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[Transcultural self-efficacy and educational needs for cultural competence in nursing of Korean nurses].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: This study was done to investigate the level of transcultural self-efficacy (TSE) and related factors and educational needs for cultural competence in nursing (CCN) of Korean hospital nurses. METHODS: A self-assessment instrument was used to measure TSE and educational needs for CCN. Questionnaires were completed by 285 nurses working in four Korean hospitals. Descriptive statistics, t-test, ANOVA, Pearson correlation coefficients, and multiple regression were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Mean TSE score for all items was 4.54 and score for mean CCN educational needs, 5.77. Nurses with master's degrees or higher had significantly higher levels of TSE than nurses with bachelor's degrees. TSE positively correlated with English language proficiency, degrees of interest in multi-culture, degree of experience in caring for multi-cultural clients, and educational needs for CCN. The regression model explained 28% of TSE. Factors affecting TSE were degree of interest in multi-culture, degree of experience in caring for multi-cultural clients, and educational needs for CCN. CONCLUSION: The results of the study indicate a need for nurse educators to support nurses to strengthen TSE and provide educational program for TSE to provide nurses with strategies for raising interests in cultural diversity and successful experiences of cultural congruent care.

Kim SH

2013-02-01

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Adaptación transcultural de la escala para medir autoeficacia en el uso del condón masculino/ Cross cultural adaptation of condom uses self-efficacy scale  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in spanish Objetivo principal: adaptar culturalmente la escala para medir autoeficacia en el uso del condón masculino, determinando su fiabilidad y validez para la investigación en el contexto cubano. Metodología: diseño transversal con metodología exploratoria en una muestra de 38 estudiantes de enfermería entre 17 y 42 años de edad. Resultados: el Alpha Cronbach para la escala total fue de 0,78 y el Índice de Correlación Interclase fue de 0,73. Conclusiones: la escala es confiable y válida para medir el uso del condón masculino en el contexto cubano. Abstract in english Objective: The purpose of this manuscript is to evaluate a Spanish version of the Condom Uses Self Efficacy Scale, and to determine its reliability and validity for use in cross-cultural research among Cuban populations. Methods: A cross- sectional design an exploratory survey methodology was used in 38 nursing students between 17 and 41 years old. Results: The Alpha Coefficient for the total scale was 0,78. The interclass correlation coefficient to measure scale's stabil (more) ity over time was 0,73 (test-retest two weeks). Conclusions: Findings support that Condom Use Self Efficacy Scale is a reliable and valid scale in measuring condom self-efficacy among Cuban persons.

Hernández Cortina, Abdul; López Rebolledo, Miladis

2011-09-01

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Adaptación transcultural de la escala para medir autoeficacia en el uso del condón masculino Cross cultural adaptation of condom uses self-efficacy scale  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objetivo principal: adaptar culturalmente la escala para medir autoeficacia en el uso del condón masculino, determinando su fiabilidad y validez para la investigación en el contexto cubano. Metodología: diseño transversal con metodología exploratoria en una muestra de 38 estudiantes de enfermería entre 17 y 42 años de edad. Resultados: el Alpha Cronbach para la escala total fue de 0,78 y el Índice de Correlación Interclase fue de 0,73. Conclusiones: la escala es confiable y válida para medir el uso del condón masculino en el contexto cubano.Objective: The purpose of this manuscript is to evaluate a Spanish version of the Condom Uses Self Efficacy Scale, and to determine its reliability and validity for use in cross-cultural research among Cuban populations. Methods: A cross- sectional design an exploratory survey methodology was used in 38 nursing students between 17 and 41 years old. Results: The Alpha Coefficient for the total scale was 0,78. The interclass correlation coefficient to measure scale's stability over time was 0,73 (test-retest two weeks). Conclusions: Findings support that Condom Use Self Efficacy Scale is a reliable and valid scale in measuring condom self-efficacy among Cuban persons.

Abdul Hernández Cortina; Miladis López Rebolledo

2011-01-01

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Transcultural adaptation and testing psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS).  

Science.gov (United States)

This study was performed to translate and transculturally adapt the English version of the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) into a Korean version, and to test psychometric properties of the Korean FAOS in terms of internal consistency, test-retest reliability, convergent validity, and dimensionality. Translation and transcultural adaptation of FAOS into a Korean version was performed according to internationally recommended guidelines. Internal consistency (N?=?294) and test-retest reliability (N?=?21) were evaluated. Convergent validity was analyzed using correlation with pain visual analogue scale (VAS) score. All subscales, except for the quality of life (Q) subscale (Cronbach's alpha, 0.615), showed satisfactory internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha?>?0.7). Cronbach's alpha of function in daily living (ADL) was highest (0.962), which might represent the redundancy of the items. All five subscales showed satisfactory reliability with ADL subscale showing the highest ICC (intraclass correlation coefficient; 0.851) and Q subscale the lowest ICC (0.718). Pain VAS score showed the highest correlation with pain (P) subscale of FAOS (r?=?0.675, p?ADL items. Translation and transcultural adaptation of FAOS into the Korean language was performed successfully. The items were understandable, and the subscales showed satisfactory test-retest reliability. Some minor revision might be needed to enhance the internal consistency of Q subscale and reduce the redundancy of ADL subscale. PMID:23703359

Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Kwon, Soon Sun; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Lee, Seung Yeol; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, Damian J; Lee, Seoryong C; Park, Moon Seok

2013-05-24

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Transcultural adaptation and testing psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS).  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study was performed to translate and transculturally adapt the English version of the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) into a Korean version, and to test psychometric properties of the Korean FAOS in terms of internal consistency, test-retest reliability, convergent validity, and dimensionality. Translation and transcultural adaptation of FAOS into a Korean version was performed according to internationally recommended guidelines. Internal consistency (N?=?294) and test-retest reliability (N?=?21) were evaluated. Convergent validity was analyzed using correlation with pain visual analogue scale (VAS) score. All subscales, except for the quality of life (Q) subscale (Cronbach's alpha, 0.615), showed satisfactory internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha?>?0.7). Cronbach's alpha of function in daily living (ADL) was highest (0.962), which might represent the redundancy of the items. All five subscales showed satisfactory reliability with ADL subscale showing the highest ICC (intraclass correlation coefficient; 0.851) and Q subscale the lowest ICC (0.718). Pain VAS score showed the highest correlation with pain (P) subscale of FAOS (r?=?0.675, p?transcultural adaptation of FAOS into the Korean language was performed successfully. The items were understandable, and the subscales showed satisfactory test-retest reliability. Some minor revision might be needed to enhance the internal consistency of Q subscale and reduce the redundancy of ADL subscale.

Lee KM; Chung CY; Kwon SS; Sung KH; Lee SY; Won SH; Lee DJ; Lee SC; Park MS

2013-10-01

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Tradução e adaptação transcultural do "Harris Hip Score modificado por Byrd" Translation and transcultural adaptation of the modified Harris Hip Score  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available OBJETIVO: As artroscopias do quadril têm sido utilizadas tanto para fins diagnósticos, como para fins terapêuticos, fazendo parte do arsenal rotineiro dos cirurgiões do quadril. Devido a necessidade de avaliação dos resultados artroscópicos, Byrd propôs a modificação do "Harris Hip Score", realizando a avaliação da dor e função. O objetivo deste estudo foi traduzir e adaptar transculturalmente o protocolo de avaliação do "Harris Hip Score" modificado por Byrd, utilizado nas artroscopias do quadril. MÉTODO: O método utilizado constituiu em: 1) tradução inicial, 2) retrotradução, 3) pré - teste e 4) teste definitivo. RESULTADOS: A versão em português foi aplicada em 30 pacientes com afecções do quadril para verificar o nível de compreensão do protocolo. Foram realizadas mudanças e substituições de termos e expressões que não foram entendidas pelos pacientes durante o pré-teste e realizada a versão final em consenso. Novamente a versão final do questionário foi aplicada com 100% de entendimento pelos pacientes. CONCLUSÃO: disponibiliza-se assim a versão final em português do questionário "Harris Hip Score" modificado por Byrd. A validação desta versão já está em desenvolvimento.OBJECTIVE: Hip arthroscopy has been used for diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes, and it is part of the daily arsenal of hip surgeons. Due to the need for arthroscopic evaluation of the results, Byrd proposed a modification of the Harris Hip Score by assessing pain and function. This study aimed to translate and cross-culturally adapt the evaluation protocol of the modified Harris Hip Score used in hip arthroscopies. METHOD: The method used consisted of: 1) an initial translation, 2) a back translation, 3) a pre-test and 4) a final test. RESULTS: The Portuguese version was used with 30 patients with hip disorders to determine the level of comprehension of the protocol. Expressions which were not understood by patients during the pre-test were modified or replaced, and the final version was obtained by consensus. The final version of the questionnaire was used once again, with 100% understanding by patients. CONCLUSION: Thus we arrived at the final Portuguese version of the modified Harris Hip Score questionnaire. Verification of the validity of this version is already in progress.

Rodrigo Pereira Guimarães; Débora Pinheiro Lédio Alves; Thiago Leonardi Azuaga; Nelson Keiske Ono; Emerson Honda; Giancarlo Cavalli Polesello; Walter Ricioli Junior; Lucia Emi Ueno; Nilza Aparecida Almeida De Carvalho

2010-01-01

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Tradução e adaptação transcultural do "Harris Hip Score modificado por Byrd"/ Translation and transcultural adaptation of the modified Harris Hip Score  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVO: As artroscopias do quadril têm sido utilizadas tanto para fins diagnósticos, como para fins terapêuticos, fazendo parte do arsenal rotineiro dos cirurgiões do quadril. Devido a necessidade de avaliação dos resultados artroscópicos, Byrd propôs a modificação do "Harris Hip Score", realizando a avaliação da dor e função. O objetivo deste estudo foi traduzir e adaptar transculturalmente o protocolo de avaliação do "Harris Hip Score" modificado por B (more) yrd, utilizado nas artroscopias do quadril. MÉTODO: O método utilizado constituiu em: 1) tradução inicial, 2) retrotradução, 3) pré - teste e 4) teste definitivo. RESULTADOS: A versão em português foi aplicada em 30 pacientes com afecções do quadril para verificar o nível de compreensão do protocolo. Foram realizadas mudanças e substituições de termos e expressões que não foram entendidas pelos pacientes durante o pré-teste e realizada a versão final em consenso. Novamente a versão final do questionário foi aplicada com 100% de entendimento pelos pacientes. CONCLUSÃO: disponibiliza-se assim a versão final em português do questionário "Harris Hip Score" modificado por Byrd. A validação desta versão já está em desenvolvimento. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: Hip arthroscopy has been used for diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes, and it is part of the daily arsenal of hip surgeons. Due to the need for arthroscopic evaluation of the results, Byrd proposed a modification of the Harris Hip Score by assessing pain and function. This study aimed to translate and cross-culturally adapt the evaluation protocol of the modified Harris Hip Score used in hip arthroscopies. METHOD: The method used consisted of: 1) an init (more) ial translation, 2) a back translation, 3) a pre-test and 4) a final test. RESULTS: The Portuguese version was used with 30 patients with hip disorders to determine the level of comprehension of the protocol. Expressions which were not understood by patients during the pre-test were modified or replaced, and the final version was obtained by consensus. The final version of the questionnaire was used once again, with 100% understanding by patients. CONCLUSION: Thus we arrived at the final Portuguese version of the modified Harris Hip Score questionnaire. Verification of the validity of this version is already in progress.

Guimarães, Rodrigo Pereira; Alves, Débora Pinheiro Lédio; Azuaga, Thiago Leonardi; Ono, Nelson Keiske; Honda, Emerson; Polesello, Giancarlo Cavalli; Ricioli Junior, Walter; Ueno, Lucia Emi; Carvalho, Nilza Aparecida Almeida De

2010-01-01

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Caregivers' anxiety and self-efficacy in palliative care.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study examined the relationship between caregivers' anxiety supporting a patient with advanced cancer and self-efficacy and their socio-demographic characteristics, and then whether these variables could influence their self-efficacy. One hundred and seven caregivers of advanced cancer patients participated in the study and completed the Greek versions of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the General Perceived Self-efficacy Scale (GSE). Significant comparisons were found between State anxiety and female gender (P= 0.009), cohabitation (P= 0.002) and relationship with the patient (P= 0.004); statistically significant associations were found between State, Trait anxiety and self-efficacy scores of caregivers (P < 0.0005 respectively). A multiple regression model (enter method) showed women (P= 0.005), spouses (P= 0.01) and self-efficacy (P= 0.02) as the significant predictors of State anxiety. Furthermore, self-efficacy seemed to be the strongest contributor of trait anxiety (P < 0.0005). Female caregivers and spouses of advanced cancer patients experience more state anxiety levels than men and other caregivers respectively. In addition, caregivers with low self-efficacy are more likely to have elevated anxiety scores than self-efficacious caregivers. These findings can help healthcare professionals focus on some problems common to caregivers of cancer patients and plan appropriate interventions.

Mystakidou K; Parpa E; Panagiotou I; Tsilika E; Galanos A; Gouliamos A

2013-03-01

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Caregivers' anxiety and self-efficacy in palliative care.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the relationship between caregivers' anxiety supporting a patient with advanced cancer and self-efficacy and their socio-demographic characteristics, and then whether these variables could influence their self-efficacy. One hundred and seven caregivers of advanced cancer patients participated in the study and completed the Greek versions of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the General Perceived Self-efficacy Scale (GSE). Significant comparisons were found between State anxiety and female gender (P= 0.009), cohabitation (P= 0.002) and relationship with the patient (P= 0.004); statistically significant associations were found between State, Trait anxiety and self-efficacy scores of caregivers (P < 0.0005 respectively). A multiple regression model (enter method) showed women (P= 0.005), spouses (P= 0.01) and self-efficacy (P= 0.02) as the significant predictors of State anxiety. Furthermore, self-efficacy seemed to be the strongest contributor of trait anxiety (P < 0.0005). Female caregivers and spouses of advanced cancer patients experience more state anxiety levels than men and other caregivers respectively. In addition, caregivers with low self-efficacy are more likely to have elevated anxiety scores than self-efficacious caregivers. These findings can help healthcare professionals focus on some problems common to caregivers of cancer patients and plan appropriate interventions. PMID:22989256

Mystakidou, K; Parpa, E; Panagiotou, I; Tsilika, E; Galanos, A; Gouliamos, A

2012-09-19

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Integration of Electronic Communication in Higher Education: Contributions of Faculty Computer Self-Efficacy.  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study examined relationships between faculty computer self-efficacy and integration of electronic communication when teaching. Results showed computer self-efficacy scores differed on age, gender, college, integration, and computer experience. Recommends faculty development efforts to increase self-efficacy by providing hands-on experiences…

Kagima, Leah Keino; Hausafus, Cheryl O.

2000-01-01

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Correlations of Self-Efficacy among Women with Gestational Diabetes  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background & Aim: Gestational diabetes is a major concern during pregnancy. Psychological factors such as self-efficacy play important role in adherence of the treatment, control of blood glucose, and the outcomes of the pregnancy. The main purpose of this study was to determine correlations of self-efficacy in women with gestational diabetes attending to educational medical centers of Iran University of Medical Sciences in Tehran. Methods & Materials: In this descriptive correlational study, we recruited 100 women aged 15-49 years old with gestational diabetes and singleton pregnancies using consecutive sampling method. Data were collected using Diabetic Self-Efficacy scale. Results: The mean age of the women was 31 years. The majority of the women (66%) had moderate economic status; and more than half (60%) had no higher education. Sixty eight percent of the study participants were obese or overweight. About 33% of the participants were nullipara; and 69% had wanted pregnancies. The results showed that 43% of the women had low self-efficacy. The self-efficacy scores were significantly correlated with education (P=0.005) and occupation (P=0.016). Conclusion: Self-efficacy is an important determinant of self-management and self-control in gestational diabetes. Regarding low self-efficacy among the women, it seems that implementing educational-counseling strategies to enhance self-efficacy can be helpful to promote optimum self-care among women with gestational diabetes

Bastani F; Zarrabi R

2010-01-01

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Application of self-efficacy theory in dental clinical practice.  

Science.gov (United States)

In clinical practice, self-efficacy refers to how certain a patient feels about his or her ability to take the necessary action to improve the indicators and maintenance of health. It is assumed that the prognosis for patient behaviour can be improved by assessing the proficiency of their self-efficacy through providing psychoeducational instructions adapted for individual patients, and promoting behavioural change for self-care. Therefore, accurate assessment of self-efficacy is an important key in daily clinical preventive care. The previous research showed that the self-efficacy scale scores predicted patient behaviour in periodontal patients and mother's behaviour in paediatric dental practice. Self-efficacy belief is constructed from four principal sources of information: enactive mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and physiological and affective states. Thus, self-efficacy can be enhanced by the intervention exploiting these sources. The previous studies revealed that behavioural interventions to enhance self-efficacy improved oral-care behaviour of patients. Therefore, assessment and enhancement of oral-care specific self-efficacy is important to promote behaviour modification in clinical dental practice. However, more researches are needed to evaluate the suitability of the intervention method. PMID:20646233

Kakudate, N; Morita, M; Fukuhara, S; Sugai, M; Nagayama, M; Kawanami, M; Chiba, I

2010-11-01

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Application of self-efficacy theory in dental clinical practice.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In clinical practice, self-efficacy refers to how certain a patient feels about his or her ability to take the necessary action to improve the indicators and maintenance of health. It is assumed that the prognosis for patient behaviour can be improved by assessing the proficiency of their self-efficacy through providing psychoeducational instructions adapted for individual patients, and promoting behavioural change for self-care. Therefore, accurate assessment of self-efficacy is an important key in daily clinical preventive care. The previous research showed that the self-efficacy scale scores predicted patient behaviour in periodontal patients and mother's behaviour in paediatric dental practice. Self-efficacy belief is constructed from four principal sources of information: enactive mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and physiological and affective states. Thus, self-efficacy can be enhanced by the intervention exploiting these sources. The previous studies revealed that behavioural interventions to enhance self-efficacy improved oral-care behaviour of patients. Therefore, assessment and enhancement of oral-care specific self-efficacy is important to promote behaviour modification in clinical dental practice. However, more researches are needed to evaluate the suitability of the intervention method.

Kakudate N; Morita M; Fukuhara S; Sugai M; Nagayama M; Kawanami M; Chiba I

2010-11-01

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A Reanalysis of Engineering Majors' Self-Efficacy Beliefs  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examines differences in women's engineering self-efficacy beliefs across grade levels in comparison to men's engineering self-efficacy (ESE) beliefs across grade levels. Data for this study was collected from 746 (635 men, 111 women) engineering students enrolled in a large research extensive university. Four major conclusions resulted from this study. (1) No significant differences in overall mean engineering self-efficacy scores were found by gender. However, this study found differences between men's and women's mean coping self-efficacy (CSE) and engineering career outcome expectations (ECOE) subscale scores. Freshmen men had significantly higher ECOE compared to upperclassmen women. (2) Overall, fifthyear men had significantly lower mean ESE scores compared to all other groups. (3) When the fifth-year group was removed from the data set, all first-year students had significantly lower subscale scores compared to all other years. In addition, men in their first-year of engineering had significantly lower subscale scores compared to other groups of men. (4) No significant differences in overall ESE scores were found among first to fifth-year women. Also, no significant differences in self-efficacy subscale scores were found among first to fifth-year women.

Concannon, James P.; Barrow, Lloyd H.

2012-12-01

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Freshmen's use of library electronic resources and self-efficacy  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available To encourage students use of the library, and in particular of its electronic resources, we need to understand what factors encourage students to seek out information in the library setting. Research has shown that self-efficacy influences academic achievement. This paper looks at the role self-efficacy plays in their search for information and use of the library's electronic resources, by surveying a class of freshmen at Baruch College. Their library and computer use were analyzed and correlated with their self-efficacy scores. Through statistical analysis, we found that use of the library correlated to the students' use of the library's electronic resources. We also found out that students who express an interest in learning about the library's electronic resources will be more likely to have higher self-efficacy.

Micaela Waldman

2003-01-01

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Improving preceptor self-efficacy using an online educational program.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a public/community health online preceptor education program on knowledge of the preceptor role and self-efficacy to perform in the preceptor role. Forty-eight public/community health nurses from five states completed an online education program, a 32-item quiz and a preceptor self-efficacy instrument. Preceptor self-efficacy and knowledge scores improved significantly after completing the online education program compared to pretest scores. Previous experience as a preceptor, age, and place of employment, were not correlated with preceptor self-efficacy scores. Previous preceptor education and highest level of education completed were positively correlated with preceptor self-efficacy scores. Previous preceptor education was reported by 39.6% of nurses. However, there was no standard curriculum for these education programs. The results of this study support the use of online education as a method for enhancing preceptor knowledge and confidence in the preceptor role.

Parsons R

2007-01-01

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Transracial and Transcultural Adoption  

Science.gov (United States)

... You Can Prepare for a Transracial or Transcultural Adoption Preparation for adoption is important for anyone thinking ... I Find Out More About Transracial or Transcultural Adoption? Child Welfare Information Gateway often receives questions about ...

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Teacher self-efficacy in instruction and in parent involvement  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The study investigated self-efficacy of a sample of Slovak primary schoolteachers in two areas: area of instruction and area of parent involvement. Twoinstruments were used: the 16-item Slovak version of Teacher Efficacy Scale ofGibson and Dembo, and ZdUR, a 24-item scale to measure self-efficacy of teacherin parents’ involvement, developed by authors of the present study. The correlation between scores of personal teaching efficacy dimension of TES and ZdUR was 0.58 and between general teaching efficacy of TES and ZdUR was only 0.01. Teachers inthis sample had better scores in all dimensions of ZdUR than those of TES, with theexception of engaging parents in school activities. Scores of four teachers in TES andZdUR were analysed to document the possibility of making the individual profiles ofteacher self-efficacy.

Peter Gavora; Jana Majer?íková

2012-01-01

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Perceived self-efficacy and academic performance of medical students at Ataturk University, Turkey.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To determine the association of perceived self-efficacy with academic performance of pre-clinical medical students. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional analytical study. PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY: Medical Education Department, Ataturk University, Turkey, from March to May 2012. METHODOLOGY: Participating students were members of the first to third year medical students class considered to be preclinical years at Ataturk University. A validated and reliable questionnaire consisted of 10 questions applied to assess the general self-efficacy of the medical students in pre-clinical years and evaluate whether their self-efficacy has relation to their academic performance. Responses and studied variables were compared using ANOVA and Pearson correlation test as applicable. RESULTS: The mean scores of three consecutive examinations were compared with self-efficacy mean scores of three classes. A validated and reliable questionnaire was used for assessment of self-efficacy. There was no correlation found in between mean examination scores and self-efficacy mean scores in first year (r = -0.11, p = 0.276), second year (r = 0.20, p = 0.180), and third year (r = -0.040, p = 0.749). However, comparison of mean scores between male and female demonstrated significant difference (p = 0.001) and males dominant in self-efficacy scores. CONCLUSION: The results illustrate in pre-clinical years at medical schools the general self-efficacy does not play any role in their performance.

Khan AS; Cansever Z; Avsar UZ; Acemoglu H

2013-07-01

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Tradução e adaptação transcultural do instrumento de avaliação do quadril "Harris Hip Score"/ Translation and cultural adaptation of the Harris Hip Score into portuguese  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVO: O Harris Hip Score é instrumento de avaliação específica, desenvolvido originalmente para avaliar os resultados da artroplastia total de quadril. O objetivo deste estudo foi traduzir e adaptar culturalmente este instrumento para a língua portuguesa. MÉTODO: O método de tradução e adaptação cultural do Harris Hip Score envolveu quatro etapas: 1 - tradução inicial; 2 - retrotradução; 3 - apreciação das versões com elaboração da versão de conse (more) nso; 4 - pré-teste comentado com elaboração da versão final. RESULTADOS: A versão de consenso foi aplicada em 30 pacientes com afecção do quadril, sendo verificadas dificuldades no entendimento de algumas expressões, as quais foram substituídas por termos de mais fácil entendimento. Na reaplicação do questionário com a nova versão houve entendimento por 100% dos pacientes no que diz respeito ao sentido semântico, idiomático e contextual. CONCLUSÃO: A versão brasileira do Harris Hip Score permitiu a disponibilização de mais este instrumento para avaliação da qualidade de vida de pacientes com afecções do quadril. Há necessidade de um estudo de avaliação da confiabilidade e validade da versão adaptada culturalmente, a qual já está em desenvolvimento. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: The Harris Hip Score is a specific evaluation tool, originally developed to assess the results of hip arthroplasty. The objective of this study was to translate and cross-culturally adapt the Harris Hip Score for the Portuguese language. METHOD: The method of translating and culturally adapting the Harris Hip Score involved four steps: 1 - initial translation, 2 - back-translation, 3 - evaluation of the pre-final versions with the development of a consensus ver (more) sion, 4 - commented pre-test with development of the final version. RESULTS: The consensus version was applied to thirty patients with hip disorders. Some difficulties were identified in understanding some expressions, which were replaced by more commonly-used expressions. When the questionnaire was re-applied, it was understood by 100% of the patients, in relation to the semantic, idiomatic and conceptual meanings. CONCLUSION: The Brazilian version of the Harris Hip Score provides another important tool for assessing quality of life of patients with hip disorders. A further study is currently underway to evaluate the reliability and validity of the culturally adapted version.

Guimarães, Rodrigo Pereira; Alves, Débora Pinheiro Lédio; Silva, Gustavo Bersani; Bittar, Simoni Teixeira; Ono, Nelson Keiske; Honda, Emerson; Polesello, Giancarlo Cavalli; Ricioli Junior, Walter; Carvalho, Nilza Aparecida Almeida de

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
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Confirmatory Analysis of Computer Self-Efficacy.  

Science.gov (United States)

|Extended previous exploratory work on computer self-efficacy and tested a four-factor self-efficacy model. Results for 414 college students demonstrate support for the hypothesized model. Survey questions appeared relevant in most situations. (SLD)|

Torkzadeh, Gholamreza; Koufteros, Xenophon; Pflughoeft, Kurt

2003-01-01

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Examining Elementary Education Pre-Service Teachers’ Self-Efficacy Beliefs  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate elementary education pre-service teachers? self-efficacy beliefs by gender, grade level and age. Participants were 163 elementary education pre-service teachers. An instrument titled “Music Education Self-Efficacy Scale” (Afacan, 2008) was used as a means of data collection. Descriptive statistics and t test was used to analyze the data. Results revealed that elementary education pre-service teachers? music education self-efficacy was, in general, moderate. Results revealed that participants? self-efficacy beliefs differ by gender, grade level and age. Women?s self-efficacy beliefs were higher than men. Junior (3rd year) students? self-efficacy was higher than sophomores (2nd year). Similarly, self-efficay scores of particiapants with an age of between 22 and 24 was higher than those with an age of between 19–21.

Deniz Beste ÇEV?K

2011-01-01

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Boys' and girls' involvement in science learning and their self-efficacy in Taiwan.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This cross-sectional study investigated the significant differences in students' self-efficacy and their involvement in learning science. Nine hundred and twenty-two elementary school fifth graders, 499 junior high school eighth graders, and 1455 senior or vocational high school eleventh graders completed the students' questionnaire. Analyses of variance (ANOVAs) and independent t-tests compared the significant similarities and differences across school levels and genders. The initial findings were as follows: A sharp decline in boys' and girls' self-efficacy scores from elementary to secondary school levels; boys have significantly higher self-efficacy scores than girls at vocational and senior high school levels; students with more involvement in science learning presented significantly higher self-efficacy scores than those with less involvement. The significant discrepancies in terms of gender and age in students' self-efficacy and involvement in learning science need to be addressed. Implications and limitations are provided.

Hong ZR; Lin HS

2013-01-01

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Relationship between Counseling Self-Efficacy and Multicultural Counseling Self-Efficacy among School Counselors  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this dissertation was to examine the relationship between school counselors' counseling self-efficacy and multicultural counseling self-efficacy. In addition, this study measured school counselors' levels of general school counseling self-efficacy, multicultural counseling self-efficacy, and the relationship between school counselor…

Crook, Tylon

2010-01-01

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The Relationship Between Self-Efficacy and Help Evasion.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Objective. To examine the relationship between self-efficacy and not wanting help to change health behaviors. Method. All employees in the Danish police department were invited to respond to an electronic questionnaire. All respondents expressing a desire to change health behaviors in relation to smoking (n = 845), alcohol (n = 684), eating (n = 4431), and physical activity (n = 5179) and who subsequently responded to questions on self-efficacy were included. Results. Both the bivariate and multiple regression analyses showed that all four specific self-efficacy scores were positively related to reporting that one did not want help. Conclusion. A high belief in one's own ability to change lifestyle behaviors in relation to smoking, alcohol, eating, and physical activity may lead to avoidance of help offers in a workplace setting.

Persson R; Cleal B; Jakobsen MO; Villadsen E; Andersen LL

2013-01-01

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Self-Efficacy: Conditioning the Entrepreneurial Mindset  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Research that has sought to identify the underlying determinants of self-efficacy is sparse. This chapter seeks to identify antecedents of entrepreneurial self-efficacy and the processes that produce and reinforce self-efficacy. It seeks to broaden our understanding of the self-efficacy concept through an exploration of its origins and via a journey to its impact in the field of entrepreneurship. Finally, it suggests pedagogical initiatives needed to promote entrepreneurial self-efficacy in the different social arenas of life.

Neergaard, Helle; Mauer, René

2009-01-01

27

Development of a Smoking Abstinence Self-efficacy Questionnaire.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Self-efficacy beliefs are an important determinant of (changes in) health behaviors. In the area of smoking cessation, there is a need for a short, feasible, and validated questionnaire measuring self-efficacy beliefs regarding smoking cessation. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to investigate the psychometric properties of a six-item questionnaire to assess smoking cessation self-efficacy. METHODS: We used longitudinal data from a smoking cessation study. A total of 513 smokers completed the Smoking Abstinence Self-efficacy Questionnaire (SASEQ) and questionnaires assessing depressive symptoms and motivation to quit smoking. After that, they set a quit date and attempted to stop smoking. One year after the quit date, smoking status of participants was assessed by self report. The psychometric properties of the SASEQ were studied and we investigated whether SASEQ scores predicted successful smoking cessation. RESULTS: Factor analysis yielded one factor, with an Eigenvalue of 3.83, explaining 64% of variance. All factor loadings were ?0.73. We found a Cronbach's alpha of 0.89 for the SASEQ, low correlations for the SASEQ with depressive symptoms, and motivation to quit, indicating that self-efficacy is measured independently of these concepts. Furthermore, high baseline SASEQ scores significantly predicted smoking abstinence at 52 weeks after the quit date (OR?=?1.85; 95% CI?=?1.20~2.84). CONCLUSIONS: The SASEQ appeared to be a short, reliable, and valid questionnaire to assess self-efficacy beliefs regarding smoking abstinence. In the present study, this instrument also had good predictive validity. The short SASEQ can easily be used in busy clinical practice to guide smoking cessation interventions.

Spek V; Lemmens F; Chatrou M; van Kempen S; Pouwer F; Pop V

2013-09-01

28

Measuring technology self efficacy: reliability and construct validity of a modified computer self efficacy scale in a clinical rehabilitation setting.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: To describe a modification of the computer self efficacy scale for use in clinical settings and to report on the modified scale's reliability and construct validity. METHODS: The computer self efficacy scale was modified to make it applicable for clinical settings (for use with older people or people with disabilities using everyday technologies). The modified scale was piloted, then tested with patients in an Australian inpatient rehabilitation setting (n?=?88) to determine the internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Construct validity was assessed by correlation of the scale with age and technology use. Factor analysis using principal components analysis was undertaken to identify important constructs within the scale. RESULTS: The modified computer self efficacy scale demonstrated high internal consistency with a standardised alpha coefficient of 0.94. Two constructs within the scale were apparent; using the technology alone, and using the technology with the support of others. Scores on the scale were correlated with age and frequency of use of some technologies thereby supporting construct validity. CONCLUSIONS: The modified computer self efficacy scale has demonstrated reliability and construct validity for measuring the self efficacy of older people or people with disabilities when using everyday technologies. This tool has the potential to assist clinicians in identifying older patients who may be more open to using new technologies to maintain independence.

Laver K; George S; Ratcliffe J; Crotty M

2012-01-01

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Self-efficacy, coping with stress and goal-orientation in nurse managers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between self-efficacy, coping with stress, and goal-orientation in nurse managers. The results indicated that the self-efficacy scores were significantly correlated with learning goal-orientation (r=.37, p.05), helplessness approach (r=-.13, p>.05), social support approach (r=-.01, p>.05), and performance avoid orientation (r=.18, p>.05) was not significant. This study showed a positive meaningful relationship between nurse managers' self-efficacy levels and learning goal orientation and performance-proving orientation. The study provided information related to the variables with self-efficacy of nurse managers. Given the results of this study, it seems important to develop intervention programs to facilitate self-efficacy and goal-orientation and to reduce stress

Melek Kalkan; Hatice Odac?; Hatice Epli Koç

2011-01-01

30

Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Writing  

Science.gov (United States)

Introduction: While "teaching self-efficacy" has been supported as an important construct related to teacher competence (eg. Goddard, Hoy & Hoy, 2000), little is known about how in-service teachers think about themselves as writers, or writing self-efficacy, particularly as it relates to writing performance. The present study is a preliminary…

Lavelle, Ellen

2006-01-01

31

A review of transcultural nursing.  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, transcultural nursing is reviewed in the light of the literature mainly relevant to the British context. The key features of transcultural nursing are examined in the context of multicultural Britain as follows: definitions, racism, ethnocentrism, culture, diversity, transcultural health care practice and nurse education. Models of transcultural care practice and contemporary developments in cultural care are also explored. There is evidence from emerging literature that innovations are taking place in promoting transcultural care practice and education. However, the article concludes that much practice-based research is still needed to establish transcultural nursing in Britain. PMID:15701535

Narayanasamy, Aru; White, Ethelrene

2005-02-01

32

A review of transcultural nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In this article, transcultural nursing is reviewed in the light of the literature mainly relevant to the British context. The key features of transcultural nursing are examined in the context of multicultural Britain as follows: definitions, racism, ethnocentrism, culture, diversity, transcultural health care practice and nurse education. Models of transcultural care practice and contemporary developments in cultural care are also explored. There is evidence from emerging literature that innovations are taking place in promoting transcultural care practice and education. However, the article concludes that much practice-based research is still needed to establish transcultural nursing in Britain.

Narayanasamy A; White E

2005-02-01

33

Factors associated with self-efficacy for managing recovery in the trauma intensive care population: A prospective cohort study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper was to identify factors associated with self-efficacy for managing recovery in the trauma intensive care population. INTRODUCTION: Injury accounts for 6.5% of disease burden in Australia, with similar levels being reported in other developed countries. While some studies regarding self-efficacy have identified a relationship to patient recovery post acute injury, others have been inconclusive. This study will identify factors associated with self-efficacy for managing recovery in the trauma intensive care population. METHODS: A prospective cohort study of patients aged ?18 years, admitted to a metropolitan tertiary hospital in South East Queensland between June 2008 and August 2010 for the acute treatment of injury. Demographic, injury, acute care and psychosocial factors were considered. The primary outcome was self-efficacy measured by the 6-item self-efficacy scale (SES) 1 and 6 months post hospital discharge. All factors significant (p<0.10) on univariate analysis were included in multivariable modelling where p<0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: A total of 88 patients were included. The mean self-efficacy score at 1 and 6 months was similar (6.8 vs 6.9 respectively). Self-efficacy at 1 month, psychological distress (K-10) Score and illness perception (K10) Score accounted for 68.4% (adjusted R(2)) of the variance in 6 month self-efficacy (F3,75)=57.17, p<0.001. Illness perception was the strongest contributor to 6 month self-efficacy (beta=-0.516), followed by psychological distress (beta=-0.243) and self-efficacy at 1 month (beta=0.205). CONCLUSION: Significant factors associated with self-efficacy for managing recovery at 6 months included 1 month self-efficacy, illness perception and psychological distress. To promote patient recovery, screening patients at 1 month in order to commence relevant interventions could be beneficial.

Connolly FR; Aitken LM; Tower M; Macfarlane B

2013-06-01

34

Predictors of self-efficacy for sleep in primary care.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To identify factors impacting self-efficacy for sleep. Specifically, the aims were to examine associations between self-efficacy for sleep and (1) socio-demographic variables and (2) potential predictors including sleep severity, depression, dysfunctional beliefs about sleep, quality of life/health status and insomnia treatment acceptability for behavioural treatment. BACKGROUND: Between 50 and 70 million Americans experience insomnia. Costs of treatment, absenteeism and reduced productivity exceed 42 billion dollars annually. Medication for insomnia can result in impaired memory, fatigue, injuries, reduced health, medication habituation, difficulties in work and relationships and enhanced healthcare usage. Studies have suggested that behavioural management can be beneficial; however, factors contributing to success with behavioural management are unclear. DESIGN: This quantitative correlational study used inventory-based measures. METHODS: The Self-Efficacy for Sleep Scale, Insomnia Treatment Acceptability Scale, SF-8™ Health Survey, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale and Dysfunctional Beliefs about Sleep Scale were completed by 236 individuals with significant insomnia as measured by Insomnia Severity Index scores of 8 or higher. RESULTS: A significant association was found between sleep self-efficacy and race (p < 0·01). All predicator variables except one were found to be significantly correlated with the self-efficacy for sleep (p < 0·01). CONCLUSIONS: For behavioural self-management strategies to be effective for treating insomnia, these reported predictors may need to be assessed and managed. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: These findings suggest that nurses may want to assess insomnia severity, health status, level of depression and beliefs about sleep prior to beginning or when encountering barriers to the successful utilisation of behavioural approaches to manage sleep. If a patient is found to possess these limiting factors, the nurse may want to address these issues through medication, education and/or other behavioural approaches. Once addressed, the patient may find behavioural management for insomnia to be quite successful.

Rutledge CM; La Guardia AC; Bluestein D

2013-05-01

35

Self-efficacy's influence on student academic achievement in the medical anatomy curriculum.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Self-efficacy is defined as a person's beliefs in his or her own abilities to successfully complete a task and has been shown to influence student motivation and academic behaviors. More specifically, anatomical self-efficacy is defined as an individual's judgment of his or her ability to successfully complete tasks related to the anatomy curriculum; these include dissecting, learning anatomical concepts, and applying anatomical knowledge to clinical situations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of anatomical self-efficacy on the academic performance of students enrolled in a medical gross anatomy course. To obtain students' anatomical self-efficacy ratings, surveys containing the same anatomical self-efficacy instrument were completed by first-year medical students at a southeastern United States allopathic medical school after each of four gross anatomy assessments. Additional data collected included student demographic information, Medical College Admission Test(®) (MCAT(®)) scores, and anatomy assessment scores, both written examination and laboratory practical. To investigate the potential predictive nature of self-efficacy for academic performance on both the written examination and the laboratory practical components of medical anatomy assessments, hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted. For these analyses, academic ability (defined as the sum of the physical sciences and biological sciences MCAT scores) was controlled. The results of the hierarchical linear regressions indicated that all four laboratory practical scores were predicted by the corresponding self-efficacy ratings, while two (i.e., thorax/abdomen and pelvis/lower limb) of the four written examination scores were predicted by the corresponding self-efficacy ratings (P ? 0.05).

Burgoon JM; Meece JL; Granger NA

2012-09-01

36

Self-efficacy's influence on student academic achievement in the medical anatomy curriculum.  

Science.gov (United States)

Self-efficacy is defined as a person's beliefs in his or her own abilities to successfully complete a task and has been shown to influence student motivation and academic behaviors. More specifically, anatomical self-efficacy is defined as an individual's judgment of his or her ability to successfully complete tasks related to the anatomy curriculum; these include dissecting, learning anatomical concepts, and applying anatomical knowledge to clinical situations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of anatomical self-efficacy on the academic performance of students enrolled in a medical gross anatomy course. To obtain students' anatomical self-efficacy ratings, surveys containing the same anatomical self-efficacy instrument were completed by first-year medical students at a southeastern United States allopathic medical school after each of four gross anatomy assessments. Additional data collected included student demographic information, Medical College Admission Test(®) (MCAT(®)) scores, and anatomy assessment scores, both written examination and laboratory practical. To investigate the potential predictive nature of self-efficacy for academic performance on both the written examination and the laboratory practical components of medical anatomy assessments, hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted. For these analyses, academic ability (defined as the sum of the physical sciences and biological sciences MCAT scores) was controlled. The results of the hierarchical linear regressions indicated that all four laboratory practical scores were predicted by the corresponding self-efficacy ratings, while two (i.e., thorax/abdomen and pelvis/lower limb) of the four written examination scores were predicted by the corresponding self-efficacy ratings (P ? 0.05). PMID:22653759

Burgoon, Jennifer Marie; Meece, Judith L; Granger, Noelle A

2012-05-31

37

Self-Efficacy and Critical Thinking Dispositions as Predictors of Success in School Practicum  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A growing body of literature supports the relation between students’ sense of self-efficacy and their academic performance. Similarly, there are studies indicating a relationship between critical thinking dispositions and academic performance. The purpose of the present study is to examine in what degree the teacher candidates’ sense of self-efficacy and critical thinking dispositions predict their success in school practicum course. A total of 104 subjects (23 male, 81 female) participated in the study. Data related to teacher candidates’ sense self-efficacy was collected using Teachers’ Sense of Self-Efficacy Scale (Çapa, Çak?ro?lu & Sar?kaya, 2005). Teacher candidates’ critical thinking dispositions were collected using the Turkish version of California Critical Thinking Dispositions Inventory (CCTDI) which was adapted into Turkish by Kökdemir (2003). As for the success in school practicum course, teacher candidates’ grades awarded by their school practicum supervisors were used. Statistically significant correlation was found between the self-efficacy and critical dispositions scores, and between critical thinking disposition scores and school practicum grades of the participants. The results of the regression analysis showed that teacher candidates’ critical thinking dispositions scores predict their success in school practicum course. However, contrary to the expectations, their senses of self-efficacy scores do not predict their success in the same course.

Gülru Yüksel; Bülent Alc?

2012-01-01

38

An Analysis on the Effect of Computer Self-Efficacy over Scientific Research Self-Efficacy and Information Literacy Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

Present research investigates reciprocal relations amidst computer self-efficacy, scientific research and information literacy self-efficacy. Research findings have demonstrated that according to standardized regression coefficients, computer self-efficacy has a positive effect on information literacy self-efficacy. Likewise it has been detected…

Tuncer, Murat

2013-01-01

39

An Analysis on the Effect of Computer Self-Efficacy over Scientific Research Self-Efficacy and Information Literacy Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

|Present research investigates reciprocal relations amidst computer self-efficacy, scientific research and information literacy self-efficacy. Research findings have demonstrated that according to standardized regression coefficients, computer self-efficacy has a positive effect on information literacy self-efficacy. Likewise it has been detected…

Tuncer, Murat

2013-01-01

40

Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Pre-Service Primary Teachers on Physical Education  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the self-efficacy perception of the pre-service teachers towards Physical Education. Subjects are 423 student teachers from four Educational Faculties in Artvin, Rize, Trabzon and Giresun. Data were gathered via “The Scale of Physical Education Self Efficacy Perception” which was developed by the researchers. The scale developed in three parts as theoretical knowledge, practice skills and formation skills. The scale was applied to the student teachers who had completed Physical Education courses in their faculty programs. Findings indicated that male student teachers had higher self-efficacy perception scores toward Physical Education than female student teachers in terms of theoretical knowledge and practice skills dimensions. Also, the students teachers who had get the Physical Education Courses in sport facilities had higher self-efficacy perception scores toward Physical Education than the student teachers who hadn?t get this course in sport facilities.

Cemalettin ?PEK; Cengiz BAYRAKTAR

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
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Student information literacy: psychometric validation of a self-efficacy report.  

Science.gov (United States)

Psychometric characteristics of the Student Information Literacy Self-efficacy Report based on responses from 498 students ages 9 to 12 years are reported. Students report their self-efficacy (confidence and difficulty) in 11 different phases of being information literate, i.e., developing a topic, planning, self-management, locating sources, selecting sources, retrieving information, analysing information, evaluating information, synthesising knowledge, presenting knowledge, and self-evaluation using a positively packed rating scale. The data were strongly internally consistent (Cronbach alpha=.95) with a test-retest reliability of .78. The 11 phases, factors measured by a matching pair of self-efficacy questions, were confirmed (chi2=529.68; df= 198; RMSEA =.058; TLI=.940). Ratings were correlated low with teachers' ratings and test scores of information literacy skills and moderately correlated with academic self-concept. The test provides unique information about students' self-efficacy for information literacy. Its use in classrooms is warranted. PMID:16173376

Brown, Gavin T L

2005-06-01

42

Student information literacy: psychometric validation of a self-efficacy report.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Psychometric characteristics of the Student Information Literacy Self-efficacy Report based on responses from 498 students ages 9 to 12 years are reported. Students report their self-efficacy (confidence and difficulty) in 11 different phases of being information literate, i.e., developing a topic, planning, self-management, locating sources, selecting sources, retrieving information, analysing information, evaluating information, synthesising knowledge, presenting knowledge, and self-evaluation using a positively packed rating scale. The data were strongly internally consistent (Cronbach alpha=.95) with a test-retest reliability of .78. The 11 phases, factors measured by a matching pair of self-efficacy questions, were confirmed (chi2=529.68; df= 198; RMSEA =.058; TLI=.940). Ratings were correlated low with teachers' ratings and test scores of information literacy skills and moderately correlated with academic self-concept. The test provides unique information about students' self-efficacy for information literacy. Its use in classrooms is warranted.

Brown GT

2005-06-01

43

Predictors Of Java Programming Self Efficacy Among Engineering Students In A Nigerian University  

CERN Multimedia

The study examined the relationship between Java programming self-efficacy and programming background of engineering students in a Nigerian University. One hundred and ninety two final year engineering students randomly selected from six engineering departments of the university participated in the study. Two research instruments: Programming Background Questionnaire and Java Programming Self-Efficacy Scale were used in collecting relevant information from the subjects. The resulting data were analyzed using Pearson product correlation and Multiple regression analysis. Findings revealed that Java Programming self-efficacy has no significant relationship with each of the computing and programming background factors. It was additionally obtained that the number of programming courses offered and programming courses weighed scores were the only predictors of Java self-efficacy.

Jegede, Philip Olu

2009-01-01

44

Self-efficacy and the prediction of domain-specific cognitive abilities.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

We evaluated predictors of performance in 4 specific cognitive ability domains: verbal, numerical, spatial, and mechanical. The predictors were individual differences in self-efficacy beliefs, self-enhancement tendencies, and cross-domain abilities. Our university students' beliefs about their verbal, numerical, and spatial capabilities correlated well with their actual performance on standardized tests (verbal r=.33, numerical r=.27, spatial r=.36). In contrast, the students' self-efficacy for mechanical tasks did relatively poorly in predicting mechanical test performance (r=.10). Most interesting were two other findings: (a) The best predictor of domain performance was level of cross-domain performance by far, even for mechanical tasks, and (b) self-enhancement tendencies added to cross-domain abilities and self-efficacy beliefs in the prediction of performance. The results are discussed in terms of possible mechanisms explaining how one's score on a maximal performance task can be affected by self-efficacy beliefs and self-enhancement tendencies.

Paunonen SV; Hong RY

2010-02-01

45

Coping Strategies and Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Management in Older Mexican Adults  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus 2 (DM2) affects 20% of the elderly population in Mexico, causes disability and death, and demands many life-style changes. Since DM2 control is largely responsibility of the patient, management itself is source of stress. Coping is a process by which persons face stressful situations, and active coping have proved being effective in disease control. Social-cognitive perspective suggests that self-efficacy believes can regulate human functioning, therefore they could promote specific coping if relations between them are found. The study aim was to examine the association between coping strategies and self-efficacy in DM2 management in a group of 126 Mexican adults over 54 years old (= 68.57, SD = 7.19), which answered an interview about sociodemographics data, self-efficacy in diabetes and coping strategies. The most common kind of coping used by the sample was self-recreation (= 50.41, SD = 19.50) and religious faith (= 50.04, SD = 17.65), and in self-efficacy the domain of taking the medicines had the greater score (= 90.25, SD = 16.08). Total score in self-efficacy had significant correlations with active coping (r = .402, p ? .01) and self-recreation (r = .291, p ? .01). We concluded that there are relationships between self-efficacy beliefs in diabetes management and active coping. The correlation found can be used to guide future interventions with these patients, but the relation should be studied deeper for directional search, if is proved that DM self-efficacy beliefs enhance active coping; self-efficacy based interventions should be promote.

