid tsunami hazard assessments. A heterogeneous source model is essential to simulate the observed distribution of the run-up correctly, though.

  6. Tsunami precursors excited by surface seismic waves during the 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sementsov, Kirill A.; Nosov, Mikhail A.; Kolesov, Sergey V.; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    Weak gravitational waves that preceded the arrival of tsunami were registered by the DONET (JAMSTEC) stations during the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. We shall call these waves tsunami precursors. The amplitude and period of tsunami precursors amounted to 3 cm and 150 s, respectively. Tsunami precursors are clearly manifested in ocean-bottom pressure variations recorded by DONET stations that were in operation during the 2011 event. Being excited immediately after the passage of surface seismic waves the precursors were observed during at least one hour until the arrival of tsunami waves. Ocean bottom seismometers (accelerometers) did not detect any similar signals within the same time-frequency range. We assume physical mechanism of generation of the precursor is related to low-frequency seismic surface waves. Theoretical estimates of parameters of the precursor carried out on the base of this assumption are in a good agreement with the observed values. Results of 3D numerical simulation of tsunami precursors carried out in the framework of linear potential theory are presented and analyzed. The study was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research (projects 13-05-92100, 13-05-00337).

  7. The tsunami signature on a submerged promontory: the case study of the Atacames Promontory, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioualalen, M.; Ratzov, G.; Collot, J.-Y.; Sanclemente, E.

    2011-02-01

    Shelf promontories exhibit very specific bathymetric features with regards to tsunamis. Because of their submerged cape morphology, a potential tsunami generated seawards of the promontory will exhibit a specific mode of propagation and coastal impact. To identify this peculiar tsunami signature, the Atacames Promontory, Ecuador, was chosen as a case study (another example is the shelf of the Nile delta, Egypt). The area is tectonically very active, hosts earthquakes among the most powerful recorded, as well as areas of slope instabilities that have triggered significant submarine landslides in the past (several cubic kilometres of volume). Both types of events are likely to be tsunamigenic. To examine the tsunami behaviour at the coastal area of the promontory and at its vicinity, we have considered two examples of tsunamigenic landslides of which scars were identified near the base of the continental slope. We also took into consideration two earthquake scenarios that are likely to represent most classes of earthquakes possibly occurring in this area depending on their locations and subsequent tsunami directivity, that is, a sensitivity test investigation. We took two distinct earthquake scenarios which are based on the 1942 and 1958 events that stroke the area. Then we computed their derived tsunamis and analysed their coastal impact. We found that significant tsunamis can be generated by either landslides or earthquakes. However, the maxima of wave amplitude occur offshore (but still above the underwater promontory): the concave-type shape of the bathymetric field often yields a refraction/focusing area that is located on the shelf promontory and not at the coast area of the promontory: the wave propagates first through the focusing area before striking the considered coast. This area may be considered as a sheltered zone. Besides, in the vicinity of the promontory (not exactly concerned by the study), the city of Esmeraldas, is relatively sheltered due to the presence of the underwater canyon at its termination and due to diverging waves.

  8. TOWARD INDONESIAN TSUNAMI EARLY WARNING SYSTEM BY USING RAPID RUPTURE DURATIONS CALCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Adlazim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia has an Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (Ina-TEWS since 2008. The Ina-TEWS has used automatic processing on hypocenter; Mwp, Mw (mB and Mj. If earthquake occurred in Ocean, depth 7, then Ina-TEWS announce early warning that the earthquake can generate tsunami. However, the announcement of the Ina-TEWS is still not accuracy. Purpose of this study is to estimate earthquake rupture duration of large Indonesia earthquakes that occurred in Indian Ocean, Java, Timor Sea, Banda Sea, Arafura Sea and Pacific Ocean using a direct procedure and software developed Lomax and Michelini for rapid assessment of earthquake tsunami potential by deriving two simple measures from vertical component broadband P-wave velocity record. The first is the high-frequency apparent rupture duration, Tdur which may be related to can be related to the critical parameters rupture length (L, depth (z, and shear modulus (?. The second is a confirmation of the earlier finding by Lomax and Michelini, namely that the rupture duration has a stronger influence to generate tsunami than Mw and Depth. We analyzed at least 510 vertical seismogram recorded by GEOFON-IA and IRIS-DMC networks. Our analysis shows that the seismic potency, LWD, which is more obviously related to capability to generate a tsunami than former. The larger Tdur the larger is the seismic potency LWD because Tdur is proportional to L/vr (with vr – rupture velocity. We also suggest that tsunami potential is not directly related to the faulting type of source and for events that have rupture duration greater than 50 s, the earthquakes generated tsunami. With available real-time seismogram data, rapid calculation, rupture duration discriminant can be completed within 3 to 8 min after the P-onset.

  9. Heavy ion event generator HYDJET++ (HYDrodynamics plus JETs)

    CERN Document Server

    Lokhtin, I P; Petrushanko, S V; Snigirev, A M; Arsene, I; Tywoniuk, K

    2008-01-01

    HYDJET++ is a Monte-Carlo event generator for the simulation of relativistic heavy ion AA collisions considered as a superposition of the soft, hydro-type state and the hard, multi-parton state. This model is the development and continuation of HYDJET event generator (Lokhtin & Snigirev, 2006, EPJC, 45, 211). The main program is written in the object-oriented C++ language under the ROOT environment. The hard part of HYDJET++ is identical to the hard part of Fortran-written HYDJET and is included in the generator structure as a separate directory. The soft part of HYDJET++ event is the "thermal" hadronic state generated on the chemical and thermal freeze-out hypersurfaces represented by the parameterization of relativistic hydrodynamics with preset freeze-out conditions. It includes longitudinal, radial and elliptic flow effects and decays of hadronic resonances. The corresponding fast Monte-Carlo simulation procedure, C++ code FAST MC (Amelin et al., 2006, PRC, 74, 064901; 2008, PRC, 77, 014903) is adapte...

  10. ALGERIA’S VULNERABILITY TO TSUNAMIS FROM NEAR-FIELD SEISMIC SOURCES

    OpenAIRE

    ALGERIA’S VULNERABILITY TO TSUNAMIS FROM NEAR-FIELD SEISMIC SOURCES; Cisternas, A.; J. -L. Vigneresse; W. Dudley; B. Mc Adoo

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of the effects of tsunami damage relative to earthquake damage may help to identify critical coastal zone structures and exposed populations for near field tsunami risk. In this work, we propose to define the ratio between tsunami intensity and earthquake intensity as a measure of near field tsunami vulnerability for coastal communities. This parameter is estimated for 13 tsunami events reported in North Algeria from the 14th century to present. Although the results show that there...

  11. EL TERREMOTO Y POSTERIOR TSUNAMI DEL 26 DE DICIEMBRE DE 2004 EN INDONESIA

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    BEATRIZ ELENA, ESTRADA ROLDÁN; JOSEF, FARBIARZ FARBIARZ.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available [...] Abstract in english A short compilation of the cause, characteristics and effects of the tsunami generated on the 26 of December of 2004 in Indonesia is presented here. The general context of generation of this phenomena is illustrated together with the tectonic environment in which this tsunami in particular was produ [...] ced. Finally, a brief introduction to tsunamis in Colombia including tsunami cases and areas of higher tsunami hazard is considered.

