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Effectiveness of cultural immersion and culture classes for enhancing nursing students' transcultural self-efficacy.  

Science.gov (United States)

With diversity increasing in the United States, educators are struggling to find the most effective methods to prepare nursing students to care for diverse populations. This study's purpose was to determine the impact of immersion experiences and cultural classes on nursing students' transcultural competence. A pretest-posttest, quasi-experimental design was used. Nursing students completing a 2-week to 3-week immersion experience (n = 14) completed the Transcultural Self-Efficacy Tool online 1 week prior to and immediately following an immersion experience. The control group (n = 25), who were students not participating in an immersion experience, completed the instrument during the same time frame. Students who participated in an immersion experience had significantly higher posttest transcultural self-efficacy scores (p transcultural self-efficacy scores. Recommendations included encouraging student participation in immersion experiences to enhance transcultural competence. PMID:21323246

Larsen, Rachelle; Reif, LuAnn

2011-06-01

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Transcultural Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Baccalaureate Nursing Students.  

Science.gov (United States)

Addressing the health care needs of a 21st-century nation that is experiencing increased diversity and disparity will require new models of educating future providers. The cultural competence and confidence model was the guiding framework in a study evaluating the influence of cultural educational offerings on the transcultural self-efficacy (TSE) perceptions in baccalaureate nursing students. The Transcultural Self-Efficacy Tool was used to measure perceived TSE in a pretest (N = 260), posttest (N = 236) study over an academic year. Significant changes were demonstrated in overall self-efficacy and on the cognitive, practical, and affective subscales. A classification and regression tree analysis identified social orientation as the demographic variable most predictive of the TSE level. This study supports previous research where positive changes were found in students' TSE based on the inclusion of cultural interventions in the nursing curriculum. PMID:24841469

Halter, Margaret; Grund, Faye; Fridline, Mark; See, Sharon; Young, Lisa; Reece, Carol

2014-05-13

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The Influence of International Service-Learning on Transcultural Self-Efficacy in Baccalaureate Nursing Graduates and Their Subsequent Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to explain how participation in an international service-learning project during a community health course influenced transcultural self-efficacy of baccalaureate nursing graduates following graduation and their subsequent clinical practice. A qualitative, explanatory case study was used to conduct telephone…

Amerson, Roxanne

2012-01-01

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Adaptación transcultural de la escala para medir autoeficacia en el uso del condón masculino Cross cultural adaptation of condom uses self-efficacy scale  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objetivo principal: adaptar culturalmente la escala para medir autoeficacia en el uso del condón masculino, determinando su fiabilidad y validez para la investigación en el contexto cubano. Metodología: diseño transversal con metodología exploratoria en una muestra de 38 estudiantes de enfermería entre 17 y 42 años de edad. Resultados: el Alpha Cronbach para la escala total fue de 0,78 y el Índice de Correlación Interclase fue de 0,73. Conclusiones: la escala es confiable y válida para medir el uso del condón masculino en el contexto cubano.Objective: The purpose of this manuscript is to evaluate a Spanish version of the Condom Uses Self Efficacy Scale, and to determine its reliability and validity for use in cross-cultural research among Cuban populations. Methods: A cross- sectional design an exploratory survey methodology was used in 38 nursing students between 17 and 41 years old. Results: The Alpha Coefficient for the total scale was 0,78. The interclass correlation coefficient to measure scale's stability over time was 0,73 (test-retest two weeks. Conclusions: Findings support that Condom Use Self Efficacy Scale is a reliable and valid scale in measuring condom self-efficacy among Cuban persons.

Abdul Hernández Cortina

2011-09-01

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Cultural self-efficacy of baccalaureate nursing students in a Greek University  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Culturally specific care requires that nursing students know, understand, and identify cultural factors related to client care, and conduct their nursing practice accordingly. The aim of this study was to identify the cultural self-efficacy of baccalaureate nursing students in a Greek University. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a Transcultural Self-Efficacy Tool was used as a framework, to examine transcultural practices of Greek nursing students. A questionnaire was administered to a sample of students at a Greek Nursing Faculty, and 136 questionnaires returned (Response Rate: 87%). Results: Neither group, i.e., freshmen and senior (4th) year students of a Greek Nursing Faculty, expressed confidence in their ability to care for culturally-diverse patients. Mean scores for the three subscales were higher for senior students (cognitive m = 7.17, practical m = 6.76, affective m = 7.77) than for freshmen students (cognitive m = 6.96, practical m = 6.60, affective m = 7.43) making year of studies a characteristic that was found to be statistically important. A medium level of self-efficacy was found for the two subscales; cognitive (72%, n = 39; 78%, n = 62), practical (52%, n = 26; 48.8%, n = 4), and for the affective subscale the level of self-efficacy was found high (78%, n = 39; 82.6%, n = 71) in freshmen year and senior students. Conclusions: Results suggest that freshmen students exhibited a lack of confidence asking patients from different cultural backgrounds, questions about their own cultural heritage and beliefs while senior students appreciated cultural sensitivity and awareness and therefore confirmed the value of skilled nursing care. PMID:24554941

Sarafis, Pavlos A; Malliarou, Maria M

2013-01-01

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The impact of reading self-efficacy and task value on reading comprehension scores in different item formats  

OpenAIRE

It has been hypothesized that students with low self-ef?cacy will struggle with complex reading tasks in assessment situations. In this study we examined whether perceived reading self-ef?cacy and reading task value uniquely predicted reading comprehension scores in two different item formats in a sample of ?fth-grade students. Results showed that, after controlling for variance associated with word reading ability, listening comprehension, and nonverbal ability through hierarchical mul...

Solheim, Oddny Judith

2011-01-01

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Educational Persistence: Self-Efficacy and Topics in a College Orientation Course  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examines whether a college orientation course for online programs leads to increased self-efficacy and, if so, which course topics are related to changes in students' self-efficacy. The culminating research question explores whether self-efficacy is related to enrollment persistence. Students' self-efficacy scores improved significantly…

Brewer, Susan A.; Yucedag-Ozcan, Arfe

2013-01-01

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Transcultural Wellness: An Exploratory Study  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored differences in wellness scores between a transcultural sample and the normative sample of the Five Factor Wellness Inventory (5F-Wel; Myers & Sweeney, 2005c). Differences between the two groups were found on all scales of the 5F-Wel, with transculturals scoring higher than the normative sample. Implications for practitioners…

McDonald, K. Elizabeth

2011-01-01

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Path analysis of self-efficacy and diving performance revisited.  

Science.gov (United States)

The Feltz (1982) path analysis of the relationship between diving efficacy and performance showed that, over trials, past performance was a stronger predictor than self-efficacy of performance. Bandura (1997) criticized the study as statistically "overcontrolling" for past performance by using raw past performance scores along with self-efficacy as predictors of performance. He suggests residualizing past performance by regressing the raw scores on self-efficacy and entering them into the model to remove prior contributions of self-efficacy imbedded in past performance scores. To resolve this controversy, we reanalyzed the Feltz data using three statistical models: raw past performance, residual past performance, and a method that residualizes past performance and self-efficacy. Results revealed that self-efficacy was a stronger predictor of performance in both residualized models than in the raw past performance model. Furthermore, the influence of past performance on future performance was weaker when the residualized methods were conducted. PMID:18648112

Feltz, Deborah L; Chow, Graig M; Hepler, Teri J

2008-06-01

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Leadership, self-efficacy, and student achievement  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the relationships between teacher leadership, science teacher self-efficacy, and fifth-grade science student achievement in diverse schools in a San Antonio, Texas, metropolitan school district. Teachers completed a modified version of the Leadership Behavior Description Question (LBDQ) Form XII by Stogdill (1969), the Science Efficacy and Belief Expectations for Science Teaching (SEBEST) by Ritter, Boone, and Rubba (2001, January). Students' scores on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) measured fifth-grade science achievement. At the teacher level of analysis multiple regressions showed the following relationships between teachers' science self-efficacy and teacher classroom leadership behaviors and the various teacher and school demographic variables. Predictors of teacher self efficacy beliefs included teacher's level of education, gender, and leadership initiating structure. The only significant predictor of teacher self-efficacy outcome expectancy was gender. Higher teacher self-efficacy beliefs predicted higher leadership initiating structure. At the school level of analysis, higher school levels of percentage of students from low socio-economic backgrounds and higher percentage of limited English proficient students predicted lower school student mean science achievement. These findings suggest a need for continued research to clarify relationships between teacher classroom leadership, science teacher self-efficacy, and student achievement especially at the teacher level of analysis. Findings also indicate the importance of developing instructional methods to address student demographics and their needs so that all students, despite their backgrounds, will achieve in science.

Grayson, Kristin

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Brief Psychometric Analysis of the Self-Efficacy Teacher Report Scale  

Science.gov (United States)

This study provides preliminary analysis of reliability and validity of scores on the Self-Efficacy Teacher Report Scale, which was designed to assess teacher perceptions of self-efficacy of students aged 8 to 17 years. (Contains 3 tables.)

Erford, Bradley T.; Duncan, Kelly; Savin-Murphy, Janet

2010-01-01

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Are Self-Efficacy Instruments Comparable to Knowledge and Skills Tests in Training Evaluation Settings?  

Science.gov (United States)

Researchers have linked self-efficacy to performance, but they have not investigated the relationship between self-efficacy and knowledge and skills tests within a training evaluation setting, which is the main purpose of this study. Additionally, researchers have acknowledged self-efficacy scores may be distorted as a result of assessors…

Lanigan, Mary L.

2008-01-01

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Cross-cultural adaptation and clinical validation of the Neonatal Skin Condition Score to Brazilian Portuguese / Adaptación transcultural y validación clínica de la Neonatal Skin Condition Score para el portugués de Brasil / Adaptação transcultural e validação clínica da Neonatal Skin Condition Score para o português do Brasil  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Languages: English, Portuguese, Spanish Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVO: descrever o processo de adaptação transcultural e validação clínica para uso no Brasil da Neonatal Skin Condition Score. MÉTODOS: trata-se de estudo metodológico de adaptação transcultural, incluindo cinco etapas: tradução inicial, síntese da tradução inicial, retrotradução, avaliaçã [...] o por um Comitê de Especialistas e testagem da versão pré-final e estudo transversal observacional com análise das propriedades psicométricas, utilizando os testes estatísticos de Kappa Ajustado, coeficiente de correlação intraclasse e método de Bland-Altman. Recrutaram-se, aleatoriamente, 38 profissionais para avaliação da clareza do instrumento adaptado e, por conveniência, 47 recém-nascidos internados na Neonatologia do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, para a validação clínica do instrumento. RESULTADOS: os resultados demonstraram 85% de clareza da escala adaptada. Os testes estatísticos evidenciaram confiabilidades intra e interobservador item a item de moderada a forte e, no escore total de forte a muito forte, houve variação entre os escores atribuídos pelos enfermeiros aos pacientes menor que 2 pontos. CONCLUSÕES: a escala foi adaptada e validada para uso no português falado no Brasil. As propriedades psicométricas da Escala de Condição da Pele do Recém-Nascido, versão brasileira do instrumento, apresentaram resultados semelhantes à validação da escala original. Abstract in spanish OBJETIVO: describir el proceso de adaptación transcultural y validación clínica para uso en Brasil de la Neonatal Skin Condition Score. MÉTODOS: se trata de un estudio metodológico de adaptación transcultural incluyendo cinco etapas: traducción inicial, síntesis de la traducción inicial, retro [...] traducción, evaluación por un Comité de Especialistas y prueba de la versión prefinal y estudio transversal observacional con análisis de las propiedades psicométricas utilizando las pruebas estadísticas de Kappa Ajustado, Coeficiente de Correlación Intraclase y método de Bland Altman. Se reclutó aleatoriamente 38 profesionales para evaluación de la claridad del instrumento adaptado y por conveniencia 47 recién nacidos internados en la Neonatología del Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre para la validación clínica del instrumento. RESULTADOS: demostraron cerca de 85% de claridad de la escala adaptada. Las pruebas estadísticas evidenciaron confiabilidades intra e interobservador ítem a ítem de moderada a fuerte y en el puntaje total de fuerte a muy fuerte, hubo variación entre los puntajes atribuidos por los enfermeros a los pacientes menor que 2 puntos. CONCLUSIONES: la escala fue adaptada y validada para uso en el portugués hablado en Brasil. Las propiedades psicométricas de la Escala de Condição da Pele do Recém-Nascido, versión brasileña del instrumento, presentaron resultados semejantes a la validación de la escala original. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: to describe the process of cross-cultural adaptation and clinical validation of the Neonatal Skin Condition Score. METHODS: this methodological cross-cultural adaptation study included five steps: initial translation, synthesis of the initial translation, back translation, review by [...] an Committee of Specialists and testing of the pre-final version, and an observational cross-sectional study with analysis of the psychometric properties using the Adjusted Kappa, Intraclass Correlation Coefficient, and Bland-Altman Method statistical tests. A total of 38 professionals were randomly recruited to review the clarity of the adapted instrument, and 47 newborns hospitalized in the Neonatology Unit of the Clinical Hospital of Porto Alegre were selected by convenience for the clinical validation of the instrument. RESULTS: the adapted scale showed approximately 85% clarity. The statistical tests showed moderate to strong intra and interobserver item to item reliability and from strong to very strong in the tot

Juliana Machado, Schardosim; Luma Maiara, Ruschel; Giordana de Cássia Pinheiro da, Motta; Maria Luzia Chollopetz da, Cunha.

2014-10-01

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A Reanalysis of Engineering Majors' Self-Efficacy Beliefs  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examines differences in women's engineering self-efficacy beliefs across grade levels in comparison to men's engineering self-efficacy (ESE) beliefs across grade levels. Data for this study was collected from 746 (635 men, 111 women) engineering students enrolled in a large research extensive university. Four major conclusions resulted from this study. (1) No significant differences in overall mean engineering self-efficacy scores were found by gender. However, this study found differences between men's and women's mean coping self-efficacy (CSE) and engineering career outcome expectations (ECOE) subscale scores. Freshmen men had significantly higher ECOE compared to upperclassmen women. (2) Overall, fifthyear men had significantly lower mean ESE scores compared to all other groups. (3) When the fifth-year group was removed from the data set, all first-year students had significantly lower subscale scores compared to all other years. In addition, men in their first-year of engineering had significantly lower subscale scores compared to other groups of men. (4) No significant differences in overall ESE scores were found among first to fifth-year women. Also, no significant differences in self-efficacy subscale scores were found among first to fifth-year women.

Concannon, James P.; Barrow, Lloyd H.

2012-12-01

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Low Self-Efficacy Lead to Failure in Adopting CHO-Counting Approach to Control Diabetes: Pilot Study  

OpenAIRE

This study aimed to evaluate the impact of self-efficacy in adopting carbohydrate counting behavior on their glycemic control, lipid profile and body weight among patients with type 2 diabetes. Self-efficacy was measured using chwarzer and Renner self-efficacy scale. All patients, regardless of their self-efficacy score, received an intervention composed of tailored diet plans based on the carbohydrate counting method. Anthropometric and laboratory measurements were performed at baselin...

Abu-mweis, Suhad S.; Reema Fayez Tayyem; Bawadi, Hiba A.

2013-01-01

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Teacher self-efficacy in instruction and in parent involvement  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The study investigated self-efficacy of a sample of Slovak primary schoolteachers in two areas: area of instruction and area of parent involvement. Twoinstruments were used: the 16-item Slovak version of Teacher Efficacy Scale ofGibson and Dembo, and ZdUR, a 24-item scale to measure self-efficacy of teacherin parents’ involvement, developed by authors of the present study. The correlation between scores of personal teaching efficacy dimension of TES and ZdUR was 0.58 and between general teaching efficacy of TES and ZdUR was only 0.01. Teachers inthis sample had better scores in all dimensions of ZdUR than those of TES, with theexception of engaging parents in school activities. Scores of four teachers in TES andZdUR were analysed to document the possibility of making the individual profiles ofteacher self-efficacy.

Peter Gavora

2012-06-01

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Self-efficacy, coping with stress and goal-orientation in nurse managers  

OpenAIRE

The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between self-efficacy, coping with stress, and goal-orientation in nurse managers. The results indicated that the self-efficacy scores were significantly correlated with learning goal-orientation (r=.37, p.05) was not significant. This study showed a positive meaningful relationship between nurse managers' self-efficacy levels and learning goal orientation and performance-proving orientation. The study provided information related t...

Melek Kalkan; Hatice Odac?; Hatice Epli Koç

2011-01-01

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Self efficacy measurement and goal attainment after pulmonary rehabilitation  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Rachel Garrod, Johanna Marshall, Fiona JonesSchool of Physiotherapy, St George’s, University of London and Kingston University Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences, UKBackground: Little is known about self-efficacy in COPD and its role as a mediator of goal attainment after rehabilitation. We hypothesized that higher baseline self efficacy may facilitate goal attainment.Methods: 48 COPD patients completed pulmonary rehabilitation, self-efficacy was measured using the COPD Self Efficacy Scale (CSES. Personal goals were used as self reported outcome. Relationships were evaluated between CSES and St George’s Hospital Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ; depression; using Brief Assessment Schedule Cards (BASDEC, London Chest Activity of Daily Living Scale (LCADL and exercise tolerance; using Six-Minute Walking Distance (6MWD and muscle strength.Results: 74 Stable COPD patients, mean FEV1 1.2 (0.6 l, age 68.1 (10.2 years were recruited. 51 patients completed rehabilitation and 48 of those CSES and reported goal attainment. 94 goals were documented. Baseline self efficacy did not differ according to whether goal was achieved or not. Relationships were evident between CSES and SGRQ (r = –0.53, 6MWD (r = 0.36, BASDEC (r = –0.31, LCADL (r = –0.33 (all p ? 0.01, but not FEV1, pack years or muscle strength. There was a significant improvement in CSES scores pre to post rehabilitation, mean difference (95% CI 0. 27 (0.04 to 0.51.Conclusions: Self efficacy, using the CSES, improves with rehabilitation but baseline self efficacy does not appear to influence goal attainment.Keywords: self-efficacy, COPD, pulmonary rehabilitation, goal

Rachel Garrod

2008-11-01

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Caregiving representations at work and the moderating role of job self-efficacy.  

Science.gov (United States)

Summary.-This study measured the effect of job self-efficacy and caregiving dimensions (hyperactivation and deactivation) on Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB) in a sample of 160 customer service workers. While job self-efficacy and caregiving deactivation independently had moderate main effects on OCB-Individual and OCB-Organizational, the effect of caregiving hyperactivation was smaller and significantly contributed solely to OCB-Organizational. When caregiving dimensions were examined in interaction with job self-efficacy, the effect of deactivated caregiving on OCB-Organizational was stronger for workers who scored high on job self-efficacy. PMID:25621667

Reizer, Abira; Hetsroni, Amir

2015-02-01

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Self-Efficacy for Self-Regulated Learning: A Validation Study  

Science.gov (United States)

The psychometric properties and multigroup measurement invariance of scores on the Self-Efficacy for Self-Regulated Learning Scale taken from Bandura's Children's Self-Efficacy Scale were assessed in a sample of 3,760 students from Grades 4 to 11. Latent means differences were also examined by gender and school level. Results reveal a…

Usher, Ellen L.; Pajares, Frank

2008-01-01

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Primary School Children's Self-Efficacy for Music Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

The Self-Efficacy for Musical Learning questionnaire was adapted and tested with 404 primary school children, producing a robust Cronbach alpha (0.87) and confirming a single underlying factor through exploratory factor analysis. Test-retest scores showed the measure's stability over a 9-month period. Data were collected on children's prior music…

Ritchie, Laura; Williamon, Aaron

2011-01-01

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Self-efficacy, state anxiety, and cortisol responses to treadmill running.  

Science.gov (United States)

Social cognitive theory of Bandura hypothesizes that increases in self-efficacy act as a mechanism for anxiety reduction and lower biological stress reactions. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to examine self-efficacy, anxiety, and cortisol responses to 20 minutes of treadmill running at 85% maximal heart rate and a control condition among 12 physically active males. For this study, self-efficacy, anxiety, and cortisol were measured prior to and 5 and 20 min. after exercise for individuals completing a 20-min. treadmill running activity or a 20 min. rest (control) activity. Repeated-measures analyses of variance showed significant condition by time interaction for self-efficacy and cortisol (ps self-efficacy and cortisol increased pre- to posttreatment. Moreover, the analysis of variance for anxiety yielded a main effect for time, with reductions in anxiety scores observed in both conditions. Correlational analyses showed that posttreatment cortisol levels were inversely correlated -.51 to self-efficacy scores and positively correlated .55 to anxiety scores. The correlation between self-efficacy and anxiety was not significant. These results provide partial support for the predicted relationships among self-efficacy, anxiety, and cortisol responses to treadmill running. Suggestions for research are provided. PMID:11565921

Butki, B D; Rudolph, D L; Jacobsen, H

2001-06-01

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Development of a Career Task Self-Efficacy Scale: The Kuder Task Self-Efficacy Scale.  

Science.gov (United States)

Three instruments were completed by 345 undergraduates: Kuder Task Self-Efficacy Scale (KTSES), Self-Esteem Inventory, and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale. The construct validity of the KTSES was supported, and some relationship was found between career task self-efficacy and self-esteem/career decision-making self-efficacy. (SK)

Lucas, Jennifer L.; And Others

1997-01-01

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The Predictors for Maternal Self-efficacy in Early Parenthood  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background & aim: Many parents do not believe in their ability to fulfill their parental responsibilities. Parental self-efficacy is crucial to parents’ sense of well-being and is considered a predictor for quality of life. However, evidence is scarce on the factors that influence parents’ perception of efficacy. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the predictors for parental self-efficacy in the early postpartum period. Methods:This descriptive analytical study was conducted on 150 primiparous women referring to the health care centers of Mashhad during their early postpartum months. For data collection, we used demographic questionnaires, Bates’ Infant Characteristics Questionnaire (ICQ, Scale of Perceived Social Support, Reece’s parent expectations survey (PES, and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS. For data analysis, independent T-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and stepwise regression were performed, using SPSS version 16. Results: In this study, a significant association was observed between self-efficacy scores and the parents’ income, educational status, depression, and infant’s gender. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between self-efficacy scores and infant’s characteristics, mother’s satisfaction with childbirth experience, perceived support from friends, infant’s perceived temperament, infant’s gender, mother’s educational level, and depression, which could predict 26.1% of parental self-efficacy. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the most significant predictors of maternal self-efficacy during the early postpartum months were maternal depression and educational status, infant’s gender, and infant’s characteristics.

Elham Azmoude

2015-04-01

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The relationship between academic self-efficacy and self-efficacy levels of teacher candidates  

OpenAIRE

In this research, the relationship between academic self-efficacy beliefs and teachers' sense of efficacy were investigated for teacher candidate. The research is a descriptive study in relational screening model. Two separate instruments were used to collect data: the Academic Self-efficacy Scale to measure academic self-efficacy, and Teacher Self-efficacy Scale to measure the self-efficacy perceptions of teacher candidate. Mann Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis tests were conducted since the dat...

Kaz?m Çelik; Erkan Tabancal?

2013-01-01

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Self-Efficacy: Conditioning the Entrepreneurial Mindset  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Research that has sought to identify the underlying determinants of self-efficacy is sparse. This chapter seeks to identify antecedents of entrepreneurial self-efficacy and the processes that produce and reinforce self-efficacy. It seeks to broaden our understanding of the self-efficacy concept through an exploration of its origins and via a journey to its impact in the field of entrepreneurship. Finally, it suggests pedagogical initiatives needed to promote entrepreneurial self-efficacy in the different social arenas of life.

Neergaard, Helle; Mauer, René

2009-01-01

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Tradução e adaptação transcultural do instrumento de avaliação do quadril "Harris Hip Score" Translation and cultural adaptation of the Harris Hip Score into portuguese  

OpenAIRE

OBJETIVO: O Harris Hip Score é instrumento de avaliação específica, desenvolvido originalmente para avaliar os resultados da artroplastia total de quadril. O objetivo deste estudo foi traduzir e adaptar culturalmente este instrumento para a língua portuguesa. MÉTODO: O método de tradução e adaptação cultural do Harris Hip Score envolveu quatro etapas: 1 - tradução inicial; 2 - retrotradução; 3 - apreciação das versões com elaboração da versão de consenso; 4 - pré-teste c...

Rodrigo Pereira Guimarães; Débora Pinheiro Lédio Alves; Gustavo Bersani Silva; Simoni Teixeira Bittar; Nelson Keiske Ono; Emerson Honda; Giancarlo Cavalli Polesello; Walter Ricioli Junior; Nilza Aparecida Almeida De Carvalho

2010-01-01

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Factors associated with nurses’ self-efficacy in clinical setting in Iran, 2013  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: In nursing, self-efficacy is quite critical for skill performance. Some factors might influence and predict self-efficacy in nurses. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate self-efficacy and the factors predicting nurses’ self-efficacy in clinical setting. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 264 nurses were selected from five hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences by stratified random sampling. General Self-efficacy Scale (GSE) was used to assess a general sense of perceived self-efficacy. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple regression analysis. Results: The mean of self-efficacy in all the nurses was 29.78 [Standard Deviation (SD) = 5.82]. Moreover, the self-efficacy of the nurses with diploma, bachelor's, and master's degrees was 32.22 (SD = 6.21), 29.33 (SD = 5.68), and 32.00 (SD = 6.00), respectively. In addition, a significant difference was found between the nurses with bachelor's and diploma degrees regarding their self-efficacy (P = 0.01). Also, a significant relationship was found between self-efficacy and willingness to work in the nursing unit (F = 3.31, P = 0.01) and interest in the nursing field (F = 2.43, P = 0.04). The nurses who had more than 16 years of working experience in the field of nursing reported a better self-efficacy score. Overall, self-efficacy was predicted by the years of experience in the field of nursing (? =0.25, P = 0.009) and the interest in the nursing field (? = ?0.15, P = 0.02). Conclusions: This study indicated that the nurses with diploma degrees gained higher self-efficacy scores compared to those with bachelor's degrees. Changing the nursing curriculum and increasing the motivation in the nursing context might enhance the interest in the nursing field as well as the nurses’ self-efficacy. Of course, other studies are recommended to be conducted to improve the nurses’ self-efficacy. PMID:25878701

Soudagar, Simin; Rambod, Masoume; Beheshtipour, Noushin

2015-01-01

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Tradução e adaptação transcultural do instrumento de avaliação do quadril "Harris Hip Score" / Translation and cultural adaptation of the Harris Hip Score into portuguese  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Languages: English, Portuguese Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVO: O Harris Hip Score é instrumento de avaliação específica, desenvolvido originalmente para avaliar os resultados da artroplastia total de quadril. O objetivo deste estudo foi traduzir e adaptar culturalmente este instrumento para a língua portuguesa. MÉTODO: O método de tradução e adaptação [...] cultural do Harris Hip Score envolveu quatro etapas: 1 - tradução inicial; 2 - retrotradução; 3 - apreciação das versões com elaboração da versão de consenso; 4 - pré-teste comentado com elaboração da versão final. RESULTADOS: A versão de consenso foi aplicada em 30 pacientes com afecção do quadril, sendo verificadas dificuldades no entendimento de algumas expressões, as quais foram substituídas por termos de mais fácil entendimento. Na reaplicação do questionário com a nova versão houve entendimento por 100% dos pacientes no que diz respeito ao sentido semântico, idiomático e contextual. CONCLUSÃO: A versão brasileira do Harris Hip Score permitiu a disponibilização de mais este instrumento para avaliação da qualidade de vida de pacientes com afecções do quadril. Há necessidade de um estudo de avaliação da confiabilidade e validade da versão adaptada culturalmente, a qual já está em desenvolvimento. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: The Harris Hip Score is a specific evaluation tool, originally developed to assess the results of hip arthroplasty. The objective of this study was to translate and cross-culturally adapt the Harris Hip Score for the Portuguese language. METHOD: The method of translating and culturally ad [...] apting the Harris Hip Score involved four steps: 1 - initial translation, 2 - back-translation, 3 - evaluation of the pre-final versions with the development of a consensus version, 4 - commented pre-test with development of the final version. RESULTS: The consensus version was applied to thirty patients with hip disorders. Some difficulties were identified in understanding some expressions, which were replaced by more commonly-used expressions. When the questionnaire was re-applied, it was understood by 100% of the patients, in relation to the semantic, idiomatic and conceptual meanings. CONCLUSION: The Brazilian version of the Harris Hip Score provides another important tool for assessing quality of life of patients with hip disorders. A further study is currently underway to evaluate the reliability and validity of the culturally adapted version.

Rodrigo Pereira, Guimarães; Débora Pinheiro Lédio, Alves; Gustavo Bersani, Silva; Simoni Teixeira, Bittar; Nelson Keiske, Ono; Emerson, Honda; Giancarlo Cavalli, Polesello; Walter, Ricioli Junior; Nilza Aparecida Almeida de, Carvalho.

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Tradução e adaptação transcultural do instrumento de avaliação do quadril "Harris Hip Score" Translation and cultural adaptation of the Harris Hip Score into portuguese  

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Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O Harris Hip Score é instrumento de avaliação específica, desenvolvido originalmente para avaliar os resultados da artroplastia total de quadril. O objetivo deste estudo foi traduzir e adaptar culturalmente este instrumento para a língua portuguesa. MÉTODO: O método de tradução e adaptação cultural do Harris Hip Score envolveu quatro etapas: 1 - tradução inicial; 2 - retrotradução; 3 - apreciação das versões com elaboração da versão de consenso; 4 - pré-teste comentado com elaboração da versão final. RESULTADOS: A versão de consenso foi aplicada em 30 pacientes com afecção do quadril, sendo verificadas dificuldades no entendimento de algumas expressões, as quais foram substituídas por termos de mais fácil entendimento. Na reaplicação do questionário com a nova versão houve entendimento por 100% dos pacientes no que diz respeito ao sentido semântico, idiomático e contextual. CONCLUSÃO: A versão brasileira do Harris Hip Score permitiu a disponibilização de mais este instrumento para avaliação da qualidade de vida de pacientes com afecções do quadril. Há necessidade de um estudo de avaliação da confiabilidade e validade da versão adaptada culturalmente, a qual já está em desenvolvimento.OBJECTIVE: The Harris Hip Score is a specific evaluation tool, originally developed to assess the results of hip arthroplasty. The objective of this study was to translate and cross-culturally adapt the Harris Hip Score for the Portuguese language. METHOD: The method of translating and culturally adapting the Harris Hip Score involved four steps: 1 - initial translation, 2 - back-translation, 3 - evaluation of the pre-final versions with the development of a consensus version, 4 - commented pre-test with development of the final version. RESULTS: The consensus version was applied to thirty patients with hip disorders. Some difficulties were identified in understanding some expressions, which were replaced by more commonly-used expressions. When the questionnaire was re-applied, it was understood by 100% of the patients, in relation to the semantic, idiomatic and conceptual meanings. CONCLUSION: The Brazilian version of the Harris Hip Score provides another important tool for assessing quality of life of patients with hip disorders. A further study is currently underway to evaluate the reliability and validity of the culturally adapted version.

Rodrigo Pereira Guimarães

2010-01-01

31

Breastfeeding self-efficacy and the use of prescription medication: a pilot study.  

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Objective. To examine the association of self-efficacy, perception of milk production, and lactating women's use of medication prescribed to increase breast milk in a cohort of 18-40-year-old mothers over six months. Methods. Mothers (n = 76) attending community clinics completed the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale and the Humenick/Hill Lactation Scale, a measure of perceived milk production, three times. Results. Domperidone, a dopamine antagonist, was used by 28% of participants. On average, those using domperidone had lower self-efficacy scores than those not using it (P Breastfeeding self efficacy and perception of milk production were positively correlated. Conclusion. Breastfeeding assessment conducted prior to prescription of galactogogues is recommended for mothers and healthy term babies. Following Baby-Friendly hospital protocols and increasing self-efficacy for lactating women may be most effective in sustaining breastfeeding. Risks and benefits of various galactogogues are discussed. PMID:22220176

Mannion, Cynthia; Mansell, Deborah

2012-01-01

32

Psychometric evaluation of the gambling self-efficacy questionnaire with treatment-seeking pathological gamblers.  

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Gambling-related self-efficacy has been shown to correspond with treatment success and maintenance of treatment gains. Accordingly, there is a need for gambling assessment measures that have been validated with treatment-seeking individuals. In this study, we reported on the evaluation of a measure of perceived self-efficacy to control gambling behavior in high-risk relapse situations, the Gambling Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (GSEQ; May, Whelan, Steenbergh, & Meyers, 2003). Confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses provided some support for the original single-factor solutions, but also suggested the presence of individual patterns of self-efficacy across high-risk situations. The GSEQ demonstrated convergence with indices of problem-gambling severity and scores on the measure significantly increased across a brief cognitive-behavioral intervention. The sensitivity and specificity were evaluated and the findings supported that an average self-efficacy rating of 70% corresponded with indices of pathological gambling. PMID:25180557

Winfree, Walter R; Ginley, Meredith K; Whelan, James P; Meyers, Andrew W

2014-12-01

33

Self-efficacy, coping with stress and goal-orientation in nurse managers  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between self-efficacy, coping with stress, and goal-orientation in nurse managers. The results indicated that the self-efficacy scores were significantly correlated with learning goal-orientation (r=.37, p.05, helplessness approach (r=-.13, p>.05, social support approach (r=-.01, p>.05, and performance avoid orientation (r=.18, p>.05 was not significant. This study showed a positive meaningful relationship between nurse managers' self-efficacy levels and learning goal orientation and performance-proving orientation. The study provided information related to the variables with self-efficacy of nurse managers. Given the results of this study, it seems important to develop intervention programs to facilitate self-efficacy and goal-orientation and to reduce stress

Melek Kalkan

2011-09-01

34

Psychometric properties of the General Self Efficacy-12 Scale in Spanish: general and clinical population samples.  

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The General Self Efficacy Scale (GSES-12) is a short version of the Sherer's Self-Efficacy Scale, and evaluates a general dimension and three aspects of self-efficacy: initiative, persistence and effort. The aim of this study is to explore the factorial structure, reliability, and criterion validity of the Spanish adaptation of the GSES-12 in general and clinical populations. The sample was composed of 714 volunteers (332 from the clinical population). Results of the principal components analysis yielded a 3-factor structure that was later confirmed through Confirmatory Factor Analysis. Moreover, this study shows good internal consistency and test-retest values, and differences in self-efficacy scores between the clinical and non-clinical groups. The present study demonstrates that the Spanish version of the GSES-12 is a valid and reliable measure, and it adds relevant information to the debate about the dimensional structure of general self-efficacy. PMID:24973225

Herrero, R; Espinoza, M; Molinari, G; Etchemendy, E; Garcia-Palacios, A; Botella, C; Baños, R M

2014-10-01

35

Reliability and validity of a novel haemophilia-specific self-efficacy scale.  

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Higher self-efficacy in chronic disease patients is associated with higher development of self-management skills and increased quality-of-life. Quantification and monitoring of self-efficacy is therefore of importance. Self-efficacy in haemophilia patients has received little attention due to lack of standardized scales. To validate the novel Haemophilia-specific Self-Efficacy Scale (HSES) in haemophilia patients on prophylactic home treatment, haemophilia patients aged 1-18 years on prophylactic treatment ?1 year were included from three Dutch Haemophilia Treatment Centres. The HSES consists of 12 items, relating to perceptions of the ability to function on a day-to-day basis with regard to patient's disease. Retest was performed in a subsample. Validity was proven by the General Self-Efficacy Scale and by the health-related quality-of-life assessment tool Haemo-QoL. Data were analysed from 53 children (response 75%), with a mean age of 9.8 years (SD 4.0). Mean total scale score of HSES was 55.5 (SD 4.7; range 38-60), with a ceiling effect of 17%. The HSES showed adequate internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.72) and good test-retest reliability (Intra-Class-Correlation coefficient 0.75; P < 0.01; n = 37). The convergent validity was adequate as haemophilia-specific self-efficacy correlated significantly with general self-efficacy (r = 0.38; P < 0.01). High HSES scores correlated significantly with quality-of-life as measured by the Haemo-QoL (r = -0.42; P ? 0.01). The novel HSES is a reliable and valid tool to assess self-efficacy in paediatric haemophilia patients on prophylactic home treatment. High self-efficacy correlated with higher quality-of-life, further underlining the importance to standardly assess, monitor and improve self-efficacy. PMID:24720660

Lock, J; Raat, H; Peters, M; Tamminga, R Y J; Leebeek, F W G; Moll, H A; Cnossen, M H

2014-07-01

36

Self-efficacy as a potential moderator of the effects of framed health messages  

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This study focuses on self-efficacy as a potential moderator of the effects of gain- and loss-framed health messages. Undergraduate students (N = 124) received a gain- or loss-framed message about consuming ecological meat. The data revealed that for participants high in self-efficacy, the gain-framed message resulted in consuming more ecological meat than the loss-framed message. Moreover it was found that – within the gain-frame condition – participants low in self-efficacy scored highe...

Werrij, M. Q.; Ruiter, R. A. C.; Riet, J. P.; Vries, H.

2011-01-01

37

Self-Efficacy and Critical Thinking Dispositions as Predictors of Success in School Practicum  

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Full Text Available A growing body of literature supports the relation between students’ sense of self-efficacy and their academic performance. Similarly, there are studies indicating a relationship between critical thinking dispositions and academic performance. The purpose of the present study is to examine in what degree the teacher candidates’ sense of self-efficacy and critical thinking dispositions predict their success in school practicum course. A total of 104 subjects (23 male, 81 female participated in the study. Data related to teacher candidates’ sense self-efficacy was collected using Teachers’ Sense of Self-Efficacy Scale (Çapa, Çak?ro?lu & Sar?kaya, 2005. Teacher candidates’ critical thinking dispositions were collected using the Turkish version of California Critical Thinking Dispositions Inventory (CCTDI which was adapted into Turkish by Kökdemir (2003. As for the success in school practicum course, teacher candidates’ grades awarded by their school practicum supervisors were used. Statistically significant correlation was found between the self-efficacy and critical dispositions scores, and between critical thinking disposition scores and school practicum grades of the participants. The results of the regression analysis showed that teacher candidates’ critical thinking dispositions scores predict their success in school practicum course. However, contrary to the expectations, their senses of self-efficacy scores do not predict their success in the same course.

Gülru Yüksel

2012-04-01

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Eating Disorders, Normative Eating Self-Efficacy and Body Image Self-Efficacy: Women in Recovery Homes  

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Although eating disorders (EDs) and ED symptoms are common among individuals in recovery for substance abuse (SA), long-term SA treatment programmes rarely address these problems. The present study examined the prevalence of EDs among women residing in Oxford Houses—low-cost, self-governed recovery homes for SA. Further, among women both with and without an ED diagnosis, the association between duration of Oxford House residency and eating-related self-efficacy scores was examined as an ind...

Czarlinski, Jennifer A.; Aase, Darrin M.; Jason, Leonard A.

2011-01-01

39

The "Asthma Self-Efficacy Scale".  

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According to Bandura, a person's expectations that a favorable outcome will follow a particular behavior are not sufficient to promote the occurrence of the behavior; the person must also believe that he or she will be effective at performing the behavior. The latter is referred to as self-efficacy. It has become a major focus in assessing patient performance of skills required to manage their illness. The present paper describes the development, testing, and applicability of an instrument for assessing self-efficacy in asthmatic patients. It notes that the Asthma Self-Efficacy Scale is not only a reliable paper-and-pencil instrument, but that it has a wide potential applicability throughout health care settings in measuring self-efficacy in asthmatic patients. The Asthma Self-Efficacy Scale is included. PMID:3662130

Tobin, D L; Wigal, J K; Winder, J A; Holroyd, K A; Creer, T L

1987-10-01

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Science teaching self-efficacy in a primary school: A case study  

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Bandura's theory of self-efficacy predicts that teachers with high, self-efficacy should persist longer, provide a greater academic focus in child-centred classrooms and exhibit different types of feedback than teachers who have lower self-efficacy. This paper reports on the science teaching self-efficacy in a group of teachers at a state primary school. The research was conducted in two stages using firstly the Science Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Instrument (STEBI-A) to identify cases, and secondly, a semistructured interview coupled with classroom observations. Thirty seven teaching staff were surveyed with the STEBI-A instrument. The five highest and five lowest scoring teachers on the personal science teaching self-efficacy subscale of the STEBI-A were interviewed. The analysis of interviews and observations indicated that teachers with high personal science teaching self-efficacy have had a long interest in science and a relatively strong background of formal science studies with opportunities for exploring out of school activities. Although they may have experienced negative science experiences in their own schooling other ameliorating factors existed which maintained their interest. Their instructional strategies in science lessons were more child-centred than those reported by teachers with lower personal science teaching self-efficacy. The implications of the results for the inservice training of teachers are discussed.

de Laat, Jenny; Watters, James J.

1995-12-01

41

The relationship between academic self-efficacy and self-efficacy levels of teacher candidates  

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Full Text Available In this research, the relationship between academic self-efficacy beliefs and teachers' sense of efficacy were investigated for teacher candidate. The research is a descriptive study in relational screening model. Two separate instruments were used to collect data: the Academic Self-efficacy Scale to measure academic self-efficacy, and Teacher Self-efficacy Scale to measure the self-efficacy perceptions of teacher candidate. Mann Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis tests were conducted since the data were not normally distributed. The study group was comprised of 250 teacher candidate. The result of the study indicated that academic self-efficacy beliefs and teachers' sense of teacher candidates were quite high. Additionally it was found out that teacher candidates who had higher level of academic self-efficacy beliefs (comparing to teacher candidates who had moderate or lower level of academic self-efficacy practiced better in each dimension of Teacher's Self-Efficacy Belief Scale (except for academic development. There wasn't a significant difference according to neither gender nor having a job or not. But there was a significant difference in the dimension of effective learning and teaching process according to teacher candidates' majors of study in favour of Social Sciences. Besides there was a significant difference in the dimension of creating positive classroom environment and academic self-efficacy in terms of their ages in favor of 20 year-old and below.

Kaz?m Çelik

2013-04-01

42

Self-efficacy: a cause of debate.  

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In response to a paper (Hawkins, 1992) arguing that self-efficacy is a predictor but not a cause of behavior, Bandura (1995) has raised a series of counter arguments. None of these counter arguments seem sufficient to retreat from the claim that self-efficacy is not a true cause of behavior. The present paper reaffirms the position that self-efficacy is a useful concept when used as a descriptive metaphor. Examples from applied psychology are raised to justify this position. Discourse analysis is introduced as one approach which is able to circumvent the debate about the reality or nonreality of mental entities. PMID:8576404

Hawkins, R M

1995-09-01

43

Predictors Of Java Programming Self Efficacy Among Engineering Students In A Nigerian University  

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The study examined the relationship between Java programming self-efficacy and programming background of engineering students in a Nigerian University. One hundred and ninety two final year engineering students randomly selected from six engineering departments of the university participated in the study. Two research instruments: Programming Background Questionnaire and Java Programming Self-Efficacy Scale were used in collecting relevant information from the subjects. The resulting data were analyzed using Pearson product correlation and Multiple regression analysis. Findings revealed that Java Programming self-efficacy has no significant relationship with each of the computing and programming background factors. It was additionally obtained that the number of programming courses offered and programming courses weighed scores were the only predictors of Java self-efficacy.

Jegede, Philip Olu

2009-01-01

44

ACTIVE STRATEGIES DURING INQUIRY-BASED SCIENCE TEACHER EDUCATION TO IMPROVE LONG-TERM TEACHER SELF-EFFICACY  

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Teacher development aimed at increasing the use of inquiry based methods in schools is an important way to reach science learning goals. To this end, the EC has promoted inquiry based science teaching (IBST) within the Seventh Framework Program (FP7). One dimension, typically absent from the FP7 products, is the personal capacity belief of self- efficacy which has been shown to be important to personal behavioral change. The purpose of this research was to develop and test a model of teacher professional development (TPD) which adds specific elements for altering teacher self-efficacies to existing FP7 IBST products. This model was tested for its usefulness in increasing participant self-efficacy as evidenced by short and long term quantitative measures as well as by evaluation of long terminquiry lessons. Workshops to promote IBST were conducted in five different countries. Each workshop included strategies for increasing participant’s self-efficacies. Pre and post assessments showed consistently improved personal self-efficacy scores in all of the workshops. In addition, and unlike other long-term studies of teachers, these self-efficacy scores did not significantly diminish over six months. The promotion of self-efficacy in TPD provides a consistent way of evaluating the impact of IBST workshops through the use of changes in self-efficacy.

Evans, Robert Harry

2012-01-01

45

Social-Cognitive Predictors of Health Behavior : Action Self-Efficacy and Coping Self-Efficacy  

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The effects of social-cognitive variables on preventive nutrition and behavioral intentions were studied in 580 adults at 2 points in time. The authors hypothesized optimistic self-beliefs operate in 2 phases and made a distinction between action self-efficacy (preintention) and coping self-efficacy (postintantion). Risk perceptions, outcome expectancies, and action self-efficacy were specified as predictors of the intention at Wave 1. Behavioral intention and coping serf-efficacy served as ...

Schwarzer, Ralf; Renner, Britta

2000-01-01

46

The effect of manipulated and accurate assessment feedback on the self-efficacy of dance students.  

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Research undertaken with athletes has shown that lower-evaluated feedback is related to low self-efficacy levels. However, the relationship between teacher feedback and self-efficacy has not been studied in the dance setting. In sports or dance contexts, very few studies have manipulated feedback content to examine its impact on performers' self-efficacy in relation to the execution of a specific movement. Therefore, the aim of this investigation was to explore the effect of manipulated upper, lower, and accurate grade feedback on changes in dancers' self-efficacy levels for the execution of the "Zapateado" (a flamenco foot movement). Sixty-one students (56 female, 5 male, ages 13 to 22 ± 3.25 years) from a Spanish dance conservatory participated in this experimental study. They were randomly divided into four feedback groups: 1. upper-evaluated, 2. objective and informational, 3. lower-evaluated, and 4. no feedback-control. Participants performed three trials during a 1-hour session and completed questionnaires tapping self-efficacy pre-feedback and post-feedback. After each trial, teachers (who were confederates in the study) were first asked to rate their perception of each dancer's competence level at performing the movement according to conventional criteria (scores from 0 to 10). The results were then manipulated, and students accurate, lower-evaluated, or upper-evaluated scores were given. Those in the accurate feedback group reported positive change in self-efficacy, whereas those in the lower-evaluated group showed no significant change in self-efficacy during the course of the trial. Findings call into question the common perception among teachers that it can be motivating to provide students with inaccurate feedback that indicates that the students' performance level is much better or much worse than they actually perceive it to be. Self-efficacy appears most likely to increase in students when feedback is accurate. PMID:25741781

García-Dantas, Ana; Quested, Eleanor

2015-01-01

47

Relation of Interest and Self-Efficacy Occupational Congruence and Career Choice Certainty  

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A sample of 2145 adults completed the Personal Globe Inventory (PGI) as well as indicating their occupational choice and the certainty of this choice. The PGI yielded interest and self-efficacy scores and these were used with the occupational choice to calculate a congruence score for interests and one for efficacy. The prediction of career…

Tracey, Terence J. G.

2010-01-01

48

The development of research self-efficacy scale  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to develop a scale towards identifying research-related self-efficacies of universitystudents. Research Self-Efficacy Scale (RSS has been applied to 310 students pursuing academic education at theNear East University (NEU. For structural validity of the Scale, exploratory factor analysis (EFA was performed. Asa result of the EFA, a structure with a single factor composed of 18 items and explaining 31% of the variation hasbeen identified. Structural validity has been especially observed also through the Scale scores of those groupswhose properties are known. Analysis results have shown a higher Scale point in favour of those who have takenresearch methods modules as opposed to those who have not, and those who have previous research experienceas opposed to those who do not. The analysis for concurrent validity has produced a significant negativecorrelation between the Scale scores and the scores of the research anxiety scale, and a significant positivecorrelation between the Scale scores and perceived academic achievement. The alpha coefficient of the Scalescores is .87 and the split-half reliability coefficient is .85.