Mónica Hattori-Hara; Ana Luisa González-Celis

2013-01-01

46

ACTIVE STRATEGIES DURING INQUIRY-BASED SCIENCE TEACHER EDUCATION TO IMPROVE LONG-TERM TEACHER SELF-EFFICACY  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Teacher development aimed at increasing the use of inquiry based methods in schools is an important way to reach science learning goals. To this end, the EC has promoted inquiry based science teaching (IBST) within the Seventh Framework Program (FP7). One dimension, typically absent from the FP7 products, is the personal capacity belief of self- efficacy which has been shown to be important to personal behavioral change. The purpose of this research was to develop and test a model of teacher professional development (TPD) which adds specific elements for altering teacher self-efficacies to existing FP7 IBST products. This model was tested for its usefulness in increasing participant self-efficacy as evidenced by short and long term quantitative measures as well as by evaluation of long terminquiry lessons. Workshops to promote IBST were conducted in five different countries. Each workshop included strategies for increasing participant’s self-efficacies. Pre and post assessments showed consistently improved personal self-efficacy scores in all of the workshops. In addition, and unlike other long-term studies of teachers, these self-efficacy scores did not significantly diminish over six months. The promotion of self-efficacy in TPD provides a consistent way of evaluating the impact of IBST workshops through the use of changes in self-efficacy.

Evans, Robert Harry

2012-01-01

47

The development of research self-efficacy scale  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to develop a scale towards identifying research-related self-efficacies of universitystudents. Research Self-Efficacy Scale (RSS) has been applied to 310 students pursuing academic education at theNear East University (NEU). For structural validity of the Scale, exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was performed. Asa result of the EFA, a structure with a single factor composed of 18 items and explaining 31% of the variation hasbeen identified. Structural validity has been especially observed also through the Scale scores of those groupswhose properties are known. Analysis results have shown a higher Scale point in favour of those who have takenresearch methods modules as opposed to those who have not, and those who have previous research experienceas opposed to those who do not. The analysis for concurrent validity has produced a significant negativecorrelation between the Scale scores and the scores of the research anxiety scale, and a significant positivecorrelation between the Scale scores and perceived academic achievement. The alpha coefficient of the Scalescores is .87 and the split-half reliability coefficient is .85.

Sener Büyükoztürk; Kübra Atalay; Zenal Sozgun; Senay Kebapc?

2011-01-01

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Interprofessional clinical training improves self-efficacy of health care students  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Background: Interprofessional collaboration potentially enhances patient safety and satisfaction, and reduces tensions and conflicts among health care professionals. Such collaboration is challenging, however, because health care professionals lack sufficient knowledge of other professional roles and competences to engage in fruitful interprofessional teamwork. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of an interprofessional training program on students’ self-efficacy in interprofessional collaboration. Methods: The study was designed as a quasi-experiment with an intervention group (239 students) and a comparison group (405 students). The intervention was provided by an interprofessional clinical study unit (ICS) and included students from nursing, medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, laboratory technology and radiography. Self-efficacy data were collected through web-based questionnaires completed before and after the students’ clinical training. Results: In the simple statistical analysis, all four self-efficacy scores for the ICS group improved over time although one score (Q4) change did not reach statistical significance (p=0.08). After adjustment for profession, gender, baseline difference between the two groups and the score change for the comparison group, the ICS group’s self-efficacy score gain remained statistically significant. Conclusion: The study showed that interprofessional training improved students’ perception of self-efficacy more than traditional clinical training.

NØrgaard, Birgitte; Draborg, Eva

2013-01-01

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Relation of Interest and Self-Efficacy Occupational Congruence and Career Choice Certainty  

Science.gov (United States)

A sample of 2145 adults completed the Personal Globe Inventory (PGI) as well as indicating their occupational choice and the certainty of this choice. The PGI yielded interest and self-efficacy scores and these were used with the occupational choice to calculate a congruence score for interests and one for efficacy. The prediction of career…

Tracey, Terence J. G.

2010-01-01

50

Developing the Reader Self-Efficacy Scale  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Reading comprehension has affective and social dimensions as well as its cognitive dimension. Thus, to understand and improve reading instruction, affective and social dimensions should be well understood. Perceived self-efficacy is one of affective issues influencing learning and it should be taken into consideration in reading instruction. With this in mind, this study aims at developing the Reader Self-Efficacy Scale with a group of 518 students as participants. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed a 6-item scale with one factor. The Cronbach Alpha coefficient was determined to be 0.948. This new Reader Self-Efficacy Scale could easily be used for training and research purposes depending on its high validity and reliability.

Hakan ÜLPER; Derya YAYLI; ?smail KARAKAYA

2013-01-01

51

When functional capacity and real-world functioning converge: the role of self-efficacy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Although functional capacity is typically diminished, there is substantial heterogeneity in functional outcomes in schizophrenia. Motivational factors likely play a significant role in bridging the capacity-to-functioning gap. Self-efficacy theory suggests that although some individuals may have the capacity to perform functional behaviors, they may or may not have confidence they can successfully perform these behaviors in real-world settings. We hypothesized that the relationship between functional capacity and real-world functioning would be moderated by the individual's self-efficacy in a sample of 97 middle-aged and older adults with schizophrenia (mean age = 50.9 ± 6.5 years). Functional capacity was measured using the Brief UCSD Performance-based Skills Assessment (UPSA-B), self-efficacy with the Revised Self-Efficacy Scale, and Daily Functioning via the Specific Level of Functioning (SLOF) scale and self-report measures. Results indicated that when self-efficacy was low, the relationship between UPSA-B and SLOF scores was not significant (P = .727). However, when self efficacy was high, UPSA-B scores were significantly related to SLOF scores (P = .020). Similar results were observed for self-reported social and work functioning. These results suggest that motivational processes (ie, self-efficacy) may aid in understanding why some individuals have the capacity to function well but do not translate this capacity into real-world functioning. Furthermore, while improvement in capacity may be necessary for improved functioning in this population, it may not be sufficient when motivation is absent.

Cardenas V; Abel S; Bowie CR; Tiznado D; Depp CA; Patterson TL; Jeste DV; Mausbach BT

2013-07-01

52

When functional capacity and real-world functioning converge: the role of self-efficacy.  

Science.gov (United States)

Although functional capacity is typically diminished, there is substantial heterogeneity in functional outcomes in schizophrenia. Motivational factors likely play a significant role in bridging the capacity-to-functioning gap. Self-efficacy theory suggests that although some individuals may have the capacity to perform functional behaviors, they may or may not have confidence they can successfully perform these behaviors in real-world settings. We hypothesized that the relationship between functional capacity and real-world functioning would be moderated by the individual's self-efficacy in a sample of 97 middle-aged and older adults with schizophrenia (mean age = 50.9 ± 6.5 years). Functional capacity was measured using the Brief UCSD Performance-based Skills Assessment (UPSA-B), self-efficacy with the Revised Self-Efficacy Scale, and Daily Functioning via the Specific Level of Functioning (SLOF) scale and self-report measures. Results indicated that when self-efficacy was low, the relationship between UPSA-B and SLOF scores was not significant (P = .727). However, when self efficacy was high, UPSA-B scores were significantly related to SLOF scores (P = .020). Similar results were observed for self-reported social and work functioning. These results suggest that motivational processes (ie, self-efficacy) may aid in understanding why some individuals have the capacity to function well but do not translate this capacity into real-world functioning. Furthermore, while improvement in capacity may be necessary for improved functioning in this population, it may not be sufficient when motivation is absent. PMID:22328642

Cardenas, Veronica; Abel, Stephanie; Bowie, Christopher R; Tiznado, Denisse; Depp, Colin A; Patterson, Thomas L; Jeste, Dilip V; Mausbach, Brent T

2012-02-10

53

Are Teachers Qualified to Teach Entrepreneurship? Analysis of Entrepreneurial Attitude and Self-efficacy  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Recent research on the impacts of entrepreneurship education revealed that graduates lack the motivation and competencies required for new venture creation. Students entrepreneurial motivation and competencies can be highly influenced by teachers attitude toward and self-efficacy in entrepreneurship. However, there is little knowledge about entrepreneurial attitude and self-efficacy of teachers specifically at vocational and technical schools. This study aimed to examine entrepreneurial attitude and self-efficacy among 315 teachers from technical and vocational secondary schools in Malaysia. It employed a survey research method and a set of questionnaire to measure the teachers' entrepreneurial attitude and self-efficacy. Analysis of the data indicated that the teachers had attitudes as consistent with entrepreneurs and a high entrepreneurial self-efficacy. More specifically, the teachers scored high in all dimensions of entrepreneurial attitude except self-esteem affect and behavior, personal control affect, personal control cognition and innovation behavior. Therefore, the teachers have a positive attitude towards entrepreneurship and a high sense of self-efficacy.

Z.A. Lope Pihie; A. Bagheri

2011-01-01

54

Spanish Version of Broome's Pelvic Muscle Self-Efficacy Scale: Validity and Reliability.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Self-efficacy appears to be an important predictor of functional recovery for women with urinary incontinence, but no specific Spanish-language questionnaires exist to measure pelvic floor exercise self-efficacy. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to design a valid and reliable Spanish version of Broome's Pelvic Muscle Self-Efficacy Scale, to measure self-efficacy, as perceived by women with urinary incontinence, in performing pelvic floor exercises. DESIGN: Observational validation study. METHODS: We first used translation-back translation to design the survey, and then we validated the survey in a sample of 119 incontinent women who had undergone a pelvic floor training program. We assessed the questionnaire's reliability and construct validity. Descriptive statistics were used to score the questionnaire. We evaluated internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha coefficient and Pearson's correlation coefficients. To assess construct validity, we performed exploratory factor analysis, using both the principal components extraction method and the Varimax rotation method. RESULTS: The reliability coefficient (0.91) and the correlations between items were high. The factor analysis revealed that six main factors accounted for 75.80% of the variance. LIMITATIONS: Conclusions regarding the validity of our questionnaire should be conditioned by the inability to assess criterion-related validity. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the Spanish version of Broome's questionnaire on self-efficacy constitutes a measuring tool for a psychometrically accurate, clinically relevant estimation of women's self-efficacy in performing pelvic floor exercises.

Medrano Sánchez EM; Suárez Serrano CM; De la Casa Almeida M; Díaz Mohedo E; Chillón Martínez R

2013-08-01

55

Self-Efficacy and green entrepreneurship  

Science.gov (United States)

The objective of this study is to investigate empirically the extent to which self-efficacy contributes to the development of green entrepreneurial intention. The measurement constructs of self-efficacy were classified into market opportunities, innovative environment, initiating relationships, defining purpose, coping with challenges, and developing human resources. The study comprises 252 usable convenient samples through structured questionnaires. The coefficient of determination R2 shows that the variance of intention to entrepreneurship is explained by the variance of the independent variables. It was also found that the model is fit for prediction.

Tan, K. L.; Suhaida, S.; Leong, Y. P.

2013-06-01

56

The correlation between breastfeeding self-efficacy and maternal postpartum depression in southern Brazil.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between breastfeeding self-efficacy and postpartum depression symptoms in a sample of Portuguese-speaking mothers in southern Brazil. BACKGROUND: There remains equivocal evidence regarding a putative association between breastfeeding self-efficacy and postpartum depression. METHOD: This is a cross-sectional study in which eligible research participants completed screening questionnaires and other assessment tools. Mothers were interviewed once only in their homes between the 2nd and 12th week of the postpartum period. Research participants completed the Portuguese version of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Breastfeeding self-efficacy was evaluated through the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES-SF). RESULTS: A total number of 89 mothers completed the investigation: 69 (77%) were exclusively breastfeeding, whereas 20 mothers (22.7%) were partially breastfeeding at the time of the interview. Mothers who combined breastfeeding and bottle-feeding presented higher PDSS and EPDS scores. The breastfeeding self-efficacy scores were higher in mothers who exclusively breastfed and were negatively associated (p<0.001) with both EPDS and PDSS (postpartum depression) scores. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that mothers who suffer from depressive symptoms may experience less confidence in their ability to breastfeed. This association may be particularly relevant for the purpose of screening procedures for depression and unsatisfactory breastfeeding during the postpartum period.

Zubaran C; Foresti K

2013-03-01

57

Self-efficacy in mastery learning to apply a therapeutic psychomotor skill.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study assessed changes in Self-efficacy scores produced by each of the four steps of instruction used to teach students a therapeutic psychomotor skill used by osteopathic physicians. Volunteering subjects were an entire class of 83 first-year osteopathic medical students (40 men, 43 women, M age = 25.1 yr.). Self-reported Self-efficacy to perform the skill was sampled: (1) after an instructor's demonstration of the skill during a laboratory session, (2) after paired students practiced during the laboratory session, (3) after independent self-paced practice outside class using an instructional handout and videotape, and (4) after receiving individualized feedback on skill performance from an instructor acting as the "patient." The first two steps, representing typical skill instruction, produced mean Self-efficacy scores of 18% and 30%, respectively. On the last two steps, added to implement mastery learning, mean Self-efficacy scores increased to 75% and 85%, respectively. The instructors confirmed that all students mastered performance of the skill. Mastery learning was effective in developing both the therapeutic skill and high Self-efficacy to utilize the skill. PMID:15773696

Mann, Douglas D; Eland, David C

2005-02-01

58

Mechanisms of change in cognitive behavioral therapy for panic disorder: The unique effects of self-efficacy and anxiety sensitivity.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The present study examined temporal dependencies of change of panic symptoms and two promising mechanisms of change (self-efficacy and anxiety sensitivity) during an 11-session course of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for Panic Disorder (PD). 361 individuals with a principal diagnosis of PD completed measures of self-efficacy, anxiety sensitivity, and PD symptoms at each session during treatment. Effect size analyses indicated that the greatest changes in anxiety sensitivity occurred early in treatment, whereas the greatest changes in self-efficacy occurred later in treatment. Results of parallel process latent growth curve models indicated that changes in self-efficacy and anxiety sensitivity across treatment uniquely predicted changes in PD symptoms. Bivariate and multivariate latent difference score models indicated, as expected, that changes in anxiety sensitivity and self-efficacy temporally preceded changes in panic symptoms, and that intraindividual changes in anxiety sensitivity and self-efficacy independently predicted subsequent intraindividual changes in panic symptoms. These results provide strong evidence that changes in self-efficacy and anxiety sensitivity during CBT influence subsequent changes in panic symptoms, and that self-efficacy and anxiety sensitivity may therefore be two distinct mechanisms of change of CBT for PD that have their greatest impact at different stages of treatment.

Gallagher MW; Payne LA; White KS; Shear KM; Woods SW; Gorman JM; Barlow DH

2013-11-01

59

[The relationship between career decision-making self efficacy and anxiety].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the paper is to examine the relationship among Career Decision-Making Self Efficacy, existential anxiety and anxiety in the sample of college students during the professional choice. METHODS: Data on The Revised Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy-Shot Form, Existential Anxiety Scale (EAS), SCL-90 and self-identity status were collected and analyzed on a sample of 500 college students. RESULTS: 201 rural students' career decision making self-efficacy scores were as follows: self-appraisal (12.58 ± 3.48), occupational information (12.07 ± 3.05), goal selection (12.48 ± 3.51), planning (12.17 ± 3.10), problem solving (9.75 ± 2.38), all scores were lower than urban students, the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). Rural Students' anxiety dimension score were as follows: death and the fate of anxiety (14.75 ± 2.56), the meaningless and empty anxiety (19.32 ± 2.88), condemnation and guilt anxiety (13.72 ± 2.38), alienation and loneliness anxiety (16.82 ± 2.51), all scores are higher than urban students, the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). There is negative correlation between Anxiety and career decision making self-efficacy. There is a significant positive correlation between anxiety and existential anxiety. There exists a significant negative correlation among factors of student and career decision making self-efficacy and anxiety. Meaningless and emptiness anxiety on career decision making self-efficacy are significant predictors. CONCLUSION: There is negative correlation among existential anxiety, occupational information and anxiety during the professional choice.

Yao C; Cai Y; Liu J; Shan D; Zhou X

2012-03-01

60

Hope, self-efficacy, spiritual well-being and job satisfaction.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

TITLE: Hope, self-efficacy, spiritual well-being and job satisfaction. AIM: This paper is a report of a study of the relations of spiritual well-being, global job satisfaction, and general self-efficacy to hope in Continuing Care Assistants. BACKGROUND: Healthcare providers have described their hope as an important part of their work and a form of work motivation. Hope may be an important factor in preventing burnout and improving job satisfaction. METHODS: A concurrent triangulation mixed method design was used. Sixty-four Continuing Care Assistants (personal care aides) who registered for a 'Living with Hope' Conference completed a demographic form, Herth Hope Index, Global Job Satisfaction Questionnaire, Spiritual Well-Being Scale, General Self-Efficacy Scale, and a hope questionnaire. Data were collected in 2007. The response rate was 58%. RESULTS: Using linear regression, 29.9% of the variance in Herth Hope Index score was accounted for by scores from the General Self-Efficacy Scale and Spiritual Well-Being Scale. General Self-efficacy scores (positive relationship) and Spiritual Well-Being scores (negative relationship) accounted for a significant part of the variance. Qualitative data supported all findings, with the exception of the negative relationship between hope and spiritual well-being; participants wrote that faith, relationships, helping others and positive thinking helped them to have hope. They also wrote that hope had a positive influence on their job satisfaction and performance. CONCLUSION: Hope is an important concept in the work life of Continuing Care Assistants. Supportive relationships, adequate resources, encouragement by others, and improving perceptions of self-efficacy (ability to achieve goals in their workplace) may foster their hope.

Duggleby W; Cooper D; Penz K

2009-11-01

 
 
 
 
61

Reflexiones sobre docencia transcultural.  

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Full Text Available Describe algunas circunstancias que afectan la enseñanza de la lengua inglesa a nivel universitario, y reflexiona sobre todo en la necesidad de enriquecer las relaciones dialógicas culturales en el salón de lenguas extranjeras. Propone (y Lee Zoreda lo lleva a cabo en su práctica docente) enseñar no sólo la lengua sino la cultura norteamericana por medio de un programa de alfabetización transcultural.

Margaret Lee Zoreda

1994-01-01

62

Service Learning and Its Influence on Pre-Service Teachers: A Study of Social Responsibility and Self-Efficacy  

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Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to study pre-service teachers on social responsibility and self-efficacy through service learning. The mixed methodology included two major procedures (i) the actual use of a developed service learning instructional model by means of action research principles and qualitative research and (ii) the study into the pre-service teacher on social responsibility and self-efficacy by means of quantitative research and quantitative research. The findings revealed that the pre-service teachers had after score of social responsibility and self-efficacy higher than those before learning through service learning.

Parichart Prasertsang; Prasart Nuangchalerm; Chaloey Pumipuntu

2013-01-01

63

General Self-Efficacy Among Family’s Female Caregiver of Elderly with Alzheimer’s Disease  

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Full Text Available Background & Aim: Caregivers of elderly with Alzheimer's disease, particularly females, encounter challenges. Their different roles in giving care to the patients could result in physical and mental disorders. The self-efficacy seems to be an essential factor in empowering individuals coping with stressful situations and challenging tasks. The aim of this study was to investigate general self-efficacy among women as family caregivers of elderly with Alzheimers disease. Methods & Materials: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 112 women reffered to the Iran Alzheimer Association, Tehran were selected through convenience sampling method. The General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE-10) was used to collect data. Data were entered into the SPSS-16 and then processed using descriptive statistics and independent t-test, ANOVA and Scheffe. Results: The mean score of the general self-efficacy was 28.24±6.34 indicating that considerable percentage of the participants had unsatisfactory level of self-efficacy (65.2%). In addition, there were significant relationships between the women's general self-efficacy with educational and economic statuses (P<0.05). There were no significant relationships between general self-efficacy with age, marital status, occupational status and duration of caring. Conclusion: According to the findings, a considerable percentage of the participants had unsatisfactory level of self-efficacy. Therefore, it is essential to promote the caregivers self-efficacy in order to give them the ability of better adaptation with the lifes challenges. In particular, the self-efficacy promotive programs should be implemented among caregivers with lower educational and economic status.

Farideh Bastani; Elham Ghasemi; Reza Negarandeh; Hamid Haghani

2012-01-01

64

Malaysian Counselors’ Self-Efficacy: Implication for Career Counseling  

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Full Text Available The present study was intended to measure Malaysian counselors’ self-efficacy. The finding shows thatMalaysian school counselors have high self-efficacy. Self-efficacy correlated significantly with work experienceas a counselor. The study also shows that counselors with postgraduate education are more effacious than theircounterparts who have an undergraduate degree only. Counselors’ self-efficacy does not differ as a function ofgender and program of study. However, what is important is their experiences and advance education.

Ab Rahim Bakar; Noor Syamilah Zakaria; Shamsiah Mohamed

2011-01-01

65

The Music Education Self Efficacy Scale  

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Full Text Available The aim of this research is to develop a valid and reliable scale which will be able to asses the level of self efficacy about music education of Turkish primary school student teachers. The scale, composed of 23 questions and prepared in 5 point likert scale, was applied to 137 primary school student teachers who were 3rd and 4th grades of Ahi Evran University Education Faculty Department of Primary Education in 2006-2007 academic year. The data was analised by SPSS software programme. After the factor analysis, 4 questions were taken out of the scale. There were 11 positive questions and 8 negative questions at “The Music Education Self Efficacy Scale”. Cronbach Alfa internal integrity of the scale was found to be 0.8410.

?enol AFACAN

2008-01-01

66

Pre-Service English Language Teachers' Perceptions of Computer Self-Efficacy and General Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

|The primary aim of this study is to investigate pre-service English language teachers' perceptions of computer self-efficacy in relation to different variables. Secondarily, the study also explores the relationship between pre-service English language teachers' perceptions of computer self-efficacy and their perceptions of general self-efficacy.…

Topkaya, Ece Zehir

2010-01-01

67

Internet Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Prospective Teachers (Case of F?rat University)  

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Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine if prospective teachers’ perception of internet self-efficacy differ related to gender, faculty, frequency of internet access and accession place variables. Population of the study includes fourth year students enrolled at Education, Science and Humanitarian & Social Sciences Faculties. The sample consists of 661 students. A 25-item five-point Likert type scale was developed and used. Percent, frequency, item test correlation, mean score, independent samples t test, Anova, LSD, KWH and MWU tests were used to analyze the data. Students’ views differed related to gender, faculty, frequency of internet access and accession place variables. Male prospective teachers have higher level of self-efficacy towards internet than females. Education Faculty students’ self-efficacy levels are higher than the other two faculties. The students who connect internet more have higher level of self-efficacy than those who connect less. Those who connect internet at internet cafes have lower level of self-efficacy.

Mehmet Nuri GÖMLEKS?Z; P?nar ERTEN

2013-01-01

68

Effects of Observational Practice and Gender on the Self-efficacy and Learning of Aiming Skill  

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Full Text Available The purposes of the present investigation were to study the effects of observational model and gender on the learning and self-efficacy of dart throwing skill. Forty eight novice girls and boys from PE classes were divided into two observational and physical practice groups, randomly. In acquisition phase and in retention and transfer tests, they practiced 60 trials and 12 trials, respectively. The results of acquisition phase showed that there was significant main effect of gender and the follow-up results demonstrated that the males had more accurate performance and more self-efficacy score than females (p0.05), but the males had more accurate performance than females in retention and transfer phases. In conclusion, observing a model can result in acquiring and learning of a skill as well as the executing a skill because of the role of self-efficacy and observational model is more effective for males than females for learning facilitation.

Mohsen Shafizadeh

2007-01-01

69

Evaluating self-efficacy for managing chronic disease: psychometric properties of the six-item Self-Efficacy Scale in Germany.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: Self-efficacy - the confidence to carry out certain behaviour in order to achieve a specific goal - has increasingly been recognized as an essential prerequisite of effective self-management of chronic diseases. Therefore, valid and reliable measures are needed to evaluate self-efficacy in both research and clinical practice. This study explored the psychometric properties of the German version of the Self-Efficacy for Managing Chronic Disease 6-Item Scale (SES6G). METHODS: We performed standardized translation and cultural adaptation of the SES6G into German. The SES6G was externally validated with the German General Self-Efficacy Scale (SWE). Cronbach's alpha, descriptive statistics and principal component analysis were used to assess psychometric properties of the SES6G. We assessed the effect of the number of co-occurring chronic diseases on SES6G scores using linear regression modelling by controlling for age, gender and education level. RESULTS: We analysed data of 244 primary care patients in Germany. The SES6G showed good convergent construct validity to the SWE (spearman rank correlation 0.578, P < 0.001) and high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.930). Principal component analysis underlined the one-dimensional structure of the instrument. Adjusted for age and gender, increasing numbers of co-occurring chronic diseases were associated with lower SES6G scores (standardized ?-value -0.27, P < 0.001). Education level showed no significant effect. CONCLUSIONS: The SES6G is a reliable and valid instrument to assess patients' self-efficacy for managing chronic diseases. It may enhance further research in German-speaking countries and appears to be a valuable measure for clinical practice.

Freund T; Gensichen J; Goetz K; Szecsenyi J; Mahler C

2013-02-01

70

Relative contributions of self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping in predicting student procrastination.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The relative contributions of self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping student procrastination were explored. College undergraduate participants (N = 138; 40 men, 97 women, one not reporting sex) filled out the Procrastination Scale, the Self-Handicapping Scale-Short Form, and the Self-regulation and Self-handicapping scales of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. A hierarchical regression of the above measures indicated that self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping all predicted scores on the Procrastination Scale, but self-regulation fully accounted for the predictive power of self-efficacy. The results suggested self-regulation and self-handicapping predict procrastination independently. These findings are discussed in relation to the literature on the concept of "self-efficacy for self-regulation" and its use in the field of procrastination research.

Strunk KK; Steele MR

2011-12-01

71

Relative contributions of self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping in predicting student procrastination.  

Science.gov (United States)

The relative contributions of self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping student procrastination were explored. College undergraduate participants (N = 138; 40 men, 97 women, one not reporting sex) filled out the Procrastination Scale, the Self-Handicapping Scale-Short Form, and the Self-regulation and Self-handicapping scales of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. A hierarchical regression of the above measures indicated that self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-handicapping all predicted scores on the Procrastination Scale, but self-regulation fully accounted for the predictive power of self-efficacy. The results suggested self-regulation and self-handicapping predict procrastination independently. These findings are discussed in relation to the literature on the concept of "self-efficacy for self-regulation" and its use in the field of procrastination research. PMID:22420126

Strunk, Kamden K; Steele, Misty R

2011-12-01

72

Correlates of Self-Efficacy for Condom Use Among Male Clients of Female Sex Workers in Tijuana, Mexico.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Male clients of female sex workers (FSWs) in Tijuana, Mexico engage in high levels of unprotected sex. While behavioral change theories posit that self-efficacy predicts condom use, correlates of self-efficacy for condom use remain largely unstudied. We examined these correlates among male clients of FSWs in Tijuana. Eligible male clients were at least 18 years of age, HIV-negative, lived in Tijuana or San Diego, reported unprotected sex with a Tijuana FSW at least once in the past 4 months, and agreed to be treated for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Participants completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire including demographics, substance use, psychosocial and psychosexual characteristics (e.g., outcome expectancies for negotiation of safer sex, social support, and sexual sensation seeking), and sexual behaviors. Participants also underwent HIV/STI testing. A stepwise hierarchical multiple regression analysis identified correlates of self-efficacy for condom use. Of 393 male clients, median age was 37 years. Participants were mostly Spanish-speaking and employed. Factors independently associated with higher self-efficacy for condom use were higher positive outcome expectancies for negotiation of safer sex, lower sexual sensation seeking scores, and higher social support scores. Both psychosocial and psychosexual factors may influence self-efficacy for condom use among male clients of FSWs. These factors represent central constructs in sociocognitive models that explain behavioral change and could be intervention targets for improving self-efficacy for condom use and, ultimately, safer sex behavior.

Volkmann T; Wagner KD; Strathdee SA; Semple SJ; Ompad DC; Chavarin CV; Patterson TL

2013-07-01

73

Transcultural Concepts in Nursing Care  

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Full Text Available Transcultural issues often play a vital role in the delivery of effective nursing care. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

Editorial Office

1996-01-01

74

[Sickness absence may impair self-efficacy].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Self-efficacy (SE) questionnaire data from the DWECS study in 2000 and 2005, age, sex, and transfer of sickness absence compensation data from the DREAM register. Men: sickness absence for more than 12 weeks and one and three absence spells are associated with decline in SE; women: decline in SE is associated with sickness absence for more than 52 weeks and two sickness absence spells. For both sexes SE declines at age 40-50 years. SE declines with length of sickness and sickness absence spells.

Sommer B; Thomsen GF; Labriola M

2013-05-01

75

The development of self-efficacy and self-esteem in pharmacy students based on experiential education  

Science.gov (United States)

This doctoral thesis contributes to the literature on self-efficacy and self-esteem and the relationship to a student's school, age, gender, ethnicity, GPA, paid and introductory pharmacy practice experiences in a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program. Graduates with a high level of self-efficacy and self-esteem are more desirable as pharmacists upon graduation. A quantitative survey, which includes two standardized instruments, the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), was administered to students at five schools of pharmacy in the northeast United States, resulting in a total of 399 responses. The findings confirm the significance of paid experiences and increased levels of a student's self-efficacy in a pharmacy setting. The other finding was related to ethnicity where the Asian/Pacific Islander students showed lower self-efficacy than other ethnic groups, which may be due to a cultural difference in displaying traits of high self-efficacy. Self-esteem also showed a positive finding for students with paid experiences and students who were older. There was an ethnicity finding where Asian/Pacific Islanders scored lower on the self-esteem scale, while the African-Americans scored higher than all the other groups. The results show that students improve their levels of self-efficacy and self-esteem through extended practical experiences. Schools should provide structured experiences of a sufficient length, beyond the present 300 hours, to prepare students for their transition into a professional role. Educators should be aware of the difference in Asian/Pacific Islander culture and encourage students to demonstrate their self-efficacy and self-esteem so other professionals can recognize them for their attributes.

Yorra, Mark L.

76

Exercise adherence, cardiopulmonary fitness and anthropometric changes improve exercise self-efficacy and health-related quality of life.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Regular exercise increases exercise self-efficacy and health-related quality of life (HRQOL); however, the mechanisms are unknown. We examined the associations of exercise adherence and physiological improvements with changes in exercise self-efficacy and HRQOL. METHODS: Middle-aged adults (N = 202) were randomized to 12 months aerobic exercise (360 minutes/week) or control. Weight, waist circumference, percent body fat, cardiopulmonary fitness, HRQOL (SF-36), and exercise self-efficacy were assessed at baseline and 12 months. Adherence was measured in minutes/day from activity logs. RESULTS: Exercise adherence was associated with reduced bodily pain, improved general health and vitality, and reduced role-emotional scores (P(trend) ? 0.05). Increased fitness was associated with improved physical functioning, bodily pain and general health scores (P(trend) ? 0.04). Reduced weight and percent body fat were associated with improved physical functioning, general health, and bodily pain scores (P(trend) < 0.05). Decreased waist circumference was associated with improved bodily pain and general health but with reduced role-emotional scores (P(trend) ? 0.05). High exercise adherence, increased cardiopulmonary fitness and reduced weight, waist circumference and percent body fat were associated with increased exercise self-efficacy (P(trend) < 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Monitoring adherence and tailoring exercise programs to induce changes in cardiopulmonary fitness and body composition may lead to greater improvements in HRQOL and self-efficacy that could promote exercise maintenance.

Imayama I; Alfano CM; Mason CE; Wang C; Xiao L; Duggan C; Campbell KL; Foster-Schubert KE; Wang CY; McTiernan A

2013-07-01

77

Measuring self-efficacy to use vaginal microbicides: the Microbicide Use Self-Efficacy instrument.  

Science.gov (United States)

Objectives To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Microbicide Use Self-Efficacy (MUSE) instrument and to examine correlates of self-efficacy to use vaginal microbicides among a sample of racially and ethnically diverse women living in the north-eastern United States. Methods: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analytic methods were used to explore and determine the dimensionality and psychometric properties of the MUSE instrument. Construct validity was assessed by examining the relationships of the MUSE instrument to key sexual behaviour, partner communication, relationship and psychosocial variables. Results: Two dimensions of self-efficacy to use microbicides were psychometrically validated and identified as 'Adherence and Access' and 'Situational Challenges.' The two four-item subscales measuring Adherence and Access and Situational Challenges had reliability coefficients of 0.78 and 0.85, respectively. Correlates of the two measures were tested at a Bonferroni-adjusted ? level of P=0.001, and 19 of 43 variables analysed were found to significantly relate to Adherence and Access, whereas 16 of 43 variables were significantly related to Situational Challenges. Of the 35 significant relationships, 32 were in the domains of partner communication, partner relationships, and behavioural and psychosocial variables. Conclusions: The MUSE instrument demonstrated strong internal validity, reliability and initial construct validity. The MUSE instrument can be a useful tool in capturing the multidimensional nature of self-efficacy to use microbicides among diverse populations of women. PMID:23806676

Fava, Joseph L; van den Berg, Jacob J; Rosen, Rochelle K; Salomon, Liz; Vargas, Sara; Christensen, Anna L; Pinkston, Megan; Morrow, Kathleen M

2013-08-01

78

Evaluation of Primary School Teachers' Technological Self-Efficacy  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the technological self-efficacy of primary school teachers, and compare their technological efficiencies depending on gender and professional experience variables. The study was quantitative descriptive and survey method was applied to collect data. The data of the study was gathered through personal information questionnaire and “Technology Self-Efficacy Scale”. The results of the research showed that technology self-efficacy beliefs of teacher were in the mid level. In addition, it was found that while technology self-efficacy beliefs of teachers did not differ in gender, but there became a difference depending on their professional experience.

Tuba Gökçek; Gönül Güne?; Ebru Gençtürk

2013-01-01

79

Psychometric properties of the Hurricane Coping Self-Efficacy measure following Hurricane Katrina.  

Science.gov (United States)

The Hurricane Coping Self-Efficacy (HCSE) measure is a validated tool for assessing self-efficacy appraisals after hurricanes. Data were collected 6 months after Hurricane Katrina from 1542 employed residents of New Orleans, and 181 participants randomly selected to complete a repeat survey to confirm the psychometric properties of the HCSE measure. Overall, coping self-efficacy was greater among men, the most educated and those with the highest income. Confirmatory factor analyses indicated a relatively good fit of the HCSE items into a single construct, with Bentler's comparative fit and McDonald's centrality index scores of 0.92 and 0.87, respectively. The repeatability of scores was high (Pearson's correlation = 0.70). Additionally, HCSE scores were highly correlated with validated scales of perceived stress and posttraumatic stress symptoms, and significantly lower scores were observed among participants who sought counseling after the storm. The HCSE measure exhibited excellent internal consistency, external validity and repeatability after Hurricane Katrina. PMID:18626297

Hyre, Amanda D; Benight, Charles C; Tynes, L Lee; Rice, Janet; DeSalvo, Karen B; Muntner, Paul

2008-07-01

80

A novel Medical Achievement Self-efficacy Scale (MASS): a valid and reliable tool.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In search for an instrument to measure overall curriculum impact, we developed a Medical Achievement Self-efficacy Scale (MASS) and presented it to medical students enrolled in the different years of the integrated Ghent curriculum. The research aim was to study the validity and reliability of this new scale. MASS items were constructed based on the end terms of the Ghent curriculum, as it is related to the general competency frameworks of CanMEDs and the Five-star Doctor. The scale includes at least two items for each CanMEDS competency domain. Items were examined by seven experts in view of content and face validity. This resulted in an MASS version, containing 18 items, to be rated on a five-point Likert scale. This version was piloted on 94 undergraduate medical students enrolled at the Catholic University of Leuven. The final version was presented to 1066 undergraduate medical students enrolled at Ghent University. Reliability of the MASS scale was high (?=0.89). As expected, self-efficacy scores increased significantly over the years (F=39.11, p<0.001). In view of determining predictive validity, regression analysis was carried out to predict students' academic achievement from self-efficacy scores. As expected, MASS scores significantly predicted Maastricht Progress Test scores (F=108.18, p<0.001).

Turan S; Valcke M; De Maeseneer J; Aper L; Koole S; De Wispelaere C; Deketelaere A; Derese A

2013-07-01

 
 
 
 
81

Stress and depression in students: the mediating role of stress management self-efficacy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of mental health issues appears to be increasing. Stress that leads to depression may be mediated if people believe that they have the wherewithal to manage it. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the extent to which the relationship between adverse stress and depression is mediated by university students' perceived ability to manage their stress. METHOD: Students were sampled randomly at a Canadian university in 2006 (n = 2,147) and 2008 (n = 2,292). Data about students' stress (1 item), depression (4 items), stress management self-efficacy (4 items), and their demographics were obtained via the online National College Health Assessment survey and analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis and latent variable mediation modeling. RESULTS: Greater stress management self-efficacy was associated with lower depression scores for students whose stress impeded their academic performance, irrespective of their gender and age (total Rdepression = 41%). The relationship between stress and depression was mediated partially by stress management self-efficacy (37% to 55% mediation, depending on the severity of stress). CONCLUSIONS: Identifying students with limited stress management self-efficacy and providing them with appropriate supportive services may help them to manage stress and prevent depression.

Sawatzky RG; Ratner PA; Richardson CG; Washburn C; Sudmant W; Mirwaldt P

2012-01-01

82

Emotional intelligence, self-efficacy, and occupational therapy students' fieldwork performance.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study explored the relationship of emotional intelligence level and self-efficacy to fieldwork performance for occupational therapy students. Occupational therapy students (n = 199) from 36 occupational therapy programs in the United States completed the two surveys, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test and the Student Confidence Questionnaire, during their professional Level 2 fieldwork placements. The surveys were compared to the Fieldwork Performance Evaluation for the Occupational Therapy Student completed by the fieldwork educators. Results showed that degree of emotional intelligence, having a choice in the fieldwork setting, and having professional experience in a related setting were positively correlated to Fieldwork Performance scores. Students' self-efficacy was not related to Fieldwork Performance scores. This suggests fostering students' emotional intelligence and capacity for accurate skill appraisal supports fieldwork success.

Andonian L

2013-07-01

83

Business Student Computer Self-Efficacy: Ten Years Later  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study analyzes computer self-efficacy for two independent samples of students enrolled in an introduction to information systems course in 1996 and 2006. We administered two validated and frequently employed measures of general computer self-efficacy to each group of students and collected demographic and computer-use data. Our findings…

Karsten, Rex; Schmidt, Dennis

2008-01-01

84

Creative Self-Efficacy Development and Creative Performance over Time  

Science.gov (United States)

Building from an established framework of self-efficacy development, this study provides a longitudinal examination of the development of creative self-efficacy in an ongoing work context. Results show that increases in employee creative role identity and perceived creative expectation from supervisors over a 6-month time period were associated…

Tierney, Pamela; Farmer, Steven M.

2011-01-01

85

Pre-service Teachers’ Performance in their University Coursework and Mathematical Self-Efficacy Beliefs: What is the Role of Gender and Year in Program  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of gender and year in program on the performance and mathematical self-efficacy beliefs of 145 pre-service mathematics teachers in Turkey. One of the main purposes of this study investigate how duration in a teacher education program influenced the performance and mathematical selfefficacy beliefs of pre-service teachers. In addition, gender differences between male and female pre-service mathematics teachers, depending upon year in program, are examined. Results revealed that there were significant statistical effects of gender and year in program on both pre-service teachers’ performance and self-efficacy scores. Female pre-service teachers scored significantly higher than males on performance, butsignificant difference was detected between female and male pre-service teachers with respect to mathematics self-efficacy scores. Senior pre-service teachers had the highest scores compared to other students in program on bother performance and mathematics self-efficacy scores. Although the present study is small, results tentatively suggest a further investigation of the relationship between performance and self-efficacy beliefs might be fruitful. Studying how mathematical self-efficacy develops across school years and what factors facilitate its development could yield valuable implications for the field of mathematic education.

Mine Isiksal

2005-01-01

86

An Examination of the Biology Teachers’ Laboratory Self-Efficacy  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study is prepared for two basic aims: first one is to prepare a valid and reliable scale which determines laboratory selfefficacyperceptions of biology teachers and the second is to examine biology teachers’ laboratory self-efficacy perceptions from the personal characteristics points of view. The participants of this study are 126 biology teachers. In this study, to collect the data the Laboratory Self-Efficacy Scale was developed by the researcher. Frequency, arithmetic mean, t-test, factor analysis is used in evaluation of the data. At the end of the study, it was found out that laboratory self-efficacy perceptions of biology teachers are on intermediate level. In addition to this, two statically significant differences were determined between professional experience levels and laboratory self-efficacy perceptions of teachers, and betweenprofessional experience levels and laboratory self-efficacy perceptions of teachers. These differences were in favor of femaleteachers and teachers with less than 10 years experience.

Gülay EK?C?

2009-01-01

87

Impact of Self Efficacy on Motivation and Performance of Employees  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this study is to perform a meta-analysis which analyses the individual research findings which pertainto the relationship between self-efficacy, employee motivation and work related performance of the employee.From the results of the study it is observed that self-efficacy theory can be applied for work related performancein terms of motivating different employee related facets as well as organizational pursuits. In this study theresearcher has attempted to assess the influence of self-efficacy on the performance of individuals at workplaceand the mechanism by which self-efficacy of an individual determines his/her work related performance andmotivation. Thus, it becomes necessary to identify the practical implications of the outcomes related toimproving employee self-efficacy in order to motivate them and improve their performance.

Jacob Cherian; Jolly Jacob

2013-01-01

88

Self-efficacy and adherence as mediating factors between personality traits and health-related quality of life.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: Personality traits are rather stable dispositions in adulthood, while self-efficacy and adherence may be modified through targeted interventions. Health-related quality of life (HRQL) serves as a vital outcome measure. The present aim was to explore the function of self-efficacy and adherence as mediators for the influencing effect of personality traits on HRQL in people with chronic disease. METHODS: An epidemiological sample of 786 persons completed questionnaires on personality, general self-efficacy, adherence behaviour and HRQL. Data were statistically analysed using descriptive statistics, correlation analyses and path models. RESULTS: Self-efficacy mediated the effect of Extraversion and Conscientiousness on mental HRQL. Neuroticism had a direct effect on both physical and mental HRQL. Adherence partially mediated the effect of both Agreeableness and Conscientiousness on mental HRQL. CONCLUSIONS: The mental HRQL in people scoring low on Extraversion or low on Conscientiousness could be improved by strengthening general self-efficacy. Increasing adherence in people scoring low on Agreeableness or Conscientiousness could improve their mental HRQL, but the improvement was small and may be of lesser clinical relevance. These results argue for personalized interventions intended to positively affect health outcomes in people with chronic disease.

Axelsson M; Lötvall J; Cliffordson C; Lundgren J; Brink E

2013-04-01

89

Rasch Analysis Supports the Use of the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ) is used by physiotherapists both clinically and in research. However, current understanding of the PSEQ's measurement properties is incomplete, such that we cannot be confident it provides unbiased information on someone's self-efficacy. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to investigate the scale properties of the PSEQ using Rasch analysis. We also sought to determine whether age, gender, pain severity, pain duration and pain-related disability bias the function of the PSEQ. DESIGN: The study was retrospective, using data obtained from three existing studies. METHODS: Data were combined from over 600 patients with low back pain of varying duration. Rasch analysis was used to evaluate targeting, category ordering, unidimensionality, person-fit, internal consistency and item bias. RESULTS: We provide evidence of adequate category ordering, unidimensionality and internal consistency of the PSEQ. Importantly we found no evidence of item bias. LIMITATIONS: The PSEQ did not adequately target the sample, targeting instead people with lower self-efficacy than this population. Item 7 was hardest for participants to endorse, showing excessive positive misfit to the Rasch model. Response strings of misfitting persons revealed older participants and those reporting high levels of disability. CONCLUSIONS: The individual items of the PSEQ can be validly summed to provide a score of self-efficacy that is robust to age, gender, pain severity, pain duration and disability. While item 7 is the most problematic, it may provide important clinical information and needs further investigation before its exclusion. Although the PSEQ is commonly used with people with low back pain, of whom our sample was representative, our results suggest it targets patients with lower self-efficacy than that observed in our sample.

Di Pietro F; Catley MJ; McAuley JH; Parkitny L; Maher CG; Costa LD; Macedo LG; Williams CM; Moseley GL

2013-09-01

90

Entrepreneurial self-efficacy in a multicultural society: Measures and ethnic differences  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Deficits in self-beliefs lower entrepreneurial activity in the broader South African context. A brief theoretical analysis preceded establishing the psychometric evaluations of the entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) and general selfefficacy (GSE) measures. Participants representing different major ethnic groups in SA were sampled. Results indicate that the GSE scale remains a single factor solution thereby confirming the unidimensionality and reliability of this measure. The different ESE sub-domains provide a far more fine-grained approach to understanding self-efficacy. ANOVA determined significant differences in self-efficacy scores between the different groups. Apart from introducing the ESE construct to the SA literature, it is the first time that a study has united the general and specific measures of self-efficacy as well as measuring both the magnitude and strength dimensions of self-efficacy beliefs. Opsomming Tekortkominge in selfgeloofwaardigheid doen afbreuk aan entrepreneuriese aktiwiteite in die breër Suid Afrikaanse konteks. ’n Samevattende teoretiese analise het die vasstelling van strukturele ekwivalensie van die entrepreneuriese ESE en GSE skale voorafgegaan. ’n Steekproef van MBA respondente, verteenwoordigend van die hoof etniese groepe binne SA, is vir die studie gebruik. Bevindinge dui daarop dat die GSE skaal ’n enkel faktor oplossing is bevestigend van die enkel dimensionaliteit en betroubaarheid van hierdie maatstaf. ANOVA dui daarop dat merkbare verskille bestaan tussen die ESE tellings van die verskillende groeperinge. Benewens die bekendstelling van die ESE konsep, aan die SA literatuur, verenig hierdie studie vir die eerste keer die breë en spesifieke maatstawwe van selfgeloofwaardigheid, en meet dit ook die grote en sterkte van hierdie verandelikes.

Boris Urban

2006-01-01

91

Measuring a change in self-efficacy following pulmonary rehabilitation: an evaluation of the PRAISE tool.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Self-efficacy explores the emotional functioning and coping skills of an individual and is thought to be a strong predictor of health behaviors, which is particularly important for pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). However, to our knowledge, there is no measure of self-efficacy developed to explore behavior change in the context of PR. METHODS: We investigated the reproducibility and sensitivity of Pulmonary Rehabilitation Adapted Index of Self-Efficacy (PRAISE): a tool adapted from the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) to measure the dimension of self-efficacy at the time of a course of PR. Twenty-nine clinically stable patients with COPD completed PRAISE on their initial assessment to PR. The tool was then completed 7 days later. An additional 225 patients completed PRAISE prior to, and on completion of a 7-week course of PR. In addition, exercise capacity was measured by the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT), with the Medical Research Council (MRC) dyspnea scale, Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire-Self Reported (CRQ-SR), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) also being collected. This process was repeated postrehabilitation. Data were then analyzed to investigate the possibility that PRAISE could be an indicator of PR response. RESULTS: In the reproducibility study, the mean change in score was 0.72 (95% CI, -2.27-0.82), examined with intraclass correlation coefficients, r = 0.99; indicating PRAISE test-retest reproducibility. The mean change of score in the sensitivity study pre- to post-PR was 3.59 (95% CI, 2.24-4.73; P = .015). Change in the ISWT was 83.44 m (95% CI, 54.0-112.8; P < .0001). There were several statistically significant differences between variables, particularly with the mastery and emotion elements of the CRQ-SR at baseline, but this was lost post-PR. This observation was also found with HADS. No significant differences were found between MRC dypsnea scale grades with the change in PRAISE score. PRAISE could not predict a successful outcome of PR. CONCLUSIONS: The PRAISE tool is a reliable and sensitive measure of self-efficacy for patients with COPD attending PR.