  12. Tsunami Source of the 2010 Mentawai, Indonesia Earthquake Inferred from Tsunami Field Survey and Waveform Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Kenji; Nishimura, Yuichi; Putra, Purna Sulastya; Gusman, Aditya Riadi; Sunendar, Haris; Fujii, Yushiro; Tanioka, Yuichiro; Latief, Hamzah; Yulianto, Eko

    2013-09-01

    The 2010 Mentawai earthquake (magnitude 7.7) generated a destructive tsunami that caused more than 500 casualties in the Mentawai Islands, west of Sumatra, Indonesia. Seismological analyses indicate that this earthquake was an unusual "tsunami earthquake," which produces much larger tsunamis than expected from the seismic magnitude. We carried out a field survey to measure tsunami heights and inundation distances, an inversion of tsunami waveforms to estimate the slip distribution on the fault, and inundation modeling to compare the measured and simulated tsunami heights. The measured tsunami heights at eight locations on the west coasts of North and South Pagai Island ranged from 2.5 to 9.3 m, but were mostly in the 4-7 m range. At three villages, the tsunami inundation extended more than 300 m. Interviews of local residents indicated that the earthquake ground shaking was less intense than during previous large earthquakes and did not cause any damage. Inversion of tsunami waveforms recorded at nine coastal tide gauges, a nearby GPS buoy, and a DART station indicated a large slip (maximum 6.1 m) on a shallower part of the fault near the trench axis, a distribution similar to other tsunami earthquakes. The total seismic moment estimated from tsunami waveform inversion was 1.0 × 1021 Nm, which corresponded to Mw 7.9. Computed coastal tsunami heights from this tsunami source model using linear equations are similar to the measured tsunami heights. The inundation heights computed by using detailed bathymetry and topography data and nonlinear equations including inundation were smaller than the measured ones. This may have been partly due to the limited resolution and accuracy of publically available bathymetry and topography data. One-dimensional run-up computations using our surveyed topography profiles showed that the computed heights were roughly similar to the measured ones.

  13. Deflation and Deformation of the Askja Caldera Complex, Iceland, Since 1983: Strain and Stress Development on Caldera Boundaries Prior to Tsunami Generating Rockslide in 2014 at Lake Öskjuvatn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmundsson, F.; Drouin, V.; Parks, M.; Dumont, S.; Heimisson, E. R.; Hjartardottir, A. R.; Einarsson, P.; Hoskuldsson, A.; Brandsdottir, B.; Saemundsson, T.; Johannesson, T.; Helgason, J. K.; Sturkell, E. C.; Pedersen, R.; Hooper, A. J.; Spaans, K.; Minet, C.; Gudmundsson, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    The relation between ground deformation and caldera development can be studied at the Askja caldera complex at the divergent plate boundary in Iceland. The Lake Öskjuvatn caldera, 4-5 km wide and about 250 m deep, began forming shortly prior to a major explosive eruption in 1875 and continued to grow rapidly for over 2 decades. The boundaries of the caldera collapse remain unstable. A large rockslide on 21 July 2014 of the order of 30-100 million cubicmeters generated a lake tsunami with run up heights of over 30 m. Geodetic measurements at the volcano since 1983 suggest that instability of the basal plane of failure of the rockslide may have steadily increased as the volcano deflated throughout this period. Deformation (subsidence and horizontal contraction) has been mapped by levelling, distance measurements, GPS and satellite radar interferometry (InSAR) using the ERS, Envisat, Radarsat, TerraSAR-X and Cosmo-SkyMed satellites. An intermediate digital elevation model has been delivered by the TanDEM-X mission. Initial subsidence rate was up to 7 cm/yr, decaying to 2-3 cm in recent years. A large part of the signal can be reproduced by a model with pressure decrease in a spherical source at 3 km depth, interpreted as a pressure drop in a magma chamber, or subsidence may occur over a structurally weak region in relation to plate spreading. The 2014 rockslide has a basal plane of failure passing through intact rock. A section of the basal plane is exhumed by the slide, revealing impressive striations and slip marks. A simple model, assuming uniform elastic halfspace with a rectangular failure plane extending to the surface, indicates that Coulomb stress on the failure plane or a deeper weakness zone under the rockslide, increased by over 2 MPa since 1983 due to the deflation, exceeding the change often associated with stress triggering of earthquakes. Furthermore, the slide occurred in an area of persistent geothermal and seismic activity. Although gravity, geothermal alteration, topography and climate factors are likely to dictate mostly the 21 July 2014 rockslide, our observations and modelling indicate the rockslide is an integral event in the development of the Öskjuvatn caldera, with deflation of the volcano in recent decades contributing to instability of the caldera boundary and failure on the basal plane of the rockslide.

  14. Automated event generation for loop-induced processes

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschi, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    We present the first fully automated implementation of cross-section computation and event generation for loop-induced processes. This work is integrated in the MadGraph5_aMC@NLO framework. We describe the optimisations implemented at the level of the matrix element evaluation, phase space integration and event generation allowing for the simulation of large multiplicity loop-induced processes. Along with some selected differential observables, we illustrate our results with a table showing inclusive cross-sections for all loop-induced hadronic scattering processes with up to three final states in the SM as well as for some relevant two to four processes. Many of these are computed here for the first time.

  15. Stochastic generation of hourly rainstorm events in Johor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojumuddin, Nur Syereena; Yusof, Fadhilah; Yusop, Zulkifli

    2015-02-01

    Engineers and researchers in water-related studies are often faced with the problem of having insufficient and long rainfall record. Practical and effective methods must be developed to generate unavailable data from limited available data. Therefore, this paper presents a Monte-Carlo based stochastic hourly rainfall generation model to complement the unavailable data. The Monte Carlo simulation used in this study is based on the best fit of storm characteristics. Hence, by using the Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) and Anderson Darling goodness-of-fit test, lognormal appeared to be the best rainfall distribution. Therefore, the Monte Carlo simulation based on lognormal distribution was used in the study. The proposed model was verified by comparing the statistical moments of rainstorm characteristics from the combination of the observed rainstorm events under 10 years and simulated rainstorm events under 30 years of rainfall records with those under the entire 40 years of observed rainfall data based on the hourly rainfall data at the station J1 in Johor over the period of 1972-2011. The absolute percentage error of the duration-depth, duration-inter-event time and depth-inter-event time will be used as the accuracy test. The results showed the first four product-moments of the observed rainstorm characteristics were close with the simulated rainstorm characteristics. The proposed model can be used as a basis to derive rainfall intensity-duration frequency in Johor.