Sener Büyükoztürk

2011-03-01

49

Bandura's theory of self-efficacy: applications to oncology.  

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Self-efficacy (Bandura, 1986) has been shown to impact on health practices as well as adaptation to illness and treatment. The purposes of this paper are to describe self-efficacy theory and review literature using self-efficacy theory to investigate prevention of cancer and adaptation to cancer. Measurement of self-efficacy is also discussed. Evidence from research examining applications of Bandura's theory of self-efficacy in oncology suggests relationships between self-efficacy and cancer prevention and self-efficacy and adaptation to cancer. Strong percepts of self-efficacy predict intention to quit smoking, increased participation in screening programs, and adjustment to cancer diagnosis. Increased self-efficacy is associated with increased adherence to treatment, increased self-care behaviors, and decreased physical and psychological symptoms. The advanced practice nurse is in an excellent position to give feedback that may help support patients' self-efficacy. PMID:9188268

Lev, E L

1997-01-01

50

Global Self-Esteem and Self-Efficacy Correlates: Relation of Academic Achievement and Self-Esteem among Emirati Students  

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Full Text Available We investigated the relationships between global self-esteem, academic self-efficacy and academic performance among a sample of 255 college students in the United Arab Emirates. The widely used Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale (RSES; Rosenberg, 1965 and an academic self-efficacy scale, modified from (Jinks and Morgan, 1999 were used to assess student’s self-esteem and their academic self-efficacy. Each student’s average grade for the mid-semester and final semester was used as the performance measure. Confirmatory factor analyses using Analysis of Moment Structures (AMOS version 18 performed on the scores of the RSES revealed two factors (positive and negative self-esteem as hypothesized. Correlated results indicated significant relationships between global self-esteem and academic self-efficacy. Also academic achievement was associated with having high academic self-efficacy.

Ernest Afari

2012-03-01

51

Are Teachers Qualified to Teach Entrepreneurship? Analysis of Entrepreneurial Attitude and Self-efficacy  

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Full Text Available Recent research on the impacts of entrepreneurship education revealed that graduates lack the motivation and competencies required for new venture creation. Students entrepreneurial motivation and competencies can be highly influenced by teachers attitude toward and self-efficacy in entrepreneurship. However, there is little knowledge about entrepreneurial attitude and self-efficacy of teachers specifically at vocational and technical schools. This study aimed to examine entrepreneurial attitude and self-efficacy among 315 teachers from technical and vocational secondary schools in Malaysia. It employed a survey research method and a set of questionnaire to measure the teachers' entrepreneurial attitude and self-efficacy. Analysis of the data indicated that the teachers had attitudes as consistent with entrepreneurs and a high entrepreneurial self-efficacy. More specifically, the teachers scored high in all dimensions of entrepreneurial attitude except self-esteem affect and behavior, personal control affect, personal control cognition and innovation behavior. Therefore, the teachers have a positive attitude towards entrepreneurship and a high sense of self-efficacy.

A. Bagheri

2011-01-01

52

Developing the Reader Self-Efficacy Scale  

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Full Text Available Reading comprehension has affective and social dimensions as well as its cognitive dimension. Thus, to understand and improve reading instruction, affective and social dimensions should be well understood. Perceived self-efficacy is one of affective issues influencing learning and it should be taken into consideration in reading instruction. With this in mind, this study aims at developing the Reader Self-Efficacy Scale with a group of 518 students as participants. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed a 6-item scale with one factor. The Cronbach Alpha coefficient was determined to be 0.948. This new Reader Self-Efficacy Scale could easily be used for training and research purposes depending on its high validity and reliability.

Hakan ÜLPER

2013-04-01

53

[A concept analysis of self-efficacy].  

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Over the past decade, self-efficacy has become one of the most measured variables in studies on health behaviors and patient education. The concept was originally proposed in 1977 by Bandura, who initially promoted its use in social science research, especially psychology. It is now considered one of the most important determinants of health-related behaviors. Using Walker and Avant's concept analysis methods, the authors clarify the attributes and characteristics of self-efficacy. Refinement of this concept is proposed as a prerequisite for application to nursing research and practice. PMID:15137187

Chiang, Li-Chi; Kuo, Ya-Wen; Lin, Chouh-Jiaun

2004-04-01

54

Toward making the invisible visible: Studying science teaching self-efficacy beliefs  

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This dissertation consists of two articles to be submitted for publication. The first, a literature review, makes visible common influences on science teaching self-efficacy beliefs and also points to potentially invisible validation concerns regarding the instrument used. The second investigates the participants' invisible science teaching self-efficacy beliefs and, through the use of a more focused interview, makes those beliefs visible. Science teaching self-efficacy beliefs are science teachers' perceptions of their abilities to teach science effectively. The construct "teaching self-efficacy" originated in social cognitive theory (Bandura, 1977). The first article reviews the mixed results from teaching self-efficacy research in science contexts. The review focuses upon factors that facilitate or inhibit the development of self-efficacy beliefs among science teachers across stages of their careers. Although many studies of science teaching self-efficacy beliefs have utilized the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument - STEBI (Enochs & Riggs, 1990; Riggs & Enochs, 1990), this review also includes non-STEBI studies in order to represent diverse lines of research methodology. The review's findings indicate that antecedent factors such as science activities in and out of school, teacher preparation, science teaching experiences and supportive job contexts are significant influences on the development of science teaching self-efficacy beliefs. The review also indicates that the majority of these studies are short term and rely on a single STEBI administration with the collection of antecedent/demographic and/or interview data. The second article documents a study that responded to the above literature review findings. This study utilized multiple STEBI administrations during the preservice and beginning year of teaching for two science teachers. Rather than general questions, these participants were asked item specific, yet open-ended, questions to determine what events or experiences the participants felt influenced their survey answers. This methodological approach was chosen to add clarity to the STEBI scores and to add another layer in the ongoing process of instrument validation. Unlike some studies in science teaching self-efficacy, both participants' STEBI scores continued to increase as they transitioned from preservice to beginning teachers. The participant responses to the focused interview probes also validated their STEBI scores 77% of the time.

Perkins, Catherine J.

55

General Self-Efficacy Among Family’s Female Caregiver of Elderly with Alzheimer’s Disease  

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Full Text Available Background & Aim: Caregivers of elderly with Alzheimer's disease, particularly females, encounter challenges. Their different roles in giving care to the patients could result in physical and mental disorders. The self-efficacy seems to be an essential factor in empowering individuals coping with stressful situations and challenging tasks. The aim of this study was to investigate general self-efficacy among women as family caregivers of elderly with Alzheimers disease. Methods & Materials: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 112 women reffered to the Iran Alzheimer Association, Tehran were selected through convenience sampling method. The General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE-10 was used to collect data. Data were entered into the SPSS-16 and then processed using descriptive statistics and independent t-test, ANOVA and Scheffe. Results: The mean score of the general self-efficacy was 28.24±6.34 indicating that considerable percentage of the participants had unsatisfactory level of self-efficacy (65.2%. In addition, there were significant relationships between the women's general self-efficacy with educational and economic statuses (P<0.05. There were no significant relationships between general self-efficacy with age, marital status, occupational status and duration of caring. Conclusion: According to the findings, a considerable percentage of the participants had unsatisfactory level of self-efficacy. Therefore, it is essential to promote the caregivers self-efficacy in order to give them the ability of better adaptation with the lifes challenges. In particular, the self-efficacy promotive programs should be implemented among caregivers with lower educational and economic status.

Hamid Haghani

2012-06-01

56

Family Interaction Patterns as Predictors of Vocational Identity and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy.  

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Vocational identity scores of 210 college students varied by family achievement orientation. Career decision-making self-efficacy was influenced by family differences in achievement, intellectual-cultural, and moral-religious 'orientation; conflict; and expressiveness. Family interaction patterns thus may play a small but significant role in…

Hargrove, Byron K.; Creagh, Maureen G.; Burgess, Brian L.

2002-01-01

57

Knowledge Monitoring, Goal Orientations, Self-Efficacy, and Academic Performance: A Path Analysis  

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The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between knowledge monitoring and motivation as defined by self-efficacy and goal orientations. A path model was proposed to hypothesize the causal relations among predictors of the students' total score in the Educational Psychology course. The sample consisted of undergraduate…

Al-Harthy, Ibrahim S.; Was, Christopher A.

2013-01-01

58

[Self-efficacy among health learners/self-efficacy among health educators].  

Science.gov (United States)

The Social Cognitive Theory has helped health educators develop effective health education programs that target self-efficacy among participants in changing their health behavior. Bandura has identified four resources on which individuals determine their levels of self-efficacy: (1) performance accomplishment, (2) vicarious reinforcement, (3) verbal persuasion, and (4) emotional arousal. Examples of health education strategies that utilize each of the four resources to increase participants' self-efficacy are described. Health education professionals in Japan have attempted to use programs based on the Social Cognitive Theory for Japanese populations. It is criticized that health educators that use such programs are not well trained in effective use, and that those programs have not been utilized at their maximum potentials. Using the frame-work of the Social Cognitive Theory, the importance of incorporating ways to increase self-efficacy of health educators in providing health education services into education and training of health educators is discussed. PMID:10437454

Chikamoto, Y

1998-01-01

59

Does Emotional Self-efficacy Predict Teachers' Self-efficacy and Empathy?  

OpenAIRE

Research has shown that teachers` self-efficacy and empathy are two of the most important variables consistently related to outcomes of positive teaching and student learning. Emotional self-efficacy refers to peoples' judgment regarding their own capacity to process emotional information accurately and effectively. It is considered a powerful variable affecting the emotional state of individuals and their performance. The main objective of the present study was to examine to what extent emot...

Marina Goroshit; Meirav Hen

2014-01-01

60

Iranian Students' Self Efficacy and Their Language Achievements  

OpenAIRE

Many studies have examined the function of self efficacy in academic achievement, though as Pajares (2000) mentioned the relation of language achievement and self efficacy has not been studied well and there has been small research in this regard. This made the researcher to investigate the relationship between Iranian students' language achievements and their self efficacy. It also studied the variations of Iranian students' self efficacy and their majors. Besides, it explores the difference...

Atefeh Nasrollahi; Hamed Barjasteh

2013-01-01

61

The moderating effect of self-efficacy on normal-weight, overweight, and obese children's math achievement: a longitudinal analysis.  

Science.gov (United States)

Increased body weight is associated with decreased cognitive function in school-aged children. The role of self-efficacy in shaping the connection between children's educational achievement and obesity-related comorbidities has not been examined to date. Evidence of the predictive ability of self-efficacy in children is demonstrated in cognitive tasks, including math achievement scores. This study examined the relationship between self-efficacy and math achievement in normal weight, overweight, and obese children. I hypothesized that overweight and obese children with higher self-efficacy will be less affected in math achievement than otherwise comparable children with lower self-efficacy. I tested this prediction with multilevel growth modeling techniques using the ECLS-K 1998-1999 survey data, a nationally representative sample of children. Increased self-efficacy moderates the link between body weight and children's math achievement by buffering the risks that increased weight status poses to children's cognitive function. My findings indicate that self-efficacy moderates math outcomes in overweight, but not obese, children. PMID:25618606

Kranjac, Ashley Wendell

2015-03-01

62

Examining Dimensions of Self-Efficacy for Writing  

Science.gov (United States)

A multifactor perspective on writing self-efficacy was examined in 2 studies. Three factors were proposed--self-efficacy for writing ideation, writing conventions, and writing self-regulation--and a scale constructed to reflect these factors. In Study 1, middle school students (N = 697) completed the Self-Efficacy for Writing Scale (SEWS), along…

Bruning, Roger; Dempsey, Michael; Kauffman, Douglas F.; McKim, Courtney; Zumbrunn, Sharon

2013-01-01

63

Calibration between Student Mastery and Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

Content mastery and self-efficacy were measured at the beginning and at the end of two classes in Research Methods in Psychology. A multiple-choice test measured content mastery and a questionnaire measured self-efficacy. Self-efficacy reports improved significantly over the course of instruction, as did examination performance. The correlation…

Brannick, Michael T.; Miles, Donald E.; Kisamore, Jennifer L.

2005-01-01

64

Measuring Distinct Types of Musical Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

This research examines the specific nature of self-efficacy beliefs within music. Separate questionnaires assessing self-efficacy for musical learning and self-efficacy for musical performing were developed and tested, and the reliability of the new questionnaires was demonstrated using internal reliability tests and exploratory factor analysis. A…

Ritchie, Laura; Williamon, Aaron

2011-01-01

65

Identifying Events that Impact Self-Efficacy in Physics Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

We present a method of analyzing the development of self-efficacy in real time using a framework of self-efficacy opportunities (SEOs). Considerable research has shown a connection between self-efficacy, or the confidence in one's own ability to perform a task, and success in science fields. Traditional methods of investigating the development of…

Sawtelle, Vashti; Brewe, Eric; Goertzen, Renee Michelle; Kramer, Laird H.

2012-01-01

66

Self-Efficacy and Learning in Sorority and Fraternity Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Past research consistently reveals that "self-efficacy," referring to one's perceived ability to obtain a desired outcome, in academic courses is linked to academic achievement and motivation in those courses. In particular, high self-efficacy in courses is associated with high academic performance, and low self-efficacy in courses is associated…

Thompson, Jon G., Jr.; Oberle, Crystal D.; Lilley, Jennifer L.

2011-01-01

67

The Interface between EFL Learners' Self-Efficacy Concerning Listening Comprehension and Listening Proficiency  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Since the focus of education has shifted from teacher-directed to learner-oriented instruction in recent decades, a growing body of research in the field of EFL/ESL learning involves issues relevant to learners and their individual differences. It should be pointed out that one of the important factors affecting test scores is test takers’ characteristics. Therefore, the present study concentrated on one of these individual differences; namely self-efficacy. To narrow down the focus of investigation, this study aimed at exploring the role of EFL learner's self-efficacy regarding listening comprehension in their listening test performance. Hence, the main research question addressed by the present study was ‘Are there any relationships between EFL learners’ self-efficacy regarding listening comprehension and listening proficiency?’ A group of 61 freshmen undergraduate learners of English consented to participate in the present study. Data on the learners’ self-efficacy were collected through an author-designed questionnaire. The listening proficiency was quantified and extracted based on the students’ answers to a listening test performance titled as 'Listening Diagnostic Pre-test' adopted from paper-based Longman TOEFL(2001, pp.3-6. The results of statistical analyses indicated that listening comprehension self- efficacy was significantly related to listening proficiency.

Ali RAHIMI

2009-04-01

68

Strategies enhancing self-efficacy in diabetes education: a review.  

Science.gov (United States)

Enhancing self-efficacy in patients with chronic illnesses has been shown to have a positive effect on behavior change. In fact, according to Bandura (1986), self-efficacy is the most important predictor of change in behavior. Thus, in order to make positive changes, effective measures for enhancing self-efficacy are needed in educational programs. There are four important sources of information for increasing self-efficacy: performance accomplishments, vicarious learning, verbal persuasion, and self-appraisal of emotional and physiological responses. Strategies for enhancing self-efficacy are described here for each source of information and for combinations of sources. PMID:11871582

van de Laar, K E; van der Bijl, J J

2001-01-01

69

Relative contributions of self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping in predicting student procrastination.  

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The relative contributions of self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping student procrastination were explored. College undergraduate participants (N = 138; 40 men, 97 women, one not reporting sex) filled out the Procrastination Scale, the Self-Handicapping Scale-Short Form, and the Self-regulation and Self-handicapping scales of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. A hierarchical regression of the above measures indicated that self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping all predicted scores on the Procrastination Scale, but self-regulation fully accounted for the predictive power of self-efficacy. The results suggested self-regulation and self-handicapping predict procrastination independently. These findings are discussed in relation to the literature on the concept of "self-efficacy for self-regulation" and its use in the field of procrastination research. PMID:22420126

Strunk, Kamden K; Steele, Misty R

2011-12-01

70

Correlates of self-efficacy for condom use among male clients of female sex workers in Tijuana, Mexico.  

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Male clients of female sex workers (FSWs) in Tijuana, Mexico engage in high levels of unprotected sex. While behavioral change theories posit that self-efficacy predicts condom use, correlates of self-efficacy for condom use remain largely unstudied. We examined these correlates among male clients of FSWs in Tijuana. Eligible male clients were at least 18 years of age, HIV-negative, lived in Tijuana or San Diego, reported unprotected sex with a Tijuana FSW at least once in the past 4 months, and agreed to be treated for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Participants completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire including demographics, substance use, psychosocial and psychosexual characteristics (e.g., outcome expectancies for negotiation of safer sex, social support, and sexual sensation seeking), and sexual behaviors. Participants also underwent HIV/STI testing. A stepwise hierarchical multiple regression analysis identified correlates of self-efficacy for condom use. Of 393 male clients, median age was 37 years. Participants were mostly Spanish-speaking and employed. Factors independently associated with higher self-efficacy for condom use were higher positive outcome expectancies for negotiation of safer sex, lower sexual sensation seeking scores, and higher social support scores. Both psychosocial and psychosexual factors may influence self-efficacy for condom use among male clients of FSWs. These factors represent central constructs in sociocognitive models that explain behavioral change and could be intervention targets for improving self-efficacy for condom use and, ultimately, safer sex behavior. PMID:23842786

Volkmann, Tyson; Wagner, Karla D; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Semple, Shirley J; Ompad, Danielle C; Chavarin, Claudia V; Patterson, Thomas L

2014-05-01

71

Self-efficacy in Second/Foreign Language Learning Contexts  

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Full Text Available This study reviews the empirical literature of self-efficacy, a central component of social cognitive theory, in the area of second language learning by focusing on two research questions: first, to what extent, has self-efficacy, as a predicting variable, has been explored in the field of second language learning? Second, what factors affect learners’ self-efficacy beliefs in learning a foreign/second language? On addressing the research questions, 32 articles published between 2003 and 2012 were selected. The articles were classified into two main categories – effects of self-efficacy and factors affecting self-efficacy. Then each category was divided into certain subcategories for discussion. The findings of the review revealed that several factors enhance the level of students’ self-efficacy, and self-efficacy is a strong predictor of performance in different language skills and tasks. Limitations of the empirical studies discussed and directions for further investigation are also presented.

Saeid Raoofi

2012-09-01

72

The development of self-efficacy and self-esteem in pharmacy students based on experiential education  

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This doctoral thesis contributes to the literature on self-efficacy and self-esteem and the relationship to a student's school, age, gender, ethnicity, GPA, paid and introductory pharmacy practice experiences in a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program. Graduates with a high level of self-efficacy and self-esteem are more desirable as pharmacists upon graduation. A quantitative survey, which includes two standardized instruments, the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), was administered to students at five schools of pharmacy in the northeast United States, resulting in a total of 399 responses. The findings confirm the significance of paid experiences and increased levels of a student's self-efficacy in a pharmacy setting. The other finding was related to ethnicity where the Asian/Pacific Islander students showed lower self-efficacy than other ethnic groups, which may be due to a cultural difference in displaying traits of high self-efficacy. Self-esteem also showed a positive finding for students with paid experiences and students who were older. There was an ethnicity finding where Asian/Pacific Islanders scored lower on the self-esteem scale, while the African-Americans scored higher than all the other groups. The results show that students improve their levels of self-efficacy and self-esteem through extended practical experiences. Schools should provide structured experiences of a sufficient length, beyond the present 300 hours, to prepare students for their transition into a professional role. Educators should be aware of the difference in Asian/Pacific Islander culture and encourage students to demonstrate their self-efficacy and self-esteem so other professionals can recognize them for their attributes.

Yorra, Mark L.

73

Self-Efficacy as a Suicidal Ideation Predictor: A Population Cohort Study in Rural Japan  

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Full Text Available Background: Self-efficacy has been widely studied in suicide, both in its causality and treatment effects. However, the evidence of causality is still ambiguous and there is a lack of generalizability. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between self-efficacy and suicidal ideation through a population cohort study. Methods: The community-based household survey using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted in a rural area of Japan, Happo Town, in Akita Prefecture with community residents aged 30 and over at two respective time points by local health volunteers. The baseline survey was conducted in 2010 with a response rate of 88.9% (n = 6044. Among them, 3812 residents met the inclusion criteria for the follow-up survey in 2012 where the response rate was 75.3% (n = 2869. Exposure variables to suicidal ideation included demographic details, depression and self-efficacy. The Institutional Review Board and the Ethics Committee of Akita University approved the study protocol and all subjects signed informed consent. Results: A total number of 2105 participants (76.4% without suicidal ideation in the baseline study were enrolled into the follow-up study, and 8.2% of them had developed suicidal ideation. These participants with suicidal ideation were significantly less likely to be married/cohabitant; they had worse subjective health, poorer self-perceived economic status, stronger depressive mood, and lower self-efficacy scores. The odds ratio of the self-efficacy scores at follow-up survey for participants who had developed suicidal ideation were about 2 times lower than at baseline (95% confidence interval = 1. 53 - 3.06. After adjusting for all confounding factors, the association was still significant (OR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.15 - 2.42. Conclusion: This result suggests that suicidal ideation may be prevented by increasing self-efficacy. We suggest that self-efficacy can be an effective tool for identifying people with suicidal ideation, and increasing self-efficacy can be strategically beneficial for larger suicide prevention.

Yoshio Kobayashi

2015-02-01

74

Effects of sex composition by class and instructor's sex on physical self-efficacy of college men.  

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The relationship of sex composition of class and instructor's sex to Physical Self-efficacy has yielded conflicting results in several studies. This study examined the relationship of sex composition of class and instructor's sex to scores on Physical Self-efficacy, Perceived Physical Ability, and Physical Self-presentation Confidence of 80 male students enrolled in one of four sections of a strength training class. Analysis indicated no significant difference on Physical Self-efficacy between male students who were enrolled in all male classes or in coeducational classes; improvements in scores on Physical Self-efficacy were not specific to the sex composition of the class or sex of the instructor and no significant difference on Perceived Physical Ability and Physical Self-presentation Confidence between male students who joined an all male class or a coeducational class. Perceived Physical Ability improved from the pretest to the posttest in all classes; and no improvement in scores for Physical Self-presentation Confidence was found in all classes. In conclusion, the analysis showed sex composition of the class and sex of the instructor were not significantly related to scores for self-efficacy. PMID:10769888

Gibbons, E S; Rust, D M; Blassingame, C L; Reed, J L

2000-02-01

75

A Comparison of Brunei and Hong Kong - SAR Student Teachers’ Self-efficacy in Implementing Inclusive Education Practices: Implications for Teacher Education  

OpenAIRE

The survey compared the scores of 159 (118 females) randomly selected Brunei and Hong Kong (Special Administrative Region) student teachers on the New General Self-efficacy Scale (NGSS); Self-efficacy in Implementing Inclusive Practices Scale (SIIPS); Sentiments, Attitudes and Concerns about Inclusive Education Scale (SACIES); and Inclusive Classroom Setting Scale (ICSS). The scales were reliable and valid for use with participants in both countries. Females scored significantly higher on NGS...

Kathleen Tait; Lawrence Mundia

2013-01-01

76

Investigation of the effect of self-efficacy levels of caregiver family members of the individuals with schizophrenia on burden of care.  

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Sixty-two individuals with schizophrenia and their families were part of a descriptive study that investigated the effect of self-efficacy levels on the burden of care, using family member caregivers of schizophrenia patients. Data were collected using a questionnaire on the descriptive characteristics of patients and their families, the Self-Efficacy Scale, and Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale. The results for caregivers indicated a total mean self-efficacy score of 76.4±17.76 and a total mean of burden of care score of 68.64±18.60. A negative significant relation was discovered by looking at the correlation between the total mean scores (r=-.260, pburden of care decreases with the increasing level of self-efficacy in caregiver family members. PMID:25017564

Durmaz, Hatice; Okanl?, Ay?e

2014-08-01

77

Adapting Computer Programming Self-Efficacy Scale and Engineering Students' Self-Efficacy Perceptions  

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Students might have different type and different level of perceptions: Positive or negative perceptions on programming; a perception on benefit of programming, perceptions related to difficulties of programming process etc. The perception of student on their own competence is defined as self-efficacy. Based on the discussions reported in…

Korkmaz, Özgen; Altun, Halis

2014-01-01

78

Psychometric properties of the Hurricane Coping Self-Efficacy measure following Hurricane Katrina.  

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The Hurricane Coping Self-Efficacy (HCSE) measure is a validated tool for assessing self-efficacy appraisals after hurricanes. Data were collected 6 months after Hurricane Katrina from 1542 employed residents of New Orleans, and 181 participants randomly selected to complete a repeat survey to confirm the psychometric properties of the HCSE measure. Overall, coping self-efficacy was greater among men, the most educated and those with the highest income. Confirmatory factor analyses indicated a relatively good fit of the HCSE items into a single construct, with Bentler's comparative fit and McDonald's centrality index scores of 0.92 and 0.87, respectively. The repeatability of scores was high (Pearson's correlation = 0.70). Additionally, HCSE scores were highly correlated with validated scales of perceived stress and posttraumatic stress symptoms, and significantly lower scores were observed among participants who sought counseling after the storm. The HCSE measure exhibited excellent internal consistency, external validity and repeatability after Hurricane Katrina. PMID:18626297

Hyre, Amanda D; Benight, Charles C; Tynes, L Lee; Rice, Janet; DeSalvo, Karen B; Muntner, Paul

2008-07-01

79

Assessing Perceived Empathic and Social Self-Efficacy Across Countries  

OpenAIRE

The Perceived Empathic Self-Efficacy Scale (PESE) and the Perceived Social Self-Efficacy Scale (PSSE) were developed to assess, respectively, individuals’ self-efficacy beliefs regarding both empathic responding to others’ needs or feelings and managing interpersonal relationships. In this study of young adults, a unidimensional factorial structure of both scales was found in Italy, the United States, and Bolivia. Complete invariance at the metric level and partial invariance at the scala...

Di Giunta, Laura; Eisenberg, Nancy; Kupfer, Anne; Steca, Patrizia; Tramontano, Carlo; Caprara, Gian Vittorio

2010-01-01

80

Self efficacy measurement and goal attainment after pulmonary rehabilitation  

OpenAIRE

Rachel Garrod, Johanna Marshall, Fiona JonesSchool of Physiotherapy, St George’s, University of London and Kingston University Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences, UKBackground: Little is known about self-efficacy in COPD and its role as a mediator of goal attainment after rehabilitation. We hypothesized that higher baseline self efficacy may facilitate goal attainment.Methods: 48 COPD patients completed pulmonary rehabilitation, self-efficacy was measured using the COPD Self...

Rachel Garrod; Johanna Marshall; Fiona Jones

2008-01-01

81

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE LEVEL OF SELF-EFFICACY, PERFORMANCE INDICATORS, AND PARTICIPATION IN YOUTH BASKETBALL  

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Full Text Available The present study analyzed the relationship between the level of self-efficacy of the player with the ball in basketball, various performance indicators, and individual participation of the youth player in competition, with the goal of being able to establish initial values that help to define game styles and systems that are adapted to the characteristics of the youth player. In order to evaluate the levels of self-efficacy, a questionnaire was administered to 187 players from the under-16 age category. From a total of 22 games, the following variables related to the individual performance of the player were analyzed: a points scored; b shot attempts and shots made of 1, 2, and 3 points; c efficacy percentage of 1, 2, and 3-point shots; d rebounds made; and e personal fouls received. With regard to participation, the following variables were analyzed: f minutes played; g total time of ball possession; h number of ball possessions; i number of passes received; and j number of offensive phases in which the player participates. The results indicate that the performance and participation variables correctly classify 74.2% when differentiating between players with high and low levels of selfefficacy. The players with high levels of self-efficacy presented higher values in the different performance and participation variables than the players with low levels of self-efficacy.

Enrique Ortega

2009-01-01

82

Effects of Observational Practice and Gender on the Self-efficacy and Learning of Aiming Skill  

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Full Text Available The purposes of the present investigation were to study the effects of observational model and gender on the learning and self-efficacy of dart throwing skill. Forty eight novice girls and boys from PE classes were divided into two observational and physical practice groups, randomly. In acquisition phase and in retention and transfer tests, they practiced 60 trials and 12 trials, respectively. The results of acquisition phase showed that there was significant main effect of gender and the follow-up results demonstrated that the males had more accurate performance and more self-efficacy score than females (p<0.05. There were no significant differences between observational and physical groups on throwing accuracy and self-efficacy (p>0.05, but the males had more accurate performance than females in retention and transfer phases. In conclusion, observing a model can result in acquiring and learning of a skill as well as the executing a skill because of the role of self-efficacy and observational model is more effective for males than females for learning facilitation.

Mohsen Shafizadeh

2007-01-01

83

Self-Efficacy in Social Work: Development and Initial Validation of the Self-Efficacy Scale for Social Workers  

OpenAIRE

Self-efficacy beliefs do not reflect a generic sense of competence, but are instead context-specific. Therefore, self-efficacy should be assessed by using an ad hoc scale measuring individual behaviors that allows social workers to exercise influence over events that affect their work life. The present study describes the development and initial validation of the self-efficacy scale for social workers (SESSW). Items were generated through the Critical Incident Technique. Sixteen social worker...

Monica Pedrazza; Elena Trifiletti; Sabrina Berlanda; Gian Antonio Di Bernardo

2013-01-01

84

Effects of Goal Setting and Self-efficacy on Wheelchair Basketball Performance  

OpenAIRE

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of goal setting and the mediating role of self-efficacy in the relationship between performance scores, in selected wheelchair basketball skills. Male wheelchair basketball players (n= 36) of mean age 29.3 years (SD = 6.3) participated in the study. Participants were assigned to two groups, the goal-setting group (n = 18) and the control group (n=18). Participants performed three wheelchair basketball tasks (passing, shooting, and dribbling)...

Katartzi, E.; ?????????, ?.; Theodorakis, ?.; Tzetzis, G.; Vlachopoulos, S.; ???????????, ?.; ????????, ?.; ????????????, ?.

2011-01-01

85

The Interface between EFL Learners' Self-Efficacy Concerning Listening Comprehension and Listening Proficiency  

OpenAIRE

Since the focus of education has shifted from teacher-directed to learner-oriented instruction in recent decades, a growing body of research in the field of EFL/ESL learning involves issues relevant to learners and their individual differences. It should be pointed out that one of the important factors affecting test scores is test takers’ characteristics. Therefore, the present study concentrated on one of these individual differences; namely self-efficacy. To narrow down the focus of inve...

Rahimi, Ali; Abedini, Atiyeh

2009-01-01

86

A Survey of Correlation Infertility Self-Efficacy with Behavioral Health Scales in Infertile Women  

OpenAIRE

Background: Infertility is a unique medical challenge that can have health behavioral consequence on infertile women including lack of self-esteem, depression, anxiety, fertility problem in infertile couples. The aim of this study was to evaluate correlation between self-efficacy and health behaviors scales in infertile women. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on 89 infertile women with mild to moderate depression (Beck scores 10 - 47) who were recruited from Fatemeh Zahra Infert...

Mahbobeh Faramarzi; Hajar Pasha; Seddigheh Esmailzadeh; Farzan Kheirkhah; Karimollah Hajian-Tilaki; Hajar Salmalian

2014-01-01

87

Preliminary Study of the Autism Self-Efficacy Scale for Teachers (ASSET)  

OpenAIRE

The purpose of the current study was to evaluate a new measure, the Autism Self-Efficacy Scale for Teachers (ASSET) for its dimensionality, internal consistency, and construct validity derived in a sample of special education teachers (N = 44) of students with autism. Results indicate that all items reflect one dominant factor, teachers’ responses to items were internally consistent within the sample, and compared to a 100-point scale, a 6-point response scale is adequate. ASSET scores were...

Ruble, Lisa A.; Toland, Michael D.; Birdwhistell, Jessica L.; Mcgrew, John H.; Usher, Ellen L.

2013-01-01

88

Learners with Low Self-Efficacy for Information Literacy Rely on Library Resources Less Often But Are More Willing to Learn How to Use Them  

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Full Text Available Objectives – To determine whether there is a relationship between self-efficacy (i.e., confidence regarding information literacy skills and self-efficacy for distance learning; and to compare the use of electronic resources by high and low information literacy self-efficacy distance learners and their interest in learning more about searching. Design – Online survey. Setting – A small public university in the United States of America. Subjects – Undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in one or more online courses. Most respondents were in their twenties, 76% were female, 59% were undergraduates, and 69% were full time students. Methods – Students were asked six demographic questions, eight questions measuring their self-efficacy for information literacy, and four questions measuring their self-efficacy for online learning. All self-efficacy questions were adapted from previous studies and used a one to five Likert scale. The response rate was 6.2%. Correlational analysis was conducted to test the first two hypotheses (students who have higher self-efficacy for information seeking are more likely to have higher self-efficacy for online learning and for information manipulation. Descriptive analysis was used for the remaining hypotheses, to test whether students who have higher information literacy self-efficacy are more likely to have high library skills (hypothesis three and are more interested in learning about how to use library resources (hypothesis four. Among respondents high information literacy self-efficacy and low self-efficacy groups were distinguished, using the mean score of information literacy self-efficacy. Main Results – There was a significant correlation between self-efficacy for information seeking and self-efficacy for online learning (r = .27, as well as self-efficacy for information manipulation (r = .79. Students with high information seeking self-efficacy were more likely to use library databases (28.72%, while low self-efficacy respondents more often chose commercial search engines (30.98%. However those respondents were more likely to be interested in learning how to use library resources. Conclusion – Distance students with higher self-efficacy for information seeking and use also had higher self-efficacy for online learning. It is important to encourage such self-efficacy since studies have shown that it relates to better information literacy skills and a higher ability to be self-regulated learners. Confident learners process information, make effective decisions, and improve their learning more easily. Furthermore many respondents in this survey had little or false knowledge of how to use appropriate resources for their learning needs. This points to the need for effective library instruction. This study also shows that low self-efficacy students would like to have library instruction, especially to help them plan specific research assignments.

Dominique Daniel

2014-09-01

89

Self-efficacy pathways to childhood depression.  

Science.gov (United States)

This prospective research analyzed how different facets of perceived self-efficacy operate in concert within a network of sociocognitive influences in childhood depression. Perceived social and academic inefficacy contributed to concurrent and subsequent depression both directly and through their impact on academic achievement, prosocialness, and problem behaviors. In the shorter run, children were depressed over beliefs in their academic inefficacy rather than over their actual academic performances. In the longer run, the impact of a low sense of academic efficacy on depression was mediated through academic achievement, problem behavior, and prior depression. Perceived social inefficacy had a heavier impact on depression in girls than in boys in the longer term. Depression was also more strongly linked over time for girls than for boys. PMID:10074708

Bandura, A; Pastorelli, C; Barbaranelli, C; Caprara, G V

1999-02-01

90

Career Self-Efficacy: Exemplary Recent Research and Emerging Directions  

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This article discusses what the author views as exemplary work illustrating important directions in research on the applications of Bandura's self-efficacy theory to career theory, assessment, and counseling. The author begins with research on measuring career self-efficacy, following which research testing the postulated behavioral consequences…

Betz, Nancy E.

2007-01-01

91

Emotional Intelligence and Self-Efficacy among Physical Education Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

Research has documented a positive association between Emotional Intelligence (EI) and well-being, performance and self-efficacy. The purpose of the current study was to examine potential associations between EI and self-efficacy among physical education teachers. The Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue) and the Teacher Sense of…

Mouton, Alexandre; Hansenne, Michel; Delcour, Romy; Cloes, Marc

2013-01-01

92

Self-Efficacy and Burnout in Professional School Counselors  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated the relationships between burnout and self-efficacy among school counselors. Also, the level of their burnout and self-efficacy was examined in terms of the social support, task perception and the number of students. A sample of 194 school counselors filled out the Maslach Burnout Inventory, The School Counselors…

Gunduz, Bulent

2012-01-01

93

Attributional Style and Self-Efficacy in Singaporean Adolescents  

Science.gov (United States)

This investigation examined the relationship between adolescent students' attributional style and their perceived academic self-efficacy using the Children's Attributional Style Questionnaire (CASQ) (Seligman et al., 1984) and Multidimensional Scales of Perceived Self Efficacy (Bandura, 1989). Attributional style, defined as the way in which…

Yeo, Lay See; Tan, Kayce

2012-01-01

94

Regulation of Cognitive Processes through Perceived Self-Efficacy.  

Science.gov (United States)

Addresses issues concerning the extension of self-efficacy theory to memory functioning. Issues include perceived memory capabilities, memory self-appraisal, personal control over memory functioning, preservation of a favorable sense of memory self-efficacy, and strategies for generalizing the impact of training in memory skills. (RJC)

Bandura, Albert

1989-01-01

95

Career Self-Efficacy among African-American Female Adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

A study of 157 African-American female adolescents found that their career self-efficacy and vocational interests were not correlated, nor were career self-efficacy and the range of careers they considered. Vocational interests and career consideration categories (female, male, gender-neutral, secondary, postsecondary) were significantly…

Smith-Weber, Sheila M.

1999-01-01

96

The Four Sources of Influence on Computer Self-Efficacy.  

Science.gov (United States)

Using Bandura's four sources of influence on self-efficacy, 210 students rated their computer self-efficacy. Mastery experiences were most influential for white males; vicarious learning had the most influence for females and nonwhite students. (Contains 29 references.) (SK)

Smith, Sheila M.

2001-01-01

97

Entrepreneurial self-efficacy in a multicultural society: Measures and ethnic differences  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Deficits in self-beliefs lower entrepreneurial activity in the broader South African context. A brief theoretical analysis preceded establishing the psychometric evaluations of the entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE and general selfefficacy (GSE measures. Participants representing different major ethnic groups in SA were sampled. Results indicate that the GSE scale remains a single factor solution thereby confirming the unidimensionality and reliability of this measure. The different ESE sub-domains provide a far more fine-grained approach to understanding self-efficacy. ANOVA determined significant differences in self-efficacy scores between the different groups. Apart from introducing the ESE construct to the SA literature, it is the first time that a study has united the general and specific measures of self-efficacy as well as measuring both the magnitude and strength dimensions of self-efficacy beliefs. Opsomming Tekortkominge in selfgeloofwaardigheid doen afbreuk aan entrepreneuriese aktiwiteite in die breër Suid Afrikaanse konteks. ’n Samevattende teoretiese analise het die vasstelling van strukturele ekwivalensie van die entrepreneuriese ESE en GSE skale voorafgegaan. ’n Steekproef van MBA respondente, verteenwoordigend van die hoof etniese groepe binne SA, is vir die studie gebruik. Bevindinge dui daarop dat die GSE skaal ’n enkel faktor oplossing is bevestigend van die enkel dimensionaliteit en betroubaarheid van hierdie maatstaf. ANOVA dui daarop dat merkbare verskille bestaan tussen die ESE tellings van die verskillende groeperinge. Benewens die bekendstelling van die ESE konsep, aan die SA literatuur, verenig hierdie studie vir die eerste keer die breë en spesifieke maatstawwe van selfgeloofwaardigheid, en meet dit ook die grote en sterkte van hierdie verandelikes.

Boris Urban

2006-01-01

98

The effect of site-based preservice experiences on elementary science teaching self-efficacy beliefs  

Science.gov (United States)

Current reform in science education has focused on the need for improvement of preservice teacher training (National Science Education Standards, 1996). As a situation specific construct (Bandura, 1977), self-efficacy studies have been conducted to investigate factors that impact preservice teachers' sense of confidence as it relates to their ability to become successful science teachers. This descriptive study identified factors in the site based experiences that affected preservice elementary teachers' self-efficacy as measured by the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument (STEBL-B) (Enochs and Riggs, 1990). The sample consisted of the entire population of undergraduate elementary preservice teachers in the site based teacher education program during the fall semester of 1997 at a large south central urban university. The 131 paired, pretest posttests of the entire STEBL-B and the two constructs were analyzed for significance in mean score gains. Results of the paired t test yielded a t value of 11.52 which was significant at p self-efficacy from site based experiences. Results of this study indicate that the experiences of the site based program has a significant positive impact on the preservice teachers' self-efficacy. The implication for teacher educators is that this specific affective dimension can be significantly enhanced. The site based program can provide the four factors Bandura identified as sources of information used to determine self-efficacy. These include performance accomplishments through authentic teaching experiences, vicarious experiences through observation of the site based teachers, and verbal persuasion and physiological states from feedback given by the university coordinators. The majority of these preservice teachers started the semester with a negative attitude toward teaching science, but ended the semester with a positive view of themselves as effective science teachers in the future.

Wingfield, Mary E.

99

[Chronic pain and the belief in self-efficacy].  

Science.gov (United States)

The treatment of chronic pain patients includes beliefs, attitudes, values and behavior modifications. Dysfunctional beliefs about pain and management can become the central problem and determine the treatment's outcome. Among the important beliefs for the management of chronic pain, self-efficacy deserves to be highlighted. The concept of self-efficacy, developed by Bandura, is the belief on the individual ability to perform successfully certain tasks or behaviors in order to produce a desired outcome. This study is a critical review of the literature on the belief of self-efficacy related to chronic pain and about the methods to assess self-efficacy. Studies listed in Medline (1992 to 2002), Lilacs and Dedalus (the entire databases) were analyzed. The key words were pain and self-efficacy, dor and auto-eficácia. PMID:17542137

Salvetti, Marina de Góes; Pimenta, Cibele Andrucioli de Mattos

2007-03-01

100

Witness self-efficacy: development and validation of the construct.  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite the application of Self-Efficacy Theory (Bandura, 1977, 2000) to many areas of psychology, there is a lack of research on self-efficacy in the ability to testify in court. The present study fills this gap by incrementally developing the construct of Witness Self-Efficacy and establishing its psychometric properties. Study I features exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses yielding a two-factor Witness Self-Efficacy Scale (WSES). The two components are Poise and Communication Style. Study II uses a second data collection to show that both WSES domains possess convergent, divergent, and predictive validity relations consistent with those expected using an SET framework. Notably, WSES components predicted perceptions of witness credibility and sentencing outcomes above and beyond witness extraversion, general self-efficacy, and general self-confidence. Implications for SET and witness preparation training are discussed. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:20731010

Cramer, Robert J; Neal, Tess M S; DeCoster, Jamie; Brodsky, Stanley L

2010-01-01

101

Impact of Self Efficacy on Motivation and Performance of Employees  

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Full Text Available The aim of this study is to perform a meta-analysis which analyses the individual research findings which pertainto the relationship between self-efficacy, employee motivation and work related performance of the employee.From the results of the study it is observed that self-efficacy theory can be applied for work related performancein terms of motivating different employee related facets as well as organizational pursuits. In this study theresearcher has attempted to assess the influence of self-efficacy on the performance of individuals at workplaceand the mechanism by which self-efficacy of an individual determines his/her work related performance andmotivation. Thus, it becomes necessary to identify the practical implications of the outcomes related toimproving employee self-efficacy in order to motivate them and improve their performance.

Jacob Cherian

2013-06-01

102

Writing Essays: Does Self-Efficacy Matter? The Relationship between Self-Efficacy in Reading and in Writing and Undergraduate Students' Performance in Essay Writing  

Science.gov (United States)

Self-efficacy beliefs have been identified as associated with students' academic performance. The present research assessed the relationship between two new self-efficacy scales (self-efficacy in reading [SER] and self-efficacy in writing [SEW]) and students' writing performance on a piece of assessed written coursework. Using data from first and…

Prat-Sala, Merce; Redford, Paul

2012-01-01

103

Contextual Differential Item Functioning: Examining the Validity of Teaching Self-Efficacy Instruments Using Hierarchical Generalized Linear Modeling  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of the study is to further investigate the validity of instruments used for collecting preservice teachers' perceptions of self-efficacy adapting the three-level IRT model described in Cheong's study (2006). The focus of the present study is to investigate whether the polytomously-scored items on the preservice teachers'…

Zhao, Jing

2012-01-01

104

Perspectives on transcultural care.  

Science.gov (United States)

Culture has been defined as the thoughts, communications, actions, customs, beliefs, values, and institutions of racial, ethnic, religious, or social groups. A culture of nursing refers to the learned and transmitted lifeways, values, symbols, patterns, and normative practices of members of the nursing profession of a particular society. To serve the unique and diverse needs of patients in the United States, it is imperative that nurses understand the importance of cultural differences by valuing, incorporating, and examining their own health-related values and beliefs and those of their health care organizations, for only then can they support the principle of respect for persons and the ideal of transcultural care. PMID:19850185

Bjarnason, Dana; Mick, JoAnn; Thompson, Julia A; Cloyd, Elizabeth

2009-12-01

105

Relationship between knowledge, attitude, behavior, and self-efficacy on the radiation safety management of radiation workers in medical institutions  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Radiation safety managements in medical institutions are needed to protect certain radiation damages as a part of National Coalition. This study investigates the characteristics of self-efficacy that become the major factor on the knowledge, attitude, and behavior on the radiation safety management of radiation workers as an approach of educational aspects and analyzes the relationship between such factors to provide basic materials for improving the activity level of radiation safety managements. In order to implement the goal of this study, a survey was performed for 1,200 workers who were engaged in radiation treatments in medical centers, such as general hospital, university hospital, private hospital, and public health center for 42 days from July 23, 2006. Then, the results of the analysis can be summarized as follows: 1. Average scores on knowledge, attitude, and behavior in the radiation safety management were presented as 75.76{+-}11.20, 90.55{+-}8.59, 80.58{+-}11.70, respectively. Also, the average score of self-efficacy was recorded as 73.55{+-}9.82. 2. Knowledge levels in the radiation safety management showed significant differences according to the sex, age, marriage, education, and experience. Also, males of married, older, highly educated, and largely experienced represented high knowledge levels. Attitude levels in the radiation safety management showed certain significant differences according to the type of medical centers in which private hospitals showed a relatively low level compared to that of high levels in university hospitals. Behavior levels in the radiation safety management also represented significant differences according to the age, marriage, education, experience, and types of medical centers. Factors in married, general hospital, older, highly educated, and largely experienced showed high behavior levels. In addition, the self-efficacy showed certain differences according to the marriage and types of medical centers. Factors in married and general hospital demonstrated high self-efficacy levels. 3. Relationship between knowledge, attitude, behavior, and self-efficacy on the radiation safety management showed statistical differences according to the relationship between the knowledge and the attitude, the knowledge and the behavior, the attitude and the behavior, the attitude and the self-efficacy, and the behavior and the self-efficacy. The relationship between the behavior and the self-efficacy was represented as {gamma} = 0.482, which was the strongest relationship in such factors. Also, the knowledge and self-efficacy didn't show certain relationships.