Vincent E; Sewell L; Wagg K; Deacon S; Williams J; Singh S

2011-12-01

92

Relationship among metabolic control, oral parameters and self-efficacy in diabetic patients.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

UNLABELLED: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between patients' answers to behavioral questionnaires on diabetes and oral health, oral parameters and metabolic control of diabetes. A cross-sectional study was conducted on fifty type 2 diabetic subjects selected according to specific criteria, mainly: diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus occurred at least 6 months before the study, presence of > or = 5 natural teeth and having at least two recent glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c measurements. Three questionnaires were administered to the patients after a preliminary testing phase. The questionnaires were: Multidimensional Diabetes Questionnaire (MDQ), organized in three sections; Stress Evaluation Questionnaire for Diabetics, a single questionnaire; and Dental Self-efficacy, organized in three sections. Clinical parameters were O'Leary Plaque Index, and percentage of bleeding on probing. Diabetic metabolic control was calculated using HbA1c measurements. Reliability of questionnaires was analyzed using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Relationship among variables was tested by Pearson Correlation analysis. A p-value <0.05 was significant. RESULTS: The mean age of the study sample was 52.2 years; 38 individuals were women (77%), and 12 were men (23%). The majority had only completed elementary education (55%). Mean plaque index score was 53.51% (SD 21.6), mean bleeding on probing was 36.33% (SD 23.65). Mean HbA1c value was 9.22% (SD 2.6). Dental self-efficacy for using dental floss and visiting a dentist was low, but it was high for tooth brushing. There was a significant correlation between the MDQ and HbA1c Percentage of bleeding on probing had a correlation with self-efficacy for dental visits. The MDQ section I had a correlation with O'Leary Plaque Index, sections II and III had a correlation with self-efficacy for tooth brushing, section III had a correlation with self-efficacy for visiting a dentist. In conclusion, self-efficacy questionnaires for tooth brushing and visiting a dentist had a significant correlation with self-efficacy for diabetes control.

Serrano C; Pardo G; Barrera LA; Gamboa L; Másmela A; Zorro S

2011-01-01

93

Iranian Students' Self Efficacy and Their Language Achievements  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Many studies have examined the function of self efficacy in academic achievement, though as Pajares (2000) mentioned the relation of language achievement and self efficacy has not been studied well and there has been small research in this regard. This made the researcher to investigate the relationship between Iranian students' language achievements and their self efficacy. It also studied the variations of Iranian students' self efficacy and their majors. Besides, it explores the differences between students' majors and their language achievements. 112 students from Islamic Azad University Babol Branch, Islamic Azad University Ghaemshahr Branch, and Babol University of Medical sciences were chosen for the sample of present study. In order to measure students' language proficiency, Michigan Test of English Language Proficiency (MTELP) was administered. The self-efficacy questionnaire which was an adaptation of Bandura's questionnaire included 40 items with subsequent 5-point Likert-scale response choices. The result of study shows a positive relation between self efficacy and Iranian students' language proficiency. This study also found that students' major will have an effect on both language proficiency and self efficacy

Atefeh Nasrollahi; Hamed Barjasteh

2013-01-01

94

Role of Self Efficacy Predictors in Nutritional Behaviors of Kerman High School Female Students in 2006-2007 Academic Year  

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Full Text Available Introduction: Enhancing the nutritional condition of teenaged girls can be the most effective and fundamental preventive measure against chronic disease in years ahead. Knowing the predictive factors of behaviors is one the most efficient way of preventive programs in societies, especially in the developing countries. This study was conducted to determine the role of selfefficacy in predicting the dietary behaviors of Kerman high school girls in 2006-2007. Methods: In this correlation study, girl students in Kerman high schools were selected as research population. Based on pilot study, sample size was estimated to be 800 students. Taking into consideration sample drop out, 900 questionnaires were distributed, and 812 were finally analyzed. Data were gathered using research– made questionnaire comprising of 5 parts including general & demographic questions, dietary behaviors, dietary selfefficacy, physical activity and exercise selfefficacy. Data were collected and analyzed following validity and reliability determination. Results: Results indicated that most students (57/4%) were 16 years of age or younger, and the obtained total scores in the dietary behavior and related self- efficacy was 66% and 61%, respectively. The results of the multiple regression model showed that besides dietary selfefficacy, factors including level of fathers education, assessment of the family status in comparison with others from the student’s point of view, importance of safe and healthy food consumption, right of choosing desired foods, number of meals served with family, and mother’s occupation were among the predictive factors of dietary behavior. Conclusion: The results have confirmed the role of selfefficacy concepts, according to Pender’s model as a health promoting behavior. Therefore, increased selfefficacy methods such adverbial stimulation and good model offer can be used as one of the health behaviors promotion factors

M Hosein-Nejad; M Aziz- zadeh-Forozi; S Mohammad-Alizadhe; AA Haghdoost

2008-01-01

95

Influence of self-efficacy on compliance to workplace exercise.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Continuous neck and shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal complaint. Physical exercise can reduce pain symptoms, but compliance to exercise is a challenge. Exercise-specific self-efficacy has been found to be a predictor of participation in preplanned exercise. Little is known about the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to workplace physical exercise. PURPOSE: To determine the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to specific strength exercises during working hours for laboratory technicians. METHODS: We performed a cluster-randomized controlled trial, including laboratory technicians from two industrial production units in Copenhagen, Denmark. The participants were randomized to supervised specific strength exercises for the neck and shoulder muscles for 20 minutes three times a week (n?=?282) or to a reference group (n?=?255). The participants answered baseline and follow-up questions regarding self-efficacy and registered all exercises in a diary. RESULTS: Overall compliance to exercises was 45 %. Compliance in company A (private sector) differed significantly between the three self-efficacy groups after 20 weeks. The odds ratio of compliance was 2.37 for moderate versus low self-efficacy, and 2.93 for high versus low self-efficacy. No significant difference was found in company B (public sector) or in the intervention group as a whole. CONCLUSION: We did not find self-efficacy to be a general statistically significant predictor of compliance to exercises during 20 weeks, but found self-efficacy to be a predictor of compliance in a private sector setting. Workplace-specific differences might be present and should be taken into account.

Pedersen MM; Zebis MK; Langberg H; Poulsen OM; Mortensen OS; Jensen JN; Sjøgaard G; Bredahl T; Andersen LL

2013-09-01

96

Influence of Self-Efficacy on Compliance to Workplace Exercise  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

BACKGROUND: Continuous neck and shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal complaint. Physical exercise can reduce pain symptoms, but compliance to exercise is a challenge. Exercise-specific self-efficacy has been found to be a predictor of participation in preplanned exercise. Little is known about the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to workplace physical exercise. PURPOSE: To determine the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to specific strength exercises during working hours for laboratory technicians. METHODS: We performed a cluster-randomized controlled trial, including laboratory technicians from two industrial production units in Copenhagen, Denmark. The participants were randomized to supervised specific strength exercises for the neck and shoulder muscles for 20 minutes three times a week (n?=?282) or to a reference group (n?=?255). The participants answered baseline and follow-up questions regarding self-efficacy and registered all exercises in a diary. RESULTS: Overall compliance to exercises was 45 %. Compliance in company A (private sector) differed significantly between the three self-efficacy groups after 20 weeks. The odds ratio of compliance was 2.37 for moderate versus low self-efficacy, and 2.93 for high versus low self-efficacy. No significant difference was found in company B (public sector) or in the intervention group as a whole. CONCLUSION: We did not find self-efficacy to be a general statistically significant predictor of compliance to exercises during 20 weeks, but found self-efficacy to be a predictor of compliance in a private sector setting. Workplace-specific differences might be present and should be taken into account.

Pedersen, Mette Merete; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt

2012-01-01

97

Primary teachers’ and primary pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs and attitudes toward teaching profession  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to compare the primary teachers and pre-service primary teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs and attitudes toward teaching profession in Turkey. Descriptive method was used in the study and the study was carried out on 180 first grade and 107 fourth grade primary pre-service teachers at the Faculty of Education in Rize University and 131 primary teachers working in the primary schools located in Çayeli (Rize) district. The Attitude Scale towards Teaching Profession (Özgür, 1994) and the Turkish form of the Ohio State Teacher Efficacy Scale (Balo?lu and Karada?, 2008) were used as data gathering instrument in the study. The study results revealed that the first grade primary pre-service teachers’ scores on the attitudes towards teaching professions were statistically higher than the scores of the fourth grade primary pre-service teachers and of the primary teachers. However, the study results indicated that the teaching self-efficacy scores of the first grade pre-service teachers were statistically lower than the teaching self-efficacy scores of the fourth grade pre-service teachers and primary teachers. On the other hand, the study results showed that females’ attitudes towards teaching profession were higher than the attitudes of their male counterparts whereas self-efficacy scores did not differentiate due to the gender of the primary pre-service teachers and primary teachers. Moreover, the study results indicated that there were not any significant correlation between the self-efficacy and attitudes scores of the pre-service teachers and primary teachers.

Cemalettin ?pek; Fatih Camadan

2012-01-01

98

Relationship between knowledge, attitude, behavior, and self-efficacy on the radiation safety management of radiation workers in medical institutions  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Radiation safety managements in medical institutions are needed to protect certain radiation damages as a part of National Coalition. This study investigates the characteristics of self-efficacy that become the major factor on the knowledge, attitude, and behavior on the radiation safety management of radiation workers as an approach of educational aspects and analyzes the relationship between such factors to provide basic materials for improving the activity level of radiation safety managements. In order to implement the goal of this study, a survey was performed for 1,200 workers who were engaged in radiation treatments in medical centers, such as general hospital, university hospital, private hospital, and public health center for 42 days from July 23, 2006. Then, the results of the analysis can be summarized as follows: 1. Average scores on knowledge, attitude, and behavior in the radiation safety management were presented as 75.76±11.20, 90.55±8.59, 80.58±11.70, respectively. Also, the average score of self-efficacy was recorded as 73.55±9.82. 2. Knowledge levels in the radiation safety management showed significant differences according to the sex, age, marriage, education, and experience. Also, males of married, older, highly educated, and largely experienced represented high knowledge levels. Attitude levels in the radiation safety management showed certain significant differences according to the type of medical centers in which private hospitals showed a relatively low level compared to that of high levels in university hospitals. Behavior levels in the radiation safety management also represented significant differences according to the age, marriage, education, experience, and types of medical centers. Factors in married, general hospital, older, highly educated, and largely experienced showed high behavior levels. In addition, the self-efficacy showed certain differences according to the marriage and types of medical centers. Factors in married and general hospital demonstrated high self-efficacy levels. 3. Relationship between knowledge, attitude, behavior, and self-efficacy on the radiation safety management showed statistical differences according to the relationship between the knowledge and the attitude, the knowledge and the behavior, the attitude and the behavior, the attitude and the self-efficacy, and the behavior and the self-efficacy. The relationship between the behavior and the self-efficacy was represented as ? = 0.482, which was the strongest relationship in such factors. Also, the knowledge and self-efficacy didn't show certain relationships.

2007-01-01

99

Relationship between knowledge, attitude, behavior, and self-efficacy on the radiation safety management of radiation workers in medical institutions  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Radiation safety managements in medical institutions are needed to protect certain radiation damages as a part of National Coalition. This study investigates the characteristics of self-efficacy that become the major factor on the knowledge, attitude, and behavior on the radiation safety management of radiation workers as an approach of educational aspects and analyzes the relationship between such factors to provide basic materials for improving the activity level of radiation safety managements. In order to implement the goal of this study, a survey was performed for 1,200 workers who were engaged in radiation treatments in medical centers, such as general hospital, university hospital, private hospital, and public health center for 42 days from July 23, 2006. Then, the results of the analysis can be summarized as follows: 1. Average scores on knowledge, attitude, and behavior in the radiation safety management were presented as 75.76{+-}11.20, 90.55{+-}8.59, 80.58{+-}11.70, respectively. Also, the average score of self-efficacy was recorded as 73.55{+-}9.82. 2. Knowledge levels in the radiation safety management showed significant differences according to the sex, age, marriage, education, and experience. Also, males of married, older, highly educated, and largely experienced represented high knowledge levels. Attitude levels in the radiation safety management showed certain significant differences according to the type of medical centers in which private hospitals showed a relatively low level compared to that of high levels in university hospitals. Behavior levels in the radiation safety management also represented significant differences according to the age, marriage, education, experience, and types of medical centers. Factors in married, general hospital, older, highly educated, and largely experienced showed high behavior levels. In addition, the self-efficacy showed certain differences according to the marriage and types of medical centers. Factors in married and general hospital demonstrated high self-efficacy levels. 3. Relationship between knowledge, attitude, behavior, and self-efficacy on the radiation safety management showed statistical differences according to the relationship between the knowledge and the attitude, the knowledge and the behavior, the attitude and the behavior, the attitude and the self-efficacy, and the behavior and the self-efficacy. The relationship between the behavior and the self-efficacy was represented as {gamma} = 0.482, which was the strongest relationship in such factors. Also, the knowledge and self-efficacy didn't show certain relationships.

Han, Eun Ok [Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

2007-06-15

100

Effects of single sex lab groups on physics self-efficacy, behavior, and academic performance  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between the gender composition of a laboratory group and student behaviors, self-efficacy, and quiz performance, within the college physics laboratory. A student population was chosen and subdivided into two groups, which were assigned either same-sex or coed laboratory teams while executing identical laboratory activities and instruction. Assessments were carried out prior to instruction, during the course, and at the end of one semester worth of instruction and laboratory activities. Students were assessed in three areas: behaviors exhibited during laboratory activities, self-efficacy, and scores on laboratory quizzes. Analyses considered the differences in outcomes after a single semester of physics laboratories that differed only in team gender organization. The results indicated that there were no statistically significant differences in behavior variable, self-efficacy or laboratory quiz scores between same sex teams and coed teams. There were also no statistically significant differences between genders, and no interaction effect present. In a post-hoc analysis of the individual behaviors data, it was noted that there is present a practical difference in the individual behaviors exhibited by males and females. This difference implies a difference in how males and females successfully engage in the laboratory activities.

Hunt, Gary L.

 
 
 
 
101

Increasing self-efficacy through empowerment: preoperative education for orthopaedic patients.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: To examine whether patients who received an empowerment model of education for preoperative orthopaedic teaching had improved outcomes compared to patients who received the traditional education. DESIGN: An experimental (empowerment teaching method) group vs. comparison (traditional teaching method) group posttest design. SAMPLE: Seventy-four patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery. METHODS: Following the preoperative teaching session, patients in both groups completed a questionnaire designed to measure their perceptions of the teaching (empowerment) and self-efficacy (belief in their ability to carry out perioperative tasks). A chart audit and phone interview was done after discharge to assess length of stay, pain management, complications, and patient perceptions of the ability to complete perioperative tasks. FINDINGS: Patients in the empowerment group felt the educational approach was more empowering and had significantly higher self-efficacy scores than those in the traditional teaching group. There was much less variation in empowerment and self-efficacy scores in the empowerment group. The empowerment group reported feeling greater confidence in performing perioperative tasks. There were no differences in length of stay, complications or pain control. CONCLUSION: Use of an empowerment teaching approach enabled patients to become more confident in their ability to carry out perioperative tasks and become a more integral part of the preoperative teaching process. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING RESEARCH: The theoretical model will be used to structure other educational programs and guide research. More sensitive measures of complications and pain control should be considered for future studies.

Pellino T; Tluczek A; Collins M; Trimborn S; Norwick H; Engelke ZK; Broad J

1998-07-01

102

Psychometric evaluation of the surrogate decision making self-efficacy scale.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Currently, no instrument exists to assess self-efficacy for surrogate decision making. This study assessed the psychometric properties of the Surrogate Decision Making Self-Efficacy Scale (SDM-SES). Interview data from surrogate decision makers (SDMs) were used to generate the items. Items were assessed for face validity by expert gerontological nurses. Responses from a sample of 155 SDMs for nursing home residents with dementia were analyzed to assess the psychometric properties of the scale scores. Internal consistency was calculated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and construct validity was evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient suggested high internal consistency, and results of the confirmatory factor analysis supported the construct validity of the instrument. The SDM-SES may be useful as an assessment instrument, as well as an outcome measure for interventions aimed at increasing the capacity of SDMs. Future validations are suggested to optimize its utility.

Lopez RP; Guarino AJ

2013-01-01

103

[The sense of self-efficacy in maintaining health promoting behaviors in older adults].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This descriptive study used a qualitative approach and was developed with older adults who were members of a recreational center in Porto Alegre (Brazil). The objective was to understand the influence of the sense of self-efficacy on maintaining health-promoting behaviors among the participants. Interviews were performed with eleven older adults who obtained scores on the WHOQOL-brief questionnaire with standard deviation equal or above the group mean (> or = 85.18). Content analysis of the interviews revealed four categories: positive personal attitudes and attributes; expectation to enjoy a higher quality of life; expectation to live longer; and other aspects that make behavior maintenance easier. The study found evidence that these individuals sustain health-promoting behaviors similar to what is recommended by health professionals and organizations. It appears that they maintain those behaviors due to their positive sense of self-efficacy.

da Silva MC; Lautert L

2010-03-01

104

Using Self-Efficacy to Assess the Readiness of Nursing Educators and Students for Mobile Learning  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the self-efficacy of nursing faculty and students related to their potential use of mobile technology and to ask what implications this technology has for their teaching and learning in practice education contexts. We used a cross-sectional survey design involving students and faculty in two nursing education programs in a western Canadian college. In January, 2011, 121 faculty members and students completed the survey. Results showed a high level of ownership and use of mobile devices among our respondents. The median mobile self-efficacy score was 75 on a scale of 100, indicating that both faculty and students were highly confident in their use of mobile technologies and prepared to engage in mobile learning.

Richard F. Kenny Caroline L. Park; Jocelyne M. C. Van Neste-Kenny; Pamela Burton; Caroline L. Park; Adnan Qayyum

2012-01-01

105

Self-efficacy, self-care behavior, anxiety, and depression in Taiwanese with type 2 diabetes: A cross-sectional survey.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The relationships between self-efficacy, self-care behavior, anxiety, and depression for Taiwanese individuals with type 2 diabetes were determined in this study. Depression and anxiety are common symptoms that can contribute toward adverse medical outcomes. A descriptive, cross-sectional, correlational design was used. The sample comprised 201 patients with type 2 diabetes from diabetes outpatient clinics at three teaching hospitals in Taiwan. The results of this study revealed that people with diabetes who had received diabetes health education, regularly made clinical visits, underwent treatment, and did not smoke demonstrated a high self-efficacy score (P?Self-efficacy among people with diabetes positively correlated with illness duration (P?Self-efficacy among people with diabetes negatively correlated with anxiety and depression (P?Self-efficacy can be a predictor of anxiety and depression (P?self-efficacy levels might reduce anxiety and depression. Self-efficacy-enhancing programs should be held regularly in clinical practices. Conducting psychological research on diabetes drives policy and healthcare system change.

Wu SF; Huang YC; Lee MC; Wang TJ; Tung HH; Wu MP

2013-01-01

106

Assessment of self-efficacy levels of Toros University students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the self-efficacy levels of Toros University students according to some demographic characteristics between 2012-2013 academic year. The sample group includes 325 students studying in different departments in Toros University. Besides the questionnaire that contains demographic information, the self-efficacy scale was used in order to gather the data. The scale was developed Y?ld?r?m and ?lhan (2010). One way ANOVA for more than two groups and t test analysis were used. The results showed that there was not any significant difference for self-efficacy levels of students according to their gender, age and families’ income level (p>0.05). As a result it could be said that self-efficacy levels of students did not differ according to the demographic variables which were examined in this research.

Erol Türedi; Mehmet Miman; ?hsan Sar?; Zafer Bekiro?ullar?

2013-01-01

107

Measures of parents' self-efficacy and perceived barriers to children's sun protection: construct validity and reliability in melanoma survivors.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Valid and reliable psychosocial measures for parents are lacking in the children's sun protection literature. We examined the construct validity and reliability of measures of parents' self-efficacy and perceived barriers specific to four sun protection behaviors in children: sunscreen, clothing, shade and limiting time outdoors. Melanoma survivors (N = 205) with children aged 12 years and younger completed an interview. Confirmatory factor analyses supported a four-factor structure of self-efficacy in which each factor was specific to one of the sun protection behaviors. This structure, consistent with Bandura's conceptualization, suggests using behavior-specific scores. A bifactor model best fit the perceived barriers data. Each item loaded on both a general barriers factor and one of four behavior-specific factors. Based on the magnitude of general factor loadings relative to behavior-specific factor loadings, use of subscale scores or a total score is recommended. Correlations between self-efficacy measures (0.30-0.46) and between perceived barriers measures (0.22-0.42) suggested convergent validity. Correlations between self-efficacy and perceived barriers were strongest within behavior (-0.34 to -0.63), suggesting discriminant validity. Almost all measures were most strongly associated with corresponding behaviors, supporting construct validity. Reliabilities ranged from 0.72 to 0.90. Measures are valid and reliable for use in children's sun protection studies.

Tripp MK; Diamond PM; Vernon SW; Swank PR; Dolan Mullen P; Gritz ER

2013-10-01

108

Measures of parents' self-efficacy and perceived barriers to children's sun protection: construct validity and reliability in melanoma survivors.  

Science.gov (United States)

Valid and reliable psychosocial measures for parents are lacking in the children's sun protection literature. We examined the construct validity and reliability of measures of parents' self-efficacy and perceived barriers specific to four sun protection behaviors in children: sunscreen, clothing, shade and limiting time outdoors. Melanoma survivors (N = 205) with children aged 12 years and younger completed an interview. Confirmatory factor analyses supported a four-factor structure of self-efficacy in which each factor was specific to one of the sun protection behaviors. This structure, consistent with Bandura's conceptualization, suggests using behavior-specific scores. A bifactor model best fit the perceived barriers data. Each item loaded on both a general barriers factor and one of four behavior-specific factors. Based on the magnitude of general factor loadings relative to behavior-specific factor loadings, use of subscale scores or a total score is recommended. Correlations between self-efficacy measures (0.30-0.46) and between perceived barriers measures (0.22-0.42) suggested convergent validity. Correlations between self-efficacy and perceived barriers were strongest within behavior (-0.34 to -0.63), suggesting discriminant validity. Almost all measures were most strongly associated with corresponding behaviors, supporting construct validity. Reliabilities ranged from 0.72 to 0.90. Measures are valid and reliable for use in children's sun protection studies. PMID:23204537

Tripp, Mary K; Diamond, Pamela M; Vernon, Sally W; Swank, Paul R; Dolan Mullen, Patricia; Gritz, Ellen R

2012-11-30

109

Self-efficacy, medication adherence, and quality of life among people living with HIV in Hunan Province of China: a questionnaire survey.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Self-efficacy is associated with health behavior and medication adherence in persons living with HIV infection (PLWH). This paper describes self-efficacy, medication adherence, and quality of life (QOL), and it examines the relationships among these variables in PLWH in China. A cross-sectional survey of 199 patients was completed using the HIV Self-Efficacy Questionnaire and the QOL for Chinese HIV-Infected Questionnaire. Medication adherence was measured through direct questioning of pill-taking behavior. Results showed that self-efficacy for disease management was moderate, with a mean score of 6.61. Of the 199 patients, 157 (78.9%) reported that medication adherence was higher than 90%. The scores for dimensions of QOL ranged from 33.1 to 81.4, with six dimensions lower than 60. Stepwise regression analyses showed that self-efficacy, medication adherence, and drug use were significant predictors of QOL. These results suggest a need for intervention programs to improve self-efficacy and quality of life in Chinese PLWH.

Huang L; Li L; Zhang Y; Li H; Li X; Wang H

2013-03-01

110

Anxiety, Self Efficacy Expectation and Social Support in Patients after Coronary Angioplasty and Coronary Bypass  

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Full Text Available "nBackground: Coronary artery bypass grafting surgery (CABG) and precutaneous transluminal coronary intervention (PCI) are safe and effective in the treatment of coronary artery disease. The aim of this study was to determine and compare anxi­ety, self efficacy expectation and perceived social support between CABG patients and PCI patients referral to receiving car­diac rehabilitation programs."nMethods: In this descriptive- analytical study 150 patients with CABG and PCI were selected. The Spilberger state trait anxi­ety inventory, general self efficacy scale and perceived social support scale three instruments for collecting data in the pre­sent study."nResults: PCI patients as compared to CABG patients experience higher anxiety (P= 0.02) and lower perceived social sup­port (P= 0.02). Self efficacy score in the PCI patients was higher than CABG patients (P= 0.01)."nConclusion: It is necessary to be more considerate to psychological problems in the PCI patients.

T Dehdari; A Heidarnia; A Ramezankhani; S Sadeghian; F Ghofranipour

2008-01-01

111

Danish version of 'The COPD self-efficacy scale' : translation and psychometric properties  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Scand J Caring Sci; 2012; 26; 615-623 Danish version of 'The COPD self-efficacy scale': translation and psychometric properties The aim of the study was to translate 'The COPD self-efficacy scale' (CSES) into Danish and to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Danish version (CSES-DK). CSES enables assessment of self-efficacy in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The scale consists of 34 items, describing situations which may cause dyspnoea in patients with COPD. The CSES was translated into Danish using a standard forward-backward translation procedure. To estimate the reliability, measurements of internal consistency and repeatability were applied. The validity of the Danish version was evaluated by examining the associations between the CSES-DK score and socio-demographic variables (age, gender, education, disease severity and self-rated health). Factor analysis was conducted to compare the internal structure of the Danish version and the American source version. The studyincluded 151 patients with COPD, recruited from three outpatient clinics. Estimates of reliability were in accordance with the original version of CSES (Cronbach's a = 0.97, test-retest r = 0.82, p

Emme, Christina; Mortensen, Erik L

2012-01-01

112

Malay Secondary School Students’ Entrepreneurial Attitude Orientation and Entrepreneurial Self-efficacy: A Descriptive Study  

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Full Text Available As the influential factors affecting intention to become an entrepreneur, entrepreneurial attitude orientation and self-efficacy of students have been one of the main focuses of entrepreneurship research. However, there is not enough information on secondary school students’ attitude toward and efficacy of entrepreneurship particularly, in Malaysia. Through a descriptive approach, this study aimed to determine entrepreneurial attitude and entrepreneurial self-efficacy in order to evaluate the entrepreneurship inclination and potential among Malaysian secondary school students. A sample of 2,574 students was randomly selected from three states around Malaysia as the participants of this study. A set of questionnaire was developed based on previous researches to measure students’ entrepreneurial attitude and self-efficacy. The findings indicate that Malay students have a moderately high attitude toward entrepreneurship. More specifically, the students scored high in self-esteem cognition and achievement cognition but low in self-esteem behavior and self-esteem affect. Moreover, the students perceived themselves as moderately capable of establishing new ventures. The implication of the findings and areas for future researches are discussed.

Z.A. Lope Pihie; A. Bagheri

2011-01-01

113

Effect of guided relaxation and imagery on falls self-efficacy: a randomized controlled trial.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of guided relaxation and imagery (GRI) on improvement in falls self-efficacy in older adults who report having a fear of falling. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled trial with allocation to GRI or guided relaxation with music of choice. SETTING: General community. PARTICIPANTS: Ninety-one men and women aged 60 to 92. INTERVENTION: Participants were randomized to listen to a GRI audio compact disk (intervention group) or a guided relaxation audio compact disk and music of choice (control group) twice a week for 6 weeks for 10 minutes per session. MEASUREMENTS: Primary outcome measure was the Short Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I). Secondary outcome measures were the Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (LTEQ) and the Timed Up and Go (TUG) mobility test. RESULTS: GRI participants reported greater improvements on the Short FES-I (P = .002) and LTEQ (P = .001) scores and shorter time on the TUG (P = .002) than the guided relaxation and music-of-choice group. CONCLUSION: GRI was more effective at increasing falls self-efficacy and self-reported leisure time exercise and reducing times on a simple mobility test than was guided relaxation with music of choice. GRI is an effective, simple, low-cost tool for older adults to improve falls self-efficacy and leisure time exercise behaviors.

Kim BH; Newton RA; Sachs ML; Glutting JJ; Glanz K

2012-06-01

114

Reliability and validity of a Self-Efficacy Scale for AIDS Prevention among Turkish university students.  

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Full Text Available This study design determined the internal consistency, validity and factorial structure of the Turkish Self-Efficacy scale for AIDS (T-SEA-27). The 27 items scale firstly was translated into Turkish using back-translation method and the cultural equivalence was provided by expert views. Secondly, the psychometric properties of the scale were evaluated on 507 university students. The test-retest reliability of the intraclass correlations was satisfactory in a subsample of 60 students tested after a 2-week interval. Psychometric analysis supported the reliability and validity of the T-SEA-27 scale and four subscales: refusing sexual intercourse (a= .97), questioning potential partners (a= .90), condom use (a= .74) and family related (a= .95). The self-efficacy score was significantly higher for those studying in health sciences, those who were not sexually active and the female students. Our outcomes showed that T-SEA-27 is a valid instrument in evaluating self-efficacy for HIV/AIDS in Turkish young people.

Serap Bulduk; Semra Erdo?an

2008-01-01

115

Reliability and Validity of the Sexual Self-Efficacy Scale-Erectile Functioning  

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Full Text Available Objectives:The purpose of the present study was to examine the reliability and validity of the Sexual Self-Efficacy Scale-Erectile Functioning (SSES-E) among university students. Method: 115 married male students of Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran, were selected voluntarily, and completed the SSES-E. Results: The alpha chronbakh coefficient was calculated as ?= 0.95 and for the five factors extracted, it was 0.82 to 0.91. Also, exploratory factor analysis using varimax rotation and with eagenvalues more than one, extracted five factors (having intercourse without fear or anxiety, keeping an erection during the intercourse, get a sexual encounter, reach to orgasm, and re-sexual desire) which explained 74.04% of the items variances. There was significant correlation between total score and five extracted factors. Furthermore, there was high sexual self-efficacy among 20 males and low sexual self-efficacy among 17 males. Conclusion: The clinical psychologists and family councelors can use and benefit the  SSES-E to identify the male clients with erectile difficulties for training and treatment activities in clinical and counceling settings.

Gholamreza Rajabi; Nasir Dastan; Masoud Shahbazi

2012-01-01

116

Impact of Journaling on Students’ Self-Efficacy and Locus of Control  

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Full Text Available While considerable research has examined the academic and cognitive value of journaling, little has examined the psychological impact of journaling on the personal development of college students. Research on cognitive-behavioral therapy indicates that journaling can have a positive impact on individuals’ self-growth and intrapersonal characteristics. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of classroom-based journaling on students’ self-efficacy and locus of control. Students in two undergraduate courses were required to complete weekly journal assignments; one class received targeted information on cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and one class did not. Students completed pre-, mid-, and post-course assessments on self-efficacy, locus of control, and learning. Results revealed that self-efficacy scores for both groups significantly improved after the early journaling assignments; however, there were no differences between those who received direct CBT instruction and those who did not. These findings indicate that journaling may have important psychological benefits above and beyond its expected academic and cognitive outcomes.

Krista K. Fritson

2008-01-01

117

Human and Social Capital Development for Self Efficacy of University Graduates: Bases for Development of Society  

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Full Text Available The study investigated perceptions of students and employers about the development of human and social capital in terms of intellectual development skills, personal development skills, professional development skills, and social development skills for self efficacy of university graduates. How students and employers were viewing the development of human and social capital for self efficacy of university graduates; which areas of development skills were relatively stronger; and which sectors of industry or discipline of study were more satisfied or worried about were the questions answered in the study. Students of 4 public and 4 private universities and managers of 65 companies from 12 sectors of industry listed with Lahore Stock Exchange constituted the sample. Data were collected through an adopted, 30-item survey scale which was found reliable at 0.930 Cronbach's alpha. Mean scores and correlations were calculated for the four sub-scales. One-Sample t-test, Independent samples t-test, and one-way ANOA were employed for significance and variance analysis. The study concluded that students and employers were not fully satisfied with the development of human and social capital for self efficacy of university graduates. Intellectual development skills got the highest position whereas personal development skills were found at the lowest position. Professional and social development skills were found in the middle. This situation reflects performance of universities below standards and speaks of under utilization of their potential for contributing to the development of society. Serious initiative for the development of human and social capital for self efficacy of university graduates was the major recommendation.

Shoukat Ali Raza; Shahid Zia; Syed Abir Hassan Naqvi; Faiz. M. Shaikh

2011-01-01

118

Self-efficacy of first aid for home accidents among parents with 0- to 4-year-old children at a metropolitan community health center in Taiwan.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Although accidental injury is the main factor involved in the death of young children in many countries, few studies have focused on parents' competence with regard to self-efficacy of first aid for their children following injuries occurring at home. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate parental self-sufficiency of first aid for home accidents in children aged 0-4 years. The study is a cross-sectional designed. Data from 445 parents recruited were collected by purposive sampling at eight metropolitan community health centers in central Taiwan. Measurements were taken from a self-developed questionnaire that included 37 questions. Logistic regression analysis was applied to explore the associations between factors and parents' self-efficacy of first aid at home accident. Our findings show that parents' overall rate of knowledge of first aid was 72%. The mean score for 100% certainty in parents' self-efficacy of first aid was 26.6%. The lowest scores for self-efficacy were with regard to choking and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). There was a significantly positive correlation between parents' knowledge and self-efficacy of first aid (p<0.01), and thus knowledge of first aid is a predictor of parents' self-efficacy. Knowledge of first aid is also a partly mediator between participants' attending first aid program, participants' first aid information obtained from health personnel and self-efficacy of first aid. Our findings suggest that medical services should provide first aid resources to help manage accidental injuries involving children, particularly information on how to deal with choking and CPR. With an appropriate program provided by health professionals, parents' self-efficacy of first aid for home accidents will be positively enhanced.

Wei YL; Chen LL; Li TC; Ma WF; Peng NH; Huang LC

2013-03-01

119

The effect of community health nurse home visit on self-care self-efficacy of the elderly living in selected Falavarjan villages in Iran in 2010  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Perceived self-efficacy is a strong predictor for behavior. Considering the importance of health-promoting self-care behaviors in increasing quality of life in the elderly, this study was aimed at defining the effect of nurse home visits on self-care self-efficacy of the elderly in rural areas. Materials and Methods: This is a pre and post quasi-experimental study conducted on 33 older adults randomly selected from five villages in Falavarjan province in Iran. Intervention program was in the direction of self-care self-efficacy in four domains including nutrition, health practice, physical activity, and well-being in the form of five home visit programs and one group session by a nurse during 6 weeks, and included two different sections of education and nursing interventions administered based on needs assessment and determination of the tasks for the clients and their families. Theoretical framework of this study was supported by Bandura's self-efficacy, Orem's self-care theory, and Pender's revised health promotion model. The data were collected by self-care self-efficacy and demographic information questionnaire before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and paired t-test. Results: The mean elderly score in the four aforementioned domains increased after the home visit program. A significant difference was seen in the mean total scores of self-care self-efficacy and its subscales by paired t-test before and after intervention (P < 0.001). Conclusions: It was observed that home visit program, integrated with the theories, had a positive influence on improving self-care self-efficacy of the elderly, and was supported by Bandura's theory of self-efficacy suggesting four sources of performance accomplishment, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and emotional arousal. With regard to the importance of self-care behavior in health promotion of the elderly, multifaceted low-cost interventions with the highest effect seem essential.

Hosseini, Habibollah; Torkani, Sara; Tavakol, Khosrow

2013-01-01

120

The effect of community health nurse home visit on self-care self-efficacy of the elderly living in selected Falavarjan villages in Iran in 2010.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Perceived self-efficacy is a strong predictor for behavior. Considering the importance of health-promoting self-care behaviors in increasing quality of life in the elderly, this study was aimed at defining the effect of nurse home visits on self-care self-efficacy of the elderly in rural areas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a pre and post quasi-experimental study conducted on 33 older adults randomly selected from five villages in Falavarjan province in Iran. Intervention program was in the direction of self-care self-efficacy in four domains including nutrition, health practice, physical activity, and well-being in the form of five home visit programs and one group session by a nurse during 6 weeks, and included two different sections of education and nursing interventions administered based on needs assessment and determination of the tasks for the clients and their families. Theoretical framework of this study was supported by Bandura's self-efficacy, Orem's self-care theory, and Pender's revised health promotion model. The data were collected by self-care self-efficacy and demographic information questionnaire before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and paired t-test. RESULTS: The mean elderly score in the four aforementioned domains increased after the home visit program. A significant difference was seen in the mean total scores of self-care self-efficacy and its subscales by paired t-test before and after intervention (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: It was observed that home visit program, integrated with the theories, had a positive influence on improving self-care self-efficacy of the elderly, and was supported by Bandura's theory of self-efficacy suggesting four sources of performance accomplishment, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and emotional arousal. With regard to the importance of self-care behavior in health promotion of the elderly, multifaceted low-cost interventions with the highest effect seem essential.

Hosseini H; Torkani S; Tavakol K

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
121

Health-related quality of life with KDQOL-36 and its association with self-efficacy and treatment satisfaction in Korean dialysis patients.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to measure the level of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and to reveal the association of self-efficacy and treatment satisfaction with it in Korean dialysis patients. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, AND MEASUREMENTS: The study subjects were 237 patients receiving either hemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD) from two university hospitals, from February to June in 2010. We investigated HRQOL using the Korean version of Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form 36 (KDQOL-36), and self-efficacy and treatment satisfaction by self-administrative questionnaire and their dialysis-related variables by reviewing clinical records. The associations of self-efficacy and treatment satisfaction with HRQOL were assessed using multiple linear regression analysis. RESULTS: The mean HRQOL results were as follows: Physical component score (PCS) was 39.1 ± 8.5, Mental component score (MCS) 44.6 ± 6.8, symptom/problem list was 67.6 ± 17.1, effects of disease score was 58.5 ± 19.6, and burden of disease score was 41.1 ± 28.4. Between PD and HD patients, we could find significant difference only in the symptom/problem list. After removing confounder's effects by multivariate analysis, respectively, treatment goal self-efficacy and treatment management self-efficacy were significantly related with all 5 domains, except PCS. Treatment satisfaction was significantly related with PCS, MCS, and effects of kidney disease. CONCLUSIONS: Patients' self-efficacy and treatment satisfaction could influence their HRQOL. Regular and systematic monitoring using KDQOL-36 and interventions to increase self-efficacy and treatment satisfaction should be considered in dialysis care in Korea.

Kim JY; Kim B; Park KS; Choi JY; Seo JJ; Park SH; Kim CD; Kim YL

2013-05-01

122

Self-Efficacy and Fear Avoidance Beliefs in Chronic Low Back Pain Patients: Coexistence and Associated Factors.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

A cross sectional study was conducted with the objective to assess the coexistence of self-efficacy and fear avoidance beliefs and establish the associated factors. Data collection was performed (215 individuals with lower back pain at three health services and two industries). The following instruments were used: Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, Beck's Depression Inventory, Piper's Fatigue Scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and the Chronic Pain Self-Efficacy Scale. Wilks' lambda test was performed, followed by MANOVA model to assess the effect of self-efficacy beliefs and fear avoidance on independent variables. Most subjects were women (65.1%), 45 years of age or younger (50.7%), with a family income between $450 and $1,350 per month (49.3%). Depression was present in 21.4%, fatigue in 29.3%, and disability in 68%. The average (standard deviation) of self-efficacy was 180.8 (60.4), and fear avoidance was 42.0 (11.5). A significant negative correlation was observed between the total score of both beliefs. The Wilks' lambda test showed that gender, income, depression, disability, and fatigue were significant and were included in the model. In the Manova analysis, low self-efficacy was associated with lower income, fatigue, depression, and level of disability (p < .001). High fear avoidance was associated to the male gender, lower income, depression, and level of disability (p < .001). The analysis of the confidence areas showed that a reduced self-efficacy and increased fear avoidance are related to an increased level of disability (p < .001). Specific intervention strategies must be implemented change these beliefs.

de Moraes Vieira EB; de Góes Salvetti M; Damiani LP; de Mattos Pimenta CA

2013-07-01

123

Developing the Computer User Self-Efficacy (CUSE) Scale: Investigating the Relationship between Computer Self-Efficacy, Gender and Experience with Computers.  

Science.gov (United States)

|Describes the development and validation of the 30-item Computer User Self-Efficacy (CUSE) Scale, a copy of which is appended. Topics include social cognitive theory; experience and computer self-efficacy; gender differences; and the measurement of computer self-efficacy in student computer users and its relevance to learning in higher education.…

Cassidy, Simon; Eachus, Peter

2002-01-01

124

Abstinence self-efficacy in people with severe mental illness.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

To validate the Brief Situational Confidence Questionniare (BSCQ) with people diagnosed with severe mental illness (N=129), we examined the associations between abstinence self-efficacy (BSCQ) and alcohol consumption level (within the previous 6months), drug use, and problems related to substance use while controlling for key symptoms of major mental illness and motives for alcohol use (Drinking Motives Questionnaire). Regression models revealed that abstinence self-efficacy was a significant predictor of all three substance use measures suggesting that, even when controlling for psychiatric symptoms and substance use motives, abstinence self-efficacy accounts for unique variance in alcohol use, drug use, and related problems. This study is limited by the cross sectional design and lack of structured diagnostic interviewing.

O'Hare T; Shen C

2013-07-01

125

Is a strong sense of self-efficacy always beneficial?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The concept of self-efficacy, introduced by Albert Bandura, has received a lot of attention in psychological research. This comes as no surprise, as it encompasses a person's beliefs about his or her capabilities to successfully do what is necessary for desired goals, which is a central mechanism in human agency. The concept has been linked to many outcomes (e.g. motivation and performance), almost exclusively yielding positive results. Recently, however, arguments have risen that a strong sense of selfefficacy may not always be as beneficial as presumed until now. In this article, I review the core of the positive literature on self-efficacy and highlight studies that question and oppose the dominance of these positive self-efficacy associations. Implications for future research, emphasizing the need of a different research approach, are mentioned.

Thomas VERHAEREN

2012-01-01

126

Perceived Self-efficacy and Coping Strategies in Stressful Situations  

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Full Text Available AbstractObjectives: This study was carried out to determine the relationship between perceived self-efficacy and coping strategies in stressful situations. Method: This study was conducted using survey and cross-sectional method. Data were collected from 373 students of seven educational groups of Yazd University, between 22 June and 22 July 2006. The subjects were selected through cluster-randomized sampling method. The instruments for gathering data were Coping Strategies Scale-Revised (CSS-R), General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS), Undergraduate Students Scale (USS), and Multidimensional Assessment of Stressful Life Events Scale (MASLES).  Results: The results showed significant difference among students with different levels of perceived self-efficacy, with regard to coping strategies in general (P<0.001), and with regard to components of coping strategies: seeking social support (p<0.01), avoidance coping (P<0.001), emotion-focused coping (p<0.01), active coping (p<0.01), and self-control (p<0.01) in particular. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that the perceived self-efficacy variable accounted for 20.3% of the variance in coping strategies. Conclusion: The results of the current study casts doubt on the premises of social-cognitive theory about the higher use of problem-focused coping by persons with high perceived self-efficacy, and the higher use of emotion-focused coping, such as avoidance coping and self-control by persons with lower perceived self-efficacy.    

2008-01-01

127

The relationship between self-efficacy for behaviors that promote healthy weight and clinical indicators of adiposity in a sample of early adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: Examine the relationship between self-efficacy and various measures of adiposity in a sample of teens. METHODS: A total of 132 teens were selected from schools participating in an existing research study titled Teen Eating and Activity Mentoring in Schools (TEAMS). Teens completed demographic questionnaires and healthy eating-specific and physical activity-specific measures of self-efficacy. Waist circumference (WC), triceps skinfold thickness (TSF), and body mass index (BMI) percentile scores were also obtained. RESULTS: Regression analyses indicated that healthy eating-specific and physical activity-specific measures of self-efficacy predicted WC and TSF. ANOVA revealed significant differences in healthy eating-specific self-efficacy levels between students of recommended weight and overweight/obese status. Supplemental analyses showed significant negative relationships between a student's ideal BMI ratio and self-efficacy. CONCLUSIONS: Because self-efficacy may be amenable to change, these findings could inform future efforts aimed at increasing behaviors that promote healthy weight status among early adolescents.

Steele MM; Daratha KB; Bindler RC; Power TG

2011-12-01

128

The effect of self-talk in learning the volleyball service skill and self-efficacy improvement.  

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Full Text Available In this study the effect of self-talk on learning the volleyball service skill was examined and also the self-efficacy improvement. Participants were 57 female players 13 years old (mean age =12.83, SD=0.97) with two years experience (?=1.99, SD=0.67). Prior to the beginning of the program, participants were randomly assigned into two groups: a. the instructional self-talk group (ISTG, n = 28) and b. the control (traditional) group (CG, n = 29). All athletes followed a four-week practice program, aiming at overhand service skill learning and self-efficacy improvement. The program consisted of two practice units (60 min) per week. Participants of ISTG were taught to use the self-talk (for technique) loud before they performed the service drills. The control group received traditional feedback, that is, knowledge of performance and knowledge of results provided by the instructor. Service performance was assessed by videotaped evaluations in five basic elements of skill. There were three measurement periods for field test: pre-, post- and retention tests (one week after post-test). ANOVA repeated measures revealed significant interaction between groups and measures. There was also significant interaction between groups and self-efficacy scores. The results indicated that participants of the ISTG had better scores in the final measurement than the control group, when technique was evaluated and improved also their self-efficacy. In conclusion the Self-talk helps female volleyball athletes to improve performance and learning of overhand service skill and to improve also their self-efficacy. This study adds some useful elements to practitioners and how they used self-talk in the practice.

Eleni Zetou; Nikolas Vernadakis; Evangelos Bebetsos

2013-01-01

129

Assessment of fall-related self-efficacy and activity avoidance in people with Parkinson's disease  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Fear of falling (FOF) is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), and it is considered a vital aspect of comprehensive balance assessment in PD. FOF can be conceptualized differently. The Falls-Efficacy Scale (FES) assesses fall-related self-efficacy, whereas the Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (SAFFE) assesses activity avoidance due to the risk of falling. This study aimed at investigating the validity and reliability of FES and SAFFE in people with PD. Methods Seventy-nine people with PD (mean age; 64 years, SD 7.2) completed the Swedish version of FES(S), SAFFE and the physical functioning (PF) scale of the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). FES(S) and SAFFE were administered twice, with an 8.8 (SD 2.3) days interval. Assumptions for summing item scores into total scores were examined and score reliability (Cronbach's alpha and test-retest reliability) were calculated. Construct validity was assessed by examining the pattern of Spearman correlations (rs) between the FES(S)/SAFFE and other variables, and by examining differences in FES(S)/SAFFE scores between fallers and non-fallers, genders, and between those reporting FOF and unsteadiness while turning. Results For both scales, item mean scores (and standard deviations) were roughly similar and corrected item-total correlations exceeded 0.4. Reliabilities were ?0.87. FES(S)-scores correlated strongest (rs, -0.74, p s, -0.76, p s ? 0.08). Experiencing falls, unsteadiness while turning, and FOF was associated with lower fall-related self-efficacy and higher activity avoidance. Conclusions This study provides initial support for the score reliability and validity of the FES(S) and SAFFE in people with PD.

Nilsson Maria H; Drake Anna-Maria; Hagell Peter

2010-01-01

130

Disease-specific self-efficacy in spasmodic dysphonia patients.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: Self-efficacy (SE) is an optimistic self-belief that one can perform a novel task. This concept involves empowerment, self-esteem, and adaptation to a stressful situation. SE is a strong predictor of health behaviors. Our objectives were to study SE in spasmodic dysphonia (SD) and to develop a disease-specific SE-SD scale. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: Academic hospital. SUBJECT AND METHODS: Disease-specific SE-SD items were developed with laryngologists, speech pathologists, and SD patients. These items, General SE Scale, Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI-10), Consensus Auditory Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), were administered to SD patients who presented for botulinum toxin injections. RESULTS: One hundred forty-five SD patients (mean age 59.5 ± 13.6 years) had a general SE score (Cronbach's ? = 0.894) of 33.4 ± 5.2 out of 40. This was negatively correlated with HADS-A (r = -0.42, P < 0.001) and HADS-D (r = -0.42, P < .001), but not correlated with VHI-10 (r = -0.098, P = .243) and CAPE-V (r = -0.047, P = .57). Factor analysis selected 8 items from the general SE scale and 5 disease-specific SE-SD items to generate a 13-item disease-specific SE-SD scale (Cronbach's ? = 0.907). Disease-specific SE-SD score was 42.1 ± 6.9 out of 52 and was negatively correlated with VHI-10 (r = -0.19, P = .005), HADS-A (r = -0.43, P < .001), and HADS-D (r = -0.57, P < .001), but not correlated with CAPE-V (r = -0.024, P = .60). CONCLUSION: SD patients established on botulinum toxin injections have high degrees of general and disease-specific SE. Patients with higher SE-SD demonstrate lower vocal handicap and lower levels of anxiety and depression. A 13-item disease-specific SE-SD scale has been developed.

Hu A; Isetti D; Hillel AD; Waugh P; Comstock B; Meyer TK

2013-03-01

131

Transcultural perspectives in nursing administration.  