  16. NiMax system for hadronic event generators in HEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have suggested a new approach to the development and use of Monte Carlo event generators in high-energy physics (HEP). It is a component approach, when a complex numerical model is composed of standard components. Our approach opens a way to organize a library of HEP model components and provides a great flexibility for the construction of very powerful and realistic numerical models. To support this approach we have designed the NiMax software system (framework) written in C++

  17. On the feasibility of new tsunami warning system by measuring the low frequency T phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is widely known that, before a tsunami attacked a coast, loud sounds like thunders were heard in coastal areas and/or vessels in the ocean felt sea shocks. Sea shocks are violent shocks with long durations felt by ocean vessels at the moment of submarine earthquakes. The cause of sea shocks is thought to be the T phase. Tsunami-producing earthquakes, large and shallow focus seismic events occurring at sea can generate the T phase, that is, seismic waves generated by their conversion at an ocean bottom, propagate over large distance at the speed of the sound wave in the sea water along the SOFAR channel. Many studies have been done about the use of the T phase for tsunami warnings. For example, in this paper, considering the compressibility of the sea water, it is shown that another mechanism can also generate the low frequency T phase. It is also shown that the low frequency T phase carries the information of the magnitude and the duration of the displacement of the ocean bottom and is useful for tsunami warnings, in particular, for near shore tsunami warnings. 3 refs, 8 figs

  18. Tsunami hazard assessment in the Colombian Caribbean Coast with a deterministic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero Diaz, L.; Correa, R.; Ortiz R, J. C.; Restrepo L, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    For the Caribbean Sea, we propose six potential tectonic sources of tsunami, defining for each source the worst credible earthquake from the analysis of historical seismicity, tectonics, pasts tsunami, and review of IRIS, PDE, NOAA, and CMT catalogs. The generation and propagation of tsunami waves in the selected sources were simulated with COMCOT 1.7, which is a numerical model that solves the linear and nonlinear long wave equations in finite differences in both Cartesian, and spherical coordinates. The results of the modeling are presented in maps of maximum displacement of the free surface for the Colombian Caribbean coast and the island areas, and they show that the event would produce greater impact is generated in the source of North Panama Deformed Belt (NPDB), where the first wave train reaches the central Colombian coast in 40 minutes, generating wave heights up to 3.7 m. In San Andrés and Providencia island, tsunami waves reach more than 4.5 m due effects of edge waves caused by interactions between waves and a barrier coral reef around of each island. The results obtained in this work are useful for planning systems and future regional and local warning systems and to identify priority areas to conduct detailed research to the tsunami threat.

  19. National Geophysical Data Center Tsunami Data Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroker, K. J.; Dunbar, P. K.; Brocko, R.

    2008-12-01

    NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and co-located World Data Center for Geophysics and Marine Geology long-term tsunami data archive provides data and derived products essential for tsunami hazard assessment, forecast and warning, inundation modeling, preparedness, mitigation, education, and research. As a result of NOAA's efforts to strengthen its tsunami activities, the long-term tsunami data archive has grown from less than 5 gigabyte in 2004 to more than 2 terabytes in 2008. The types of data archived for tsunami research and operation activities have also expanded in fulfillment of the P.L. 109-424. The archive now consists of: global historical tsunami, significant earthquake and significant volcanic eruptions database; global tsunami deposits and proxies database; reference database; damage photos; coastal water-level data (i.e. digital tide gauge data and marigrams on microfiche); bottom pressure recorder (BPR) data as collected by Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) buoys. The tsunami data archive comes from a wide variety of data providers and sources. These include the NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers, NOAA National Data Buoy Center, NOAA National Ocean Service, IOC/NOAA International Tsunami Information Center, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, U.S. Geological Survey, tsunami catalogs, reconnaissance reports, journal articles, newspaper articles, internet web pages, and email. NGDC has been active in the management of some of these data for more than 50 years while other data management efforts are more recent. These data are openly available, either directly on-line or by contacting NGDC. All of the NGDC tsunami and related databases are stored in a relational database management system. These data are accessible over the Web as tables, reports, and interactive maps. The maps provide integrated web-based GIS access to individual GIS layers including tsunami sources, tsunami effects, significant earthquakes, significant volcano events, and various spatial reference layers such as topography, population density, and political boundaries. The map service also provides ftp links and hyperlinks to additional hazards information such as the NGDC collection of hazards photos. The NGDC website also provides a Keyhole Markup Language (KML) file, updated nightly, containing tsunami sources and runups

  20. Using GPS to Detect Imminent Tsunamis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y. Tony

    2009-01-01

    A promising method of detecting imminent tsunamis and estimating their destructive potential involves the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) data in addition to seismic data. Application of the method is expected to increase the reliability of global tsunami-warning systems, making it possible to save lives while reducing the incidence of false alarms. Tsunamis kill people every year. The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami killed about 230,000 people. The magnitude of an earthquake is not always a reliable indication of the destructive potential of a tsunami. The 2004 Indian Ocean quake generated a huge tsunami, while the 2005 Nias (Indonesia) quake did not, even though both were initially estimated to be of the similar magnitude. Between 2005 and 2007, five false tsunami alarms were issued worldwide. Such alarms result in negative societal and economic effects. GPS stations can detect ground motions of earthquakes in real time, as frequently as every few seconds. In the present method, the epicenter of an earthquake is located by use of data from seismometers, then data from coastal GPS stations near the epicenter are used to infer sea-floor displacements that precede a tsunami. The displacement data are used in conjunction with local topographical data and an advanced theory to quantify the destructive potential of a tsunami on a new tsunami scale, based on the GPS-derived tsunami energy, much like the Richter Scale used for earthquakes. An important element of the derivation of the advanced theory was recognition that horizontal sea-floor motions contribute much more to generation of tsunamis than previously believed. The method produces a reliable estimate of the destructive potential of a tsunami within minutes typically, well before the tsunami reaches coastal areas. The viability of the method was demonstrated in computational tests in which the method yielded accurate representations of three historical tsunamis for which well-documented ground-motion measurements were available. Development of a global tsunami-warning system utilizing an expanded network of coastal GPS stations was under consideration at the time of reporting the information for this article.

  1. How to learn and develop from both good and bad lessons- the 2011Tohoku tsunami case -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Megumi; Okazumi, Toshio