Han, Eun Ok [Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

2007-06-15

106

Relationship between knowledge, attitude, behavior, and self-efficacy on the radiation safety management of radiation workers in medical institutions  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Radiation safety managements in medical institutions are needed to protect certain radiation damages as a part of National Coalition. This study investigates the characteristics of self-efficacy that become the major factor on the knowledge, attitude, and behavior on the radiation safety management of radiation workers as an approach of educational aspects and analyzes the relationship between such factors to provide basic materials for improving the activity level of radiation safety managements. In order to implement the goal of this study, a survey was performed for 1,200 workers who were engaged in radiation treatments in medical centers, such as general hospital, university hospital, private hospital, and public health center for 42 days from July 23, 2006. Then, the results of the analysis can be summarized as follows: 1. Average scores on knowledge, attitude, and behavior in the radiation safety management were presented as 75.76±11.20, 90.55±8.59, 80.58±11.70, respectively. Also, the average score of self-efficacy was recorded as 73.55±9.82. 2. Knowledge levels in the radiation safety management showed significant differences according to the sex, age, marriage, education, and experience. Also, males of married, older, highly educated, and largely experienced represented high knowledge levels. Attitude levels in the radiation safety management showed certain significant differences according to the type of medical centers in which private hospitals showed ers in which private hospitals showed a relatively low level compared to that of high levels in university hospitals. Behavior levels in the radiation safety management also represented significant differences according to the age, marriage, education, experience, and types of medical centers. Factors in married, general hospital, older, highly educated, and largely experienced showed high behavior levels. In addition, the self-efficacy showed certain differences according to the marriage and types of medical centers. Factors in married and general hospital demonstrated high self-efficacy levels. 3. Relationship between knowledge, attitude, behavior, and self-efficacy on the radiation safety management showed statistical differences according to the relationship between the knowledge and the attitude, the knowledge and the behavior, the attitude and the behavior, the attitude and the self-efficacy, and the behavior and the self-efficacy. The relationship between the behavior and the self-efficacy was represented as ? = 0.482, which was the strongest relationship in such factors. Also, the knowledge and self-efficacy didn't show certain relationships

107

A Survey of Correlation Infertility Self-Efficacy with Behavioral Health Scales in Infertile Women  

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Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a unique medical challenge that can have health behavioral consequence on infertile women including lack of self-esteem, depression, anxiety, fertility problem in infertile couples. The aim of this study was to evaluate correlation between self-efficacy and health behaviors scales in infertile women. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on 89 infertile women with mild to moderate depression (Beck scores 10 - 47 who were recruited from Fatemeh Zahra Infertility and Reproductive Health Research Center. All participants completed Self-efficacy Inventory (ISE and other health behavioral scales (e.g., the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Cattle Anxiety Scale (CAS, Fertility Problem Infertility (FPI, and GHQ. Pearson correlation coefficient and Spearman rho correlation coefficient were used to analyze the data. Variables were included in the study if they had a p-value of

Mahbobeh Faramarzi

2014-04-01

108

Influence of Self-Efficacy on Compliance to Workplace Exercise  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

BACKGROUND: Continuous neck and shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal complaint. Physical exercise can reduce pain symptoms, but compliance to exercise is a challenge. Exercise-specific self-efficacy has been found to be a predictor of participation in preplanned exercise. Little is known about the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to workplace physical exercise. PURPOSE: To determine the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to specific strength exercises during working hours for laboratory technicians. METHODS: We performed a cluster-randomized controlled trial, including laboratory technicians from two industrial production units in Copenhagen, Denmark. The participants were randomized to supervised specific strength exercises for the neck and shoulder muscles for 20 minutes three times a week (n?=?282) or to a reference group (n?=?255). The participants answered baseline and follow-up questions regarding self-efficacy and registered all exercises in a diary. RESULTS: Overall compliance to exercises was 45 %. Compliance in company A (private sector) differed significantly between the three self-efficacy groups after 20 weeks. The odds ratio of compliance was 2.37 for moderate versus low self-efficacy, and 2.93 for high versus low self-efficacy. No significant difference was found in company B (public sector) or in the intervention group as a whole. CONCLUSION: We did not find self-efficacy to be a general statistically significant predictor of compliance to exercises during 20 weeks, but found self-efficacy to be a predictor of compliance in a private sector setting. Workplace-specific differences might be present and should be taken into account.

Pedersen, Mette Merete; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt

2013-01-01

109

The Relationship between Self-efficacy and Breastfeeding, Tehran, Iran  

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Full Text Available Background & Aim: Breastfeeding is the most cost-effective, health-promoting, and disease-preventing activity that new mothers can perform. Many researches have focused on identifying factors that influence breastfeeding initiation and duration. An important and modifiable factor is the perceived self-efficacy of mothers for breast feedings. It refers to a mother's perceived ability to breastfeed her newborn; and is a dominant variable in the duration of breastfeeding. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between self-efficacy and breastfeeding. Methods & Materials: A descriptive, longitudinal, analytic approach was used in this study. The three-part questionnaire was administered to the eligible pregnant women (437 pregnant women who were at least in 37 weeks of gestation and intended to breastfeed. They were then contacted again at one and four months postpartum to determine their infants' feeding level and method. The questionnaire was re-administered to the participants at that time. Results: The results showed that 80.4 percent of participants had exclusive breastfeeding during one month. There was no significant relationship between antenatal breastfeeding self-efficacy and the breastfeeding. The self-efficacy was significantly related to breastfeeding outcomes at one month. Mothers with high self-efficacy were significantly more likely to breastfed their babies exclusively at one and four months postpartum than the mothers with low self-efficacy. Conclusion: Maternal breastfeeding self-efficacy is significantly related to breastfeeding duration and level. Measuring breastfeeding self-efficacy not only identifies high risk mothers, but also provides important information to health care providers in providing support to new mothers.   Key words: breastfeeding, pregnant women, self-efficacy

Sh Varaei (MSc.

2009-10-01

110

The effect of time-management training on test-anxiety and self-efficacy of Iranian intermediate EFL learners  

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Full Text Available The present study aimed to examine the effect of time-management training on Iranian EFL learners' test-anxiety and self-efficacy. A quasi-experimental design was used. The study was carried out in Tabriz Azad University and University of Applied Sciences and Technology. Thirty-eight BA students majoring in TEFL who enrolled in the above mentioned context in the academic year 1390-1391 participated in the study. The instruments used in the study were Time-Management Behavior Scale constructed by Macan, Shahani, Dipboye, et al. (1990, General Self-Efficacy Scale constructed by Jerusalem and Schwarzer (1992 and Westside Test-Anxiety Scale constructed by Driscoll (2007.The results indicated that there was a significant difference between the mean scores of experimental group's test-anxiety before and after time-management training and also there was a significant difference between the mean scores of experimental group and control group's test-anxiety after intervention. These findings also apply to the mean scores of self-efficacy. Therefore, it can be concluded that time-management training affects EFL learners' test-anxiety and self-efficacy. The findings of this study have some implications for researchers, teachers, universities and institutions.

Biook Behnam

2014-01-01

111

Ethics and Transcultural Nursing Care.  

Science.gov (United States)

Argues that nursing practice and theory cannot be ethical unless cultural factors are taken into consideration and that ethical/transcultural nursing is central to the philosophy and practice of nursing. (Author)

Eliason, Michele J.

1993-01-01

112

Academic self-efficacy: from educational theory to instructional practice  

OpenAIRE

Self-efficacy is a personal belief in one’s capability to organize and execute courses of action required to attain designated types of performances. Often described as task-specific self-confidence, self-efficacy has been a key component in theories of motivation and learning in varied contexts. Furthermore, over the last 34 years, educational researchers from diverse fields of inquiry have used the notion of self-efficacy to predict and explain a wide range of human functioning, from ath...

Artino, Anthony R.

2012-01-01

113

Science self-efficacy of African American middle school students: Relationship to motivation self-beliefs, achievement, gender, and gender orientation  

Science.gov (United States)

Motivation researchers have established that students' self-efficacy beliefs, the confidence they have in their academic capabilities, are related to academic outcomes. Self-efficacy has been amply researched in mathematics and language arts and nearly exclusively with White students. African American students and the area of science have each received scant attention. Typically, gender differences favor boys in mathematics and girls in language arts. Researchers have also found that these differences may be a function of gender orientation beliefs. The purpose of this study was to extend findings in science self-efficacy and to African American middle school students. I sought to determine whether self-efficacy assessed at differing levels of specificity (lab skills versus science grades) would each predict science achievement assessed at corresponding levels, to discover whether mean scores in academic motivation and achievement would differ by gender, and to determine whether these differences are a function of gender orientation (N = 268). Science grade self-efficacy was positively associated with the grades obtained by boys and by girls. For girls, grades were also associated positively with science self-concept and negatively with value of science. For reasons resulting from problematic instructional practices, lab skills self-efficacy was not associated with lab grades. Girls reported stronger science self-efficacy and received higher grades in science class. Gender orientation beliefs did not account for these differences, but masculinity and femininity were each associated with science grade self-efficacy, suggesting that androgyny is an adaptive orientation for the science self-efficacy beliefs of African American students. Findings are interpreted within the framework of A. Bandura's (1986) social cognitive theory.

Britner, Shari Lynn

114

Negative self-efficacy and goal effects revisited.  

Science.gov (United States)

The authors address the verification of the functional properties of self-efficacy beliefs and document how self-efficacy beliefs operate in concert with goal systems within a sociocognitive theory of self-regulation in contrast to the focus of control theory on discrepancy reduction. Social cognitive theory posits proactive discrepancy production by adoption of goal challenges working in concert with reactive discrepancy reduction in realizing them. Converging evidence from diverse methodological and analytic strategies verifies that perceived self-efficacy and personal goals enhance motivation and performance attainments. The large body of evidence, as evaluated by 9 meta-analyses for the effect sizes of self-efficacy beliefs and by the vast body of research on goal setting, contradicts findings (J. B. Vancouver, C. M. Thompson, & A. A. Williams, 2001; J. B. Vancouver, C. M. Thompson, E. C. Tischner, & D. J. Putka 2002) that belief in one's capabilities and personal goals is self-debilitating. PMID:12675397

Bandura, Albert; Locke, Edwin A

2003-02-01

115

Impact of Self Efficacy on Motivation and Performance of Employees  

OpenAIRE

The aim of this study is to perform a meta-analysis which analyses the individual research findings which pertainto the relationship between self-efficacy, employee motivation and work related performance of the employee.From the results of the study it is observed that self-efficacy theory can be applied for work related performancein terms of motivating different employee related facets as well as organizational pursuits. In this study theresearcher has attempted to assess the influence of ...

Jacob Cherian; Jolly Jacob

2013-01-01

116

Childbirth self-efficacy inventory in Tanzania : a pilot study  

OpenAIRE

Background. To give birth can be a stressful experience and women cope with thisstress in many different ways and have different personal outcomes. Self-efficacy orconfidence in ability to cope with labour can be considered as an important factoraffecting pregnant women’s motivation of normal childbirth and their interpretation ofthe childbirth event.The aim. The purpose of this study was to test the Chinese short form of theinstrument Childbirth self-efficacy instrument (CBSEI) in Tanzania...

Bjo?rk, Eleonora; Thorildsson, Mari

2007-01-01

117

The German Teacher Trainers’ Self-Efficacy Beliefs  

OpenAIRE

In this study, the aim is to identify the interpersonal self-efficacy beliefs of German teacher trainers’ in Turkey. It is a descriptive survey and the population of the study consists of German teacher trainers who have worked in the seven regions of Turkey during the 2012-2013 academic year. The sample comprises 52 German teacher trainers chosen randomly from the related population. The version of “The Teacher Interpersonal Self-efficacy Scale (TISE)” which was developed by Brouwers a...

Veli Batdi

2014-01-01

118

Malay Secondary School Students’ Entrepreneurial Attitude Orientation and Entrepreneurial Self-efficacy: A Descriptive Study  

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Full Text Available As the influential factors affecting intention to become an entrepreneur, entrepreneurial attitude orientation and self-efficacy of students have been one of the main focuses of entrepreneurship research. However, there is not enough information on secondary school students’ attitude toward and efficacy of entrepreneurship particularly, in Malaysia. Through a descriptive approach, this study aimed to determine entrepreneurial attitude and entrepreneurial self-efficacy in order to evaluate the entrepreneurship inclination and potential among Malaysian secondary school students. A sample of 2,574 students was randomly selected from three states around Malaysia as the participants of this study. A set of questionnaire was developed based on previous researches to measure students’ entrepreneurial attitude and self-efficacy. The findings indicate that Malay students have a moderately high attitude toward entrepreneurship. More specifically, the students scored high in self-esteem cognition and achievement cognition but low in self-esteem behavior and self-esteem affect. Moreover, the students perceived themselves as moderately capable of establishing new ventures. The implication of the findings and areas for future researches are discussed.

Z.A. Lope Pihie

2011-01-01

119

Breastfeeding and Aboriginal women: validation of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this methodological investigation, part of a prospective cohort study, was to test the reliability and validity of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (BSES-SF) among Aboriginal women.The sample comprised 130 breastfeeding Aboriginal women from the postpartum ward of an urban tertiary care hospital or a rural community hospital.The women provided baseline information while in hospital and were telephoned at 4 and 8 weeks postpartum for assessment of their method of infant feeding. The BSES-SF was found to be a valid and reliable tool for assessing breastfeeding self-efficacy among Aboriginal women. Significant differences were found in BSES-SF in-hospital scores among women who at 4 weeks postpartum were exclusively breastfeeding, combination feeding, or solely feeding formula (F(2) = 7.31, p = 0.001).The authors conclude that Aboriginal women with low breastfeeding self-efficacy in the early postpartum period may be at risk for early cessation and could benefit from additional breastfeeding support. PMID:23923727

McQueen, Karen A; Montelpare, William J; Dennis, Cindy-Lee

2013-06-01

120

Stress and self-efficacy predict psychological adjustment at diagnosis of prostate cancer.  

Science.gov (United States)

Prostate cancer is the most frequently non-skin cancer diagnosed among men. Diagnosis, a significant burden, generates many challenges which impact on emotional adjustment and so warrants further investigation. Most studies to date however, have been carried out at or post treatment with an emphasis on functional quality of life outcomes. Men recently diagnosed with localised prostate cancer (N = 89) attending a Rapid Access Prostate Clinic to discuss treatment options completed self report questionnaires on stress, self-efficacy, and mood. Information on age and disease status was gathered from hospital records. Self-efficacy and stress together explained more than half of the variance on anxiety and depression. Self-efficacy explained variance on all 6 emotional domains of the POMS (ranging from 5-25%) with high scores linked to good emotional adjustment. Perceived global and cancer specific stress also explained variance on the 6 emotional domains of the POMS (8-31%) with high stress linked to poor mood. These findings extend understanding of the role of efficacy beliefs and stress appraisal in predicting emotional adjustment in men at diagnosis and identify those at risk for poor adaptation at this time. Such identification may lead to more effective patient management. PMID:24993798

Curtis, Ruth; Groarke, AnnMarie; Sullivan, Frank

2014-01-01

121

Danish version of 'The COPD self-efficacy scale' : translation and psychometric properties  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Scand J Caring Sci; 2012; 26; 615-623 Danish version of 'The COPD self-efficacy scale': translation and psychometric properties The aim of the study was to translate 'The COPD self-efficacy scale' (CSES) into Danish and to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Danish version (CSES-DK). CSES enables assessment of self-efficacy in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The scale consists of 34 items, describing situations which may cause dyspnoea in patients with COPD. The CSES was translated into Danish using a standard forward-backward translation procedure. To estimate the reliability, measurements of internal consistency and repeatability were applied. The validity of the Danish version was evaluated by examining the associations between the CSES-DK score and socio-demographic variables (age, gender, education, disease severity and self-rated health). Factor analysis was conducted to compare the internal structure of the Danish version and the American source version. The studyincluded 151 patients with COPD, recruited from three outpatient clinics. Estimates of reliability were in accordance with the original version of CSES (Cronbach's a = 0.97, test-retest r = 0.82, p

Emme, Christina; Mortensen, Erik L

2012-01-01

122

Sources of coming out self-efficacy for lesbians.  

Science.gov (United States)

The empirical literature on disclosing a lesbian sexual orientation has explored the circumstantial and demographic variables related to this act. This exploratory study utilized self-efficacy theory (Bandura, 1986) to investigate the extent to which each of the four sources of efficacy information (e.g., performance accomplishments, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, or emotional arousal) contributed to the coming out self-efficacy of lesbians, that is, the sense of confidence possessed by a lesbian to disclose her sexual orientation to others. Anonymous survey packets were completed by 134 lesbians. Results of regression analyses indicated that emotional arousal was the most potent predictor of coming out self-efficacy. Verbal persuasion and vicarious experience also were significant. The most theoretically salient source of self-efficacy information, performance accomplishments (Bandura, 1986), was not a significant predictor of coming out self-efficacy. Further, significant correlations were found between coming out self-efficacy and outness and life-style satisfaction, which were also significantly correlated to measures of psychological adjustment. PMID:9010825

Anderson, M K; Mavis, B E

1996-01-01

123

Health visitors and breastfeeding support: influence of knowledge and self-efficacy.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

BACKGROUND: Little is known about what influences health visitors' breastfeeding support. The objective was to describe health visitors' breastfeeding experiences, beliefs, knowledge and self-efficacy in breastfeeding guidance and determine the impact of a training course on these factors, and how they were reflected in practice. METHODS: A randomized intervention study enrolled 52 health visitors in the intervention group and 57 in the comparison group. The intervention group participated in an 18-hour pre-study training course that focused on knowledge about lactation and how to guide the mother to learn the mechanisms of breastfeeding. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires before the intervention and after the follow-up period. One hundred and six (97%) health visitors and 1302 (82%) mothers responded. RESULTS: At baseline no substantial differences were seen between the two groups on years since education, own breastfeeding experiences, beliefs or self-efficacy in breastfeeding guidance except that health visitors in the intervention group, who had completed the course, demonstrated significantly higher scores on knowledge questions (P < 0.01). After the intervention health visitors in the intervention group reported significantly higher self-efficacy in guidance on three of five breastfeeding problems (P < 0.01). Mothers in the intervention group reported having received more support than mothers in the comparison group. CONCLUSION: An interactive course increased the health visitors' knowledge of breastfeeding practice. After the intervention period the health visitors in the intervention group had increased their self-efficacy in helping mothers with common breastfeeding problems. The mothers in the intervention group reported more informational and instrumental breastfeeding support.

Kronborg, Hanne; Væth, Michael

2008-01-01

124

Sources of Science Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Middle School Students  

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The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree to which A. Bandura's ([1997]) hypothesized sources of self-efficacy predict the science self-efficacy beliefs of middle school students (N = 319), to replicate previous findings that science self-efficacy predicts science achievement, and to explore how science self-efficacy and its…

Britner, Shari L.; Pajares, Frank

2006-01-01

125

Who Cares about Others?: Empathic Self-Efficacy as an Antecedent to Prosocial Behavior  

Science.gov (United States)

Two studies tested associations among self-efficacy and prosocial behavior. In Study 1 we measured academic self-efficacy, emotional self-efficacy and self-reported prosocial behavior. The study showed that academic but not emotional self-efficacy was positively correlated with prosocial behavior. Study 1 included only self-oriented emotions, and…

Eklund, Jakob; Loeb, Carina; Hansen, Eric M.; Andersson-Wallin, Ann-Charlotte

2012-01-01

126

Relationship among Iranian EFL Learners’ Self-efficacy in Writing, Attitude towards Writing, Writing Apprehension and Writing Performance  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The main trust of the present study was to investigate whether writing performance in students of English as a foreign language (EFL was related to self-efficacy in writing, writing apprehension,  and attitude towards writing. Fifty IELTS students (30 females and 20 males studying IELTS Writing participated in this study. In order to collect data, three instruments were used which were a writing apprehension test (WAT, a self-efficacy in writing scale (SWS, and a questionnaire on attitude towards writing (WAQ. In order to make the questionnaires more comprehensible, they were adapted to Iranian context. This study conducted in two phases. First, the questionnaires were administered in the fist hour. In the second phase participants were given 45 minutes to write an argumentative essay on a given topic. The compositions were scored according to IELTS Writing Band Descriptive for public version by two raters. The obtained marks were taken to indicate the students’ overall writing performance. The findings of the study suggested that, self-efficacy in writing and writing apprehension was negatively correlated. Moreover there was a positive correlation between self-efficacy and attitude towards writing. Besides, the results showed that self-efficacy and writing performance were positively correlated. The correlation between writing apprehension and attitude towards writing was negative. Finally there was a negative correlation between writing apprehension and writing performance. The results of a three-way ANOVA revealed that those learners with positive attitudes performed significantly better than those with negative attitudes on writing task. In terms of self-efficacy and apprehension levels no significant differences were found.  

Hoda Sarkhoush

2013-09-01

127

Self-Efficacy and Postpartum Depression Teaching Behaviors of Hospital-Based Perinatal Nurses  

OpenAIRE

Based upon the Self-Efficacy Theory, this study examined the relationship between self-efficacy, self-efficacy-related variables, and postpartum depression teaching behaviors of hospital-based perinatal nurses. Findings revealed that teaching new mothers about postpartum depression is related to a perinatal nurse's self-efficacy in postpartum-depression teaching, self-esteem, and the following self-efficacy-related variables: social persuasion (supervisor's expectations for teaching); mastery...

Logsdon, M. Cynthia; Foltz, Melissa Pinto; Scheetz, James; Myers, John A.

2010-01-01

128

Arthritis Self-Efficacy and Self-Efficacy for Resisting Eating: Relationships to Pain, Disability, and Eating Behavior in Overweight and Obese Individuals with Osteoarthritic Knee Pain  

OpenAIRE

This study examined arthritis self-efficacy and self-efficacy for resisting eating as predictors of pain, disability, and eating behaviors in overweight or obese patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Patients (N=174) with a body mass index between 25 and 42 completed measures of arthritis-related self-efficacy, weight-related self-efficacy, pain, physical disability, psychological disability, overeating, and demographic and medical information. Hierarchical linear regression analyses...

Pells, Jennifer J.; Shelby, Rebecca A.; Keefe, Francis J.; Dixon, Kim E.; Blumenthal, James A.; Lacaille, Lara; Tucker, Jessica M.; Schmitt, Daniel; Caldwell, David S.; Kraus, Virginia B.

2007-01-01

129

Gender-role Perception and Employment Status in the Self-efficacy of Women  

OpenAIRE

The effect of gender-role perception and employment status on the self-efficacy of womenis examined. The study adopted a 2 (androgynous and sex-typed) X 2 (employed andunemployed) factorial design. One hundred and twenty women participated in the study.The sample consistsof 60 employed and 60 unemployed women. Both the groups ofemployed and unemployed women are categorized into androgynous and sex-typed on thebasis of the median split of their scores on the measure of androgyny. The responden...

Sangeeta Rath; Aakankshya Mishra

2013-01-01

130

The effect of self-talk in learning the volleyball service skill and self-efficacy improvement.  

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Full Text Available In this study the effect of self-talk on learning the volleyball service skill was examined and also the self-efficacy improvement. Participants were 57 female players 13 years old (mean age =12.83, SD=0.97 with two years experience (?=1.99, SD=0.67. Prior to the beginning of the program, participants were randomly assigned into two groups: a. the instructional self-talk group (ISTG, n = 28 and b. the control (traditional group (CG, n = 29. All athletes followed a four-week practice program, aiming at overhand service skill learning and self-efficacy improvement. The program consisted of two practice units (60 min per week. Participants of ISTG were taught to use the self-talk (for technique loud before they performed the service drills. The control group received traditional feedback, that is, knowledge of performance and knowledge of results provided by the instructor. Service performance was assessed by videotaped evaluations in five basic elements of skill. There were three measurement periods for field test: pre-, post- and retention tests (one week after post-test. ANOVA repeated measures revealed significant interaction between groups and measures. There was also significant interaction between groups and self-efficacy scores. The results indicated that participants of the ISTG had better scores in the final measurement than the control group, when technique was evaluated and improved also their self-efficacy. In conclusion the Self-talk helps female volleyball athletes to improve performance and learning of overhand service skill and to improve also their self-efficacy. This study adds some useful elements to practitioners and how they used self-talk in the practice.

Eleni Zetou

2013-02-01

131

Comparación intergeneracional del machismo sexual y conductas de autoeficacia / Intergenerational Comparison of Sexual Machismo and Self-efficacy Behaviors  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Mexico | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish La presente investigación tomó como marco de referencia la teoría de la autoeficacia de Bandura, la clasificación en cuatro grupos generacionales (silenciosos, baby boomers, X, milenio) con base en los planteamientos de Bickel y Brown, (2005); Sánchez (2008), así como la definición de machismo de Ca [...] stañeda (2002, 2007). Lo anterior para dar respuesta a los objetivos de evaluar diferencias entre grupos generacionales en las variables autoeficacia en el uso del condón, autoeficacia para evitar conductas de riesgo y machismo, y establecer las diferencias dentro de cada grupo generacional. Se evaluó a un total de 565 personas. Los principales resultados reflejan que las variables de autoeficacia muestran un mayor puntaje conforme avanzan las generaciones, observando que las generaciones más jóvenes presentan mayor autoeficacia. En cuanto al machismo, se encontró nivel equivalente entre la generación milenio y la X, así como entre la generación milenio y los baby boomers. Se discuten los resultados en su utilidad para establecer programas de prevención. Abstract in english This research took as a framework the self-efficacy theory of Bandura, the classification into four generational groups (Silent, Baby-Boomers, X and Millennium)based on the approach of Bickel and Brown, (2005); Sanchez (2008), and others cited by them; and the definition of machismo by Castañeda (20 [...] 02, 2007). This in order to respond to the proposed objectives of find differences between generational groups on self-efficacy in condom use, self-efficacy to avoid risky behaviors and machismo, and establish differences within each age group. The analysis was made with 565 persons. The main result show that self-efficacy variables show a higher score as the generation progress, noting that younger generations have higher self-efficacy. As for sexism, equivalent score was found between Millennium and X generation and among the Millennium and Baby-Boomers. Results are discussed in its utility to establish prevention programs.

Cecilia Lourdes, Díaz-Rodríguez; Mónica Teresa, González Ramírez.

2012-08-01

132

Assessment of fall-related self-efficacy and activity avoidance in people with Parkinson's disease  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Fear of falling (FOF is common in Parkinson's disease (PD, and it is considered a vital aspect of comprehensive balance assessment in PD. FOF can be conceptualized differently. The Falls-Efficacy Scale (FES assesses fall-related self-efficacy, whereas the Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (SAFFE assesses activity avoidance due to the risk of falling. This study aimed at investigating the validity and reliability of FES and SAFFE in people with PD. Methods Seventy-nine people with PD (mean age; 64 years, SD 7.2 completed the Swedish version of FES(S, SAFFE and the physical functioning (PF scale of the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36. FES(S and SAFFE were administered twice, with an 8.8 (SD 2.3 days interval. Assumptions for summing item scores into total scores were examined and score reliability (Cronbach's alpha and test-retest reliability were calculated. Construct validity was assessed by examining the pattern of Spearman correlations (rs between the FES(S/SAFFE and other variables, and by examining differences in FES(S/SAFFE scores between fallers and non-fallers, genders, and between those reporting FOF and unsteadiness while turning. Results For both scales, item mean scores (and standard deviations were roughly similar and corrected item-total correlations exceeded 0.4. Reliabilities were ?0.87. FES(S-scores correlated strongest (rs, -0.74, p s, -0.76, p s ? 0.08. Experiencing falls, unsteadiness while turning, and FOF was associated with lower fall-related self-efficacy and higher activity avoidance. Conclusions This study provides initial support for the score reliability and validity of the FES(S and SAFFE in people with PD.

Drake Anna-Maria

2010-10-01

133

Academic procrastination, emotional intelligence, academic self-efficacy, and GPA: a comparison between students with and without learning disabilities.  

Science.gov (United States)

Academic procrastination has been seen as an impediment to students' academic success. Research findings suggest that it is related to lower levels of self-regulated learning and academic self-efficacy and associated with higher levels of anxiety, stress, and illness. Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to assess, regulate, and utilize emotions and has been found to be associated with academic self-efficacy and a variety of better outcomes, including academic performance. Students with learning disabilities (LD) are well acquainted with academic difficulty and maladaptive academic behavior. In comparison to students without LD, they exhibit high levels of learned helplessness, including diminished persistence, lower academic expectations, and negative affect. This study examined the relationships among academic procrastination, EI, and academic performance as mediated by academic self-efficacy in 287 LD and non-LD students. Results indicated that the indirect effect of EI on academic procrastination and GPA was stronger in LD students than in non-LD students. In addition, results indicated that LD students scored lower than non-LD students on both EI and academic self-efficacy and higher on academic procrastination. No difference was found in GPA. PMID:22442254

Hen, Meirav; Goroshit, Marina

2014-01-01

134

Religiosity, self-efficacy for exercise, and African American women.  

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Physical inactivity among African American women persists despite health promotion efforts targeting this population. In the African American faith community, thinking patterns related to personal versus divine control over health status could affect self-efficacy beliefs and physical activity behavior. Religiosity, a determinate of self-efficacy for exercise, is influenced by culture. This exploratory pilot study assessed the psychometric properties and relevance of selected study instruments and relationships among the study variables in African American women recruited through a rural church. Findings indicated a trend toward significance among study variables and that the God Locus of Health Control and Physical Exercise Self-Efficacy Scales were reliable for capturing attitudes about ability to engage in physical activity and religiosity in this sample. Six of the twenty-five women recruited failed to complete the Stanford Brief Activity Survey for Work and Leisure Time Activity correctly, suggesting the need to revise instructions prior to future instrument administration. PMID:20842529

Robinson, Bridget K; Wicks, Mona Newsome

2012-09-01

135

Mechanisms governing empowerment effects: a self-efficacy analysis.  

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This experiment tested the hypotheses that perceived coping and cognitive control self-efficacy govern the effects of personal empowerment over physical threats. Women participated in a mastery modeling program in which they mastered the physical skills to defend themselves successfully against unarmed sexual assailants. Multifaceted measures of theoretically relevant variables were administered within a staggered intragroup control design to test the immediate and long-term effects of the empowerment program and the mechanisms through which it produced its effects. Mastery modeling enhanced perceived coping and cognitive control efficacy, decreased perceived vulnerability to assault, and reduced the incidence of intrusive negative thinking and anxiety arousal. These changes were accompanied by increased freedom of action and decreased avoidant behavior. Path analyses of causal structures revealed a dual path of regulation of behavior by perceived coping self-efficacy, one mediated through perceived vulnerability and risk discernment and the other through perceived cognitive control self-efficacy and intrusive negative thinking. PMID:2324938

Ozer, E M; Bandura, A

1990-03-01

136

Is a strong sense of self-efficacy always beneficial?  

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Full Text Available The concept of self-efficacy, introduced by Albert Bandura, has received a lot of attention in psychological research. This comes as no surprise, as it encompasses a person's beliefs about his or her capabilities to successfully do what is necessary for desired goals, which is a central mechanism in human agency. The concept has been linked to many outcomes (e.g. motivation and performance, almost exclusively yielding positive results. Recently, however, arguments have risen that a strong sense of selfefficacy may not always be as beneficial as presumed until now. In this article, I review the core of the positive literature on self-efficacy and highlight studies that question and oppose the dominance of these positive self-efficacy associations. Implications for future research, emphasizing the need of a different research approach, are mentioned.

Thomas VERHAEREN

2012-01-01

137

Increasing self-efficacy and quality lesson planning using Lesson-Study with elementary preservice teachers  

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This qualitative, quasi-experimental study examined if lesson-study could be a successful approach in improving lesson plan quality and increasing self-efficacy levels toward teaching science at the preservice elementary teacher level in North Mississippi. Lesson-Study can be defined as a cycle of instructional improvement in which small groups work together to design and teach a lesson, revising again as needed over the course of a semester. This study described the experiences of two sections of preservice teachers enrolled in a science methods course as they engaged in lesson-study at a comprehensive university in Northeast Mississippi. One section of the class served as the control group while the other section, as the treatment group, received lesson-study over the course of the semester. Data was gathered in the form of interviews, observations, and a self-efficacy survey (STEBI-B). Lesson plans were also graded using a rubric to determine quality level. Findings indicated that, while not statistically significant, the treatment groups scores on the self-efficacy instrument increased more on average than the control groups' scores. There were also positive comments about the lesson study process from the teacher candidates in the treatment group as well as positive behaviors recorded by the researcher. Additionally, according to the external evaluators who graded the final drafts of the lessons, the treatment group had greater gains than the control class on average. These conclusions suggested the lesson study process implemented during the preservice teaching level can be beneficial.

Mitchell, Elizabeth Ann

138

The Role of Informal Science Centers in Science Education: Attitudes, Skills, and Self-efficacy  

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Full Text Available Informal learning relates to activities that occur outside the school environment. These learning environments, such as visits to science centers provide valuable motivational opportunities for students to learn science. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the pre-academic center in science education and particularly to explore its effects on 750 middle-school students' attitudes toward science, their scientific thinking skills and self-efficacy. Pre and post-case based questionnaires were designed to assess the students’ higher order thinking skills – inquiry, graphing, and argumentation. In addition, a five-point Likert scale questionnaire was used to assess students' attitudes and self-efficacy. The research results indicated a positive effect of the pre-academic science center activities on scientific thinking skills. A significant improvement in the students' inquiry and graphing skills was found, yet non significant differences were found in argumentation skill. The students significantly improved their ability to ask research questions based on reading a scientific text, and to describe and analyze research results that were presented graphically. While no significant differences were found between girls and boys in the pre-questionnaire, in the post-questionnaire the girls' scores in inquiry skill were significantly higher than boys' scores. Increases in students' positive attitudes toward science and self-efficacy were found but the results were not statistically significant. However, the program length was found to be an important variable that affects achievement of educational goals. A three-dimension-based framework is suggested to characterize learning environments: organizational, psychological, and pedagogical.

Irit Sasson

2014-09-01

139

Outcome expectancy and self-efficacy: theoretical implications of an unresolved contradiction.  

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According to self-efficacy theory, self-efficacy--defined as perceived capability to perform a behavior--causally influences expected outcomes of behavior, but not vice versa. However, research has shown that expected outcomes causally influence self-efficacy judgments, and some authors have argued that this relationship invalidates self-efficacy theory. Bandura has rebutted those arguments saying that self-efficacy judgments are not invalidated when influenced by expected outcomes. This article focuses on a contradiction in Bandura's rebuttal. Specifically, Bandura has argued (a) expected outcomes cannot causally influence self-efficacy, but (b) self-efficacy judgments remain valid when causally influenced by expected outcomes. While the debate regarding outcome expectancies and self-efficacy has subsided in recent years, the inattention to this contradiction has led to a disproportionate focus on self-efficacy as a causal determinant of behavior at the expense of expected outcomes. PMID:20505161

Williams, David M

2010-11-01

140

Assessing Regulatory Emotional Self-Efficacy in Three Countries  

OpenAIRE

The Regulatory Emotional Self-Efficacy (RESE) scale was developed to assess perceived self-efficacy in managing negative (NEG) and in expressing positive (POS) affect (G. V. Caprara & M. Gerbino, 2001). In this study of young adults, the factorial structure of the RESE scale was found to be similar in Italy, the United States, and Bolivia: In addition to a factor for POS, NEG was represented by a second-order factor of 2 different negative affects: despondency-distress (DES) and anger-irritat...

Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Di Giunta, Laura; Eisenberg, Nancy; Gerbino, Maria; Pastorelli, Concetta; Tramontano, Carlo

2008-01-01

141

Multidimensional Self-Efficacy and Affect in Wheelchair Basketball Players  

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In the current study, variables grounded in social cognitive theory with athletes with disabilities were examined. Performance, training, resiliency, and thought control self-efficacy, and positive (PA) and negative (NA) affect were examined with wheelchair basketball athletes (N = 79). Consistent with social cognitive theory, weak to strong…

Martin, Jeffrey J.

2008-01-01

142

Factors Affecting Students' Self-Efficacy in Higher Education  

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Researchers working in educational settings are increasingly paying attention to the role students' thoughts and beliefs play in the learning process. Self-efficacy, a key element of social cognitive theory, appears to be an important variable because it affects students' motivation and learning. This article investigates empirical literature…

van Dinther, Mart; Dochy, Filip; Segers, Mien

2011-01-01

143

Sources of Self-Efficacy in Mathematics: A Validation Study  

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The purpose of this study was to develop and validate items with which to assess A. Bandura's (1997) theorized sources of self-efficacy among middle school mathematics students. Results from Phase 1 (N=1111) were used to develop and refine items for subsequent use. In Phase 2 of the study (N=824), a 39-item, four-factor exploratory model fit best.…

Usher, Ellen L.; Pajares, Frank

2009-01-01

144

Exploring Factors Related to Preschool Teachers' Self-Efficacy  

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This study examined how teacher (teaching experience, perceptions of teacher collaboration and teacher influence) and classroom (children's engagement) characteristics predicted teacher self-efficacy for 48 preschool teachers in the U.S. Results showed a significant interaction effect between teachers' perceptions of collaboration and children's…

Guo, Ying; Justice, Laura M.; Sawyer, Brook; Tompkins, Virginia

2011-01-01

145

Evidence for a Multidimensional Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale  

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This series of three studies considers the multidimensionality of exercise self-efficacy by examining the psychometric characteristics of an instrument designed to assess three behavioral subdomains: task, scheduling, and coping. In Study 1, exploratory factor analysis revealed the expected factor structure in a sample of 395 students.…

Rodgers, W. M.; Wilson, P. M.; Hall, C. R.; Fraser, S. N.; Murray, T. C.

2008-01-01

146

Drinking Motives, Alcohol Expectancies, Self-Efficacy, and Drinking Patterns  

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The current study focused on the associations between drinking motives, alcohol expectancies, self-efficacy, and drinking behavior in a representative sample of 553 Dutch adolescents and adults. Data were gathered by means of self-report questionnaires and a 14-days drinking diary. A model was postulated in which negative expectancies and…

Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Wiers, Reinout; Lemmers, Lex; Overbeek, Geertjan

2005-01-01

147

Academic Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Teacher Candidates  

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This study aims determining academic self-efficacy perception of teacher candidates. It is survey model. Population of the study consists of teacher candidates in 2010-2011 academic years at Ahmet Kelesoglu Education Faculty of Education Formation of Selcuk University. A simple random sample was selected as sampling method and the study was…

Yesilyurt, Etem

2013-01-01

148

Interests, Self-Efficacy, and Choice Goals: An Experimental Manipulation  

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An experimental design was used to test the hypothesis that vocational interests can be a precursor to the development of self-efficacy. Participants (n = 180) rated job descriptions for careers in the domains of information technology, sales, and teaching that contained information on activities and work values. Participants rated those job…

Bonitz, Verena S.; Larson, Lisa M.; Armstrong, Patrick Ian

2010-01-01

149

A Gender Study Investigating Physics Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

The underrepresentation of women in physics has been well documented and a source of concern for both policy makers and educators. My dissertation focuses on understanding the role self-efficacy plays in retaining students, particularly women, in introductory physics. I use an explanatory mixed methods approach to first investigate quantitatively…

Sawtelle, Vashti

2011-01-01

150

The Relationship between Computer Anxiety and Computer Self-Efficacy  

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This study examined the relationship between computer anxiety and computer self-efficacy of students and teachers in elementary and secondary schools. The sample included a total of 845 subjects from two private school systems in Turkey. The Oetting's Computer Anxiety Scale was used to measure computer anxiety whereas the Murphy's Computer…

Simsek, Ali

2011-01-01

151

Self-Efficacy: Toward a Unifying Theory of Behavioral Change  

Science.gov (United States)

This research presents an integrative theoretical framework to explain and to predict psychological changes achieved by different modes of treatment. This theory states that psychological procedures, whatever their form, alter the level and strength of "self-efficacy". (Editor/RK)

Bandura, Albert

1977-01-01

152

Computer-Mediated Discussion, Self-Efficacy and Gender  

Science.gov (United States)

In the context of hybrid instruction, this study was designed to explore whether gender has an influence on learners' preferences for synchronous or asynchronous modes of computer-mediated communication, and whether this decision impacts learners' self-efficacy (SE) towards knowledge acquisition. The participants were 180 teacher-education…

Lin, ShinYi; Overbaugh, Richard C.

2009-01-01

153

Self-efficacy, stress, and acculturation as predictors of first year science success among Latinos at a South Texas university  

Science.gov (United States)

The study tested the hypothesis that self-efficacy, stress, and acculturation are useful predictors of academic achievement in first year university science, independent of high school GPA and SAT scores, in a sample of Latino students at a South Texas Hispanic serving institution of higher education. The correlational study employed a mixed methods explanatory sequential model. The non-probability sample consisted of 98 university science and engineering students. The study participants had high science self-efficacy, low number of stressors, and were slightly Anglo-oriented bicultural to strongly Anglo-oriented. As expected, the control variables of SAT score and high school GPA were statistically significant predictors of the outcome measures. Together, they accounted for 19.80% of the variation in first year GPA, 13.80% of the variation in earned credit hours, and 11.30% of the variation in intent to remain in the science major. After controlling for SAT scores and high school GPAs, self-efficacy was a statistically significant predictor of credit hours earned and accounted for 5.60% of the variation; its unique contribution in explaining the variation in first year GPA and intent to remain in the science major was not statistically significant. Stress and acculturation were not statistically significant predictors of any of the outcome measures. Analysis of the qualitative data resulted in six themes (a) high science self-efficacy, (b) stressors, (c) positive role of stress, (d) Anglo-oriented, (e) bicultural, and (f) family. The quantitative and qualitative results were synthesized and practical implications were discussed.

McNamara, Mark W.

154

SELF-EFFICACY OF FORMALLY AND NON-FORMALLY TRAINED PUBLIC SECTOR TEACHERS  

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Full Text Available The main objective of the study was to compare the formally and non-formally trained in-service public sector teachers’ Self-efficacy. Five hypotheses were developed describing no difference in the self-efficacy of formally and non-formally trained teachers to influence decision making, influence school resources, instructional self-efficacy, disciplinary self-efficacy and create positive school climate. Teacher Efficacy Instrument (TSES developed by Bandura (2001 consisting of thirty 9-point items was used in the study. 342 formally trained and 255 non-formally trained respondents’ questionnaires were received out of 1500 mailed. The analysis of data revealed that the formally trained public sector teachers are high in their self-efficacy on all the five categories: to influence decision making, to influence school resources, instructional self-efficacy, disciplinary self-efficacy and self-efficacy to create positive school climate.

Muhammad Nadeem ANWAR

2009-07-01

155

Auto-eficácia e sintomas depressivos em doentes com dor crônica Self-efficacy and depressive symptoms in chronic pain patients  

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Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Auto-eficácia é a crença na habilidade pessoal de desempenhar com sucesso tarefas ou de apresentar comportamentos para produzir um resultado desejável. É conceito-chave para o adequado controle de doenças crônicas e estudos sobre o tema são incipientes no Brasil. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a crença de auto-eficácia de pacientes com dor crônica e relacioná-la a variáveis sociodemográficas, de características da dor e à presença de sintomas depressivos. MÉTODOS: A amostra, de conveniência, foi de 132 sujeitos. Os instrumentos utilizados foram a Escala de Auto-Eficácia para Dor Crônica (AEDC e o Inventário de Depressão de Beck (IDB. RESULTADOS: O escore médio de auto-eficácia foi 170,8 (DP = 56,7. Auto-eficácia menor foi observada nos pacientes com até 8 anos de escolaridade, quando comparada à de pacientes com escolaridade entre 9 e 11 anos (p = 0,015. Auto-eficácia mais elevada foi observada nos doentes com dor menos intensa (p = 0,042. A Escala AEDC apresentou correlação negativa com o IDB (r = - 0,48; p BACKGROUND: Self-efficacy is the belief about one’s personal ability to perform a task or specific behavior successfully. Self-efficacy is a key concept to manage chronic diseases and the studies about it are insufficient in Brazil. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate chronic pain patient’s self-efficacy belief and relate to social demographic variables, pain and depressive symptoms. METHODS: The convenience sample was 132 subjects. The instruments utilized were Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale (CPSS in Portuguese version (AEDC and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. RESULTS: The self-efficacy average score was 170.8 (DP = 56.7. Low self-efficacy was observed in 8 year education level patients compared to 9 to 11 year education level (p = 0.015. Higher self-efficacy was observed in patients with lower pain intensity (p = 0.042. The AEDC was negative correlated to IDB depression (r = - 0.48; p < 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with 8 year education level showed low self-efficacy than patients with 9 to 11 year education level. Subjects with lower pain intensity and fewer depressive symptoms showed higher self-efficacy scores.

Marina de Góes Salvetti

2007-01-01

156

SELF-EFFICACY OF FORMALLY AND NON-FORMALLY TRAINED PUBLIC SECTOR TEACHERS  

OpenAIRE

The main objective of the study was to compare the formally and non-formally trained in-service public sector teachers’ Self-efficacy. Five hypotheses were developed describing no difference in the self-efficacy of formally and non-formally trained teachers to influence decision making, influence school resources, instructional self-efficacy, disciplinary self-efficacy and create positive school climate. Teacher Efficacy Instrument (TSES) developed by Bandura (2001) consisting of thirty 9-...

Anwar, Muhammad Nadeem

2009-01-01

157

The Relationship between Self-efficacy and Stress among Iranian EFL Teachers  

OpenAIRE

This study investigated the relationship between self- efficacy and stress among 108 EFL teachers in Iran. The participants were administered self-efficacy and stress questionnaires. Pearson Product-Moment Correlation and Multiple Regression analyses were used. The results indicated significant negative correlation between self efficacy and stress. Also it was found that both dimensions of self-efficacy, namely, classroom and organizational efficacies, either collectively or separately, could...

Shahin Vaezi; Nasser Fallah

2011-01-01

158

Predictors of Weight Loss Success: Exercise vs. Dietary Self-Efficacy and Treatment Attendance  

OpenAIRE

Pre-treatment diet and exercise self-efficacies can predict weight loss success. Changes in diet self-efficacy across treatment appear to be even stronger predictors than baseline levels, but research on changes in exercise self-efficacy is lacking. Using data from a pilot study evaluating tangible reinforcement for weight loss (N = 30), we examined the impact of changes in diet and exercise self-efficacy on outcomes. Multiple regression analyses indicated that treatment attendance and change...

Byrne, Shannon; Barry, Danielle; Petry, Nancy M.

2012-01-01

159

Testing Phase-specific self-efficacy beliefs in the context of dietary behaviour change  

OpenAIRE

Background: Self-efficacy is an important predictor of health behaviour change. Within the health action process approach (HAPA; Schwarzer, 2008), motivational and volitional self-efficacy can be distinguished. Motivational self-efficacy is assumed to serve as predictor of intention formation whereas volitional self-efficacy should be relevant for behaviour change. This study examined these assumptions in a sample with overweight and obese individuals. Moreover, we tested whether behavioural ...

Ochsner, Sibylle; Scholz, Urte; Hornung, Rainer

2013-01-01

160

The Relationship between Self-efficacy and Stress among Iranian EFL Teachers  

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Full Text Available This study investigated the relationship between self- efficacy and stress among 108 EFL teachers in Iran. The participants were administered self-efficacy and stress questionnaires. Pearson Product-Moment Correlation and Multiple Regression analyses were used. The results indicated significant negative correlation between self efficacy and stress. Also it was found that both dimensions of self-efficacy, namely, classroom and organizational efficacies, either collectively or separately, could predict stress among EFL teachers. Implications of the study are discussed.

Shahin Vaezi

2011-09-01

161

Impact of SCALE-UP on science teaching self-efficacy of students in general education science courses  

Science.gov (United States)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of two pedagogical models used in general education science on non-majors' science teaching self-efficacy. Science teaching self-efficacy can be influenced by inquiry and cooperative learning, through cognitive mechanisms described by Bandura (1997). The Student Centered Activities for Large Enrollment Undergraduate Programs (SCALE-UP) model of inquiry and cooperative learning incorporates cooperative learning and inquiry-guided learning in large enrollment combined lecture-laboratory classes (Oliver-Hoyo & Beichner, 2004). SCALE-UP was adopted by a small but rapidly growing public university in the southeastern United States in three undergraduate, general education science courses for non-science majors in the Fall 2006 and Spring 2007 semesters. Students in these courses were compared with students in three other general education science courses for non-science majors taught with the standard teaching model at the host university. The standard model combines lecture and laboratory in the same course, with smaller enrollments and utilizes cooperative learning. Science teaching self-efficacy was measured using the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument - B (STEBI-B; Bleicher, 2004). A science teaching self-efficacy score was computed from the Personal Science Teaching Efficacy (PTSE) factor of the instrument. Using non-parametric statistics, no significant difference was found between teaching models, between genders, within models, among instructors, or among courses. The number of previous science courses was significantly correlated with PTSE score. Student responses to open-ended questions indicated that students felt the larger enrollment in the SCALE-UP room reduced individual teacher attention but that the large round SCALE-UP tables promoted group interaction. Students responded positively to cooperative and hands-on activities, and would encourage inclusion of more such activities in all of the courses. The large enrollment SCALE-UP model as implemented at the host university did not increase science teaching self-efficacy of non-science majors, as hypothesized. This was likely due to limited modification of standard cooperative activities according to the inquiry-guided SCALE-UP model. It was also found that larger SCALE-UP enrollments did not decrease science teaching self-efficacy when standard cooperative activities were used in the larger class.