Science.gov (United States)

Population demographics are reshaping the healthcare work force with respect to race, ethnicity, gender, national origin, sexual orientation, age, handicap, disability, and related factors as national sensitivity to various forms of diversity grows. Given the demographic trends, it is inevitable that nurse administrators will need skill in transcultural administration as they manage diversity and identify the cultural origins of conflict in the multicultural workplace. Culture influences the manner in which administrators, staff and patients perceive, identify, define and solve problems. In this article, the complex and interrelated factors that influence workplace diversity are examined. PMID:9824983

Andrews, M M

1998-11-01

132

Transcultural perspectives in nursing administration.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Population demographics are reshaping the healthcare work force with respect to race, ethnicity, gender, national origin, sexual orientation, age, handicap, disability, and related factors as national sensitivity to various forms of diversity grows. Given the demographic trends, it is inevitable that nurse administrators will need skill in transcultural administration as they manage diversity and identify the cultural origins of conflict in the multicultural workplace. Culture influences the manner in which administrators, staff and patients perceive, identify, define and solve problems. In this article, the complex and interrelated factors that influence workplace diversity are examined.

Andrews MM

1998-11-01

133

Nutrition self-efficacy assessment: development of a questionnaire and evaluation of reliability in African-American and Latino children.  

Science.gov (United States)

BACKGROUND: We aimed to develop tools that could be reliably used to evaluate self-efficacy for consuming vegetables and low-sugar foods and beverages for African American and Latino children living in inner-city communities. METHODS: A total of 112 children, aged 8-11 years, identified by a parent as being either African-American or Latino, were recruited and administered questionnaires. Internal consistency, a measure of reliability, was assessed by calculating the Cronbach's alpha of test scores. RESULTS: Cronbach's alpha exceeded the threshold of acceptability of 0.70 for the Authors' Vegetables Self-Efficacy Index, and all three Low-Sugar Self-Efficacy Indices, including the Reference Index, the Authors' Low-Sugar Food and Beverage Index, and the Low-Sugar Beverages Index. CONCLUSIONS: We present internally consistent tools that could be reliably used to evaluate self-efficacy for consuming vegetables and low-sugar foods and beverages in 8-11-year-old African-American and Latino children from low socio-economic communities. PMID:23682745

Sharma, S; Roberts, L; Fleming, S

2013-05-19

134

Nutrition self-efficacy assessment: development of a questionnaire and evaluation of reliability in African-American and Latino children.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: We aimed to develop tools that could be reliably used to evaluate self-efficacy for consuming vegetables and low-sugar foods and beverages for African American and Latino children living in inner-city communities. METHODS: A total of 112 children, aged 8-11 years, identified by a parent as being either African-American or Latino, were recruited and administered questionnaires. Internal consistency, a measure of reliability, was assessed by calculating the Cronbach's alpha of test scores. RESULTS: Cronbach's alpha exceeded the threshold of acceptability of 0.70 for the Authors' Vegetables Self-Efficacy Index, and all three Low-Sugar Self-Efficacy Indices, including the Reference Index, the Authors' Low-Sugar Food and Beverage Index, and the Low-Sugar Beverages Index. CONCLUSIONS: We present internally consistent tools that could be reliably used to evaluate self-efficacy for consuming vegetables and low-sugar foods and beverages in 8-11-year-old African-American and Latino children from low socio-economic communities.

Sharma S; Roberts L; Fleming S

2013-05-01

135

The outcomes of anxiety, confidence, and self-efficacy with Internet health information retrieval in older adults: a pilot study.  

Science.gov (United States)

Technology has a great impact on nursing practice. With the increasing numbers of older Americans using computers and the Internet in recent years, nurses have the capability to deliver effective and efficient health education to their patients and the community. Based on the theoretical framework of Bandura's self-efficacy theory, the pilot project reported findings from a 5-week computer course on Internet health searches in older adults, 65 years or older, at a senior activity learning center. Twelve participants were recruited and randomized to either the intervention or the control group. Measures of computer anxiety, computer confidence, and computer self-efficacy scores were analyzed at baseline, at the end of the program, and 6 weeks after the completion of the program. Analysis was conducted with repeated-measures analysis of variance. Findings showed participants who attended a structured computer course on Internet health information retrieval reported lowered anxiety and increased confidence and self-efficacy at the end of the 5-week program and 6 weeks after the completion of the program as compared with participants who were not in the program. The study demonstrated that a computer course can help reduce anxiety and increase confidence and self-efficacy in online health searches in older adults. PMID:20571374

Chu, Adeline; Mastel-Smith, Beth

136

Academic Procrastination, Emotional Intelligence, Academic Self-Efficacy, and GPA: A Comparison Between Students With and Without Learning Disabilities.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Academic procrastination has been seen as an impediment to students' academic success. Research findings suggest that it is related to lower levels of self-regulated learning and academic self-efficacy and associated with higher levels of anxiety, stress, and illness. Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to assess, regulate, and utilize emotions and has been found to be associated with academic self-efficacy and a variety of better outcomes, including academic performance. Students with learning disabilities (LD) are well acquainted with academic difficulty and maladaptive academic behavior. In comparison to students without LD, they exhibit high levels of learned helplessness, including diminished persistence, lower academic expectations, and negative affect. This study examined the relationships among academic procrastination, EI, and academic performance as mediated by academic self-efficacy in 287 LD and non-LD students. Results indicated that the indirect effect of EI on academic procrastination and GPA was stronger in LD students than in non-LD students. In addition, results indicated that LD students scored lower than non-LD students on both EI and academic self-efficacy and higher on academic procrastination. No difference was found in GPA.

Hen M; Goroshit M

2012-03-01

137

Academic Procrastination, Emotional Intelligence, Academic Self-Efficacy, and GPA: A Comparison Between Students With and Without Learning Disabilities.  

Science.gov (United States)

Academic procrastination has been seen as an impediment to students' academic success. Research findings suggest that it is related to lower levels of self-regulated learning and academic self-efficacy and associated with higher levels of anxiety, stress, and illness. Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to assess, regulate, and utilize emotions and has been found to be associated with academic self-efficacy and a variety of better outcomes, including academic performance. Students with learning disabilities (LD) are well acquainted with academic difficulty and maladaptive academic behavior. In comparison to students without LD, they exhibit high levels of learned helplessness, including diminished persistence, lower academic expectations, and negative affect. This study examined the relationships among academic procrastination, EI, and academic performance as mediated by academic self-efficacy in 287 LD and non-LD students. Results indicated that the indirect effect of EI on academic procrastination and GPA was stronger in LD students than in non-LD students. In addition, results indicated that LD students scored lower than non-LD students on both EI and academic self-efficacy and higher on academic procrastination. No difference was found in GPA. PMID:22442254

Hen, Meirav; Goroshit, Marina

2012-03-21

138

The outcomes of anxiety, confidence, and self-efficacy with Internet health information retrieval in older adults: a pilot study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Technology has a great impact on nursing practice. With the increasing numbers of older Americans using computers and the Internet in recent years, nurses have the capability to deliver effective and efficient health education to their patients and the community. Based on the theoretical framework of Bandura's self-efficacy theory, the pilot project reported findings from a 5-week computer course on Internet health searches in older adults, 65 years or older, at a senior activity learning center. Twelve participants were recruited and randomized to either the intervention or the control group. Measures of computer anxiety, computer confidence, and computer self-efficacy scores were analyzed at baseline, at the end of the program, and 6 weeks after the completion of the program. Analysis was conducted with repeated-measures analysis of variance. Findings showed participants who attended a structured computer course on Internet health information retrieval reported lowered anxiety and increased confidence and self-efficacy at the end of the 5-week program and 6 weeks after the completion of the program as compared with participants who were not in the program. The study demonstrated that a computer course can help reduce anxiety and increase confidence and self-efficacy in online health searches in older adults.

Chu A; Mastel-Smith B

2010-07-01

139

Parental self-efficacy and its measurement - an evaluation of a parental self-efficacy measurement scale.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To field test a parental self-efficacy scale regarding its acceptability and feasibility and to describe parental self-efficacy in a convenience sample of parents with children aged 6 years old or less. BACKGROUND: Self-care within families is increasingly emphasised in health policy as a means of maximising healthcare resources. This study reports the field testing of a scale designed to measure parental self-efficacy. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey of parents of children aged 6 years old or less. METHODS: Subjects were recruited through a parenting internet website (n = 84) and local parenting and community organisations (n = 68) and asked to complete a questionnaire containing the scale. Data collection took place between January and August 2011. RESULTS: The scale, previously validated with an expert panel of professionals, gathered information about parental self-efficacy when administered either directly or through an on-line data collection portal, although there were more missing data when administered via the Internet. Although convenience and self-selecting samples precluded parameter estimation, areas of concern highlighted were difficulties differentiating children with serious illnesses and the use of the Personal Child Health Record. Use of the Internet was widespread, as was use of community pharmacists and nursery staff. CONCLUSION: Although the primary purpose was not to collect specific data, the data indicated the continuing concern of parents regarding serious illness and where additional investment may be required to meet parental needs and expectations. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The previously validated scale can be used to collect information about parental self-efficacy either through a paper questionnaire or the Internet. Although there was slightly more missing data from the Internet version, the ease of its administration makes this an attractive option. Parents generally reported high levels of self-efficacy and satisfaction with services; however, the scale was able to identify areas where further investment might be useful.

Purssell E; While A

2013-05-01

140

Preliminary Study of the Autism Self-Efficacy Scale for Teachers (ASSET).  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The purpose of the current study was to evaluate a new measure, the Autism Self-Efficacy Scale for Teachers (ASSET) for its dimensionality, internal consistency, and construct validity derived in a sample of special education teachers (N = 44) of students with autism. Results indicate that all items reflect one dominant factor, teachers' responses to items were internally consistent within the sample, and compared to a 100-point scale, a 6-point response scale is adequate. ASSET scores were found to be negatively correlated with scores on two subscale measures of teacher stress (i.e., self-doubt/need for support and disruption of the teaching process) but uncorrelated with teacher burnout scores. The ASSET is a promising tool that requires replication with larger samples.

Ruble LA; Toland MD; Birdwhistell JL; McGrew JH; Usher EL

2013-09-01

 
 
 
 
141

Self-efficacy with application to nursing education: a concept analysis.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

TOPIC: Concept analysis and self-efficacy. PURPOSE: This article analyzes the concept self-efficacy and its relationship to nursing education using Walker and Avant's methodology. SOURCES: Published literature. CONCLUSION: Nursing literature suggests increasing students' perceived self-efficacy will help to narrow the theory-practice gap. Self-efficacy is a cognitive variable that affects performance behaviors and affective processes. Perceived self-efficacy can be influenced by a direct experience, vicarious experience, or verbal persuasion. Individuals with high levels of self-efficacy demonstrate the defining attributes of confidence, perceived capability, and perseverance.

Robb M

2012-07-01

142

Correlations of Self-Efficacy among Women with Gestational Diabetes  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Background & Aim: Gestational diabetes is a major concern during pregnancy. Psychological factors such as self-efficacy play important role in adherence of the treatment, control of blood glucose, and the outcomes of the pregnancy. The main purpose of this study was to determine correlations of ...

Bastani F; Zarrabi R

143

Parent Self-Efficacy Mediates the Impact of Family Intervention.  

Science.gov (United States)

Self-appraisals are thought to play an important role in a number of youth problem behaviors. Self-perceived competence in the parental role may be an important mediator of family interventions. The purpose of the study described was to determine whether parental self-efficacy is causally related to effective child rearing. To do so, the authors…

MacPhee, David; Miller-Heyl, Jan

144

Choosing with confidence: Self-efficacy and preferences for choice  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Previous research on the role of choice set size in decision making has focused on decision outcomes and satisfaction. In contrast, little is known about interindividual differences in preferences for larger versus smaller choice sets, let alone the causes of such differences. Drawing on self-efficacy theory, two studies examined the role of decision-making self-efficacy in preferences for choice. Using a correlational approach, Study 1 (n = 89) found that decision-making self-efficacy was positively associated with preferences for choice across a range of consumer decisions. This association was found both between- and within-subjects. Study 2 (n = 65) experimentally manipulated decision-making self-efficacy for an incentive-compatible choice among photo printers. Preferences for choice and pre-choice information seeking were significantly lower in a low-efficacy condition compared to a high-efficacy condition and a control group. Future research directions and implications for decision-making theory and public policy are discussed.

Andrew E. Reed; Joseph A. Mikels; Corinna E. Lockenhoff

2012-01-01

145

Computer Self-Efficacy of University Faculty in Lebanon  

Science.gov (United States)

|Faculty use of technology is a critical issue in higher education; administrators and students are expecting faculty instruction to incorporate technology in classroom and distance education. Competition is demanding technologically proficient graduates for schools and colleges. Research indicates that computer self-efficacy (CSE) may be one…

Saleh, Hanadi Kassem

2008-01-01

146

The Relationship between Computer Anxiety and Computer Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study examined the relationship between computer anxiety and computer self-efficacy of students and teachers in elementary and secondary schools. The sample included a total of 845 subjects from two private school systems in Turkey. The Oetting's Computer Anxiety Scale was used to measure computer anxiety whereas the Murphy's Computer…

Simsek, Ali

2011-01-01

147

English Language Teachers’ Knowledge and their Self-efficacy  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The present research aims at exploring the relationship between novice English teachers' knowledge and their self-efficacy. A teacher knowledge test and an efficacy questionnaire were administered to 55 novice English teachers. The data were gathered from male and female novice teachers teaching at ...

Azadeh Zakeri; Mohammad Alavi

148

Self-efficacy: measurement and intervention in nursing.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Assisting people with chronic illnesses to change their behavior is important in effecting self-management and in achieving the highest possible level of health. There is increasing evidence that a vital ingredient in health-related behavior change is the perceived self-efficacy of the individual to behave differently; however, disease- and age-specific measures and interventions have received insufficient attention to date. This special issue reports the results of the first stages of an international collaboration that is addressing the development and testing of instruments and interventions to measure and ultimately to enhance self-efficacy in management of diabetes mellitus. These instruments are now being used and tested further by other investigators, as well as in ongoing studies by the authors. Additionally, the issue addresses the importance of theory-based interventions and their use in enhancing self-efficacy as a means of encouraging positive behavior change. The results of two intervention studies designed to improve patients' self-management of obesity and cancer support the use of strategies to enhance self-efficacy in changing behavior. They also underscore the need to continue to identify, develop and test targeted nursing interventions.

Shortridge-Baggett LM

2001-01-01

149

Self-efficacy scale for teachers”-Preliminary study-  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to introduce “Self-efficacy scale for teachers” into scientific field in order to evaluate teachers’ opinions on their self-efficacy. This study which is conducted to develop “Self-efficacy scale for teachers” aims at making clear the contribution of teacher behaviour to psychological measuring as well as providing support for psychometric studies which have recently become popular. In order to determine the self-efficacy of teachers, 3 experts who have a good command on the field and work in education sector put forward 20 items after having discussed on them and later they reduced them to 13 items. Then, 5 point likert scale comprising of 13 items was prepared. 3 experts who have a good command on the field removed 5 items of the scale which are not suitable for self-efficacy, which cannot define self-efficacy and whose scale set up could not be formed properly. Finally, 8 items remained in the scale, which is also the final state of it. Upon reducing the scale to 8 items, 50 teachers were applied the 8-item scale. It was investigated that whether the questions are comprehensible and whether there are general problems regarding the questions. Second application started after proving the comprehensibility of the 8 items. 670 teachers from each branch were applied the scale in the second application. 170 teachers were removed from the study as they lacked several questions in the scale. Statistical analyses were carried out on the forms filled out by 500 teachers from each branch. Descriptive Statistics, Pearson’s Correlation Technique, Principal Components Factor Analysis and Cronbach’s Alpha were used for the analyses of the statistics. According to the findings obtained from the analyses, it was found out that there were no inoperative items and all 8 items could be utilized. It was determined that Cronbach’s Alpha, which is an internal consistency coefficient, was .87 and the scale had high reliability coefficient. The scale was under only one factor. Results showed that “Self-efficacy scale for teachers” could be more beneficial when it is applied on a broader group of teachers.

P?nar K?v?lc?m; Turhan Toros; Mehmet Miman; Fikret Soyer

2013-01-01

150

Condom promotion in Belize: self-efficacy of Belizean nurses.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Outside of abstinence, correct and consistent condom use is the single most effective tool to prevent the transmission human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This is particularly true in countries such as Belize where incidence rates remain high. Women are physiologically at higher risk for HIV, and many feel powerless to insist on condom use. Although nurses are in a position to promote condom use, variables that influence this decision are not clearly understood. In this study, we examined variables that influence a nurses' self-efficacy to promote and teach condom use to women specifically to reduce their HIV risk. METHODS: Data related to self-efficacy, vicarious experience related to condom use promotion and a nurse's sexual relationship power were collected from nurses practising in Belize (n = 60). These data were cross-sectional and collected at the annual nurses' conference. RESULTS: Both years of nursing education and positive vicarious experience promoting and teaching condom use to women were positively correlated to their self-efficacy to do so. Vicarious experience was significantly correlated to self-efficacy in a subgroup of nurses with lower sexual relationship power but not in those with higher sexual relationship power. CONCLUSIONS: When designing HIV continuing education programmes for nurses in Belize, it is important to consider level of nursing education and access to vicarious experience such as mentoring and role modelling. An additional factor to consider is the influence that a nurse's power in her own primary sexual relationship may play in the formation of her self-efficacy.

Nash WA

2011-12-01

151

The relationships among knowledge, self-efficacy, preparedness, decisional conflict, and decisions to participate in a cancer clinical trial.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Cancer clinical trials (CCTs) are important tools in the development of improved cancer therapies; yet, participation is low. Key psychosocial barriers exist that appear to impact a patient's decision to participate. Little is known about the relationship among knowledge, self-efficacy, preparation, decisional conflict, and patient decisions to take part in CCTs. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine if preparation for consideration of a CCT as a treatment option mediates the relationship between knowledge, self-efficacy, and decisional conflict. We also explored whether lower levels of decisional conflict are associated with greater likelihood of CCT enrollment. METHOD: In a pre-post test intervention study, cancer patients (N = 105) were recruited before their initial consultation with a medical oncologist. A brief educational intervention was provided for all patients. Patient self-report survey responses assessed knowledge, self-efficacy, preparation for clinical trial participation, decisional conflict, and clinical trial participation. RESULTS: Preparation was found to mediate the relationship between self-efficacy and decisional conflict (p = 0.003 for a test of the indirect mediational pathway for the decisional conflict total score). Preparation had a more limited role in mediating the effect of knowledge on decisional conflict. Further, preliminary evidence indicated that reduced decisional conflict was associated with increased clinical trial enrollment (p = 0.049). CONCLUSIONS: When patients feel greater CCT self-efficacy and have more knowledge, they feel more prepared to make a CCT decision. Reduced decisional conflict, in turn, is associated with the decision to enroll in a clinical trial. Our results suggest that preparation for decision-making should be a target of future interventions to improve participation in CCTs.

Miller SM; Hudson SV; Egleston BL; Manne S; Buzaglo JS; Devarajan K; Fleisher L; Millard J; Solarino N; Trinastic J; Meropol NJ

2013-03-01

152

The Relationship between Self-efficacy and Stress among Iranian EFL Teachers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study investigated the relationship between self- efficacy and stress among 108 EFL teachers in Iran. The participants were administered self-efficacy and stress questionnaires. Pearson Product-Moment Correlation and Multiple Regression analyses were used. The results indicated significant negative correlation between self efficacy and stress. Also it was found that both dimensions of self-efficacy, namely, classroom and organizational efficacies, either collectively or separately, could predict stress among EFL teachers. Implications of the study are discussed.

Shahin Vaezi; Nasser Fallah

2011-01-01

153

Self-Efficacy and Postpartum Depression Teaching Behaviors of Hospital-Based Perinatal Nurses  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Based upon the Self-Efficacy Theory, this study examined the relationship between self-efficacy, self-efficacy-related variables, and postpartum depression teaching behaviors of hospital-based perinatal nurses. Findings revealed that teaching new mothers about postpartum depression is related to a p...

Logsdon, M. Cynthia; Foltz, Melissa Pinto; Scheetz, James; Myers, John A.

154

Exploring Baccalaureate Social Work Students' Self-Efficacy: Did It Change over Time?  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored baccalaureate social work students' self-efficacy at a rural southern university. Bandura's concept of self-efficacy is used as a theoretical base for the study. Students (N = 43) in introductory social work courses and in the field practicum course completed the Foundation Practice Self Efficacy Scale. Following The Council on…

Ahn, Bonnie; Boykin, Lolita; Hebert, Corie; Kulkin, Heidi

2012-01-01

155

Developing a Measurement Tool for Assessing Physiotherapy Students' Self-Efficacy: A Pilot Study  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this research was to determine if self-efficacy can be correlated with prior academic achievement and whether self-efficacy can be an outcome measure of education. A self-efficacy instrument was developed and administered to physiotherapy students following completion of their pre-clinical theory experience. The questionnaire results…

Jones, Anne; Sheppard, Lorraine

2012-01-01

156

Principals' Self-Efficacy: Relations with Job Autonomy, Job Satisfaction, and Contextual Constraints  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of the present study was to explore relations between principals' self-efficacy, perceived job autonomy, job satisfaction, and perceived contextual constraints to autonomy. Principal self-efficacy was measured by a multidimensional scale called the Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale. Job autonomy, job satisfaction, and contextual…

Federici, Roger A.

2013-01-01

157

Health risk appraisal for older people 5: self-efficacy in patient-doctor interactions.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Enhancing self-efficacy is central to programmes promoting self-care and self-management. However, little is known about older people's self-efficacy in doctor-patient interactions. This paper investigates lifestyle, medical and demographic factors associated with self-efficacy in doctor-patient int...

Raymond, M; Iliffe, S; Kharicha, K; Harari, D; Swift, C; Gillmann, G; Stuck, AE

158

Auto-eficácia e sintomas depressivos em doentes com dor crônica Self-efficacy and depressive symptoms in chronic pain patients  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Auto-eficácia é a crença na habilidade pessoal de desempenhar com sucesso tarefas ou de apresentar comportamentos para produzir um resultado desejável. É conceito-chave para o adequado controle de doenças crônicas e estudos sobre o tema são incipientes no Brasil. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a crença de auto-eficácia de pacientes com dor crônica e relacioná-la a variáveis sociodemográficas, de características da dor e à presença de sintomas depressivos. MÉTODOS: A amostra, de conveniência, foi de 132 sujeitos. Os instrumentos utilizados foram a Escala de Auto-Eficácia para Dor Crônica (AEDC) e o Inventário de Depressão de Beck (IDB). RESULTADOS: O escore médio de auto-eficácia foi 170,8 (DP = 56,7). Auto-eficácia menor foi observada nos pacientes com até 8 anos de escolaridade, quando comparada à de pacientes com escolaridade entre 9 e 11 anos (p = 0,015). Auto-eficácia mais elevada foi observada nos doentes com dor menos intensa (p = 0,042). A Escala AEDC apresentou correlação negativa com o IDB (r = - 0,48; p BACKGROUND: Self-efficacy is the belief about one’s personal ability to perform a task or specific behavior successfully. Self-efficacy is a key concept to manage chronic diseases and the studies about it are insufficient in Brazil. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate chronic pain patient’s self-efficacy belief and relate to social demographic variables, pain and depressive symptoms. METHODS: The convenience sample was 132 subjects. The instruments utilized were Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale (CPSS) in Portuguese version (AEDC) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). RESULTS: The self-efficacy average score was 170.8 (DP = 56.7). Low self-efficacy was observed in 8 year education level patients compared to 9 to 11 year education level (p = 0.015). Higher self-efficacy was observed in patients with lower pain intensity (p = 0.042). The AEDC was negative correlated to IDB depression (r = - 0.48; p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with 8 year education level showed low self-efficacy than patients with 9 to 11 year education level. Subjects with lower pain intensity and fewer depressive symptoms showed higher self-efficacy scores.

Marina de Góes Salvetti; Cibele Andrucioli de Mattos Pimenta; Lais Verderame Lage; José Oswaldo de Oliveira Junior; Roberto de Oliveira Rocha

2007-01-01

159

Achieving Self-efficacy in the Virtual Learning Environment  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Virtual learning environments (VLEs) provide a seamless interface fororganising online learning, and are proving indispensable in distance learning. Thetechnological environments, though, are often adopted with little thought aboutpedagogical strategies, especially for students who may be adversely affected by theadditional challenges of new technology. The mature age student, in particular, faces abarrage of factors, which may adversely affect their learning abilities. This paper exploresfactors that influence achievement of learning objectives by mature students. We proposea self-efficacy model which enables learners to attain self-efficacy in virtual learningenvironments. The model takes into account factors that impact specifically on maturestudents. We propose changes in learning as well as pedagogical strategies toaccommodate the specific needs of mature students.

Simone Heaperman

160

Enhancing the Attitudes and Self-Efficacy of Older Adults Toward Computers and the Internet: Results of a Pilot Study.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This pilot study explored whether a manualized computer and Internet training program could enhance older adults' computer self-efficacy and attitudes toward computers and the Internet. A total of 32 community-dwelling adults 65 years of age or older were randomly assigned to either an experimental or control group, with each group consisting of 8 women and 8 men. The experimental group received 6 weeks of training with 2-hour one-on-one sessions once per week. The same training was administered to the control group upon completion of the post-test, 6 weeks after the baseline assessment, to match the procedures on all counts with the exception of training administration. The results of two ANCOVAs indicated that participants within the experimental group improved significantly on both their computer self-efficacy (p < .001) and attitudinal scores (p < .001) at the post-training assessment. No improvements were found in the control group.

Lagana L

2008-09-01

 
 
 
 
161

Enhancing the Attitudes and Self-Efficacy of Older Adults Toward Computers and the Internet: Results of a Pilot Study.  

Science.gov (United States)

This pilot study explored whether a manualized computer and Internet training program could enhance older adults' computer self-efficacy and attitudes toward computers and the Internet. A total of 32 community-dwelling adults 65 years of age or older were randomly assigned to either an experimental or control group, with each group consisting of 8 women and 8 men. The experimental group received 6 weeks of training with 2-hour one-on-one sessions once per week. The same training was administered to the control group upon completion of the post-test, 6 weeks after the baseline assessment, to match the procedures on all counts with the exception of training administration. The results of two ANCOVAs indicated that participants within the experimental group improved significantly on both their computer self-efficacy (p < .001) and attitudinal scores (p < .001) at the post-training assessment. No improvements were found in the control group. PMID:20148185

Lagana, Luciana

2008-09-01

162

The effect of empowerment program on empowerment level and self-care self-efficacy of patients on hemodialysis treatment.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who receive dialysis confront the burdens of long-term illness and numerous physical problems. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental study. The selected patients from Gorgan Dialysis Centre were randomly assigned into an empowerment group (n = 40) and a control group (n = 40). Instruments comprised scales of Empowerment and the Strategies Used by People to Promote Health (SUPPH). Data were collected at baseline and at 6 weeks following the intervention. The data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics through SPSS (version 17). RESULTS: The results indicate that scores of the empowerment (P ? 0.001) and self-care self-efficacy (P = 0.003) in the empowerment group showed a significantly greater improvement than the control group. CONCLUSIONS: The study supports the effectiveness of the empowerment program to promote empowerment level and self-care self-efficacy of hemodialysis patients.

Royani Z; Rayyani M; Behnampour N; Arab M; Goleij J

2013-01-01

163

Does self-efficacy moderate intensity of pain?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

75 subjects were randomly assigned to five self-efficacy conditions (High-High, High-Low, Low-High, Low-Low, and Control) in a 5 x 3 (condition x trial) design. Pressure was applied three times to an exposed finger. After baseline, subjects received false biofeedback (i.e., independent of ratings of pain) that their ability to regulate intensity of pain was either good (High-High and High-Low) or poor (Low-High and Low-Low), or there was no biofeedback (Control). After a second trial, subjects were told that their biofeedback indicated either good (High-High and Low-High) or poor (High-Low and Low-Low) regulatory ability, or they were not given biofeedback (Control). They then received a final trial. Before each trial, subjects recorded self-efficacy expectations for regulating intensity of pain. Mixed multivariate analyses of variance on ratings of intensity and self-efficacy expectations did not yield hypothesized interactions for condition x trial.

Stevens MJ

1992-08-01

164

Developing teacher self-efficacy via a formal HIV/AIDS intervention.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated the effects of a HIV/AIDS module on teachers' sense of self-efficacy regarding their ability to bring about behaviours in their learners which contribute to responsible living and a reduction of the spread of HIV in their communities. The sample was 128 in-service teachers studying in nine different centres in three South African provinces in their second year of a part-time degree in education. A modified Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument (STEBI) was used to generate quantitative data, while semi-structured individual and focus group interviews provided qualitative data. Statistical analyses (ANOVA and MANOVA) revealed statistically significant differences between the participants pre- and post-test self-efficacy scores. Interview data suggested that improved confidence enabled the teachers to gain a better understanding of cultural barriers to HIV/AIDS education and the impediments to developing an effective HIV/AIDS policy in their schools. The study also highlighted the importance of leadership from school management for the successful adoption and implementation of an effective HIV/AIDS policy in schools. Enhanced confidence is noted as a motivating factor for teacher participation in community efforts to support those affected by HIV/AIDS. PMID:21409302

Webb, Paul; Gripper, Anita

2010-10-01

165

Self-efficacy as a predictor of academic performance in science.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Nursing students have traditionally experienced difficulties with the science subjects in nursing curricula, and irrespective of the institution conducting a nursing programme, this trend appears to be continuing. A satisfactory means of predicting academic performance in these subjects will facilitate the development of educational strategies designed to assist students overcome their difficulties. In this study, an instrument called the Self-Efficacy for Science (SEFS) was developed and tested. The SEFS was designed to predict academic performance in the science areas of a first-year undergraduate nursing course. A cohort of first-year students enrolled in a bachelor of nursing course were surveyed by questionnaire. Students' academic scores for two first-year science subjects were obtained and used as the criterion measure for the study. Principal component factor analysis revealed the SEFS contained six instead of the hypothesized four factors. These six factors could explain 70% of students' self-efficacy for science. Cronbach alpha of the SEFS was 0.9. The SEFS could predict 24% of the cohort's academic performance in a physical science subject and 18.5% for a bioscience subject. Studying science in the final year at high school was not statistically significantly related to the SEFS. Implications for students and future research are discussed.

Andrew S

1998-03-01

166

Development of a pre-service teachers' self-efficacy instrument regarding teacher health education standards.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Whereas many education programs expect students to use national standards in various content areas, few studies have been conducted that examine pre-service teachers' confidence in demonstrating their use of the professional teacher standards. PURPOSE: The purpose of this project was 2-fold: (1) To develop the Pre-service Health Education National Standards Self-efficacy (PHENSS) Scale; and (2) To establish the instrument's ability to draw inferences from PHENSS Scale scores. METHODS: The final instrument consisted of 29 items and 4 demographic items. Validation was established using qualitative and quantitative procedures. After the instrument had been validated, pre-service elementary education and pre-service secondary health education teachers were recruited to complete the instrument at 2 different times. RESULTS: Items were grouped to form 7 subscales (a subscale for each standard) and were analyzed to determine test-retest reliability and internal consistency. All scales were found to be statistically significant (p???.05). Cronbach's alpha for the 7 subscales ranged from .73 to .96, and ??=?.94 for the entire instrument. CONCLUSION: The instrument, which assessed self-efficacy toward implementing Professional Teacher Standards in Health Education, was found to be both valid and reliable.

Clark JK; Brey RA; Clark SE

2013-10-01

167

Developing teacher self-efficacy via a formal HIV/AIDS intervention.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study investigated the effects of a HIV/AIDS module on teachers' sense of self-efficacy regarding their ability to bring about behaviours in their learners which contribute to responsible living and a reduction of the spread of HIV in their communities. The sample was 128 in-service teachers studying in nine different centres in three South African provinces in their second year of a part-time degree in education. A modified Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument (STEBI) was used to generate quantitative data, while semi-structured individual and focus group interviews provided qualitative data. Statistical analyses (ANOVA and MANOVA) revealed statistically significant differences between the participants pre- and post-test self-efficacy scores. Interview data suggested that improved confidence enabled the teachers to gain a better understanding of cultural barriers to HIV/AIDS education and the impediments to developing an effective HIV/AIDS policy in their schools. The study also highlighted the importance of leadership from school management for the successful adoption and implementation of an effective HIV/AIDS policy in schools. Enhanced confidence is noted as a motivating factor for teacher participation in community efforts to support those affected by HIV/AIDS.

Webb P; Gripper A

2010-10-01

168

Cardiac-self efficacy predicts adverse outcomes in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients  

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Full Text Available Background: Little is known about the predictive role of Cardiac Self Efficacy (CSE) in the ensuing months following a coronary event. We sought to determine whether CSE predicts adverse events in the months following discharge in patients with Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). Design: Data from a prospective study of 193 patients recently hospitalized for CAD. Methods: Data were collected via participant self-report and medical records at 3-month post-discharge (baseline; T1), 6-month post-discharge (T2) and 9-month post-discharge (T3). CSE was measured using the Cardiac Self Efficacy Scale. Multi-variate regression modeling was applied to explore the association between baseline CSE scores and cardiac-related hospital admissions and functional cardiac status at T2 and T3. Other outcomes included any hospital admissions, self-reported mental and physical health at follow up. Results: Higher CSE scores at baseline significantly predicted better cardiac functioning and self-rated mental and physical health at both T2 and T3 (with one exception); this was consistent across all five models. While baseline CSE did not predict cardiac or other hospital admission at T2, CSE was a significant predictor of both outcomes at T3; higher CSE scores resulted in reductions in likelihood of hospital admissions. After adjustment for psychosocial variables however, neither association remained. Baseline depression explained the association between baseline CSE and any cardiac admissions, as well as baseline CSE and any hospital admissions at T3 follow up. Conclusions: While CSE can predict key outcomes following a CAD event, much of the association can be explained by the presence of depression.

Adrienne O’Neil; Michael Berk; Justin Davis; Lesley Stafford

2013-01-01

169

Agricultural Personnel’s Proactive Behavior: Effects of Self efficacy Perceptions and Perceived Organizational Support  

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Full Text Available A model for predicting psychological empowerment and proactive behavior was examined with 80 agricultural personnel from Karaj, Iran country. They completed measures of perceived organizational support (POS), psychological empowerment (PE), self efficacy (JSE), and proactive behavior (PB). Results supported the conceptual framework of study for understanding internal and motivational underpinnings that may contribute to explain psychological empowerment and proactive behavior. Perceived organizational support and self efficacy related positively to psychological empowerment and proactive behavior, and perceived organizational support and self efficacy each contributed distinctive variance to the explanation of psychological empowerment. Self efficacy partially mediated the relationship between perceived organizational support and psychological empowerment, psychological empowerment partially mediated the relationship between self efficacy and proactive behavior, and the combination of psychological empowerment and self efficacy fully mediated the relationship between perceived organizational support and proactive behavior. Finally, the research provided managerial implications.Key words: Psychological Empowerment (PE); Proactive Behavior (PB); Perceived Organizational Support (POS); Self Efficacy

Seyyed Mohammad Kazem Hashemi; Hossein Kazem Nadi; Seyed Mahmood Hosseini; Ahmad Rezvanfar

2012-01-01

170

The effect of an intervention combining self-efficacy theory and pedometers on promoting physical activity among adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: To study the effect of an intervention combining self-efficacy theory and pedometers on promoting physical activity among adolescents. BACKGROUND: The beneficial effects of regular physical activity on health in youths are well-documented. However, adolescence is found to be the age of greatest decline in physical activity participation. Physical activity participation among girls was generally less frequent and less intense than boys. Therefore, there is a strong need for effective interventions that can help promote physical activity in this population. DESIGN: An experimental design. METHODS: Two classes of female junior college students (mean age = 16) were randomly sampled from a total of four classes and, of those, one each was randomly assigned to either the intervention (n = 46) or the control group (n = 48). Self-efficacy was used as a core theoretical foundation of the intervention design, and pedometers were provided to the students in the intervention group. Distances between each domestic scenic spot were illustrated graphically in a walking log for students to mark the extent of their walking or running. Students in the control group participated in a usual physical education programme. The primary outcome was a change in the number of aerobic steps. The secondary outcomes were changes in cardiopulmonary endurance and exercise self-efficacy. RESULTS: At 12-week follow-up, the mean change in aerobic steps was 371 steps and 108 steps in the intervention and control group, respectively. The difference in mean change between the two groups was 467 steps. Effects of the intervention on changes of cardiopulmonary endurance and perceived exercise self-efficacy scores were not found. CONCLUSIONS: Among adolescent girls, a 12-week intervention designed on the theoretical foundation of self-efficacy theory and provision of pedometers was found to have an effect on increasing their physical activity. The intervention, using graphs of domestic scenic spots to represent the distance of walking or running as monitored by pedometers, might enhance motivation regarding physical activity. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: It is important for health professionals, including school health nurses, involved in the care of adolescent health, to design and provide a physical activity intervention combining self-efficacy theory and provision of pedometer to promote physical activity.

Lee LL; Kuo YC; Fanaw D; Perng SJ; Juang IF

2012-04-01

171

Tradução e adaptação cultural da Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale para o português Traducción y adaptación cultural de la Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale para el portugués Translation and cultural adaptation of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale to Portuguese  

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Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: traduzir e adaptar a Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale ( BSES), para a realidade cultural do Brasil e avaliar a validade de conteúdo da versão em português, para que possa ser utilizada na população brasileira. MÉTODOS: O estudo envolveu duas fases (1. protocolo de tradução e adaptação cultural e 2. validade de conteúdo). RESULTADOS: O escore total variou de 93 a 162 pontos (M = 127,03; DP = 19,62). Quando considerado apenas as multíparas, a pontuação da escala variou de 106 a 156 (M = 131,66; DP = 15,91). A versão mostrou ser de fácil compreensão, obtendo-se adequada validação semântica e de consistência. O Índice de Validação de Conteúdo foi 0,84 e o coeficiente alfa de Cronbach = 0,90. CONCLUSÕES: Os achados sugerem que a BSES é adequada para screening da confiança materna no seu potencial para amamentar. No entanto, é necessário avaliar as propriedades psicométricas deste instrumento em amostra com diferentes níveis sociais e educacionais e em outras regiões do Brasil.OBJETIVOS: traducir y adaptar la escala Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES), para la realidad cultural de Brasil y evaluar la validez de contenido de la versión en portugués para que pueda ser utilizada en la población brasileña. MÉTODOS: El estudio se realizó en dos fases (1- protocolo de traducción y adaptación cultural, y 2- Validación del contenido). RESULTADOS: El puntaje total varió de 93 a 162 puntos (P = 127,03; DE = 19,62). Cuando fueron consideradas apenas las multíparas, la puntuación de la escala varió de 106 a 156 (P = 131,66; DE = 15,91). La versión mostró ser de fácil comprensión, obteniéndose una adecuada validación semántica y de consistencia. El Índice de Validación de Contenido fue 0,84 y el coeficiente alfa de Cronbach = 0,90. CONCLUSIONES: Los hallazgos sugieren que la BSES es adecuada para detectar la confianza materna en su potencialidad para amamantar. Sin embargo, es necesario evaluar las propiedades psicométricas de este instrumento en muestras con diferentes niveles sociales y educacionales y en otras regiones de Brasil.OBJECTIVES: Translate and adapt the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES) to the cultural reality of Brazil and evaluate the content validity of the Portuguese version, so that it can be used in the Brazilian population. METHODS: The study was made in two phases (1- Protocol translation and cultural adaptation, and 2- Validity of Content). RESULTS: The total score ranged from 93 to 162 points (M = 127.03, SD = 19.62). When considering only women who bore many children, the score scale ranged from 106 to 156 (M = 131.66, SD = 15.91). The translated version proved to be easy to understand, showing good consistency and semantic validation. The Index for the Validation of Content was 0.84 and the Cronbach's alpha = 0.90. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that the BSES is suitable for screening the maternal confidence in its potentiality to breastfeed. However, it is necessary to evaluate the psychometric properties of this instrument in samples with different social and educational levels, and in other regions of Brazil

Mônica Oliveira Batista Oriá; Lorena Barbosa Ximenes

2010-01-01

172

Tradução e adaptação cultural da Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale para o português/ Translation and cultural adaptation of the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale to Portuguese/ Traducción y adaptación cultural de la Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale para el portugués  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVOS: traduzir e adaptar a Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale ( BSES), para a realidade cultural do Brasil e avaliar a validade de conteúdo da versão em português, para que possa ser utilizada na população brasileira. MÉTODOS: O estudo envolveu duas fases (1. protocolo de tradução e adaptação cultural e 2. validade de conteúdo). RESULTADOS: O escore total variou de 93 a 162 pontos (M = 127,03; DP = 19,62). Quando considerado apenas as multíparas, a pontua? (more) ?ão da escala variou de 106 a 156 (M = 131,66; DP = 15,91). A versão mostrou ser de fácil compreensão, obtendo-se adequada validação semântica e de consistência. O Índice de Validação de Conteúdo foi 0,84 e o coeficiente alfa de Cronbach = 0,90. CONCLUSÕES: Os achados sugerem que a BSES é adequada para screening da confiança materna no seu potencial para amamentar. No entanto, é necessário avaliar as propriedades psicométricas deste instrumento em amostra com diferentes níveis sociais e educacionais e em outras regiões do Brasil. Abstract in spanish OBJETIVOS: traducir y adaptar la escala Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES), para la realidad cultural de Brasil y evaluar la validez de contenido de la versión en portugués para que pueda ser utilizada en la población brasileña. MÉTODOS: El estudio se realizó en dos fases (1- protocolo de traducción y adaptación cultural, y 2- Validación del contenido). RESULTADOS: El puntaje total varió de 93 a 162 puntos (P = 127,03; DE = 19,62). Cuando fueron considerad (more) as apenas las multíparas, la puntuación de la escala varió de 106 a 156 (P = 131,66; DE = 15,91). La versión mostró ser de fácil comprensión, obteniéndose una adecuada validación semántica y de consistencia. El Índice de Validación de Contenido fue 0,84 y el coeficiente alfa de Cronbach = 0,90. CONCLUSIONES: Los hallazgos sugieren que la BSES es adecuada para detectar la confianza materna en su potencialidad para amamantar. Sin embargo, es necesario evaluar las propiedades psicométricas de este instrumento en muestras con diferentes niveles sociales y educacionales y en otras regiones de Brasil. Abstract in english OBJECTIVES: Translate and adapt the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale (BSES) to the cultural reality of Brazil and evaluate the content validity of the Portuguese version, so that it can be used in the Brazilian population. METHODS: The study was made in two phases (1- Protocol translation and cultural adaptation, and 2- Validity of Content). RESULTS: The total score ranged from 93 to 162 points (M = 127.03, SD = 19.62). When considering only women who bore many children, (more) the score scale ranged from 106 to 156 (M = 131.66, SD = 15.91). The translated version proved to be easy to understand, showing good consistency and semantic validation. The Index for the Validation of Content was 0.84 and the Cronbach's alpha = 0.90. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that the BSES is suitable for screening the maternal confidence in its potentiality to breastfeed. However, it is necessary to evaluate the psychometric properties of this instrument in samples with different social and educational levels, and in other regions of Brazil

Oriá, Mônica Oliveira Batista; Ximenes, Lorena Barbosa

2010-04-01

173

Self-Efficacy, State Anxiety, and Motivation during Mandatory Combative Training  

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Full Text Available U.S. Army soldiers (n = 52) attending Instructor Combative Training (ICT) courses at two military installations in the US were examined before, during and at the end of the course on self-defense efficacy (SDE), teaching combatives self-efficacy (TCSE), combatives state anxiety (CSA), and motivation. In a quasi-experimental design, a cognitive-behavioral coping intervention targeting combative anxiety was implemented. Two classes (n = 32) constituted the interventions and one class as a control group (n = 20). RM ANOVAs revealed a significant increase in SDE and TCSE across the course for the experimental groups. Specifically, the intervention group soldiers scored lower in CSA during high anxiety driven events and higher in motivation than the control group soldiers along the course progression. The results provide preliminary evidence that a combatives anxiety coping strategy can influence SDE, TCSE, CSA, and motivation during mandatory psychologically demanding training.

Hector R. Morales-Negron; Robert C. Eklund; Gershon Tenenbaum

2011-01-01

174

An investigation of the attitudes, anxieties and self-efficacy beliefs towards mathematics lessons high school students’ in terms of gender, types of school, and students’ grades  

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Full Text Available In recent years, there has been an increasing recognition that mathematics anxiety plays an important role in students’ learning of mathematics and thus, mathematics anxiety has gained heightened awareness by mathematics educators as an important factor in the teaching of mathematics (Bursal & Paznokas, 2006; Thomas & Higbee, 1999; McLeod, 1988; Singh, Granville, & Dika, 2002; Sloan, Daane, & Geisen, 2002; Vinson, 2001; Zettle & Raines, 2000). Math anxiety defined by Richardson & Suinn (1972) as a “feelings of tension and anxiety that interfere with the manipulation of numbers and the solving of mathematical problems in a wide variety of ordinary life and academic situations”. Research demonstrated that the physiological, cognitive, and behavioral consequences of math anxiety may impair life functioning. For example, students who have math anxiety exhibit physiological reactivity to numeric stimuli and have faulty beliefs and negative attitudes regarding their problem solving abilities. These students also may avoid environment and careers that require utilization of math skills, and will sacrifice accuracy for speed when performing numeric tasks (Ashcraft & Kirk, 2001). Purpose and significanceThe purpose of this research is to examine whether there is a significant difference between the attitudes, anxieties, and self-efficacy beliefs towards mathematics lessons high school students’ in terms of gender, types of school and students’ grades. It is very important to reveal relationships between attitudes towards mathematics lessons, anxieties towards mathematics lessons and self-efficacy beliefs to develop high school students’ positive attitudes towards mathematics lessons.MethodsIn this study, descriptive research method was conducted. A total of 418 students, from three different school types participated in the study. The schools are Anatolian High School, Vocational High School and Public High School. Three scales were implemented on students to reveal relationships between students’ attitudes towards mathematics lessons, anxieties towards mathematics lessons and self-efficacy beliefs. The results obtained from scales were analyzed with SPSS 13.0.ResultsIt was observed in the findings of study that there are no statistically significant differences between students’ gender and scores of attitudes towards mathematics lessons, anxieties towards mathematics lessons and self-efficacy beliefs. But there are statistically significant differences between students’ types of school and students’ grades and scores of attitudes towards mathematics lessons, anxieties towards mathematics lessons and self-efficacy beliefs.Discussion and ConclusionsStudents’ achievements in mathematics lessons are directly related to students’ self-efficacy beliefs, attitudes towards mathematics lessons and anxieties towards mathematics lessons. Students’ mathematics achievements will increase because of students’ high self-efficacy beliefs and attitudes towards mathematics lessons. In this study, there are no statistically significant differences between students’ gender and scores of attitudes towards mathematics lessons, anxieties towards mathematics lessons and self-efficacy beliefs. But there are statistically significant differences between students’ types of school and students’ grades and scores of attitudes towards mathematics lessons, anxieties towards mathematics lessons and self-efficacy beliefs. While students’ who attended from successful schools- self-efficacy beliefs and attitudes towards mathematics lessons are high, their anxiety levels towards mathematics lessons are low. Besides, it was observed, when students’ grades increase, their self-efficacy beliefs and attitudes towards mathematics lessons get higher and their anxiety levels towards mathematics lessons get lower.

N. ?zzet Kurbano?lu; Mithat Takunyac?

2012-01-01

175

Academic Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Teacher Candidates  

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Full Text Available This study aims determining academic self-efficacy perception of teacher candidates. It is survey model. Population of the study consists of teacher candidates in 2010-2011 academic years at Ahmet Kele?o?lu Education Faculty of Education Formation of Selçuk University. A simple random sample was selected as sampling method and the study was conducted on 312 teacher candidates. The data of this study was obtained by “academic selfefficacy scale” which was developed by Jerusalem and Schwazer (1981) and translated into Turkish by Y?lmaz, Gürçay, and Ekici (2007) and its reliability value was determined as .79. However, Cronbach Alfa reliability value of this scale became .76 with the result of the data analysis of the study. SPSS package program was used to analyze the data; and the data analysis, frequency, percentage, arithmetic mean, standard deviation, independent samples t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc tests (LSD) test were used. When the findings of the research were considered in general, the result showed that the academic self-efficacy perception level of the candidates was at desired level. However, teachers' views about the level of academic self-efficacy perception showed that most of them preferred a lower level option "suits me", instead of "totally suits me" option that was the highest degree of participation of four likert-type scale. This illustrated that their perception about this issue was not at a very high level. When independent variables were taken into account, among the academic perception levels of teacher candidates, a significant difference was detected in terms of working as a teacher or not and academic achievement variables but it revealed no significant difference in terms of gender and type of education program variables.