    2013-04-01

    The 2011 Tohoku tsunami revealed Japan has repeated same mistakes in a long tsunami disaster history. After the disaster Japanese remember many old lessons and materials: an oral traditional evacuation method 'Tsunami TENDENKO' which is individual independent quick evacuation, a tsunami historical memorial stone "Don't construct houses below this stone to seaside" in Aneyoshi town Iwate prefecture, Namiwake-shrine naming from the story of protect people from tsunami in Sendai city, and so on. Tohoku area has created various tsunami historical cultures to descendent. Tohoku area had not had a tsunami disaster for 50 years after the 1960 Chilean tsunami. The 2010 Chilean tsunami damaged little fish industry. People gradually lost tsunami disaster awareness. At just the bad time the magnitude (M) 9 scale earthquake attacked Tohoku. It was for our generations an inexperienced scale disaster. People did not make use of the ancestor's lessons to survive. The 2004 Sumatra tsunami attacked just before 7 years ago. The magnitude scale is almost same as M 9 scale. Why didn't Tohoku people and Japanese tsunami experts make use of the lessons? Japanese has a character outside Japan. This lesson shows it is difficult for human being to learn from other countries. As for Three mile island accident case in US, it was same for Japan. To addition to this, there are similar types of living lessons among different hazards. For examples, nuclear power plantations problem occurred both the 2012 Hurricane Sandy in US and the 2011 Tohoku tsunami. Both local people were not informed about the troubles though Oyster creek nuclear power station case in US did not proceed seriously all. Tsunami and Hurricane are different hazard. Each exparts stick to their last. 1. It is difficult for human being to transfer living lessons through next generation over decades. 2. It is difficult for human being to forecast inexperienced events. 3. It is usually underestimated the danger because human being have a tendency to judge based on own experience. 4. It is difficult for human being to make use of lessons from different countries because human being would not like to think own self suffer victim for a self-preservation mind. 5. It is usual for experts not to pay attention to other fields even if similar case occurs in different fields. We started collecting 18 hazards of such historical living lessons all over the world before the 2011 Tohoku tsunami. We adapted to this project collecting lessons from Tohoku tsunami and will publish for small children in developing countries in March 2013. This will be translated in at least 10 languages. This disaster lessons guide books are free. We will introduce some lessons in the presentations. We believe education is one of useful countermeasures to prevent from repeating same mistakes and transfer directly living lessons to new generations.

  2. Process Monitoring For Safeguards Via Event Generation, Integration, And Interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a recognized safeguards benefit from using process monitoring (PM) on nuclear facilities to complement nuclear materials accountancy. We introduce a model-based approach for PM in which the assessment regarding the state of the monitored system is conducted at a system-centric level. The proposed architecture integrates both time-driven and event-driven data integration and analysis for decision-making. While the time-driven layers of the proposed architecture encompass more traditional PM methods based on time series data and analysis, the event-driven layers encompass operation monitoring methods based on discrete event data integration and analysis. By integrating process- and operation-related information and methodologies within an unified modeling and monitoring framework that includes not only current but also past plant behaviors, the task of anomaly detection is greatly improved because this decision-making approach can benefit from not only known time-series relationships among measured signals but also from known event sequence relationships among generated events. Building from the proposed system-centric PM architecture, we briefly introduce methods that can be used to implement its different components. The application of the proposed approach is then demonstrated via simulation experiments.

  3. Tsunami recorded on the open ocean floor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filloux, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    On March 14, 1979 a sizeable earth-quake (Ms-7.6 Richter scale) occurred on the continential shelf adjacent to S.W. Mexico, near Petatlan in the state of Guerrero. This earthquake generated a small tsunami that was recorded in deep water, 1000 km away, thus providing for the first time a glance at a tsunami traveling in the open ocean. The same sea floor pressure record displays conspicuous signals associated with vertical sea floor motions generated at the passage of the first Rayleight seismic wave, R1. Seismic and tsunami travel velocities are in agreement with our present understanding of the phenomena, and tsunami detectability in deep water is demonstrated to be well within present day state of the art in the design of sea floor pressure transducers. As calculations anticipate, the E.M. signals associated with the passage of the tsunami were too faint to be detected.

  4. Introduction to "Historical and Recent Catastrophic Tsunamis in the World: Volume II. Tsunamis from 1755 to 2010"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Kenji; Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Dominey-Howes, Dale; Borrero, José C.

    2013-09-01

    Eighteen papers on past and recent destructive tsunamis are included in Volume II of the PAGEOPH topical issue "Historical and Recent Catastrophic Tsunamis in the World." Three papers discuss deep-sea (DART) and coastal tsunami observations, warning systems and risk management in the Pacific Ocean. Four papers examine the 1755 Lisbon, 1964 Alaska, 2003 Algeria, and 2011 Haiti tsunamis. Four more papers, as well as some papers in Volume I, report on various aspects of the 2010 Chile tsunami. Two papers present some results of field survey and modelling investigation of the 2010 Mentawai, Indonesia, tsunami. Three papers report on modelling efforts of tsunami generation by earthquake and landslide, and of tsunami propagation. Finally, two papers discuss hazard assessment using a probabilistic approach.

  5. MODELING OF THE 1755 LISBON TSUNAMI

    OpenAIRE

    Charles L. Mader

    2001-01-01

    The generation and propagation of the November 1, 1755 Lisbon earthquake generated tsunami is of current interest to the IOCARIBE Tsunami Scientific Steering Committee.The November 1, 1755 Lisbon earthquake generated a tsunami with a period of one hour and amplitudes of 20 meters at Lisbon and along the African and south European coasts, of 4 meters along the English coast, and of 7 meters at Saba in the Caribbean after 7 hours of travel. The modeling was performed using the SWAN code whi...

  6. Tsunami source parameters estimated from slip distribution and their relation to tsunami intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshakova, Anna; Nosov, Mikhail; Kolesov, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    Estimation of the level of tsunami hazard on the basis of earthquake moment magnitude often fails. The most important reason for this is that tsunamis are related to earthquakes in a complex and ambiguous way. In order to reveal a measure of tsunamigenic potential of an earthquake that would be better than moment magnitude of earthquake we introduce a set of tsunami source parameters that can be calculated from co-seismic ocean-bottom deformation and bathymetry. We consider more than two hundred ocean-bottom earthquakes (1923-2014) those for which detailed slip distribution data (Finite Fault Model) are available on USGS, UCSB, Caltech, and eQuake-RC sites. Making use of the Okada formulae the vector fields of co-seismic deformation of ocean bottom are estimated from the slip distribution data. Taking into account bathymetry (GEBCO_08) we determine tsunami source parameters such as double amplitude of bottom deformation, displaced water volume, potential energy of initial elevation, etc. The tsunami source parameters are examined as a function of earthquake moment magnitude. The contribution of horisontal component of ocean bottom deformation to tsunami generation is investigated. We analyse the Soloviev-Imamura tsunami intensity as a function of tsunami source parameters. The possibility of usage of tsunami source parameters instead of moment magnitude in tsunami warning is discussed. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project 14-05-31295

  7. Preparedness for quantitative tsunami forecasting; Tsunami no ryoteki yoho ni mukete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekita, Y. [Meteorological Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-15

    This paper describes Tsunami forecasting. The way for predicting the Tsunami scale in each Tsunami forecasting area was not so remarkably improved since the Tsunami forecasting service in the whole country has been initiated in 1952. In the Tsunami forecasting map used for current Tsunami prediction, it is supposed that the scale of Tsunami to be generated is determined by only the magnitude and that the Tsunami attenuation by propagation depends on only the distance from epicenter. This becomes a subject of discussion in Tsunami forecasting. To solve the problem in the former, the submarine fluctuation accompanying an earthquake must be recognized as soon as possible. However, there is no effective method at present. For the problem in the latter, the propagation of Tsunami in various earthquakes is calculated in advance, and the resultant data is stored in data base. Since the information immediately after an earthquake occurs is only the focal position and magnitude, the data base that is presently being created is retrieved by only them. 3 figs.