Cassani, Mary Kay Kuhr

162

Perceived Barriers and Self-efficacy: Impact on Self-care Behaviors in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes  

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Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0pt 5.4pt 0pt 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0pt; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Background & Aim: Regarding the importance of determining the determinants of diabetes self-care, this study aimed to examine two major determinants of self-care activities, i.e. perceived barriers, and perceived self-efficacy among type two diabetic patients in Tehran, Iran. "n"n Methods & Materials: In this cross-sectional study, 128 patients were recruited to the study using convenience sampling. The validated diabetes instruments were completed by the patients. The included participants aged older than 18 years. Data were analyzed using bivariate correlation and path analysis. "n"n Results: The mean score of the perceived barriers and perceived self-efficacy were 3.05 and 2.18, respectively. The maximum score of self-care was 4.18. There was a positive correlation between self-efficacy and the self-care (r=0.22; P<0.01. Positive correlations were also found between education with self-efficacy and self-care (r=0.28; P<0.05, (r=0.29; P<0.05. There was a negative correlation between perceived barriers and self-care behaviors (r=-0.68; P<0.000. Using serial multiple regressions and path analysis, we had a final model (RMSEA=0.05; GFI=0.95; CFI=0.98; P=0.44; and Chi-Square=26.5. This model showed that perceived barriers were the strongest predictor for self-care behaviors. Perceived barriers mediated the effect of self-efficacy on the self-care behaviors. "n"n Conclusion: The intervention efforts that address the studied determinants related to self-care behavior could potentially impact type two diabetic patients' self-care activities. These determinants should be mentioned in the program developing."n"n  "n"n Key words: self efficacy, self-care, diabetes mellitus, determinants

E Shakibazadeh

2009-01-01

163

Validação da Chronic Pain Self-Efficacy Scale para a língua portuguesa Chronic Pain Self-Efficacy Scale portuguese validation  

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Full Text Available A crença de auto-eficácia relaciona-se com a percepção da dor e com a funcionalidade física e psíquica dos doentes. O objetivo deste estudo foi validar para a língua portuguesa a Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale. A amostra foi de 132 pacientes com dor crônica de etiologia variada. A validade da escala em língua portuguesa foi confirmada pela análise fatorial, que manteve os três domínios e os 22 itens da escala original; a variância explicada foi de 60,8%. A confiabilidade, analisada pelo alfa de Cronbach, variou entre 0,76 e 0,92 para os domínios e foi de 0,94 para a escala total. A validade convergente, verificada por meio da comparação entre a Escala de Auto-Eficácia para Dor Crônica (AEDC e o Inventário de Depressão de Beck (IDB mostrou correlação negativa e estatisticamente significativa. Este estudo disponibiliza para a língua portuguesa um instrumento válido e confiável para a avaliação da auto-eficácia de pacientes com dor crônica.The self-efficacy belief relates to pain perception and physical and psychiatric functionality. The goal of this study was to validate to the Portuguese language the Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale (CPSS. The subjects were 132 chronic pain patients with pain from several etiologies. The scale validity in the Portuguese language was confirmed by factor analyzis, which maintained the 3 factors and 22 items of the original scale; the accounted variance was 60,8%. The reliability, analyzed by Cronbach's alpha coefficient, were 0,76 - 0,92 to the factors and 0,94 to the total scale. The convergent validity, verified by the comparison with the Portuguese version of the Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale and Beck Depression Inventory (IDB showed significantly negative correlation. This study made available to the Portuguese language a valid and reliable instrument to assess self-efficacy in chronic pain patients.

Marina de Góes Salvetti

2005-07-01

164

Validação da Chronic Pain Self-Efficacy Scale para a língua portuguesa / Chronic Pain Self-Efficacy Scale portuguese validation  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available A crença de auto-eficácia relaciona-se com a percepção da dor e com a funcionalidade física e psíquica dos doentes. O objetivo deste estudo foi validar para a língua portuguesa a Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale. A amostra foi de 132 pacientes com dor crônica de etiologia variada. A validade da esca [...] la em língua portuguesa foi confirmada pela análise fatorial, que manteve os três domínios e os 22 itens da escala original; a variância explicada foi de 60,8%. A confiabilidade, analisada pelo alfa de Cronbach, variou entre 0,76 e 0,92 para os domínios e foi de 0,94 para a escala total. A validade convergente, verificada por meio da comparação entre a Escala de Auto-Eficácia para Dor Crônica (AEDC) e o Inventário de Depressão de Beck (IDB) mostrou correlação negativa e estatisticamente significativa. Este estudo disponibiliza para a língua portuguesa um instrumento válido e confiável para a avaliação da auto-eficácia de pacientes com dor crônica. Abstract in english The self-efficacy belief relates to pain perception and physical and psychiatric functionality. The goal of this study was to validate to the Portuguese language the Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale (CPSS). The subjects were 132 chronic pain patients with pain from several etiologies. The scale vali [...] dity in the Portuguese language was confirmed by factor analyzis, which maintained the 3 factors and 22 items of the original scale; the accounted variance was 60,8%. The reliability, analyzed by Cronbach's alpha coefficient, were 0,76 - 0,92 to the factors and 0,94 to the total scale. The convergent validity, verified by the comparison with the Portuguese version of the Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale and Beck Depression Inventory (IDB) showed significantly negative correlation. This study made available to the Portuguese language a valid and reliable instrument to assess self-efficacy in chronic pain patients.

Marina de Góes, Salvetti; Cibele A. de Mattos, Pimenta.

2005-07-01

165

Translation and validation of the Hong Kong Chinese version of the breastfeeding self-efficacy scale-short form.  

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Healthcare providers do not have a validated instrument to measure breastfeeding self-efficacy among Hong Kong Chinese. In this study, we sought to translate the breastfeeding self-efficacy scale-short form (BSES-SF) into Hong Kong Chinese and to examine the psychometric properties in a sample of 185 breastfeeding mothers. The construct validity of the translated scale was supported by confirmatory factor analysis and known group analysis. The receiver operating characteristics analysis indicated that the total score of the translated scale at 48-72? hours after delivery could be a useful diagnostic tool for identifying mothers likely to discontinue breastfeeding prematurely, before 6 months postpartum. Further research to cross-validate the suggested cut-off value of the scale is recommended. PMID:22693037

Ip, Wan-Yim; Yeung, Lai-Shan; Choi, Kai-Chow; Chair, Sek-Ying; Dennis, Cindy-Lee

2012-10-01

166

Mathematically precocious and female: Self-efficacy and STEM course choices among high achieving middle grade students  

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The problem addressed in this project is the lack of mathematically gifted females choosing to pursue advanced science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses in secondary education due to deficiencies in self-efficacy. The purpose of this project was to study the effects of a child-guided robotics program as it relates to the self-efficacy of mathematically gifted 6th grade female students and their future course choices in the advanced STEM content areas. This mixed-model study utilized a STEM attitude survey, artifacts, interviews, field notes, and standardized tests as measurement tools. Significance was found between genders in the treatment group for the standardized science scores, indicating closure in the achievement gap. Research suggests that STEM enrichment is beneficial for mathematically gifted females.

Burt, Stacey M.

167

The Impact of a Self-Efficacy Intervention on Short-Term Breast-Feeding Outcomes  

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Maternal self-efficacy for breast-feeding may contribute to success in breast-feeding. This study aimed to increase breast-feeding self-efficacy and actual breast-feeding through an intervention based on Bandura's self-efficacy theory. A total of 90 pregnant women participated in the study. The women who were assigned to a breast-feeding…

Nichols, Jeni; Schutte, Nicola S.; Brown, Rhonda F.; Dennis, Cindy-Lee; Price, Ian

2009-01-01

168

Sources of Writing Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Elementary, Middle, and High School Students  

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The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of Albert Bandura's four hypothesized sources of self-efficacy on students' writing self-efficacy beliefs (N = 1256) and to explore how these sources differ as a function of gender and academic level (elementary, middle, high). Consistent with the tenets of self-efficacy theory, each of the…

Pajares, Frank; Johnson, Margaret J.; Usher, Ellen L.

2007-01-01

169

The Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Achievement in At-Risk High School Students  

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The focus of this quantitative survey study was the examination of the relationship between self-efficacy and academic achievement in 164 at-risk high school students. The study used Bandura's self-efficacy as the theoretical framework. The research questions involved understanding the levels of self-efficacy in at-risk high school students and…

Gold, Jarrett Graham

2010-01-01

170

Job Search Self-Efficacy of East Asian International Graduate Students  

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Using a sample of 86 East Asian international graduate students, this study examined Bandura's perceived self-efficacy model (1986) in the domain of job search self-efficacy and tested the mediating effects of job search self-efficacy in the relationship between efficacy source variables and job search behaviors. Results show that both performance…

Lin, Yi-Jiun; Flores, Lisa Y.

2013-01-01

171

Gaining a Degree: The Effect on Teacher Self-Efficacy and Emotions  

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Bandura's concept of self-efficacy has been the focus of numerous research studies related to teacher self-efficacy. Most studies have investigated Bandura's first three sources of self-efficacy beliefs: mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, and social persuasion--with much less emphasis placed on Bandura's fourth source, the role of…

Williams, Ruth

2009-01-01

172

Improving Fifth Grade Students' Mathematics Self-Efficacy Calibration and Performance through Self-Regulation Training  

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This primary goal of this study was to investigate the effects of strategy training and self-reflection, two subprocesses of Zimmerman's cyclical model of self-regulation, on fifth grade students' mathematics performance, self-efficacy, self-evaluation, and calibration measures of self-efficacy bias, self-efficacy accuracy, self-evaluation bias,…

Ramdass, Darshanand H.

2009-01-01

173

An Investigation of Factors Related to Self-Efficacy for Java Programming among Engineering Students  

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The purpose of this study was to examine the factors related to self-efficacy for Java programming among first year engineering students. An instrument assessing Java programming self-efficacy was developed from the computer programming self-efficacy scale of Ramalingam & Wiedenbeck. The instrument was administered at the beginning of the course…

Askar, Petek; Davenport, David

2009-01-01

174

Idiocentrism-Allocentrism and Academics Self-Efficacy for Research in Beijing Universities  

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Purpose: This article aims to explore how self-efficacy is related to academic research activities and how intra-culturally relevant factors may play a role in self-efficacy in the context of higher education in Beijing. In particular, relationships of self-efficacy for research with research productivity and idiocentrism-allocentrism are to be…

Zhao, Jingsong; McCormick, John; Hoekman, Katherine

2008-01-01

175

Self-Efficacy and Successful School-to-Work Transition: A Longitudinal Study.  

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Academic self-efficacy and grades at ages 12-15 in relation to unemployment and job satisfaction at 21 were calculated from Germany archival data (n=391). The relationship between high self-efficacy and unemployment was mediated by higher career-related motivation. The relationship between self-efficacy and job satisfaction was mediated by higher…

Pinquart, Martin; Juang, Linda P.; Silbereisen, Rainer K.

2003-01-01

176

Self-Efficacy and Stress of Staff Managing Challenging Behaviours of People with Learning Disabilities  

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Self-efficacy has been reported to play a significant role in stress levels of parents facing challenging behaviours of their children with learning disabilities. The role of self-efficacy has also been found to affect the stress levels of professional caregivers in such situations. To understand the implications of staff self-efficacy in…

Cudre-Mauroux, Annick

2011-01-01

177

Principal Self-Efficacy: Relations with Burnout, Job Satisfaction and Motivation to Quit  

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The purpose of this study was to explore relations between principals' self-efficacy, burnout, job satisfaction and principals' motivation to quit. Principal self-efficacy was measured by a recently developed multidimensional scale called the Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale. Burnout was measured by a modified version of the Maslach Burnout…

Federici, Roger A.; Skaalvik, Einar M.

2012-01-01

178

Mind over Matter: Contributing Factors to Self-Efficacy in Montessori Teachers  

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Interpreting Albert Bandura's term "self-efficacy" as the individual's belief in his own abilities to succeed in spite of the given circumstances, this study seeks to identify the influences which lead to self-efficacy in Montessori teachers. In order to evaluate perceptions of self-efficacy, 35 pre-service teachers in the…

Bhatia, Punum

2012-01-01

179

Brief Psychometric Analysis of the Self-Efficacy Parent Report Scale (SEPRS)  

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The Self-Efficacy Parent-Report Scale was designed to assess parent perceptions of self-efficacy of their children aged 7 to 17 years. Internal aspects of validity indicated a marginal fit of the data to the unidimensional model. External facets of validity indicated the Self-Efficacy Parent-Report Scale had excellent convergent and discriminant…

Erford, Bradley T.; Gavin, Kate

2013-01-01

180

Assessing BSW Student Direct Practice Skill Using Standardized Clients and Self-Efficacy Theory  

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Entering and exiting BSW students were compared on self-efficacy and on direct practice skill performance with a standardized client. Self-efficacy was tested as a predictor and as a mediator of skill performance. Ordinary least squares hierarchical regression found BSW education to be predictive of higher skill and higher self-efficacy. After…

Rawlings, Mary A.

2012-01-01

181

Effect of glycemic load on eating behavior self-efficacy during weight loss  

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High eating behavior self-efficacy may contribute to successful weight loss. Diet interventions that maximize eating behavior self-efficacy may therefore improve weight loss outcomes. However, data on the effect of diet composition on eating behavior self-efficacy are sparse. To determine the eff...

182

The Effects of Self-Efficacy on Academic Success of First-Generation College Sophomore Students  

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The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of self-efficacy on academic success of first-generation college sophomore students. The participants in the study consisted of college sophomores from 5 of the 23 California State University campuses. An online College Self-Efficacy Inventory was employed to measure participants' self-efficacy

Vuong, Mui; Brown-Welty, Sharon; Tracz, Susan

2010-01-01

183

Developing Academic Self-Efficacy: Strategies to Support Gifted Elementary School Students  

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Self-efficacy is the belief in one's capacity to perform and accomplish goals. Specifically, academic self-efficacy refers to a student's perception of their ability to engage and successfully complete academic tasks. Self-efficacy affects students' behavioral choices, motivation, thought patterns and responses, perception of control, and…

Merriman, Lauren

2012-01-01

184

Persistence at an Urban Community College: The Implications of Self-Efficacy and Motivation  

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This study examined how self-efficacy and motivation affected student persistence at an urban community college. Self-efficacy was studied at two dimensions: self-regulated learning efficacy and self-efficacy for academic achievement. Motivation was also investigated at two levels: intrinsic motivation and extrinsic motivation. Results show that…

Liao, Hsiang-Ann; Edlin, Margot; Ferdenzi, Anita Cuttita

2014-01-01

185

The Challenge of Transcultural Diversities  

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Full Text Available The economic and social dynamics of globalisation have brought with them a new kind of migration movement that can no longer be approached within the traditional framework of the Nation-State and its limits. Starting from the idea of the importance of transcultural diversity as a democratic social resource that should be emphasised and preserved through cultural political intervention, the author of the article stresses the need for a change of paradigm in drafting cultural policies. The case of Europe is a clear example of the process of complexisation and diversification of this transnational space and of the need for the continuation of the process of Europeisation for some kind of accommodation between national and cosmopolitan principles. In this way, the author –basing his argument on reports from the Council of Europe– calls for a transnational cultural policy to defend transcultural diversity; a policy in which the Council will have to play a key role.

Kevin Robins

2008-09-01

186

Effects of music therapy on drug avoidance self-efficacy in patients on a detoxification unit: a three-group randomized effectiveness study.  

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Self-efficacy is a component of Bandura's social cognitive theory and can lead to abstinence and a reduction of relapse potential for people who have substance abuse disorders. To date, no music therapy researcher has utilized this theoretical model to address abstinence and reduce the likelihood of relapse in people who have addictions. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on drug avoidance self-efficacy in a randomized three-group wait-list control design with patients on a detoxification unit. Participants (N = 131) were cluster randomized to one of three single-session conditions: music therapy, verbal therapy, or wait-list control. Music therapy participants received a group lyric analysis intervention, verbal therapy participants received a group talk therapy session, and wait-list control participants eventually received a group recreational music therapy intervention. Although there was no significant between-group difference in drug avoidance self-efficacy, participants in the music therapy condition tended to have the highest mean drug avoidance self-efficacy scores. Posttest written comments supported the use of both music therapy and verbal therapy sessions. Two music therapy participants specifically noted that their initial skepticism had dissipated after receiving music therapy. Despite a lack of significant differences, the theoretical support of self-efficacy for substance abuse rehabilitation suggests that this may be an area of continued clinical focus and empirical investigation. Clinical anecdotes, limitations of the study, and suggestions for future research are provided. PMID:25514686

Silverman, Michael J

2014-01-01

187

The Portuguese version of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form.  

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The objective of this study was to translate and psychometrically assess a Portuguese version of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (BSES-SF). The original English version of the BSES-SF was translated to Portuguese and tested among a sample of 89 mothers in southern Brazil from the 2nd to 12th postpartum week followed by face-to-face interviews. The mean total score of the Portuguese version of the BSES-SF was 63.6 +/- 6.22. The reliability analysis of each item in the scale attained significant Cronbach's alphas of 0.63 or superior. The Cronbach's alpha generated by the entire range of 14 questions was 0.71. A factor analysis identified one factor that contributed to 20% of the variance. This study demonstrates that the original English version of the BSES-SF was successfully adapted to Portuguese. The Portuguese version of the BSES-SF constitutes a reliable research instrument for evaluating breastfeeding self-efficacy in Brazil. PMID:20139376

Zubaran, Carlos; Foresti, Katia; Schumacher, Marina; Thorell, Mariana Rossi; Amoretti, Aline; Müller, Lúcia; Dennis, Cindy Lee

2010-08-01

188

APN knowledge, self-efficacy, and practices in providing women's healthcare services to women with disabilities.  

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Women with disabilities require the same gynecological and reproductive healthcare services as women without disabilities, yet they often experience difficulty obtaining them. Advanced practice nurses (APNs) increasingly provide primary care services that include women's health care, yet their influence on this population has not been systematically examined. This study examined the practices, environments, knowledge, and self-efficacy of APNs in Texas regarding provision of women's health care to women with disabilities. The study's respondents are 744 women who replied to a mailed survey. The results reveal that while nurses do not lack knowledge, work environments do not support competent care of women with disabilities and practices do not always follow national guidelines. Predictors of self-efficacy in provision of health care to women with disabilities were status as a women's health nurse practitioner, previous rehabilitation experience, high knowledge scores, and a working environment perceived as accessible. Until changes are made in APN education and environmental barriers are addressed, APNs may not be able to provide optimal women's healthcare services to women with disabilities. PMID:19772116

Lehman, Cheryl A

2009-01-01

189

Self-efficacy: a predictor but not a cause of behavior.  

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The concept of self-efficacy, as expounded by Bandura as part of his Social Cognitive Theory, has made considerable impact in the psychological literature. It is argued that self-efficacy is a useful hypothetical construct for predicting behavior, but it has no valid claim to being a cause of behavior. Claims for self-efficacy as a causal agent have failed to acknowledge that self-efficacy itself is an epi-phenomenon of performance. Conventional learning theory explanations of observed performance levels are shown to be more parsimonious than accounts relying on the concept of self-efficacy. PMID:1302251

Hawkins, R M

1992-12-01

190

Is a strong sense of self-efficacy always beneficial?  

OpenAIRE

The concept of self-efficacy, introduced by Albert Bandura, has received a lot of attention in psychological research. This comes as no surprise, as it encompasses a person's beliefs about his or her capabilities to successfully do what is necessary for desired goals, which is a central mechanism in human agency. The concept has been linked to many outcomes (e.g. motivation and performance), almost exclusively yielding positive results. Recently, however, arguments have risen that a strong se...

Verhaeren, Thomas

2012-01-01

191

Self-Efficacy of Piano Teachers’ of Specialized Music School  

OpenAIRE

The piano teachers from specialized music schools have been often criticized for a lack of psychological and pedagogical competences, i.e. emotional instability, proneness for engendering fear, inability to motivate pupils etc. This paper deals with the following questions: How do piano teachers self evaluate their professional competences? Will their self-assessment be the same as this of their supervisors? The theoretical framework is provided by the theory of self-efficacy and teacher self...

Chmurzynska, Malgorzata

2009-01-01

192

Academic Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Teacher Candidates  

OpenAIRE

This study aims determining academic self-efficacy perception of teacher candidates. It is survey model. Population of the study consists of teacher candidates in 2010-2011 academic years at Ahmet Kele?o?lu Education Faculty of Education Formation of Selçuk University. A simple random sample was selected as sampling method and the study was conducted on 312 teacher candidates. The data of this study was obtained by “academic selfefficacy scale” which was developed by Jerusalem and Schw...

Yes?i?lyurt, Dr Etem

2013-01-01

193

The changing signs in the relationships among self-efficacy, personal goals, and performance.  

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The common interpretation of the positive correlation among self-efficacy, personal goals, and performance is questioned. Using self-efficacy theory (A. Bandura, 1977), it was predicted that cross-sectional correlational results were a function of past performance's influence on self-efficacy, and using control theory (W. T. Powers, 1973), it was predicted that self-efficacy could negatively influence subsequent performance. These predictions were supported with 56 undergraduate participants, using a within-person procedure. Personal goals were also positively influenced by self-efficacy and performance but negatively related to subsequent performance. A 2nd study involving 185 undergraduates found that manipulated goal level positively predicted performance and self-efficacy positively predicted performance in the difficult-goal condition. The discussion focuses on conditions likely to affect the sign of the relationship among self-efficacy, goals, and performance. PMID:11519645

Vancouver, J B; Thompson, C M; Williams, A A

2001-08-01

194

A Comparison of Brunei and Hong Kong - SAR Student Teachers’ Self-efficacy in Implementing Inclusive Education Practices: Implications for Teacher Education  

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Full Text Available The survey compared the scores of 159 (118 females randomly selected Brunei and Hong Kong (Special Administrative Region student teachers on the New General Self-efficacy Scale (NGSS; Self-efficacy in Implementing Inclusive Practices Scale (SIIPS; Sentiments, Attitudes and Concerns about Inclusive Education Scale (SACIES; and Inclusive Classroom Setting Scale (ICSS. The scales were reliable and valid for use with participants in both countries. Females scored significantly higher on NGSS than male counterparts. In addition, Brunei participants scored significantly higher on NGSS and SACIES than Hong Kong peers. Furthermore, the samples’ scores differed significantly on NGSS and SACIES by participants’ educational level with A-Level trainees scoring highest. Moreover, the majority of the participants generally scored high on all the scales. However, Two-Way ANOVA revealed only one independent variable (ICSS with a significant main effect on SIIPS, the dependent variable. Also only one lower-order interaction variable (gender and educational level had a significant joint effect on the dependent variable, SIIPS. Overall, the results indicate a need to increase self-efficacy in males and Hong Kong students. Extra attention and interventions ought to be directed to SACIES and ICSS variables. Mixed-methods research was recommended to gain more comprehensive insights.

Kathleen Tait

2013-12-01

195

An investigation of the attitudes, anxieties and self-efficacy beliefs towards mathematics lessons high school students’ in terms of gender, types of school, and students’ grades  

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Full Text Available In recent years, there has been an increasing recognition that mathematics anxiety plays an important role in students’ learning of mathematics and thus, mathematics anxiety has gained heightened awareness by mathematics educators as an important factor in the teaching of mathematics (Bursal & Paznokas, 2006; Thomas & Higbee, 1999; McLeod, 1988; Singh, Granville, & Dika, 2002; Sloan, Daane, & Geisen, 2002; Vinson, 2001; Zettle & Raines, 2000. Math anxiety defined by Richardson & Suinn (1972 as a “feelings of tension and anxiety that interfere with the manipulation of numbers and the solving of mathematical problems in a wide variety of ordinary life and academic situations”. Research demonstrated that the physiological, cognitive, and behavioral consequences of math anxiety may impair life functioning. For example, students who have math anxiety exhibit physiological reactivity to numeric stimuli and have faulty beliefs and negative attitudes regarding their problem solving abilities. These students also may avoid environment and careers that require utilization of math skills, and will sacrifice accuracy for speed when performing numeric tasks (Ashcraft & Kirk, 2001. Purpose and significanceThe purpose of this research is to examine whether there is a significant difference between the attitudes, anxieties, and self-efficacy beliefs towards mathematics lessons high school students’ in terms of gender, types of school and students’ grades. It is very important to reveal relationships between attitudes towards mathematics lessons, anxieties towards mathematics lessons and self-efficacy beliefs to develop high school students’ positive attitudes towards mathematics lessons.MethodsIn this study, descriptive research method was conducted. A total of 418 students, from three different school types participated in the study. The schools are Anatolian High School, Vocational High School and Public High School. Three scales were implemented on students to reveal relationships between students’ attitudes towards mathematics lessons, anxieties towards mathematics lessons and self-efficacy beliefs. The results obtained from scales were analyzed with SPSS 13.0.ResultsIt was observed in the findings of study that there are no statistically significant differences between students’ gender and scores of attitudes towards mathematics lessons, anxieties towards mathematics lessons and self-efficacy beliefs. But there are statistically significant differences between students’ types of school and students’ grades and scores of attitudes towards mathematics lessons, anxieties towards mathematics lessons and self-efficacy beliefs.Discussion and ConclusionsStudents’ achievements in mathematics lessons are directly related to students’ self-efficacy beliefs, attitudes towards mathematics lessons and anxieties towards mathematics lessons. Students’ mathematics achievements will increase because of students’ high self-efficacy beliefs and attitudes towards mathematics lessons. In this study, there are no statistically significant differences between students’ gender and scores of attitudes towards mathematics lessons, anxieties towards mathematics lessons and self-efficacy beliefs. But there are statistically significant differences between students’ types of school and students’ grades and scores of attitudes towards mathematics lessons, anxieties towards mathematics lessons and self-efficacy beliefs. While students’ who attended from successful schools- self-efficacy beliefs and attitudes towards mathematics lessons are high, their anxiety levels towards mathematics lessons are low. Besides, it was observed, when students’ grades increase, their self-efficacy beliefs and attitudes towards mathematics lessons get higher and their anxiety levels towards mathematics lessons get lower.

N. ?zzet Kurbano?lu

2012-01-01

196

The impact of depression on abstinence self-efficacy and substance use outcomes among emerging adults in residential treatment.  

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A large proportion of emerging adults treated for substance use disorder (SUD) present with symptoms of negative affect and major depressive disorder (MDD). However, little is known regarding how these comorbidities influence important mechanisms of treatment response, such as increases in abstinence self-efficacy (ASE). This study tested the degree to which MDD and/or depressive symptoms interacted with during-treatment changes in ASE and examined these variables' relation to outcome at 3 months' posttreatment. Participants (N = 302; 74% male) completed measures at intake, midtreatment, end-of-treatment, and at 3-month follow-up. ASE was measured with the Alcohol and Drug Use Self-Efficacy (ADUSE) scale; depressive symptoms were assessed with the Brief Symptom Inventory 18 (BSI 18) Depression scale; and current MDD diagnoses were deduced from the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV). Random coefficient regression analyses focused on during-treatment changes in ASE, with BSI 18 scores and MDD diagnosis included as moderators. At intake, individuals with MDD or high levels of depressive symptoms had significantly lower ASE, particularly in negative affect situations. No evidence for moderation was found: ASE significantly increased during treatment regardless of MDD status. There was a main effect of BSI 18 Depression scores: those with lower BSI 18 scores had lower ASE scores at each time point. MDD and BSI 18 Depression did not predict 3-month outcome, but similar to previous findings ASE did predict abstinence status at 3 months. Treatment-seeking emerging adults with MDD merit particular clinical attention because of their lower reported self-efficacy throughout treatment. PMID:22288980

Greenfield, Brenna L; Venner, Kamilla L; Kelly, John F; Slaymaker, Valerie; Bryan, Angela D

2012-06-01

197

Contextualized science curriculum: Influence on student learning and attitudes, and teachers' self-efficacy beliefs in an urban middle school  

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The purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of a contextualized science curriculum on students' content acquisition, students' attitude toward school science, students' engagement in the science classroom, teachers' perceptions of students' attitudes in the science classroom, and teachers' self-efficacy beliefs in an urban middle school setting. Fifty-six (N = 56) urban school students (seventh graders) in two intact groups and their science (n = 2) teachers were purposively selected for the study. The study focused on a nine-week science unit using a traditional and a contextualized version of the curriculum on the topic 'Earth's Waters'. Five research questions guided the study. The quantitative data collected during the study included content acquisition data, student attitude data, and observational data. Formal interviews with students and the teachers at the end of the nine-week period provided data about teachers' perceptions of students' attitudes in the science classroom and teachers' self-efficacy beliefs. Results of the study did not indicate any statistically significant differences in content acquisition and students' attitudes toward science between the control and the experimental groups. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups on student engagement scores using an observation instrument. Interview data indicated the positive impact of contextualized curriculum on students' attitude toward science and on participating teachers' self-efficacy beliefs in the experimental group. Implications for science education and strategies for future research are also included.

Verma, Geeta Kumari

2001-12-01

198

Self-efficacy estimates for drug use practices predict risk reduction among injection drug users.  

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We used baseline outcome efficacy (OE) estimates for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk reduction to predict subsequent risk reduction 6 months hence among 792 injection drug users in a prospective study. Declines in drug use, frequency of injection, and needle sharing were found among those with high OE scores after adjustment for baseline behavior and antecedent factors. No OE effect was found in multivariate analysis for shooting gallery attendance, a risk that substantially declined in this cohort. OE for needle disinfection was associated with reduced drug risk behaviors, but not for improved needle hygiene practices over time. The self-efficacy model is useful in understanding psychological factors in risk reduction among injection drug users. PMID:12023500

Celentano, David D; Cohn, Sylvia; Davis, Richard O; Vlahov, David

2002-06-01

199

Validity of the Turkish version of the medication adherence self-efficacy scale-short form in hypertensive patients  

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Full Text Available Objective: Study purpose was to examine the validity of a 13-item short form of the Medication Adherence Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (MASES-SF in an independent sample of 150 hypertensive Turkish patients.Methods: This is a methodological study and 150 adult patients, who are receiving medication for hypertension in the last one year, were included as the study sample. The sample of the study was chosen with the method of simple random sampling. The study was conducted between October 25, 2010 and December 31, 2010 at Family Health Center (FHC. In this study, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used for psychometric evaluation. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was used to evaluate the reliability of the scale. Results: Confirmatory factor analysis showed that all goodness indexes were at acceptable quality: ?2=61.72, df=65, p>0.05, GFI=0.99, CFI=1.00, RMSA=0.00. Reliability coefficient of the Turkish adaptation of MASES-SF was found as 0.94 and item-total correlations ranged between 0.13 - 0.52. Patients with uncontrolled hypertension had lower self-efficacy scores compared to those with normal blood pressure. Conclusion: This result indicated that the preliminary criterion validity is adequate. Psychometric testing demonstrated satisfactory internal consistency and validity of the instrument for patients in the study group. It can be used confidently in determining and testing interventions to improve medication adherence self-efficacy perceptions and behaviors in hypertensive Turkish patients. The MASES-SF is brief, quick to administer, and capture useful data on medication adherence self-efficacy in hypertensive patients.

Rabia Hac?hasano?lu

2012-03-01

200

Tradução e adaptação cultural da Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale para o português Traducción y adaptación cultural de la Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale para el portugués Translation and cultural adaptation of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale to Portuguese  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: traduzir e adaptar a Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale ( BSES, para a realidade cultural do Brasil e avaliar a validade de conteúdo da versão em português, para que possa ser utilizada na população brasileira. MÉTODOS: O estudo envolveu duas fases (1. protocolo de tradução e adaptação cultural e 2. validade de conteúdo. RESULTADOS: O escore total variou de 93 a 162 pontos (M = 127,03; DP = 19,62. Quando considerado apenas as multíparas, a pontuação da escala variou de 106 a 156 (M = 131,66; DP = 15,91. A versão mostrou ser de fácil compreensão, obtendo-se adequada validação semântica e de consistência. O Índice de Validação de Conteúdo foi 0,84 e o coeficiente alfa de Cronbach = 0,90. CONCLUSÕES: Os achados sugerem que a BSES é adequada para screening da confiança materna no seu potencial para amamentar. No entanto, é necessário avaliar as propriedades psicométricas deste instrumento em amostra com diferentes níveis sociais e educacionais e em outras regiões do Brasil.OBJETIVOS: traducir y adaptar la escala Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES, para la realidad cultural de Brasil y evaluar la validez de contenido de la versión en portugués para que pueda ser utilizada en la población brasileña. MÉTODOS: El estudio se realizó en dos fases (1- protocolo de traducción y adaptación cultural, y 2- Validación del contenido. RESULTADOS: El puntaje total varió de 93 a 162 puntos (P = 127,03; DE = 19,62. Cuando fueron consideradas apenas las multíparas, la puntuación de la escala varió de 106 a 156 (P = 131,66; DE = 15,91. La versión mostró ser de fácil comprensión, obteniéndose una adecuada validación semántica y de consistencia. El Índice de Validación de Contenido fue 0,84 y el coeficiente alfa de Cronbach = 0,90. CONCLUSIONES: Los hallazgos sugieren que la BSES es adecuada para detectar la confianza materna en su potencialidad para amamantar. Sin embargo, es necesario evaluar las propiedades psicométricas de este instrumento en muestras con diferentes niveles sociales y educacionales y en otras regiones de Brasil.OBJECTIVES: Translate and adapt the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES to the cultural reality of Brazil and evaluate the content validity of the Portuguese version, so that it can be used in the Brazilian population. METHODS: The study was made in two phases (1- Protocol translation and cultural adaptation, and 2- Validity of Content. RESULTS: The total score ranged from 93 to 162 points (M = 127.03, SD = 19.62. When considering only women who bore many children, the score scale ranged from 106 to 156 (M = 131.66, SD = 15.91. The translated version proved to be easy to understand, showing good consistency and semantic validation. The Index for the Validation of Content was 0.84 and the Cronbach's alpha = 0.90. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that the BSES is suitable for screening the maternal confidence in its potentiality to breastfeed. However, it is necessary to evaluate the psychometric properties of this instrument in samples with different social and educational levels, and in other regions of Brazil

Mônica Oliveira Batista Oriá

2010-04-01

201

Tradução e adaptação cultural da Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale para o português / Translation and cultural adaptation of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale to Portuguese / Traducción y adaptación cultural de la Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale para el portugués  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Languages: English, Portuguese Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVOS: traduzir e adaptar a Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale ( BSES), para a realidade cultural do Brasil e avaliar a validade de conteúdo da versão em português, para que possa ser utilizada na população brasileira. MÉTODOS: O estudo envolveu duas fases (1. protocolo de tradução e adaptação cu [...] ltural e 2. validade de conteúdo). RESULTADOS: O escore total variou de 93 a 162 pontos (M = 127,03; DP = 19,62). Quando considerado apenas as multíparas, a pontuação da escala variou de 106 a 156 (M = 131,66; DP = 15,91). A versão mostrou ser de fácil compreensão, obtendo-se adequada validação semântica e de consistência. O Índice de Validação de Conteúdo foi 0,84 e o coeficiente alfa de Cronbach = 0,90. CONCLUSÕES: Os achados sugerem que a BSES é adequada para screening da confiança materna no seu potencial para amamentar. No entanto, é necessário avaliar as propriedades psicométricas deste instrumento em amostra com diferentes níveis sociais e educacionais e em outras regiões do Brasil. Abstract in spanish OBJETIVOS: traducir y adaptar la escala Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES), para la realidad cultural de Brasil y evaluar la validez de contenido de la versión en portugués para que pueda ser utilizada en la población brasileña. MÉTODOS: El estudio se realizó en dos fases (1- protocolo de trad [...] ucción y adaptación cultural, y 2- Validación del contenido). RESULTADOS: El puntaje total varió de 93 a 162 puntos (P = 127,03; DE = 19,62). Cuando fueron consideradas apenas las multíparas, la puntuación de la escala varió de 106 a 156 (P = 131,66; DE = 15,91). La versión mostró ser de fácil comprensión, obteniéndose una adecuada validación semántica y de consistencia. El Índice de Validación de Contenido fue 0,84 y el coeficiente alfa de Cronbach = 0,90. CONCLUSIONES: Los hallazgos sugieren que la BSES es adecuada para detectar la confianza materna en su potencialidad para amamantar. Sin embargo, es necesario evaluar las propiedades psicométricas de este instrumento en muestras con diferentes niveles sociales y educacionales y en otras regiones de Brasil. Abstract in english OBJECTIVES: Translate and adapt the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES) to the cultural reality of Brazil and evaluate the content validity of the Portuguese version, so that it can be used in the Brazilian population. METHODS: The study was made in two phases (1- Protocol translation and cultu [...] ral adaptation, and 2- Validity of Content). RESULTS: The total score ranged from 93 to 162 points (M = 127.03, SD = 19.62). When considering only women who bore many children, the score scale ranged from 106 to 156 (M = 131.66, SD = 15.91). The translated version proved to be easy to understand, showing good consistency and semantic validation. The Index for the Validation of Content was 0.84 and the Cronbach's alpha = 0.90. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that the BSES is suitable for screening the maternal confidence in its potentiality to breastfeed. However, it is necessary to evaluate the psychometric properties of this instrument in samples with different social and educational levels, and in other regions of Brazil

Mônica Oliveira Batista, Oriá; Lorena Barbosa, Ximenes.

2010-04-01

202

Relationship of Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Urban Public School Students to Performance on a High-Stakes Mathematics Test  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of "self-efficacy" for "Enlisting Social Resources, Self-Regulatory Efficacy, self-efficacy" for "Self-Regulated Learning," and "self-efficacy" for "Academic Achievement" (Bandura's Children's "Self-Efficacy Scale," 2006) of urban public school students to performance on the high stakes…

Afolabi, Kolajo A.

2010-01-01

203

Development of Condom-Use Self-Efficacy over 36 Months among Early Adolescents: A Mediation Analysis  

Science.gov (United States)

This research evaluates condom-use self-efficacy and its increase throughout adolescence. Documentation of the development of condom-use self-efficacy would be important for prevention efforts given the influence of self-efficacy on actual condom usage. This study assesses a hypothesized mediation mechanism of the development of self-efficacy

Chen, Xinguang; Dinaj-Koci, Veronica; Brathwaite, Nanika; Cottrell, Lesley; Deveaux, Lynette; Gomez, Perry; Harris, Carole; Li, Xiaoming; Lunn, Sonja; Marshall, Sharon; Stanton, Bonita

2012-01-01

204

Academic Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Teacher Candidates  

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Full Text Available This study aims determining academic self-efficacy perception of teacher candidates. It is survey model. Population of the study consists of teacher candidates in 2010-2011 academic years at Ahmet Kele?o?lu Education Faculty of Education Formation of Selçuk University. A simple random sample was selected as sampling method and the study was conducted on 312 teacher candidates. The data of this study was obtained by “academic selfefficacy scale” which was developed by Jerusalem and Schwazer (1981 and translated into Turkish by Y?lmaz, Gürçay, and Ekici (2007 and its reliability value was determined as .79. However, Cronbach Alfa reliability value of this scale became .76 with the result of the data analysis of the study. SPSS package program was used to analyze the data; and the data analysis, frequency, percentage, arithmetic mean, standard deviation, independent samples t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and post hoc tests (LSD test were used. When the findings of the research were considered in general, the result showed that the academic self-efficacy perception level of the candidates was at desired level. However, teachers' views about the level of academic self-efficacy perception showed that most of them preferred a lower level option "suits me", instead of "totally suits me" option that was the highest degree of participation of four likert-type scale. This illustrated that their perception about this issue was not at a very high level. When independent variables were taken into account, among the academic perception levels of teacher candidates, a significant difference was detected in terms of working as a teacher or not and academic achievement variables but it revealed no significant difference in terms of gender and type of education program variables.

Dr. Etem YE??LYURT

2013-04-01

205

Reading instruction in science: Teachers' practices, beliefs, & self-efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

The Common Core State Standards (CCSS, 2010) and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS, 2013) call on science teachers to play a stronger role in helping students learn from informational science texts. Curriculum implementation efforts aimed at addressing these new standards should build on what teachers are already doing to help students with reading in their classrooms and the pedagogical issues that they feel are important to science learning. However, few current studies have gathered these important insights from science teachers. Aiming to fill this gap in the literature, this study attempted to describe middle school science teachers' current practices, beliefs, and self-efficacy regarding reading and reading instruction in their classrooms. A conceptual model hypothesizing that self-efficacy mediates the relationship between teachers' beliefs about how important reading instruction is to science learning and how often they provide reading instruction in their science classes was also tested. Participants (N = 247) reported that students regularly engaged in reading-related tasks in science class. Somer's D correlation analyses highlighted positive associations between the frequency with which teachers reported that students engaged in various reading-related tasks and the frequency with which they reported providing reading instruction for those tasks, suggesting that students tended to receive explicit instruction or coaching for the reading-related tasks they engaged in most often. Middle school science teachers also expressed positive beliefs about the importance of reading-related tasks and explicit instruction or coaching for reading in science and tended to take on responsibility for helping students become better readers of science texts. Last, a path analysis confirmed that the association between teachers' beliefs and practices was mediated through teachers' self-efficacy (beta = .07, p < .001). This suggests that self-efficacy can influence teacher practice: even if teachers believe that reading instruction is important or even essential to science learning, they might avoid or resist providing reading instruction if they do not feel efficacious in helping students become stronger readers of science texts.

Morales, Christina M.

206

Impact of perceived self-efficacy in coping with stressors on components of the immune system.  

Science.gov (United States)

This experiment examined the impact of experimentally varied perceived self-efficacy in exercising control over stressors on components of the immunological system. Immunological changes while coping with phobic stressors were measured within an intrasubject control design that included a baseline phase, an efficacy-acquisition phase, and a maximal-efficacy phase. In each of these phases, perceived coping self-efficacy, level of autonomic and endocrine activation, and several components of the immunological system were measured. Development of strong perceived self-efficacy to control phobic stressors had an immunoenhancing effect. A slow growth of perceived self-efficacy, heart rate acceleration, and cortisol activation attenuated immunological system status during the efficacy-acquisition phase. Rapid growth of perceived self-efficacy also predicted maintenance of immunoenhancement during the maximal perceived self-efficacy phase. PMID:2148350

Wiedenfeld, S A; O'Leary, A; Bandura, A; Brown, S; Levine, S; Raska, K

1990-11-01

207

Self-Efficacy Beliefs, Motivation, Race, and Gender in Middle School Science  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to discover whether the science motivation beliefs of middle school students (N = 262) vary as a function of their gender or race/ethnicity and to determine whether science self-efficacy beliefs predict science achievement when motivation variables shown to predict achievement in other academic areas are controlled. Girls reported stronger science self-efficacy and self-efficacy for self-regulation, and they received higher grades in science. Boys had stronger performance-approach goals. White students had stronger self-efficacy and achievement, and African American students reported stronger task goals. Self-efficacy was the only motivation variable to predict the science achievement of girls, boys, and White students. Self-efficacy and self-concept predicted the science achievement of African American students. Results are interpreted from the perspective of Bandura's social cognitive theory.

Britner, Shari L.; Pajares, Frank

208

The Effect of Science Teacher Candidates’ Self-Efficacy towards Science Education on Academic Achievement  

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Full Text Available The aim of study is to determinate the effect of self-efficacy beliefs towards science instruction on the academic achievement. In addition, it is investigated that effect of gender on self-efficacy and academic achievement. The sample of this research consist of total 127 candidates science teachers who attend II. III. IV. grades of Gazi University, Educational Faculty, Science Teaching Program on the spring semester of 2008-2009 educational period. In this study, to collect data, “System in Our Body Achievement Test” and “Science Instruction Self-efficacy Beliefs Scale” were used. The results showed that most of the science teacher candidates? general achievement level and self-efficacy beliefs are not sufficient. In addition the teacher candidates? general achievement level and self-efficacy beliefs do not vary according to the gender and it can be concluded that, self-efficacy beliefs predicts the academic achievement in system in our body concept positively in meaningful way.

P?nar FETTAHLIO?LU

2011-08-01

209

Effectiveness of a Breastfeeding Self-efficacy Intervention: Do Hospital Practices Make a Difference?  

OpenAIRE

Breastfeeding self-efficacy interventions are important for improving breastfeeding outcomes. However, the circumstances that may influence the effectiveness of the interventions are unclear, especially in the context of hospitals with suboptimal infant feeding practices. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the effect of a self-efficacy intervention on breastfeeding self-efficacy and exclusive breastfeeding, and further assessed the difference in its effect by hospital-routine type. In this interventi...

Otsuka, Keiko; Taguri, Masataka; Dennis, Cindy-lee; Wakutani, Kiriko; Awano, Masayo; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Jimba, Masamine

2013-01-01

210

Expanding crossover Research : The crossover of job-related self-efficacy within couples  

OpenAIRE

This article reports a study that examined the crossover of job-related self-efficacy within working couples, its underlying mechanisms, and its work-related consequences. We proposed that the job-related self-efficacy of one partner (the ‘actor’) can be transmitted to the other partner (the ‘partner’). By building on self-efficacy research (Bandura, 1997), we hypothesized vicarious experience and verbal persuasion to be the mediators underlying this crossover process. We expected tha...

Neff, Angela; Niessen, Cornelia; Sonnentag, Sabine; Unger, Dana

2013-01-01

211

A behavior-analytic critique of Bandura's self-efficacy theory  

OpenAIRE

A behavior-analytic critique of self-efficacy theory is presented. Self-efficacy theory asserts that efficacy expectations determine approach behavior and physiological arousal of phobics as well as numerous other clinically important behaviors. Evidence which is purported to support this assertion is reviewed. The evidence consists of correlations between self-efficacy ratings and other behaviors. Such response-response relationships do not unequivocally establish that one response causes an...

Biglan, Anthony

1987-01-01

212

An Investigation into Iranian EFL Learners’ Level of Writing Self-efficacy  

OpenAIRE

This article sets out to examine the relationship between EFL learners’ sense of self-efficacy and their writing achievement. In order to tackle with this question, two self-efficacy questionnaires were employed, English and General self-efficacy. Ninety-three Iranian EFL learners from four different universities in north-eastern part of Iran took part in the study. Pearson correlation and ANOVA were run to analyze the collected data. The findings indicated a significant relationship no...

Azar Hosseini Fatemi; Fatemeh Vahidnia

2013-01-01

213

Self-efficacy instruments for patients with chronic diseases suffer from methodological limitations - a systematic review  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Measurement of self-efficacy requires carefully developed and validated instruments. It is currently unclear whether available self-efficacy instruments for chronic diseases fulfill these requirements. Our aim was to systematically identify all existing self-efficacy scales for five major chronic diseases and to assess their development and validation process. Methods We conducted a systematic literature search in electronic databases (MEDLINE, PSYCHINFO, and EMBASE) to id...

Steurer-Stey Claudia; Svarin Anna; Frei Anja; Puhan Milo A

2009-01-01

214

English Bar as a Venue to Boost Students’ Speaking Self-Efficacy at the Tertiary Level  

OpenAIRE

Research in EFL and ESL has confirmed that self-efficacy affects language learners’ choices of learning tasks, persistence, motivation and achievement. As a cognitive construct, self-efficacy can be strengthened by both outcomes of behaviors and input from the environment. This paper studies the effects of an English Bar, a self-access center for students to practice oral English, on Chinese college students’ self-efficacy enhancement. The study’s questionnaire and in-depth interviews r...