Dr. Etem YE??LYURT

2013-01-01

176

Middle School Students' Science Self-Efficacy and Its Sources: Examination of Gender Difference  

Science.gov (United States)

The main purpose of the present study is to investigate middle school students' science self-efficacy as well as its sources and outcomes as a function of gender. Bandura's hypothesized sources of self-efficacy (i.e., mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and emotional arousal) in addition to being inviting with self and inviting with others were examined as sources of self-efficacy, while cognitive and metacognitive strategy use was examined as an outcome of self-efficacy. A total of 1,932 students participated in the study and were administered self-report instruments. Results showed that the relationship between science self-efficacy and its proposed sources does not change as a function of gender. All proposed sources, except for vicarious experience, were found to be significantly related to students' scientific self-efficacy. Moreover, girls were found to experience significantly more emotional arousal and to send positive messages to others more than boys. On the other hand, no gender difference was found concerning science self-efficacy and strategy use. The findings also revealed a positive association between science self-efficacy and strategy use. Overall, findings supported Bandura's conception of self-efficacy and suggested invitations as additional sources of self-efficacy.

K?ran, Dekant; Sungur, Semra

2012-10-01

177

Validity of the Turkish version of the medication adherence self-efficacy scale-short form in hypertensive patients  

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Full Text Available Objective: Study purpose was to examine the validity of a 13-item short form of the Medication Adherence Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (MASES-SF) in an independent sample of 150 hypertensive Turkish patients.Methods: This is a methodological study and 150 adult patients, who are receiving medication for hypertension in the last one year, were included as the study sample. The sample of the study was chosen with the method of simple random sampling. The study was conducted between October 25, 2010 and December 31, 2010 at Family Health Center (FHC). In this study, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used for psychometric evaluation. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was used to evaluate the reliability of the scale. Results: Confirmatory factor analysis showed that all goodness indexes were at acceptable quality: ?2=61.72, df=65, p>0.05, GFI=0.99, CFI=1.00, RMSA=0.00. Reliability coefficient of the Turkish adaptation of MASES-SF was found as 0.94 and item-total correlations ranged between 0.13 - 0.52. Patients with uncontrolled hypertension had lower self-efficacy scores compared to those with normal blood pressure. Conclusion: This result indicated that the preliminary criterion validity is adequate. Psychometric testing demonstrated satisfactory internal consistency and validity of the instrument for patients in the study group. It can be used confidently in determining and testing interventions to improve medication adherence self-efficacy perceptions and behaviors in hypertensive Turkish patients. The MASES-SF is brief, quick to administer, and capture useful data on medication adherence self-efficacy in hypertensive patients.

Rabia Hac?hasano?lu; Rabia Hac?hasano?lu; Cantürk Çap?k

2012-01-01

178

Contraceptive self-efficacy: a primary prevention strategy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This paper discusses the development, implementation, and qualitative evaluation of an intervention designed to improve contraceptive self-efficacy (CSE) in a population at high risk for pregnancy. In a previous study, a relationship was found between CSE and a measure of contraceptive use for sexually active young women attending a family planning clinic. Here, the concept of CSE is further developed to identify contraceptive and sexual issues for adolescent males, for adolescents who show little or no motivation to obtain or use contraceptives, and for those adolescents who would plan to carry a pregnancy to term if they were to become pregnant. Implications are drawn for developing primary prevention programs.

Levinson RA

1984-01-01

179

Imagined Transcultural Histories and Geographies  

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Full Text Available In a globalised world, an assumption prevails that the nation has somehow lost its power to regulate our lives, being undermined by other forces, either top-down through the impact of global capitalism or bottom-up through migrations, transnational religious, ethnic or social movement communities or other transversal politics. A related idea is that ‘culture’ is now irrevocably hybridised and border-zoned, that we no longer live in a world of discrete, located, identifiable and historically grounded cultures but in some unstable and for-the-moment insterstitiality, a sort of cultural interlanguage that sits outside well-mapped structures of power. Yet, just as the nation and the boundaries it sets around culture are being conceptually chased from our maps of the world, they come galloping back to reassert themselves. They do so politically, economically, legally, symbolically. Amidst all the noise of our transnationalisms, hybridities and interstitialities, the idea of what it is to be ‘Australian’ or ‘French’ or ‘Filipino’ or ‘Asian’ reaffirms itself, in mental geographies and constructed histories, as our ‘imagined community’ (to use Benedict Anderson’s famous term [Anderson 1983]), or indeed, ‘imagined Other’, even if it is an imagined ‘Other’ that we would somehow wish to incorporate into our newly hybridised Self. Using the notion of transcultural mappings, the articles in this special issue investigate this apparent paradox. They look at how the Self and Other have been mapped through imagined links between geography, history and cultural location. They interrogate the tension between the persistence of mappings of the world based on discrete national or cultural identities on one hand, and, on the other hand, the push to move beyond these carefully guarded borders and problematise precise notions of identity and belonging.

Bronwyn Winter

2012-01-01

180

Developing resident learning profiles: Do scientific evidence epistemology beliefs, EBM self-efficacy beliefs and EBM skills matter?  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated resident scientific evidence epistemology beliefs, evidence based medicine (EBM) self-efficacy beliefs, and EBM skills. A convenience sample of fifty-one residents located in six U.S. based residency programs completed an online instrument. Hofer's epistemology survey questionnaire was modified to test responses based on four types of scientific evidence encountered in medical practice (Clinical Trial Phase 1, Clinical Trial Phase 3, Meta-analysis and Qualitative). It was hypothesized that epistemology beliefs would differ based on the type of scientific evidence considered. A principal components analysis produced a two factor solution that was significant across type of scientific evidence suggesting that when evaluating epistemology beliefs context does matter. Factor 1 is related to the certainty of research methods and the certainty of medical conclusions and factor 2 denotes medical justification. For each type of scientific evidence, both factors differed on questions comprising the factor structure with significant differences found for the factor 1 and 2 questions. A justification belief case problem using checklist format was triangulated with the survey results, and as predicted the survey and checklist justification z scores indicated no significant differences, and two new justification themes emerged. Modified versions of Finney and Schraw's statistical self-efficacy and skill instruments produced expected significant EBM score correlations with unexpected results indicating that the number of EBM and statistics courses are not significant for EBM self-efficacy and skill scores. The study results were applied to the construction of a learning profile that provided residents belief and skill feedback specific to individual learning needs. The learning profile design incorporated core values related to 'Believer' populations that focus on art, harmony, tact and diplomacy. Future research recommendations include testing context and case problems in other domains with larger sample sizes, offering belief feedback profiles to understand how individuals value and apply belief knowledge, and conducting belief and skill testing using online access.

Robert, Nancy J.

 
 
 
 
181

Normative influences and alcohol consumption: the role of drinking refusal self-efficacy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article extends the theory of normative social behavior by conceptualizing drinking refusal self-efficacy as an important moderator in the relationship between descriptive norms and drinking intentions and behavior. A study was conducted among Korean high school students (N?=?538) to assess their normative perceptions, drinking refusal self-efficacy, and drinking intentions. We found a significant association between self-efficacy and drinking intentions and behavior, as well as an interaction effect between self-efficacy and descriptive norms on drinking intentions and behavior. Having stronger efficacy appears to mitigate the harmful effects of descriptive norms on drinking intentions and behavior. Implications for school-based interventions are also discussed.

Jang SA; Rimal RN; Cho N

2013-01-01

182

Self-Efficacy In Relation Emotional Intelligence Of Senior Secondary School Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This research has been performed with the aim of determining the relation between emotional intelligence (EI) and Self-Efficacy of the senior secondary school students. In gathering the data the descriptive method has been used and the measuring tools of Self-Efficacy Questionnaire developed by Peter Muris and Emotional Intelligence scale (2005) developed by Dr. Rambir Sharma have been used. The results obtained from Pearson Correlation showed that there is a positive significant correlation between emotional intelligence (EI) and self-efficacy (r =0.3). It was also found that female students were better than male students with regard to their self efficacy and emotional intelligence

Rita Saini

2012-01-01

183

Burnout and self-efficacy: a study on teachers' beliefs when implementing an innovative educational system in the Netherlands.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: In the Netherlands, secondary education has seen radical changes that originated with the national authorities, including the Study-home system, a pupil-centred approach in which teachers help develop pupils' independent working and creative thinking in order to get them to take responsibility for their own academic achievements. As educational innovations are more often than not accompanied by stress, the present study focuses on the onset of burnout among teachers who recently implemented this innovative system in the Netherlands. AIMS: To test hypotheses that the extent to which teachers have a negative attitude towards the new instructional practices relates positively to their level of burnout, and that their self-efficacy beliefs regarding implementation of the practices and coping with stress involved in this relate negatively to their burnout levels. SAMPLE: A random sample of 490 teachers employed in the Study-home system participated in this study. METHODS: Three questionnaires were used. The Dutch version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory for teachers (Schaufeli & Van Horn, 1995) was used to assess the teachers' burnout level. Second, a specially developed self-efficacy questionnaire relating to the domains of: (1) guiding groups of students using the principle of differentiation, (2) involving pupils with tasks and (3) use of innovative educational practices. Last, a questionnaire on the teachers' attitudes concerning the usefulness and effectiveness of the Study-home as an educational innovation. RESULTS: Regression analyses showed that the self-efficacy beliefs for each of the three domains were significantly and negatively related to the depersonalisation and emotional exhaustion dimensions of burnout, and significantly positively related to the personal accomplishment dimension. Furthermore, the more negative the teachers' attitudes towards the Study-home appeared to be, the more they appeared to suffer from depersonalisation and emotional exhaustion, and the lower they scored on the personal accomplishment dimension of burnout. CONCLUSIONS: The study's results indicate that teachers' self-efficacy beliefs are related to their burnout level. Teachers with strong self-efficacy beliefs seem to be more prepared to experiment with, and later also to implement new educational practices.

Evers WJ; Brouwers A; Tomic W

2002-06-01

184

Psychometric properties of a hurricane coping self-efficacy measure.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This brief report describes the psychometric properties of an instrument designed to measure Hurricane Coping Self-Efficacy (HCSE). Survivors of Hurricane Andrew (n = 165) and Hurricane Opal (n = 63) completed the HCSE and assessments of optimism, social support, distress, and resource loss. Principal components factor analyses revealed a unidimensional structure for the HCSE. Internal consistency of the HCSE was strong. In both samples, HCSE was positively associated with optimism and social support, but negatively associated with general psychological distress, trauma related distress, and resource loss. Finally, hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated that the HCSE explained a significant amount of experimental variance for intrusive thoughts and avoidance after controlling for social support, lost resources, and optimism.

Benight CC; Ironson G; Durham RL

1999-04-01

185

Cultural adaptation of condom use self efficacy scale in Ghana  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Accurate assessment of self-reports of sexual behaviours are vital to the evaluation of HIV prevention and family planning interventions. This investigation was to determine the cross-cultural suitability of the Condom Use Self Efficacy Scale (CUSES) for Ghana. A survey using a sample of 520 aged 17 to 32 years from Ghana completed the anonymous scale. A Principal Component Analysis identified a 14 item scale with four reliable factors labelled Appropriation (Cronbach alpha=.85), Assertive (Cronbach alpha=.90), Pleasure and Intoxicant (Cronbach alpha=.83), and STDs (Cronbach alpha=.81) that altogether explained 73.72% of total variance. The scale correlated well with a measure of actual condom use (r=.73), indicating evidence of construct validity. The factor loadings were similar to the original scale but not identical suggesting relevant cultural variations. The study therefore cautioned researchers against the use of the original CUSES without validation in African settings and contexts

Paul Narh Doku; Kwaku Asante Oppong

2010-01-01

186

Body weight attributions and eating self-efficacy in adolescence.  

Science.gov (United States)

In an attempt to find an optimum age during adolescence to target weight control programs successfully, 189 adolescents were surveyed using measures of eating self-efficacy and body-weight attributions. The sensitivity of the attribution measures was assessed in a pilot study using 100 adolescents. The major experiment indicated higher levels of eating control at 12 and 13 years of age, decreasing with age. However, the locus of control measure indicated an increase in internal attributions with age. It is argued that this paradox between degree of control subjects reported over their eating and the degree subjects believed their body weight to be controlled internally may have important clinical implications and should be investigated further. PMID:2048460

Moss, N D; Dadds, M R

1991-01-01

187

Body weight attributions and eating self-efficacy in adolescence.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In an attempt to find an optimum age during adolescence to target weight control programs successfully, 189 adolescents were surveyed using measures of eating self-efficacy and body-weight attributions. The sensitivity of the attribution measures was assessed in a pilot study using 100 adolescents. The major experiment indicated higher levels of eating control at 12 and 13 years of age, decreasing with age. However, the locus of control measure indicated an increase in internal attributions with age. It is argued that this paradox between degree of control subjects reported over their eating and the degree subjects believed their body weight to be controlled internally may have important clinical implications and should be investigated further.

Moss ND; Dadds MR

1991-01-01

188

Autoeficacia en la prevención sexual del Sida: la influencia del género/ Self-efficacy in AIDS sexual prevention: influence of gender  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in spanish La literatura científica apunta a que la escasa autoeficacia para el uso del preservativo explicaría muchas conductas de riesgo de transmisión del VIH en jóvenes. Se analiza la autoeficacia de los jóvenes en el uso del preservativo, la existencia de diferencias de género y la relación con variables relevantes en la prevención. Se aplicó la "Subescala de Autoeficacia en el Uso del Preservativo", incluida en el Cuestionario de Prevención del Sida (Ballester, Gil y (more) Giménez, 2007), a 3540 universitarios (50.9% mujeres, 49.1% hombres). Los resultados indican que los jóvenes obtienen puntuaciones medias-altas en autoeficacia, mostrándose la menor puntuación en el autocontrol en el momento de excitación. Se obtienen diferencias estadísticamente significativas en distintas situaciones según el género, siendo las mujeres las que se perciben más autoeficaces que los hombres, sobre todo en situaciones relacionadas con una posible evaluación negativa por parte de la pareja al sugerir su uso; y menos que ellos en aquellas referidas al ámbito público (comprar preservativos). Además, la autoeficacia correlacionó significativamente con la intención de conducta preventiva, la mayor frecuencia autoinformada de uso del preservativo y la percepción de eficacia del preservativo en la prevención del VIH. Las futuras intervenciones preventivas deberían incluir un componente de autoeficacia y una perspectiva de género. Abstract in english The scientific literature suggests that a low self-efficacy for condom use may be related to many risky behaviors for HIV transmission in young people. We analyze the self-efficacy of condom use among youth, the existence of gender differences and the relationship with other relevant variables in HIV prevention. The "Self-Efficacy Condom Use Subscale", included in the AIDS Prevention Questionnaire (Ballester, Gil and Giménez, 2007), was administrated to 3540 university s (more) tudents (50.9% women, 49.1% men). The results showed that the sample obtained medium-high scores on self-efficacy, showing the lowest scores when behavior involves their sexual control at the time of excitation. Statistically significant differences were obtained in different situations according to gender. In this regard, women perceived themselves higher condom use self-efficacy than men, especially when their suggestion about condom use might cause a negative evaluation to the partner; and unless than men those relating to public domain (buying condoms). Moreover, self-efficacy correlated significantly with preventive behavior intention, increased self-reported frequency of condom use and perceived effectiveness of condoms in HIV prevention. Future preventive interventions should include an element of self-efficacy and a differentiated perspective by gender.

Ballester, Rafael; Gil-Llario, María Dolores; Ruiz-Palomino, Estefanía; Giménez-García, Cristina

2013-01-01

189

An exploration into the role of depression and self-efficacy on township men who have sex with men's ability to engage in safer sexual practices.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Men who have sex with men (MSM) in South Africa remain at particular risk of HIV infection. The Ukwazana baseline survey is the first to explore this risk in relation to psychological factors associated with unprotected anal intercourse (UAI). A cohort of 316 MSM from township peri-urban Cape Town took part in the survey. The survey found that 55.2% had engaged in UAI over the preceding 6 months. Depression was significantly associated with UAI. Respondents with self-efficacy scores less than two standard deviations above the mean were also more likely to have engaged in UAI. A Sobel test for mediation highlighted that the depression-UAI association was partially mediated by self-efficacy, indicating that most of the effect of depression on UAI was not covarying with self-efficacy. This study, therefore, highlights that both depression and self-efficacy should be considered factors to be addressed in HIV-prevention programmes aimed at peri-urban MSM.

Tucker A; Liht J; de Swardt G; Jobson G; Rebe K; McIntyre J; Struthers H

2013-10-01

190

The influence of self-efficacy and outcome expectations on the relationship between perceived environment and physical activity in the workplace  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent research and commentary contends that ecological approaches may be particularly useful for understanding and promoting physical activity participation in various settings including the workplace. Yet within the physical activity domain there is a lack of understanding of how ecological environment factors influence behaviour. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between perceived environment, social-cognitive variables, and physical activity behaviour. Methods Participants (N = 897) were employees from three large worksites who completed self-report inventories containing measures of self-efficacy, outcome expectations, perceptions of the workplace environment (PWES), and physical activity behaviour during both leisure-time and incorporated throughout the workday. Results Results of both bivariate and multiple regression analyses indicated the global PWES scores had a limited association with leisure-time physical activity (R2adj =.01). Sequential regression analyses supported a weak association between physical activity incorporated in the workplace and PWES (R2adj = .04) and the partial mediation of self-efficacy on the relationship between PWES and workplace physical activity (variance accounted for reduced to R2adj = .02 when self-efficacy was controlled). Conclusion Overall, the results of the present investigation indicate that self-efficacy acted as a partial mediator of the relationship between perceived environment and workplace physical activity participation. Implications of the findings for physical activity promotion using ecological-based approaches, and future directions for research from this perspective in worksite settings are discussed.

Prodaniuk Tricia R; Plotnikoff Ronald C; Spence John C; Wilson Phillip M

2004-01-01

191

An exploration into the role of depression and self-efficacy on township men who have sex with men's ability to engage in safer sexual practices.  

Science.gov (United States)

Men who have sex with men (MSM) in South Africa remain at particular risk of HIV infection. The Ukwazana baseline survey is the first to explore this risk in relation to psychological factors associated with unprotected anal intercourse (UAI). A cohort of 316 MSM from township peri-urban Cape Town took part in the survey. The survey found that 55.2% had engaged in UAI over the preceding 6 months. Depression was significantly associated with UAI. Respondents with self-efficacy scores less than two standard deviations above the mean were also more likely to have engaged in UAI. A Sobel test for mediation highlighted that the depression-UAI association was partially mediated by self-efficacy, indicating that most of the effect of depression on UAI was not covarying with self-efficacy. This study, therefore, highlights that both depression and self-efficacy should be considered factors to be addressed in HIV-prevention programmes aimed at peri-urban MSM. PMID:23387517

Tucker, Andrew; Liht, Jose; de Swardt, Glenn; Jobson, Geoffrey; Rebe, Kevin; McIntyre, James; Struthers, Helen

2013-02-06

192

A Qualitative Exploration of Higher Self-Efficacy String Students Preparing for a Competition  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined and qualitatively described the music practice behaviors, strategies, and thoughts of four high school string students who indicated a high string playing self-efficacy. Concepts of practice, motivation, achievement, and self-efficacy were linked together to analyze tendencies and summarize strategies. These students were…

Clark, Jennifer Cahill

2013-01-01

193

Bystander Behavior in Bullying Situations: Basic Moral Sensitivity, Moral Disengagement and Defender Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of the present study was to investigate how basic moral sensitivity in bullying, moral disengagement in bullying and defender self-efficacy were related to different bystander behaviors in bullying. Therefore, we examined pathways that linked students' basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement, and defender self-efficacy to different…

Thornberg, Robert; Jungert, Tomas

2013-01-01

194

A Study on the Correlation between Self Efficacy and Foreign Language Learning Anxiety  

Science.gov (United States)

Anxiety in language learning is one of the less researched areas; that is why this study explores whether the anxiety level of foreign language learners is related to their self efficacy levels. For this purpose, 100 participants joined the study and the Foreign Language Learning Anxiety Scale and The Self Efficacy Scale were administered to them.…

Cubukcu, Feryal

2008-01-01

195

Linking Preservice Teachers' Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Mathematics Teaching Efficacy to Their Mathematical Performance  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study examined preservice teachers' mathematics self-efficacy and mathematics teaching efficacy and compared them to their mathematical performance. Participants included 89 early childhood preservice teachers at a Midwestern university. Instruments included the Mathematics Self-Efficacy Scale (MSES), Mathematics Teaching Efficacy Beliefs…

Bates, Alan B.; Latham, Nancy; Kim, Jin-ah

2011-01-01

196

Self-Efficacy, Motivation, and Academic Adjustment among African American Women Attending Institutions of Higher Education  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the relationships among self-efficacy beliefs, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and academic adjustment among 111 African American women in college. Results revealed that self-efficacy beliefs predicted Motivation to Know, Externally Regulated motivation, Identified motivation, and academic adjustment. Furthermore,…

Thomas, Deneia M.; Love, Keisha M.; Roan-Belle, Clarissa; Tyler, Keneth M.; Brown, Carrie Lynn; Garriott, Patton O.

2009-01-01

197

Adolescents' Self-Efficacy to Overcome Barriers to Physical Activity Scale  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper describes a revised measure of self-efficacy to overcome barriers to moderate and vigorous physical activity in a sample of 484 high school students in Toronto, Ontario. The students had a mean age of 15.3 years. Principal axis factoring with oblique rotation yielded five factors: self-efficacy to overcome internal, harassment, physical…

Dwyer, John J. M.; Chulak, Tala; Maitland, Scott; Allison, Kenneth R.; Lysy, Daria C.; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Sheeshka, Judy

2012-01-01

198

The Relationship between Self-efficacy and Stress among Iranian EFL Teachers  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study investigated the relationship between self- efficacy and stress among 108 EFL teachers in Iran. The participants were administered self-efficacy and stress questionnaires. Pearson Product-Moment Correlation and Multiple Regression analyses were used. The results indicated significant nega...

Shahin Vaezi; Nasser Fallah

199

Self-Efficacy in Written Composition among Deaf and Hearing Students in Primary and Secondary Education  

Science.gov (United States)

Introduction: This article presents some of the more important results from a study focused on the analysis of self-efficacy in written composition among deaf and hearing students. This type of self-efficacy is essential to adequate development of the complex process of writing and the quality of written texts. Method: A total of 116 students…

Gutierrez-Caceres, Rafaela

2011-01-01

200

Self-efficacy as a potential moderator of the effects of framed health messages  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study focuses on self-efficacy as a potential moderator of the effects of gain- and loss-framed health messages. Undergraduate students (N = 124) received a gain- or loss-framed message about consuming ecological meat. The data revealed that for participants high in self-efficacy, the gain-fram...

Werrij, M.Q.; Ruiter, R.A.C.; Riet, J.P., van 't; Vries, H., de

 
 
 
 
201

Teacher Self-Efficacy and Classroom Management Styles in Jordanian Schools  

Science.gov (United States)

|Two main purposes guided this study. The first was to identify the degree to which Jordanian teachers practise classroom management styles in their classrooms and their level of teacher self-efficacy. The second purpose was to explore the relationships between classroom management styles and teacher self-efficacy. This study is quantitative in…

Abu-Tineh, Abdullah M.; Khasawneh, Samar A.; Khalaileh, Huda A.

2011-01-01

202

Infant temperament and maternal parenting self-efficacy predict child weight outcomes.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Relationships between infant negative reactivity and self-regulation, parenting self-efficacy, and child weight outcomes were examined. Greater observed negative reactivity predicted more child weight gain when mothers had lower parenting self-efficacy. Lower mother-reported self-regulation predicted a greater child weight status. Results highlight potential early risk/protective factors.

Anzman-Frasca S; Stifter CA; Paul IM; Birch LL

2013-05-01

203

Bystander Behavior in Bullying Situations: Basic Moral Sensitivity, Moral Disengagement and Defender Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

|The aim of the present study was to investigate how basic moral sensitivity in bullying, moral disengagement in bullying and defender self-efficacy were related to different bystander behaviors in bullying. Therefore, we examined pathways that linked students' basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement, and defender self-efficacy to different…

Thornberg, Robert; Jungert, Tomas

2013-01-01

204

Nurses' Motivations for Web-Based Learning and the Role of Internet Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

|The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical nurses' Internet self-efficacy and motivations toward Web-based learning. The sample consisted of 256 volunteer nurses from one selected medical centre in Taiwan. This study used the Internet Self-efficacy Survey (ISS) and the Motivations about Web-based Continuing Learning Survey (MWCL) for…

Liang, Jyh-Chong; Wu, Szu-Hsien

2010-01-01

205

Self-Efficacy, Motivation, and Academic Adjustment among African American Women Attending Institutions of Higher Education  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study examined the relationships among self-efficacy beliefs, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and academic adjustment among 111 African American women in college. Results revealed that self-efficacy beliefs predicted Motivation to Know, Externally Regulated motivation, Identified motivation, and academic adjustment. Furthermore,…

Thomas, Deneia M.; Love, Keisha M.; Roan-Belle, Clarissa; Tyler, Keneth M.; Brown, Carrie Lynn; Garriott, Patton O.

2009-01-01

206

School Nurses' Perceptions of Self-Efficacy in Providing Diabetes Care  

Science.gov (United States)

|The purpose of this study was to measure school nurses' perceived self-efficacy in providing diabetes care and education to children and to identify factors that correlate with higher self-efficacy levels in the performance of these tasks. The results of this study revealed that the surveyed school nurses perceived a moderate level of…

Fisher, Kelly L.

2006-01-01

207

Mindfulness and Counseling Self-Efficacy: The Mediating Role of Attention and Empathy  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the predictive relationship between mindfulness and counseling self-efficacy and the potential mediating effects of attention and empathy. Master's-level counseling interns and doctoral counseling students (N = 179) were surveyed to determine levels of mindfulness, attention, empathy, and counseling self-efficacy. Pearson…

Greason, Paige Bentley; Cashwell, Craig S.

2009-01-01

208

The Relationship between Hope, Eustress, Self-Efficacy, and Life Satisfaction among Undergraduates  

Science.gov (United States)

|The construct of eustress was studied alongside hope and self-efficacy, to explore how these constructs are related to life satisfaction among undergraduates. Questionnaires were administered to undergraduates to test the hypotheses that (1) as eustress levels increase, so will life satisfaction levels; (2) when eustress, hope, and self-efficacy

O'Sullivan, Geraldine

2011-01-01

209

A Survey Study of Chinese In-Service Teachers' Self-Efficacy about Inclusive Education  

Science.gov (United States)

A survey study was conducted to a total of 323 in-service teachers (110 special education teachers and 213 general education teachers) in Shanghai regarding their self-efficacy and concerns about inclusive education. Multivariate analysis results reveal that special teachers have significantly higher self-efficacy about inclusive education than…

Wang, Mian; Zan, Fei; Liu, Jiaqiu; Liu, Chunling; Sharma, Umesh

2012-01-01

210

Adolescents' Self-Efficacy to Communicate about Sex: Its Role in Condom Attitudes, Commitment, and Use  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study examined whether and how self-efficacy to communicate with parents and peers about sex relate to sexually experienced adolescent males' and females' (N = 144, 112) condom attitudes, intentions, and use. Results showed that males who reported greater self-efficacy to communicate with parents used condoms more frequently; and both males…

Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie L.; Kropp, Rhonda Y.; Boyer, Cherrie B.; Tschann, Jeanne M.; Ellen, Jonathan M.

2004-01-01

211

The Relationship between Hope, Eustress, Self-Efficacy, and Life Satisfaction among Undergraduates  

Science.gov (United States)

The construct of eustress was studied alongside hope and self-efficacy, to explore how these constructs are related to life satisfaction among undergraduates. Questionnaires were administered to undergraduates to test the hypotheses that (1) as eustress levels increase, so will life satisfaction levels; (2) when eustress, hope, and self-efficacy

O'Sullivan, Geraldine

2011-01-01

212

Physical Activity and Self-efficacy in Normal and Over-fat Children.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To examine the independent and combined association of self-efficacy and fatness with physical activity in 5(th) grade children. METHODS: Participants were 281 students (10.4 ± 0.7 years). Physical activity was assessed using a self-report question. Self-efficacy to be physically active was assessed using a 5-point scale. Body fatness was assessed by bioelectrical impedance. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and t-tests were used. RESULTS: There were no differences in reported days of physical activity between boys and girls, and normal-fat and over-fat children. However, children with high self-efficacy participated in significantly more physical activity compared to their low self-efficacy counterparts (3.4 ± 2.0 days vs. 5.4 ± 1.8 days, respectively, p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Only physical activity self-efficacy was related to physical activity, fatness was not.

Suton D; Pfeiffer KA; Feltz DL; Yee KE; Eisenmann JC; Carlson JJ

2013-09-01

213

Emotional Intelligence, Self-efficacy and Diversity Receptiveness of University Students: A Correlation Study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the interrelationship of emotional intelligence and self-efficacy drives, and diversity receptiveness of overseas college students. Factors of emotional intelligence, self-efficacies and diversity receptiveness were examined with these overseas students. Survey data on demographics, the Emotions Scale (EIS), Self-efficacy scale (SES) and Diversity Receptive Scale (DRS) were collected from eighty nine students enrolled in post graduate business programs. In data collection this study used simple random sampling technique. Data collected were analyzed using descriptive statistics and bivariate correlations between emotional intelligence, self-efficacy, and diversity receptiveness. The findings of the study indicate that there is a significant relationship between emotional intelligence, the competencies of self-efficacy, and diversity receptiveness of college students.

Saeed Behjat; Mohammmed S. Chowdhury

2012-01-01

214

Rasch analysis of the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) in spinal cord injury (SCI).  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study examined the psychometric properties of the General Self-Efficacy Scale by applying Rasch analysis to data from 102 persons with spinal cord injury. Our results suggest that the General Self-Efficacy Scale is a psychometrically robust instrument suitable for application in a spinal cord injury population. The General Self-Efficacy Scale shows an overall fit to the Rasch model (?(2) = 15.5, df = 20, p = .75), high reliability (rp = 0.92), ordered response scale structure, and no item bias by gender, age, education, and lesion levels. However, the analyses indicate a ceiling effect and potential to enhance the differentiation of the General Self-Efficacy Scale across self-efficacy levels.

Peter C; Cieza A; Geyh S

2013-03-01

215

Changes in Preservice Teachers’ Self-Efficacy: From Science Methods to Student Teaching  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to assess preservice teachers self-efficacy at different stages of their educationalcareer in an attempt to determine the extent to which self-efficacy beliefs may change over time. In addition, thecritical incidents, which may contribute to changes in self-efficacy, were also investigated. The instrument usedin the study was the Teaching Science as Inquiry (TSI) Instrument. The TSI Instrument was administered to 38preservice elementary teachers to measure the self-efficacy beliefs of the teacher participants in regard to theteaching of science as inquiry. Based on the results and the associated data analysis, mean and median valuesdemonstrate positive change for self-efficacy and outcome expectancy throughout the data collection period.

Lori A. Smolleck; Allison M. Mongan

2011-01-01

216

Self-efficacy and its application in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: a critical review  

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Full Text Available Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, a prevalent progressively disabling disease affecting one or both knee joints requires extensive self-management. Self-efficacy, a psychological attribute generally denoting one’s perceived belief about their ability to successfully perform a particular behavior, including health behaviors, is a significant predictor of psychological well-being, adherence to prescribed treatments, and pain coping mechanisms in persons with various forms of chronic disease, including arthritis. This paper examines the available peer-reviewed research published over the last 35 years detailing: i) the concept of self-efficacy, ii) the relationship between self-efficacy and adjustment to arthritis, iii) the research concerning self-efficacy in the context of knee osteoarthritis disability, and iv) some promising approaches for promoting the wellbeing of adults with knee osteoarthritis through the application of self-efficacy theory and other approaches. Based on this data, directions for future research and practice are offered.

Ray Marks

2012-01-01

217

Developing and validating an instrument for measuring mobile computing self-efficacy.  

Science.gov (United States)

IT-related self-efficacy has been found to have a critical influence on system use. However, traditional measures of computer self-efficacy and Internet-related self-efficacy are perceived to be inapplicable in the context of mobile computing and commerce because they are targeted primarily at either desktop computer or wire-based technology contexts. Based on previous research, this study develops and validates a multidimensional instrument for measuring mobile computing self-efficacy (MCSE). This empirically validated instrument will be useful to researchers in developing and testing the theories of mobile user behavior, and to practitioners in assessing the mobile computing self-efficacy of users and promoting the use of mobile commerce systems. PMID:18721088

Wang, Yi-Shun; Wang, Hsiu-Yuan

2008-08-01

218

Developing and validating an instrument for measuring mobile computing self-efficacy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

IT-related self-efficacy has been found to have a critical influence on system use. However, traditional measures of computer self-efficacy and Internet-related self-efficacy are perceived to be inapplicable in the context of mobile computing and commerce because they are targeted primarily at either desktop computer or wire-based technology contexts. Based on previous research, this study develops and validates a multidimensional instrument for measuring mobile computing self-efficacy (MCSE). This empirically validated instrument will be useful to researchers in developing and testing the theories of mobile user behavior, and to practitioners in assessing the mobile computing self-efficacy of users and promoting the use of mobile commerce systems.

Wang YS; Wang HY

2008-08-01

219

Using logistic regression to investigate self-efficacy and the predictors for National Council Licensure Examination success for baccalaureate nursing students  

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Full Text Available Objectives: Ensuring success on the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX®) is a complex role for nurse educators. It is vital that nurse educators attain knowledge about the predictors of NCLEX success so they can design strategies and interventions to optimize student performance. Numerous studies are noted that examined the predictors for NCLEX success, reflecting great interest in this area. However, most investigated the academic predictors; few studies examined the nonacademic predictors. The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of selected academic, nonacademic, and self-efficacy variables on NCLEX outcomes to provide new knowledge to nursing science about these predictors. Methods: This quantitative study used Albert Bandura’s Social Learning Theory as the theoretical framework to guide its focus. Academic variables were pre-nursing scores/grades and nursing course grades, while the nonacademic variables focused on personal and environmental factors/stressors, primary language spoken, and self-efficacy expectations. A national study was conducted using an online survey. After nursing graduates (n=196) received their NCLEX scores, instruments with established reliability and validity were used to collect data about their experiences while attending school. The instruments included the (1) Recent Life Changes Questionnaire (RLCQ); (2) The Brief Measure of Worry Severity (BMWS); and (3) The General Perceived Self-Efficacy scale. Multiple logistic regression was the primary data analysis method used to identify the variables that influence NCLEX passage. Correlation analysis using Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient was also done to identify relationships existing among self-efficacy, and academic and nonacademic variables of NCLEX passage. The Chi-square test for independence was used to investigate primary language spoken and NCLEX outcome. Results: Logistic regression findings demonstrated that the medical-surgical grade, home and family events and responsibilities, and self-efficacy expectations were significant variables affecting NCLEX outcomes. Correlation analysis revealed that all academic variables showed a positive correlation with self-efficacy expectations, indicating that as a course grade improved, self-efficacy increased. Also, negative correlations between the nonacademic variables and self-efficacy expectations indicated that as worry or responsibilities increased for the individual, self-efficacy decreased. The Chi-square test for independence showed a significant relationship between primary language spoken and NCLEX outcome. Conclusions: Findings imply that medical-surgical nursing courses need to be a priority in curriculum planning. Another finding demonstrates the influence of self-efficacy on NCLEX passage – the more confident a student is and the more support systems available, the better he or she will perform. This finding points to the critical need for nurse educators to study ways to increase a student’s self-confidence. The findings of this study also demonstrated that home and family events and responsibilities influence success. This knowledge may assist nurse educators to consider informing students about the need for them to seek out assistance from faculty if home and family events present obstacles to learning. Finally, it was noted that primary language spoken affects outcome. Nurse educators need to plan curricular strategies that will meet individual student needs by having a variety of support resources in place for these students. 

Linda Anne Silvestri; Michele C. Clark; Sheniz A. Moonie

2012-01-01

220

Occupational therapy intervention: effects on self-care, performance, satisfaction, self-esteem/self-efficacy, and role functioning of older Hispanic females with arthritis.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

ABSTRACT The purpose of this pilot study was to compare the effectiveness of occupation-based and enabling/preparatory interventions on self-care, perceived performance, satisfaction, self-efficacy, and role function among older Hispanic females with arthritis. A pre- and post-outcome measures design with semi-structured interview and questionnaire/rating scales was used with matched participants assigned to one of two intervention groups or a control, non-intervention group. For measures of task-specific functioning and self-efficacy, there were no statistically significant differences in average gain scores between the two interventions. Average gain scores were higher for the enabling/preparatory intervention than for the control group. For the occupational intervention, the scores were higher than for the control group for self-care/activities of daily living (ADL) functioning and self-esteem/self-efficacy. The results suggest that client-centered occupational therapy intervention provided within the home environment is beneficial for occupational performance, participation, role competence, and quality of life.

Landa-Gonzalez B; Molnar D

2012-04-01

 
 
 
 
221

Affective symptoms and change in diabetes self-efficacy and glycaemic control.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS: To examine the role of baseline depression, anxiety and stress symptoms on post-intervention diabetes self-efficacy and glycaemic control (HbA(1c)). METHODS: The current study analysed data from patients (n = 85) with treated but uncontrolled Type 2 diabetes who participated in a comparative effectiveness study of two diabetes self-management interventions. Hierarchical linear regression was used to examine the relationships between baseline affective symptoms and post-intervention diabetes self-efficacy and the moderating effects of baseline affective symptoms on the relationship between changes in diabetes self-efficacy and post-intervention HbA(1c). RESULTS: Baseline depression was inversely associated with post-intervention diabetes self-efficacy (P = 0.0001) after adjusting for baseline characteristics including diabetes self-efficacy. In contrast, normal-mild levels of stress were associated with higher post-intervention diabetes self-efficacy (P = 0.04). Anxiety and stress symptoms significantly and independently moderated the relationship between changes in diabetes self-efficacy and post-intervention HbA(1c) (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03, respectively). Further evaluation of these interactions demonstrated that changes in diabetes self-efficacy were associated with lower post-intervention HbA(1c), but only among those with higher baseline affective symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: We found a moderating effect across affective symptoms on the relationship between diabetes self-efficacy changes and post-intervention HbA1c in the context of a self-management intervention. Results suggest that patients with poorly controlled diabetes who have higher levels of depression, anxiety and stress symptoms may derive greater benefits from self-management interventions known to improve diabetes self-efficacy.

Robertson SM; Amspoker AB; Cully JA; Ross EL; Naik AD

2013-05-01

222

Self-Efficacy, Performance, Training and Well-Being of Industrial Workers in Lagos, Nigeria  

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Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to investigate whether Self- Efficacy (SE) has anything to do with industrialemployees’ training, performance and well-being in Nigeria industrial settings. Self-Efficacy (belief about one’sability to accomplish specific tasks) form a central role in the regulatory process through which an individual’smotivation and performance are governed. It also affects employees’ training and well-being. The descriptivesurvey research design of the ex-post facto type was adopted. The population for the study consisted ofemployees of SKG Lagos, Glaxo, Ikeja and Smithkline Beecham, Ogba. The simple random sampling techniquewas used to select 274 respondents for the study. Four research instruments structured on a modified four pointrating format of Strongly Agree (SA)=4, Agree (A)=3, Disagree (D)=2. Strongly Disagree (SD)=1 were used andhaving reliability coefficient of: Self-Efficacy Scale (SES)=0.85; Training Acquisition Scale (TAS)=0.80; WorkPerformance Scale (WPS)=0.82 and Well-being Scale (WBS)=0.87. Data were analyzed with t-test statistic. Thefinding revealed that workers with high self-efficacy are higher performers of assigned duties than those withlow selfefficacy, workers with high level of self-efficacy are more amenable to training than those with lowlevel of selfefficacy and workers with high self-efficacy are better in their well-being than those with low selfefficacy. It was recommended that industrial social worker should work on the psychic of the workers so thattheir self-efficacy can be developed or strengthen positively with the intent of promoting higher performance,adaptability to training and fostering of employees well-being.

E. M. Ajala

2013-01-01

223

Comparison of the medical students' perceived self-efficacy and the evaluation of the observers and patients.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The accuracy of self-assessment has been questioned in studies comparing physicians' self-assessments to observed assessments; however, none of these studies used self-efficacy as a method for self-assessment. The aim of the study was to investigate how medical students' perceived self-efficacy of specific communication skills corresponds to the evaluation of simulated patients and observers. METHODS: All of the medical students who signed up for an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) were included. As a part of the OSCE, the student performance in the "parent-physician interaction" was evaluated by a simulated patient and an observer at one of the stations. After the examination the students were asked to assess their self-efficacy according to the same specific communication skills. The Calgary Cambridge Observation Guide formed the basis for the outcome measures used in the questionnaires. A total of 12 items was rated on a Likert scale from 1-5 (strongly disagree to strongly agree). We used extended Rasch models for comparisons between the groups of responses of the questionnaires. Comparisons of groups were conducted on dichotomized responses. RESULTS: Eighty-four students participated in the examination, 87% (73/84) of whom responded to the questionnaire. The response rate for the simulated patients and the observers was 100%. Significantly more items were scored in the highest categories (4 and 5) by the observers and simulated patients compared to the students (observers versus students: -0.23; SE:0.112; p=0.002 and patients versus students:0.177; SE:0.109; p=0.037). When analysing the items individually, a statistically significant difference only existed for two items. CONCLUSION: This study showed that students scored their communication skills lower compared to observers or simulated patients. The differences were driven by only 2 of 12 items. The results in this study indicate that self-efficacy based on the Calgary Cambridge Observation guide seems to be a reliable tool.

Ammentorp J; Thomsen JL; Jarbøl DE; Holst R; Øvrehus AL; Kofoed PE

2013-01-01

224

Enhancing Pre-service Teacher’s Self-efficacy and Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Designing Digital Media with Self-regulated Learning Instructional Support in Online Project-based Learning  

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Full Text Available This study investigated pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy in designing digital media and their technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK) for designing digital media using different forms of self- regulated learning instructional support for online project-based learning. The study used a 2x2 factorial research design. The sample consisted of 232 pre-service teachers from an institution situated in Bangkok, Thailand. The four different forms of self-regulated learning instructional support for online project-based learning were PB+SQ+PA, PB+SQonly, PB+PAonly, and PBonly. Two-way Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) was used for data analysis. The results showed significant differences in pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy and TPCK posttest scores. No main effect was found between two different self-regulated learning strategies (SQ and PA) upon the means of self-efficacy in designing digital media scores and TPCK scores. The self-regulated learning strategies (SQ and PA) had a statistically significant interaction upon the means of self-efficacy in designing digital media scores while the self-regulated learning strategies (SQ and PA) had no interaction upon the means of the TPCK scores.

2013-01-01

225

Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Mathematical Problem-Solving of Gifted Students  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Path analysis was used to test the predictive and mediational role that self-efficacy beliefs play in the mathematical problem-solving of middle school gifted students (n = 66) mainstreamed with regular education students (n = 232) in algebra classes. Self-efficacy of gifted students made an independent contribution to the prediction of problem-solving in a model that controlled for the effects of math anxiety, cognitive ability, mathematics GPA, self-efficacy for self-regulated learning, and sex. Gifted girls surpassed gifted boys in performance but did not differ in self-efficacy. Gifted students reported higher math self-efficacy and self-efficacy for self-regulated learning as well as lower math anxiety than did regular education students. Although most students were overconfident about their capabilities, gifted students had more accurate self-perceptions and gifted girls were biased toward underconfidence. Results support the hypothesized role of self-efficacy in A. Bandura's (1986) social cognitive theory.

Pajares F

1996-10-01

226

Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Mathematical Problem-Solving of Gifted Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Path analysis was used to test the predictive and mediational role that self-efficacy beliefs play in the mathematical problem-solving of middle school gifted students (n = 66) mainstreamed with regular education students (n = 232) in algebra classes. Self-efficacy of gifted students made an independent contribution to the prediction of problem-solving in a model that controlled for the effects of math anxiety, cognitive ability, mathematics GPA, self-efficacy for self-regulated learning, and sex. Gifted girls surpassed gifted boys in performance but did not differ in self-efficacy. Gifted students reported higher math self-efficacy and self-efficacy for self-regulated learning as well as lower math anxiety than did regular education students. Although most students were overconfident about their capabilities, gifted students had more accurate self-perceptions and gifted girls were biased toward underconfidence. Results support the hypothesized role of self-efficacy in A. Bandura's (1986) social cognitive theory. PMID:8979868

Pajares

1996-10-01

227

Self-Efficacy in EFL: Difference among Proficiency Groups and Relationship with Success  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study intended to investigate the self-efficacy of EFL students enrolled at Gaziantep University’s School of Foreign Languages (GUSFL). More specifically, the aim was to explore EFL self-efficacy level of the students in relation to their academic success in English. In addition, demographic variables such as students’ age and gender were studied in relation to their self-efficacy. This study was conducted in the spring semester of 2007-2008 academic years. One hundred seventy five preparatory students at GUSFL (60 females and 115 males) participated in the study with the mean age of 19.7. The data were collected through the English as a Foreign Language Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (EFL-SEQ). The analysis of the EFL self-efficacy survey revealed that EFL learners at GUSFL had high sense of self-efficacy in language learning tasks. Therefore, self-efficacy was disclosed to be an influential aspect in students’ success in English language learning.

Filiz Yalç?n TILFARLIO?LU; Emrah C?NKARA

2009-01-01

228

Asthma management self-efficacy in parents of primary school-age children.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this study was to investigate asthma management self-efficacy in parents of primary school-age children with asthma and to explore possible associations between parent asthma management self-efficacy, parent and child characteristics, asthma task difficulty and asthma management responsibility. A cross-sectional descriptive survey of 113 parents was conducted to assess the level of parent asthma management self-efficacy, asthma task difficulty and confidence, asthma responsibility and socio-demographic characteristics. The findings indicate that parents had higher self-efficacy for attack prevention than attack management. Parents had higher self-efficacy for asthma management tasks that are simple, skills based and performed frequently such as medication administration and less confidence and greater difficulty with tasks associated with judgement and decision-making. Multivariate linear regression analysis identified English language, child asthma responsibility and parent education as predictors of higher asthma management self-efficacy, while an older child was associated with lower parent asthma management self-efficacy. The implications of these results for planning and targeting health education and self-management interventions for parents and children are discussed.

Brown N; Gallagher R; Fowler C; Wales S

2013-02-01

229

Self-efficacy in pregnant women with severe fear of childbirth.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To apply and test the concept of childbirth self-efficacy to expectations of the upcoming birth in the context of severe fear of childbirth (SFOC). DESIGN: Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. SETTING: A region in the southeast of Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: Nulliparous pregnant women (N = 17) with SFOC. METHOD: The interviews were analyzed according to content analysis using deductive and inductive approaches. The seven domains of The Childbirth Self-Efficacy Inventory (CBSEI) made up the matrix for the deductive analysis. RESULTS: Behaviors for coping with labor and childbirth were related to six domains of childbirth self-efficacy: concentration, support, control, motor/relaxation, self-encouragement, and breathing. Most of these behaviors referred to capabilities to carry out (self-efficacy expectancy) rather than to beliefs in effectiveness (outcome expectancy). Five additional subdomains representing defined childbirth self-efficacy were identified: guidance, the body controls, the professionals' control, reliance, and fatalism. CONCLUSION: The domains of childbirth self-efficacy have been deepened and expanded in relation to SFOC. It is imperative to identify pregnant women with SFOC and their efficacy beliefs to help them find appropriate coping behaviors prior to the onset of labor, and furthermore these behaviors must be supported by health care professionals during labor and childbirth. Support in the form of verbal persuasion emanating from the subdomains of childbirth self-efficacy ought to be added.

Salomonsson B; Berterö C; Alehagen S

2013-03-01

230

Predictors of self-efficacy for HIV prevention among Hispanic women in South Florida.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Self-efficacy is a critical element for HIV prevention, however little is known about the predictors of self-efficacy for HIV prevention among Hispanic women. In this cross-sectional study we assessed if age, living with a partner, employment status, HIV knowledge, self-esteem, and intimate partner violence (IPV) predicted self-efficacy for HIV prevention in 548 Hispanic women in South Florida who participated in a randomized controlled trial (SEPA). The majority of Hispanic women reported high levels of self-efficacy for HIV prevention. Women who were older, living with a partner, had less HIV knowledge, and had a history of IPV reported significantly lower levels of self-efficacy for HIV prevention. HIV knowledge was the most important predictor of self-efficacy for HIV prevention. Employment was not a significant predictor of self-efficacy for HIV prevention. Predictors identified in the study can be used to identify high-risk Hispanic women who are in need of HIV prevention interventions.

Villegas N; Cianelli R; Gonzalez-Guarda R; Kaelber L; Ferrer L; Peragallo N

2013-01-01

231

Self-efficacy as a positive youth development construct: a conceptual review.  