  8. Evaluation of tsunami vulnerability along northeast coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Pravakar; Usha, Tune; Ramanamurthy, M. V.

    2014-05-01

    The Sumatra tsunami of 26 December 2004 with a moment magnitude of 9.3 Mw caused colossal damage to the south-southeastern Indian coast and Andaman-Nicobar group of Islands. However, the northeastern coastline bordering the northwestern Bay of Bengal remained unaffected although a tidal station located in the region recorded the highest water level (~2.5 m) for the entire east coast of India on the eventful day. As a part of hazard mitigation and planning for the northeastern coast, four major settlements, viz., Gopalpur, Puri, Paradip and Digha were evaluated for tsunami vulnerability. Inundation and run-up scenarios were generated for Bay of Bengal earthquake sources such as Arakan-1762, Car Nicobar-1881, North Andaman-1941 and Sumatra 2004 using TUNAMI N2 model. The paper describes computed run-up heights and landward inundation for 20-25 km coastal stretch with different geomorphologies and topographical characteristics. Simulation results indicate that the model is able to generate a comparable run-up of 2-4.5 m for 2004 Sumatra event for Paradip region while at other locations of the coastline, it was largely unnoticed as the inundation remained within the beach limit; however water entered inland mainly through the waterways and inundated low-lying areas. It is concluded that northeast coast of India is relatively safe from the tsunami originating in Bay of Bengal region.

  9. Tsunami Hazard Evaluation for the East Coast of Korea by using Empirical Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a tsunami hazard curve was determined for a probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) induced tsunami event in Nuclear Power Plant site. A Tsunami catalogue was developed by using historical tsunami record which happen before 1900 and instrumental tsunami record after 1900. For the evaluation of return period of tsunami run-up height, power-law, uppertruncated power law and exponential function were considered for the assessment of regression curves and compared with each result. Although the total tsunami records were only 9 times at the east coast of Korea during tsunami catalogue, there was no such research like this about tsunami hazard curve evaluation and this research lay a cornerstone for probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment (PTHA) in Korea

  10. Tsunami Hazard Evaluation for the East Coast of Korea by using Empirical Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Kyu; Choi, In Kil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    In this study, a tsunami hazard curve was determined for a probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) induced tsunami event in Nuclear Power Plant site. A Tsunami catalogue was developed by using historical tsunami record which happen before 1900 and instrumental tsunami record after 1900. For the evaluation of return period of tsunami run-up height, power-law, uppertruncated power law and exponential function were considered for the assessment of regression curves and compared with each result. Although the total tsunami records were only 9 times at the east coast of Korea during tsunami catalogue, there was no such research like this about tsunami hazard curve evaluation and this research lay a cornerstone for probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment (PTHA) in Korea

  11. Learning from Fukushima. A holistic approach to tsunami risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two devastating tsunamis in the 21st century were caused by large megathrust earthquakes on tectonic plate boundaries; the Boxing Day tsunami in 2004 and the Great Tohoku tsunami in 2011. Both of these events have led to a focus on tsunamis caused by megathrusts when assessing risks to coastal nuclear power plants. From a longer time perspective, however, such earthquakes are not the only - or even the most significant - sources of large tsunamis. It is important that the key lesson from the impact of the Great Tohoku earthquake and associated tsunami on the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant - that unexpected combinations of events can cause complete failure of defence in depth - is not lost by looking in too much detail at these particular incidents. Instead a wider assessment of events that can give rise to giant waves and major inundation should be considered. (author)

  12. Monte-Carlo event generation for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Siegert, Frank

    This thesis discusses recent developments for the simulation of particle physics in the light of the start-up of the Large Hadron Collider. Simulation programs for fully exclusive events, dubbed Monte-Carlo event generators, are improved in areas related to the perturbative as well as non-perturbative regions of strong interactions. A short introduction to the main principles of event generation is given to serve as a basis for the following discussion. An existing algorithm for the correction of parton-shower emissions with the help of exact tree-level matrix elements is revisited and significantly improved as attested by first results. In a next step, an automated implementation of the POWHEG method is presented. It allows for the combination of parton showers with full next-to-leading order QCD calculations and has been tested in several processes. These two methods are then combined into a more powerful framework which allows to correct a parton shower with full next-to-leading order matrix elements and h...

  13. Numerical modeling of tsunami waves generated by the flank collapse of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano (La Palma, Canary Islands): Tsunami source and near field effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, S. M.; Harris, J. C.; Grilli, S. T.; Fabre, R.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we study waves generated by the potential collapse of the west flank of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano (CVV; La Palma, Canary Island, Spain) through numerical simulations performed in two stages: (i) the initial slide motion and resulting free surface elevation are first calculated using a 3D Navier-Stokes model; (ii) generated waves are then input into a 2D (horizontal) Boussinesq model to further simulate propagation to the nearby islands. Unlike in earlier work on CVV, besides a similar extreme slide volume scenario of 450 km3, in our simulations: (i) we consider several slide scenarios featuring different volumes (i.e., 20, 40, 80 km3), which partly result from a geotechnical slope stability analysis; (ii) we use a more accurate bathymetry; and (iii) an incompressible version of a multiple-fluid/material Navier-Stokes model. We find wave trains for each scenario share common features in terms of wave directivity, frequency, and time evolution, but maximum elevations near CVV significantly differ, ranging from 600 to 1200 m (for increasing slide volume). Additionally, our computations show that significant energy transfer from slide to waves only lasts for a short duration (order 200 s), which justifies concentrating our best modeling efforts on the early slide motion phase. The anticipated consequences of such wave trains on La Palma and other Canary Islands are assessed in detail in the paper.

  14. Space-Time Distribution of Tsunami Impact in the European-Meditterranean Region as Results from a New Tsunami Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakogianni, Georgia; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos; Fokaefs, Anna; Papageorgiou, Antonia; Triantafyllou, Ioanna

    2015-04-01

    We have compiled a new tsunami catalogue covering the entire European and Mediterranean (EM) region from pre-historical times up to the present. The catalogue is of increased completeness and homogeneity with respect to previous ones containing more than 370 events with reliability assignment to all the events listed. New historical events were inserted, while revised parameters of historical tsunamigenic earthquakes were extensively adopted particularly for the most active region of the eastern Mediterranean. In association to the catalogue, an inventory of tsunami impact was created with the main attributes being the numbers of people killed and injured, the damage to buildings, vessels, cultivated land and to other property. The inventory includes also a record of the tsunami environmental impact, such as soil erosion, geomorphological changes, boulder replacement and tsunami sediment deposits. Data on the tsunami impact were used to assign tsunami intensity in the 12-point Papadopoulos-Imamura (2001) scale for the majority of the events listed. The tsunami impact was studied as for its space and time distribution. In space, the tsunami impact was mapped in terms of tsunami intensity and impact zones were determined. The time distribution of the tsunami impact was examined for each one of the impact zones. Leaving aside large pre-historical tsunamis, such as the one produced by the LBA or Minoan eruption of Thera (Santorini) volcano, due to the lack of certain impact data, it has been found that the main impact comes from extreme, earthquake tsunamigenic events, such the ones of AD 365 in Crete, 551 in Lebanon, 1303 in Crete, 1755 in Lisbon. However, high impact may also occur from events of lower magnitude, such as the 1908 tsunami in Messina straits and the 1956 tsunami in the South Aegean, which underlines the strong dependence of the impact on the community exposure. Another important finding is that the cumulative impact of relatively moderate or even small, local tsunamis, produced by earthquakes, landslides or volcanic activity, is quite important and that such a distributed tsunami impact should not be neglected in actions undertaken for the tsunami risk mitigation. This research is a contribution to the EU-FP7 tsunami research project ASTARTE (Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe), grant agreement no: 603839, 2013-10-30.