Mingxu Liu

2013-01-01

215

A Study of Self-efficacy in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease and Its Predictors  

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Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Enhancement of empowerment in patients with coronary artery disease has a major role in the promotion of their health behaviors. Promotion of self-efficacy is a one of the ways for improving this skill, which has a significant impact on improving patients’ condition and on preventing complications and readmission. The objective of this study was to determine the predictors of general, exercise, and diet behavior self-efficacies in coronary artery disease patients.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 195 patients with coronary artery disease referred to the Heart Clinic of Educational Treatment Center of Dr Heshmat Hospital in Rasht, were selected through convenient sampling and were surveyed through questionnaires about illness perception, general self-efficacy, exercise self-efficacy and diet behavior self-efficacy. The Chi 2 test was used to examine the relations between variables, and the multiple logistic regression test was used to determine the predictors.Results: In this study, 74.9% of samples had desirable general self-efficacy, 86.2% had desirable diet self-efficacy, and 28.2% had desirable exercise self-efficacy. In addition, variables such as age, sex, diagnosis of heart disease, and illness perception were predictors of general self-efficacy. Occupational status and illness perception variables were the predictors of exercise self-efficacy; and the predictor of diet self-efficacy was illness perception.Conclusion: Considering the results of this research, it seems that more precise plannings are needed for the promotion of exercise self-efficacy in coronary artery disease patients.

Ezzat Paryad

2013-03-01

216

Ethnic identity, collective self-esteem and academic self-efficacy among tertiary education students  

OpenAIRE

This study examined the relationships between ethnic identity, collective self-esteem and academic self-efficacy among students at a higher learning institution. These relationships were examined among a sample of 144 respondents. The multigroup ethnic identity measure, the collective self-esteem scale and the academic self-efficacy scale were used to measure ethnic identity, collective self-esteem and academic self-efficacy, respectively. Positive correlations were found be...

Thomas, Tsholofelo Angela

2011-01-01

217

Reliability and Validity of the Self Efficacy Expectations and Outcome Expectations After ICD Implantation Scales  

OpenAIRE

The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and validity characteristics of two new scales that measure self-efficacy expectations (SE-ICD) and outcome expectations (OE-ICD) in survivors (n=168) of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), all of whom received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Cronbach's alpha reliability demonstrated good internal consistency (SE-ICD ? = 0.93 and OE-ICD ? = 0.81). Correlations with other self-efficacy instruments (general self-efficacy and so...

Dougherty, Cynthia M.; Johnston, Sandra K.; Thompson, Elaine Adams

2007-01-01

218

The role of sports training and recreation at self-efficacy perception of adolescents  

OpenAIRE

In the following diploma the role of a sports training and a sports recreation for the perception of adolescents’ self-efficacy is presented. In the theoretical part the self-efficacy theory and its placement into adolescence are described as well as all three kinds of sports workout (sports training, sports recreation and sports education), connection between sport and adolescence and sport’s influence on the self-efficacy. In the empirical part the role of the sports training and rec...

Ivanc?ic?, Hani

2013-01-01

219

Health locus of control and the sense of self-efficacy in patients with systolic heart failure: a pilot study  

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Full Text Available Agnieszka Rydlewska,1,2 Justyna Krzysztofik,3 Julia Libergal,3 Agata Rybak,3 Waldemar Banasiak,1 Piotr Ponikowski,1,2 Ewa A Jankowska1,21Centre for Heart Diseases, Department of Cardiology, Military Hospital, Wroclaw, Poland; 2Department of Heart Diseases, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland; 3Student’s Scientific Organization, Laboratory for Applied Research on Cardiovascular System, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, PolandBackground: Treatment of heart failure (HF requires the lifelong adherence to medical self-care regimes. The objective of this study was to examine health-control beliefs and the sense of self-efficacy (psychological features particularly important for efficient compliance among patients suffering from chronic diseases in patients with systolic HF in relation to clinical status and depressive symptoms.Subjects and methods: Sixty-six consecutive patients with chronic systolic HF, hospitalized in the Centre for Heart Diseases, Military Hospital (94% men, age: 61 ± 11 years, ischemic etiology: 63%, left ventricular ejection fraction: 32% ± 12%, filled in (during their hospital stay: (1 the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale measuring three possible localizations of health control: “internality” (ie, the belief that health status depends only on personal decisions and behaviors; “powerful others externality” ([PHLC subscale] ie, the conviction that health depends on “powerful people” such as doctors, family members, close friends, and “chance externality” (ie, belief that health status is determined by chance, fate, or luck, and (2 the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale. The results obtained by HF patients were compared to those reported by patients with other chronic diseases and healthy subjects.Results: In patients with HF, internality was similar to values obtained by patients with diabetes, men after myocardial infarction, and women after mastectomy; and was lower than in healthy subjects. Powerful others externality was more pronounced in patients with HF as compared to other groups of patients and healthy people. Only women after mastectomy had higher scores of PHLC. In patients with HF, chance externality was similar to values reported in patients with renal failure, men after myocardial infarction, and women after mastectomy; and was less pronounced than in healthy subjects. The majority (77% of patients with HF were characterized by a high sense of self-efficacy (>the 7th sten score, having the highest sense of self-efficacy among patients with other chronic diseases and healthy controls. Higher internality was accompanied by higher sense of self-efficacy (P < 0.05 in patients with HF. Subjects with high plasma N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (reflecting the disease severity had the least pronounced internality (P < 0.05, whereas those with more advance depressive symptoms had the lower sense of self-efficacy (P = < 0.05.Conclusion: Patients with systolic HF demonstrate a conviction that other people, including physicians, have a large influence on their health status, and at the same time are aware of the efficacy of their own activities in coping with the disease. Such a configuration of psychological features seems to be beneficial in the context of the developing modern strategies, which due to the improved cooperation between the physicians and the patients could enhance the compliance in patients with HF.Keywords: health locus of control, self-efficacy, heart failure, compliance, depressive symptoms

Rydlewska A

2013-04-01

220

Registered nurses' self-efficacy for assessing and responding to woman abuse in emergency department settings.  

Science.gov (United States)

Enhanced knowledge regarding the factors that influence and support the self-efficacy of emergency department (ED) registered nurses and their provision of care to women who have experienced abuse is necessary for the promotion of optimal health care. The purpose of this study was to examine the self-efficacy of registered nurses with respect to assessing and responding to woman abuse in the ED. Study hypotheses and research questions were derived from Bandura's theory of self-efficacy. A secondary analysis (N = 158) of data from the Violence against Women: Health Care Provider Survey was completed. Originally, survey questions were not developed to operationalize the concepts outlined by Bandura. However, they were found to be good indicators. Four scales were developed from the item pool, validated through factor analysis and used to operationalize study variables. Positive relationships were found between self-efficacy information available to ED registered nurses and their self-efficacy for assessing and responding to woman abuse (r= .73, p self-efficacy expectations, and actual clinical responses related to woman abuse (r= .55, p self-efficacy information, self-efficacy expectations and outcome expectancies predicted ED registered nurses' clinical responses to woman abuse. Overall, the model explained 40% of the variance in ED registered nurses' clinical responses to woman abuse. Results provide additional support for Bandura's theory and demonstrate that the clinical responses of ED registered nurses are complex and must be understood in terms of self-efficacy and the factors that support its development. PMID:17290955

Hollingsworth, Erin; Ford-Gilboe, Marilyn

2006-12-01

221

Investigating Preschool and Primary School Teachers’ Self-Efficacy and Needs in Teaching Science: A Pilot Study  

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Full Text Available In recent years, the curricula reforms at the levels of preschool and primary school in Sweden have caused new demands on the teachers. In particular, numerous teachers lack the educational training in science subjects. Therefore, this study aims to investigate teachers’ self-efficacy and needs in relationto science teaching. A total of 71 teachers, divided into three groups of preschool, 1-3 grades and 4-6 grades, were invited to join this pilot study. From the EU FP7 project, PROFILES, a Likert scale questionnaire (with scores from 1 to 3 to represent strongly disagree, agree to strongly agree, and I don’t know was scored 0 was used and revised for the data collection in this pilot study. The results showed that the participating teachers had relatively high self-efficacy and no significant differences were found among the three groups of teachers. However, even though the teachers had high self-efficacy, the needs of further education were expressed by the teachers to a large extent. In particular, the group of preschool teachers addressed the need for more content knowledge (CK in physics and chemistry (>41%. In terms of the groups of 1-3 and 4-6 grades teachers, the needs relating to scientific literacy were revealed, with a focus on engaging students in socio-scientific problems (52%, 56% and assessment (44%, 61%. The implication of this study is discussed in the hope to contribute to teachers’ professional development for both pre- and in-service teachers in science education.

Susanne Walan

2014-03-01

222

Association of research self-efficacy with medical student career interests, specialization, and scholarship: a case study.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study used variables proposed in social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to focus the evaluation of a research curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University (CCLCM). Eight cohorts of CCLCM medical students completed a web-based version of the six-scale Clinical Research Appraisal Inventory-Short Form (CRAI-SF) items at matriculation (n = 128) or graduation (n = 111) during 2009-2013. Parametric statistics were used to compare CRAI-SF scales to domains proposed in SCCT: trainees' characteristics (gender, training level, advanced degree), career interests, career intentions (medical specialty), and performance (peer-reviewed publications and required thesis topic). A number of lessons emerged in using theory to frame the evaluation of a complex educational program. Graduates rated their research self-efficacy significantly higher on all six CRAI-SF scales with large effect sizes (>.90) on five scales (Conceptualizing a Study, Study Design and Analysis, Responsible Research Conduct, Collaborating with Others, and Reporting a Study). Women and men did not have significantly different scores on CRAI-SF scales (p > .05), suggesting that the research program provides adequate supports for women students. Most thesis projects addressed clinical (36.9 %, n = 41) or translational (34.2 %, n = 38) research topics. The CRAI-SF discriminated between medical school matriculates and graduates, suggesting that research self-efficacy increases with mastery experiences. No significant relationships occurred between CRAI-SF scores and graduates' thesis topics or chosen clinical specialty. Correlations demonstrated significant relationships between graduates' perceptions of research self-efficacy and their interest in clinical research careers. PMID:25037264

Bierer, S Beth; Prayson, Richard A; Dannefer, Elaine F

2015-05-01

223

Enhancing Pre-service Teacher’s Self-efficacy and Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Designing Digital Media with Self-regulated Learning Instructional Support in Online Project-based Learning  

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Full Text Available This study investigated pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy in designing digital media and their technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK for designing digital media using different forms of self- regulated learning instructional support for online project-based learning. The study used a 2x2 factorial research design. The sample consisted of 232 pre-service teachers from an institution situated in Bangkok, Thailand. The four different forms of self-regulated learning instructional support for online project-based learning were PB+SQ+PA, PB+SQonly, PB+PAonly, and PBonly. Two-way Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA was used for data analysis. The results showed significant differences in pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy and TPCK posttest scores. No main effect was found between two different self-regulated learning strategies (SQ and PA upon the means of self-efficacy in designing digital media scores and TPCK scores. The self-regulated learning strategies (SQ and PA had a statistically significant interaction upon the means of self-efficacy in designing digital media scores while the self-regulated learning strategies (SQ and PA had no interaction upon the means of the TPCK scores.

2013-01-01

224

Using logistic regression to investigate self-efficacy and the predictors for National Council Licensure Examination success for baccalaureate nursing students  

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Full Text Available Objectives: Ensuring success on the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX® is a complex role for nurse educators. It is vital that nurse educators attain knowledge about the predictors of NCLEX success so they can design strategies and interventions to optimize student performance. Numerous studies are noted that examined the predictors for NCLEX success, reflecting great interest in this area. However, most investigated the academic predictors; few studies examined the nonacademic predictors. The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of selected academic, nonacademic, and self-efficacy variables on NCLEX outcomes to provide new knowledge to nursing science about these predictors. Methods: This quantitative study used Albert Bandura’s Social Learning Theory as the theoretical framework to guide its focus. Academic variables were pre-nursing scores/grades and nursing course grades, while the nonacademic variables focused on personal and environmental factors/stressors, primary language spoken, and self-efficacy expectations. A national study was conducted using an online survey. After nursing graduates (n=196 received their NCLEX scores, instruments with established reliability and validity were used to collect data about their experiences while attending school. The instruments included the (1 Recent Life Changes Questionnaire (RLCQ; (2 The Brief Measure of Worry Severity (BMWS; and (3 The General Perceived Self-Efficacy scale. Multiple logistic regression was the primary data analysis method used to identify the variables that influence NCLEX passage. Correlation analysis using Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient was also done to identify relationships existing among self-efficacy, and academic and nonacademic variables of NCLEX passage. The Chi-square test for independence was used to investigate primary language spoken and NCLEX outcome. Results: Logistic regression findings demonstrated that the medical-surgical grade, home and family events and responsibilities, and self-efficacy expectations were significant variables affecting NCLEX outcomes. Correlation analysis revealed that all academic variables showed a positive correlation with self-efficacy expectations, indicating that as a course grade improved, self-efficacy increased. Also, negative correlations between the nonacademic variables and self-efficacy expectations indicated that as worry or responsibilities increased for the individual, self-efficacy decreased. The Chi-square test for independence showed a significant relationship between primary language spoken and NCLEX outcome. Conclusions: Findings imply that medical-surgical nursing courses need to be a priority in curriculum planning. Another finding demonstrates the influence of self-efficacy on NCLEX passage – the more confident a student is and the more support systems available, the better he or she will perform. This finding points to the critical need for nurse educators to study ways to increase a student’s self-confidence. The findings of this study also demonstrated that home and family events and responsibilities influence success. This knowledge may assist nurse educators to consider informing students about the need for them to seek out assistance from faculty if home and family events present obstacles to learning. Finally, it was noted that primary language spoken affects outcome. Nurse educators need to plan curricular strategies that will meet individual student needs by having a variety of support resources in place for these students. 

Linda Anne Silvestri

2012-12-01

225

Predictive Power of the Sources of Primary School Students' Self-Efficacy Beliefs on Their Self-Efficacy Beliefs for Learning and Performance  

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The purpose of this study is to reveal the extent to which the sources of 6th- 8th grade students' self-efficacy beliefs predict their self-efficacy beliefs for learning and performance. The study is correlational and was conducted on a total of 1049 students during the fall term of the educational year 2010-2011. The data of the study were…

Arslan, Ali

2012-01-01

226

Adaptation of Academic Self-Efficacy Scale into Turkish  

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Full Text Available Purpose of this study is to adapt Academic Self-efficacy Scale into Turkish, determine validity and reliability of the scale developed by Morgan and Jinks (2003. Because of the correlation between the marks obtained from the English and Turkish Forms of the scale is .95, both of these forms were accepted as equivalent. Working group of the study included 380 students who were attending 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th grades of four different primary schools in three counties of Ankara. Structural validity of the scale determined through exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. As a result of exploratory factor analysis, it was seen that scale has three factor structure as it was original, but the third factor formed different factor. Factors were ability, context, and educational quality. Scale's reliability of Turkish form was determined as .80 with repetition and through Cronbach alfa inner reliability technique as .82.

Hüseyin ÖNCÜ

2012-04-01

227

Nanotechnology and Secondary Science Teacher's Self-Efficacy  

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The recommendations of the United States President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and the multi-agency National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) identified the need to prepare the workforce and specialists in the field of nanotechnology in order for the United States to continue to compete in the global marketplace. There is a lack of research reported in recent literature on the readiness of secondary science teachers to introduce higher level sciences---specifically nanotechnology---in their classes. The central research question of this study examined secondary science teachers' beliefs about teaching nanotechnology comfortably, effectively, and successfully. Bandura's self-efficacy theory provided the conceptual framework for this phenomenological study. A data analysis rubric was used to identify themes and patterns that emerged from detailed descriptions during in-depth interviews with 15 secondary science teachers. The analysis revealed the shared, lived experiences of teachers and their beliefs about their effectiveness and comfort in teaching higher-level sciences, specifically nanotechnology. The results of the study indicated that, with rare exceptions, secondary science teachers do not feel comfortable or effective, nor do they believe they have adequate training to teach nanotechnology concepts to their students. These teachers believed they were not prepared or trained in incorporating these higher level science concepts in the curriculum. Secondary science teachers' self-efficacy and personal beliefs of effectiveness in teaching nanotechnology can be an important component in achieving a positive social change by helping to familiarize high school students with nanotechnology and how it can benefit society and the future of science.

Cox, Elena K.

228

Relationships between Teachers' Creativity Fostering Behaviors and Their Self-Efficacy Beliefs  

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This study aims to examine primary and secondary school teachers' creativity fostering behaviors and self-efficacy beliefs according to gender and subject matters taught by teachers and to investigate the relationships between teachers' creativity fostering behaviors and their self-efficacy beliefs. The study was conducted with the…

Ozkal, Nese

2014-01-01

229

Changes in Self-Efficacy of Prospective Special and General Education Teachers: Implication for Inclusive Education  

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The impact of three variables on the self-efficacy of 992 general and special education preservice teachers was examined. These variables were years of preservice education, experience with children with special educational needs, and training in inclusion or exceptional education. All participants responded to a teacher self-efficacy scale that…

Leyser, Yona; Zeiger, Tali; Romi, Shlomo

2011-01-01

230

Treatment of Phobic Disorders Using Cognitive and Exposure Methods: A Self-Efficacy Analysis.  

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Examined predictions derived from self-efficacy theory in comparing the effects of exposure and cognitive interventions with simple phobics. Guided exposure (GE) was significantly superior to cognitive restructuring (CR) in enhancing approach behavior, increasing level and strength of self-efficacy, reducing subjective fear, and decreasing…

Biran, Mia; Wilson, G. Terence

1981-01-01

231

Computer Self-Efficacy, Computer Anxiety, Performance and Personal Outcomes of Turkish Physical Education Teachers  

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The purpose of this study is to determine the computer self-efficacy, performance outcome, personal outcome, and affect and anxiety level of physical education teachers. Influence of teaching experience, computer usage and participation of seminars or in-service programs on computer self-efficacy level were determined. The subjects of this study…

Aktag, Isil

2015-01-01

232

Sources of Self-Efficacy: An Investigation of Elementary School Students in France  

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The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of Bandura's (1997) theorized sources of self-efficacy on the academic and self-regulatory efficacy beliefs of 3rd-grade elementary school students (N = 395) in France, to examine whether classroom context might explain a significant portion of the variation in self-efficacy, and to assess…

Joet, Gwenaelle; Usher, Ellen L.; Bressoux, Pascal

2011-01-01

233

Developing Teaching Self-Efficacy in Research Institutions: A Study of Award-Winning Professors  

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The purpose of this study was to assess the sources of award-wining research professors' (six women; six men) teaching self-efficacy through the framework of Bandura's (1986) social cognitive theory. Semi-structured interviews revealed that mastery experiences and social persuasions were particularly influential sources of self-efficacy and that…

Morris, David B.; Usher, Ellen L.

2011-01-01

234

Student and Teacher Self-Efficacy and the Connection to Reading and Writing  

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Self-efficacy or the belief in one's ability (Bandura, 1977) on the part of both teachers and students is thought to be directly related to teacher and student success. Few studies have compared teacher efficacy, student efficacy, and student ability at once. This study examined the relationship between teacher self-efficacy, student…

Corkett, Julie; Hatt, Blaine; Benevides, Tina

2011-01-01

235

Middle School Students' Science Self-Efficacy and Its Sources: Examination of Gender Difference  

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The main purpose of the present study is to investigate middle school students' science self-efficacy as well as its sources and outcomes as a function of gender. Bandura's hypothesized sources of self-efficacy (i.e., mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and emotional arousal) in addition to being inviting with self and…

Kiran, Dekant; Sungur, Semra

2012-01-01

236

Research Design and the Predictive Power of Measures of Self-Efficacy  

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The purpose of this enquiry was to examine how research design impacts on the predictive power of measures of self-efficacy. Three cautions for designing research into self-efficacy drawn from the seminal work of Albert Bandura (1986) and a further caution proposed by the current author together form the analytical framework for this enquiry. For…

Moriarty, Beverley

2014-01-01

237

Using Asynchronous AV Communication Tools to Increase Academic Self-Efficacy  

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Technology-enhanced learning environments (TELEs) deliver instructional content and provide an array of scaffolding features designed to support independent student learning. TELEs also support teacher efforts to guide student inquiry within these sometimes complex environments. Self-efficacy, defined by Bandura [Bandura, A. (1994). Self-efficacy.…

Girasoli, Anthony J.; Hannafin, Robert D.

2008-01-01

238

Developing and Validating a New Instrument to Measure the Self-Efficacy of Elementary Mathematics Teachers  

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The purpose of this study was the development and validation of an instrument to measure the self-efficacy of elementary mathematics teachers. Self-efficacy, as defined by Bandura, was the theoretical framework for the development of the instrument. The complex belief systems of mathematics teachers, as touted by Ernest (1989) provided insight…

McGee, Jennifer Richardson

2012-01-01

239

Contributions of Self-Efficacy Theory to Career Counseling: A Personal Perspective  

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In this document the author provides a brief overview of A. Bandura's self-efficacy theory. The author also provides a discussion of the value of this theory to career counselors, which includes particularly useful features of the concept of self-efficacy and suggestions for its application in career assessment and counseling, with a special focus…

Betz, Nancy E.

2004-01-01

240

Construction and Field Testing of the "Job Seeking Self-Efficacy Scale"  

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The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument, the "Job Seeking Self-Efficacy Scale," to measure perceived self-efficacy in job-seeking activities. The construction of the instrument, which incorporated tasks that have been determined to be important in job seeking for individuals with disabilities, was based on Bandura's theory of…

Strauser, David R.; Berven, Norman L.

2006-01-01

241

The Self-Efficacy Scale for Preschool Teachers Regarding Asthma Care: Instrument Development and Validation  

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Background: The purpose of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a questionnaire that assesses preschool teachers' self-efficacy in providing asthma care. Methods: A total of 407 teachers from 54 preschools in Taiwan participated in the study by completing the asthma management self-efficacy scale. We assessed…

Gau, Bih-Shya; Hung, Chao-Chia

2014-01-01

242

Interaction between Task Values and Self-Efficacy on Maladaptive Achievement Strategy Use  

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We tested the interaction between task value and self-efficacy on defensive pessimism, academic cheating, procrastination and self-handicapping among 574 Korean 11th graders in the context of English as a foreign language. We hypothesised that perceiving high value in tasks or domains for which self-efficacy was low would pose a threat to…

Lee, Jeesoo; Bong, Mimi; Kim, Sung-il

2014-01-01

243

Initial Teacher Education: Does Self-Efficacy Influence Candidate Teacher Academic Achievement and Future Career Performance?  

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This quantitative investigation examined the influence of low and high self-efficacy on candidate teacher academic performance in a foreign language teaching methodology course through testing the speculation that high self-efficacy levels would improve pedagogical-content knowledge (PCK). Positivism guided the research design at the levels of…

Shawer, Saad F.

2013-01-01

244

Exploring the Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Retention in Introductory Physics  

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The quantitative results of Sources of Self-Efficacy in Science Courses-Physics (SOSESC-P) are presented as a logistic regression predicting the passing of students in introductory Physics with Calculus I, overall as well as disaggregated by gender. Self-efficacy as a theory to explain human behavior change [Bandura [1977] "Psychological Review,…

Sawtelle, Vashti; Brewe, Eric; Kramer, Laird H.

2012-01-01

245

Internet Self-Efficacy Preferences of Internet Based Environments and Achievement of Prospective Teachers  

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The aims of this study are to determine prospective chemistry teachers' internet self-efficacy and preferences of constructivist internet-assisted environments and to examine the relationship between their internet self-efficacy and their preferences for constructivist internet-assisted environments, the relationship between their achievement in…

Ozyalcin Oskay, Ozge

2011-01-01

246

Social Self-Efficacy, Academic Locus of Control, and Internet Addiction  

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The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship of internet addiction, social self-efficacy, and academic locus of control. Participants were 311 university students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Online Cognition Scale, the Academic Locus of Control Scale, and the Perceived Social Self-efficacy Scale. The…

Iskender, Murat; Akin, Ahmet

2010-01-01

247

Beginning Generalist Teacher Self-Efficacy for Music Compared with Maths and English  

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In 2008, 201 beginning generalist teachers throughout Queensland, Australia, responded to a questionnaire intended to create a snapshot of current self-efficacy beliefs towards teaching music. Beginning teachers were asked to rank their perceived level of teacher self-efficacy for music, English and maths. Results were analysed through a series of…

Garvis, Susanne

2013-01-01

248

Teacher Self-Efficacy and Classroom Management Styles in Jordanian Schools  

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Two main purposes guided this study. The first was to identify the degree to which Jordanian teachers practise classroom management styles in their classrooms and their level of teacher self-efficacy. The second purpose was to explore the relationships between classroom management styles and teacher self-efficacy. This study is quantitative in…

Abu-Tineh, Abdullah M.; Khasawneh, Samar A.; Khalaileh, Huda A.

2011-01-01

249

Determination of Self-Efficacy Beliefs of High School Students towards Math Literacy  

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The purpose of this study is to determine the high school students' self-efficacy beliefs about math literacy, and examine this beliefs in terms of some variables. The research was conducted on 712 high school students. A questionnaire and Math Literacy Self-Efficacy Scale were used for data collection. The data were analyzed in terms of t-test,…

Ozgen, Kemal; Bindaka, Recep

2011-01-01

250

The Perception of Educational Software Development Self-Efficacy among Undergraduate CEIT Teacher Candidates  

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The objective of this study was to analyze self-efficacy perceptions for education software development of teacher candidates studying at Department of Computer Education and Instructional Technologies, with respect to a range of variables. The Educational Software Development Self-Efficacy Perception Scale was used as data collection tool. Sixty…

Uzun, Adem; Ozkilic, Ruchan; Senturk, Aysan

2013-01-01

251

Women's Self-Efficacy Perceptions in Mathematics and Science: Investigating USC-MESA Students  

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Higher education institutions have struggled with the underrepresentation of female students in the STEM majors. The authors investigate the USC-MESA program and the role of women's self-efficacy perceptions in mathematics and science. It is crucial to understand the theory of self-efficacy in examining historically underrepresented populations in…

Hong, Rebecca C.; Jun, Alexander

2012-01-01

252

The Effect of Communication Skills and Interpersonal Problem Solving Skills on Social Self-Efficacy  

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The purpose of this study was to examine communication skills, interpersonal problem solving skills, and social self-efficacy perception of adolescents and the predictive role of communication skills and interpersonal problem solving skills on social self-efficacy. This study is a quantitative and relational study aimed at examining the…

Erozkan, Atilgan

2013-01-01

253

The Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Black Women Leaders in Fortune 500 Companies  

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Black women are underrepresented in leadership positions within organizations. The extent to which self-efficacy influences the advancement potential of Black females is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the self-efficacy beliefs of black women in leadership positions and to determine how Black women leaders' careers are…

Jackson, LaTonya R.

2012-01-01

254

Using Mathematics in Teaching Science Self-Efficacy Scale--UMSSS: A Validity and Reliability Study  

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In this study, an instrument, Using Mathematics in Science Self-efficacy Scale (UMSSS), was developed in order to determine preservice science teachers' self-efficacy toward the use of mathematics in their lessons. Data gathered from 250 preservice science teachers were used for Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis…

Can, Bilge Taskin; Gunhan, Berna Canturk; Erdal, Sevinc Ongel

2012-01-01

255

Item response modeling: an evaluation of the children's fruit and vegetable self-efficacy questionnaire  

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Perceived self-efficacy (SE) for eating fruit and vegetables (FV) is a key variable mediating FV change in interventions. This study applies item response modeling (IRM) to a fruit, juice and vegetable self-efficacy questionnaire (FVSEQ) previously validated with classical test theory (CTT) procedur...

256

Mastery of Negative Affect: A Hierarchical Model of Emotional Self-Efficacy Beliefs  

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Building on previous studies that formulated measures for assessing self-efficacy beliefs regarding the management of anger/irritation and despondency/sadness, we developed 3 new scales to assess perceived self-efficacy in managing fear, shame/embarrassment, and guilt. In Study 1, the internal and construct validity of the 5 aforementioned…

Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Di Giunta, Laura; Pastorelli, Concetta; Eisenberg, Nancy

2013-01-01

257

Effects of School-Wide Positive Behavior Support on Teacher Self-Efficacy  

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This study examined the relationships between implementation of a school-wide approach to behavior, School-wide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS), and teacher self-efficacy. Twenty-two teachers from schools implementing SWPBS and 40 teachers from schools not implementing SWPBS completed a questionnaire measuring aspects of self-efficacy.…

Kelm, Joanna L.; McIntosh, Kent

2012-01-01

258

Infant Temperament and Maternal Parenting Self-efficacy Predict Child Weight Outcomes  

OpenAIRE

Relationships between infant negative reactivity and self-regulation, parenting self-efficacy, and child weight outcomes were examined. Greater observed negative reactivity predicted more child weight gain when mothers had lower parenting self-efficacy. Lower mother-reported self-regulation predicted a greater child weight status. Results highlight potential early risk/protective factors.

Anzman-frasca, Stephanie; Stifter, Cynthia A.; Paul, Ian M.; Birch, Leann L.

2013-01-01

259

Academic Support Services and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy in Student Athletes  

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This study examined the relationship between evaluations of academic support services and student athletes' career decision-making self-efficacy. One hundred and fifty-eight NCAA athletes (68% male) from 11 Division I teams completed measures of satisfaction with their academic support services, career decision-making self-efficacy, general…

Burns, Gary N.; Jasinski, Dale; Dunn, Steve; Fletcher, Duncan

2013-01-01

260

Social Support Reciprocity and Occupational Self-Efficacy Beliefs during Mothers' Organizational Re-Entry  

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The present study assesses the effects of a lack of social support reciprocity at work on employees' occupational self-efficacy beliefs. We assume that the self-efficacy effects of received support and support reciprocity depend on the specific work context (e.g., phase in the process of organizational socialization). 297 women who returned to…

Jaeckel, Dalit; Seiger, Christine P.; Orth, Ulrich; Wiese, Bettina S.

2012-01-01

261

Self-Efficacy, Reflection, and Achievement: A Short-Term Longitudinal Examination  

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This short-term longitudinal study involved the inclusion of personal self-efficacy and the 4 categories of reflective thinking practice within 1 conceptual framework. Using structural equation modeling, the author explored the temporally displaced effects of prior performance (Time 1) on self-efficacy (Time 2, Time 3) and the four categories of…

Phan, Huy P.

2014-01-01

262

Attribution and Self-Efficacy and Their Interrelationship in the Korean EFL Context  

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This study examined the interrelationships between learners' attributions and self-efficacy and their achievements in learning English as a foreign language. Participants were 192 ninth-grade English learners in Korea who were asked to provide attribution and self-efficacy ratings upon receiving test grades. Results indicated that learners with…

Hsieh, Peggy Pei-Hsuan; Kang, Hyun-Sook

2010-01-01

263

Informational Sources, Self-Efficacy and Achievement: A Temporally Displaced Approach  

Science.gov (United States)

Personal self-efficacy is an important theoretical orientation that helps to explain students' learning and academic achievements. One area of research inquiry has involved the four major sources of information and their predictive effects on self-efficacy. As an extension for examination, the purpose of our investigation was to explore the…

Phan, Huy Phuong

2012-01-01

264

Path Analysis Examining Self-Efficacy and Decision-Making Performance on a Simulated Baseball Task  

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The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between decision-making self-efficacy and decision-making performance in sport. Undergraduate students (N = 78) performed 10 trials of a decision-making task in baseball. Self-efficacy was measured before performing each trial. Decision-making performance was assessed by decision speed and…

Hepler, Teri J.; Feltz, Deborah L.

2012-01-01

265

Impact of Adolescents' Filial Self-Efficacy on Quality of Family Functioning and Satisfaction  

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In this prospective study, we tested a structural model in which adolescents' perceived self-efficacy to manage parental relationships affected their satisfaction with family life both directly, and indirectly, through its impact on family practices. Findings based on 380 Italian adolescents showed that perceived filial self-efficacy was linked…

Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Pastorelli, Concetta; Regalia, Camillo; Scabini, Eugenia; Bandura, Albert

2005-01-01

266

The Relationship of Academic Self-Efficacy to Class Participation and Exam Performance  

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This study examined the relationship of academic self-efficacy to engagement in class discussion and performance on major course exams among students (N = 165) in an undergraduate human development course. Cluster analysis was used to identify three levels of academic self-efficacy: high (n = 34), medium (n = 91), and low (n = 40). Results…

Galyon, Charles E.; Blondin, Carolyn A.; Yaw, Jared S.; Nalls, Meagan L.; Williams, Robert L.

2012-01-01

267

The Effect of Self-Assessment on EFL Learners' Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated the continuous influence of self-assessment on EFL (English as a foreign language) learners' self-efficacy. The participants, divided into an experimental and a control group, were 57 Iranian EFL learners in an English-language institute. The participants' self-efficacy was measured through a questionnaire that…

Baleghizadeh, Sasan; Masoun, Atieh

2013-01-01

268

Factors Influencing Teachers' Technology Self-Efficacy: A Case Study  

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Factors influencing teachers' levels of technology self-efficacy were examined through a qualitative multi-site, multi-subject case study research design. An initial survey was administered to all full-time, certified teachers at three school sites in order to gauge teachers' current level of technology self-efficacy. From that…

Farah, Amy Caroline

2012-01-01

269

Self-Efficacy in Internet-Based Learning Environments: A Literature Review  

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This paper reviews 46 papers from 1999 to 2009 regarding self-efficacy in Internet-based learning environments, and discusses three major categories of research: (1) learners' Internet self-efficacy, assessing learners' confidence in their skills or knowledge of operating general Internet functions or applications in Internet-based learning; (2)…

Tsai, Chin-Chung; Chuang, Shih-Chyueh; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Meng-Jung

2011-01-01

270

Self-Efficacy, Motivation, and Academic Adjustment among African American Women Attending Institutions of Higher Education  

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This study examined the relationships among self-efficacy beliefs, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and academic adjustment among 111 African American women in college. Results revealed that self-efficacy beliefs predicted Motivation to Know, Externally Regulated motivation, Identified motivation, and academic adjustment. Furthermore,…

Thomas, Deneia M.; Love, Keisha M.; Roan-Belle, Clarissa; Tyler, Keneth M.; Brown, Carrie Lynn; Garriott, Patton O.

2009-01-01

271

Validity-Supporting Evidence of the Self-Efficacy for Teaching Mathematics Instrument  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study is to provide evidence of reliability and validity of the Self-Efficacy for Teaching Mathematics Instrument (SETMI). Self-efficacy, as defined by Bandura, was the theoretical framework for the development of the instrument. The complex belief systems of mathematics teachers, as touted by Ernest provided insights into the…

McGee, Jennifer R.; Wang, Chuang

2014-01-01

272

Measuring Self-Efficacy: Multitrait-Multimethod Comparison of Scaling Procedures.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examined convergent and discriminant validity of various self-efficacy measures across two studies, one involving 358 U.S. high school students and another involving 235 Korean female high school students. Across the studies the first-order confirmatory factor analyses provide support for both convergent validity of different self-efficacy

Bong, Mimi; Hocevar, Dennis

2002-01-01

273

Success in Science Learning and Preservice Science Teaching Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined relationships between conceptual understanding, self-efficacy, and outcome expectancy beliefs as preservice teachers learned science in a constructivist-oriented methods class. Participants included 49 preservice elementary teachers. Analysis revealed that participants increased in self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and…

Bleicher, Robert E.; Lindgren, Joan

2005-01-01

274

Gender Differences in Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Back Substitution in Multiple-Choice Assessment  

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A quantitative observational study exploring the relationship of gender to mathematics self-efficacy and the frequency of back substitution in multiple-choice assessment sampled undergraduates at a western United States parochial university. Research questions addressed: to what extent are there gender differences in mathematics self-efficacy, as…

Goodwin, K. Shane; Ostrom, Lee; Scott, Karen Wilson

2009-01-01

275

School Counselor Program Choice and Self-Efficacy: Relationship to Achievement Gap and Equity  

Science.gov (United States)

This article reports the results of a national study of American School Counselor Association members (N = 860). Information includes level of school counselor self-efficacy, type of program, status of achievement gap, and equity in their schools. School counselors with higher self-efficacy were more aware of achievement gap data, and school…

Bodenhorn, Nancy; Wolfe, Edward W.; Airen, Osaro E.

2010-01-01

276

Mindfulness and Counseling Self-Efficacy: The Mediating Role of Attention and Empathy  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the predictive relationship between mindfulness and counseling self-efficacy and the potential mediating effects of attention and empathy. Master's-level counseling interns and doctoral counseling students (N = 179) were surveyed to determine levels of mindfulness, attention, empathy, and counseling self-efficacy. Pearson…

Greason, Paige Bentley; Cashwell, Craig S.

2009-01-01

277

Auto-eficácia e sintomas depressivos em doentes com dor crônica / Self-efficacy and depressive symptoms in chronic pain patients  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Auto-eficácia é a crença na habilidade pessoal de desempenhar com sucesso tarefas ou de apresentar comportamentos para produzir um resultado desejável. É conceito-chave para o adequado controle de doenças crônicas e estudos sobre o tema são incipientes no Brasil. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a crença [...] de auto-eficácia de pacientes com dor crônica e relacioná-la a variáveis sociodemográficas, de características da dor e à presença de sintomas depressivos. MÉTODOS: A amostra, de conveniência, foi de 132 sujeitos. Os instrumentos utilizados foram a Escala de Auto-Eficácia para Dor Crônica (AEDC) e o Inventário de Depressão de Beck (IDB). RESULTADOS: O escore médio de auto-eficácia foi 170,8 (DP = 56,7). Auto-eficácia menor foi observada nos pacientes com até 8 anos de escolaridade, quando comparada à de pacientes com escolaridade entre 9 e 11 anos (p = 0,015). Auto-eficácia mais elevada foi observada nos doentes com dor menos intensa (p = 0,042). A Escala AEDC apresentou correlação negativa com o IDB (r = - 0,48; p Abstract in english BACKGROUND: Self-efficacy is the belief about one’s personal ability to perform a task or specific behavior successfully. Self-efficacy is a key concept to manage chronic diseases and the studies about it are insufficient in Brazil. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate chronic pain patient’s self-efficacy belief [...] and relate to social demographic variables, pain and depressive symptoms. METHODS: The convenience sample was 132 subjects. The instruments utilized were Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale (CPSS) in Portuguese version (AEDC) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). RESULTS: The self-efficacy average score was 170.8 (DP = 56.7). Low self-efficacy was observed in 8 year education level patients compared to 9 to 11 year education level (p = 0.015). Higher self-efficacy was observed in patients with lower pain intensity (p = 0.042). The AEDC was negative correlated to IDB depression (r = - 0.48; p

Marina de Góes, Salvetti; Cibele Andrucioli de Mattos, Pimenta; Lais Verderame, Lage; José Oswaldo de, Oliveira Junior; Roberto de Oliveira, Rocha.

278

Childbirth confidence: validating the Childbirth Self-Efficacy Inventory (CBSEI) in an Australian sample.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the reliability and validity of the Childbirth Self-Efficacy Inventory (CBSEI) (Lowe 1993) in a sample of 100 Australian women. Consistent with US data, the measure was shown to have high internal consistency. Validity of the instrument was determined by applying self-efficacy theory (Bandura 1982), which predicts that parity should have the largest effect on childbirth self-efficacy, followed by knowledge, then support and finally anxiety. Results revealed that having prior good birth experience and knowledge about childbirth had significant effects on childbirth self-efficacy. A factor analysis was performed to determine whether the original factor structure of this instrument held for Australian women. While outcome expectancies and self-efficacy expectancies emerged as distinct factors, the results showed that Australian women did not differentiate between active and second-stage labour. Rather than the two stages of labour emerging as dimensions of the CBSEI, two externally focused coping strategies were revealed. PMID:9378885

Drummond, J; Rickwood, D

1997-09-01

279

When self-efficacy negatively relates to motivation and performance in a learning context.  

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Recent reviews of the training literature have advocated directly manipulating self-efficacy in an attempt to improve the motivation of trainees. However, self-regulation theories conceive of motivation as a function of various goal processes, and assert that the effect of self-efficacy should depend on the process involved. Training contexts may evoke planning processes in which self-efficacy might negatively relate to motivation. Yet the typical between-persons studies in the current literature may obscure the effect. To examine this issue, 63 undergraduate students completed a series of questionnaires measuring self-efficacy and motivation before 5 class exams. Self-efficacy was negatively related to motivation and exam performance at the within-person level of analysis, despite a significant positive relation with performance at the between-persons level. PMID:16953775

Vancouver, Jeffrey B; Kendall, Laura N

2006-09-01

280

Youth self-efficacy domains as predictors of change in routine community mental health services.  

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Abstract Objective: This study examined how youth self-efficacy in four domains-Social, Academic Diligence, Academic Proficiency, and Behavioral Regulation-was associated with youth symptoms and psychotherapy outcomes. Method: Participants were 104 youth (aged 12-17, mean age 14.6) and their parents/guardians. Youth completed a measure of perceived self-efficacy and the Youth Outcome Questionnaire-Self-Report (YOQ-SR) regularly over the course of treatment; parents/guardians also completed the Youth Outcome Questionnaire. Results: Although none of the self-efficacy domains significantly predicted changes in parent reports of symptoms, individual growth curve models indicated that increases in three of the four self-efficacy domains (Social, Academic Diligence, and Behavioral Regulation) over the course of treatment were associated with concurrent improvements in youth-reported symptoms. Conclusions: Results suggest that youth self-efficacy warrants further study in relation to change processes in youth mental health services. PMID:25047703

Warren, Jared S; Salazar, Benjamin C

2014-07-22

281

Self-efficacy and its application in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: a critical review  

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Full Text Available Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, a prevalent progressively disabling disease affecting one or both knee joints requires extensive self-management. Self-efficacy, a psychological attribute generally denoting one’s perceived belief about their ability to successfully perform a particular behavior, including health behaviors, is a significant predictor of psychological well-being, adherence to prescribed treatments, and pain coping mechanisms in persons with various forms of chronic disease, including arthritis. This paper examines the available peer-reviewed research published over the last 35 years detailing: i the concept of self-efficacy, ii the relationship between self-efficacy and adjustment to arthritis, iii the research concerning self-efficacy in the context of knee osteoarthritis disability, and iv some promising approaches for promoting the wellbeing of adults with knee osteoarthritis through the application of self-efficacy theory and other approaches. Based on this data, directions for future research and practice are offered.

Ray Marks

2012-01-01

282

Emotional Intelligence, Self-efficacy and Diversity Receptiveness of University Students: A Correlation Study  

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Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the interrelationship of emotional intelligence and self-efficacy drives, and diversity receptiveness of overseas college students. Factors of emotional intelligence, self-efficacies and diversity receptiveness were examined with these overseas students. Survey data on demographics, the Emotions Scale (EIS, Self-efficacy scale (SES and Diversity Receptive Scale (DRS were collected from eighty nine students enrolled in post graduate business programs. In data collection this study used simple random sampling technique. Data collected were analyzed using descriptive statistics and bivariate correlations between emotional intelligence, self-efficacy, and diversity receptiveness. The findings of the study indicate that there is a significant relationship between emotional intelligence, the competencies of self-efficacy, and diversity receptiveness of college students.

Saeed Behjat

2012-04-01

283

Transformational and transactional leadership and exercise-related self-efficacy: an exploratory study.  

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The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between transformational and transactional leadership behaviors and the self-efficacy ofparticipants involved in a structured 10-week exercise program. Three weeksinto their exercise classes 174 females (M age = 25.36 years, SD = 8.48) provided ratings of their exercise instructor's leadership behaviors as well as their personal efficacy related to scheduling, over-coming barriers and within-class capabilities. Results revealed that for exercise initiates, contingent rewards behaviors were able to explain unique variation in scheduling self-efficacy and barrier self-efficacy, but not within-class self-efficacy. For experienced exercisers, none of the leadership behaviors assessed in this study were associated with participant self-efficacy. PMID:17158842

Beauchamp, Mark R; Welch, Amy S; Hulley, Angie J

2007-01-01

284

Academic self-efficacy mediates the effects of school psychological climate on academic achievement.  

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This study investigated the effects of proximal and distal constructs on adolescent's academic achievement through self-efficacy. Participants included 482 ninth- and tenth- grade Norwegian students who completed a questionnaire designed to assess school-goal orientations, organizational citizenship behavior, academic self-efficacy, and academic achievement. The results of a bootstrapping technique used to analyze relationships between the constructs indicated that school-goal orientations and organizational citizenship predicted academic self-efficacy. Furthermore, school-goal orientation, organizational citizenship, and academic self-efficacy explained 46% of the variance in academic achievement. Mediation analyses revealed that academic self-efficacy mediated the effects of perceived task goal structure, perceived ability structure, civic virtue, and sportsmanship on adolescents' academic achievements. The results are discussed in reference to current scholarship, including theories underlying our hypothesis. Practical implications and directions for future research are suggested. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24708286

Høigaard, Rune; Kova?, Velibor Bobo; Øverby, Nina Cecilie; Haugen, Tommy

2015-03-01

285

Health locus of control and the sense of self-efficacy in patients with systolic heart failure: a pilot study  

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Background Treatment of heart failure (HF) requires the lifelong adherence to medical self-care regimes. The objective of this study was to examine health-control beliefs and the sense of self-efficacy (psychological features particularly important for efficient compliance among patients suffering from chronic diseases) in patients with systolic HF in relation to clinical status and depressive symptoms. Subjects and methods Sixty-six consecutive patients with chronic systolic HF, hospitalized in the Centre for Heart Diseases, Military Hospital (94% men, age: 61 ± 11 years, ischemic etiology: 63%, left ventricular ejection fraction: 32% ± 12%), filled in (during their hospital stay): (1) the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale measuring three possible localizations of health control: “internality” (ie, the belief that health status depends only on personal decisions and behaviors); “powerful others externality” ([PHLC subscale] ie, the conviction that health depends on “powerful people” such as doctors, family members, close friends), and “chance externality” (ie, belief that health status is determined by chance, fate, or luck), and (2) the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale. The results obtained by HF patients were compared to those reported by patients with other chronic diseases and healthy subjects. Results In patients with HF, internality was similar to values obtained by patients with diabetes, men after myocardial infarction, and women after mastectomy; and was lower than in healthy subjects. Powerful others externality was more pronounced in patients with HF as compared to other groups of patients and healthy people. Only women after mastectomy had higher scores of PHLC. In patients with HF, chance externality was similar to values reported in patients with renal failure, men after myocardial infarction, and women after mastectomy; and was less pronounced than in healthy subjects. The majority (77%) of patients with HF were characterized by a high sense of self-efficacy (>the 7th sten score), having the highest sense of self-efficacy among patients with other chronic diseases and healthy controls. Higher internality was accompanied by higher sense of self-efficacy (P < 0.05) in patients with HF. Subjects with high plasma N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (reflecting the disease severity) had the least pronounced internality (P < 0.05), whereas those with more advance depressive symptoms had the lower sense of self-efficacy (P = < 0.05). Conclusion Patients with systolic HF demonstrate a conviction that other people, including physicians, have a large influence on their health status, and at the same time are aware of the efficacy of their own activities in coping with the disease. Such a configuration of psychological features seems to be beneficial in the context of the developing modern strategies, which due to the improved cooperation between the physicians and the patients could enhance the compliance in patients with HF. PMID:23723691

Rydlewska, Agnieszka; Krzysztofik, Justyna; Libergal, Julia; Rybak, Agata; Banasiak, Waldemar; Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

2013-01-01

286

Self-Efficacy, Performance, Training and Well-Being of Industrial Workers in Lagos, Nigeria  

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Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to investigate whether Self- Efficacy (SE has anything to do with industrialemployees’ training, performance and well-being in Nigeria industrial settings. Self-Efficacy (belief about one’sability to accomplish specific tasks form a central role in the regulatory process through which an individual’smotivation and performance are governed. It also affects employees’ training and well-being. The descriptivesurvey research design of the ex-post facto type was adopted. The population for the study consisted ofemployees of SKG Lagos, Glaxo, Ikeja and Smithkline Beecham, Ogba. The simple random sampling techniquewas used to select 274 respondents for the study. Four research instruments structured on a modified four pointrating format of Strongly Agree (SA=4, Agree (A=3, Disagree (D=2. Strongly Disagree (SD=1 were used andhaving reliability coefficient of: Self-Efficacy Scale (SES=0.85; Training Acquisition Scale (TAS=0.80; WorkPerformance Scale (WPS=0.82 and Well-being Scale (WBS=0.87. Data were analyzed with t-test statistic. Thefinding revealed that workers with high self-efficacy are higher performers of assigned duties than those withlow selfefficacy, workers with high level of self-efficacy are more amenable to training than those with lowlevel of selfefficacy and workers with high self-efficacy are better in their well-being than those with low selfefficacy. It was recommended that industrial social worker should work on the psychic of the workers so thattheir self-efficacy can be developed or strengthen positively with the intent of promoting higher performance,adaptability to training and fostering of employees well-being.