Science.gov (United States)

Self-efficacy denotes people's beliefs about their ability to perform in different situations. It functions as a multilevel and multifaceted set of beliefs that influence how people feel, think, motivate themselves, and behave during various tasks. Self-efficacy beliefs are informed by enactive attainment, vicarious experience, imaginal experiences, and social persuasion as well as physical and emotional states. These beliefs are mediated by cognitive, motivational, affective, and selection processes to generate actual performance. Self-efficacy development is closely intertwined with a person's experiences, competencies, and developmental tasks in different domains at different stages in life. This paper reviews the literature to outline the definition and theoretical conceptualizations of the construct originally devised by Bandura that have flourished since the 1990s. Drawing from the studies of the construct to assess self-efficacy, and to inform positive youth development, the paper will present the determinants of the development of self-efficacy beliefs and identify the connection between self-efficacy and adolescent developmental outcomes. The paper will conclude with strategies to enhance youth self-efficacy and proposals for future research directions. PMID:22645423

Tsang, Sandra K M; Hui, Eadaoin K P; Law, Bella C M

2012-04-29

232

Self-efficacy as a positive youth development construct: a conceptual review.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Self-efficacy denotes people's beliefs about their ability to perform in different situations. It functions as a multilevel and multifaceted set of beliefs that influence how people feel, think, motivate themselves, and behave during various tasks. Self-efficacy beliefs are informed by enactive attainment, vicarious experience, imaginal experiences, and social persuasion as well as physical and emotional states. These beliefs are mediated by cognitive, motivational, affective, and selection processes to generate actual performance. Self-efficacy development is closely intertwined with a person's experiences, competencies, and developmental tasks in different domains at different stages in life. This paper reviews the literature to outline the definition and theoretical conceptualizations of the construct originally devised by Bandura that have flourished since the 1990s. Drawing from the studies of the construct to assess self-efficacy, and to inform positive youth development, the paper will present the determinants of the development of self-efficacy beliefs and identify the connection between self-efficacy and adolescent developmental outcomes. The paper will conclude with strategies to enhance youth self-efficacy and proposals for future research directions.

Tsang SK; Hui EK; Law BC

2012-01-01

233

The role of self-efficacy, coping, and lapses in weight maintenance.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: Successful weight maintenance after weight loss is exceedingly rare. The present study aimed to identify psychological predictors of lapses and weight maintenance. METHODS: Self-efficacy, coping, and perceptions of lapses were examined as potential predictors of lapse frequency and weight maintenance (percentage weight loss maintained). Participants included 67 adults (85.3 % women) who had intentionally lost a mean of 16 % of their body weight and had stopped losing weight at least 6 months prior to data collection. Participants completed a 7-day lapse diary tracking the frequency and perceived severity of their dietary and activity lapses, along with questionnaires on self-efficacy, coping, and characteristics of their weight loss. RESULTS: Participants had lost a mean of 13.9 kg, 20.4 months prior to data collection. More frequent lapsing was correlated with lower self-efficacy and greater perceived lapse severity. Lower percentage of weight loss maintained was correlated with lower self-efficacy, poorer coping, greater perceived lapse severity, and longer time since weight loss ended. "Regainers," who maintained <90 % of their weight loss, had poorer self-efficacy, poorer coping, greater lapse frequency, and greater perceived lapse severity, than "maintainers," who maintained at least 90 % of their weight loss. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that self-efficacy, coping, and perceived lapse severity are significant predictors of weight maintenance, consistent with the relapse prevention model. The goals of improving self-efficacy and coping skills might be important additions to weight maintenance programs.

Latner JD; McLeod G; O'Brien KS; Johnston L

2013-09-01

234

The Relationship Between Cannabis Outcome Expectancies and Cannabis Refusal Self-Efficacy in a Treatment Population.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Self-efficacy beliefs and outcome expectancies are central to Social Cognitive Theory (SCT). Alcohol studies demonstrate the theoretical and clinical utility of applying both SCT constructs. This study examined the relationship between refusal self-efficacy and outcome expectancies in a sample of cannabis users, and tested formal mediational models. DESIGN: Patients referred for cannabis treatment completed a comprehensive clinical assessment, including recently validated cannabis expectancy and refusal self-efficacy scales. SETTING: A hospital alcohol and drug outpatient clinic. PARTICIPANTS: Patients referred for a cannabis treatment (N = 1115, mean age 26.29, SD 9.39). MEASUREMENTS: The Cannabis Expectancy Questionnaire (CEQ) and Cannabis Refusal Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (CRSEQ) were completed, along with measures of cannabis severity (Severity of Dependence Scale [SDS]) and cannabis consumption. FINDINGS: Positive (? = -.29, p < .001) and negative (? = -.19, p < .001) cannabis outcome expectancies were significantly associated with refusal self-efficacy. Refusal self-efficacy, in turn, fully mediated the association between negative expectancy and weekly consumption (CI95% = 0.03, 0.17) and partially mediated the effect of positive expectancy on weekly consumption (CI95% = 0.06, 0.17). CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with Social Cognitive Theory, refusal self-efficacy (a person's belief that he or she can abstain from cannabis use) mediates part of the association between cannabis outcome expectancies (perceived consequences of cannabis use) and cannabis use.

Connor JP; Gullo MJ; Feeney GF; Kavanagh DJ; Young RM

2013-09-01

235

Measuring Computer Self-efficacy; Application of Computer Self-Efficacy in the field of IT users, A Case Study of University Student in Isfahan and Shahreza --- ?????????? ????????: ???? ? ?????? ?? ?? ??? ????? ?????? ??????? - ?????? ????? ????????? ???? ? ??? ??????????? ?????? ? ???? ?????? ?????  

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Full Text Available This paper provides some arguments in the field of self efficacy of computer users in two universities of the province of Isfahan, Iran. The results of this argument come from a survey research that used a standard questionnaire previously validated in a number of other surveys. The data I have gathered are based on a survey that was done among 200 samples including male and female students. The paper uses descriptive data analysis to describe what the situation of samples is in terms of age, education and place of computer use. A larger part of analysis, however, is placed on examination of the research hypothesis. Some of the findings indicate that there is no significant correlation between computer self efficacy among male and female students. The findings also indicate that there is no correlation between self efficacy of students in Isfahan and Shahreza. My analysis, however, indicated that there is a direct by negative correlation between and age and computer self efficacy. This means as age increases the self-efficacy decreases.--- ??? ????? ????? ?????? ??????? ?? ???? ????? ???????? ??????? ?? ????? ????? ?????????? ??????? ???????? (?????? ???????2002) ???? ???. ???????? ??????? ?????? ?? ????????? ?????? (???? ????? ???????????????2009) ??????? ??? ???. ???????? ????? ?? ???? 200 ??????? ???? ? ??? ??????????? ?????? ? ??????? ???? ?????? ????? ???????? ??? ???. ???? ????? ? ????? ??????? ?? ??????? ???? ?????? (?? ?????? ? ?? ??????) ? ????? ?????? ????? ?? ?????? (????? ?? ?????? ??????? ?? ?????? ) ? ????? ??? ?????? (????? ??????? ? ????? ?????) ??????? ??? ???. ????? ???? ????? ???????? ????? ? ????????? ????? ????????? ??????? ? ?????? ??????? ?? ???????? ??????? ?????? ??????? ?????? ????? ? ????? ????? ?????? ???? ????? ? ????? ??????? ?????? ??????? ?? ?????? ??????? ? ???????? ?? ????? ???? ???. ??? ????? ?????? ?????(1985? 1989) ??? ??????????? ??????? ????? ?????? ??????? ???????? ??????? ????????? ??? ?? ?????????? ???????? ??? ?? ????? ?? ??? ?? ???? ??????? ?????? ????? ?????????. ?????? ? ????? (2000) ?? ???? ??????? ????? ?? ????? ? ????? "??? ????? ?????? ???????2"??????????? ? ?? ??? ?????? ???????? ?? ????? ???? ????? ???????? ?? ?????????? ???????????? ??? ?? ?? ????? ????? ??????. ?????????? ???????? ?? ????? ??? ? ????? ?? ?????? ????? ?????? ??????? ???????? ???. ????? ????? ????? ?? ????? ?? ???? ???????? ???????? ? ?????? ??????? ????? ???? ??? ???? ?? ????? ?????????? ???????? ?? ???? ??? ????? ?????? ??????? ???? ??? ???. ?? ??????? ??? ????? ????? ???? ???? ?????????? ???????? ? ????? ????? ????? ????? ???? ???.

Mohammad Ali Zaki, mazaki42@yahoo.com - ???? ??? ???

2010-01-01

236

Self-efficacy instruments for patients with chronic diseases suffer from methodological limitations--a systematic review  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

BACKGROUND: Measurement of self-efficacy requires carefully developed and validated instruments. It is currently unclear whether available self-efficacy instruments for chronic diseases fulfill these requirements. Our aim was to systematically identify all existing self-efficacy scales for five majo...

Frei, A; Svarin, A; Steurer-Stey, C; Puhan, M A

237

Instructor and Student Classroom Interactions during Technology Skills Instruction for Facilitating Preservice Teachers' Computer Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

|Technology skills instruction is an important component of educational technology courses, which has been shown to raise pre-service teachers' computer self-efficacy. Computer self-efficacy, in turn, is positively related to their self-efficacy for technology integration. Studies of undergraduate technology skills instruction found that classroom…

Koh, Joyce H. L.; Frick, Theodore W.

2009-01-01

238

2011 Outstanding AFCPE[R] Conference Paper: Development and Validation of a Financial Self-Efficacy Scale  

Science.gov (United States)

This study developed a 6-item Financial Self-Efficacy Scale for use by researchers, educators, counselors, and advisors. Bandura's concept of self-efficacy and Prochaska's Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change provided the theoretical framework. Scale items were adapted from Schwarzer and Jerusalem's (1995) General Self-Efficacy Scale.…

Lown, Jean M.

2011-01-01

239

Discriminant and Incremental Validity of Self-Concept and Academic Self-Efficacy: A Meta-Analysis  

Science.gov (United States)

Two studies examined the discriminant and incremental validity of self-concept and academic self-efficacy. Study 1, which meta-analysed 64 studies comprising 74 independent samples (N = 24,773), found a strong mean correlation of 0.43 between self-concept and academic self-efficacy. The domains of self-concept and self-efficacy, and the domain…

Huang, Chiungjung

2012-01-01

240

Positive experience, self-efficacy, and action control predict physical activity changes: a moderated mediation analysis.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: Experiencing positive consequences of one's physical activity is supposed to facilitate further activity. This motivational outcome might be generated by an increase in perceived self-efficacy. In addition to such a mediator effect, we examine whether this applies generally or only under conditions of volitional control. For this purpose, perceived action control was considered as a putative moderator. DESIGN AND METHOD: N = 193 students participated in a study with three measurement points in time. At baseline, positive experience with previous physical activity was measured as a predictor of physical activity. Two weeks later, self-efficacy and action control variables were assessed as putative mediator and moderator, respectively. After another 2 weeks, physical activity was measured as the outcome. A moderated mediation model was specified with baseline physical activity and sex as covariates. RESULTS: Self-efficacy was found to mediate between initial positive experience and later physical activity, and this mediation was moderated by action control. CONCLUSIONS: Participants' perceptions of positive experience were associated with their subsequent self-efficacy fostering physical activity. However, persons with low levels of action control did not translate positive experience into physical activity via self-efficacy. STATEMENT OF CONTRIBUTION: What is already known on this subject? Numerous studies have shown that exercise-specific self-efficacy predicts subsequent physical activity. Prior positive experience with physical activity is suggested to be associated with exercise-specific self-efficacy. Furthermore, action control was found to be beneficial for the maintenance of physical activity. What does this study add? This study unveils the mechanisms between these social-cognitive determinants: our longitudinal results suggest that the mediation of positive experience and subsequent physical activity via self-efficacy is moderated by action control. Persons with low levels of action control did not translate positive experience into physical activity via self-efficacy.

Parschau L; Fleig L; Koring M; Lange D; Knoll N; Schwarzer R; Lippke S

2013-05-01

 
 
 
 
241

Parental migration, self-efficacy and cigarette smoking among rural adolescents in south China.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: Millions of children and adolescents in rural China are left behind as their parents move away for work. Little is known about the impact of parental migration on their smoking and self-efficacy. This study explores the associations among parental migration, self-efficacy and smoking. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among middle school students in Liangying Township, Guangdong, China. Socio-demographic and parental migration characteristics, as well as adolescent past 30-day smoking and self-efficacy level were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to estimate the risk of parental migration features for smoking and self-efficacy. Hierarchical regression was fitted to examine the relationship among parental migration, self-efficacy and smoking. RESULTS: 2609 students (93.4%) participated into the study, 44% of who were with parents who had ever been or were currently migrating. Smoking prevalence was 9.7% in boys and 0.9% in girls. Paternal migration was protective for adolescent smoking, whilst maternal migration increased the risk. Both paternal and maternal migration had adverse effects on self-efficacy, a strong influencing factor for smoking. No significant relationship was found between other migration features and smoking and self-efficacy. The smoking risk of maternal migration was partly mediated by self-efficacy. There were no differences between boys and girls. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that adolescents whose mothers migrate from home to work elsewhere are at elevated risk for smoking. Improving self-efficacy may be an effective means to keep adolescents away from smoking, especially for those with maternal migration.

Gao Y; Li L; Chan EY; Lau J; Griffiths SM

2013-01-01

242

Parental Migration, Self-Efficacy and Cigarette Smoking among Rural Adolescents in South China  

Science.gov (United States)

Objectives Millions of children and adolescents in rural China are left behind as their parents move away for work. Little is known about the impact of parental migration on their smoking and self-efficacy. This study explores the associations among parental migration, self-efficacy and smoking. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among middle school students in Liangying Township, Guangdong, China. Socio-demographic and parental migration characteristics, as well as adolescent past 30-day smoking and self-efficacy level were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to estimate the risk of parental migration features for smoking and self-efficacy. Hierarchical regression was fitted to examine the relationship among parental migration, self-efficacy and smoking. Results 2609 students (93.4%) participated into the study, 44% of who were with parents who had ever been or were currently migrating. Smoking prevalence was 9.7% in boys and 0.9% in girls. Paternal migration was protective for adolescent smoking, whilst maternal migration increased the risk. Both paternal and maternal migration had adverse effects on self-efficacy, a strong influencing factor for smoking. No significant relationship was found between other migration features and smoking and self-efficacy. The smoking risk of maternal migration was partly mediated by self-efficacy. There were no differences between boys and girls. Conclusions Our findings suggest that adolescents whose mothers migrate from home to work elsewhere are at elevated risk for smoking. Improving self-efficacy may be an effective means to keep adolescents away from smoking, especially for those with maternal migration.

Gao, Yang; Li, Liping; Chan, Emily Y. Y.; Lau, Joseph; Griffiths, Sian M.

2013-01-01

243

The evaluation of self-care and self-efficacy in patients undergoing hemodialysis.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to assess patients' self-care ability and self-efficacy, to examine the relationship between them and to determine the factors affecting self-care ability and self-efficacy in people undergoing hemodialysis (HD). METHODS: This research was conducted as a descriptive survey study by 138 people with ESRD who were patients of HD units service in Sivas. The data were collected with a Personal Information Form, Exercise of Self-Care Agency (ESCA) Scale and Self-Efficacy Assessment Form. Data collected from the study were analysed using percent, mean, Tukey test, significance test of two means, one-way variant analysis and Kruskal-Wallis test. RESULTS: The study results demonstrate that while there is a correlation between self-care ability and education level, work status, income level and frequency of HD application, factors such as age, gender, education level, work status, income level and frequency of HD application determine self-efficacy. Furthermore, a positive correlation was found between patients' self-care ability and self-efficacy. It was determined that as the level of self-care ability increases self-efficacy level also increases. CONCLUSIONS: Hemodialysis application affects patients' self-care ability and self-efficacy levels. There is a positive correlation between self-care ability and self-efficacy. In view of this study's results, it is recommended to organize education programmes to increase self-care ability and self-efficacy levels of HD patients and prepare comprehensive plans including patients' families.

Ba? E; Mollao?lu M

2010-06-01

244

Improving physician clinical documentation quality: evaluating two self-efficacy-based training programs.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Clinical documentation is critical to health care quality and cost. The generally poor quality of such documentation has been well recognized, yet medical students, residents, and physicians receive little or no training in it. When clinical documentation quality (CDQ) training for residents and/or physicians is provided, it excludes key constructs of self-efficacy: vicarious learning (e.g., peer demonstration) and mastery (i.e., practice). CDQ training that incorporates these key self-efficacy constructs is more resource intensive. If such training could be shown to be more effective at enhancing clinician performance, it would support the investment of the additional resources required by health care systems and residency training programs. PURPOSES: The aim of this study was to test the impact of CDQ training on clinician self-efficacy and performance and the relative efficacy of intervention designs employing two versus all four self-efficacy constructs. METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Ninety-one internal medicine residents at a major academic medical center in the northeastern United States were assigned to one of two self-efficacy-based training groups or a control group, with CDQ and clinical documentation self-efficacy measured before and after the interventions. A structural equation model (AMOS) allowed for testing the six hypotheses in the context of the whole study, and findings were cross-validated using traditional regression. FINDINGS: Although both interventions increased CDQ, the training designed to include all four self-efficacy constructs had a significantly greater impact on improving CDQ. It also increased self-efficacy. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: CDQ may be significantly improved and sustained by (a) training physicians in clinical documentation and (b) employing all four self-efficacy constructs in such training designs.

Russo R; Fitzgerald SP; Eveland JD; Fuchs BD; Redmon DP

2013-01-01

245

Development of salutogenetic factors in mental health - Antonovsky's sense of coherence and Bandura's self-efficacy related to Derogatis' symptom check list (SCL-90-R).  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: The paper analyses how resilience factors and mental health problems interrelate in a 3-year-longitudinal study with 16-19 year olds. METHODS: Resilience was measured with a 13-item short version of the Life-Orientation-Scale by Antonovsky (sense-of-coherence, SOC) and a 10-item self-efficacy-scale (SWE) by Jerusalem and Schwarzer. Mental health problems were measured with Derogatis Symptom Check list (SCL-90-R). The data set included 155 participants and was analyzed using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) designed to examine mutual influence in longitudinal data with Mplus software. RESULTS: The descriptive data analysis indicates (1) negative correlations between SOC and SCL-90-R at both age 16 and 19 in all subscales but somatization and likewise (2) between self-efficacy and SCL-90-R. (3) SOC correlates positively with SWE at age 16 and 19. Results of SEM analysis were based on the assumption of two latent variables at two points in time: resilience as measured with mean SOC and mean self-efficacy scores and health problems measured with sub scale scores of SCL-90-R - both at ages 16 and 19. The first SEM model included all possible paths between the two latent variables across time. We found (4) that resilience influences mental health problems cross-sectionally at age 16 and at age 19 but not across time. (5) Both resilience and mental health problems influenced their own development over time. A respecified SEM model included only significant paths. (6) Resilience at age 16 significantly influences health problems at age 16 as well as resilience at age 19. Health problems at age 16 influence those at age 19 and resilience at age 19 influences health problems at age 19. CONCLUSION: (a) SOC and self-efficacy instruments measure similar phenomena. (b) Since an influence of resilience on mental health problems and vice versa over time could not be shown there must be additional factors important to development. (c) SOC and self-efficacy are both very stable at 16 and 19 years. This refutes Antonovsky's assumption that SOC achieves stability first around the age of 30. SOC and self-efficacy are protective factors but they seem to form in (early) childhood.

Kröninger-Jungaberle H; Grevenstein D

2013-01-01

246

Heavy episodic drinking in college females: an exploration of expectancies, consequences, and self-efficacy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Differences on expectancies and self-efficacy between college females who engage in heavy episodic drinking (HED) and non-HED were examined. Students (N = 95) from Southern California filled out the Comprehensive Effects of Alcohol, Cognitive Appraisal of Risky Events, and Drinking Context Convivial Drinking scales as well as self-efficacy, alcohol use, and demographic items in the fall semester of 2008. Logistic and linear regression showed that greater positive expectancies and lower self-efficacy were predictive of categorization as HED and greater convivial drinking. Implications, limitations, and directions for future research are discussed.

Lienemann BA; Lamb CS

2013-01-01

247

[Self-efficacy and attitudes towards drug consumption in childhood: exploring concepts].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This paper aims to explore the concepts of self-efficacy and attitude towards consumption, approached by the theory of motivation and human behavior. This is a theoretical study based on literature. High levels of self-efficacy have beneficial consequences for the functioning of the individual. Concerning attitudes towards drugs, the presence or absence of preconceptions and positive values of drugs increases risk or consumer protection. Nurses should apply the concepts of self-efficacy and attitudes towards consumption to guide actions of health promotion and prevention of drug consumption in children and adolescents.

Hurtado DS; Nascimento LC

2010-05-01

248

Loneliness, depression, and computer self-efficacy as predictors of problematic internet use.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study investigated whether university students' levels of loneliness, depression, and computer self-efficacy were significant predictors of their problematic Internet use levels. The study was carried out with 559 Turkish university students. The research data were analyzed by multiple regression analysis. The findings indicated that loneliness, depression, and computer self-efficacy were significant predictors of problematic Internet use. Loneliness was found as the most important predictive variable. Depression predicted problematic Internet use on the second rank, and computer self-efficacy on the third rank.

Ceyhan AA; Ceyhan E

2008-12-01

249

Loneliness, depression, and computer self-efficacy as predictors of problematic internet use.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated whether university students' levels of loneliness, depression, and computer self-efficacy were significant predictors of their problematic Internet use levels. The study was carried out with 559 Turkish university students. The research data were analyzed by multiple regression analysis. The findings indicated that loneliness, depression, and computer self-efficacy were significant predictors of problematic Internet use. Loneliness was found as the most important predictive variable. Depression predicted problematic Internet use on the second rank, and computer self-efficacy on the third rank. PMID:19072150

Ceyhan, A Aykut; Ceyhan, Esra

2008-12-01

250

Affective Factors That Influence Chemistry Achievement (Attitude And Self Efficacy)And The Power Of These Factors To Predict Chemistry Achievement-I  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this research, our aim was to determine students’ perception level of attitude and self efficacy towards chemistry and to put forth effects of these variables on chemistry achievement for consideration (in other words, to determine how the chemistry achievement were predicted by these variables). In this point of view the research was conducted with 819 students studying at the 1st, 2nd and the 3rd grade of 10 high schools which are located in the city center of Mersin. Addressed to research problems, data was analyzed via descriptive, correlation, linear and multiple regression statistical analyses. As a result it is determined that 2nd graders group of high schools has maximum attitude scores and the attitude towards chemistry lesson, on its own, is a significant predictor of chemistry achievement. it is also determined that 2nd graders group of high schools has maximum self efficacy scores and the self efficacy towards chemistry lesson, on its own, is a significant predictor of chemistry achievement.

Adnan KAN; Ahmet AKBA?

2006-01-01

251

Changes in family socio-economic status as predictors of self-efficacy in 13-year-old Polish adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to determine the impact that raised mother's education and a relative change in family affluence might have on adolescent general self-efficacy (GSE). METHODS: Data on 600 children born in Poland in January 1995 and their families were used. Data from early childhood and adolescence (2008) were considered and the change between these two periods was determined. RESULTS: Family affluence increased in 37.3 % of families with mothers, who had raised their education level (12.6 % of the sample), in comparison to 26.8 % in the group with no change, p < 0.001. The average GSE scores in those groups were 73.4 and 68.1, respectively, p < 0.001. In the best linear regression model adjusted for gender, the independent predictors of GSE turned out to be mother's education change and the family's current affluence. CONCLUSIONS: Raised mother's education level may encourage building up developmental assets in older children. Based on the structural model, where self-efficacy is the mediator of the relationship between socio-economic status change and the quality of life (KIDSCREEN-10) these results may be of importance in further research.

Mazur J; Malkowska-Szkutnik A; Tabak I

2013-04-01

252

Meaning-making intervention during breast or colorectal cancer treatment improves self-esteem, optimism, and self-efficacy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Existential issues often accompany a diagnosis of cancer and remain one aspect of psychosocial oncology care for which there is a need for focused, empirically tested interventions. This study examined the efficacy of a novel psychological intervention specifically designed to address existential issues through the use of meaning-making coping strategies on psychological adjustment to cancer. Eighty-two breast or colorectal cancer patients were randomly chosen to receive routine care (control group) or up to four sessions that explored the meaning of the emotional responses and cognitive appraisals of each individual's cancer experience within the context of past life events and future goals (experimental group). This paper reports the results from 74 patients who completed and returned pre- and post-test measures for self-esteem, optimism, and self-efficacy. After controlling for baseline scores, the experimental group participants demonstrated significantly higher levels of self-esteem, optimism, and self-efficacy compared to the control group. The results are discussed in light of the theoretical and clinical implications of meaning-making coping in the context of stress and illness.

Lee V; Robin Cohen S; Edgar L; Laizner AM; Gagnon AJ

2006-06-01

253

Meaning-making intervention during breast or colorectal cancer treatment improves self-esteem, optimism, and self-efficacy.  

Science.gov (United States)

Existential issues often accompany a diagnosis of cancer and remain one aspect of psychosocial oncology care for which there is a need for focused, empirically tested interventions. This study examined the efficacy of a novel psychological intervention specifically designed to address existential issues through the use of meaning-making coping strategies on psychological adjustment to cancer. Eighty-two breast or colorectal cancer patients were randomly chosen to receive routine care (control group) or up to four sessions that explored the meaning of the emotional responses and cognitive appraisals of each individual's cancer experience within the context of past life events and future goals (experimental group). This paper reports the results from 74 patients who completed and returned pre- and post-test measures for self-esteem, optimism, and self-efficacy. After controlling for baseline scores, the experimental group participants demonstrated significantly higher levels of self-esteem, optimism, and self-efficacy compared to the control group. The results are discussed in light of the theoretical and clinical implications of meaning-making coping in the context of stress and illness. PMID:16413644

Lee, Virginia; Robin Cohen, S; Edgar, Linda; Laizner, Andrea M; Gagnon, Anita J

2006-01-18

254

Relationship between self-efficacy and changes in rated tension and depression for 9- to 12-yr.-old children enrolled in a 12-wk. after-school physical activity program.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

28 girls and 26 boys (93% African American) ages 9 to 12 years were enrolled in an after-school physical activity program for 12 wk. and completed measures of exercise self-efficacy, tension, and depression. Significant negative correlations were found between changes in ratings on Exercise Self-efficacy Scale for Children scores and Profile of Mood States Tension (r =-.44) and Depression (r =-.33) over 12 wk., indicating that as rated exercise Self-efficacy increased, rated Tension and Depression tended to decrease. Findings are consistent with behavioral explanations of the relationship between exercise and mood changes. Caution is appropriate as there was no control group, and familiarity might be an explanation of the findings.

Annesi JJ

2004-08-01

255

Relationship of core self-evaluations traits--self-esteem, generalized self-efficacy, locus of control, and emotional stability--with job satisfaction and job performance: a meta-analysis.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article presents meta-analytic results of the relationship of 4 traits--self-esteem, generalized self-efficacy, locus of control, and emotional stability (low neuroticism) with job satisfaction and job performance. With respect to job satisfaction, the estimated true score correlations were .26 for self-esteem, .45 for generalized self-efficacy, .32 for internal locus of control, and .24 for emotional stability. With respect to job performance, the correlations were .26 for self-esteem, .23 for generalized self-efficacy, .22 for internal locus of control, and .19 for emotional stability. In total, the results based on 274 correlations suggest that these traits are among the best dispositional predictors of job satisfaction and job performance. T. A. Judge, E. A. Locke. and C. C. Durham's (1997) theory of core self-evaluations is used as a framework for discussing similarities between the 4 traits and their relationships to satisfaction and performance.

Judge TA; Bono JE

2001-02-01

256

Self-efficacy: Empowering parents of children with cystic fibrosis.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Can parent engagement in the development and delivery of educational materials for cystic fibrosis (CF) promote increased self-efficacy and confidence in self-management skills? Standard therapies for a child with CF frequently involve pulmonary treatment, medications, and behavioral and nutritional interventions. Parents report that the prescribed CF care can be overwhelming. Previous research at this pediatric CF Center indicated the parental perception of the difficulty in managing CF-related nutrition therapy. Parents' nutrition knowledge was an initial target of this continuous quality improvement (CQI) project with a long-range aim of increasing children's median body mass index (BMI) percentiles for patients at this pediatric CF center. METHODS: The local CF Parent Advisory Council, CF parents and staff collaborated on this family-centered CQI project. A CF parent website with weekly email newsletters and a facebook page were developed and evolved with input from parents. Parental feedback was gathered through electronic surveys, written questionnaires, focus groups and informal interviews. A convenience sample of parents participated in pre- and post-intervention surveys to determine change in self-confidence in effectively managing their children's CF treatment regimens. Results were also compared with responses from a larger previous survey. RESULTS: Parental knowledge of nutrition facts and medical nutrition therapy for CF did not increase significantly over the course of the CQI project. Surveyed parents reported increased confidence in their self-management skills. Although mean BMI percentiles have increased at this center, they remain below the national average. CONCLUSIONS: Parent-driven educational strategies provide an opportunity to promote reliable CF-related information in parent-preferred formats that enhance self-management skills in caring for children with CF. Parental confidence to follow CF center recommendations increased between 2004 and 2011. Although many factors may impact confidence, parent satisfaction with the creation of electronic resources and engagement in the CQI process were intangible, but important outcomes.

McDonald CM; Haberman D; Brown N

2013-09-01

257

Effects of health literacy to self-efficacy and preventive care utilization among older adults.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: This study examined the relationships between health literacy, self-efficacy and preventive care utilization among older adults in Taiwan. METHODS: The data were from a longitudinal survey, "Taiwan Longitudinal Study in Aging" in 2003 and 2007. A total of 3479 participants who completed both two waves were included for analysis. Health literacy first was constructed through education, cognitive function and disease knowledge through structural equation modeling (SEM); then, the associations of health literacy to later self-efficacy and preventive care were examined. RESULTS: The model fit of SEM was good, indicating that the construct of health literacy was appropriate. Healthy literacy showed a moderate positive effect on self-efficacy and a small positive effect on preventive care utilization. CONCLUSIONS: Health literacy increases self-efficacy and utilization of preventive care. Promoting people's health knowledge and health literacy is suggested.

Chen JZ; Hsu HC; Tung HJ; Pan LY

2013-01-01

258

Learning to fit in: an exploratory study of general perceived self efficacy in selected refugee groups.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

As self efficacy beliefs help determine an individual's response to challenging situations, we explored the impact of the refugee experience on efficacy beliefs and their contribution to resettlement. General self efficacy (GSE) was assessed in 186 resettled Afghan and Kurdish refugees against a range of personal and temporal variables. Although no differences in GSE in relation to temporal factors were noted, significant relationships between self efficacy, lower psychological distress and higher subjective well being were evident. The findings suggest that GSE, because of its positive association with mental health and well being, is a variable worthy of further examination in refugees. In addition to ensuring a supportive environment for learning English, proactive employment strategies should be encouraged. Further research examining the use of successful refugee role models to promote self efficacy, enhance motivation for learning and ensure newly arrived refugees view resettlement as a challenge, rather than a threat, is recommended.

Sulaiman-Hill CM; Thompson SC

2013-02-01

259

Maternal stress and perceptions of self-efficacy in socioeconomically disadvantaged mothers: an explicative model.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Studies have demonstrated that maternal stress and perceptions of self-efficacy influence a mother's performance, affecting her ability to interact with her child and to understand and answer his needs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate maternal stress and the perception of self-efficacy in the mothers of infants who are cared for in child-care centers and belong to the poorest segment of the Chilean population. To this end, these aspects were studied in 121 low-income, high-social-risk mothers with children between the ages of 4 and 9 months. The final goal was to generate an explicative model of self-efficacy and maternal stress that considered characteristics of the family and the child. The results revealed that family characteristics - especially household size, per capita incomes and mother age - are more relevant for explaining maternal self-efficacy and stress. The findings and implications for practice are discussed.

Farkas C; Valdés N

2010-12-01

260

Bystander behavior in bullying situations: basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement and defender self-efficacy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of the present study was to investigate how basic moral sensitivity in bullying, moral disengagement in bullying and defender self-efficacy were related to different bystander behaviors in bullying. Therefore, we examined pathways that linked students' basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement, and defender self-efficacy to different bystander behaviors in bullying situations. Three hundred and forty-seven teenagers completed a bullying survey. Findings indicated that compared with boys, girls expressed higher basic moral sensitivity in bullying, lower defender self-efficacy and moral disengagement in bullying. Results from the SEM showed that basic moral sensitivity in bullying was negatively related to pro-bully behavior and positively related to outsider and defender behavior, mediated by moral disengagement in bullying, which in turn was positively related to pro-bully behavior and negatively related to outsider and defender behavior. What differed in the relations between outsider and defender behaviors was the degree of defender self-efficacy.

Thornberg R; Jungert T

2013-06-01

 
 
 
 
261

Bystander behavior in bullying situations: basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement and defender self-efficacy.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of the present study was to investigate how basic moral sensitivity in bullying, moral disengagement in bullying and defender self-efficacy were related to different bystander behaviors in bullying. Therefore, we examined pathways that linked students' basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement, and defender self-efficacy to different bystander behaviors in bullying situations. Three hundred and forty-seven teenagers completed a bullying survey. Findings indicated that compared with boys, girls expressed higher basic moral sensitivity in bullying, lower defender self-efficacy and moral disengagement in bullying. Results from the SEM showed that basic moral sensitivity in bullying was negatively related to pro-bully behavior and positively related to outsider and defender behavior, mediated by moral disengagement in bullying, which in turn was positively related to pro-bully behavior and negatively related to outsider and defender behavior. What differed in the relations between outsider and defender behaviors was the degree of defender self-efficacy. PMID:23522703

Thornberg, Robert; Jungert, Tomas

2013-03-21

262

Entrepreneurial self-efficacy in a multicultural society: Measures and ethnic differences  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Deficits in self-beliefs lower entrepreneurial activity in the broader South African context. A brief theoretical analysis preceded establishing the psychometric evaluations of the entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) and general selfefficacy (GSE) measures. Participants representing different major ...

Boris Urban

263

Self-efficacy in diabetic care and occurrence of adverse events in an ambulatory setting.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

CONCLUSION: /st>To increase patients' self-efficacy by strengthening patient and family involvement may help prevent harmful events and improve patient safety in an ambulatory setting among chronically ill patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus.

Sirikamonsathian B; Sriratanaban J; Hiransuthikul N; Lertmaharit S

2013-10-01

264

Long-term effect of communication training on the relationship between physicians' self-efficacy and performance.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To examine the long term impact of a communication skills intervention on physicians' communication self-efficacy and the relationship between reported self-efficacy and actual performance. METHODS: 62 hospital physicians were exposed to a 20-h communication skills course according to the Four Habits patient-centered approach in a crossover randomized trial. Encounters with real patients before and after the intervention (mean 154 days) were videotaped, for evaluation of performance using the four habits coding scheme. Participants completed a questionnaire about communication skills self-efficacy before the course, immediately after the course, and at 3 years follow-up. Change in self-efficacy and the correlations between performance and self-efficacy at baseline and follow-up were assessed. RESULTS: Communication skills self-efficacy was not correlated to performance at baseline (r=-0.16; p=0.22). The association changed significantly (p=0.01) and was positive at follow-up (r=0.336, p=0.042). The self-efficacy increased significantly (effect size d=0.27). High performance after the course and low self-efficacy before the course were associated with larger increase in communication skills self-efficacy. CONCLUSION: A communication skills course led to improved communication skills self-efficacy more than 3 years later, and introduced a positive association between communication skills self-efficacy and performance not present at baseline. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Communication skills training enhances physicians' insight in own performance.

Gulbrandsen P; Jensen BF; Finset A; Blanch-Hartigan D

2013-05-01

265

Affect as a mediator between self-efficacy and quality of life among Chinese cancer survivors in China.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Previous studies have shown that self-efficacy influences cancer survivors' quality of life. As most of the relevant findings are based on Caucasian cancer survivors, whether the same relationship holds among Asian cancer patients and through what mechanism self-efficacy influences quality of life are unclear. This study examined the association between self-efficacy and quality of life among Chinese cancer survivors, and proposed affect (positive and negative) as a mediator between self-efficacy and quality of life. A sample of 238 Chinese cancer survivors (75% female, mean age = 55.7) were recruited from Beijing, China. Self-efficacy, affect (positive and negative) and quality of life were measured in a questionnaire package. Self-efficacy was positively associated with quality of life and positive affect, and negatively associated with negative affect. Path analyses revealed the direct effect from self-efficacy to quality of life and the indirect effects from self-efficacy to quality of life through positive affect and negative affect. The beneficial role of self-efficacy in Chinese cancer survivors' quality of life and the mediating role of affect in explaining the relationship between self-efficacy and quality of life are supported. Future interventions should include self-care and affect regulation skills training to enhance cancer survivors' self-efficacy and positive affect, as this could help to improve Chinese cancer survivors' quality of life.

Yeung NC; Lu Q

2013-09-01

266

Postpartum Exercise among Nigerian Women: Issues Relating to Exercise Performance and Self-Efficacy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Physical exercise during postpartum period is beneficial to mothers, and the health gains are abundantly reported. This study characterises the postpartum exercise profile of a group of Nigerian women and reports how their exercise self-efficacies are influenced by sociodemographic characteristics. Participants were women attending the two largest postnatal clinics in Ibadan, south-western Nigeria. A self-developed questionnaire assessed the socio-demographic and exercise profile of participants, while the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale assessed their exercise self-efficacy. About two-third (61.0%) of the participants were not aware that they could undertake physical exercise to enhance postpartum health, and 109 (47.8%) were not engaged in any exercise. Those who exercised did so for less than three days/week, and 89% of the women did not belong to any exercise support group. Exercise self-efficacy was significantly (P < 0.05) associated with being in an exercise programme, age, employment, work hours/week, monthly income, and number of pregnancies. Most of the women were not aware they could engage in postpartum exercise, and about half were not undertaking it. More women with high compared to moderate exercise self-efficacy undertook the exercise. Efforts at increasing awareness, improving exercise self-efficacy and adoption of postpartum exercise are desirable among the Nigerian women.

Adeniyi AF; Ogwumike OO; Bamikefa TR

2013-01-01

267

OCCUPATIONAL SELF EFFICACY ROLE CONFLICT AND MENTAL HEALTH OF PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The main purpose of the present study was to study the Occupational Selfefficacy role conflict and Mental Health of school teachers. The sample consisted of 600 primary school teachers selected from Belgaum and Dharwad district of Karnatak state.The objectives of the present study were; i) to study the significant difference in the occupational self efficacy, role conflict and mental health of male and female primary school teachers working in public and private aided schools. ii) To find out the correlation between occupational Self-efficacy and Role Conflict of School Teachers. iii) To find out the correlation between Occupational Self-efficacy and Mental Health of School Teachers.Findings of the study revealed that, i) There is no significant difference in the Occupational Self-efficacy, Role Conflict and Mental Health of both Male and Female Primary School Teachers working in Public and Private aided schools. ii) There is Negative and significant correlation between Occupational Self-efficacy and Role Conflict of Teachers. iii) There is a positive and significant correlation between occupational self-efficacy and Mental Health of School Teachers.

S.G.JADHAV

2013-01-01

268

The Assessment of Self-Efficacy Level According to University StudentsAND#8217; Smoking Situation  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available ABSTRACT AIM: This essay is made with the aim of assessing of self-efficacy level according to university students’ smoking situation. METHOD: The study that is descriptive type was made in between September 2009-June 2010 in University of Bingol. Totally 920 students who attend Bingol Universty in 2009-2010 academic year consist of the universe of the study. The choice of sample wasn’t used in the study, the study completed with 765 students who were volunteer to join the study data was collected by using the form including socio-demographic data and self-efficacy scale. Evaluating data was made by descriptive tests in computer environment, t test and analysis of variance. RESULTS: The rate of students’ smoking is 6,9 % among girls, 37,4 % among boys and it is totally 44,3 %. It was determined that place that they live, their fathers’ education of smoking students idea quit smoking effect their self-efficacy level. It was determined that family type, marital status, fathers’ education of non-smoking students effect their self-efficacy level. CONCLUSION: It is found that self-efficacy of non-smoking students is higher than the self-efficacy of smoking students. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(3.000): 255-264

Nur Ozlem Kilinc; Ayfer Tezel

2012-01-01

269

Computer self-efficacy - is there a gender gap in tertiary level introductory computing classes?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper explores the relationship between introductory computing students, self-efficacy, and gender. Since the use of computers has become more common there has been speculation that the confidence and ability to use them differs between genders. Self-efficacy is an important and useful concept used to describe how a student may perceive their own ability or confidence in using and learning new technology. A survey of students in an introductory computing class has been completed intermittently since the late 1990s. Although some questions have been adapted to meet the changing technology the aim of the survey has remain unchanged. In this study self-efficacy is measured using two self-rating questions. Students are asked to rate their confidence using a computer and also asked to give their perception of their computing knowledge. This paper examines these two aspects of a person's computer self-efficacy in order to identify any differences that may occur between genders in two introductory computing classes, one in 1999 and the other in 2012. Results from the 1999 survey are compared with those from the survey completed in 2012 and investigated to ascertain if the perception that males were more likely to display higher computer self-efficacy levels than their female classmates does or did exist in a class of this type. Results indicate that while overall there has been a general increase in self-efficacy levels in 2012 compared with 1999, there is no significant gender gap.

Shirley Gibbs

2013-01-01

270

Condom negotiation strategies as a mediator of the relationship between self-efficacy and condom use.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

College students are a group at high risk of sexually transmitted infections due to inconsistent condom use and engaging in other risky sexual behaviors. This study examined whether condom use self-efficacy predicted the use of condom negotiation strategies (i.e., condom influence strategies) and whether condom influence strategies mediated the relationship between condom use self-efficacy and condom use within this population, as well as whether gender moderated the mediation model. Results showed a strong relationship between condom use self-efficacy and condom influence strategies. Additionally, condom influence strategies completely mediated the relationship between condom use self-efficacy and condom use. Although condom use self-efficacy was related to condom use, the ability to use condom negotiation strategies was the most important factor predicting condom use. The mediation model held across genders, except for the condom influence strategy withholding sex, where it was not significant for men. For women, condom use self-efficacy promoted the use of a very assertive negotiation strategy, withholding sex, and was consequently related to increased condom use. Overall, using assertive condom negotiation strategies (e.g., withholding sex and direct request) were found to be the most important aspects of increasing condom use for both women and men. Implications and suggestions for prevention programming are discussed.

French SE; Holland KJ

2013-01-01

271

Social support and parenting self-efficacy among Chinese women in the perinatal period.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: to examine the changes in and relationship between perceived social support and parenting self-efficacy in the perinatal period among pregnant women in mainland China. DESIGN AND SETTING: this was a secondary analysis with data from part of an experimental study of the effects of an interpersonal-psychotherapy-oriented childbirth psychoeducation programme on maternal adaptation. A longitudinal design was employed in the present study. The study was carried out from July 2008 to May 2009 in one general hospital in Guangzhou, China. PARTICIPANTS: a convenience sample of 68 first-time mothers in mainland China completed measurement of social support and parenting self-efficacy during pregnancy and at six weeks and three months post partum. FINDINGS: perceived social support and parenting self-efficacy declined during early motherhood. Parenting self-efficacy increased from six weeks post partum to three months post partum. Perceived social support positively correlated with parenting self-efficacy. CONCLUSION: culturally competent health-care intervention should be developed during early motherhood to promote perceived social support and parenting self-efficacy for the new mothers.

Gao LL; Sun K; Chan SW

2013-07-01

272

Self-efficacy beliefs as predictors of loneliness and psychological distress in older adults.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Sociodemographic variables, social support, and physical health have been used previously in a few predictor models of loneliness and psychological distress in late life. The present study, however, was designed to test the hypothesis that self-efficacy beliefs of elderly persons are significantly stronger predictors of loneliness and psychological distress than are demographics, social support, and physical health variables used in earlier predictor models. A sample of 141 women and 101 men, aged 65 to 86, reporting awide range of health status from "poor" to "excellent" was drawn from the region of Southern Alberta. Standard self-report measures were used to assess perceived self-efficacy in eight different domains. Findings from a series of hierarchical regression analyses that were conducted separately for men, women, and the combined sample supported the hypothesis concerning the superiority of the self-efficacy variables as predictors of loneliness and psychological distress. Gender-specific variations revealed that women's stronger self-efficacy domains in the interpersonal, social, and emotional realms, and men's stronger self-efficacy beliefs in the instrumental, financial, and physical realms predicted less loneliness and psychological distress. Spiritual self-efficacy emerged as being the most potent predictor, accounting for the largest percentage of explained variance in loneliness and psychological distress in the women's and combined sample. Implications of the findings are discussed for geriatric practitioners and clinicians.

Fry PS; Debats DL

2002-01-01

273

The Relationship between EFL Learners’ Self-efficacy Beliefs and Their Language Learning Strategy Use  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The focus of education has changed from teacher-directed to learner-oriented instruction in previous years. Majority of studies in the field of EFL/ESL learning involves issues relevant to learners and their individual differences. Therefore, the present study focused on some of these individual variables; namely self-efficacy and language learning strategies. This study aimed at exploring the relationship between EFL learner's self-efficacy and language learning strategy use. Also, frequently language learning strategies by EFL learners and the existence of a significant difference in their self-efficacy beliefs and strategy use due to gender and years of English study are investigated. A group of 130 first year university students consented to participate in the present study. The results of statistical analyses indicated that there was no relationship between self-efficacy and language learning strategy use. Moreover, metacognitive strategies are frequently used language learning strategies by EFL learners. In addition, there were no significant differences in both self-efficacy and strategy use due to gender. But, there were significant differences in self-efficacy beliefs and only in metacognitive strategies due to years of English study.

Alireza Bonyadi; Farahnaz Rimani Nikou; Sima Shahbaz

2012-01-01

274

Auto-eficácia na criança asmática/ Self-efficacy in asthmatic children  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese O presente estudo tem como objectivos avaliar a auto-eficácia de um grupo de 70 crianças asmáticas e comparar a auto-eficácia em dois grupos etários (8-10 anos, n=34 e dos 11-14 anos, n=36). Foi utilizado, para medir a auto-eficácia no manejo da asma - "The asthma Self-efficacy Questionaire" (Lemanek).Encontrou-se adequada fiabilidade para o instrumento. Verificou-se que as expectativas de eficácia, ao nível dos auto-cuidados, são mais elevadas no grupo das crian (more) ças mais velhas. Encontrou-se ainda uma relação entre as expectativas de eficácia e a frequência de crises de asma, quanto maior é o sentimento de eficácia menor é a frequência das crises. Abstract in english Self-efficacy is evaluated in a group of 70 asthmatic children and two age groups are compared (8 to 10 years old and 11 to 14 years old). Self-efficacy in the management of asthma was measured by "The asthma self-efficacy questionnaire" (Lemanek). Acceptable reliability has been found for the instrument. Self-efficacy beliefs at a self-care level are higher in the group of the older children. We could still find a relationship between self-efficacy beliefs and the asthma crisis frequency, the bigger the feeling of efficacy the fewer are the crisis.

Morgado, Mafalda Vital; Pires, António; Pinto, José Rosado

2000-11-01

275

SELF-EFFICACY BELIEFS, ACHIEVEMENT MOTIVATION AND GENDER AS RELATED TO EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT  

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Full Text Available This study aims to investigate preservice computer teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs and achievement motivation levels for educational software development before and after the “Educational Software Design, Development and Evaluation (ESDDE)” course. A pretest and post test design without a control group was employed. In 2008, 46 senior students (25 male and 21 female) who were enrolled at Computer Education and Instructional Technology department participated in this study.The data were collected by the scale of self-efficacy beliefs towards Educational Software Development (ESD), achievement motivation scale besides student demographics form. Positively, the results revealed that the students’ self efficacy beliefs towards educational software development significantly improved after ESDDE course. Before the course, the students’ self-efficacy beliefs were significantly different according to perceived level of programming competency and gender in favor of male, however after the course there was no significant difference in self-efficacy beliefs regarding gender and perceived level of programming competency. Hence, achievement motivation levels after the course were significantly higher than before while gender and perceived level of programming competency had no significant effect on achievement motivation for ESD. The study is considered to contribute studies investigating gender and computer related self efficacy beliefs in IT education.