  15. Pedestrian Evacuation Analysis for Tsunami Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. M.; Ng, P.; Wood, N. J.

    2014-12-01

    Recent catastrophic tsunamis in the last decade, as well as the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Alaskan event, have heightened awareness of the threats these natural hazards present to large and increasing coastal populations. For communities located close to the earthquake epicenter that generated the tsunami, strong shaking may also cause significant infrastructure damage, impacting the road network and hampering evacuation. There may also be insufficient time between the earthquake and first wave arrival to rely on a coordinated evacuation, leaving at-risk populations to self-evacuate on foot and across the landscape. Emergency managers evaluating these coastal risks need tools to assess the evacuation potential of low-lying areas in order to discuss mitigation options, which may include vertical evacuation structures to provide local safe havens in vulnerable communities. The U.S. Geological Survey has developed the Pedestrian Evacuation Analyst software tool for use by researchers and emergency managers to assist in the assessment of a community's evacuation potential by modeling travel times across the landscape and producing both maps of travel times and charts of population counts with corresponding times. The tool uses an anisotropic (directionally dependent) least cost distance model to estimate evacuation potential and allows for the variation of travel speed to measure its effect on travel time. The effectiveness of vertical evacuation structures on evacuation time can also be evaluated and compared with metrics such as travel time maps showing each structure in place and graphs displaying the percentage change in population exposure for each structure against the baseline. Using the tool, travel time maps and at-risk population counts have been generated for some coastal communities of the U.S. Pacific Northwest and Alaska. The tool can also be used to provide valuable decision support for tsunami vertical evacuation siting.

  16. Computational particle physics for event generators and data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-energy physics data analysis relies heavily on the comparison between experimental and simulated data as stressed lately by the Higgs search at LHC and the recent identification of a Higgs-like new boson. The first link in the full simulation chain is the event generation both for background and for expected signals. Nowadays event generators are based on the automatic computation of matrix element or amplitude for each process of interest. Moreover, recent analysis techniques based on the matrix element likelihood method assign probabilities for every event to belong to any of a given set of possible processes. This method originally used for the top mass measurement, although computing intensive, has shown its efficiency at LHC to extract the new boson signal from the background. Serving both needs, the automatic calculation of matrix element is therefore more than ever of prime importance for particle physics. Initiated in the 80's, the techniques have matured for the lowest order calculations (tree-level), but become complex and CPU time consuming when higher order calculations involving loop diagrams are necessary like for QCD processes at LHC. New calculation techniques for next-to-leading order (NLO) have surfaced making possible the generation of processes with many final state particles (up to 6). If NLO calculations are in many cases under control, although not yet fully automatic, even higher precision calculations involving processes at 2-loops or more remain a big challenge. After a short introduction to particle physics and to the related theoretical framework, we will review some of the computing techniques that have been developed to make these calculations automatic. The main available packages and some of the most important applications for simulation and data analysis, in particular at LHC will also be summarized (see CCP2012 slides [1])

  17. Cosmic ray interaction event generator SIBYLL 2.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cosmic ray interaction event generator Sibyll is widely used in extensive air shower simulations. We describe in detail the properties of Sibyll 2.1 and the differences with the original version 1.7. The major structural improvements are the possibility to have multiple soft interactions, introduction of new parton density functions, and an improved treatment of diffraction. Sibyll 2.1 gives better agreement with fixed target and collider data, especially for the inelastic cross sections and multiplicities of secondary particles. Shortcomings and suggestions for future improvements are also discussed.

  18. A probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment for Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horspool, N.; Pranantyo, I.; Griffin, J.; Latief, H.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Kongko, W.; Cipta, A.; Bustaman, B.; Anugrah, S. D.; Thio, H. K.

    2014-11-01

    Probabilistic hazard assessments are a fundamental tool for assessing the threats posed by hazards to communities and are important for underpinning evidence-based decision-making regarding risk mitigation activities. Indonesia has been the focus of intense tsunami risk mitigation efforts following the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, but this has been largely concentrated on the Sunda Arc with little attention to other tsunami prone areas of the country such as eastern Indonesia. We present the first nationally consistent probabilistic tsunami hazard assessment (PTHA) for Indonesia. This assessment produces time-independent forecasts of tsunami hazards at the coast using data from tsunami generated by local, regional and distant earthquake sources. The methodology is based on the established monte carlo approach to probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA) and has been adapted to tsunami. We account for sources of epistemic and aleatory uncertainty in the analysis through the use of logic trees and sampling probability density functions. For short return periods (100 years) the highest tsunami hazard is the west coast of Sumatra, south coast of Java and the north coast of Papua. For longer return periods (500-2500 years), the tsunami hazard is highest along the Sunda Arc, reflecting the larger maximum magnitudes. The annual probability of experiencing a tsunami with a height of > 0.5 m at the coast is greater than 10% for Sumatra, Java, the Sunda islands (Bali, Lombok, Flores, Sumba) and north Papua. The annual probability of experiencing a tsunami with a height of > 3.0 m, which would cause significant inundation and fatalities, is 1-10% in Sumatra, Java, Bali, Lombok and north Papua, and 0.1-1% for north Sulawesi, Seram and Flores. The results of this national-scale hazard assessment provide evidence for disaster managers to prioritise regions for risk mitigation activities and/or more detailed hazard or risk assessment.