E. M. Ajala

2013-05-01

287

Self-efficacy strategies to improve exercise in patients with heart failure: A systematic review  

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BACKGROUND Despite exercise is recommended as an adjunct to medication therapy in patients with heart failure (HF), non-adherence to exercise is a major problem. While improving self-efficacy is an effective way to increase physical activity, the evidence concerning the relationship between strategies to enhance self-efficacy and exercise among HF has not been systematically reviewed. The objective of this systematic review is to assess the effect of interventions to change the self-efficacy on exercise in patients with HF. METHODS A systematic database search was conducted for articles reporting exercise self-efficacy interventions. Databases such as PubMed, ProQuest, CINAHL, Scopus, and PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library were searched with restrictions to the years 2000-June 2014. A search of relevant databases identified 10 studies. Published randomized controlled intervention studies focusing strategies to change self-ef?cacy to exercise adherence in HF were eligible for inclusion. In addition, studies that have applied self-efficacy-based interventions to improve exercise are discussed. RESULTS Limited published data exist evaluating the self-efficacy strategies to improve exercise in HF. Dominant strategies to improve patients’ self-efficacy were performance accomplishments, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, emotional arousal. CONCLUSION Evidence from some trials supports the view that incorporating the theory of self-efficacy into the design of an exercise intervention is beneficial. Moreover, exercise interventions aimed at integrating the four strategies of exercise self-efficacy can have positive effects on confidence and the ability to initiate exercise and recover HF symptoms. Findings of this study suggest that a positive relationship exists between self-efficacy and initiating and maintaining exercise in HF, especially in the short-term period.

Rajati, Fatemeh; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Feizi, Awat; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Hasandokht, Tolu; Mostafavi, Firoozeh

2014-01-01

288

Maternal feeding self-efficacy and fruit and vegetable intakes in infants. Results from the SAIDI study.  

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Adequate consumption of fruits and vegetables (FV) is a characteristic of a healthy diet but remains a challenge in nutrition interventions. This cross-sectional study explored the multi-directional relationships between maternal feeding self-efficacy, parenting confidence, child feeding behaviour, exposure to new food and FV intake in a cohort of 277 infants. Mothers with healthy infants weighing ?2500?g and ?37?weeks gestation were recruited post-natally from 11 South Australian hospitals. Socio-demographic data were collected at recruitment. At 6?months postnatal, infants were weighed and measured, and mothers completed a questionnaire exploring their perceptions of child feeding behaviour and child exposure to new foods. The questionnaire also included the Short Temperament Scale for Infants, Kessler 10 to measure maternal psychological distress and 5 items measuring maternal feeding self-efficacy. The number of occasions and variety of FV (number of subgroups within food groups) consumed by infants were estimated from a 24-hour dietary recall and 2?days food record. Structural equation modelling was performed using Mplus version 6.11. Median (IQR) variety scores were 2 (1-3) for fruit and 3 (2-5) for vegetable intake. The most popular FV consumed were apple (n?=?108, 45.0%) and pumpkin (n?=?143, 56.3%). None of the variables studied predicted the variety of child fruit intake. Parenting confidence, exposure to new foods and child feeding behaviour were indirectly related to child vegetable intake through maternal feeding self-efficacy while total number of children negatively predicted child vegetable variety (p?family eating environment as key strategies towards development of healthy eating in children. PMID:24911620

Koh, Gloria A; Scott, Jane A; Woodman, Richard J; Kim, Susan W; Daniels, Lynne A; Magarey, Anthea M

2014-10-01

289

Transcultural nursing: a perspective derived from Jean-Paul Sartre.  

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Transcultural nursing care is a well-established theoretical framework. This theory, developed by Madeleine Leininger, can have an impact on clinical practice, academic preparation and nursing research. The heightened interest in applying transcultural care and the increased need to espouse this framework have been triggered by constant population changes. This paper defines transcultural nursing care and expands its definition further by comparing and contrasting it with Jean-Paul Sartre's existentialist perspective. The two modes of existence as defined by Sartre are closely examined. Concrete examples are offered as cultural phenomena and the components of a cultural assessment are discussed and applied. The philosophical thesis is approached from a transcultural nursing perspective and existentialism is shown to serve as a foundation for transcultural nursing. The advantages and disadvantages of transcultural nursing practice and the preparation of transcultural nurses are finally addressed. PMID:7499611

Rajan, M F

1995-09-01

290

Validation of a self-efficacy instrument and its relationship to performance of crisis resource management skills  

OpenAIRE

Self-efficacy is thought to be important for resuscitation proficiency in that it influences the development of and access to the associated medical knowledge, procedural skills and crisis resource management (CRM) skills. Since performance assessment of CRM skills is challenging, self-efficacy is often used as a measure of competence in this area. While self-efficacy may influence performance, the true relationship between self-efficacy and performance in this setting has not been delineated...

Plant, Jennifer L.; Schaik, Sandrijn M.; Sliwka, Diane C.; Boscardin, Christy K.; O’sullivan, Patricia S.

2011-01-01

291

interna y al diálogo transcultural  

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Full Text Available Inspirado en los conceptos de An-Na´im (1995 del discurso interno y el diálogo transcultural, este artículo está focalizado en el análisis de dos herramientas que usan los practicantes de derecho y los usuarios del Consultorio Jurídico Rural de Fredonia (Antioquia durante su interacción y que, de ser estimuladas adecuadamente, pueden derivar no solo en procesos pedagógicos de refl exión sobre presupuestos fundamentales en materia de derechos, sino que también pueden llegar a constituirse en estrategias que permitan la actualización de las expectativas de los propios sujetos frente a su cultura. Para el caso de los practicantes, se explora en el tránsito entre dos lenguajes, uno eminentemente jurídico y otro coloquial, donde se da un acercamiento al lenguaje y valores de los consultantes. Ya en lo que atañe a los usuarios del Consultorio Jurídico, el análisis se construye en torno a la red local de consejos, pieza clave a partir de la cual se articulan ideas y valores de los actores sobre su entorno, pero donde el hilo conductor es la intención de resolver un confl icto por la vía jurídica.

Silvia Monroy \\u00C1lvarez

2007-01-01

292

Modeling the Interrelationships Among Pre-service Science Teachers' Understanding and Acceptance of Evolution, Their Views on Nature of Science and Self-Efficacy Beliefs Regarding Teaching Evolution  

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This study proposed a path model of relationships among understanding and acceptance of evolution, views on nature of science, and self-efficacy beliefs regarding teaching evolution. A total of 415 pre-service science teachers completed a series of self-report instruments for the specified purpose. After the estimation of scale scores using unidimensional IRT models, path analysis suggested that sophisticated views on NOS were associated with higher levels of both understanding and acceptance of evolution, and the higher level of understanding of evolution was related to the higher level of acceptance of evolution. Besides, higher levels of both understanding and acceptance of the theory and naïve views on NOS were found to be associated with stronger self-efficacy beliefs for teaching evolution effectively.

Akyol, Gülsüm; Tekkaya, Ceren; Sungur, Semra; Traynor, Anne

2012-12-01

293

Learning Disabilities, Gender, Sources of Efficacy, Self-Efficacy Beliefs, and Academic Achievement in High School Students.  

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Examines the impact of gender, learning disability status, and sources of efficacy on self-efficacy beliefs and academic achievement in the concept of Bandura's self-efficacy theory. Results revels that LD status had indirect influence on self-efficacy via the source variable; gender did not have influences; and sources of efficacy had direct…

Hampton, Nan Zhang; Mason, Emanuel

2003-01-01

294

The Use of the "Teaching as Inquiry Model" to Develop Students' Self-Efficacy in Literature Response Essay Writing  

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This article describes a project conducted with Year 12 English students. It was based on the model of "Teaching as Inquiry" (Ministry of Education, 2007) and aimed to develop students' self-efficacy in relation to their literature-response essay writing. Self-efficacy was measured using Bandura's (2006) self-efficacy scale and an intervention was…

Featonby, Amy

2012-01-01

295

2011 Outstanding AFCPE[R] Conference Paper: Development and Validation of a Financial Self-Efficacy Scale  

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This study developed a 6-item Financial Self-Efficacy Scale for use by researchers, educators, counselors, and advisors. Bandura's concept of self-efficacy and Prochaska's Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change provided the theoretical framework. Scale items were adapted from Schwarzer and Jerusalem's (1995) General Self-Efficacy Scale.…

Lown, Jean M.

2011-01-01

296

Self-Efficacy in the Context of Online Learning Environments: A Review of the Literature and Directions for Research  

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The purpose of this paper is to examine the construct of self-efficacy in the context of online learning environments. Self-efficacy is defined as "beliefs in one's capabilities to organize and execute the courses of action required to produce given attainments" (Bandura, [1997], p. 3). Traditionally, the four main sources of self-efficacy

Hodges, Charles B.

2008-01-01

297

Discriminant and Incremental Validity of Self-Concept and Academic Self-Efficacy: A Meta-Analysis  

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Two studies examined the discriminant and incremental validity of self-concept and academic self-efficacy. Study 1, which meta-analysed 64 studies comprising 74 independent samples (N = 24,773), found a strong mean correlation of 0.43 between self-concept and academic self-efficacy. The domains of self-concept and self-efficacy, and the domain…

Huang, Chiungjung

2012-01-01

298

Does Math Self-Efficacy Mediate the Effect of the Perceived Classroom Environment on Standardized Math Test Performance?  

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We examined the effect of the perceived classroom environment on math self-efficacy and the effect of math self-efficacy on standardized math test performance. Upper elementary school students (N = 1,163) provided self-reports of their perceived math self-efficacy and the degree to which their math classroom environment was mastery oriented,…

Fast, Lisa A.; Lewis, James L.; Bryant, Michael J.; Bocian, Kathleen A.; Cardullo, Richard A.; Rettig, Michael; Hammond, Kimberly A.

2010-01-01

299

Relationship Between Self-Efficacy and Symptoms of Anxiety, Depression, Worry and Social Avoidance in a Normal Sample of Students  

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Objective: Self-efficacy beliefs determine how people feel, think, motivate themselves and behave. Regarding to similar findings it is supposed that concept of self efficacy has a general role on mental health. The present study focused on examining the relationships between self-efficacy and symptoms of depression, anxiety, worry and social avoidance in a large sample of normal students (n=549).

Tahmassian, Karineh; Jalali Moghadam, Niloufar

2011-01-01

300

Junior High School Students Internet Usage and Self-Efficacy: A Re-Examination of the Gender Gap  

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This paper investigated the gender differences in junior high school students' Internet self-efficacy and their use of the Internet. A total of 1080 eighth graders were randomly selected from all junior high school students in Taiwan. The Internet Self-Efficacy Scale (ISES) was developed and used to examine students' Internet self-efficacy in two…

Tsai, Meng-Jung; Tsai, Chin-Chung

2010-01-01

301

Predictive Utility of Subject-, Task-, and Problem-Specific Self-Efficacy Judgments for Immediate and Delayed Academic Performances.  

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Studied self-efficacy perceptions of 202 Korean female high school students at 3 levels of specificity in English and mathematics. Problem-specific, task-specific, and subject-specific self-efficacy beliefs all formed separate factors in both subject areas, but the three self-efficacy factors were too highly correlated to contribute independently…

Bong, Mimi

2002-01-01

302

Role of Self-Efficacy and Task-Value in Predicting College Students' Course Performance and Future Enrollment Intentions.  

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This study compared the predictive utility of self-efficacy and task-value beliefs among Korean female college students (N=168). It assessed constructs longitudinally and attempted consolidation of self-efficacy and expectancy-value theories. Self-efficacy perceptions were assessed at varying levels of measurement specificity. Exploratory factor…

Bong, Mimi

303

Self-efficacy as a positive youth development construct: a conceptual review.  

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Self-efficacy denotes people's beliefs about their ability to perform in different situations. It functions as a multilevel and multifaceted set of beliefs that influence how people feel, think, motivate themselves, and behave during various tasks. Self-efficacy beliefs are informed by enactive attainment, vicarious experience, imaginal experiences, and social persuasion as well as physical and emotional states. These beliefs are mediated by cognitive, motivational, affective, and selection processes to generate actual performance. Self-efficacy development is closely intertwined with a person's experiences, competencies, and developmental tasks in different domains at different stages in life. This paper reviews the literature to outline the definition and theoretical conceptualizations of the construct originally devised by Bandura that have flourished since the 1990s. Drawing from the studies of the construct to assess self-efficacy, and to inform positive youth development, the paper will present the determinants of the development of self-efficacy beliefs and identify the connection between self-efficacy and adolescent developmental outcomes. The paper will conclude with strategies to enhance youth self-efficacy and proposals for future research directions. PMID:22645423

Tsang, Sandra K M; Hui, Eadaoin K P; Law, Bella C M

2012-01-01

304

Pre-competition imagery, self-efficacy and performance in collegiate golfers.  

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In this study, we examined the relationships between self-efficacy, pre-competition imagery use and performance. A modified version of the Sport Imagery Questionnaire was used to assess both the motivational and cognitive functions of imagery used by 51 varsity golfers during the hour before a Provincial University Golf Championship. In line with Martin and co-workers' model of imagery use in sport, we hypothesized that self-efficacy would be positively related to motivational general-mastery imagery use and motivational general-mastery imagery use would be predictive of golf performance. Also, consistent with theorizing by Bandura, we hypothesized that self-efficacy would predict golf performance, but that the relationship between self-efficacy and performance would be mediated by imagery use. The results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that pre-competition motivational general-mastery imagery accounted for significant variance in both self-efficacy (adjusted R2 = 0.26, P self-efficacy was predictive of golf performance and that motivational general-mastery imagery use mediated the relationship between self-efficacy and performance. The results are discussed in relation to athletes' pre-competition preparation and intervention. PMID:12200921

Beauchamp, Mark R; Bray, Steven R; Albinson, John G

2002-09-01

305

Cultural self-efficacy of Canadian nursing students caring for aboriginal patients with diabetes.  

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Cultural self-efficacy refers to how capable one feels functioning in culturally diverse situations. The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of cultural self-efficacy among nursing students, specifically in relation to individuals of Aboriginal ancestry. The authors examined the extent to which intercultural anxiety, intercultural communication, and experience with persons of Aboriginal ancestry predicted two aspects of cultural self-efficacy, namely, knowledge and skills. In this correlational study, non-Aboriginal Canadian nursing students (N = 59) completed a survey assessing these variables. Overall, cultural self-efficacy was rated as moderate by nursing students. Regression analyses indicated that greater intercultural communication skills and experience with persons of Aboriginal ancestry were significant unique predictors of higher cultural knowledge self-efficacy. Greater intercultural communication and lower intercultural anxiety significantly predicted higher cultural skills self-efficacy. The results provide direction to nursing programs interested in facilitating higher levels of cultural self-efficacy among nursing students. PMID:22477719

Quine, Allisson; Hadjistavropoulos, Heather D; Alberts, Nicole M

2012-07-01

306

The role of parental self-efficacy in adolescent school-refusal.  

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Parental characteristics such as psychopathology and parenting practices are understood to be implicated in school-refusal presentations. Expanding upon these largely affective and behavioral factors, the present study sought to examine the role of a parenting cognitive construct-parenting self-efficacy-in understanding school-refusal. School-refusing adolescents (n = 60, 53% male) and school-attending adolescents (n = 46, 39% male) aged 12-17 years (M = 13.93, SD = 1.33), along with a parent, participated in the study. Participants completed study measures of demographics, psychopathology, overall family functioning, and parenting self-efficacy. As expected, parents of school-refusing adolescents were found to have lower levels of parental self-efficacy than parents of school-attending adolescents. Parenting self-efficacy was inversely associated with parent- and adolescent- psychopathology as well as family dysfunction. Logistic regression analyses determined parenting self-efficacy to be a predictor of school-refusal. However, upon controlling for related constructs including family dysfunction, adolescent depression, and parent depression, the predictive capacity of parenting self-efficacy was eliminated. Taken together, the results highlight the likely complex relationships between parental self-efficacy, familial psychopathology, and dysfunctional family processes within this population. Research is required to further delineate these dynamic relationships among families of school-refusing adolescents. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25642779

Carless, Belinda; Melvin, Glenn A; Tonge, Bruce J; Newman, Louise K

2015-04-01

307

A COMPARISON OF FOOTBALL PLAYERS’ SPORT CONFIDENCE AND SELF-EFFICACY BELIEFS IN TURKEY  

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Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine the sport confidence and self-efficacy beliefs in football players participating in either super league (N = 48 or second league (N = 53. Athletes completed the Trait Sport Confidence Inventory (TSCI, State Sport Confidence Invetory (SSCI, and Self-Efficacy Scale (SES. Pearson Moment Correlation results indicated a positive significant relationship between State Sport Confidence and Self-Efficacy levels (r = .492, Trait Sport Confidence and Self-Efficacty levels (r = .493 and State Sport Confidence and Trait Sport Confidence levels (r = .766 of the Super League players. Results also revealed a non-significant relationship between State Sport Confidence and Self-Efficacy levels (r = .227 and a postive significant relationship was found between Trait Sport Confidence and Self-Efficacty levels (r = .271 and State Sport Confidence and Trait Sport Confidence levels (r = .787 of the Second League players. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA analyses revealed significant differences between the Super League and Second League players’ self-efficacy beliefs (F(1,99 = 7.188, p = .009. The linear regression results revealed that for both the Super League and Second League players, trait sport-confidence predicted state sport-confidence and self-efficacy. Finally, it was revealed that the super league and second league football players were similar with regard to sport confidence, whereas, they had different self-efficacy beliefs..

Ozan BOZKURT

2012-12-01

308

An Exploratory Investigation of the Relationship between Proxy Efficacy, Self-efficacy and Exercise Attendance.  

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The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between perceptions of self-efficacy, proxy efficacy, and exercise class attendance of participants involved in a 10-week structured group fitness program. At week 3, 127 females completed measures of self-efficacy and proxy efficacy and their class attendance was monitored for the subsequent four weeks. Self-efficacy was assessed through measures of exercise, scheduling, and barrier self-efficacy. Proxy efficacy was assessed through a measure of fitness instructor efficacy defined as participants' confidence in their fitness instructors' communication, teaching, and motivating capabilities. Results revealed positive correlations between self-efficacy variables and proxy efficacy. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that among those who were classified as exercise initiates (n = 33), self-efficacy and proxy efficacy accounted for 34 percent of the variance in exercise class attendance with the latter variable explaining a unique 12 percent. Consistent with theorizing, these preliminary findings indicate that for instructor-led, group physical activities such as aerobics classes, proxy efficacy perceptions are related to self-efficacy and may also be an important predictor of exercise behavior. PMID:22049390

Bray, S R; Gyurcsik, N C; Culos-Reed, S N; Dawson, K A; Martin, K A

2001-07-01

309

Agricultural Personnel’s Proactive Behavior: Effects of Self efficacy Perceptions and Perceived Organizational Support  

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Full Text Available A model for predicting psychological empowerment and proactive behavior was examined with 80 agricultural personnel from Karaj, Iran country. They completed measures of perceived organizational support (POS, psychological empowerment (PE, self efficacy (JSE, and proactive behavior (PB. Results supported the conceptual framework of study for understanding internal and motivational underpinnings that may contribute to explain psychological empowerment and proactive behavior. Perceived organizational support and self efficacy related positively to psychological empowerment and proactive behavior, and perceived organizational support and self efficacy each contributed distinctive variance to the explanation of psychological empowerment. Self efficacy partially mediated the relationship between perceived organizational support and psychological empowerment, psychological empowerment partially mediated the relationship between self efficacy and proactive behavior, and the combination of psychological empowerment and self efficacy fully mediated the relationship between perceived organizational support and proactive behavior. Finally, the research provided managerial implications.
Key words: Psychological Empowerment (PE; Proactive Behavior (PB; Perceived Organizational Support (POS; Self Efficacy

Seyyed Mohammad Kazem Hashemi

2012-03-01

310

Knowledge, Self-Efficacy, and Perceived Barriers on the Low-Iodine Diet among Thyroid Cancer Patients Preparing for Radioactive Iodine Therapy  

OpenAIRE

The purposes of the study were to assess knowledge, self-efficacy, and perceived barriers on a low-iodine diet among thyroid cancer patients and to identify strategies for nutrition education. A self-administered questionnaire was developed based on a review of literature and pilot-tested. A total of 121 female thyroid cancer patients participated in a survey and 117 responses were used for data analysis. An average knowledge score of the thyroid cancer patients was 4.5 point (available score...

Moon, Jeong-ah; Yoo, Chang-hee; Kim, Mi Hwa; Lee, Song Mi; Oh, Young Ja; Ryu, Young Hoon; Lee, Yong Sang; Chang, Hang Seok; Park, Cheong Soo; Lee, Kyung-eun

2012-01-01

311

Self-Efficacy Beliefs Are Associated with Visual Height Intolerance: A Cross-Sectional Survey  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Responses to height may range from indifference to minor distress to severe symptoms of fear of heights (acrophobia); visual height intolerance (vHI) denotes the whole spectrum of symptoms. Although there are options to manage vHI, only a small part of persons affected by vHI are willing to seek professional help or confront their problem. Purpose of this study was to determine if persons with vHI, specifically those who show avoidant behavior towards heights (avoiders), score lower in their general self-efficacy (GSE) than those who confront vHI (confronters). Method Cross-sectional survey in 607 individuals living in the urban region of Munich, Germany, using a mailed questionnaire on presence or absence of vHI, confronting or avoiding behaviour, and GSE. Results Of all participants (mean age 53.9, 50.3% female), 407 reported life-time presence of vHI. Participants with vHI had a mean GSE score of 31.8 (SD 4.3) points (participants without vHI: 32.5, SD 4.3, p ?=?0.008 for difference). Among individuals with vHI, 23% reported confronting behavior. Confronters were significantly younger (p<.0001, 50.2 vs. 55.7 years), more likely to be female (p ?=?0.0039, 64.3% female), and had a higher GSE score (p ?=?0.0049, 32.5 vs. 31.1). Associations remained significant after multiple adjustment. Conclusions Our study provides evidence for the association of GSE and vHI. These findings may have consequences for strategies of alleviation and therapy of vHI. PMID:25548910

Grill, Eva; Schäffler, Florian; Huppert, Doreen; Müller, Martin; Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Brandt, Thomas

2014-01-01

312

Effectiveness of a breastfeeding self-efficacy intervention: do hospital practices make a difference?  

Science.gov (United States)

Breastfeeding self-efficacy interventions are important for improving breastfeeding outcomes. However, the circumstances that may influence the effectiveness of the interventions are unclear, especially in the context of hospitals with suboptimal infant feeding practices. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the effect of a self-efficacy intervention on breastfeeding self-efficacy and exclusive breastfeeding, and further assessed the difference in its effect by hospital-routine type. In this intervention study with a control group, 781 pregnant women were recruited from 2 "Baby-Friendly"-certified hospitals (BFH) and 2 non-Baby-Friendly Hospitals (nBFH) in Japan, and were allocated to an intervention or control group. Participants in the intervention group were provided with a breastfeeding self-efficacy workbook in their third trimester. The primary outcome was breastfeeding self-efficacy and the secondary outcome was infant feeding status. All analyses were stratified by the type of hospital, BFH or nBFH. In BFHs, the intervention improved both breastfeeding self-efficacy through 4 weeks postpartum (p = 0.037) and the exclusive breastfeeding rate at 4 weeks postpartum (AOR 2.32, 95 % CI 1.01-5.33). In nBFHs, however, no positive effect was observed on breastfeeding self-efficacy (p =? 0.982) or on the exclusive breastfeeding rate at 4 weeks postpartum (AOR 0.97, 95 % CI 0.52-1.81); in nBFHs, supplementation was provided for breastfed infants and the mother and infant were separated in the vast majority of cases. Infant feeding status at 12 weeks was not improved in either hospital type. The intervention improved breastfeeding self-efficacy and exclusive breastfeeding at 4 weeks postpartum only in BFHs. When breastfeeding self-efficacy interventions are implemented, hospital infant feeding practices may need to be optimized beforehand. PMID:23592322

Otsuka, Keiko; Taguri, Masataka; Dennis, Cindy-Lee; Wakutani, Kiriko; Awano, Masayo; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Jimba, Masamine

2014-01-01

313

Self-Efficacy, Transition, and Patient Outcomes in the Sickle Cell Disease Population.  

Science.gov (United States)

Severe pain is a common symptom of sickle cell disease (SCD). Transitions between adult and pediatric care are a point of particular vulnerability for patients, increasing the risk for poor pain management. The purpose of this literature review was to investigate the relationships among self-efficacy, transition, and SCD health outcomes. A systematic literature search was performed within CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, MEDLINE, and PubMed on published papers between 2003 and 2013. After applying exclusion criteria, 20 articles were used in the final review. Few studies were identified that directly tested the relationship between self-efficacy and SCD outcomes. Although there are few studies on this topic, most demonstrated positive correlations between self-efficacy during transition and positive patient outcomes in the SCD population. Additional studies are needed to support causation. Studies were commonly limited by small sample sizes and attrition. Furthermore, there is a large gap in the literature regarding how self-efficacy can be increased in these patients. Interventions that promote self-efficacy have the potential to improve SCD pain outcomes, but more research is needed to develop interventions to increase these adolescents' self-efficacy. If providers can identify individuals in this population with low self-efficacy, they may be able to intervene early to improve patient outcomes. Most identified studies point to the positive correlation between self-efficacy and positive health outcomes in adolescents with SCD. Self-efficacy has the potential to guide self-care interventions and further research with the SCD population. PMID:25047808

Molter, Brittany L; Abrahamson, Kathleen

2014-07-18

314

Rasch calibration of physical activity self-efficacy and social support scale for persons with intellectual disabilities.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the construct validity of the Self-Efficacy/Social Support for Activity for persons with Intellectual Disability (SE/SS-AID) scales developed by Peterson, Peterson, Lowe, & Nothwehr (2009). A total of 146 participants with intellectual disabilities completed 6 self-efficacy (SE) items and 18 social support (SS) items. After applying the Rasch rating model, all SE items and 17 SS items fit the model and measured a single-construct. Thus, it was able to determine the item difficulty and person's level of SE and SS for physical activity by calculated logit scores. No items showed evidence for differential functioning by the level of intellectual disability. Model fit of SS subscales (e.g., staff, family, and peer) showed good-fit as well. In conclusion, SE and SS scales for physical activity can be measured more accurately for persons with intellectual disabilities by using the modified scales validated in this study. PMID:20363109

Lee, Miyoung; Peterson, Jana J; Dixon, Alicia

2010-01-01

315

Testing the self-efficacy-performance linkage of social-cognitive theory.  

Science.gov (United States)

Past empirical research examining the relationship of self-efficacy perceptions and performance has had several limitations. Most studies were performed in the laboratory with tasks not directly related to individual work performance. As a consequence, many findings are not generalizable to individual work performance. This study tested the self-efficacy-performance model found in Bandura's social-cognitive theory in a work setting, with a sample of 776 American university employees, and with discriminant function analyses. Respondents indicated that performance with computers significantly predicted perceptions of high and low self-efficacy. Results provide additional support for social-cognitive theory as outlined by Bandura. PMID:9121144

Harrison, A W; Rainer, R K; Hochwarter, W A; Thompson, K R

1997-02-01

316

Do job autonomy and negotiation self-efficacy improve employment relationships?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study investigated whether improving the employment relationship does more depend on negotiation selfefficacy or on task outonomy for a sample of employees from a Dutch telecom company. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the effects of negotiation self-efficacy and task autonomy on integrative negotiation and the effect of integrative negotiation on psychological contract breach. Results indicate that employees negotiate more integratively when they have higher negotiation self-efficacy, compared to employees with more task autonomy. Empirical support was found for the prediction that higher negotiation self-efficacy and task autonomy correlates with less psychological contract breach.

Peter R A Oeij

2006-02-01

317

Gender differences in chinese adolescents' subjective well-being: the mediating role of self-efficacy (.).  

Science.gov (United States)

Summary.-Although gender differences in self-efficacy and subjective well-being have been reported in previous studies, little published research has investigated the interrelationships between these variables in adolescents. 648 Chinese adolescents were administered a series of questionnaires to test the hypothesis that self-efficacy mediates the relationship between gender and subjective well-being. The results indicated that adolescent girls had lower general self-efficacy than adolescent boys, which explained girls' lower subjective well-being. The theoretical and practical implications may help parents and educators to strengthen adolescents' happiness. PMID:25650641

Ma, Ze-Wei; Zeng, Wei-Nan; Ye, Kai-Yin

2015-02-01

318

Multifaceted impact of self-efficacy beliefs on academic functioning.  

Science.gov (United States)

This research analyzed the network of psychosocial influences through which efficacy beliefs affect academic achievement. Parents' sense of academic efficacy and aspirations for their children were linked to their children's scholastic achievement through their perceived academic capabilities and aspirations. Children's beliefs in their efficacy to regulate their own learning and academic attainments, in turn, contributed to scholastic achievement both independently and by promoting high academic aspirations and prosocial behavior and reducing vulnerability to feelings of futility and depression. Children's perceived social efficacy and efficacy to manage peer pressure for detrimental conduct also contributed to academic attainments but through partially different paths of affective and self-regulatory influence. The impact of perceived social efficacy was mediated through academic aspirations and a low level of depression. Perceived self-regulatory efficacy was related to academic achievement both directly and through adherence to moral self-sanctions for detrimental conduct and problem behavior that can subvert academic pursuits. Familial socioeconomic status was linked to children's academic achievement only indirectly through its effects on parental aspirations and children's prosocialness. The full set of self-efficacy, aspirational, and psychosocial factors accounted for a sizable share of the variance in academic achievement. PMID:8706518

Bandura, A; Barbaranelli, C; Caprara, G V; Pastorelli, C

1996-06-01

319

An Entrepreneurial Self-Efficacy Scale with a Neutral Wording  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

In this book chapter I present a multidimensional entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) scale. The scale builds on three established ESE-scales, but the reliability of it is improved compared to the original three scales as the highly discipline-specific jargon is transformed to a more neutral wording of the items. The scale has been tested in a large scale survey including 445 students from twelve different programmes at three universities in Denmark and one university in Sweden. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) has been applied in order to investigate the multidimensionality of the items in the scale, and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) has been applied to investigate its convergent, discriminatory and nomological validity. The results demonstrate support for a multidimensional ESE-scale with high predictive validity regarding entrepreneurial behaviours and with high reliability as the items are comprehensible to respondents, regardless if they have entrepreneurial experience or not. The scale can thus beused in programme evaluations that include control groups or other type of individuals that lack entrepreneurial experience.

Moberg, Kåre

2012-01-01

320

IS SELF-EFFICACY FOR SMOKING ABSTINENCE A CAUSE OF, OR A REFLECTION ON, SMOKING BEHAVIOR CHANGE?  

OpenAIRE

Social learning theory considers self-efficacy as a causal factor in behavior change. However, in line with behavioral theory, recent clinical research suggests that self-efficacy ratings may reflect, rather than cause, behavior change. To test these two disparate views, self-efficacy was related to actual smoking abstinence on the next day (i.e. self-efficacy causes change), and abstinence status over one day was tested as a predictor of rated self-efficacy for being quit the next day (i.e. ...

Perkins, Kenneth A.; Parzynski, Craig S.; Mercincavage, Melissa; Conklin, Cynthia A.; Fonte, Carolyn A.

2011-01-01

321

Mapping the literature of transcultural nursing*  

OpenAIRE

Overview: No bibliometric studies of the literature of the field of transcultural nursing have been published. This paper describes a citation analysis as part of the project undertaken by the Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section of the Medical Library Association to map the literature of nursing.

Murphy, Sharon C.

2006-01-01

322

Transcultural Nursing Education: A Worldwide Imperative.  

Science.gov (United States)

The nursing profession must make changes in all aspects of nursing as it shifts from a largely unicultural to multicultural focus to prepare thousands of nurses in the growing and imperative area of transcultural nursing in curriculum development, research, teaching, clinical practice, and consultation. (JOW)

Leininger, Madeleine

1994-01-01

323

The revised scale for caregiving self-efficacy: reliability and validity studies.  

Science.gov (United States)

Two samples of family caregivers (Study 1: N = 169; Study 2: N = 145) of cognitively impaired older adults were used to revise, extend, and evaluate a measure of perceived self-efficacy for caregiving tasks. The Revised Scale for Caregiving Self-Efficacy measures 3 domains of caregiving self-efficacy: Obtaining Respite, Responding to Disruptive Patient Behaviors, and Controlling Upsetting Thoughts. The 3 subscales show strong internal consistency and adequate test-retest reliability. Construct validity is supported by relationships between these 3 facets of perceived caregiving efficacy and depression, anxiety, anger, perceived social support, and criticism expressed in speech samples. The Revised Scale for Caregiving Self-Efficacy has potential uses for both research and clinical purposes. PMID:11773226

Steffen, Ann M; McKibbin, Christine; Zeiss, Antonette M; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores; Bandura, Albert

2002-01-01

324

Predictors of marijuana treatment outcomes: the role of self-efficacy.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study tested the ability of sets of demographic, socioeconomic, marijuana use/abuse, psychological distress, and self-efficacy variables to predict posttreatment indices of marijuana intake and problems related to use. Subjects were 167 adults who participated in one of two outpatient treatments for marijuana dependence and completed the 3-, 6-, and 12-month posttreatment follow-ups. Only pretreatment marijuana quantity-frequency of intake and self-efficacy variables made significant and consistent contributions to the regression equations predicting posttreatment frequency of use. In contrast, socioeconomic and severity of abuse indicators predicted posttreatment marijuana-related problems. Contrary to social cognitive theory (Bandura, 1986), there was no evidence that self-efficacy mediated the effects of other predictors. Results are discussed in terms of the specificity of predictor-outcome relationships and the need for improvements in self-efficacy measurement. PMID:8186669

Stephens, R S; Wertz, J S; Roffman, R A

1993-01-01

325

Bystander behavior in bullying situations: basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement and defender self-efficacy.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of the present study was to investigate how basic moral sensitivity in bullying, moral disengagement in bullying and defender self-efficacy were related to different bystander behaviors in bullying. Therefore, we examined pathways that linked students' basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement, and defender self-efficacy to different bystander behaviors in bullying situations. Three hundred and forty-seven teenagers completed a bullying survey. Findings indicated that compared with boys, girls expressed higher basic moral sensitivity in bullying, lower defender self-efficacy and moral disengagement in bullying. Results from the SEM showed that basic moral sensitivity in bullying was negatively related to pro-bully behavior and positively related to outsider and defender behavior, mediated by moral disengagement in bullying, which in turn was positively related to pro-bully behavior and negatively related to outsider and defender behavior. What differed in the relations between outsider and defender behaviors was the degree of defender self-efficacy. PMID:23522703

Thornberg, Robert; Jungert, Tomas

2013-06-01

326

Parental Attachment, Inter-Parental Conflict and Late Adolescent’s Self-Efficacy  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between parental attachment, inter-parental conflict and self-efficacy among 374 college students aged 17 to 19 years old in Iran. The probability proportional to size sampling technique was used to obtain sample size. The Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment, the Children’s Perception of Inter-parental Conflict Scale, and the General Self-Efficacy Scale were used to measure parental attachment, inter-parental conflict and self-efficacy, respectively. Results of Pearson correlation coefficient showed that parental attachment was positively and inter-parental conflict was negatively associated with adolescent’s self-efficacy.

Nakisa Parsa

2014-03-01

327

Predicting bulimic symptoms: an interactive model of self-efficacy, perfectionism, and perceived weight status.  

Science.gov (United States)

An interactive model of perfectionism, perceived weight status, and self-efficacy was tested on 406 women to predict the bulimic symptoms of binge eating and inappropriate compensatory behaviors separately. This longitudinal study assessed hypothesized vulnerabilities of high perfectionism and low self-efficacy and the stressor of feeling overweight at Time 1 and then gathered weekly assessments of binge eating, vomiting, laxative use, fasting, and diet pill use for 11 weeks. As predicted, results showed that perfectionism, weight perception, and self-efficacy interacted to prospectively predict binge eating. In particular, women high in perfectionism who felt they were overweight and who had low self-efficacy reported the most number of weeks of binge eating. This interactive model did not predict inappropriate compensatory behaviors. Future directions and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:16301012

Bardone-Cone, A M; Abramson, L Y; Vohs, K D; Heatherton, T F; Joiner, T E

2006-01-01

328

Maternal stress and perceptions of self-efficacy in socioeconomically disadvantaged mothers: an explicative model.  

Science.gov (United States)

Studies have demonstrated that maternal stress and perceptions of self-efficacy influence a mother's performance, affecting her ability to interact with her child and to understand and answer his needs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate maternal stress and the perception of self-efficacy in the mothers of infants who are cared for in child-care centers and belong to the poorest segment of the Chilean population. To this end, these aspects were studied in 121 low-income, high-social-risk mothers with children between the ages of 4 and 9 months. The final goal was to generate an explicative model of self-efficacy and maternal stress that considered characteristics of the family and the child. The results revealed that family characteristics - especially household size, per capita incomes and mother age - are more relevant for explaining maternal self-efficacy and stress. The findings and implications for practice are discussed. PMID:20947173

Farkas, Chamarrita; Valdés, Nelson

2010-12-01

329

Teenage goals and self-efficacy beliefs as precursors of adult career and family outcomes.  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study identified and examined patterns of goal importance and self-efficacy beliefs in mid- and late adolescence as predictors of work and family outcomes in adulthood. A pattern approach was applied to appropriately identify relationships among work- and family-related goal importance and self-efficacy beliefs. Using a sample of 995 individuals, five distinct patterns of work-family goal importance and self-efficacy beliefs emerged. Individuals who assigned comparable importance to work and family goals and expressed corresponding self-efficacy beliefs in adolescence were more likely to achieve career and family outcomes in adulthood than individuals who expressed a strong preference for one domain over the other. The results supported the idea that work and family can be coordinated for mutual benefit. Furthermore, findings from the pattern approach provided an integrative view of work-family motivation and goal achievement complementing findings from traditional methods such as regression analysis. PMID:25242815

Lee, Bora; Vondracek, Fred W

2014-10-01

330

Learning to teach effectively: Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics graduate teaching assistants' teaching self-efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) from science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) are important in the teaching of undergraduate students (Golde & Dore, 2001). However, they are often poorly prepared for teaching (Luft, Kurdziel, Roehrig, & Turner, 2004). This dissertation addresses teaching effectiveness in three related manuscripts: (1) A position paper that summarizes the current research on and develops a model of GTA teaching effectiveness. (2) An adaptation and validation of two instruments; GTA perception of teaching training and STEM GTA teaching self-efficacy. (3) A model test of factors that predict STEM GTA teaching self-efficacy. Together these three papers address key questions in the understanding of teaching effectiveness in STEM GTAs including: (a) What is our current knowledge of factors that affect the teaching effectiveness of GTAs? (b) Given that teaching self-efficacy is strongly linked to teaching performance, how can we measure STEM GTAs teaching self-efficacy? (c) Is there a better way to measure GTA teaching training than currently exists? (d) What factors predict STEM GTA teaching self-efficacy? An original model for GTA teaching effectiveness was developed from a thorough search of the GTA teaching literature. The two instruments---perception of training and teaching self-efficacy---were tested through self-report surveys using STEM GTAs from six different universities including Oregon State University (OSU). The data was analyzed using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Using GTAs from the OSU colleges of science and engineering, the model of sources of STEM GTA teaching self-efficacy was tested by administering self-report surveys and analyzed by using OLS regression analysis. Language and cultural proficiency, departmental teaching climate, teaching self-efficacy, GTA training, and teaching experience affect GTA teaching effectiveness. GTA teaching self-efficacy is a second-order factor combined from self-efficacy for instructional strategies and a positive learning environment. It is correlated to GTA perception of teaching training and university GTA training. The K-12 teaching experience, GTA perception of teaching training, and facilitating factors in the departmental climate predict STEM GTA teaching self-efficacy. Hours of GTA training and supervision are fully mediated by perception of GTA training. Implications for research and training of STEM GTAs are discussed.

Dechenne, Sue Ellen

331

Social Norms and Self-efficacy Among Heavy Using Adolescent Marijuana Smokers  

OpenAIRE

Adolescence is a time in which individuals are particularly likely to engage in health-risk behaviors, with marijuana being the most prevalent illicit drug used. Perceptions of others’ use (i.e., norms) have previously been found to be related to increased marijuana use. Additionally, low refusal self-efficacy has been associated with increased marijuana consumption. This cross-sectional study examined the effects of normative perceptions and self-efficacy on negative marijuana outcomes for...

Walker, Denise D.; Neighbors, Clayton; Rodriguez, Lindsey M.; Stephens, Robert S.; Roffman, Roger A.

2011-01-01

332

Self-efficacy beliefs and fear of childbirth in nulliparous women  

OpenAIRE

Objective: To explore how childbirth self-efficacy, i.e. outcome expectancy and efficacy expectancy, was associated with fear of childbirth (FOC) and how efficacy expectancy and FOC, respectively were related to socio-demographic characteristics, mental problems and preference for a caesarean section. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a consecutive sample of 1000 pregnant nulliparous women was sent the Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire and Childbirth Self-Efficacy Inventory. Stati...

Salomonsson, Birgitta; Gullberg, Mats T.; Alehagen, Siw; Wijma, Klaas

2013-01-01

333

Improving Preservice Teachers’ Self-Efficacy through Service Learning: Lessons Learned  

OpenAIRE

University students have been barraged with service learning opportunities both as course required and as volunteer opportunities in recent years. Currently, many universities now require students to participate in engaged learning as a graduation requirement. Situated in Bandura’s theory of self-efficacy, this study examines the effects service learning has on students teaching self-efficacy when required to participate in an activity (course connected), compared to when they chose to volu...

Carianne Bernadowski; Ronald Perry; Robert Del Greco

2013-01-01

334

Self-Efficacy as a Positive Youth Development Construct: A Conceptual Review  

OpenAIRE

Self-efficacy denotes people's beliefs about their ability to perform in different situations. It functions as a multilevel and multifaceted set of beliefs that influence how people feel, think, motivate themselves, and behave during various tasks. Self-efficacy beliefs are informed by enactive attainment, vicarious experience, imaginal experiences, and social persuasion as well as physical and emotional states. These beliefs are mediated by cognitive, motivational, affective, and selection p...

Tsang, Sandra K. M.; Hui, Eadaoin K. P.; Law, Bella C. M.

2012-01-01

335

Preliminary Investigation of the Sources of Self-Efficacy Among Teachers of Students with Autism  

OpenAIRE

Teacher self-efficacy refers to the beliefs teachers hold regarding their capability to bring about desired instructional outcomes and may be helpful for understanding and addressing critical issues such as teacher attrition and teacher use of research-supported practices. Educating students with autism likely presents teachers with some of the most significant instructional challenges. The self-efficacy of 35 special education teachers of students with autism between the ages of 3 to 9 years...

Ruble, Lisa A.; Usher, Ellen L.; Mcgrew, John H.

2011-01-01

336

Mathematics Self-Efficacy and African American Male Students: An Examination of Models of Success  

OpenAIRE

The purpose of this study was to investigate the personal stories of African American men who excelled in mathematics to understand the impact of their self-efficacy beliefs on their motivation and subsequent academic achievement in mathematics at the postsecondary level. General analyses of autobiographies and interviews revealed that enactive attainment and vicarious experience were influential sources for these African American men.s self-efficacy beliefs and were supported by family, frie...

Iii, Richard Noble

2011-01-01

337

Enhancing Drug Treatment Program Staff’s Self-Efficacy to Support Patients’ HCV Needs  

OpenAIRE

To increase HCV-related support for patients in substance abuse treatment programs, we implemented an on-site staff training in 16 programs throughout the United States. It aimed to increase participants’ self-efficacy in assisting patients with their HCV-related needs. Findings indicate that participants’ self-efficacy increased both 1- and 3-months post-training, resulting in providers’ perceptions that they were better able to support patients regarding HCV. Implementing an engaging ...

Strauss, Shiela M.; Munoz-plaza, Corrine; Rosedale, Mary T.; Rindskopf, David M.; Lunievicz, Joseph

2011-01-01

338

Human and Social Capital Development for Self Efficacy of University Graduates: Bases for Development of Society  

OpenAIRE

The study investigated perceptions of students and employers about the development of human and social capital in terms of intellectual development skills, personal development skills, professional development skills, and social development skills for self efficacy of university graduates. How students and employers were viewing the development of human and social capital for self efficacy of university graduates; which areas of development skills were relatively stronger; and which sectors o...

Shoukat Ali Raza; Shahid Zia; Syed Abir Hassan Naqvi; Shaikh, Faiz M.

2011-01-01

339

Malay Secondary School Students’ Entrepreneurial Attitude Orientation and Entrepreneurial Self-efficacy: A Descriptive Study  

OpenAIRE

As the influential factors affecting intention to become an entrepreneur, entrepreneurial attitude orientation and self-efficacy of students have been one of the main focuses of entrepreneurship research. However, there is not enough information on secondary school students’ attitude toward and efficacy of entrepreneurship particularly, in Malaysia. Through a descriptive approach, this study aimed to determine entrepreneurial attitude and entrepreneurial self-efficacy in order to evaluate t...

Lope Pihie, Z. A.; Bagheri, A.

2011-01-01

340

Goal orientation and self-efficacy in relation to memory in adulthood  

OpenAIRE

The achievement goal framework (Dweck, 1986) has been well-established in children and college-students, but has rarely been examined empirically with older adults. The current study, including younger and older adults, examined the effects of memory self-efficacy, learning goals (focusing on skill mastery over time) and performance goals (focusing on performance outcome evaluations) on memory performance. Questionnaires measured memory self-efficacy and general orientation toward learning an...

Hastings, Erin C.; West, Robin L.

2011-01-01

341

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Graduate Teaching Assistants Teaching Self-Efficacy  

OpenAIRE

The graduate experience is a critical time for development of academic faculty, but often there is little preparation for teaching during the graduate career.  Teaching self-efficacy, an instructor’s belief in his or her ability to teach students in a specific context, can help to predict teaching behavior and student achievement, and can be used as a measure of graduate students’ development as instructors.  An instrument measuring teaching self-efficacy of science, technology, enginee...