Alev ATES

2011-01-01

276

Relationship between Quality of Life, Hardiness,Self-efficacy and Self-esteem amongst Employed and Unemployed Married Women in Zabol  

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Full Text Available Objective: Examining the interrelationship between quality of life, hardiness, selfefficacy and self-esteem among working (professional and non-professional), and non-working married women has motivated the researcher to launch this study. Method: The samples in the present study consisted of 250 married employed women and 250 married unemployed women in the age range of 24-41 years old belonging to lower, middle, and upper socioeconomic status groups, with educational qualification of 10±2 and above and having at least one school child. Stratified convenience sampling technique was used for the selection of the sample. The World Health Organization -Quality of Life (WHO QOL) – BREF, the Personal View Survey (PVS), the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE), The Coopersmith Self-Eesteem Inventory (CSEI) and demographic questionnaire Sheet were chosen for collection of the data. Results: Obtained Pearson r values revealed significant positive interrelationship between quality of life, hardiness, self-efficacy, and self-esteem in the whole sample, within the subgroups of professional and non-professional employed and unemployed women. Obtained pearson r values revealed significant negative relationship between employment and the above variables in women. Conclusion: It indicates that women with higher quality of life score rank also higher on hardiness, self-efficacy, and self-esteem and vice versa.

Irandokht Asadi Sadeghi Azar; Promila Vasudeva; Abdolghani Abdollahi M

2006-01-01

277

Adaptação transcultural preliminar do Children's Eating Attitude Test (Cheat) para o idioma português The preliminary transcultural adaptation of the Children's Eating Attitude Test (Cheat) for portuguese  

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Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: traduzir e adaptar o instrumento "Children's Eating Attitude Test" (Cheat) para o idioma português, avaliar a equivalência semântica e a compreensão verbal. MÉTODOS: envolveu quatro etapas: (1) tradução, (2) retradução, (3) revisão técnica e avaliação semântica, (4) pré-teste - avaliação da compreensão verbal por especialistas em transtorno alimentar. RESULTADOS: as 26 questões foram traduzidas e adaptadas para o idioma português. A versão final constou dos mesmos 26 itens apresentando-se de forma clara e de fácil compreensão (valores médios superior a 4,5 - máximo 5,0). CONCLUSÕES: o instrumento encontra-se traduzido e adaptado para o idioma português demonstrando bons resultados no processo de adaptação transcultural. São necessárias análises de validade externa, equivalência de mensuração e reprodutibilidade.OBJECTIVES: to translate and adapt the "Children's Eating Attitude Test" (Cheat) to Portuguese and evaluate the semantic equivalence and verbal comprehension. METHODS: the process involved four stages: (1) translation, (2) back-translation, (3) technical review and semantic evaluation, (4) pre-test - evaluation of verbal comprehension by specialists in eating disorders. RESULTS: the 26 questions were translated and adapted for Portuguese. The final version contained the same 26 items presented in a clear and easy-tounderstand format (average score higher than 4.5 - maximum 5.0). CONCLUSIONS: the tool has been translated and adapted for Portuguese and the transcultural adaptation process was a success. There is still a need for analyses of external validity, measurement equivalence and reproducibility.

Mariana Loureiro Barillari; Paula Costa Teixeira; Norman Hearst; Marcela Salim Kotait; Táki Athanássios Cordas; Maria Aparecida Conti

2011-01-01

278

[Mental health for the Aboriginals: a transcultural response].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This article examines how the issue of clinical intervention with the Aboriginals presents itself within Montreal's transcultural psychiatric services. The cultural consultation service at Montreal Jewish Hospital created by Dr. Kirmayer as well as the transcultural psychiatric clinic at Montreal Children's Hospital founded by Dr. Rousseau are relatively recent settings of care. Their mandate being to provide care and services to Montreal's cultural diversity, the author questions the place and response given to the demands of a minority unlike the others, the Aboriginals.

Noël D

2006-01-01

279

Self-efficacy in Environmental Education: Experiences of elementary education preservice teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite research showing Environmental Education can provide positive student outcomes in academic achievement, critical thinking, motivation and engagement (Ernst, 2007; Lieberman & Hoody, 1998; Orr, 1992; Palmer, 1998; Powers, 2004; Volk & Cheak, 2003), Environmental Education is currently not a critical element in American public school K-12 education. The present study investigates self-efficacy in Environmental Education through a mixed methods research approach. The data reveal the participants' perspectives of their sense of self-efficacy in Environmental Education. It adds to the body of work on Environmental Education and self-efficacy by specifically investigating the topics through interviews with preservice teachers. Purposeful sampling is used to identify preservice elementary education teachers in their senior year of college with a high measure of self-efficacy. Self-efficacy is measured using the Environmental Education Efficacy Belief Instrument (Sia, 1992). Forty-six preservice teachers completed the instrument. Six preservice teachers were interviewed to determine experiences that impact their self-efficacy in Environmental Education. Continual comparison and cross-case analysis are used to analyze the data. The results reveal a relationship between personal experiences with nature as a young child and current beliefs toward their personal efficacy and teaching outcome efficacy in Environmental Education. Similar to the findings of Sia (1992), the researcher discovered that preservice teachers realize that they lack sufficient knowledge and skill in Environmental Education but believe that effective teaching can increase students understanding of Environmental Education. While the preservice teachers do not believe they will teach Environmental Education as well as other subjects, they will continually seek out better ways to teach Environmental Education. Interviews with participants who had a high self-efficacy revealed the importance of playing outdoors as young children and having an adult role model with whom to share nature. Results showed that experiences with nature are absent in formal schooling, including courses in teacher education programs.

Gardner, Cynthia Crompton

280

The effect of empowerment on the self-efficacy, quality of life and clinical and laboratory indicators of patients treated with hemodialysis: a randomized controlled trial  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemodialysis patients face numerous physical and psychological stresses that result in reduced health. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of an empowerment program on self-efficacy, quality of life, clinical indicators of blood pressure and interdialytic weight gain, and laboratory results in these patients. Methods This randomized, controlled trial was conducted at Boo Ali Sina Dialysis Center, Shiraz, Iran. A total of 48 hemodialysis patients participated in this study. After acquisition of informed consent, eligible patients were randomly divided into two groups, control and experimental. Pre-test data were obtained by using a demographic data form and two questionnaires for self-efficacy and quality of life. Blood pressure and interdialytic weight gain were measured. We extracted laboratory data from patients’ charts. A six-week empowerment intervention that included four individual and two group counselling sessions was performed for the experimental group. Six weeks after intervention, post-test data were obtained from both groups in the same manner as the pre-test. Data were analyzed by ANCOVA using SPSS v11.5. Results There were no statistically significant differences in demographic variables between the groups. Pre-test mean scores for self-efficacy, quality of life, blood pressure, interdialytic weight gain and laboratory results did not differ between the groups. There was a significant difference between the experimental and control groups in terms of pre-to post-intervention changes in overall self-efficacy scores, stress reduction, and decision making, in addition to overall quality of life and all dimensions included within quality of life based on this questionnaire. Additionally, the pre- to post-intervention changes in systolic/diastolic blood pressures, interdialytic weight gain, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels significantly differed between the groups. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that a combination of individual and group empowerment counselling sessions improves self-efficacy, quality of life, clinical signs, and hemoglobin and hematocrit levels in hemodialysis patients. Empowerment of hemodialysis patients should be considered in hemodialysis centers to assist patients with the management of their health-related problems. Trial registration Irct ID: IRCT138901172621N4

Moattari Marzieh; Ebrahimi Marzieh; Sharifi Nasrin; Rouzbeh Jamshid

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
281

Self-efficacy instruments for patients with chronic diseases suffer from methodological limitations - a systematic review  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Measurement of self-efficacy requires carefully developed and validated instruments. It is currently unclear whether available self-efficacy instruments for chronic diseases fulfill these requirements. Our aim was to systematically identify all existing self-efficacy scales for five major chronic diseases and to assess their development and validation process. Methods We conducted a systematic literature search in electronic databases (MEDLINE, PSYCHINFO, and EMBASE) to identify studies describing the development and/or validation process of self-efficacy instruments for the five chronic diseases diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, arthritis, and heart failure. Two members of the review team independently selected articles meeting inclusion criteria. The self-efficacy instruments were evaluated in terms of their development (aim of instrument, a priori considerations, identification of items, selection of items, development of domains, answer options) and validation (test-retest reliability, internal consistency reliability, validity, responsiveness) process. Results Of 584 potentially eligible papers we included 25 (13 for diabetes, 5 for asthma, 4 for arthritis, 3 for COPD, 0 for heart failure) which covered 26 different self-efficacy instrument versions. For 8 instruments (30.8%), the authors described the aim before the scales were developed whereas for the other instruments the aim was unclear. In one study (3.8%) a priori considerations were specified. In none of the studies a systematic literature search was carried out to identify items. The item selection process was often not clearly described (38.5%). Test-retest reliability was assessed for 9 instruments (34.6%), validity using a correlational approach for 18 (69.2%), and responsiveness to change for 3 (11.5%) instruments. Conclusion The development and validation process of the majority of the self-efficacy instruments had major limitations. The aim of the instruments was often not specified and for most instruments, not all measurement properties that are important to support the specific aim of the instrument (for example responsiveness for evaluative instruments) were assessed. Researchers who develop and validate self-efficacy instruments should adhere more closely to important methodological concepts for development and validation of patient-reported outcomes and report their methods more transparently. We propose a systematic five step approach for the development and validation of self-efficacy instruments.

Frei, Anja; Svarin, Anna; Steurer-Stey, Claudia; Puhan, Milo A

2009-01-01

282

The SCI Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES): development and psychometric properties  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Rising prevalence of secondary conditions among persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) has focused recent attention to potential health promotion programs designed to reduce such adverse health conditions. A healthy lifestyle for people with SCI, including and specifically, the adoption of a vigorous exercise routine, has been shown to produce an array of health benefits, prompting many providers to recommend the implementation of such activity to those with SCI. Successfully adopting such an exercise regimen however, requires confidence in one's ability to engage in exercise or exercise self-efficacy. Exercise self-efficacy has not been assessed adequately for people with SCI due to a lack of validated and reliable scales, despite self efficacy's status as one of the most widely researched concepts and despite its broad application in health promotion studies. Exercise self efficacy supporting interventions for people with SCI are only meaningful if appropriate measurement tools exist. The objective of our study was to develop a psychometrically sound exercise self-efficacy self-report measure for people with SCI. Methods Based on literature reviews, expert comments and cognitive testing, 10 items were included and made up the 4-point Likert SCI Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES) in its current form. The ESES was administered as part of the first wave of a nationwide survey (n = 368) on exercise behavior and was also tested separately for validity in four groups of individuals with SCI. Reliability and validity testing was performed using SPSS 12.0. Results Cronbach's alpha was .9269 for the ESES. High internal consistency was confirmed in split-half (EQ Length Spearman Brown = .8836). Construct validity was determined using principal component factor analysis by correlating the aggregated ESES items with the Generalised Self Efficacy Scale (GSE). We found that all items loaded on one factor only and that there was a statistically significant correlation between Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES) and Generalised Self Efficacy Scale (GSE) (Spearman RHO = .316; p Conclusion Preliminary findings indicate that the ESES is a reliable instrument with high internal consistency and scale integrity. Content validity both in terms of face and construct validity is satisfactory.

Kroll Thilo; Kehn Matthew; Ho Pei-Shu; Groah Suzanne

2007-01-01

283

Self-efficacy instruments for patients with chronic diseases suffer from methodological limitations - a systematic review  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Measurement of self-efficacy requires carefully developed and validated instruments. It is currently unclear whether available self-efficacy instruments for chronic diseases fulfill these requirements. Our aim was to systematically identify all existing self-efficacy scales for five major chronic diseases and to assess their development and validation process. Methods We conducted a systematic literature search in electronic databases (MEDLINE, PSYCHINFO, and EMBASE) to identify studies describing the development and/or validation process of self-efficacy instruments for the five chronic diseases diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, arthritis, and heart failure. Two members of the review team independently selected articles meeting inclusion criteria. The self-efficacy instruments were evaluated in terms of their development (aim of instrument, a priori considerations, identification of items, selection of items, development of domains, answer options) and validation (test-retest reliability, internal consistency reliability, validity, responsiveness) process. Results Of 584 potentially eligible papers we included 25 (13 for diabetes, 5 for asthma, 4 for arthritis, 3 for COPD, 0 for heart failure) which covered 26 different self-efficacy instrument versions. For 8 instruments (30.8%), the authors described the aim before the scales were developed whereas for the other instruments the aim was unclear. In one study (3.8%) a priori considerations were specified. In none of the studies a systematic literature search was carried out to identify items. The item selection process was often not clearly described (38.5%). Test-retest reliability was assessed for 9 instruments (34.6%), validity using a correlational approach for 18 (69.2%), and responsiveness to change for 3 (11.5%) instruments. Conclusion The development and validation process of the majority of the self-efficacy instruments had major limitations. The aim of the instruments was often not specified and for most instruments, not all measurement properties that are important to support the specific aim of the instrument (for example responsiveness for evaluative instruments) were assessed. Researchers who develop and validate self-efficacy instruments should adhere more closely to important methodological concepts for development and validation of patient-reported outcomes and report their methods more transparently. We propose a systematic five step approach for the development and validation of self-efficacy instruments.

Frei Anja; Svarin Anna; Steurer-Stey Claudia; Puhan Milo A

2009-01-01

284

[Psychometric properties of a self-efficacy scale for physical activity in Brazilian adults].  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To test the validity and reliability of a self-efficacy scale for physical activity (PA) in Brazilian adults. METHODS: A self-efficacy scale was applied jointly with a multidimensional questionnaire through face-to-face interviews with 1,418 individuals (63.4% women) aged ? 18 years. The scale was submitted to validity (factorial and construct) and reliability analysis (internal consistency and temporal stability). A test-retest procedure was conducted with 74 individuals to evaluate temporal stability. RESULTS: Exploratory factor analyses revealed two independent factors: self-efficacy for walking and self-efficacy for moderate and vigorous PA (MVPA). Together, these two factors explained 65.4% of the total variance of the scale (20.9% and 44.5% for walking and MVPA, respectively). Cronbach's alpha values were 0.83 for walking and 0.90 for MVPA, indicating high internal consistency. Both factors were significantly and positively correlated (rho ? 0.17, P < 0.001) with quality of life indicators (health perception, self-satisfaction, and energy for daily activities), indicating an adequate construct validity. CONCLUSIONS: The scale's validity, internal consistency, and reliability were adequate to evaluate self-efficacy for PA in Brazilian adults.

Rech CR; Sarabia TT; Fermino RC; Hallal PC; Reis RS

2011-04-01

285

Young females' sexual self-efficacy: associations with personal autonomy and the couple relationship.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Theory suggests that young women's own efficacy for sexual self-protective behaviour is greater when they are more advanced in their cognitive autonomy, and when they have romantic partners who support autonomy rather than engage in coercive behaviours and are warm and accepting rather than rejecting. METHODS: A total of 199 women (aged 16 to 25 years) completed questionnaires measuring sexual self-efficacy, autonomy, partner communication and their partners' behaviours. Hypotheses were tested with structural equation modelling. RESULTS: Correlations showed that young women reported more self-efficacy when they had greater autonomy and reported partners to be more supportive and warmer, and less coercive and rejecting. In structural equation modelling, the association of women's autonomy with sexual self-efficacy was indirect via their perceived capacity to communicate with their partners. Associations of partner behaviours with sexual self-efficacy were both direct and indirect via the capacity to communicate. CONCLUSIONS: Sexual efficacy is enhanced among young women who report a greater general capacity to communicate openly with their partners and have partners who display more warmth and less rejecting behaviours. Young women are also higher in sexual self-efficacy when they report more cognitive autonomy and lower partner coercion, but these associations are completely indirect via females' greater capacity to communicate openly. The findings provide support for sexual health programs focussing on decision-making skills, personal competence, partners' behaviours and dyadic communication strategies.

Zimmer-Gembeck MJ

2013-07-01

286

Autoeficacia, ansiedad y rendimiento académico en adolescentes/ Self-Efficacy, anxiety and academic performance in teenagers  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in spanish Este estudio tuvo como propósito determinar si las variables psicológicas percepción de autoeficacia y ansiedad guardan relación con el rendimiento académico en un grupo de 120 estudiantes de secundaria de un colegio privado de Bogotá. Para ello, se aplicó la Escala de Autoeficacia Generalizada [EAG] y el Cuestionario de Ansiedad Estado - Rasgo [STAI]. Los resultados evidenciaron que la autoeficacia está asociada directamente con el rendimiento académico general, (more) mientras que la ansiedad no. Al examinar por áreas de conocimiento, se encontró que tanto la autoeficacia como la ansiedad resultan ser significativas para la predicción del rendimiento académico. Se discute el papel contextual de la ansiedad así como de su posible mediación en la autoeficacia y el rendimiento académico. Abstract in english The purpose of the current study was to determine whether psychological variables such self-efficacy perception and anxiety maintain a relation with academic performance in a group of 120 secondary (high school) students attending a private school in Bogotá. For this, the scale of generalized self - efficacy (GSS) and the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) was applied. The results demonstrated that self-efficacy is directly and significantly associated with general aca (more) demic performance, meanwhile anxiety does not present a significant association. The examination by knowledge areas indicates that both self-efficacy and anxiety turns out to be significant for the prediction of academic performance. The anxiety contextual role, as well as its possible mediation in self-efficacy and academic achievement is discussed.

Contreras, Françoise; Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Esguerra, Gustavo; Haikal, Andrea; Polanía, Alejandra; Rodríguez, Adriana

2005-12-01

287

The role of feedback, casual attributions, and self-efficacy in goal revision.  

Science.gov (United States)

An important issue in work motivation is how, when, and why individuals revise their goals up or down over time. In the current study, the authors examine feedback, causal attributions, and self-efficacy in this process. Although self-efficacy has frequently been suggested as a key explanatory variable for goal revision, its role has yet to be directly evaluated. Additionally, although attributions have been shown to influence goal revision following failure, the extent to which attributions influence goal revision following success remains unclear. In the current study, the authors address these issues by experimentally manipulating goal progress via performance feedback and tracking the resulting changes in self-efficacy and goal revision over time. In so doing, the authors also address several interpretive ambiguities present in the existing research. Results support the hypothesized model, finding that performance feedback and attributions interactively influenced self-efficacy, which in turn influenced goal revision. These results suggest that interventions targeting attributions, and self-efficacy more directly, may have meaningful influences on goal setting and pursuit, particularly following feedback. PMID:18457497

Tolli, Adam P; Schmidt, Aaron M

2008-05-01

288

Effects of EFL Teachers’ Self-efficacy on Motivational Teaching Behaviors  

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Full Text Available This study examined the predictability of EFL teachers’ self-efficacy on their motivational teaching behaviors. Participants involved 112 English teachers from China’s tertiary education institutes selected by a “snowball” sampling strategy and also from an EFL teacher training camp. They completed a questionnaire survey of the demographic information of participants, their perception of self-efficacy, and their motivational teaching behaviors in English classroom. Results from the descriptive statistics and a multiple regression analysis were generated based on the survey. It indicated that college EFL teachers perceived themselves with much higher self-efficacy for instructional strategies than efficacy for classroom management and efficacy for student engagement. Also, the results revealed that two most frequently used motivational strategies by teachers in language classroom were strategies for generating students’ initial motivation and strategies for maintaining and protecting students’ motivation. The results also showed that teachers’ self-efficacy significantly contributed to the prediction of teachers’ motivational teaching behaviors and accounted for more than one third of the variance to teachers’ motivational teaching behaviors. This study confirmed that there was a direct causal relationship between English teachers’ perceptions of their self-efficacy and their adoption of motivational strategies.

Wei Huangfu

2012-01-01

289

Self-efficacy and perceived benefits / barriers on the AIDs preventive behaviors  

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Full Text Available Background: Drug users (opiate dependency) account for about 65% of all AIDS cases in Iran. Drug injection has been identified as the most common way of HIV transmission in these patients. This study aimed to determine self-efficacy, and perceived benefits / barriers of AIDs preventive behaviors in opiate dependency. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2009.The study population was 86 drug user men at Re-birth association in Zarandieh city. The data were collected using self-administered questionnaires includeing demographic characteristics, perceived benefits/barriers of self-efficacy and AIDS preventive behaviors. Data was analyzed with ANOVA, regression and correlation coefficients and descriptive statistical methods. Results: Regression analysis showed that age, education level, knowledge and perceived benefits/barriers, self-efficacy, all together explain 28% of AIDS preventive behaviors variance. Perceived barriers and self- efficacy were the most important predicting factor. 63% of the samples believed that they have ability of HIV-preventive behaviors.Conclusion: The study showed the relationship of perceived benefits/barriers, self- efficacy with AIDS preventive behaviors. It is suggested that the findings of this study may be used as a basis for designing interventions to improve better performance in the concerned area.

Mahmoud Karimi; Shamsadin Niknami

2011-01-01

290

Believe, and you will achieve: changes over time in self-efficacy, engagement, and performance.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In order to answer the question whether changes in students' self-efficacy levels co-vary with similar changes in engagement and performance, a field study and an experimental study were conducted among university students. In order to do this, we adopted a subgroup approach. We created "natural" (Study 1) and manipulated (Study 2) subgroups based upon their change in self-efficacy over time and examined whether these subgroups showed similar changes over time in engagement and performance. The results of both studies are partly in line with Social Cognitive Theory, in that they confirm that changes in self-efficacy may have a significant impact on students' changes in cognition and motivation (i.e. engagement), as well as behavior (i.e. performance). More specifically, our results show that students' increases/decreases in self-efficacy were related to corresponding increases/decreases in their study engagement and task performance over time. Examining the consequences of changes in students' self-efficacy levels seems promising, both for research and practice.

Ouweneel E; Schaufeli WB; Le Blanc PM

2013-07-01

291

Functional health literacy, medication-taking self-efficacy and adherence to antiretroviral therapy.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS: To report a study of the relationship between functional health literacy and medication adherence, as mediated by medication-taking self-efficacy, while controlling for the effect of key demographic variables (such as race, income and level of education). BACKGROUND: Medication adherence is critical to successful HIV/AIDS self-management. Despite simplified regimens and the availability of tools to assist with medication-taking, adherence remains a challenge for many people living with HIV/AIDS. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, secondary analysis. METHODS: Data for this study of 302 adults living with HIV/AIDS who were taking antiretroviral medications were collected from January 2004-December 2007. Medication adherence was measured using electronic event monitors. Bivariate analyses and stepwise regression were conducted to examine the associations among functional health literacy, medication-taking self-efficacy and HIV medication adherence. RESULTS: Overall, functional health literacy was much higher than expected; however, adherence in this sample was sub-optimal. Higher medication-taking self-efficacy was associated with higher medication adherence; however, functional health literacy was not significantly related to either medication adherence or self-efficacy beliefs. Hence, medication-taking self-efficacy did not mediate the relationship between functional health literacy and medication adherence. CONCLUSIONS: Medication adherence continues to be an issue for people living with HIV/AIDS. Additional research is needed to understand the disparate findings related to functional health literacy and medication adherence in this and other studies examining this association.

Colbert AM; Sereika SM; Erlen JA

2013-02-01

292

Interaction of perceived neighborhood walkability and self-efficacy on physical activity.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: Few social ecological studies have considered the joint effects of intrapersonal and environmental influences on physical activity. This study investigated the interaction of self-efficacy and perceived neighborhood walkability in predicting neighborhood-based physical activity and how this relationship varied by gender and body mass index. METHODS: Data were derived from a cross-sectional investigation of environmental and psychosocial correlates of physical activity among adults (n = 585). Participants completed a detailed 7-day physical activity log booklet, along with a questionnaire that included measures of neighborhood walkability, self-efficacy, and several sociodemographic items. Factorial analysis of variance tests were used to examine the main effects of and interaction between walkability and self-efficacy. RESULTS: In predicting neighborhood-based physical activity, significant interactions were observed between self-efficacy and neighborhood walkability for females (but not for males) and for overweight/obese participants (but not for healthy weight individuals). Women and overweight/obese individuals with low self-efficacy demonstrated substantially greater physical activity when living in a high walkable neighborhood. CONCLUSIONS: Physical activity research and promotion efforts should take into account both environmental and personal factors and the interrelationships between them that influence active living.

Kaczynski AT; Robertson-Wilson J; Decloe M

2012-02-01

293

A Study on Pre-service English Teachers’ Self - efficacy Beliefs  

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Full Text Available The construct of teacher efficacy has been explored by a number of researchers in recent years. Teachers’ efficacy beliefs are regarded as an important criterion in increasing the productivity and motivation during the teaching and the learning process and in defining the general framework of the requirements of the teaching profession. Consequently, teacher education programs have great responsibility for shaping the self-efficacy beliefs of pre-service teachers. The purpose of this study was to explore pre-service English teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs. Another purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of some variables (gender, perceived academic achievement, grade level, department preference and the attitude of the faculty as perceived by the pre-service teachers) upon self-efficacy of pre-service English teachers. Data in this study were collected from a total number of 353 pre-service English teachers (263 girls, 90 boys) enrolled in teacher education programs of the two selected universities in Turkey. Teacher self-efficacy scale (Kan, 2007) and information sheet which was developed by the researcher were utilized in the study. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis H tests were used to data regarding the sample. Data analysis indicated that pre-service English teachers generally expressed positive efficacy beliefs regarding English language teaching profession. At the same time, results showed that pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy differentiated according to perceived academic achievement and grade level.

Gül?ah KÜLEKÇ?

2011-01-01

294

Self-efficacy with application to adolescent smoking cessation: a concept analysis.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIM: This paper is a report of a concept analysis of adolescent smoking cessation self-efficacy. BACKGROUND: Smoking cessation is a key preventive care/health promotion strategy offered by nurses worldwide. Most programming is tailored to adults although the reasons for smoking, along with coping strategies, resources and developmental stage, differ in adolescence. Understanding of the concept of self-efficacy as it relates to the adolescent population will assist nurses in addressing smoking cessation behaviours with this population. DATA SOURCES: The CINAHL and Proquest Nursing databases were searched for papers published between 1977 and 2007 using the keywords self-efficacy, adolescents and smoking cessation. The Walker and Avant method of concept analysis was applied. FINDINGS: Adolescent smoking cessation self-efficacy is the confidence, perceived capacity and perceived ability that the teen possesses to quit smoking. Identified antecedents include developmental stage, past life support, emotional support, coping strategies, resources and emotional status. Consequences are smoking cessation: positive or negative. Empirical measures are identified. CONCLUSION: Levels of self-efficacy have been shown to be an important consideration in the approach of nurses to smoking cessation counselling with the adolescent client. The theoretical definition for this concept will provide the basis for nurses to design appropriate interventions for use in smoking cessation programmes targeted to adolescents. This definition identifies the key attributes of this concept that should be addressed when caring for this population.

Heale R; Griffin MT

2009-04-01

295

Regulatory focus, self-efficacy and outcome expectations as drivers of motivation to consume healthy food products  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

In this paper we apply the principle of RegulatoryFocus Theory to investigate the interaction between self-efficacy and outcomeexpectations on individuals’ intentions to adopt health behaviors. The participants, 959 individuals (Survey 1) and 2400 individuals (Survey 2), reported self-efficacy beliefs and outcomeexpectations with regard to the consumption of omega-3 supplements and omega-3-enriched foodproducts. We found that the relationship prevention outcomeexpectations-intention was significantly attenuated at low levels of self-efficacy and strengthened at high levels of self-efficacy, respectively; whereas, the relationship promotion outcomeexpectations-intention was unaffected by the perceived levels of self-efficacy. The implications suggest that consumers’ motivation to adopt healthyfoodproducts, such as omega-3 supplements and omega-3 enriched products, should be encouraged by stimulating promotion outcomeexpectations. However, when a prevention frame is used, the individuals’ motivation should be significantly enhanced by self-efficacy beliefs.

Tudoran, Ana Alina; Scholderer, Joachim

2012-01-01

296

Intellectual disability nursing and transcultural care.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

In today's healthcare environment, nurses are urged to use up-to-date research evidence to ensure better patient outcomes and inform nursing decisions, actions and interactions with patients. Within the practice setting, there is an increasing challenge to provide care to patients from minority ethnic groups. In order to deliver care to different cultural groups, nurses need to recognize and empathize with patients' belief systems, being mindful of their diverse cultural needs. This article presents the concept of transcultural care and identifies issues within intellectual disability nursing through a focus on the components identified by Campinha-Bacote (2002; 2003) and Cortis (2003): cultural awareness, cultural skill, cultural knowledge, cultural encounter and cultural desire. It highlights the issues which are relevant to nursing practice, cultural care and service provision for persons with intellectual disability from ethnic minorities in Ireland.

Doody O; Doody CM

2012-02-01

297

The Importance of General Self-Efficacy for the Quality of Life of Adolescents with Chronic Conditions.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

We investigated the influence of general self-efficacy perceived by adolescents with chronic conditions and parents on quality of life. This cross-sectional study used the general self-efficacy scale and DISABKIDS condition-generic module to survey adolescents (92/293; 31 %) with type I diabetes, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, cystic fibrosis, kidney/urological conditions, and neuromuscular disorders; and parents (121/293; 41 %). Self perceived and parents' perceived general self-efficacy of adolescents was compared using paired t-tests, and adolescents' quality of life and general self-efficacy were compared among conditions using analysis of variance. Bivariate correlations between general self-efficacy and quality of life were identified, and multiple regression sought predictors of quality of life after controlling for background variables. Social quality of life was lowest among those with neuromuscular disorders. General self-efficacy was highest among adolescents with cystic fibrosis and lowest among those with urological conditions. Parents' perceptions of general self-efficacy were higher than adolescents' (p ? 0.05), although absolute differences were small. General self-efficacy perceived by parents and adolescents was related to emotional, physical, and social quality of life. Adolescents' perceived self-efficacy predicted all quality of life domains. Parents' perceptions of the adolescents self-efficacy predicted the adolescents' social quality of life (? = 0.19; p ? 0.01). General self-efficacy of adolescents with chronic conditions as perceived by themselves and their parents is important for adolescents' quality of life. Interventions to improve general self-efficacy should benefit quality of life among these adolescents.

Cramm JM; Strating MM; Roebroeck ME; Nieboer AP

2013-08-01

298

The Influence of Entrepreneurial Self-Efficacy on Entrepreneurial Learning Behavior - Using Entrepreneurial Intention as the Mediator Variable  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study examines 448 technical and vocational school students’ entrepreneurial learning behavior and its influencing factors to serve as a school reference for the development of entrepreneurship education measures. The results show that students’ ‘entrepreneurial intention (EI)’ has a significant direct effect on ‘entrepreneurial learning behavior (ELB)’, and ‘entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) ‘has a significant effect on ‘entrepreneurial learning behavior’ through ‘entrepreneurial self-efficacy.’ The influence pattern and empirical data of ‘entrepreneurial self-efficacy’ and ‘entrepreneurial intention’ on ‘entrepreneurial learning behavior’ has a good fit.Key words: Entrepreneurial intention; Entrepreneurial learning behavior; Entrepreneurial self-efficacy

Chun-Mei CHOU; Chien-Hua SHEN; Hsi-Chi HSIAO

2011-01-01

299

Self-Efficacy, Motivation Constructs, and Mathematics Performance of Entering Middle School Students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The objectives of this study were to determine the influence of various motivation variables on task-specific mathematics performance and to explore whether these variables change during the first year of middle school (N = 273). Students' task-specific self-efficacy was the only motivation variable to predict performance and did so both at start and end of year. There were no differences in anxiety, self-concept, or self-efficacy for self-regulation between start and end of year, but, by end of year, students described mathematics as less valuable and reported lower effort and persistence. Gifted students had stronger mathematics self-concept beliefs, and they had more accurate and less overconfident self-efficacy beliefs than did regular education students. There were no gender differences in any of the motivation constructs. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

Pajares F; Graham L

1999-04-01

300

Self-Efficacy, Motivation Constructs, and Mathematics Performance of Entering Middle School Students.  

Science.gov (United States)

The objectives of this study were to determine the influence of various motivation variables on task-specific mathematics performance and to explore whether these variables change during the first year of middle school (N = 273). Students' task-specific self-efficacy was the only motivation variable to predict performance and did so both at start and end of year. There were no differences in anxiety, self-concept, or self-efficacy for self-regulation between start and end of year, but, by end of year, students described mathematics as less valuable and reported lower effort and persistence. Gifted students had stronger mathematics self-concept beliefs, and they had more accurate and less overconfident self-efficacy beliefs than did regular education students. There were no gender differences in any of the motivation constructs. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10072312

Pajares; Graham

1999-04-01

 
 
 
 
301

Computer Self-Efficacy: A Practical Indicator of Student Computer Competency in Introductory IS Courses  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Students often receive their first college-level computer training in introductory information systems courses. Students and faculty frequently expect this training to develop a level of student computer competence that will support computer use in future courses. In this study, we applied measures of computer self-efficacy to students in a typical introductory IS course. The measures provided useful evidence that student perceptions of their ability to use computers effectively in the future significantly improved as a result of their training experience. The computer self-efficacy measures also provided enhanced insight into course-related factors of practical concern to IS educators. Study results also suggest computer self-efficacy measures may be a practical and informative means of assessing computer-training outcomes in the introductory IS course context

Rex Karsten; Roberta M. Roth

1998-01-01

302

Self-efficacy in acutely traumatized patients and the risk of developing a posttraumatic stress syndrome  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurs across 15-20% of victims suffering physical injury. The occurrence of PTSD has been attributed to both the trauma and the victim’s individual resources, such as resilience, coping strategies, and social support systems. In the present study, we explored the role of self-efficacy for cognitive self-regulation in the posttraumatic adaptation process of sixty-five patients immediately following trauma (T1) and approximately four months later (T2) assessing posttraumatic stress syndrome according to DSM-IV criteria. We hypothesized perceived self-efficacy as a predictor for an increased risk of developing posttraumatic stress symptoms. Self-efficacy measured immediately following trauma correlated significantly with the development of posttraumatic stress syndromes. This finding suggests that the evaluation of cognitive adaptation to trauma is a helpful marker for clinical outcome assessment and can therefore be used for the identification of patients needing psychotherapeutic intervention.

Flatten, Guido; Wälte, Dieter; Perlitz, Volker

2008-01-01

303

Self-efficacy as a unifying construct in nursing-social work collaboration with vulnerable populations.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The authors consider self-efficacy practice as an organizing construct guiding nursing-social work action research in partnership with older homeless and formerly homeless African-American women. The authors, both academics who together have worked with members of this vulnerable population for a decade and a half, report on their unifying action research perspective immersed in self-efficacy theory. We examine how our adaptations of Bandura's classic four sources of self-efficacy form a distinctive intervention practice designed to help older African-American women emerge from homelessness. We amplify the incorporation of the four sources (vicarious experience and exposure to powerful role models, emotional arousal and accompanying catharsis, verbal persuasion, and role performance) into a grand strategy useful in working collaboratively with members of vulnerable populations, so they can achieve outcomes that improve their functional health, well-being and ultimately their quality of life.

Washington OG; Moxley DP

2013-03-01

304

Empowerment, feminism, and self-efficacy: Relationships to body image and disordered eating.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Sociocultural norms pertaining to an ideal of thinness for women likely play a role in the development and maintenance of disturbance in body image, and by extension, disordered eating. However, competing norms associated with feminism may buffer women from pressures associated with achieving the thin ideal. The present study explored the relationship between feminist ideology, empowerment, and self-efficacy relative to body image and eating behavior with a sample of U.S. undergraduate women (N=318) attending a southeastern U.S. mid-sized university. In planned hierarchical multiple regression analyses, endorsement of feminist ideology predicted perceptions of positive body image, but did not appear to predict disordered eating. Self-efficacy emerged as a robust predictor of positive body image and lower disordered eating even after controlling for perceptions of personal empowerment and feminism. Results, although limited by correlational data, suggest that self-efficacy may protect college-aged women from disordered eating and negative body image.

Kinsaul JA; Curtin L; Bazzini D; Martz D

2013-09-01

305

Interaction between self-efficacy and initial performance in predicting the complexity of task chosen.  

Science.gov (United States)

Research on motivation has confirmed the predictive power of cognitive-affective variables on performance in complex tasks. However, less attention has been given to the determinants of task choice in situations where there is discretion about which task is to be undertaken. An experimental study was designed to analyze the role of dispositional variables (goal orientations and need for cognition) and self-regulatory variables (self-efficacy, intrinsic satisfaction, and task involvement) in the complexity of task chosen. 117 students participated in a complex decision-making task with different levels of difficulty. Results indicated that the avoidance performance goal orientation can predict the difficulty of the task chosen. Self-efficacy beliefs contribute to explaining the range of difficulty people consider feasible to attempt when initial performance is controlled. Individuals with high self-efficacy chose tasks that maximized their learning opportunities. PMID:20229920

Tabernero, Carmen; Wood, Robert E

2009-12-01

306

Interaction between self-efficacy and initial performance in predicting the complexity of task chosen.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Research on motivation has confirmed the predictive power of cognitive-affective variables on performance in complex tasks. However, less attention has been given to the determinants of task choice in situations where there is discretion about which task is to be undertaken. An experimental study was designed to analyze the role of dispositional variables (goal orientations and need for cognition) and self-regulatory variables (self-efficacy, intrinsic satisfaction, and task involvement) in the complexity of task chosen. 117 students participated in a complex decision-making task with different levels of difficulty. Results indicated that the avoidance performance goal orientation can predict the difficulty of the task chosen. Self-efficacy beliefs contribute to explaining the range of difficulty people consider feasible to attempt when initial performance is controlled. Individuals with high self-efficacy chose tasks that maximized their learning opportunities.

Tabernero C; Wood RE

2009-12-01

307

A creative writing program to enhance self-esteem and self-efficacy in adolescents.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: To describe the rationale, content, and results of a group creative writing program to increase adolescent self-esteem and self-efficacy. METHODS: Subjects were low-income, at-risk minority youth (N = 11). Free writing in response to specific exercises, sharing their own stories in their own language, and responding to their peers were used daily for 2 weeks as part of the high school English class. The program was oriented toward health rather than problems, with the content created by the adolescents. FINDINGS: The opportunity to tell their own story, in their own language in a safe, structured setting with positive feedback led to higher self-efficacy and self-esteem. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that a writing intervention focused on building self-in-relation self-esteem and the four aspects of self-efficacy resulted in increased sense of well-being.

Chandler GE

1999-04-01

308

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Graduate Teaching Assistants Teaching Self-Efficacy  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The graduate experience is a critical time for development of academic faculty, but often there is little preparation for teaching during the graduate career.  Teaching self-efficacy, an instructor’s belief in his or her ability to teach students in a specific context, can help to predict teaching behavior and student achievement, and can be used as a measure of graduate students’ development as instructors.  An instrument measuring teaching self-efficacy of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) was developed from a general university faculty teaching instrument to the specific teaching context of STEM GTAs.  Construct and face validity, measurement reliability, and factor structure of the instrument were determined from survey data of 253 STEM GTAs at six universities.  STEM GTA teaching self-efficacy correlated to various measures of GTA professional development and teaching experience.  Implications and applications for faculty involved in GTA professional development, supervision, and research are discussed.

Sue Ellen DeChenne; Larry G. Enochs; Mark Needham

2012-01-01

309

German nursing home professionals' knowledge and specific self-efficacy related to palliative care.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: In Germany, more and more terminally ill patients spend their last days of life in nursing homes, and this presents a challenge for these institutions. Even though palliative care is a growing domain in health care, no quantitative in-depth evaluations of the status quo in nursing homes has been conducted so far in Germany, partly because of lacking measuring tools. OBJECTIVE: This study used a new questionnaire to assess German health care professionals' theoretical knowledge of palliative care and their perceived self-efficacy. Both variables have been proven to be indicators for the quality of the implementation of palliative care in nursing homes. METHODS: We used the Bonn Palliative Care Knowledge Test (Bonner Palliativwissenstest, BPW) questionnaire to measure knowledge of palliative care in the domains of medicine, care, and psychosocial care and to measure self-efficacy relating to palliative care. RESULTS: Care workers (N=130) in five nursing homes in the region of Aachen in western Germany answered the questionnaires. The results show low knowledge (on average 52.8% correct answers) and self-efficacy relating to palliative care, although work with dying people is their daily challenge. While general knowledge correlated with work experience, a negative correlation of specific self-efficacy with age and working experience was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Lower self-efficacy of care workers experienced in palliative care probably implies that the difficulty of palliative care skills is underestimated by inexperienced care workers. Palliative care training is urgently needed to improve knowledge and self-efficacy. Guidance to assist care professionals involved in palliative care in nursing homes needs to be developed and provided.

Pfister D; Markett S; Müller M; Müller S; Grützner F; Rolke R; Kern M; Schmidt-Wolf G; Radbruch L

2013-07-01

310

Weight control self-efficacy types and transitions affect weight-loss outcomes in obese women.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Matching obesity treatments to heterogeneous clients is a recent evolution in the development of more effective weight-control programs, yet most interventions emphasize the external features of treatments rather than the internal belief structures of individuals. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Q methodology would identify distinct types of weight-control self-efficacy beliefs in obese women that would be linked to outcomes of a weight-loss program. Fifty-four women (45 +/- 9 yrs, Mean +/- SD) 136 +/- 10% over ideal body weight participated in a 9-month nutritional/behavioral weight loss program. Two major self-efficacy categories emerged through factor analysis of Q sorts: assureds and disbelievers. The assureds (n = 28) had the strongest self-efficacy beliefs and at baseline reported significantly (p < .01) greater self-esteem and less depression than the disbelievers (n = 26). By posttreatment, the assureds had lost significantly more weight (10 +/- 6 vs. 7 +/- 7 kg). Regrouping the data for analysis by posttreatment self-efficacy types demonstrated transitions in the self-efficacy beliefs of the women during treatment. Those who were disbelievers at baseline but became assureds posttreatment (n = 7) lost twice as much weight as the women who started and finished as disbelievers (n = 19) (10 +/- 7 kg vs. 5 +/- 5 kg). The posttreatment assureds (n = 32) lost significantly more weight than the disbelievers (n = 22) (10 +/- 6 vs. 6 +/- 5 kg), and reported better self esteem, mood, and eating patterns. Thus, assessment of intrinsic belief systems, particularly weight-control self-efficacy, may provide new directions for designing interventions that target distinctly different needs of obese women to affect greater weight loss and more positive affective states.

Dennis KE; Goldberg AP

1996-01-01

311

Junior doctors' perceptions of their self-efficacy in prescribing, their prescribing errors and the possible causes of errors.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

AIMS: Explore and compare junior doctors' perceptions of their self-efficacy in prescribing, their prescribing errors and the possible causes of those errors. METHODS: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was distributed to foundation doctors throughout Scotland, based on Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory and Human Error Theory (HET). RESULTS: 548 questionnaires were completed (35.0% of the national cohort). F1s estimated a higher daytime error rate (median 6.7 (IQR 2-12.4)) than F2s (4.0 IQR (0-10) (p=0.002)), calculated based on the total number of medicines prescribed. The majority of self-reported errors (250; 49.2%) resulted from unintentional actions. Interruptions and pressure from other staff were commonly cited causes of errors. F1s were more likely to report insufficient prescribing skills as a potential cause of error than F2s (p= 0.002). The prescribers did not believe that the outcomes of their errors were serious. F2s reported higher self-efficacy scores than F1s in most aspects of prescribing (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Foundation doctors were aware of their prescribing errors, yet were confident in their prescribing skills and apparently complacent about the potential consequences of prescribing errors. Error causation is multi-factorial often due to environmental factors, but with lack of knowledge also contributing. Thereforeinterventions are needed at all levels, including environmental changes, improving knowledge, providing feedback and changing attitudes towards the role of prescribing as a major influence on patient outcome.

Ryan C; Ross S; Davey P; Duncan EM; Fielding S; Francis JJ; Johnston M; Ker J; Lee AJ; Macleod MJ; Maxwell S; McKay G; McLay J; Webb DJ; Bond C

2013-04-01

312

A Study on the Correlation between Self Efficacy and Foreign Language Learning Anxiety  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Anxiety in language learning is one of the less researched areas; that is why this study explores whether the anxiety level of foreign language learners is related to their self efficacy levels. For this purpose, 100 participants joined the study and the Foreign Language Learning Anxiety Scale and The Self Efficacy Scale were administered to them. The results show that both aspects are uncorrelated and gender plays no important role in terms of the anxiety level and self perception ratings of these junior teacher trainees.

Feryal ÇUBUKÇU

2008-01-01

313

THE IMPACTS OF STRUCTURE, CLIMATE AND SELF-EFFICACY ON STRESS: A MALAYSIAN SURVEY  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study examines the impacts of organisational structure (formalisation and centralisation) and organisational climate in predicting job stress in a non-Western environment. It also explores the moderating effects of self-efficacy in the proposed relationships. A total of 151 securities sales personnel in Malaysia were sampled for this study. The findings indicated a positive relationship between both structural variables and stress. The organisational climate dimensions were found to be unrelated to stress. The role of self-efficacy as a moderator in the hypothesised relationships had limited support. Implications of this work and directions for future research are discussed.

Aizzat Mohd. Nasurdin; T. Ramayah; Yeoh Chee Beng

2009-01-01

314

The role of attitudes and self-efficacy in predicting condom use and purchase intentions.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study examines the condom purchasing and use habits of 256 college students in Norway and English-speaking Canada, and develops a structural equation model to explain condom purchase and use. In the model, intention to purchase condoms is influenced by self-efficacy in condom purchasing, as well as by intention to use condoms. Intention to use condoms is influenced by having a positive attitude toward condom usage and by self-efficacy in persuading a partner to use condoms. The implications for health promotion and social marketing campaigns are discussed.

Gabler J; Kropp F; Silvera DH; Lavack AM

2004-01-01

315

Why do some patients prefer to leave decisions up to the doctor: lack of self-efficacy or a matter of trust?  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

PURPOSE: Decision-making preferences among cancer survivors during their follow-up care remains understudied and limited research examines factors that underlie these preferences. The purpose of this study was to assess cancer patients' decision-making preferences during follow-up care, the role of trust and self-efficacy, and the effect of preferences on health outcomes. METHODS: Six hundred twenty-three bladder, leukemia, and colorectal cancer survivors were recruited to the Assessment of Patient Experiences of Cancer Care study between April 2003 and November 2004. Respondents were asked about their follow-up care experiences, including decision-making preferences, trust in physicians, self-efficacy, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and health appraisal. Unadjusted mean scores of trust and self-efficacy measures by decision preference group were examined. Multinomial logistic and linear regressions were conducted to examine predictors of decision-making preferences and the impact of decision-making preferences on HRQOL and health appraisal. RESULTS: While the majority of patients preferred shared decision-making (61.0 %), 16.1 % preferred to control their decisions and 22.1 % preferred physician control over decisions. Compared to the other groups, patients preferring physician control had greater trust in their physician (p?self-efficacy for engaging in the decision-making process, and lower self-efficacy for taking responsibility over decisions (p?

Chawla N; Arora NK

2013-07-01

316

Transtorno afetivo bipolar: um enfoque transcultural Transcultural aspects of bipolar disorder  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Considerando-se que existem diferenças importantes na maneira como as emoções são vivenciadas e expressas em diferentes culturas, a apresentação e o manejo do transtorno afetivo bipolar sofrem influência de fatores culturais. O presente artigo realiza uma breve revisão da evidência referente aos aspectos transculturais do transtorno bipolar.Cultural variations in the expression of emotions have been described. Consequently, there are cross-cultural influences on the diagnosis and management of bipolar disorder. This article provides a review of the evidence regarding the main aspects of transcultural psychiatry and bipolar disorder.

Marsal Sanches; Miguel Roberto Jorge

2004-01-01

317

Competent in evidence-based practice (EBP): validation of a measurement tool that measures EBP self-efficacy and task value in speech-language therapy students.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

BACKGROUND: Worldwide speech-language therapy (SLT) students are educated in evidence-based practice (EBP). For students to use EBP in their future day-to-day clinical practice, they must value EBP as positive and must feel confident in using it. For curricula developers it is therefore important to know the impact their teaching has on these aspects of students' motivational beliefs. AIMS: To develop and validate a measurement tool to assess EBP task value and self-efficacy in SLT students. METHODS & PROCEDURES: A 20-item questionnaire was developed based on a review of the literature and an additional group interview with speech-language therapists. Face validity of the questionnaire was established using a Delphi panel consisting of six EBP lecturers. Dutch bachelor SLT students (n = 149) with a different level of EBP knowledge and skills filled in the newly developed questionnaire. Reliability (internal consistency) was assessed using Cronbach's alpha and internal validity using a principal component analysis (PCA). Construct validity was assessed by comparing the bachelor SLT student scores with a group of m students (n = 15) who were highly experienced in EBP. OUTCOMES & RESULTS: The PCA showed that the questionnaire consists of two components, representing EBP task value and self-efficacy, both with good reliability (Cronbach's ? = 0.83 and 0.79, respectively). The hypothesis that master's students would score significantly higher on both components than bachelor SLT students was met. CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS: The study provides evidence on the internal consistency and construct validity of this questionnaire to evaluate EBP task value and self-efficacy in SLT students. As is common with new measures, more research is needed to evaluate further its psychometric properties.