  19. Diverse Approaches USED to Characterize the Earthquake and Tsunami Hazards Along the Southern Alaska Continental Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeussler, P. J.; Witter, R. C.; Liberty, L. M.; Brothers, D. S.; Briggs, R. W.; Armstrong, P. A.; Freymueller, J. T.; Parsons, T.; Ryan, H. F.; Lee, H. J.; Roland, E. C.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes and tsunamis are the principal geohazards of southern Alaska. The entire margin has ruptured in megathrust earthquakes, including the M9.2 1964 event, and these earthquakes have launched deadly local and trans-Pacific tsunamis. Tsunamis have been by far the largest killer in these earthquakes. Moreover, the subduction zone displays a range in locking behavior from completely locked beneath Prince William Sound, to ­­­­nearly freely slipping beneath the Shumagin Islands. Characterizing earthquake-related tsunami sources requires a diverse set of methods, and we discuss several examples. One important source for tsunamis is from megathrust splay faults. The Patton Bay splay fault system ruptured during the 1964 earthquake and generated a tsunami that impacted coastlines tens of minutes after the earthquake. A combination of multibeam mapping, high-resolution and crustal-scale seismic data, thermochronology, and detrital zircon geochronology show focused exhumation along this splay fault system for the last 2-3 Ma. Moreover, this long term pattern of exhumation mimics the pattern of uplift in 1964. Submarine landslides are another example of a tsunami source. Numerous devastating slides were triggered by the 1964 earthquake. Multibeam bathymetry, bathymetry difference maps, high-resolution seismic data, and records of paleotsunamis in coastal marshes reveal a long history of submarine landsliding in the coastal fjords of Alaska. The Little Ice Age appears to have had a significant influence on the submarine landslides in the 1964 earthquake through increased sediment production, transport to fjord margins, and, locally, compaction by glacier advances. Glacial retreat before 1964 gave rise to over-steepened slopes susceptible to dynamic failure. Numerous blocks in the submarine landslides were particularly effective in generating high tsunami run up. Finally, regional tectonic displacements of the seafloor have launched trans-Pacific tsunamis. Coastal evidence of high tsunamis in the eastern Aleutians has helped us understand the frequency of megathrust earthquakes west of Kodiak Island. Recent studies of vertical displacements produced by tsunamigenic earthquakes has led to new insights about the persistence of rupture boundaries and long term constraints on locking behavior.

  20. A program to acquire deep ocean tsunami measurements in the North Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep ocean tsunami measurements are needed to provide open ocean boundary conditions for testing numerical models in hindcast studies, and for improving our understanding of tsunami generation and propagation. Jacob (1984) has identified a portion of the Aleutian Trench which includes the Shumagin Island group as a seismic gap (the Shumagin Gap); he has computed estimates which indicate that the probability of a great earthquake occurrence (Mw > 7.8) is significantly higher for this region than any other in the U.S. Because tsunamigenic earthquakes along a major portion of the seismically active Aleutian trench threaten Hawaii and the U.S. west coast, and because a large tsunami is possible in the event of a great earthquake in the Shumagin Gap, this region has become the focus of a long-term monitoring program by the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). (author). 22 refs, 1 fig

  1. Post-crisis analysis of an ineffective tsunami alert: the 2010 earthquake in Maule, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulé, Bastien

    2014-04-01

    Considering its huge magnitude and its location in a densely populated area of Chile, the Maule seism of 27 February 2010 generated a low amount of victims. However, post-seismic tsunamis were particularly devastating on that day; surprisingly, no full alert was launched, not at the national, regional or local level. This earthquake and associated tsunamis are of interest in the context of natural hazards management as well as crisis management planning. Instead of focusing exclusively on the event itself, this article places emphasis on the process, systems and long-term approach that led the tsunami alert mechanism to be ineffectual. Notably, this perspective reveals interrelated forerunner signs of vulnerability. PMID:24601922

  2. Application of new numerical methods for near-real time tsunami height prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interactive tsunami modeling system (ITMS) for the numerical simulation of tsunami generation and propagation in the ocean with real bathymetry has been elaborated at Novosibirsk Computing Center. It was developed to be a simulation subsystem within regional tsunami warning center's software, so the following factors have been taken into account: 1) all numerical models in the system are to be united by an easy-to-use graphical interface; 2) the system should work in two modes - pre-event mode, and real-time mode; 3) the output of computations in the real-time mode should appear on the screen during computations, not waiting for the end of modeling; 4) the results of simulation should be suitable for the operative analysis and decision making. 3 refs, 7 figs

  3. Improving Tsunami Hazard Assessment: Lessons from Deposits from Seven Modern Tsunamis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunghino, B.; Jaffe, B. E.; Richmond, B. M.; Gelfenbaum, G. R.; Watt, S.; La Selle, S.; Buckley, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    Terrestrial paleotsunami deposits are studied to understand the timing and inundation extent of past tsunamis. Developing techniques to extract more information, such as flow depth, from paleotsunami deposits will improve understanding of the tsunami history in vulnerable areas and provide data for tsunami hazard assessment and planning. The analysis of deposits from recent tsunamis enables the comparison between deposit characteristics and event processes because data on the source and hydrodynamics of the tsunami can be collected. We compile and analyze data on tsunami hydrodynamics, deposits, and depositional environments collected in field studies over the last 16 years from 50 study sites from 7 tsunami events, including Papua New Guinea 1998, Peru 2001, Indian Ocean 2004, Sumatra 2005, Samoa 2009, Chile 2010, and Japan 2011. This approach allows comparisons of tsunami deposit characteristics across events and depositional environments. We find a moderate positive correlation between the mean grain size of a deposit and the flow depth of the tsunami, likely because more coarse material is transported by faster tsunami flows that are typical of greater flow depths. We also find that the local deposit thickness is not primarily controlled by flow depth and is strongly influenced by the contributions of bedload, variations in sediment supply, and local topography. We find that deposits often thicken when local topographic slope decreases and vice versa. Further study will investigate if the thicknesses of individual suspension graded layers within deposits are controlled by tsunami flow depth. By ignoring the portions of the deposit formed by bedload transport or spatial flow deceleration, the parts of the deposit formed from sediment falling out of suspension during the temporal flow deceleration of each tsunami wave may be identified. Focusing on individual layers of tsunami deposits, hypothetically formed by a single process and wave, may reveal relationships between deposit characteristics and hydrodynamic conditions that are not apparent when analyzing deposits as a whole. Refining the understanding of depositional processes occurring in modern tsunami events provides a foundation for developing techniques to reconstruct flow conditions from paleotsunami deposits.

  4. The Solomon Islands tsunami of 6 February 2013 field survey in the Santa Cruz Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, H. M.; Papantoniou, A.; Biukoto, L.; Albert, G.