Sue Ellen DeChenne; Enochs, Larry G.; Mark Needham

2012-01-01

342

Are Teachers Qualified to Teach Entrepreneurship? Analysis of Entrepreneurial Attitude and Self-efficacy  

OpenAIRE

Recent research on the impacts of entrepreneurship education revealed that graduates lack the motivation and competencies required for new venture creation. Students entrepreneurial motivation and competencies can be highly influenced by teachers attitude toward and self-efficacy in entrepreneurship. However, there is little knowledge about entrepreneurial attitude and self-efficacy of teachers specifically at vocational and technical schools. This study aimed to examine entrepreneurial attit...

Bagheri, A.; Lope Pihie, Z. A.

2011-01-01

343

Differential effects of planning and self-efficacy on fruit and vegetable consumption  

OpenAIRE

To change dietary behaviors, people must be motivated to do so. But intentions often do not translate into behavior. Strategic planning (as a mediator) is expected to move people from intention to action. However, individuals who lack perceived self-efficacy might fail to apply their plans when encountering challenging situations. Thus, self-efficacy might operate as a moderator variable when it comes to studying the mediator effects of planning on behaviors. This study examines the interacti...

Richert, Jana; Reuter, Tabea; Wiedemann, Amelie U.; Lippke, Sonia; Ziegelmann, Jochen Philipp; Schwarzer, Ralf

2010-01-01

344

Spirituality, Self-Efficacy, and Quality of Life among Adults with Sickle Cell Disease  

OpenAIRE

Spirituality and self-efficacy both have been identified as factors that contribute to management of chronic illnesses and quality of life (QOL). For individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD), the lifespan is increasing, but adults report low self-efficacy, ineffective coping skills and poor QOL. The care of adult patients with SCD requires a complex, multidisciplinary team approach with a focus not only on physiological, psychological, and social needs, but also on spiritual needs. However,...

Adegbola, Maxine

2011-01-01

345

An interactive course to enhance self-efficacy of family practitioners to treat obesity  

OpenAIRE

Abstract Background Physicians' awareness of their important role in defusing the obesity epidemic has increased. However, the number of family practitioners who treat obesity problems continues to be low. Self-efficacy refers to the belief in one's ability to organize and execute the courses of action required to produce given attainments. Thus, practitioners who judge themselves incapable of managing obesity do not even try. We hypothesized that practitioners' self-efficacy and motivation w...

Pasternak Shmuel; Feigenbaum Amiel; Katz Sara; Vinker Shlomo

2005-01-01

346

The Relationship Between Self-Efficacy and Reductions in Smoking in a Contingency Management Procedure  

OpenAIRE

Social– cognitive and behavioral theories of change disagree on what the relevant controlling variables for initiating behavior change are. Correlations between baseline smoking cessation self-efficacy and the changes in breath carbon monoxide (CO) and the reduction in breath CO and increases in smoking cessation self-efficacy from baseline were obtained from a contingency management smoking cessation procedure. A test of the difference between the cross-lag correlations suggested a nonspur...

Romanowich, Paul; Mintz, Jim; Lamb, R. J.

2009-01-01

347

Effects of EFL Teachers’ Self-efficacy on Motivational Teaching Behaviors  

OpenAIRE

This study examined the predictability of EFL teachers’ self-efficacy on their motivational teaching behaviors. Participants involved 112 English teachers from China’s tertiary education institutes selected by a “snowball” sampling strategy and also from an EFL teacher training camp. They completed a questionnaire survey of the demographic information of participants, their perception of self-efficacy, and their motivational teaching behaviors in English classroom. Results from the de...

Wei Huangfu

2012-01-01

348

Parental Attachment, Inter-Parental Conflict and Late Adolescent’s Self-Efficacy  

OpenAIRE

The main purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between parental attachment, inter-parental conflict and self-efficacy among 374 college students aged 17 to 19 years old in Iran. The probability proportional to size sampling technique was used to obtain sample size. The Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment, the Children’s Perception of Inter-parental Conflict Scale, and the General Self-Efficacy Scale were used to measure parental attachment, inter-parental conflict and ...

Nakisa Parsa; Siti Nor Yaacob; Ma'rof Redzuan; Parisa Parsa; Nooshin Sabour Esmaeili

2014-01-01

349

Self-Efficacy and Sense of Community among Adults Recovering from Substance Abuse  

OpenAIRE

Previous researchers found that abstinence-specific self-efficacy has been predictive of the likelihood of relapse for individuals in recovery from substance abuse. Oxford Houses are sober living homes that provide mutual support and are resident funded and operated. The relationships between house level sense of community and abstinence-specific self-efficacy were examined in the present study with a sample of 754 adults living in 139 Oxford Houses nationwide in a multilevel model. A signifi...

Stevens, Edward B.; Jason, Leonard A.; Ferrari, Joseph R.; Hunter, Bronwyn

2010-01-01

350

The Contribution of Agreeableness and Self-efficacy Beliefs to Prosociality  

OpenAIRE

The present study examined how agreeableness and self-efficacy beliefs about responding empathically to others’ needs predict individuals’ prosociality across time. Participants were 377 adolescents (66% males) aged 16 at Time 1 and 18 at Time 2 who took part at this study. Measures of agreeableness, empathic self-efficacy and prosociality were collected at two time points. The findings corroborated the posited paths of relations to assigning agreeableness a major role in predicting the l...

Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Alessandri, Guido; Di Giunta, Laura; Panerai, Laura; Eisenberg, Nancy

2009-01-01

351

Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy and the Use of Prescription Medication: A Pilot Study  

OpenAIRE

Objective. To examine the association of self-efficacy, perception of milk production, and lactating women's use of medication prescribed to increase breast milk in a cohort of 18–40-year-old mothers over six months. Methods. Mothers (n = 76) attending community clinics completed the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale and the Humenick/Hill Lactation Scale, a measure of perceived milk production, three times. Results. Domperidone, a dopamine antagonist, was used by 28% of participants. On ave...

Deborah Mansell; Cynthia Mannion

2011-01-01

352

Towards Sustaining Levels of Reflective Learning: How Do Transformational Leadership, Task Interdependence, and Self-Efficacy Shape Teacher Learning in Schools?  

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Full Text Available Whereas cross-sectional research has shown that transformational leadership, task interdependence, and self-efficacy are positively related to teachers’ engagement in reflective learning activities, the causal direction of these relations needs further inquiry. At the same time, individual teacher learning might play a mutual role in strengthening school-level capacity for sustained improvement. Building on previous research, this longitudinal study therefore examines how transformational leadership, task interdependence, self-efficacy, and teachers’ engagement in self-reflection mutually affect each other over time. Questionnaire data gathered on three measurement occasions from 655 Dutch Vocational Education and Training teachers was analyzed using a multivariate Latent Difference Score model. Results indicate that self-reflection and task interdependence reciprocally influence each other’s change. A considerate and stimulating transformational leader was found to contribute to this process. Change in self-efficacy was influenced by self-reflection, indicating that learning leads to competency beliefs. Together, the findings point to the important role transformational leadership practices play in facilitating teamwork, and sustaining teachers’ levels of learning in schools.

Arnoud Oude Groote Beverborg

2015-03-01

353

Teacher Training and Pre-service Primary Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Science Teaching  

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This study focuses on the improvement of pre-service teachers' self-efficacy for teaching science by including science courses within the teacher training program. Knowing how efficacy beliefs change over time and what factors influence the development by pre-service primary teachers of positive science teaching efficacy beliefs may be useful for teacher training universities, so that they can adapt their curriculum to accommodate these factors. Participants included 292 pre-service primary teachers, a cross-sectional sample from two different universities in the Netherlands across the four different years of study in the training program. Based upon our results, we conclude that the science teaching self-efficacy of pre-service teachers, in particular, improved during years 1 and 2, and not during years 3 and 4. Higher levels of self-rated subject-matter knowledge and science teaching experience in primary schools both contributed to higher levels of personal self-efficacy for science teaching. Differences at the university level in courses taken during the first year between science content courses and science methods courses also influenced the pre-service teachers' development of science teaching self-efficacy. After their first year, the pre-service teachers from the university with science content courses had significantly higher self-efficacy than pre-service teachers from the university that offered science methods courses. After the second year of teacher training, however, this difference in self-efficacy was no longer present.

Velthuis, Chantal; Fisser, Petra; Pieters, Jules

2014-06-01

354

The use of self-efficacy enhancing methods in diabetes education in the Netherlands.  

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According to the social cognitive theory of Bandura, self-efficacy predicts behavorial change. Bandura notes that self-efficacy is based on four major sources of information: performance accomplishments, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion and self-evaluation. This exploratory study examined the use of these four sources of information by Dutch nurse diabetes educators to enhance self-efficacy among people with diabetes mellitus. A survey questionnaire was sent to all Dutch nurse members of the European Association of Diabetes Educators (EADE) asking about the use of self-efficacy-enhancing methods, and four different educational programs were observed. Survey respondents said that performance accomplishments and verbal persuasion were often used, vicarious experience was hardly ever used, and the use of self-evaluation varied. The observations gave a different picture: only verbal persuasion was observed often; the other three sources were hardly ever used. Clearly, self-efficacy-enhancing educational methods are not systematically used in the Netherlands and there is little variety in the methods used. More varied methods of enhancing self-efficacy need to be developed and implemented in diabetes education programs. PMID:11871583

Koopman-van den Berg, D J; van der Bijl, J J

2001-01-01

355

Self-efficacy and functional status in schizophrenia: relationship to insight, cognition and negative symptoms.  

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Self-efficacy, defined as the confidence one has in the ability to perform a behavior or specific task, has been introduced as a crucial motivational factor for successfully carrying out social and everyday living skills (Bandura, 1977, 1997). Few studies have assessed its role in functioning in schizophrenia. The current study was designed to investigate whether degree of illness insight determined whether self-efficacy was a mediator of the relationship between two key illness features, negative symptoms and cognition, and functional skills. Sixty-nine individuals with schizophrenia were administered measures of self-efficacy, cognition, symptoms, insight and performance-based measure of everyday living and social skill. Results revealed that self-efficacy was only linked to measures of functional skills when illness insight was intact. There was evidence of moderation of confounding effects such that when self-efficacy was controlled, the relationship between negative symptoms and measures of everyday life skills became non-significant, but only when illness insight was intact. These findings emphasize the importance of including illness insight in models of the role of self-efficacy in functioning in schizophrenia. PMID:23375941

Kurtz, Matthew M; Olfson, Rachel H; Rose, Jennifer

2013-04-01

356

Computer self-efficacy - is there a gender gap in tertiary level introductory computing classes?  

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Full Text Available This paper explores the relationship between introductory computing students, self-efficacy, and gender. Since the use of computers has become more common there has been speculation that the confidence and ability to use them differs between genders. Self-efficacy is an important and useful concept used to describe how a student may perceive their own ability or confidence in using and learning new technology. A survey of students in an introductory computing class has been completed intermittently since the late 1990\\'s. Although some questions have been adapted to meet the changing technology the aim of the survey has remain unchanged. In this study self-efficacy is measured using two self-rating questions. Students are asked to rate their confidence using a computer and also asked to give their perception of their computing knowledge. This paper examines these two aspects of a person\\'s computer self-efficacy in order to identify any differences that may occur between genders in two introductory computing classes, one in 1999 and the other in 2012. Results from the 1999 survey are compared with those from the survey completed in 2012 and investigated to ascertain if the perception that males were more likely to display higher computer self-efficacy levels than their female classmates does or did exist in a class of this type. Results indicate that while overall there has been a general increase in self-efficacy levels in 2012 compared with 1999, there is no significant gender gap.

Shirley Gibbs

357

The Assessment of Self-Efficacy Level According to University StudentsAND#8217; Smoking Situation  

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Full Text Available ABSTRACT AIM: This essay is made with the aim of assessing of self-efficacy level according to university students’ smoking situation. METHOD: The study that is descriptive type was made in between September 2009-June 2010 in University of Bingol. Totally 920 students who attend Bingol Universty in 2009-2010 academic year consist of the universe of the study. The choice of sample wasn’t used in the study, the study completed with 765 students who were volunteer to join the study data was collected by using the form including socio-demographic data and self-efficacy scale. Evaluating data was made by descriptive tests in computer environment, t test and analysis of variance. RESULTS: The rate of students’ smoking is 6,9 % among girls, 37,4 % among boys and it is totally 44,3 %. It was determined that place that they live, their fathers’ education of smoking students idea quit smoking effect their self-efficacy level. It was determined that family type, marital status, fathers’ education of non-smoking students effect their self-efficacy level. CONCLUSION: It is found that self-efficacy of non-smoking students is higher than the self-efficacy of smoking students. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(3.000: 255-264

Nur Ozlem Kilinc

2012-06-01

358

Neighborhood satisfaction, functional limitations, and self-efficacy influences on physical activity in older women  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Perceptions of one's environment and functional status have been linked to physical activity in older adults. However, little is known about these associations over time, and even less about the possible mediators of this relationship. We examined the roles played by neighborhood satisfaction, functional limitations, self-efficacy, and physical activity in a sample of older women over a 6-month period. Methods Participants (N = 137, M age = 69.6 years completed measures of neighborhood satisfaction, functional limitations, self-efficacy, and physical activity at baseline and again 6 months later. Results Analyses indicated that changes in neighborhood satisfaction and functional limitations had direct effects on residual changes in self-efficacy, and changes in self-efficacy were associated with changes in physical activity at 6 months. Conclusion Our findings support a social cognitive model of physical activity in which neighborhood satisfaction and functional status effects on physical activity are in part mediated by intermediate individual outcomes such as self-efficacy. Additionally, these findings lend support to the position that individual perceptions of both the environment and functional status can have prospective effects on self-efficacy cognitions and ultimately, physical activity behavior.

McAuley Edward

2008-02-01

359

The Relationship between Self-efficacy and Writing Performance across Genders  

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Full Text Available The study examined the relationship between the learners’ self-efficacy and their writing performance across genders. Specifically, this study investigated the self-efficacy and writing performance of Makoo and Marand EFL students majoring in Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL. One hundred twenty learners, between ages 20-29, were chosen. Two instruments were used to collect data. At three different points in time, the participants were given writing assessments and also responded to the questionnaires on self-efficacy. The data were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation statistic and independent-samples t-test. Results revealed that there was no significant relationship between male and female EFL students’ self-efficacy and writing performance. It was also found that there was a significant positive relationship in self-efficacy between female and male EFL students. This study is expected to contribute to the related literature by shedding light on the relation of student self-efficacy and writing performance.

Felor Hashemnejad

2014-05-01

360

Self-objectification and condom use self-efficacy in women university students.  

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This study investigated the roles of indicators of the self-objectification process in women's condom use self-efficacy. Data were collected from 595 college women. Self-objectification variables were assessed with measures of internalization of cultural standards of beauty, body surveillance, and body shame. Participants also completed measures of perceived control over sexual activity, acceptance of sexuality, and condom use self-efficacy. Measurement and structural invariance were supported, indicating that the measurement model and hypothesized structural model did not differ across participants who were or were not sexually active. Structural equation modeling results were consistent with hypotheses and prior evidence indicating that body surveillance partially mediated the link between internalization of cultural standards of beauty and body shame. Results also indicated that body shame was associated with lower condom use self-efficacy both directly and indirectly through the partial mediation of perceived control over sexual activity; acceptance of sexuality was not a significant mediator of this link but was associated directly with greater condom use self-efficacy. These results connect the substantial literature on the self-objectification process with women's condom use self-efficacy. Specifically, these results point to interrupting the self-objectification process and reducing body shame as well as to enhancing acceptance of sexuality and control over sexual activity as potentially fruitful targets for interventions to promote women's condom use self-efficacy. PMID:25304902

Parent, Mike C; Moradi, Bonnie

2015-05-01

361

Development of an Instrument to Assess Prospective Elementary Teacher Self-Efficacy Beliefs about Equitable Science Teaching and Learning (SEBEST)  

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This paper presents an overview of the procedures used to develop and validate an instrument to measure the self-efficacy beliefs of prospective elementary teachers about equitable science teaching and learning. The instrument, titled the SEBEST, was based on the work of Ashton and Webb (1986a, 1986b) and Bandura (1977, 1986). It was modeled after the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument (STEBI) (Riggs, 1988) and the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument for Prospective Teachers (STEBI-B) (Enochs & Riggs, 1990). Based on the standardized development procedures used and associated evidence, the SEBEST appears to be a content and construct valid instrument, with high internal reliability qualities. "Most probable response" plots are introduced and used to bring meaning to SEBEST raw scores.

Ritter, Jennifer M.; Boone, William J.; Rubba, Peter A.

2001-06-01

362

The association of family social support, depression, anxiety and self-efficacy with specific hypertension self-care behaviours in Chinese local community.  

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This study aimed to test the role of family social support, depression, anxiety and self-efficacy on specific self-care behaviours. In a local community health center, 318 patients with hypertension completed a questionnaire assessing self-care, family social support, depression, anxiety and self-efficacy in 2012. Each self-care behaviour was separately analyzed with logistic regression models. The mean score of perceived family social support for hypertension treatment was 20.91 (maximum=60). Adult children were identified as the primary support source. Approximately 22.3% and 15.4% of participants reported symptoms of anxiety and depression, respectively. Participants had moderately positive levels of confidence performing self-care (42.1±13.3 out of 60). After adjusting for demographic and health variables, a 10-unit increase in family social support increased the odds ratio (OR) of taking medication by 1.39 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.87) and increased the OR for measuring blood pressure (BP) regularly by 1.33 (95% CI 1.02-1.74). Depression and anxiety were not associated with any self-care behaviours. A10-unit increase in self-efficacy increased the adjusted OR for performing physical exercise to 1.25 (95% CI 1.04-1.49). In conclusion, family social support was positively associated with medication adherence and regular BP measurement. Strategies to improve family social support should be developed for hypertension control, yet further prospective studies are needed to understand the effects of family social support, depression, anxiety and self-efficacy on self-care behaviours. PMID:25008000

Hu, H H; Li, G; Arao, T

2015-03-01

363

Statistics Related Self-Efficacy A Confirmatory Factor Analysis Demonstrating a Significant Link to Prior Mathematics Experiences for Graduate Level Students  

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Full Text Available The present study examined students' statistics-related self-efficacy, as measured with the current statistics self-efficacy (CSSE inventory developed by Finney and Schraw (2003. Structural equation modeling was used to check the confirmatory factor analysis of the one-dimensional factor of CSSE. Once confirmed, this factor was used to test whether a significant link to prior mathematics experiences exists. Additionally a new post-structural equation modeling (SEM application was employed to compute error-free latent variable score for CSSE in an effort to examine the ancillary effects of gender, age, ethnicity, department, degree level, hours completed, expected course grade, number of college-level math classes, current GPA on students' CSSE scores. Results support the one-dimensional construct and as expected, the model demonstrated a significant link between CSSE scores and prior mathematics experiences to CSSE. Additionally the students' department, expected grade, and number of prior math classes were found to have a significant effect on student's CSSE scores.

Karen Larwin

2014-02-01

364

SELF EFFICACY PERCEPTIONS OF TURKISH TEACHER CANDIDATE TÜRKÇE Ö?RETMEN? ADAYLARININ Ö?RETMENL?K MESLE??NE DÖNÜK ÖZ YETERL?K ALGILARI  

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Full Text Available The main purpose of the study is to investigate Turkish teacher candidates’ self-efficacy levels according to their gender, kind of education, graduated type of high school and academic achievement. In the study data was collected by “Turkish Teacher Candidates’ Self Efficacy Perception Scale” developed by the researchers. The scale consisting of five sub-factors is five-item Likert-type scale. 351 Turkish teacher candidates whose 179 female and 172 male attended to the study. The participants of the study consisted of 4th grade students enrolled in Turkish Teaching Departments of Mehmet Akif Ersoy University, Inönü University, Ondokuz May?s University, Sakarya University, Gaziantep University, Dokuz Eylül University and Gazi University Faculties of Education. Data was analysed by using SPSS 15.0 package program. The results of the study indicated that, Turkish teachercandidates’ self-efficacy levels is “good”. Turkish teacher candidates' self-efficacy scores did not show any changes according to their gender, kind of education, graduated type of high school. But it was observed that according to academic achievement Turkish teacher candidates’ self-efficacy scores there was significant relationship. Bu ara?t?rman?n temel amac? Türkçe ö?retmeni adaylar?n?n öz yeterlik alg?lar?n?n cinsiyete, ö?retim türüne, mezun olunan lise türüne ve akademik ba?ar? durumlar?na göre incelenmesidir. Çal??madaki veriler, ara?t?rmac?lar taraf?ndan geli?tirilen “Türkçe Ö?retmeni Adaylar?n?n Öz Yeterlik Alg?s? Ölçe?i” arac?l???yla toplanm??t?r. Be? alt faktörden olu?an ölçek, be?li likert tipi bir ölçme arac?d?r.Ara?t?rmaya 179’u k?z, 172’si erkekten olu?an 351 Türkçe ö?retmeni aday? kat?lm??t?r. Kat?l?mc?lar Mehmet Akif Ersoy Üniversitesi, ?nönü Üniversitesi, Ondokuz May?s Üniversitesi, Sakarya Üniversitesi, Gaziantep Üniversitesi, Dokuz Eylül Üniversitesi ve Gazi Üniversitesi e?itim fakültelerinin Türkçe ö?retmenli?i program? son s?n?f ö?rencileridir. Veriler, SPSS 15.0 istatistik paket program?ndan yararlan?larak analiz edilmi?tir. Ara?t?rman?n sonuçlar?na göre Türkçe ö?retmeni adaylar?n?n öz yeterlik alg?lar? “iyi” düzeydedir. Adaylar?n öz yeterlik alg?lar? cinsiyet, ö?renim türü ve mezun olunan lise türü bak?m?ndan farkl?l?k göstermezken adaylar?n akademik ba?ar? durumlar?na göre anlaml? farkl?l?k göstermektedir.

Hasan BA?CI

2012-06-01

365

Self-efficacy in Environmental Education: Experiences of elementary education preservice teachers  

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Despite research showing Environmental Education can provide positive student outcomes in academic achievement, critical thinking, motivation and engagement (Ernst, 2007; Lieberman & Hoody, 1998; Orr, 1992; Palmer, 1998; Powers, 2004; Volk & Cheak, 2003), Environmental Education is currently not a critical element in American public school K-12 education. The present study investigates self-efficacy in Environmental Education through a mixed methods research approach. The data reveal the participants' perspectives of their sense of self-efficacy in Environmental Education. It adds to the body of work on Environmental Education and self-efficacy by specifically investigating the topics through interviews with preservice teachers. Purposeful sampling is used to identify preservice elementary education teachers in their senior year of college with a high measure of self-efficacy. Self-efficacy is measured using the Environmental Education Efficacy Belief Instrument (Sia, 1992). Forty-six preservice teachers completed the instrument. Six preservice teachers were interviewed to determine experiences that impact their self-efficacy in Environmental Education. Continual comparison and cross-case analysis are used to analyze the data. The results reveal a relationship between personal experiences with nature as a young child and current beliefs toward their personal efficacy and teaching outcome efficacy in Environmental Education. Similar to the findings of Sia (1992), the researcher discovered that preservice teachers realize that they lack sufficient knowledge and skill in Environmental Education but believe that effective teaching can increase students understanding of Environmental Education. While the preservice teachers do not believe they will teach Environmental Education as well as other subjects, they will continually seek out better ways to teach Environmental Education. Interviews with participants who had a high self-efficacy revealed the importance of playing outdoors as young children and having an adult role model with whom to share nature. Results showed that experiences with nature are absent in formal schooling, including courses in teacher education programs.

Gardner, Cynthia Crompton

366

A study of teachers' self-efficacy and outcome expectancy for science teaching throughout a science inquiry-based professional development program  

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The goal of this study was to investigate the self-efficacies and outcome expectancies of science teachers over time as a result of their participation in an inquiry-based, professional development program designed to ensure that all participants are highly qualified science teachers. Eighty-six teachers participated in inquiry-based activities designed to increase their content knowledge and teaching expertise while increasing their science teaching self-efficacies and outcome expectancies of student learning. This 15-month professional development program included two summer workshops (summers of 2007 and 2008) with an 8-month classroom implementation period in between. A quasi-experimental research design was used to investigate the change in science teaching efficacy scores after participation in the inquiry-based professional development program and the relationship of this change with selected independent variables. The data consisted of (a) three sets of Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument (Riggs & Enochs, 1990) scores, STEBI-Form A (inservice), reported as a pretest, posttest, and follow-up posttest; and (b) demographic variables that were used as covariates: science education background, professional position, number of years taught, and teacher qualification status in science. Using repeated measures and multiple regressions with an alpha level of 0.05, and testing the hypothesized changes and relationships, results indicated that there were gains in Personal Science Teaching Efficacy (PSTE) and Science Teaching Outcome Expectancy (STOE) scores. Of the independent variables, only science education background was found to be a significant contributor toward increasing PSTE (p = .003) scores. The other variables were not predictive of gains in either personal science teaching efficacy or science teaching outcome expectancy. The data gave insight into possible relationships that may exist between science teachers' self-efficacies and outcome expectancies after participation in an inquiry-based professional development program. This study demonstrated the importance of considering interactions between a given set of independent variables and self-efficacy beliefs. The findings also suggested the possible value of considering factors associated with planning long-term programs for teachers' professional development to include the impact of college courses, an implementation period for incorporating the new ideas, support from colleagues and providing professional development to become Highly Qualified Teachers of science.

Cripe, M. Kathleen Leslie

2009-12-01

367

[The transcultural process in Latin America].  

Science.gov (United States)

Are we living in an age of rapid changes, or are we actually experiencing an existencial mutation? The author believes the analysis of today's transcultural processes in Latin America to be vital to the understanding of the society which is an emergent of these processes. He defines the concepts of transculturation, aculturation, adaptation creative integration and of assimilation in its biological, cultural and religious aspects. He outlines the general characteristics of a complex problem: the unity or heterogenity of the Latin American people with relation to the interaction, juxtaposition or synthesis of their different indigenous, european and african cultures over a period of four centuries. He classifies five ideological proposals which have arisen from this process: 1) the ultraconservative proposal; 2) the nationalistic proposal; 3) the indigenistic proposal; 4) the proposal of imitation; 5) the proposal of a transcendent synthesis. The subject is the transcultural process in persons who have migrated from rural areas to large cities, and from one country to another. The author describes four adoptive or integrative phases; he emphasizes that this experience implies mourning, transition and working-through for both the individual and the community. Migrants are faced with "horizontal" as well as "vertical" mobility, thus having to deal with a mobilization implying changes which may cause persecutory, depresive and confusional anxieties. These crises test the person's degree of individuation and identity, as reflected in different types of behavior. PMID:7348077

Yampey, N

1981-07-01

368

Teachers’ Self-efficacy as Determinant of Students’ Attitudes toward School: A study at the School Level  

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Full Text Available Teachers’ self-efficacy was examined as determinant of students’ attitudes toward school. Over 679 teachers and 1820 students in 23 Jordanian (primary and junior schools were selected using simple random sampling. The instrument used in this study is Norwegian teachers’ self-efficacy scale which was developed by Skaalvik and Skaalvik (2007 and students’ attitudes toward school scale which was designed by the researchers. Results indicated that the level of teachers’ self-efficacy is moderate. Also, there is a significant correlation between teachers’ self-efficacy and students’ attitudes toward school. On the other hand, teachers’ self-efficacy a good predictor of students’ attitudes toward school. Finally, the results showed that no significant differences between male and female teachers in their level of self-efficacy.

Ahmed Falah Al-Alwan

2014-01-01

369

Investigating the Effect of Levels of Proficiency on Iranian Male and Female EFL Learners’ Critical Thinking and Self-efficacy  

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Full Text Available This study explored relationship between Self-Efficacy and Critical thinking across different levels among Iranian EFL learners. The purpose of this study was twofold. This study attempted to expand our understanding of the relationship between psychologically rich variables like self-efficacy and critical thinking and language proficiency. Second, this research examined these psychological variables among genders. The study sample consisted of 120 students from some institutes in Tehran. Three measurements were used for data collection: firstly Nelson Test in order to define level of proficiency and homogeneity, then Self-Efficacy Scale (SES, and Critical Thinking Questionnaire (CTQ were administered to measure their self-efficacy and critical thinking of Iranian EFL learners. In conclusion, according to statistical analysis, the findings are indicated that there is significant relationship between critical thinking and self-efficacy and levels of proficiency. Gender has significant effect on critical thinking and self-efficacy.

Shaban Barimani Varandi

2013-12-01

370

[Self-efficacy as a mediator for improvement in oral health clinical indices].  

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The concept of self-efficacy (SE) was developed by BANDURA, in 1977. SE has been widely utilized in health care and has shown to be a powerful predictor in various domains of behavior such as in smoking cessation, weight control and participation in programs of disease prevention. This study investigated if a psychosocial intervention fosters improvements in clinical indices in patients who are about to receive dental treatment. It was predicted that the experimental group (EG) would show a greater progress as to plaque and bleeding clinical indices than the control group (CG), and SE would mediate that improvement. Besides the standardized dental procedures, the 30 participants from the EG received a psychosocial intervention based on the PROCHASKA; DiCLEMENTE'S model (1983). The 30 participants in the CG received only standardized dental procedures. The results revealed that the prevalence of scores 2 and 3 of the plaque and bleeding indices underwent a significant decrease in the EG, in relation to the CG (U = 97.00, p = 0.0001 and U = 179.00, p = 0.0001, respectively). Only the subjects from the EG presented a relevant increase of SE, considering the pre- and post-treatment periods (Z = -3.58, p < 0.0001). Yet, there was no difference between both groups as to the increase of SE between the pre- and post-testing periods. In short, the results showed that psychosocial intervention was effective and suggest that other factors besides SE may mediate a relevant improvement of clinical indices in the EG. PMID:11938719

de Souza, Gislaine Afonso; Da Silva, Angela Maria Monteiro; Galvão, Rogério

2002-01-01

371

Self-efficacy instruments for patients with chronic diseases suffer from methodological limitations - a systematic review  

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Background Measurement of self-efficacy requires carefully developed and validated instruments. It is currently unclear whether available self-efficacy instruments for chronic diseases fulfill these requirements. Our aim was to systematically identify all existing self-efficacy scales for five major chronic diseases and to assess their development and validation process. Methods We conducted a systematic literature search in electronic databases (MEDLINE, PSYCHINFO, and EMBASE) to identify studies describing the development and/or validation process of self-efficacy instruments for the five chronic diseases diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, arthritis, and heart failure. Two members of the review team independently selected articles meeting inclusion criteria. The self-efficacy instruments were evaluated in terms of their development (aim of instrument, a priori considerations, identification of items, selection of items, development of domains, answer options) and validation (test-retest reliability, internal consistency reliability, validity, responsiveness) process. Results Of 584 potentially eligible papers we included 25 (13 for diabetes, 5 for asthma, 4 for arthritis, 3 for COPD, 0 for heart failure) which covered 26 different self-efficacy instrument versions. For 8 instruments (30.8%), the authors described the aim before the scales were developed whereas for the other instruments the aim was unclear. In one study (3.8%) a priori considerations were specified. In none of the studies a systematic literature search was carried out to identify items. The item selection process was often not clearly described (38.5%). Test-retest reliability was assessed for 9 instruments (34.6%), validity using a correlational approach for 18 (69.2%), and responsiveness to change for 3 (11.5%) instruments. Conclusion The development and validation process of the majority of the self-efficacy instruments had major limitations. The aim of the instruments was often not specified and for most instruments, not all measurement properties that are important to support the specific aim of the instrument (for example responsiveness for evaluative instruments) were assessed. Researchers who develop and validate self-efficacy instruments should adhere more closely to important methodological concepts for development and validation of patient-reported outcomes and report their methods more transparently. We propose a systematic five step approach for the development and validation of self-efficacy instruments. PMID:19781095

Frei, Anja; Svarin, Anna; Steurer-Stey, Claudia; Puhan, Milo A

2009-01-01

372

Self-efficacy instruments for patients with chronic diseases suffer from methodological limitations - a systematic review  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Measurement of self-efficacy requires carefully developed and validated instruments. It is currently unclear whether available self-efficacy instruments for chronic diseases fulfill these requirements. Our aim was to systematically identify all existing self-efficacy scales for five major chronic diseases and to assess their development and validation process. Methods We conducted a systematic literature search in electronic databases (MEDLINE, PSYCHINFO, and EMBASE to identify studies describing the development and/or validation process of self-efficacy instruments for the five chronic diseases diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, asthma, arthritis, and heart failure. Two members of the review team independently selected articles meeting inclusion criteria. The self-efficacy instruments were evaluated in terms of their development (aim of instrument, a priori considerations, identification of items, selection of items, development of domains, answer options and validation (test-retest reliability, internal consistency reliability, validity, responsiveness process. Results Of 584 potentially eligible papers we included 25 (13 for diabetes, 5 for asthma, 4 for arthritis, 3 for COPD, 0 for heart failure which covered 26 different self-efficacy instrument versions. For 8 instruments (30.8%, the authors described the aim before the scales were developed whereas for the other instruments the aim was unclear. In one study (3.8% a priori considerations were specified. In none of the studies a systematic literature search was carried out to identify items. The item selection process was often not clearly described (38.5%. Test-retest reliability was assessed for 9 instruments (34.6%, validity using a correlational approach for 18 (69.2%, and responsiveness to change for 3 (11.5% instruments. Conclusion The development and validation process of the majority of the self-efficacy instruments had major limitations. The aim of the instruments was often not specified and for most instruments, not all measurement properties that are important to support the specific aim of the instrument (for example responsiveness for evaluative instruments were assessed. Researchers who develop and validate self-efficacy instruments should adhere more closely to important methodological concepts for development and validation of patient-reported outcomes and report their methods more transparently. We propose a systematic five step approach for the development and validation of self-efficacy instruments.

Steurer-Stey Claudia

2009-09-01

373

Tracking chemistry self-efficacy and achievement in a preparatory chemistry course  

Science.gov (United States)

Self-efficacy is a person's own perception about performing a task with a certain level of proficiency (Bandura, 1986). An important affective aspect of learning chemistry is chemistry self-efficacy (CSE). Several researchers have found chemistry self-efficacy to be a fair predictor of achievement in chemistry. This study was done in a college preparatory chemistry class for science majors exploring chemistry self-efficacy and its change as it relates to achievement. A subscale of CAEQ, Chemistry Attitudes and Experiences Questionnaire (developed by Dalgety et al, 2003) as well as student interviews were used to determine student chemistry self-efficacy as it changed during the course. The questionnaire was given to the students five times during the semester: in the first class and the class before each the four tests taken through the semester. Twenty-six students, both men and women, of the four major races/ethnicities were interviewed three times during the semester and events that triggered changes in CSE were followed through the interviews. HLM (hierarchical linear modeling) was used to model the results of the CSE surveys. Among the findings, women who started at significantly lower CSE than men accomplished a significant gain by the end of the semester. Blacks' CSE trends through the semester were found to be significantly different from the rest of the ethnicities.

Garcia, Carmen Alicia

374

Perceived self-efficacy and pain control: opioid and nonopioid mechanisms.  

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In this experiment, we tested for opioid and nonopioid mechanisms of pain control through cognitive means and the relation of opioid involvement to perceived coping efficacy. Subjects were taught cognitive methods of pain control, were administered a placebo, or received no intervention. Their pain tolerance was then measured at periodic intervals after they were administered either a saline solution or naloxone, an opiate antagonist that blocks the effects of endogenous opiates. Training in cognitive control strengthened perceived self-efficacy both to withstand and to reduce pain; placebo medication enhanced perceived efficacy to withstand pain but not reductive efficacy; and neither form of perceived self-efficacy changed without any intervention. Regardless of condition, the stronger the perceived self-efficacy to withstand pain, the longer subjects endured mounting pain stimulation. The findings provide evidence that attenuation of the impact of pain stimulation through cognitive control is mediated by both opioid and nonopioid mechanisms. Cognitive copers administered naloxone were less able to tolerate pain stimulation than were their saline counterparts. The stronger the perceived self-efficacy to reduce pain, the greater was the opioid activation. Cognitive copers were also able to achieve some increase in pain tolerance even when opioid mechanisms were blocked by naloxone, which is in keeping with a nonopioid component in cognitive pain control. We found suggestive evidence that placebo medication may also activate some opioid involvement. Because placebos do not impart pain reduction skills, it was perceived self-efficacy to endure pain that predicted degree of opioid activation. PMID:2821217

Bandura, A; O'Leary, A; Taylor, C B; Gauthier, J; Gossard, D

1987-09-01

375

Using personal health records to scaffold perceived self-efficacy for health promotion.  

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According to Bandura (1977), believing in one's ability to achieve a goal is one of the best predictors that a goal will be accomplished. Given its predictive power, the concept of belief in one's ability to succeed, or perceived self-efficacy, is well researched for its influence on health promotion. It has been argued that a paradigm shift must occur away from illness treatment towards illness prevention and health promotion, for healthcare to accommodate the needs of the population. Personal Health Records (PHRs) may be a tool to help facilitate this paradigm shift. PHRs are repositories of information that individuals can use to access, manage, and share their personal health information. An extension of Bandura's model of self-efficacy will be presented here which identifies opportunities for PHRs to enhance perceived self-efficacy through mastery, social modeling, social persuasion, and physiological state. Bolstering self-efficacy through PHR tools will expand the utility of PHRs beyond self-management to also facilitate health promotion and illness prevention and gains in self-efficacy are also likely to transcend into other areas of consumers' lives. PMID:25676990

Monkman, Helen; Kushniruk, Andre W

2015-01-01

376

The impact of clinical simulation on learner self-efficacy in pre-registration nursing education.  

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Clinical simulation is becoming increasingly popular in pre-registration nursing education. Incorporating teaching and learning strategies that enhance learner self-efficacy will theoretically improve clinical competence (Bandura, 1986, 1997). This paper presents the findings of a study that aimed to explore the impact of clinical simulation on self-efficacy beliefs amongst pre-registration nurses. A preliminary study (Pike, 2008) used a pre- and post-test design to measure learner self-efficacy before and after a clinical simulation session. Qualitative responses to questions on the post-test questionnaire provided themes to explore in a focus group interview with a convenience sample of nine participants. Thematic content analysis of the interview highlighted two principal findings. Firstly, students described low levels of self-efficacy with regards to communication skills, an area identified as a priority within pre-registration nursing education (NMC, 2007a). Second, students highlighted the need for learning experiences within clinical simulation to be more authentic, to improve the theory to practice gap. It is argued by incorporating strategies within clinical simulation that enhance learner self-efficacy, overall clinical competence will be improved. Suggestions for how pedagogical approaches may be developed within clinical simulation are discussed, whilst acknowledging the limitations of the small scale nature of the study. PMID:19883960

Pike, Tamsin; O'Donnell, Victoria

2010-07-01

377

The Impact of Teacher Self-efficacy on the Students’ Motivation and Achievement  

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Full Text Available The study of self-efficacy and its impact on human performance has intrigued a lot of scholars during the last two decades (e.g. Clayson, D. & Sheffet, M. 2006; Nauta, M. 2001; Muijs &Rejnolds, 2001; Bandura, 1997; Podell & Soodak, 1993. The objective of this research was to investigate the influence of teacher self-efficacy (TSE on the students’ motivation and achievement. To this end, eighty senior high school teachers in four different cities in Iran, and one hundred and fifty senior high school students, based on their teachers’ level of self-efficacy, have been selected randomly. For data collection, two instruments were employed: Teacher Self-Efficacy and Students’ Motivation questionnaires. Data were analyzed through Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient and ANOVA. The results of the study revealed that teacher self-efficacy has a positive influence on the students’ motivation and achievement. The results of the study and their pedagogical implications are discussed, and recommendations for further research are provided.

Ahmad Mojavezi

2012-03-01

378

Attrition in chronic disease self-management programs and self-efficacy at enrollment.  

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Among other goals, the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) is designed to improve self-efficacy of the chronically ill. However, a substantial proportion of the enrollees often leave CDSMPs before completing the program curriculum. This study examines factors associated with program attrition in a CDSMP implemented in a community setting. We used data from the Our Pathways to Health program, implemented in Humboldt County, California, from 2008 to 2011. Our conceptual framework is based on Bandura's self-efficacy theory, and we used logistic regression to investigate whether baseline self-efficacy and other members' efficacy are associated with participants dropping out of the CDSMP. Twenty-three percent of the participants did not complete the program similar to previous studies. Lower baseline self-efficacy increased the odds of dropout, but other members' efficacy was not associated with differential odds of dropout. Age, educational difference between the individual and the group, weekday sessions, and social/role activity limitations are also found to be associated with program attrition. Our results suggest that participants with low starting self-efficacy may need extra help to complete the program. Further research is needed to understand how to effectively provide additional support to this group. PMID:24771128

Verevkina, Nina; Shi, Yunfeng; Fuentes-Caceres, Veronica Alejandra; Scanlon, Dennis Patrick

2014-12-01

379

Factors influencing self-efficacy in breastfeeding support among public health nurses in Japan  

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Full Text Available This study investigated self-efficacy in breastfeeding support among public health nurses (PHNs working at maternal and child health (MCH services in Japanese municipalities, and its related factors such as education, working experience, breastfeeding experience, and postgraduate/continuous education. Directors of the MCH divisions were requested to select one PHN to answer the self-report questionnaires sent. The questionnaires were collected from October 2010 to January 2011. Of the 1750 questionnaires sent, 831 were returned (response rate: 47.5%; 102 were excluded from analysis because of missing data (valid response rate: 41.7%. After adjusting the weights of PHN sampling and collection rates by prefecture and population size, Model 1 of the multiple regression analysis showed that the self-efficacy in breastfeeding support was significantly higher in large/urban municipalities (? = 0.13 and in the Kanto district. Model 2 revealed that self-efficacy was significantly associated with working experience (? = 0.13 and breastfeeding experience (? = 0.22 but not with educational background. Model 3 showed that self-efficacy was significantly associated with postgraduate education (? = 0.14 and continuous education (? = 0.12. This suggested that PHNs’ self-efficacy increased through self-enrichment. It is necessary to create training opportunities about breastfeeding support for PHNs—especially those working in remote and/or small municipalities— and to provide them with new and important information.  

Noriko Toyama

2013-12-01

380

Examining the influence of other-efficacy and self-efficacy on personal performance.  

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This research examined the relative effects of other-efficacy and self-efficacy beliefs in relation to individual performance within a cooperative dyadic setting. Pairs of female participants (M(age) = 20.08, SD = 1.93) performed three practice trials on a dyadic dance-based videogame. Other-efficacy and self-efficacy beliefs were then manipulated through the provision of bogus feedback regarding each pair member's coordination abilities. Following the administration of this feedback, pairs performed a final trial on this dance-based task. The results revealed a main effect for other-efficacy, such that participants in the enhanced other-efficacy conditions outperformed those in the inhibited other-efficacy conditions on this task. A main effect for self-efficacy was not observed. Furthermore, there was no evidence of an interaction between other-efficacy and self-efficacy. The results of this study suggest that other-efficacy may supersede the effects of self-efficacy in supporting personal performance within cooperative relational contexts. PMID:21808081

Dunlop, William L; Beatty, Daniel J; Beauchamp, Mark R

2011-08-01

381

Validation of the Gambling Refusal Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Chinese undergraduate students.  

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Although research on self-efficacy in the gambling literature took place more than 25 years ago, only in the recent decade did researchers attempt to develop valid and reliable measures of gambling-related self-efficacy. Recently Casey et al. (J Gambl Stud 24:229-246, 2008) developed the Gambling Refusal Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (GRSEQ) in an Australian sample, which is a valuable tool for gambling research. The first objective of this study is to validate the measure in a new sample. Given that previous research on Chinese's gamblers' self-efficacy is lacking, and that related research often used ad-hoc measures of the construct, a second objective of this study is to evaluate whether the GRSEQ is suitable for Chinese people. A sample of 427 university students (56.4 % females, 50.7 % gamblers) answered a questionnaire with measures including the GRSEQ, subjective norms, intentions toward gambling, general self-efficacy, impulsiveness, and pathological gambling symptoms. Evidence was found for the four-factor structure, internal consistency, criterion-related validity, and discriminant validity of the Chinese version of the GRSEQ among this young Chinese group. PMID:25859577

Lai, Mark H C; Wu, Anise M S; Tong, Kowk Kit

2015-03-01

382

The Role of Teacher's Self-efficacy as a Predictor of Iranian EFL Teacher's Burnout  

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Full Text Available In foreign language setting, there are some social psychological variables that can highly influence on the teachers' and learners performance. One of these important variables in language pedagogy is Self-efficacy “an individual’s confidence in his/her ability to engage in the social interactional tasks necessary to initiate and maintain interpersonal relationships” (Bandura, 2006. Another influential factor that is importance in teaching contexts is burnout. Burn out is defined as a result of long term job-related stress, especially among human service workers such as teachers (Jennett, Harris, &Mesibov, 2003. This study, which utilized qualitative _ quantitative methodologies, aimed at measuring the relationship between the self-efficacy of Iranian English teachers and their feelings of burnout. The needed data were gathered through the application of the two questionnaires: The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI; Maslach & Jackson 1981, 1986 and a researchers-made questionnaire of self-efficacy. The participants are as 616 professional experienced teachers from both genders and different age groups, having university education from different provinces of Iran. The SPSS software (version 16 was used to change the data into numerical interpretable data. To determine the relationship between self-efficacy and teachers' burnout, correlational analysis was employed. The result showed that the participants’ self-efficacy has a reverse relationship with their burnout. In addition, a significant relationship was observed between teachers' reports of burnout, and their years of experiences.

Mona Tabatabaee Yazdi

2014-09-01

383

Effects of EFL Teachers’ Self-efficacy on Motivational Teaching Behaviors  

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Full Text Available This study examined the predictability of EFL teachers’ self-efficacy on their motivational teaching behaviors. Participants involved 112 English teachers from China’s tertiary education institutes selected by a “snowball” sampling strategy and also from an EFL teacher training camp. They completed a questionnaire survey of the demographic information of participants, their perception of self-efficacy, and their motivational teaching behaviors in English classroom. Results from the descriptive statistics and a multiple regression analysis were generated based on the survey. It indicated that college EFL teachers perceived themselves with much higher self-efficacy for instructional strategies than efficacy for classroom management and efficacy for student engagement. Also, the results revealed that two most frequently used motivational strategies by teachers in language classroom were strategies for generating students’ initial motivation and strategies for maintaining and protecting students’ motivation. The results also showed that teachers’ self-efficacy significantly contributed to the prediction of teachers’ motivational teaching behaviors and accounted for more than one third of the variance to teachers’ motivational teaching behaviors. This study confirmed that there was a direct causal relationship between English teachers’ perceptions of their self-efficacy and their adoption of motivational strategies.

Wei Huangfu

2012-12-01

384

The Impact of Parents' Sleep Quality and Hypoglycemia Worry on Diabetes Self-Efficacy.  

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Parents of young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) may experience poor sleep quality, possibly impacting their confidence in T1D management. This study investigated sleep characteristics among parents of children with T1D and relationships among parents' sleep quality, hypoglycemia worry, and diabetes self-efficacy. As part of baseline assessment for a randomized clinical trial (RCT) to promote parental management of T1D, 134 parents of children ? age 6 reported on demographics, parent sleep characteristics, hypoglycemia worry, and diabetes self-efficacy. Parents reported they slept less time than recommended by the National Sleep Foundation and endorsed greater global sleep problems than standardized norms of healthy adults; one third of parents reported their overall sleep quality was "fairly bad" or "very bad." Hypoglycemia worry and parents' sleep quality were both significantly related to diabetes self-efficacy, but parents' sleep quality did not mediate the relationship of hypoglycemia worry and diabetes self-efficacy. Many parents experience disrupted sleep that impacts their perceived ability to perform T1D management. Interventions designed to improve parental T1D self-efficacy should consider sleep and concerns about children's hypoglycemia. PMID:24738994

Herbert, Linda Jones; Monaghan, Maureen; Cogen, Fran; Streisand, Randi

2014-04-16

385

Teachers’ Self-efficacy as Determinant of Students’ Attitudes toward School: A study at the School Level  

OpenAIRE

Teachers’ self-efficacy was examined as determinant of students’ attitudes toward school. Over 679 teachers and 1820 students in 23 Jordanian (primary and junior) schools were selected using simple random sampling. The instrument used in this study is Norwegian teachers’ self-efficacy scale which was developed by Skaalvik and Skaalvik (2007) and students’ attitudes toward school scale which was designed by the researchers. Results indicated that the level of teachers’ self-efficacy ...

Ahmed Falah Al-Alwan; Ahmad Mohammed mahasneh

2014-01-01

386

An Ecological Study of the Moderating Effect of Self-Efficacy on the Relationship between Personality and Biomechanical Consistency  

OpenAIRE

Self-efficacy is a widely called upon theory in the domain of sport sciences. However, much debate surrounds the way precepts of self-efficacy are measured (Bandura, 2006) and how they relate to performance (Moritz, Feltz, Fahrbach & Mack, 2001). Following Bandura's (2006) guidelines, the present paper aims to make sense of the above criticism by testing the strength of a purpose-built self-efficacy questionnaire in predicting subjects' biomechanical performance in a dart-throwing task, again...

Gibas, David; Hansen, Clint; Isableu, Brice; Le Scanff, Christine

2012-01-01

387

The Importance of General Self-Efficacy for the Quality of Life of Adolescents with Chronic Conditions  

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We investigated the influence of general self-efficacy perceived by adolescents with chronic conditions and parents on quality of life. This cross-sectional study used the general self-efficacy scale and DISABKIDS condition-generic module to survey adolescents (92/293; 31 %) with type I diabetes, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, cystic fibrosis, kidney/urological conditions, and neuromuscular disorders; and parents (121/293; 41 %). Self perceived and parents' perceived general self-efficacy of ...

Cramm, J. M.; Strating, M. M. H.; Roebroeck, M. E.; Nieboer, A. P.

2013-01-01

388

The development and validation of a five-factor model of Sources of Self-Efficacy in clinical nursing education  

OpenAIRE

Background: The aim of this study is to validate a newly developed nurses' self-efficacy sources inventory. We test the validity of a five-dimensional model of sources of self-efficacy, which we contrast with the traditional four-dimensional model based on Bandura’s theoretical concepts. Methods: Confirmatory factor analysis was used in the development of the newly developed self-efficacy measure. Model fit was evaluated based upon commonly recommended goodness-of-fit indices, including th...

Henk Gloudemans; René Schalk; Wouter Reynaert; Johan Braeken

2013-01-01

389

Self-Efficacy and Planning Predict Dietary Behaviors in Costa Rican and South Korean Women: Two Moderated Mediation Analyses  

OpenAIRE

Dietary planning is supposed to mediate between intentions and dietary behaviors. However, if a person lacks self-efficacy, this mediation might fail. A cross-sectional study in Costa Rica and a longitudinal study in South Korea were designed to examine the moderating role of self-efficacy in the intention planning behavior relationship. Intentions, planning, self-efficacy, dietary behaviors, and baseline diet were assessed. Study 1 included 245 women; Study 2 included 358 women. Moderated me...

Gutie?rrez-don?a, Benicio; Lippke, Sonia; Renner, Britta; Kwon, Sunkyo; Schwarzer, Ralf

2009-01-01

390

Love Hurts: The Influence of Social Relations on Exercise Self-Efficacy for Older Adults With Osteoarthritis  

OpenAIRE

Exercise self-efficacy is a powerful predictor of physical activity behavior, which enhances health and well-being for older adults. Social relations have been proposed as influential precursors for exercise self-efficacy. In a longitudinal study of 160 older adults with osteoarthritis (76.9% women), the authors found that social support (but not social strain) significantly predicted exercise self-efficacy in a structural equation model examining cross-sectional data: ?2(178, N = 160) = 264...

Cotter, Kelly A.; Sherman, Aurora M.

2008-01-01

391

A Study of English Self-efficacy and English Reading Proficiency of Taiwanese Junior High School Students  

OpenAIRE

English self-efficacy has been seen critical in affecting one’s English proficiency (Linnenbrink & Pintrich, 2003; Magogwe & Oliver, 2007). In this study, participants were junior high school students in Taiwan who were surveyed about their English self-efficacy and their English reading proficiency. The effect of gender on their English self-efficacy and their English reading proficiency were explored as well. With a quantitative research method, the results indicated that Taiwanese junior...

Min-hsun Maggie Su; Jiun-jie Wang

2012-01-01

392

Collectivistic orientation, acculturative stress, cultural self-efficacy, and depression: a longitudinal study among Chinese internal migrants.  

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The current study examined the longitudinal relationship of collectivistic orientation and depression and the mediating effects of acculturative stress and cultural self-efficacy between collectivistic orientation and depression. We expect that collectivistic orientation would decrease acculturative stress and increase cultural self-efficacy, and in turn, improve depression. Using data from 641 Chinese internal migrants during a 1-year period, the results supported the hypothesis that collectivistic orientation predicted decreased depression. Moreover, collectivistic orientation alleviated depression through reducing acculturative stress. Although cultural self-efficacy was also a significant mediator, collectivistic orientation relieved depression through decreasing cultural self-efficacy. Implications for future research directions and counseling are discussed. PMID:25480108

Du, Hongfei; Li, Xiaoming; Lin, Danhua; Tam, Cheuk Chi

2015-02-01

393

Correlations between self-efficacy in resisting six temptations and dietary energy and macronutrient intake at each meal.  

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Self-efficacy in relation to eating behavior for weight control is commonly defined as having the confidence to control urges to overeat in high-risk situations. Prior researchers have suggested that self-efficacy plays a mediating role in eating behavior for weight loss and maintenance. The current study examined the relationship between self-efficacy in resisting certain temptations and daily dietary intake at each meal. Participants were 83 men and 122 women registered at the health management website "Asken". They administered questionnaires about self-efficacy and dietary records. As results of multiple regression analysis, self-efficacy in resisting negative emotions was negatively related to lunch energy intake in men (?=-0.308, p=0.023) and total (?=-0.302, p=0.003), breakfast (?=-0.334, p=0.004), and snacking (?=-0.232, p=0.022) energy intake in women. Also, self-efficacy in resisting rewards was negatively related to lunch energy intake in men (?=-0.218, p=0.040). In men, self-efficacy in resisting hunger was positively related to protein intake (?=0.148, p=0.021) and relaxation was negatively related to lipid intake (?=-0.211, p=0.009). Self-efficacy in resisting some temptations, especially negative emotions, and dietary intakes were negatively related. Future research is needed to confirm these results and assess the prospective effects of self-efficacy. PMID:25215474

Shimpo, Misa; Fukkoshi, Yuko; Akamatsu, Rie

2014-12-01

394

The impact of an introductory college-level biology class on biology self-efficacy and attitude towards science  

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Self-efficacy theory was first introduced in a seminal article by Albert Bandura in 1977 entitled "Self-efficacy: Toward a unifying theory of behavioral change". Since its original introduction, self-efficacy has been a major focus of academic performance, anxiety, career development, and teacher retention research. Self-efficacy can be defined as the belief an individual possesses about their ability to perform a given task. Bandura proposed that self-efficacy should be measured at the highest level of specificity due to the fact that different people are efficacious in different areas. Interested in students' efficacy toward biology, Ebert-May, Baldwin, & Allred (1997) created and validated a survey to measure students' biology self-efficacy. Their survey was modeled after the guidelines for science literacy, and loaded to three sub-factors; methods of biology, generalization to other science courses, and application of the concepts. As self-efficacy theory has been related to effort expenditure and persistence (Bandura, 1977; 1997), one might think it would have some effect on students' attitudes toward the topic at hand. The current research investigated what changes in biology self-efficacy occurred after an introductory biology course with an inquiry based laboratory learning environment. In addition, changes in students' attitudes towards science were explored and how self-efficacy might affect them.

Thomas, Megan Elizabeth

395

The Influence of Entrepreneurial Self-Efficacy on Entrepreneurial Learning Behavior - Using Entrepreneurial Intention as the Mediator Variable  

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Full Text Available This study examines 448 technical and vocational school students’ entrepreneurial learning behavior and its influencing factors to serve as a school reference for the development of entrepreneurship education measures. The results show that students’ ‘entrepreneurial intention (EI’ has a significant direct effect on ‘entrepreneurial learning behavior (ELB’, and ‘entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE ‘has a significant effect on ‘entrepreneurial learning behavior’ through ‘entrepreneurial self-efficacy.’ The influence pattern and empirical data of ‘entrepreneurial self-efficacy’ and ‘entrepreneurial intention’ on ‘entrepreneurial learning behavior’ has a good fit.
Key words: Entrepreneurial intention; Entrepreneurial learning behavior; Entrepreneurial self-efficacy

Chun-Mei CHOU

2011-12-01

396

INTINSIC MOTIVATION, JOB SATISFACTION AND SELF-EFFICACY AS PREDICTORS OF JOB PERFORMANCE OF INDUSTRIAL WORKERS IN IJEBU ZONE OF OGUN STATE  

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Full Text Available This study investigated self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation and job satisfaction as predictors of job performance of industrial workers with the aim of improving employees’ productivity in Nigerian industrial settings. Descriptive study of expo facto was adopted. The population for this study was made up of employees of both Frigoglas Nigeria Plc Ijebu-Ode (500 workers and Ayokunle Industry Ltd Ijebu-Ode (600 workers. A total of 150 workers were selected through simple random sampling technique from each organization. Four research instruments titled Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMT, Self-Efficacy Scale (SES and Job Satisfaction Scale (JSS were used to collect data for the study. Job Performance was assessed using the Annual Performance Evaluation Reports (APER. The IMT was adapted from Ryan (1982. The test retest reliability of the instrument administered within two weeks interval yielded .80. The SES was self developed and has coefficient of .82. JSS was also self developed and have coefficient of .76. It measured job satisfaction. The response format used for the instruments was the Likert format with options ranging from Strongly Agree (SA = 4, Agree (A = 3, Disagree (D =2 and Strongly Disagree (SD =1. Higher score on the scale indicate high, intrinsic motivation, self-efficacy and job satisfaction. All the instruments were divided into two parts. Part A solicited responses on personal information about respondents while part B collected data on the various variables under study. The workers completed the questionnaires while their APER forms were collected for each worker that completed the questionnaire. Multiple Regression Analysis was used to analyse data collected.0.05 level of significance was applied in the analysis. As a result of the finding, the analysis of the hypotheses are clear indication that (1 self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation and job satisfaction will predict the job performance of industrial workers and (2 relatively, each of these variables will predict the job performance of workers. Therefore, it is suggested that for organization to achieve their stated objectives and goals, managements of those organization must put in place policies that will encourage self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation and job satisfaction

Olayiwola OLUSOLA

2011-04-01

397

Assessing understanding of the nature of science and science self-efficacy in undergraduates involved in research in an introductory geology course  

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As part of a campus-wide effort to transform introductory science courses to be more engaging and to more accurately convey the excitement of discovery in science, we have re-created the curriculum of our introductory geology lab. We have transformed what was a series of `cookbook' lab activities into a series of activities based in scientific inquiry and cooperative learning and have included a six-week, student driven research project focused on local groundwater and surface water issues, seeking to determine whether or not this new curriculum was an effective means to increase students' understanding of the nature of science and self-efficacy towards science. In addition to developing the research project curriculum, we worked with other university faculty to create a local hydrology research station which included eight monitoring wells and a stream gage, allowing students to collect their own water-level and water-quality data as well as to retrieve automatically collected data. In order to measure nature of science understanding, we used a modified version of the Student Understanding of Science and Scientific Inquiry questionnaire (Liang et al., 2005; Clough, 2010). We modified a vocational self-efficacy survey (Riggs et al. 1994) to measure science self-efficacy. Both instruments had average Cronbach's alpha values >0.8, making them reliable for our study. After three semesters of collecting data, we have found that an authentic research project slightly improves, but does not significantly increase overall nature of science understanding or science self-efficacy. Dis-aggregating the data into demographic sub-groups, nature of science understanding increased relatively more in non-STEM students than STEM students, and science self-efficacy increased relatively more in STEM students than non-STEM students. We also measured changes in students' understanding of geologic concepts in the Fall 2011 and Spring 2012 semesters. We gave students enrolled in the lab a 15 question version of the Geoscience Concept Inventory (GCI, Libarkin et al., 2005) and found significant improvements from pre-test to post-test scores This thesis will present an overview of the our new curriculum and details about the results we found.

Moss, Elizabeth Louise

398

Bandura's self-efficacy theory: a guide for cardiac rehabilitation nursing practice.  

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To help patients achieve the greatest benefit from cardiac rehabilitation programs, nurses must assist them to modify unhealthy behaviors. Many cardiac rehabilitation programs, however, lack a theoretical foundation; therefore, interventions are usually executed without accounting for the complexities of human behavior, and little consideration is given to the difficulties encountered in altering unhealthy behavior patterns. Bandura's self-efficacy theory is considered a suitable model for cardiac rehabilitation because it provides a systematic direction which allows one to interpret, modify, and predict patients' behaviors. This article describes the development of and conceptual framework for Bandura's theory, how it provides a basis for measurement of self-efficacy, and how it may be applied to the study of cardiac rehabilitation. Finally, some research issues, which are related to applications of self-efficacy theory in cardiac rehabilitation are discussed. PMID:7722281

Jeng, C; Braun, L T

1994-12-01

399

Perceived competence: a common core for self-efficacy and self-concept?  

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This study uses Bandura's Multidimensional Scales of Perceived Self-Efficacy (MSPSE; Bandura, 1990) and Harter's Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents (SPPA; Harter, 1988) to examine the extent to which self-efficacy and competency-related elements of the self-concept are independent constructs. Factor analysis of data provided by 778 high school students revealed that when measured using domain-general measures such as the MSPSE and SPPA, self-efficacy and competency self-concept do not represent totally separate, distinct constructs. Overlap of dimensions occurs at both the first- and second-order levels of analysis. The practical and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:21516587

Hughes, Amanda; Galbraith, David; White, David

2011-05-01

400

Relationships Between Self-Efficacy, Self-Esteem and Procrastination in Undergraduate Psychology Students  

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Objective: The present study aimed to review the relationships between procrastination and two self-factors self-efficacy and self-esteem. Methods: Participants were 140 undergraduates Psychology students enrolled in Mohagheg Ardabili University, Ardabil, Iran. Instruments used for collecting the required data were the student-version of the General Procrastination Scale (GP-S), General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE) and Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale (SES). Results: Using causal modeling, two models were compared; a model with self-esteem as a mediator versus a model with procrastination as a mediator. The self-esteem mediator model accounted for 21% of the variance in procrastination. The significance of the mediation effect was found by bootstrapping method. Conclusion: The relationship of procrastination with self-esteem and self-efficacy was revealed among undergraduate psychology students.

Hajloo, Nader

2014-01-01

401

Enhancing Self-Efficacy in Elementary Science Teaching With Professional Learning Communities  

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Emerging from Bandura's Social Learning Theory, this study of in-service elementary school teachers examined the effects of sustained Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) on self-efficacy in science teaching. Based on mixed research methods, and a non-equivalent control group experimental design, the investigation explored changes in personal self-efficacy and outcome expectancy among teachers engaged in PLCs that featured Demonstration Laboratories, Lesson Study, and annual Summer Institutes. Significant changes favoring the experimental group were found on all quantitative measures of self-efficacy. Structured clinical interviews revealed that observed changes were largely attributable to a wide range of direct (mastery) and vicarious experiences, as well as emotional reinforcement and social persuasion.

Mintzes, Joel J.; Marcum, Bev; Messerschmidt-Yates, Christl; Mark, Andrew

2013-11-01

402

Tinkering self-efficacy and team interaction on freshman engineering design teams  

Science.gov (United States)

This study utilizes Bandura's theory of self-efficacy as a framework to examine the development of tinkering skills white working on a freshman engineering design team. The four sources of self-efficacy were analyzed in the context of tinkering within the design team. The research question, 'Does tinkering self-efficacy change for female students during the Freshman Engineering Design class while working on mixed sex teams?', was addressed using quantitative data collection and field observations. Approximately 41 students enrolled in a freshman engineering design class at a public university in the southwest participated by providing self-reports about their tinkering involvement during each design project. In addition, three mixed-sex student teams were observed while working to complete the course design projects. An observation protocol based on Bandura's sources of self efficacy, was used to document tinkering interactions within the three observed teams. The results revealed that Bandura's sources of self-efficacy influenced tinkering involvement. The self-efficacy source, performance accomplishment measured through prior tinkering experience, was the most influential on tinkering involvement. Unlike Bandura's ranking of influence, verbal persuasion was shown to correlate with more tinkering behaviors than the observation of others. The number of females on a team had no impact on tinkering involvement. Tinkering involvement did not change as students progressed from one project to another. However, the competitive nature of the design project appeared to have a negative impact on tinkering involvement and the division of tasks within the team. In addition, a difference was found in the female students' perception of their tinkering involvement and observation of their tinkering involvement. The findings suggest that effective implementation of teamwork including teamwork preparation, more emphasis on the design process and the elimination of competition between teams are necessary to create a more equitable learning environment.

Richardson, Arlisa Labrie

403

Disability, Activities of Daily Living and Self Efficacy in Dialysis Patients  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess patients’ disability, activities of daily living and self-efficacy patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD and continuos ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD, to examine the relationship between them. Material and Methods: This study was carried with 152 patients as sample group. In this study, three instruments were used: Personal Information Form, Brief Disability Questionnaire, Katz\\'s Activity\\'s of Daily Living Index and Lawton and Brody\\'s Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Index and Self-efficacy Assessment Form. Data collected from the study was analyzed using percent, mean, Tukey test, significance test of two means, One-way variant analysis and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: The study results demonstrate that while there is a correlation between self-care ability and age, education level, marital status and additional health problems, factors such as age, gender, education level, work status, income level, social insurance status and frequency of hemodialysis application determine self-efficacy. Furthermore, a negative correlation was found between patients’ disability and activities of daily living , self-efficacy. It was determined that as the level of disability increases self-efficiacy level decreases. Conclusions: Dialysis application affects patients’ disability, activities of daily living and self-efficacy levels. In view of this study’s results, it is recommended to organize education programs to increase self-efficacy levels of dialysis patients and prepare comprehensive plans including patients’ families. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(2.000: 181-186

Mukadder Mollaoglu

2011-04-01

404

Increasing Memory Self-Efficacy and Strategy Use in Hispanic Elders  

OpenAIRE

This study tested the effects of a 4-week, nine-session group intervention taught in Spanish to Hispanic older adults entitled “Quieres Mejorar Tu Memoria” (Do you wish to improve your memory?). The program was based on Bandura’s self-efficacy theory and was designed to increase memory self-efficacy and strategy use. A total of 33 older adults attending a senior center (mean--age = 69 years; education = 5 years; MMSE = 25) participated in the study. A booster session and a post-test wer...

Mcdougall, Graham J.

1998-01-01

405

Self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and fantasies as predictors of alcoholics' postreatment drinking.  

Science.gov (United States)

The usefulness of distinguishing between alcoholic patients' expectations and their fantasies about treatment outcome was examined. Results at 6 and 12 months follow-up did not support the results of research with nonalcoholic participants which related better outcomes to a combination of positive expectations and negative fantasies about future drink-related situations. Higher self-efficacy expectancy at intake, however, was associated with better clinical outcome. Findings supported Bandura's (1986) contention that outcome expectations add little information on prediction beyond that explained by self-efficacy expectancy. The clinical implications of these results are discussed. PMID:9781821

Long, C G; Hollin, C R; Williams, M J

1998-10-01

406

The Effects of Self-Regulation and Self-Efficacy on Substance Use Abstinence  

OpenAIRE

Previous research found that self-regulation and self-efficacy were linked to substance use abstinence. The present study examined the relationships between changes in self-regulation and self-efficacy as predictors of substance use abstinence. A total of 150 adult individuals (62% female; M age = 37.1 SD = 8.1; 38% male) in substance abuse recovery participated in a randomized, longitudinal study comparing a communal housing model versus usual aftercare. Both the change in self-regulation (p...

Chavarria, Jesus; Stevens, Edward B.; Jason, Leonard A.; Ferrari, Joseph R.

2012-01-01

407

Gender-Differences in Self-Efficacy ICT Related to Various ICT-User Profiles in Finland and Norway. How Do Self-Efficacy, Gender and ICT-User Profiles Relate to Findings from PISA 2006  

Science.gov (United States)

In this paper, we explored the relationship between self-efficacy, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) user profiles, and gender. Self-efficacy is an important theoretical and empirical concept to identify and describe how students perceive their own ability to solve a task. ICT user profiles were developed as an empirical framework to…

Tomte, Cathrine; Hatlevik, Ove E.

2011-01-01

408

Boosting scholastic test scores by willpower : the role of implementation intentions  

OpenAIRE

As both high self-efficacy beliefs (Bandura, 1997) and forming implementation intentions (Gollwitzer & Sheeran, 2006) are known to improve goal attainment, it is suggested that implementation intentions geared at strengthening self-efficacy should be a very helpful self-regulation strategy to achieve high scholastic test scores. In Study 1, female participants had to perform a math test either with the goal intention of solving as many problems as possible or with an additional selfefficacy s...

Bayer, Ute C.; Gollwitzer, Peter M.

2007-01-01

409

Transcultural nursing course in Tanzania, Africa.  

Science.gov (United States)

A transcultural nursing course in Tanzania was offered in fall 2010 at Williston State College, located in North Dakota. Madeleine Leininger's Culture Care: Diversity and Universality Theory (Principles of Developing Cultural Competence) was the framework used for the experience. The course provided nursing students the opportunity to learn about the culture, health, and illness beliefs of Tanzanians; their values and practices; the prevalence of HIV/AIDS; and the differences and similarities between the healthcare systems, hospice/palliative care, and home visits in Tanzania as compared to the United States. PMID:22647987

Owens, Rhoda

2012-06-01

410

Tibetan Buddhist medicine: a transcultural nursing experience.  

Science.gov (United States)

Tibetan medicine, at 2,500 years old, is considered the oldest surviving medical tradition. A combination of logical healing practices, spiritual methods, and mystical practice, this tradition has a holistic basis as one of its foundational theories. It is known as the earliest form of mind-body medicine and can lend much of its wisdom to holistic and psychosomatic medicine and nursing, as well as the emerging field of psychoneuroimmunology. A basic overview of Tibetan medicine, coupled with a Western-educated nurse's experience during the care of a Tibetan Buddhist monk, provided an expanded view of the riches inherent in transcultural holistic nursing. PMID:7829858

Begley, S S

1994-09-01

411

The Development of Self-Efficacy and Self-Esteem in Pharmacy Students Based on Experiential Education  

Science.gov (United States)

This doctoral thesis contributes to the literature on self-efficacy and self-esteem and the relationship to a student's school, age, gender, ethnicity, GPA, paid and introductory pharmacy practice experiences in a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program. Graduates with a high level of self-efficacy and self-esteem are more desirable as…

Yorra, Mark L.

2012-01-01

412

Self-Efficacy Scale for Weight Loss among Multi-Ethnic Women of Lower Income: A Psychometric Evaluation  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: This study examined test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and construct and predictive validity of the Physical Activity and Nutrition Self-Efficacy (PANSE) scale, an 11-item instrument to assess weight-loss self-efficacy among postpartum women of lower income. Methods: Seventy-one women completed the PANSE scale and…

Latimer, Lara; Walker, Lorraine O.; Kim, Sunghun; Pasch, Keryn E.; Sterling, Bobbie Sue

2011-01-01

413

Cooperative Learning and Its Effect on Fourth-Grade Mathematics Students' Achievement, Motivation, and Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

The focus of this study was to explore the relationship between the use of cooperative learning strategies and student achievement, and student perceptions of self-efficacy and motivation in mathematics. Teacher perceptions of the impact that cooperative learning strategies have on student achievement, intrinsic motivation, and self-efficacy were…

Torchia, Sean P.

2012-01-01

414

The Influence of Student Teaching on Physical Education Student Teachers' Self-Efficacy and Outcome Expectancy Beliefs  

Science.gov (United States)

This study was designed to determine the impact of 12-week student teaching semesters on student teachers' self-efficacy and outcome expectancy beliefs in teaching physical education classes. A pre-post design was used to examine changes in beliefs of 107 physical education student teachers. Self-efficacy (instructional strategies, class…

Gao, Zan; Xiang, Ping; Chen, Senlin; McBride, Ron

2014-01-01

415

The Influence of Film and Experiential Pedagogy on Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy and Multicultural Counseling Competence  

Science.gov (United States)

Scholarly discourse has emphasized the need for culturally competent practices. Additionally, multicultural self-efficacy has been found to be critical in working with clients from diverse backgrounds, however, there is a relative paucity of literature on how to teach counselor trainees to be culturally competent and self-efficacious (Kim &…

Greene, Jennifer H.; Barden, Sejal M.; Richardson, Edrica D.; Hall, Kristopher G.

2014-01-01

416

Self-Efficacy and Participation in Physical and Social Activity among Older Adults in Spain and the United States  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose: We explored Bandura's self-efficacy theory as applied to older adult (aged 63-92) participation in physical and social activity in a cross-cultural study. Design and Methods: Older adults in Spain (n = 53) and the United States (n = 55) completed questions regarding self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and participation in physical and…

Perkins, Jessica M.; Multhaup, Kristi S.; Perkins, H. Wesley; Barton, Cole

2008-01-01

417

Middle School Students' Self-Efficacy, Attitudes, and Achievement in a Computer-Enhanced Problem-Based Learning Environment  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the effect of a computer-enhanced problem-based learning (PBL) environment on middle school students' learning, investigating the relationship among students' self-efficacy, attitude toward science, and achievement. As Bandura defined it (1986), self-efficacy refers to the beliefs people have about whether or not they can…

Liu, Min; Hsieh, Peggy (Pei-Hsuan); Cho, Yoonjung; Schallert, Diane

2006-01-01

418

A Study of English Writing and Domain-Specific Motivation and Self-Efficacy of Chinese EFL Learners  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper aims to analyze the relationships between English writing and domain-specific motivation and self-efficacy of Chinese EFL learners. 66 English major students from two grades were invited as participants to complete a writing task and two self-designed questionnaires on English writing motivation and self-efficacy, respectively. It was…

Zhang, Yanyan; Guo, Hui

2012-01-01

419

Effects of Online College Student's Internet Self-Efficacy on Learning Motivation and Performance  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigates how Internet self-efficacy helps students to transform motivation into learning action, and its influence on learning performance. In this study, the effects of Internet self-efficacy on motivation and the learning performance of online college students were examined using social cognitive theory. The subjects of this study…

Chang, Chiung-Sui; Liu, Eric Zhi-Feng; Sung, Hung-Yen; Lin, Chun-Hung; Chen, Nian-Shing; Cheng, Shan-Shan

2014-01-01

420

Family Background, Students' Academic Self-Efficacy, and Students' Career and Life Success Expectations  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the relationship of family background on students' academic self-efficacy and the impact of students' self-efficacy on their career and life success expectations. The study used the national dataset of the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS: 2002), funded by the U.S. Department of Education. Based on a path…

Kim, Mihyeon

2014-01-01

421

Use of ICT Technologies and Factors Affecting Pre-Service ELT Teachers' Perceived ICT Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

This study aims to identify both level and frequency of ICT technology use and factors affecting perceived self-efficacy levels of pre-service English Language Teaching (ELT) teachers' (n = 241) ICT self-efficacy. The data were collected through a survey (Çuhadar & Yücel, 2010) during the 2011-2012 academic year that includes items on the…

Bozdogan, Derya; Özen, Rasit

2014-01-01

422

Perceived Risk and Self-Efficacy as Motivators: Understanding Individuals' Long-Term Use of Health Information.  

Science.gov (United States)

Considers to what extent perceived risk and self-efficacy interact with each other to determine individuals' motivation to seek health information. Identifies 4 groups of individuals according to their perceived risk and self-efficacy; responsive, proactive, avoidance, and indifference. Attempts to resolve some of the outstanding issues with…

Rimal, Rajiv N.

2001-01-01

423

The Impact of a 15-Week Lifetime Wellness Course on Behavior Change and Self-Efficacy in College Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a lifetime wellness course on changing students' global self-efficacy, physical self-efficacy, and wellness behavior. Methods: Seventy-one college students from a lifetime wellness course completed the TestWell Wellness Inventory--Standard Edition (National Wellness Institute,…

Lockwood, Park; Wohl, Roy

2012-01-01

424

Validation of a Self-Efficacy Instrument and Its Relationship to Performance of Crisis Resource Management Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

Self-efficacy is thought to be important for resuscitation proficiency in that it influences the development of and access to the associated medical knowledge, procedural skills and crisis resource management (CRM) skills. Since performance assessment of CRM skills is challenging, self-efficacy is often used as a measure of competence in this…

Plant, Jennifer L.; van Schaik, Sandrijn M.; Sliwka, Diane C.; Boscardin, Christy K.; O'Sullivan, Patricia S.

2011-01-01

425

The Effects of Aural versus Notated Instructional Materials on Achievement and Self-Efficacy in Jazz Improvisation  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of aural versus notated pedagogical materials on achievement and self-efficacy in instrumental jazz improvisation performance. A secondary purpose of this study was to investigate how achievement and self-efficacy may be related to selected experience variables. The sample for the…

Watson, Kevin E.

2010-01-01

426

Acculturation, Enculturation, Ethnic Identity, and Conscientiousness as Predictors of Latino Boys' and Girls' Career Decision Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the role of culture and personality on the career decision self-efficacy of 338 Latino seventh-grade public middle school students. Specifically, we examined the role of acculturation, enculturation, ethnic identity, and conscientiousness on career decision self-efficacy. Findings indicated Latina girls were more acculturated…

Ojeda, Lizette; Pina-Watson, Brandy; Castillo, Linda G.; Castillo, Rosalinda; Khan, Noshaba; Leigh, Jennifer

2012-01-01

427

The Combined Effects of Classroom Teaching and Learning Strategy Use on Students' Chemistry Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

For students to be successful in school chemistry, a strong sense of self-efficacy is essential. Chemistry self-efficacy can be defined as students' beliefs about the extent to which they are capable of performing specific chemistry tasks. According to Bandura ("Psychol. Rev." 84:191-215, 1977), students acquire information about…

Cheung, Derek

2015-01-01

428

Democratic Values and Teacher Self-Efficacy Perceptions: A Case of Pre-Service English Language Teachers in Turkey  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated democratic values of pre-service English language teachers in relation to their teacher self-efficacy perceptions in a Turkish context. It also examined the possible relationships between gender, grade and democratic values and self-efficacy perceptions. A questionnaire survey was conducted with 294 pre-service teachers.…

Topkaya, Ece Zehir; Yavu, Aysun

2011-01-01

429

Comparison of the medical students' perceived self-efficacy and the evaluation of the observers and patients  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The accuracy of self-assessment has been questioned in studies comparing physicians' self-assessments to observed assessments; however, none of these studies used self-efficacy as a method for self-assessment.The aim of the study was to investigate how medical students' perceived self-efficacy of specific communication skills corresponds to the evaluation of simulated patients and observers.

Ammentorp, Jette; Thomsen, Janus Laust

2013-01-01

430

Instructor Verbal and Nonverbal Immediacy and the Relationship with Student Self-Efficacy and Task Value Motivation  

Science.gov (United States)

This descriptive correlation study sought to examine the relationships between verbal immediacy, nonverbal immediacy, self-efficacy and task value. Respondents assessed the verbal and nonverbal immediacy of their course instructor, and then assessed their personal self-efficacy and task value motivation. Results showed a significant positive…

Velez, Jonathan J.; Cano, Jamie

2012-01-01

431

Academic Procrastination of Undergraduates: Low Self-Efficacy to Self-Regulate Predicts Higher Levels of Procrastination  

Science.gov (United States)

This article reports two studies exploring the academic procrastination of 456 undergraduates. Study 1 explores the relationships among academic procrastination, self-regulation, academic self-efficacy, self-esteem, and self-efficacy for self-regulation. Results reveal that although other self-variables are related to procrastination,…

Klassen, Robert M.; Krawchuk, Lindsey L.; Rajani, Sukaina

2008-01-01

432

Attitudes to Technology, Perceived Computer Self-Efficacy and Computer Anxiety as Predictors of Computer Supported Education  

Science.gov (United States)

There is a large body of research regarding computer supported education, perceptions of computer self-efficacy, computer anxiety and the technological attitudes of teachers and teacher candidates. However, no study has been conducted on the correlation between and effect of computer supported education, perceived computer self-efficacy, computer…

Celik, Vehbi; Yesilyurt, Etem

2013-01-01

433

Using Commonality Analysis to Quantify Contributions that Self-Efficacy and Motivational Factors Make in Mathematics Performance  

Science.gov (United States)

Self-efficacy and mathematics anxiety have been identified as predictors of mathematics achievement. In the present study, secondary analyses on matrix summaries available from prior published studies were utilized to investigate the contribution that self-efficacy and mathematics anxiety made in mathematics performance. Commonality analyses were…

Zientek, Linda Reichwein; Thompson, Bruce

2010-01-01

434

The Relationship between Statistics Self-Efficacy, Statistics Anxiety, and Performance in an Introductory Graduate Statistics Course  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between statistics self-efficacy, statistics anxiety, and performance in introductory graduate statistics courses. The study design compared two statistics self-efficacy measures developed by Finney and Schraw (2003), a statistics anxiety measure developed by Cruise and Wilkins (1980),…

Schneider, William R.

2011-01-01

435

The Relationship between Teachers' Self-Efficacy with Behavior Management and School-Wide Positive Behavior Supports  

Science.gov (United States)

Classroom management is a common concern for educators. Teachers with high self-efficacy are strongly linked with having successful characteristics regarding their classroom management styles and strategies. With this in mind, the current study examined classroom teachers' perceived self-efficacy, specifically regarding their behavior…

Micek, Kristin

2014-01-01

436

Career Self-Efficacy and Personality: Linking Career Confidence and the Healthy Personality  

Science.gov (United States)

This article extends recent work on the relationship between personality and career self-efficacy by examining relationships across two new inventories with scales for identifying human strengths. The Healthy Personality Inventory (HPI) has 17 content scales tapping an array of positive personality measures. The CAPA Confidence Inventory (CCI) has…

Borgen, Fred H.; Betz, Nancy E.

2008-01-01

437

How Does Student Ability and Self-Efficacy Affect the Usage of Computer Technology?  

Science.gov (United States)

The main aim of this research was to find out the self-efficacy level among participant students and analyze their beliefs. This study showed that male students are more confident comparing to female student, similar to research of Bimer (2000), the computer usage has been known as biased toward the interests and fashion of men, this research also…

Isman, Aytekin; Celikli, Gulsun Ersoy

2009-01-01

438

Understanding the Influence of Perceived Usability and Technology Self-Efficacy on Teachers' Technology Acceptance  

Science.gov (United States)

The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) represents how users come to accept and use a given technology and can be applied to teachers' use of educational technologies. Here the model is extended to incorporate teachers' perceived usability and self-efficacy measures toward the technologies they are currently using. The authors administered a survey…

Holden, Heather; Rada, Roy

2011-01-01

439

Career Decision Self-Efficacy of Lesbians throughout the Life Span  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the relationship of lesbian identity development and internalized homophobia and the impact on career decision self-efficacy. One hundred and twenty-four women participated. Although the sample was highly integrated, participants reported different experiences in their career development. Implications for counseling lesbian…

Rheineck, Jane E.

2005-01-01

440

Preliminary Evidence that Self-Efficacy Predicts Physical Activity in Multiple Sclerosis  

Science.gov (United States)

Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) are less physically active than nondiseased people. One method for increasing physical activity levels involves the identification of factors that correlate with physical activity and that are modifiable by a well designed intervention. This study examined two types of self-efficacy as cross-sectional and…

Motl, Robert W.; McAuley, Edward; Doerksen, Shawna; Hu, Liang; Morris, Katherine S.

2009-01-01

441

Role of Academic Self-Efficacy in Moderating the Relation between Task Importance and Test Anxiety  

Science.gov (United States)

Emphasizing task importance, which is regarded as a way of motivating engaged behavior, may increase an individual's anxiety. The present research investigated whether academic self-efficacy could moderate the maladaptive relation between task importance and test anxiety. 1978 and 1670 Grade 9 Singaporean students participated in a survey related…

Nie, Youyan; Lau, Shun; Liau, Albert K.

2011-01-01

442

Japanese Children and Plate Waste: Contexts of Low Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: Leaving a portion of meals uneaten, known as plate waste, is a serious problem among children in Japan. Although children's confidence that they can completely finish meals is related to plate waste, the circumstances that influence this confidence are not known. This study examined situations in which low self-efficacy for…

Abe, Keina; Akamatsu, Rie

2015-01-01

443

The Moderating Role of Self-Efficacy in the Organizational Culture-Training Transfer Relationship  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper aims to examine the combined effects of self-efficacy and organizational culture on employees' transfer of knowledge/skills acquired through training. The questionnaires were distributed to 252 newly hired employees working in a service organization in Greece. Each of the independent variables examined added incrementally to the…

Simosi, Maria

2012-01-01

444

Confidence: A Better Predictor of Academic Achievement than Self-Efficacy, Self-Concept and Anxiety?  

Science.gov (United States)

In this paper we report the results from a study that assessed confidence together with scales measuring self-belief--i.e., self-efficacy, different kinds of self-concepts, and anxiety--among the 15-year old students from Singapore. A distinct confidence factor was identified in the domains of mathematics (N = 1940) and English (N = 1786). Our…

Stankov, Lazar; Lee, Jihyun; Luo, Wenshu; Hogan, David J.

2012-01-01

445

Dutch dental patients on informed consent: knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and behaviour.  

Science.gov (United States)

In The Netherlands, the legal doctrine of informed consent is established in the 'Medical Treatment Contract Act', which was introduced in 1995. This study assessed dental patients' knowledge, attitudes and self-efficacy, as well as their self-reported behaviour concerning informed consent. One hundred and twenty-eight patients (response rate: 91.4%) filled out a questionnaire on these topics, right after their treatment or consultation. Results show that only a minority of the patients is acquainted with the 'Medical Treatment Contract Act'. However, their specific rights concerning informed consent are better known. On the other hand, patients' attitudes and self-efficacy were less positive. Dental patients' self-reported behaviour, did not reflect their attitudes and self-efficacy though. Contrary to social-psychological theory, almost no significant relations were found between the four measured variables, and self-reported behaviour could hardly be predicted by patients' knowledge, attitudes and self-efficacy. In light of these findings, it is concluded that other factors, which take into account more of a consumerist perspective on the dentist-patient relationship, probably play a more important role in predicting to what extent patients assert their rights in dental practice. PMID:11804769

Schouten, Barbara; Hoogstraten, Johan; Eijkman, Michiel

2002-01-01

446

How Do Self-Efficacy, Contextual Variables and Stressors Affect Teacher Burnout in an EFL Context?  

Science.gov (United States)

This study was an attempt to investigate the relationships among stressors, contextual variables, self-efficacy and teacher burnout in Iran as an EFL (English as a Foreign Language) context. A battery of questionnaires was administered to 216 English language teachers of private language institutes. Using Amos version 20, structural equation…

Khani, Reza; Mirzaee, Alireza

2015-01-01

447

Conflict Resolution Styles, Self-Efficacy, Self-Control, and Future Orientation of Urban Adolescents  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the correlates and predictors of conflict resolution styles in a sample of urban seventh and eighth graders. Girls were found to rely on verbal assertion more frequently and aggressiveness less frequently than boys in the sample. Self-efficacy and self-control were found to be significant predictors of conflict resolution…

Vera, Elizabeth M.; Shin, Richard Q.; Montgomery, Gloria P.; Mildner, Carolyn; Speight, Suzette L.

2004-01-01

448

The Importance of Self-Efficacy and Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century  

Science.gov (United States)

Two decades have now passed since Bandura (1986) introduced the concept of self-efficacy within the social cognitive theory of human behavior. He defined it as "people's judgments of their capabilities to organize and execute courses of action required to attain designated types of performances" (1986). Much empirical evidence now supports the…

Jabbarifar, Taghi

2011-01-01

449

Women's self-efficacy perceptions in mathematics and science: Investigating USC-MESA students  

Science.gov (United States)

This study is an investigation into female high school seniors in the USC-MESA program and how the role of self-efficacy perceptions in mathematics and science relates to their college major choice. Bandura's theory on self-efficacy provides the backdrop for this study. This study is qualitative and takes an ethnographic approach incorporating 23 interviews, 2 focus groups, 49.5 hours of observation, and document analysis. Results show that female high school seniors participating in the USC-MESA program demonstrate a strong self-efficacy perception in mathematics and science through their academic choices and pursuits in high school and beyond. This finding confirms a linear approach in understanding how courses taken in high school contribute to the trajectory of college academic choices. It also challenges the theory of self-efficacy in math and science to examine historically underrepresented populations in the field and the external factors that play a key role in their persistence to pursue STEM fields in college and beyond.

Hong, Rebecca Cheng-Shun

450

FACULTY MENTORS' AND STUDENTS' PERCEPTIONS OF STUDENTS' RESEARCH SELF-EFFICACY  

OpenAIRE

Mentoring in nursing is an important process for socializing nurse researchers, developing a body of professional knowledge, and influencing career choices of students. Self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997) is concerned with one's perceived ability to perform tasks within a specific domain.

Lev, Elise L.; Kolassa, John; Bakken, Lori L.

2009-01-01

451

Exploring Teacher Self-Efficacy for Inclusive Practices in Three Diverse Countries  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to explain teachers' perceived efficacy for teaching in inclusive classrooms by using a sample of 1911 in-service teachers from China, Finland, and South Africa. Bandura's theory of self-efficacy was used as a starting point to develop distinct models for each country. We found that in all countries, experience in…

Malinen, Olli-Pekka; Savolainen, Hannu; Engelbrecht, Petra; Xu, Jiacheng; Nel, Mirna; Nel, Norma; Tlale, Dan

2013-01-01

452

Self-efficacy beliefs as shapers of children's aspirations and career trajectories.  

Science.gov (United States)

This prospective study tested with 272 children a structural model of the network of sociocognitive influences that shape children's career aspirations and trajectories. Familial socioeconomic status is linked to children's career trajectories only indirectly through its effects on parents' perceived efficacy and academic aspirations. The impact of parental self-efficacy and aspirations on their children's perceived career efficacy and choice is, in turn, entirely mediated through the children's perceived efficacy and academic aspirations. Children's perceived academic, social, and self-regulatory efficacy influence the types of occupational activities for which they judge themselves to be efficacious both directly and through their impact on academic aspirations. Perceived occupational self-efficacy gives direction to the kinds of career pursuits children seriously consider for their life's work and those they disfavor. Children's perceived efficacy rather than their actual academic achievement is the key determinant of their perceived occupational self-efficacy and preferred choice of worklife. Analyses of gender differences reveal that perceived occupational self-efficacy predicts traditionality of career choice. PMID:11280478

Bandura, A; Barbaranelli, C; Caprara, G V; Pastorelli, C

2001-01-01

453

Improving Preservice Teachers' Self-Efficacy through Service Learning: Lessons Learned  

Science.gov (United States)

University students have been barraged with service learning opportunities both as course required and as volunteer opportunities in recent years. Currently, many universities now require students to participate in engaged learning as a graduation requirement. Situated in Bandura's theory of self-efficacy, this study examines the effects service…

Bernadowski, Carianne; Perry, Ronald; Del Greco, Robert

2013-01-01

454

Enhancing Self-Efficacy in Elementary Science Teaching with Professional Learning Communities  

Science.gov (United States)

Emerging from Bandura's Social Learning Theory, this study of in-service elementary school teachers examined the effects of sustained Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) on self-efficacy in science teaching. Based on mixed research methods, and a non-equivalent control group experimental design, the investigation explored changes in…

Mintzes, Joel J.; Marcum, Bev; Messerschmidt-Yates, Christl; Mark, Andrew

2013-01-01

455

Traditional-Aged College Juniors' Career Planning Self-Efficacy: A Case Study  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this single-site case study was to explore and describe traditional-age college juniors' reports of self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997) regarding Career Planning (Barker & Kellen, 1998). More specifically, the career planning confidence levels of college juniors enrolled in a required career development course at a private…

Sherman, Dawn C.

2012-01-01

456

Body dissatisfaction and condom use self-efficacy: a meta-analysis.  

Science.gov (United States)

The consistent use of condoms is the most effective behavior for reducing the acquisition of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and condom use self-efficacy has been shown to be a key construct related to condom use. However, the examination of modifiable psychosocial and behavioral correlates of condom use self-efficacy is lacking. Recent investigations have highlighted the association of body dissatisfaction with condom use self-efficacy, and the current study conducted a meta-analysis on all available data addressing this relationship. Eleven individual effect-size parameters from nine studies yielded a total sample of 2495 men and women participants. A random-effects model revealed an average effect-size of r=-.25, Cohen's d=-0.52, which is moderate in strength. As body dissatisfaction increases, ones' self-efficacy regarding the use of condoms diminishes. Integrating interventions to decrease body dissatisfaction and sexual risk behaviors may prove to be an effective strategy to decrease STIs. PMID:25462884

Blashill, Aaron J; Safren, Steven A

2015-01-01

457

Computer Self-Efficacy, Anxiety, and Learning in Online versus Face to Face Medium  

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The purpose of this research is to examine the relationships between changes to computer self-efficacy (CSE) and computer anxiety and the impact on performance on computer-related tasks in both online and face-to-face mediums. While many studies have looked at these factors individually, relatively few have included multiple measures of these…

Hauser, Richard; Paul, Ravi; Bradley, John

2012-01-01

458

Sleep characteristics, sleep problems, and associations of self-efficacy among German university students  

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Full Text Available Angelika A Schlarb1,2, Dominika Kulessa1,*, Marco D Gulewitsch1,*1Faculty of Science, Department of Psychology, University of Tübingen, 2Faculty of Psychology, University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Sleep problems, especially insomnia, are a common complaint among adults. International studies on university students have shown prevalence rates between 4.7% and 36.2% for sleep difficulties, and 13.1% and 28.1% for insomnia. Sleep problems are associated with lower social and academic performance and can have a severe impact on psychological and physical health.Objective: The goal of this study was to outline sleep characteristics, prevalence of sleep problems, insomnia, and associations with self-efficacy among German university students.Methods: A total of 2196 university students (70.9% women; mean age 24.16 years participated in the study. Sleep characteristics, sleep problems, insomnia, and self-efficacy were assessed using a questionnaire.Results and conclusion: Analyses revealed that more than 16% of surveyed students needed more than 30 minutes to fall asleep. About 7.7% of the students suffered from insomnia. Short sleep was significantly associated with a considerably increased rate of insomnia (20%. Insomniacs showed lower self-efficacy than students without sleep problems.Keywords: university students, sleep characteristics, sleep problems, insomnia, self-efficacy

Gulewitsch MD

2012-02-01

459

The Impact of an Online Orientation Program on the Impostor Phenomenon, Self-Efficacy, and Anxiety  

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The imposter phenomenon (IP), defined as the fear that others may perceive one to be an intellectual "phony", and its association to one's self-efficacy (SE) and anxiety, requires further research. This dissertation investigates the IP, SE, and anxiety and their interrelationships at the beginning and at the end of an orientation program for a…

Ives, Sujata Kolhatkar

2010-01-01

460

Self-Efficacy, Motivation and Their Relationship to Academic Performance of Bangladesh College Students  

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This study was designed to examine how self-efficacy, motivation and academic performance interact among students enrolled in an introductory marketing course in a private university of Bangladesh. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaire from the students. Empirical results reveal that there are statistically positive…

Chowdhury, Mohammed S.; Shahabuddin, A. M.

2007-01-01