    2013-12-01

    On February 6, 2013 at 01:12:27 UTC (local time: UTC+11), a magnitude Mw 8.0 earthquake occurred 70 km to the west of Ndendo Island (Santa Cruz Island) in the Solomon Islands. The under-thrusting earthquake near a 90° bend, where the Australian plate subducts beneath the Pacific plate generated a locally focused tsunami in the Coral Sea and the South Pacific Ocean. The tsunami claimed the lives of 10 people and injured 15, destroyed 588 houses and partially damaged 478 houses, affecting 4,509 people in 1,066 households corresponding to an estimated 37% of the population of Santa Cruz Island. A multi-disciplinary international tsunami survey team (ITST) was deployed within days of the event to document flow depths, runup heights, inundation distances, sediment and coral boulder depositions, land level changes, damage patterns at various scales, performance of the man-made infrastructure and impact on the natural environment. The 19 to 23 February 2013 ITST covered 30 locations on 4 Islands: Ndendo (Santa Cruz), Tomotu Noi (Lord Howe), Nea Tomotu (Trevanion, Malo) and Tinakula. The reconnaissance completely circling Ndendo and Tinakula logged 240 km by small boat and additionally covered 20 km of Ndendo's hard hit western coastline by vehicle. The collected survey data includes more than 80 tsunami runup and flow depth measurements. The tsunami impact peaked at Manoputi on Ndendo's densely populated west coast with maximum tsunami height exceeding 11 m and local flow depths above ground exceeding 7 m. A fast tide-like positive amplitude of 1 m was recorded at Lata wharf inside Graciosa Bay on Ndendo Island and misleadingly reported in the media as representative tsunami height. The stark contrast between the field observations on exposed coastlines and the Lata tide gauge recording highlights the importance of rapid tsunami reconnaissance surveys. Inundation distance and damage more than 500 m inland were recorded at Lata airport on Ndendo Island. Landslides were observed on volcanic Tinakula Island and on Ndendo Island. Observations from the 2013 Santa Cruz tsunami are compared against the 2007 and 2010 Solomon Islands tsunamis. The team also interviewed eyewitnesses and educated residents about the tsunami hazard in numerous ad hoc presentations and discussions. The combination of ancestral knowledge and recent Solomon Islands wide geohazards education programs triggered an immediate spontaneous self-evacuation containing the death toll in the small evacuation window of few minutes between the end of the ground shaking and the onslaught of the tsunami. Fortunately school children were shown a video on the 1 April 2007 Solomon Islands tsunami 3 months prior to the Santa Cruz event and the headmaster of the school at Venga evacuated the later flooded school already during a foreshock. On Tomotu Noi Island at Bamoi the residents evacuated inland towards a crocodile infested lake, which was not reached by the tsunami inundation. Community-based education and awareness programs are particularly essential to help save lives in locales at risk from near-source tsunamis.

  5. State Emergency Response and Field Observation Activities in California (USA) during the March 11, 2011, Tohoku Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. M.; Wilson, R. I.; Goltz, J.; Fenton, J.; Long, K.; Dengler, L.; Rosinski, A.; California Tsunami Program

    2011-12-01

    This poster will present an overview of successes and challenges observed by the authors during this major tsunami response event. The Tohoku, Japan tsunami was the most costly to affect California since the 1964 Alaskan earthquake and ensuing tsunami. The Tohoku tsunami caused at least $50 million in damage to public facilities in harbors and marinas along the coast of California, and resulted in one fatality. It was generated by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake which occurred at 9:46PM PST on Thursday, March 10, 2011 in the sea off northern Japan. The tsunami was recorded at tide gages monitored by the West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC), which projected tsunami surges would reach California in approximately 10 hours. At 12:51AM on March 11, 2011, based on forecasted tsunami amplitudes, the WCATWC placed the California coast north of Point Conception (Santa Barbara County) in a Tsunami Warning, and the coast south of Point Conception to the Mexican border in a Tsunami Advisory. The California Emergency Management Agency (CalEMA) activated two Regional Emergency Operation Centers (REOCs) and the State Operation Center (SOC). The California Geological Survey (CGS) deployed a field team which collected data before, during and after the event through an information clearinghouse. Conference calls were conducted hourly between the WCATWC and State Warning Center, as well as with emergency managers in the 20 coastal counties. Coordination focused on local response measures, public information messaging, assistance needs, evacuations, emergency shelters, damage, and recovery issues. In the early morning hours, some communities in low lying areas recommended evacuation for their citizens, and the fishing fleet at Crescent City evacuated to sea. The greatest damage occurred in the harbors of Crescent City and Santa Cruz. As with any emergency, there were lessons learned and important successes in managing this event. Forecasts by the WCATWC were highly accurate. Exercises and workshops have enhanced communications between state and local agencies, and emergency managers are more educated about what to expect. Areas for improvement include keeping people out of the hazard area; educating the non-English speaking community; and reinforcing the long duration and unpredictable peak damaging waves of these events to emergency managers. The Governor proclaimed a state of emergency in six counties and the President declared a major disaster on April 18, 2011, allowing federal assistance to support repairs and economic recovery. Detailed evaluation of local maritime response activities, harbor damage, and measured and observed tsunami current velocity data will help the California Tsunami Program develop improved tsunami hazard maps and guidance for maritime communities. The state program will continue to emphasize the importance of both tsunami warnings and advisories, the unpredictable nature of each tsunami, and encourage public understanding of tsunamis to prepare and protect themselves in the future.

  6. Direct bed stress measurements under solitary tsunami-type waves and breaking tsunami wave fronts

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.; Baldock, T

    2009-01-01

    estimation of the bed stress is important in estimation of the forces induced during tsunami wave propagation, both on the seabed as well as on the subsurface installations. Bed and shear stresses generated by wave forms that represent tsunami (a solitary...

  7. Tsunami disaster risk management capabilities in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marios Karagiannis, Georgios; Synolakis, Costas

    2015-04-01

    Greece is vulnerable to tsunamis, due to the length of the coastline, its islands and its geographical proximity to the Hellenic Arc, an active subduction zone. Historically, about 10% of all world tsunamis occur in the Mediterranean region. Here we review existing tsunami disaster risk management capabilities in Greece. We analyze capabilities across the disaster management continuum, including prevention, preparedness, response and recovery. Specifically, we focus on issues like legal requirements, stakeholders, hazard mitigation practices, emergency operations plans, public awareness and education, community-based approaches and early-warning systems. Our research is based on a review of existing literature and official documentation, on previous projects, as well as on interviews with civil protection officials in Greece. In terms of tsunami disaster prevention and hazard mitigation, the lack of tsunami inundation maps, except for some areas in Crete, makes it quite difficult to get public support for hazard mitigation practices. Urban and spatial planning tools in Greece allow the planner to take into account hazards and establish buffer zones near hazard areas. However, the application of such ordinances at the local and regional levels is often difficult. Eminent domain is not supported by law and there are no regulatory provisions regarding tax abatement as a disaster prevention tool. Building codes require buildings and other structures to withstand lateral dynamic earthquake loads, but there are no provisions for resistance to impact loading from water born debris Public education about tsunamis has increased during the last half-decade but remains sporadic. In terms of disaster preparedness, Greece does have a National Tsunami Warning Center (NTWC) and is a Member of UNESCO's Tsunami Program for North-eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and connected seas (NEAM) region. Several exercises have been organized in the framework of the NEAM Tsunami Warning System, with the Greek NWTC actively participating as a Candidate Tsunami Watch Provider. In addition, Greece designed and conducted the first tsunami exercise program in the Union Civil Protection Mechanism in 2011, which also considered the attrition of response capabilities by the earthquake generating the tsunami. These exercises have demonstrated the capability of the Greek NWTC to provide early warning to local civil protection authorities, but warning dissemination to the population remains an issue, especially during the summer season. However, there is no earthquake or tsunami national emergency operations plan, and we found that tsunami disaster planning and preparedness activities are rather limited at the local level. We acknowledge partial support by the project ASTARTE (Assessment, STrategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe) FP7-ENV2013 6.4-3, Grant 603839 to the Technical University of Crete.

  8. The Generator of the Event Structure Lexicon (GESL): Automatic Annotation of Event Structure for Textual Inference Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Seohyun

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation aims to develop the Generator of the Event Structure Lexic