Spek B; Wieringa-de Waard M; Lucas C; van Dijk N

2013-07-01

318

Gender-Differences in Self-Efficacy ICT Related to Various ICT-User Profiles in Finland and Norway. How Do Self-Efficacy, Gender and ICT-User Profiles Relate to Findings from PISA 2006  

Science.gov (United States)

|In this paper, we explored the relationship between self-efficacy, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) user profiles, and gender. Self-efficacy is an important theoretical and empirical concept to identify and describe how students perceive their own ability to solve a task. ICT user profiles were developed as an empirical framework to…

Tomte, Cathrine; Hatlevik, Ove E.

2011-01-01

319

Comparison of the medical students' perceived self-efficacy and the evaluation of the observers and patients  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The accuracy of self-assessment has been questioned in studies comparing physicians' self-assessments to observed assessments; however, none of these studies used self-efficacy as a method for self-assessment.The aim of the study was to investigate how medical students' perceived self-efficacy of specific communication skills corresponds to the evaluation of simulated patients and observers.

Ammentorp, Jette; Thomsen, Janus Laust

2013-01-01

320

Attitudes to Technology, Perceived Computer Self-Efficacy and Computer Anxiety as Predictors of Computer Supported Education  

Science.gov (United States)

|There is a large body of research regarding computer supported education, perceptions of computer self-efficacy, computer anxiety and the technological attitudes of teachers and teacher candidates. However, no study has been conducted on the correlation between and effect of computer supported education, perceived computer self-efficacy, computer…

Celik, Vehbi; Yesilyurt, Etem

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
321

Turkish Pre-Service Science and Mathematics Teachers' Computer Related Self-Efficacies, Attitudes, and the Relationship between These Variables  

Science.gov (United States)

|The purpose of this study was to investigate Turkish pre-service science and mathematics teachers' computer self-efficacies (CSEs) and computer attitude (CA) considering gender, year in program, and computer ownership as independent variables. Additionally the study aimed to examine the relationship between CSE and CA. Computer Self-efficacy

Pamuk, Savas; Peker, Deniz

2009-01-01

322

The Effects of Web Page Design Instruction on Computer Self-Efficacy of Preservice Teachers and Correlates.  

Science.gov (United States)

|Tests the effects of Web page design instruction on improving computer self-efficacy of preservice teachers. Various computer experiences, including weekly computer use, weekly Internet use, and use frequencies of word processing, e-mail, games, and presentation software were significantly related to computer self-efficacy. Use frequencies of…

Chu, Li-Li

2003-01-01

323

Engagement with Mathematics Courseware in Traditional and Online Remedial Learning Environments: Relationship to Self-Efficacy and Achievement  

Science.gov (United States)

|This research applied Bandura's (1986) social cognitive theory to examine engagement with courseware in traditional and online remedial mathematics learning environments. The study investigated the relationship of courseware engagement to age, computer self-efficacy, computer playfulness, and self-efficacy for self-regulated mathematics learning.…

Spence, Dianna J.; Usher, Ellen L.

2007-01-01

324

Democratic Values and Teacher Self-Efficacy Perceptions: A Case of Pre-Service English Language Teachers in Turkey  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated democratic values of pre-service English language teachers in relation to their teacher self-efficacy perceptions in a Turkish context. It also examined the possible relationships between gender, grade and democratic values and self-efficacy perceptions. A questionnaire survey was conducted with 294 pre-service teachers.…

Topkaya, Ece Zehir; Yavu, Aysun

2011-01-01

325

Using Commonality Analysis to Quantify Contributions that Self-Efficacy and Motivational Factors Make in Mathematics Performance  

Science.gov (United States)

|Self-efficacy and mathematics anxiety have been identified as predictors of mathematics achievement. In the present study, secondary analyses on matrix summaries available from prior published studies were utilized to investigate the contribution that self-efficacy and mathematics anxiety made in mathematics performance. Commonality analyses were…

Zientek, Linda Reichwein; Thompson, Bruce

2010-01-01

326

Instructor Verbal and Nonverbal Immediacy and the Relationship with Student Self-Efficacy and Task Value Motivation  

Science.gov (United States)

|This descriptive correlation study sought to examine the relationships between verbal immediacy, nonverbal immediacy, self-efficacy and task value. Respondents assessed the verbal and nonverbal immediacy of their course instructor, and then assessed their personal self-efficacy and task value motivation. Results showed a significant positive…

Velez, Jonathan J.; Cano, Jamie

2012-01-01

327

Sources of academic self-efficacy-beliefs : The role of the specificity level of autobiographical memories about academic performance  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The impact on academic self-efficacy beliefs of the specificity at which memories of past academic performance are processed was investigated. Relying on autobiographical memory (AM) theories, it was predicted that, for past academic failures, which represent a threat to self-efficacy beliefs, speci...

Vanlede, Marie; Bourgeois, Etienne; Galand, Benoît; Philippot, Pierre

328

Academic Procrastination of Undergraduates: Low Self-Efficacy to Self-Regulate Predicts Higher Levels of Procrastination  

Science.gov (United States)

This article reports two studies exploring the academic procrastination of 456 undergraduates. Study 1 explores the relationships among academic procrastination, self-regulation, academic self-efficacy, self-esteem, and self-efficacy for self-regulation. Results reveal that although other self-variables are related to procrastination,…

Klassen, Robert M.; Krawchuk, Lindsey L.; Rajani, Sukaina

2008-01-01

329

Biology Self Efficacy Beliefs of the Students Studying in the Department of Biology and Department of Biology Teaching  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the self-efficacy beliefs toward biology of the students studying in the department of biology and studying in the department of biology teaching. Also in this study biology self-efficacy beliefs of students were examined according to variables of grade and department. The study was done through survey method. The research was held in 2008-2009 spring semester Faculty of Education Biology Teaching Program 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th grade students and Faculty of Science Department of Biology 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th grade students-478 students in total. As a tool of data collection, biology self-efficacy scale was used in this study. Findings indicate that biology self-efficacy beliefs of students are at the mid-level. In addition, in this study it was identified that biology self-efficacy of students studying in department of biology teaching is higher than the self-efficacy of students studying in the department of biology. Also, at the end of eta-square correlation coefficient analysis it was determined that variable of department affected self-efficacy towards biology at a low level (?=.01). On the other hand, it was identified that variable of grade did not affect the biology self-efficacy beliefs.© 2012 IOJES. All rights reserved

Gülay Ekici; P?nar Fettahl?o?lu; Ay?e Sert Ç?b?k

2012-01-01

330

The Impact of Supervisory Mentoring on Personal Learning and Career Outcomes: The Dual Moderating Effect of Self-Efficacy  

Science.gov (United States)

Using survey data from 226 employees and their supervisors in four manufacturing companies in China, we found that employee self-efficacy has a dual moderating effect on the impact of supervisory mentoring on subordinate career outcomes. Path analytic tests of mediated moderation suggested that self-efficacy moderates the mediated effects of…

Pan, Wen; Sun, Li-Yun; Chow, Irene Hau Siu

2011-01-01

331

A Study of English Writing and Domain-Specific Motivation and Self-Efficacy of Chinese EFL Learners  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper aims to analyze the relationships between English writing and domain-specific motivation and self-efficacy of Chinese EFL learners. 66 English major students from two grades were invited as participants to complete a writing task and two self-designed questionnaires on English writing motivation and self-efficacy, respectively. It was…

Zhang, Yanyan; Guo, Hui

2012-01-01

332

The Relationship between Levels of Expertise, Task Difficulty, Perceived Self-Efficacy, and Mental Effort Investment in Task Performance  

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This study examined the impact of different levels of task difficulty and expertise on self-efficacy judgments. In addition, the study examines how self-efficacy judgments affect the amount of mental effort investment and task performance under different levels of task difficulty and expertise. Results from this study are used to build a…

Ho, Hsin-Ning

2010-01-01

333

Attitudes to Technology, Perceived Computer Self-Efficacy and Computer Anxiety as Predictors of Computer Supported Education  

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There is a large body of research regarding computer supported education, perceptions of computer self-efficacy, computer anxiety and the technological attitudes of teachers and teacher candidates. However, no study has been conducted on the correlation between and effect of computer supported education, perceived computer self-efficacy, computer…

Celik, Vehbi; Yesilyurt, Etem

2013-01-01

334

Educational Self-Efficacy of College Women: Implications for Theory, Research, and Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the relationships among academic stress, valuing of education, self-esteem, and educational self-efficacy for first-semester, female undergraduates and the interaction of race/ethnicity with these variables. Conducted at a large, southwestern university, this study was part of a comprehensive examination of psychosocial factors…

Rayle, Andrea Dixon; Arredondo, Patricia; Kurpius, Sharon E. Robinson

2005-01-01

335

Depression among Collage Students; The Role of General Self-Efficacy and Perceived Social Support  

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Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder reported among college students. Evidence suggests that depression rate is especially high among medical students. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship of general self-efficacy and social support with depression levels of university students.Materials & Methods: This was a descriptive analytic study carried out among 235 students in Hamadan University of medical sciences. Samples were classified with the appropriate assignment done and gathering information from standard questionnaires (Beck Depression Inventory test & General Self Efficacy Scale & Perceived Social Support Scale). The data were analyzed by SPSS-13.Results: 37 percent of students showed different degrees of depression. A significant negative correlation was found among depression, self efficacy (P.value= 0.000, r= -0.581), and social support (P.value= 0.000, r= -0.617). Also the results showed that there was significant relationship between depression and student's dwelling (P<0.05).Conclusion: These findings also indicated the potential roles of social support in mediating depression. According to the results self efficacy strategies could improve the students' mental health.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;18(4):60-66)

F. Jalilian; Sh. Emdadi; M. Karimi; M. Barati; H. Gharibnavaz

2012-01-01

336

Constructivism and Career Decision Self-Efficacy for Asian Americans and African Americans  

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Career development that adequately addresses the needs of multicultural students is important. The authors explored whether a constructivist career course might be a viable mechanism for improving career decision self-efficacy for 81 Asian American and African American college students. Results indicated significant increases in all 5 elements of…

Grier-Reed, Tabitha; Ganuza, Zoila M.

2011-01-01

337

Determinants of Computer Self-Efficacy--An Examination of Learning Motivations and Learning Environments  

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|The purpose of this article is to discuss determinants of computer self-efficacy from the perspective of participant internal learning motivations and external learning environments. The former consisted of three motivations--interest, trend, and employment--while the latter comprised two environments--home and school. Through an intermediate…

Hsu, Wen-Kai K.; Huang, Show-Hui S.

2006-01-01

338

The Importance of Self-Efficacy and Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century  

Science.gov (United States)

Two decades have now passed since Bandura (1986) introduced the concept of self-efficacy within the social cognitive theory of human behavior. He defined it as "people's judgments of their capabilities to organize and execute courses of action required to attain designated types of performances" (1986). Much empirical evidence now supports the…

Jabbarifar, Taghi

2011-01-01

339

Exercise Self-Efficacy and Perceived Wellness among College Students in a Basic Studies Course  

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|University basic studies courses provide a valuable opportunity for facilitating the knowledge, skills, and beliefs that develop healthy behaviors to last a lifetime. Belief in one's ability to participate in physical activity, exercise self-efficacy, is a psychological construct that has had a documented impact on physical activity. Although…

Sidman, Cara L.; D'Abundo, Michelle Lee; Hritz, Nancy

2009-01-01

340

Turkish and English Language Teacher Candidates' Perceived Computer Self-Efficacy and Attitudes toward Computer  

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|The aim of this study is to reveal the relation between the Turkish and English language teacher candidates' social demographic characteristics and their perceived computer self-efficacy and attitudes toward computer. The population of the study consists of the teacher candidates in the Turkish and English language departments at the universities…

Adalier, Ahmet

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
341

Computer Self-Efficacy, Anxiety, and Learning in Online versus Face to Face Medium  

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|The purpose of this research is to examine the relationships between changes to computer self-efficacy (CSE) and computer anxiety and the impact on performance on computer-related tasks in both online and face-to-face mediums. While many studies have looked at these factors individually, relatively few have included multiple measures of these…

Hauser, Richard; Paul, Ravi; Bradley, John

2012-01-01

342

Investigating the Relationship between Curiosity Level and Computer Self Efficacy Beliefs of Elementary Teachers Candidates  

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|Nowadays, "lifelong learning individual" concept is gaining importance in which curiosity is one important feature that an individual should have as a requirement of learning. It is known that learning will naturally occur spontaneously when curiosity instinct is awakened during any learning-teaching process. Computer self-efficacy belief is…

Gulten, Dilek Cagirgan; Yaman, Yavuz; Deringol, Yasemin; Ozsari, Ismail

2011-01-01

343

Computer Self-Efficacy and Factors Influencing E-Learning Effectiveness  

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|Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the influences of system and instructor factors on e-learning effectiveness under the interactions of computer self-efficacy. In this study, the factors of the e-learning system are functionality, interaction, and response. The factors of the e-learning instructor are attitude, technical…

Chien, Tien-Chen

2012-01-01

344

Perceived Social Supports, Computer Self-Efficacy, and Computer Use among High School Students  

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|This study investigated the function of social supports and computer self-efficacy in predicting high school students' perceived effect of computer use. The study was survey method to collect data. The questionnaires were distributed to the high school students in Taiwan. 620 questionnaires were distributed and 525 questionnaires were gathered…

Hsiao, Hsi-Chi; Tu, Ya-Ling; Chung, Hsin-Nan

2012-01-01

345

Learning with Computer-Based Learning Environments: A Literature Review of Computer Self-Efficacy  

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|Although computer-based learning environments (CBLEs) are becoming more prevalent in the classroom, empirical research has demonstrated that some students have difficulty learning with these environments. The motivation construct of computer-self efficacy plays an integral role in learning with CBLEs. This literature review synthesizes research…

Moos, Daniel C.; Azevedo, Roger

2009-01-01

346

Computer Self-Efficacy, Competitive Anxiety and Flow State: Escaping from Firing Online Game  

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|Flow state in game playing affected by computer self-efficacy and game competitive anxiety was studied. In order to examine the effect of those constructs with high competition, this study select "Escaping from firing online game" which require college students to escape from fire and rescue people and eliminate the fire damage along the way of…

Hong, Jon-Chao; Pei-Yu, Chiu; Shih, Hsiao-Feng; Lin, Pei-Shin; Hong, Jon-Chao

2012-01-01

347

Gender Differences in Academic Self-Efficacy: A Meta-Analysis  

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A meta-analysis of 187 studies containing 247 independent studies (N = 68,429) on gender differences in academic self-efficacy identified an overall effect size of 0.08, with a small difference favoring males. Moderator analysis demonstrated that content domain was a significant moderator in explaining effect size variation. Females displayed…

Huang, Chiungjung

2013-01-01

348

COMPARISONS OF SELF-EFFICACY AND HOPE AMONG STUDENTS WITH AND WITHOUT LEARNING DISABILITIES  

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Full Text Available Learning disability is a life-long condition that can affect academic functioning, everyday life and social life. In multiple areas, academic and other, students with LD often underachieve, and often with pervasive negative consequences. This study compared self-efficacy and hope in 30 elementary school (sixth grade) children with learning disabilities (LD) and 30 their peers without LD. An ex post facto design was used. Statistical population comprised of all students in elementary schools (sixth grade) in, Harsin, Iran, during the 2012-2013 academic year. Students with learning disabilities were randomly selected. The students with LD had been diagnosed by Colorado Learning Difficulties Questionnaire (CLDQ). The students completed the Wechsler Memory Scale, General Self-Efficacy Scale, and Children’s Hope Scale. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS 20) was used for computing descriptive statistics and analysis of variance. Differences were found between the groups on the self-efficacy and hope. The study demon­strated the important role of self-efficacy and hope for students with LD.

Mohammad HOJATI; Mohammad ABBASI

2013-01-01

349

THE EFFECTS OF INTERVAL FEEDBACK ON THE SELF-EFFICACY OF NETBALL UMPIRES  

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Full Text Available The present study used quantitative and qualitative methods to explore the relationship between interval feedback and self-efficacy toward umpiring netball games. Grade "A" level umpires (n = 7) provided feedback to umpires (n = 40) under two conditions; 1) interval feedback given at the end of one tournament game (after 14 minutes) and again at the end of a second consecutive game (after 28 minutes), and 2) feedback at the end of the game (after 28 minutes). Umpires in both conditions completed an Umpiring Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (USEQ) which was a 14-item measure designed to assess factors relevant to netball umpire performance. Participants completed the USEQ immediately before game one, during the interval, and after a second game. Umpires also completed a feedback questionnaire which enabled them to reflect on the feedback received. A repeated measures factorial (time x feedback condition) ANOVA indicated no significant interaction effect (F = 0.05, p > .05), and no main effect for condition (F = 0.06, p > .05) or time (F = 1.61, p > .05) for changes in self-efficacy. Although there were no significant effects, qualitative data alluded to aspects of feedback perceived to enhance umpire self-efficacy, thus identifying ways in which feedback might have a more consistent effect. Practical implications of the study in relation to verbal interval feedback are discussed

Alison J. Mahoney; Tracey Devonport; Andrew M. Lane

2008-01-01

350

Investigating School Counselors' Perceived Role and Self-Efficacy in Managing Multiparty Student Conflict  

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|The purpose of this study was to examine school counselors' perceived role and self-efficacy in managing multiparty student conflict. Literature on conflict resolution in the field of education has not addressed conflicts that take place among three or more students, or multiparty student conflict. Therefore, investigated in this study were…

Yacco, Summer

2010-01-01

351

Knowledge, Health Beliefs, and Self-Efficacy regarding Osteoporosis in Perimenopausal Women  

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The aims of this pilot study were to (1) determine if having a family history of osteoporosis impacts knowledge, health beliefs, and self-efficacy regarding osteoporosis among perimenopausal women aged 42–52 and to (2) describe the impact of an osteoporosis-specific educational intervention had on the knowledge, health beliefs, and self-efficacy of this population. Participants completed three surveys measuring knowledge, health beliefs, and self-efficacy related to osteoporosis before and two months after the educational program. At baseline, no differences were noted in knowledge of osteoporosis among women with and without a family history of osteoporosis, although women with a family history perceived a greater susceptibility for developing osteoporosis than women without the family history. Findings indicate that both groups increased in knowledge of osteoporosis (P < .001). Benefits of calcium increased in the women without a family history of osteoporosis (P < .001) and benefits of exercise increase in women with a family history of osteoporosis (P = .007). There were no significant statistical findings regarding self-efficacy between the two groups of women. Findings indicate that an osteoporosis-specific educational program improves perimenopausal women's knowledge and some health beliefs.

Endicott, Renee D.

2013-01-01

352

The influence of self-efficacy on the effects of framed health messages  

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Health promoting messages can be framed in terms of the gains that are associated with healthy behaviour, or the losses that are associated with unhealthy behaviour. In this study, we examined the influence of self-efficacy to quit smoking on the effects of gain framed and loss framed anti-smoking m...

Riet, J.P., van 't; Ruiter, R.A.C.; Werrij, M.Q.; Vries, H., de

353

Improving Preservice Teachers’ Self-Efficacy through Service Learning: Lessons Learned  

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Full Text Available University students have been barraged with service learning opportunities both as course required and as volunteer opportunities in recent years. Currently, many universities now require students to participate in engaged learning as a graduation requirement. Situated in Bandura’s theory of self-efficacy, this study examines the effects service learning has on students teaching self-efficacy when required to participate in an activity (course connected), compared to when they chose to volunteer in service learning projects. As instructors of preservice teachers it is our commitment to prepare these students to their maximum potential. Identifying best practices for teacher preparation is an overarching goal of this study. A pre/post survey examined students’ self-perceptions for each service opportunity in regards to their perceived teaching self-efficacy. Results indicate that students’ self-efficacy improved when service learning was connected or imbedded in the context of learning and connected to a specific course. These findings indicate course connected service learning has a greater impact on preservice teachers’ perceptions of their ability to be effective future classroom teachers. Therefore course connected service learning can be viewed as a best practice in preservice teaching instruction.

Carianne Bernadowski; Ronald Perry; Robert Del Greco

2013-01-01

354

Long term follow-up on health care professionals’ self-efficacy after communication skills training  

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Full Text Available Introduction: Good communication is commonly recognised to be a precondition for optimal health care and treatment.  Nevertheless, serious communication problems are still experienced by patients as well as by health care professionals and therefore an orthopaedic surgery department initiated a three-day communication skills training course for all staff members expecting an increase in patient-centeredness in communication and more respectful inter-collegial communi- cation. The aim of this study is to report the long term effect of communication skills training course on health care professionals’ self-efficacy in communication with patients and colleagues. Method: An intervention study assessing health care professionals’ self-efficacy before and eighteen months after having participated in the course using pre-course data as baseline for paired t-tests of means. Data were collected by means of questionnaires. Results: Responses to the 18-months post-course questionnaire were received from 121 participants (93%) showing sustained significant increases in self-efficacy across professions for all questions regarding communication with both patients and colleagues. Discussion: This long term assessment shows that communication skills training can produce significant and sustainable increases in the self-efficacy of health care professionals in communication with both patients and colleagues.

Birgitte Nørgaard; Jette Jette Ammentorp; Poul Erik Kofoed

2013-01-01

355

Medication-taking self-efficacy and medication adherence among HIV-infected cocaine users.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This prospective, observational study tested the ability of self-efficacy for taking antiretroviral medications to predict medication adherence among current and former cocaine and heroin users. Electronic monitors to record bottle openings and self-report measures of medication adherence were used. The sample included 99 men and women who were interviewed at 4-week intervals for 6 months. Mixed effects regression models to test the relationship of substance use and self-efficacy for medication-taking with percent of self-report adherence, dose adherence, number of days adherent, and adherence to medication schedule at each study visit showed that medication-taking self-efficacy was significantly related to all measures of adherence except schedule adherence. Findings also showed that electronically monitored adherence measures declined over the study period whereas self-report adherence did not. Findings suggest that self-efficacy can have a sustained effect on adherence to doses but may not be an influential predictor of adherence to their correct timing.

Waldrop-Valverde D; Dong C; Ownby RL

2013-05-01

356

Self-Efficacy Mediates the Relationship between Depressive Symptoms and Medication Adherence among Hypertensive African Americans  

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Many studies have documented the negative effects of depression on adherence to recommended treatment; however, little is known about the mechanism underlying this relationship. Using the Kenny and Baron analytic framework of mediation, the authors assessed whether self-efficacy mediated the relationship between depression and medication adherence…

Schoenthaler, Antoinette; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Allegrante, John P.

2009-01-01

357

Perceived Self-Efficacy of Licensed Counselors to Provide Substance Abuse Counseling  

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|This nationwide, quantitative study documented licensed counselors' perceived self-efficacy of adequately providing substance abuse services. Despite their lack of substance abuse training, counselors were highly confident in their ability to provide quality substance abuse services. Counselor training implications are discussed. (Contains 3…

Chandler, Nichelle; Balkin, Richard S.; Perepiczka, Michelle

2011-01-01

358

DIAGNOSTIC POTENTIAL OF THE SELF-EFFICACY RESEARCH METHODS AND A STYLE OF SITUATIONAL ATTRIBUTION ??????????????? ????????? ??????? ???????????? ????????????????? ? ????? ?????????? ????????  

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Full Text Available The article contains a formulated concept of personality as an integrated characteristic of a person and the author’s approach to formation of the diagnostic toolkit complex for personality study including its external and internal components. As an example, the author offers a self-efficacy research and a style of situational attribution

Ostroushko M. G.

2012-01-01

359

Sleep characteristics, sleep problems, and associations of self-efficacy among German university students  

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Full Text Available Angelika A Schlarb1,2, Dominika Kulessa1,*, Marco D Gulewitsch1,*1Faculty of Science, Department of Psychology, University of Tübingen, 2Faculty of Psychology, University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Sleep problems, especially insomnia, are a common complaint among adults. International studies on university students have shown prevalence rates between 4.7% and 36.2% for sleep difficulties, and 13.1% and 28.1% for insomnia. Sleep problems are associated with lower social and academic performance and can have a severe impact on psychological and physical health.Objective: The goal of this study was to outline sleep characteristics, prevalence of sleep problems, insomnia, and associations with self-efficacy among German university students.Methods: A total of 2196 university students (70.9% women; mean age 24.16 years) participated in the study. Sleep characteristics, sleep problems, insomnia, and self-efficacy were assessed using a questionnaire.Results and conclusion: Analyses revealed that more than 16% of surveyed students needed more than 30 minutes to fall asleep. About 7.7% of the students suffered from insomnia. Short sleep was significantly associated with a considerably increased rate of insomnia (20%). Insomniacs showed lower self-efficacy than students without sleep problems.Keywords: university students, sleep characteristics, sleep problems, insomnia, self-efficacy

Schlarb AA; Kulessa D; Gulewitsch MD

2012-01-01

360

Basic Conditioning Factors' Influences on Adolescents' Healthy Behaviors, Self-Efficacy, and Self-Care  

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This article reports a secondary statistical analysis of data from a study investigating the relationships among health-promoting self-care behaviors, self-care self-efficacy, and self-care agency in an adolescent population (Callaghan, 2005). The purpose of this study was to identify the influences...

Callaghan, Donna

 
 
 
 
361

Self-efficacy, professional commitment, and job satisfaction of diabetic medical care personnel.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among the self-efficacy, professional commitment, and job satisfaction of diabetic health-care personnel. The research design was cross-sectional. Three teaching hospitals, one from each of northern, middle and southern parts of Taiwan, were selected for data collection and used questionnaires to collect data; 202 participants were recruited. The demographic data for job title and job satisfaction were not significantly different (F = 2.13, P = 0.090). Self-efficacy was significantly positively correlated with professional commitment (r = 0.29, P = 0.000) and with job satisfaction (r = 0.14, P = 0.041). A total of 34.1% of the variance in job satisfaction was explained by age, years of service in the medical or nursing field, the actual number of years caring for patients with diabetes, self-efficacy, and professional commitment. Understanding the self-efficacy and professional commitment of medical and nursing personnel can help increase job satisfaction and improve the quality of medical and nursing care. PMID:23343231

Vivienne Wu, Shu-Fang; Lee, Mei-Chen; Liang, Shu-Yuan; Chuang, Yeu-Hui; Lu, Yu-Ying; Wu, Meng-Ping

2012-12-01

362

The relationship between self-efficacy and positive aspects of caregiving in Alzheimer's disease caregivers.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVES: Positive aspects of the caregiving experience may buffer caregivers from the many negative psychological and physical consequences of caregiving. Understanding what factors relate to the recognition of positive aspects of caregiving is important for the enhancement of caregiver well-being. Self-efficacy is a potentially modifiable psychological construct that has been associated with positive thinking, improved control of negative affect, and enhanced motivation. METHODS: This study examined the relationship between positive aspects of caregiving and self-efficacy among 57 family members caring for a loved one with Alzheimer's disease. Participant data was gathered through individual interviews conducted as a part of a larger randomized controlled trial of a caregiver intervention. RESULTS: We found that self-efficacy accounted for a significant percentage of the variance in positive aspects of caregiving after controlling for other factors commonly associated with positive aspects of caregiving including caregiver demographics, care recipient neuropsychiatric symptoms, and caregiver depression. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that high self-efficacy relates to caregivers' perception of positive aspects of the caregiving experience.

Semiatin AM; O'Connor MK

2012-01-01

363

Disability, Activities of Daily Living and Self Efficacy in Dialysis Patients  

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Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess patients’ disability, activities of daily living and self-efficacy patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) and continuos ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), to examine the relationship between them. Material and Methods: This study was carried w...

Mukadder Mollaoglu

364

A gender perspective on career preferences and entrepreneurial self-efficacy  

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Orientation: Gender perspectives on entrepreneurship illustrate that women are less likely than men to prefer those occupations which have been traditionally male-dominated, because of the tendency for women to have lower self-efficacy perceptions in relation to entrepre...

Boris Urban

365

The role of family and peers in social self-efficacy: links to depression in adolescence.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The roles of family, peers, and selected social factors in the origins of depression were assessed in a school-based study of adolescents. Social self-efficacy and social support from family and peers were found to be interrelated in their links with depression. Risk factors are delineated and suggestions for preventive intervention are offered.

McFarlane AH; Bellissimo A; Norman GR

1995-07-01

366

Elementary EFL Teachers' Computer Phobia and Computer Self-Efficacy in Taiwan  

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|The advent and application of computer and information technology has increased the overall success of EFL teaching; however, such success is hard to assess, and teachers prone to computer avoidance face negative consequences. Two major obstacles are high computer phobia and low computer self-efficacy. However, little research has been carried…

Chen, Kate Tzuching

2012-01-01

367

Physical Activity Patterns and Self-Efficacy of Selected College Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Much attention has been given to the fact that Americans are becoming less active. This study was designed to examine the levels of exercise-specific self-efficacy and physical activity rates in a selected group of college students. Students were recruited as they entered a fitness facility. Participation consisted of completing a survey that…

Hutchins, Matt; Drolet, Judy C.; Ogletree, Roberta J.

2010-01-01

368

Neighborhood Environment, Self-Efficacy, and Physical Activity in Urban Adolescents  

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Objectives: To test the pathways between perceptions of built environment factors and physical activity in urban youth. Methods: Three hundred fifty high school students' perceptions of neighborhood, and barrier self efficacy were measured by a Web survey. Physical activities were assessed using a one-week diary and accelerometers. Results:…

Voorhees, Carolyn C.; Yan, Alice F.; Clifton, Kelly J.; Wang, Min Qi

2011-01-01

369

From Ethnocentrism to Transculturalism: A Film Studies Pedagogical Journey  

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Full Text Available  This study reviews the exploratory implementation of an ‘internationalising the curriculum’ policy in relation to a cultural studies unit within a Creative Industries Faculty at an Australian university. Charting certain pedagogical practices in the delivery of transnational film studies, this case study involves a critical, contextual examination of student feedback as well as current theories about transcultural curricula in general and film studies curricula in particular. The study shows that tertiary students can be provided with an extraordinarily rich range of differing, sometimes conflicting, but always engaging transcultural insights and understandings.  It is further argued that transnational competencies may be developed and enabled through the innovative realisation of a type of ‘border crossing’ pedagogical model, largely by foregrounding transcultural ‘affective’ issues around social justice.

Helen Yeates; Margaret McVeigh; Tess Van Hemert

2011-01-01

370

Impulse control, diabetes-specific self-efficacy, and diabetes management among emerging adults with type 1 diabetes.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

OBJECTIVE: To explore the relationships among impulse control, diabetes-specific self-efficacy, and diabetes management behaviors among emerging adults with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: A total of 204 high school seniors (M = 18.25 years, SD = .45, 55.9% females) with type 1 diabetes self-reported on impulse control, diabetes-specific self-efficacy, and diabetes management behaviors during the past 3 months. Mediation and path analyses were used to address aims. RESULTS: Greater impulse control was associated with better diabetes management among these emerging adults. In addition, diabetes-specific self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between impulse control and diabetes management. CONCLUSIONS: Impulse control and diabetes-specific self-efficacy may be important in the management of type 1 diabetes among emerging adults. Diabetes-specific self-efficacy may play an important role in successful diabetes management among youth with lower impulse control.

Stupiansky NW; Hanna KM; Slaven JE; Weaver MT; Fortenberry JD

2013-04-01

371

Validation of a dutch self-efficacy scale for adherence to fluid allowance among patients on haemodialysis.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Many haemodialysis patients have problems limiting their fluid intake, and this might be influenced by their self-efficacy. Thus interventions to improve patients' self-efficacy might lead to an improvement in their adherence to fluid restriction. The fluid intake appraisal inventory (FIAI) evaluates patients' self-efficacy with regard to fluid intake. The aim of this study was to translate and validate the FIAI for use in the Netherlands. Four translators, seven experts, and four haemodialysis patients participated in the translation part of the study. Thirty-three patients from one dialysis centre in the Netherlands completed the Dutch FIAI. The instrument had good content validity (interdialytic weight gain was found to be negatively correlated with self-efficacy), internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.982), and stability (Spearman's rho = 0.823). These findings indicate that the Dutch FIAI can be used in clinical practice as a self-efficacy screening instrument for adult haemodialysis patients on fluid restriction.

Winters AM; Lindberg M; Sol BG

2013-03-01

372

Pre-service science teachers' teaching self-efficacy in relation to personality traits and academic self-regulation.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

The aim of this study is to examine the relationship among pre-service science teachers' personality traits, academic self-regulation and teaching self-efficacy by proposing and testing a conceptual model. For the specified purpose, 1794 pre-service science teachers participated in the study. The Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale, the NEO Five-Factor Inventory, and the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire were administered to assess pre-service science teachers' teaching self-efficacy, personality, and academic self-regulation respectively. Results showed that agreeableness, neuroticism, performance approach goals, and use of metacognitive strategies are positively linked to different dimensions of teaching self-efficacy, namely self-efficacy for student engagement, instructional strategies, and classroom management. In general, while agreeableness and neuroticism were found to be positively associated with different facets of self-regulation and teaching self-efficacy, openness was found to be negatively linked to these adaptive outcomes.

Senler B; Sungur-Vural S

2013-01-01

373

Parental TV viewing, parental self-efficacy, media equipment and TV viewing among preschool children.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined if parental TV viewing, parental self-efficacy or access to media equipment were associated with TV viewing among UK preschool-aged children. Data were derived from a cross-sectional survey of 252 parents of 3-5-year-old children. Parents reported child and parent TV viewing and the number of TVs, DVDs, computers, games consoles, hand-held games consoles, music players and laptop computers in the home. Parents also completed scales which assessed their self-efficacy to limit the screen viewing (SV) and promote the physical activity (PA) and their own PA self-efficacy. Analysis indicated that around two thirds of the children spent two or more hours per day watching TV while 75 % of parents watched ?2 h of TV per day. Logistic regression models showed that children who had a parent who watched ?2 h of TV per day were over five times more likely to also watch ?2 h of TV per day. Each unit increase in parental self-efficacy to limit SV was associated with a 77 % reduction in the likelihood that the child watched ?2 h of TV per day. Each additional piece of media equipment in the home was associated with a 28 % increase in the likelihood that parents watched ?2 h of TV per day. Conclusion: Family-based interventions focusing on changing access to home media equipment and building parental self-efficacy to reduce child TV viewing could form part of efforts to reduce TV viewing among preschool children. PMID:23812514

Jago, Russell; Sebire, Simon J; Edwards, Mark J; Thompson, Janice L

2013-06-29

374

Relationship between knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy of nurses in the management of pediatric pain.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Pain management is a very important aspect of nursing care of the pediatric patient. A nurse's knowledge and attitude can affect his or her ability to adequately provide pediatric pain management. This study examined the level of knowledge of pediatric pain management, the attitudes of nurses, and the level of self-efficacy of pediatric nurses in acute care. In addition, the relationship between the years of experience and the levels of knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy were examined. A cross-sectional, correlational design was used in a convenience, non-probability sample of 25 pediatric nurses. Nurses volunteering to participate in the study were asked to complete two instruments: Pediatric Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PNKAS-Shriners Revision) (Manworren, 2000, 2001) and Nurses' Self-Efficacy in Managing Children's Pain (Chiang, Chen, & Huang, 2006). There was no statistically significant relationship between knowledge and self-efficacy (r = 0.039, p = 0.853) or knowledge and years of nursing experience (r = 0.050, p = 0.822). There was a statistically significant relationship between the level of knowledge and the years of pediatric experience (r = 0.404, p = 0.05) and knowledge and the membership in a professional nursing organization (t = 4.050, p = 0.004). Years of pediatric nursing experience correlated with significantly higher knowledge levels, as did a membership in a professional nursing organization. Further, education may benefit pediatric nurses in regard to their management of pediatric pain. Research is needed to examine the effects of self-efficacy on pediatric pain management and how it relates to the level of knowledge.

Stanley M; Pollard D

2013-07-01

375

Relationship between knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy of nurses in the management of pediatric pain.  

Science.gov (United States)

Pain management is a very important aspect of nursing care of the pediatric patient. A nurse's knowledge and attitude can affect his or her ability to adequately provide pediatric pain management. This study examined the level of knowledge of pediatric pain management, the attitudes of nurses, and the level of self-efficacy of pediatric nurses in acute care. In addition, the relationship between the years of experience and the levels of knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy were examined. A cross-sectional, correlational design was used in a convenience, non-probability sample of 25 pediatric nurses. Nurses volunteering to participate in the study were asked to complete two instruments: Pediatric Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PNKAS-Shriners Revision) (Manworren, 2000, 2001) and Nurses' Self-Efficacy in Managing Children's Pain (Chiang, Chen, & Huang, 2006). There was no statistically significant relationship between knowledge and self-efficacy (r = 0.039, p = 0.853) or knowledge and years of nursing experience (r = 0.050, p = 0.822). There was a statistically significant relationship between the level of knowledge and the years of pediatric experience (r = 0.404, p = 0.05) and knowledge and the membership in a professional nursing organization (t = 4.050, p = 0.004). Years of pediatric nursing experience correlated with significantly higher knowledge levels, as did a membership in a professional nursing organization. Further, education may benefit pediatric nurses in regard to their management of pediatric pain. Research is needed to examine the effects of self-efficacy on pediatric pain management and how it relates to the level of knowledge. PMID:24027950

Stanley, Mercedes; Pollard, Deborah

376

The contributions of self-efficacy and perceived organisational support when taking charge at work  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in english ORIENTATION: Taking charge as an extra role in the workplace is necessary for the survival of modern firms. Therefore, understanding the personal and organisational factors when one takes charge is critical for organisations. RESEARCH PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to investigate the contributions of self-efficacy and perceived organisational support when taking charge at work. MOTIVATION FOR THE STUDY: Although many previous studies have examined the antecedents of ta (more) king charge in North American business environments, we know little about taking charge in the developing economies of Africa. Research about taking charge will provide valuable information for managers of businesses in developing countries in Africa. RESEARCH DESIGN, APPROACH AND METHOD: This study used a cross-sectional survey design to examine the contributions of self-efficacy and perceived organisational support to taking charge at work amongst 201 bank workers in Nsukka, Southeast Nigeria. MAIN FINDINGS: Regression analysis results showed that self-efficacy had a significant relationship with taking charge at work. The results also showed a statistically significant relationship between perceived organisational support and taking charge at work. PRACTICAL/MANAGERIAL IMPLICATIONS: The implications of the results are that interventions that focus on improving self-efficacy will contribute to the behaviours of employees who take charge. In addition, organisations that develop strategies to make employees perceive the organisation as supportive will also have members that engage in more supervisory behaviours. CONTRIBUTION/VALUE-ADD: This study was one of the first attempts to investigate taking charge at work in a developing economy of Africa. The results of the study, that self-efficacy and perceived organisational support have relationships with taking charge at work, will contribute to a better understanding of the concept and to building robust theories.

Onyishi, Ike E.; Ogbodo, Elizabeth

2012-01-01

377

Parental TV viewing, parental self-efficacy, media equipment and TV viewing among preschool children.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

This study examined if parental TV viewing, parental self-efficacy or access to media equipment were associated with TV viewing among UK preschool-aged children. Data were derived from a cross-sectional survey of 252 parents of 3-5-year-old children. Parents reported child and parent TV viewing and the number of TVs, DVDs, computers, games consoles, hand-held games consoles, music players and laptop computers in the home. Parents also completed scales which assessed their self-efficacy to limit the screen viewing (SV) and promote the physical activity (PA) and their own PA self-efficacy. Analysis indicated that around two thirds of the children spent two or more hours per day watching TV while 75 % of parents watched ?2 h of TV per day. Logistic regression models showed that children who had a parent who watched ?2 h of TV per day were over five times more likely to also watch ?2 h of TV per day. Each unit increase in parental self-efficacy to limit SV was associated with a 77 % reduction in the likelihood that the child watched ?2 h of TV per day. Each additional piece of media equipment in the home was associated with a 28 % increase in the likelihood that parents watched ?2 h of TV per day. Conclusion: Family-based interventions focusing on changing access to home media equipment and building parental self-efficacy to reduce child TV viewing could form part of efforts to reduce TV viewing among preschool children.

Jago R; Sebire SJ; Edwards MJ; Thompson JL

2013-06-01

378

INVESTIGATING THE SELF-EFFICACY BELIEFS OF SCIENCE AND ELEMENTARY TEACHERS WITH RESPECT TO SOME VARIABLES  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study was carried out to identify how the level of the primary school science and elementary teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs changed in terms of some variables such as branch, gender, seniority, weekly lesson hours, in-service training, satisfaction with her/his job, socio-economic level of the school, and satisfaction with the working environment. In this study, which is bases on the correlative investigation model, the Scale of Self-efficacy Belief in Science Teaching developed by Riggs and Enochs (1990) and studied in terms of validity and reliability by Haz?r-B?kmaz (2004), and a 12-question Personal Information Form were applied to the science and elementary teachers working in the primary schools in Ayd?n. The study was carried out with science teachers (N=58) and elementary teachers (N=74), in total 132 participants. 54.5% of the participants were female and 45.5% of the participants were male. The data gathered in this study were evaluated with SPSS 11.5, percent and frequency values were calculated and ANOVA, ‘t’ and ‘Scheffe’ tests were applied. According to the findings of this study, teachers’ perception of self-efficacy does not differentiate in respect to gender, seniority, number of the lessons they give, having in-service training and being satisfied with the working conditions; it differentiates in respect to the branches and the job satisfaction. Additionally, between the number of the courses they give, science self-efficacy belief (r= -.178) and science teaching outcome expectancy negative and low level relations were found. Thus, it can be said that the more the number of the lessons they give increases, the more science self-efficacy beliefs decrease.

Asuman Seda SARACALO?LU; Nilgün YEN?CE

2009-01-01

379

A Transcultural Reading of Television Advertising  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Global television has enabled cultures across the world to meet within the virtual space and interact in terms of decoding, meaning making and appropriating messages. It is also the case of the Romanian audience, a local community of viewers who have long been exposed to highly censored and restrictive programming (under the communist regime) and who are now enabled to identify with the (western) communities they have aspired to. We intend to illustrate our case with TV advertisements, which, generally, provide abundant material for television viewers, with socio-culturally determined profiles, to re-construct meanings into either coincidental or disjunctive semantic outputs. Since the act of consumption is productive, we aim to show that in spite of the possibly conflicting readings of the poly- and multi-semantics of the ads, viewers can coalesce into interpretative communities irrespective of their cultural make and cooperate towards the production of a joint meaning. We consider that this is an illustration of transculturalism at the level of a local audience interacting with the symbolic representations of cultures elsewhere on television.

Diana Cotrãu

2005-01-01

380

Transcultural Nursing: Basic Concepts and Case Studies  

Science.gov (United States)

Created by the nonprofit organization Transcultural Nursing, this very useful website covers both basic concepts related to diversity as well as providing an array of case studies designed to help students, nurses and anyone practicing in the health professions better understand cultural diversity. The case studies are nicely designed, divided by general cultural community (Hispanic, Middle Eastern, Deaf, Asian, Afro American and Migrant Worker) with basic information about religion(s) or other demographic information that might relate to that particular group. Following the general information are three or four case studies illustrating specific instances where cultural differences came into play in a nursing or medical situation. The site also has an introductory area, which outlines some basic concepts including defining terms such as, cultural values and ethnocentrism. A page dedicated to the topic of third world nursing offers insight into this type of hands on experience in nursing in diverse communities, and a list of references and related links round out this very useful site.

Fernandez, Victor; Fernandez, Kathy

2006-11-03

 
 
 
 
381

Relationship between Some Demographic Variables and Perceived Self-efficacy in Social Interactions with Peers among Junior High School Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present research was studying the relationship between "parent’s education, father's job and the number of siblings" and the perceived self-efficacy in social interactions with peers in junior high school students. The relation between academic achievement and social self-efficacy was also studied. Method: In a descriptive cross-sectional study 398 junior high school students (204 girls and 194 boys) who were selected using random cluster sampling completed the Scale for Perceived Self-efficacy in Social Interactions with Peers. Data were analyzed using t statistical test, one way analysis of variance, and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: Findings revealed that the psychometric properties of the mentioned scale are appropriate for use in Iranian population. Also, this study did not show a significant relationship between perceived self-efficacy in the interaction with peers and academic achievement. Girls were not significantly different from boys with regard to self-efficacy. Father’s job had a significant relationship with perceived self-efficacy in social interaction with peers (p<0.01). Parent’s education did not have a significant relationship with self-efficacy. There was a significant relationship between the number of siblings and self-efficacy (p<0.05).Conclusion: Father’s job and the number of siblings have a direct relationship with perceived self-efficacy in social interaction with peers but academic achievements, parent’s education, and sex are not related to perceived self-efficacy in social interaction with peers. 

Massoud Hosseinchari; Rasoul Kiani

2008-01-01

382

Adaptação transcultural preliminar do Children's Eating Attitude Test (Cheat) para o idioma português/ The preliminary transcultural adaptation of the Children's Eating Attitude Test (Cheat) for portuguese  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVOS: traduzir e adaptar o instrumento "Children's Eating Attitude Test" (Cheat) para o idioma português, avaliar a equivalência semântica e a compreensão verbal. MÉTODOS: envolveu quatro etapas: (1) tradução, (2) retradução, (3) revisão técnica e avaliação semântica, (4) pré-teste - avaliação da compreensão verbal por especialistas em transtorno alimentar. RESULTADOS: as 26 questões foram traduzidas e adaptadas para o idioma português. A versão (more) final constou dos mesmos 26 itens apresentando-se de forma clara e de fácil compreensão (valores médios superior a 4,5 - máximo 5,0). CONCLUSÕES: o instrumento encontra-se traduzido e adaptado para o idioma português demonstrando bons resultados no processo de adaptação transcultural. São necessárias análises de validade externa, equivalência de mensuração e reprodutibilidade. Abstract in english OBJECTIVES: to translate and adapt the "Children's Eating Attitude Test" (Cheat) to Portuguese and evaluate the semantic equivalence and verbal comprehension. METHODS: the process involved four stages: (1) translation, (2) back-translation, (3) technical review and semantic evaluation, (4) pre-test - evaluation of verbal comprehension by specialists in eating disorders. RESULTS: the 26 questions were translated and adapted for Portuguese. The final version contained the s (more) ame 26 items presented in a clear and easy-tounderstand format (average score higher than 4.5 - maximum 5.0). CONCLUSIONS: the tool has been translated and adapted for Portuguese and the transcultural adaptation process was a success. There is still a need for analyses of external validity, measurement equivalence and reproducibility.

Barillari, Mariana Loureiro; Teixeira, Paula Costa; Hearst, Norman; Kotait, Marcela Salim; Cordas, Táki Athanássios; Conti, Maria Aparecida

2011-12-01

383

Self-efficacy and barriers to multiple behavior change in low-income African Americans with hypertension.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Behavioral risk factors are among the preventable causes of health disparities, yet long-term change remains elusive. Many interventions are designed to increase self-efficacy, but little is known about the effect on long-term behavior change in older, low-income African Americans, especially when facing more problematic barriers. A cohort of 185 low-income African-Americans with hypertension reported barriers they encountered while undergoing a multiple behavior change trial from 2002 to 2006. The purpose of the present study was to explore the relationships between self-efficacy, barriers, and multiple behavior change over time. Higher self-efficacy seemed to be partially helpful for smoking reduction and increasing physical activity, but not for following a low-sodium diet. Addiction was indirectly associated with less reduction in smoking through lower self-efficacy. Otherwise, different barriers were associated with behavior change than were associated with self-efficacy: being "too busy" directly interfered with physical activity and "traditions" with low-sodium diet; however, they were neither the most frequently reported barriers, nor associated with lower self-efficacy. This suggests that an emphasis on self-efficacy alone may be insufficient for overcoming the most salient barriers encountered by older African Americans. Additionally, the most common perceived barriers may not necessarily be relevant to long-term behavioral outcomes.

Mansyur CL; Pavlik VN; Hyman DJ; Taylor WC; Goodrick GK

2013-02-01

384

An examination of athletes' self-efficacy and strength training effort during an entire off-season.  

UK PubMed Central (United Kingdom)

Over the past 30-plus years in which self-efficacy (or confidence at a task) has been researched, findings have shown that in almost every domain of human functioning, self-efficacy positively relates to effort, persistence, and other adaptive behaviors. However, in the past decade, new research postulating that too much self-efficacy can lead to complacency and a subsequent downturn in behavior or performance has also experienced resurgence in the literature. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to test these opposing viewpoints regarding self-efficacy and effort for Division I athletes in a strength and conditioning domain over off-season training, a procedure yet to be undertaken. Subjects (N = 99), from 4 different sports (M(ag)e = 20.0 years, SD = 1.2 years), completed self-efficacy and effort measures at 4 distinct time points during off-season training. In addition, strength and conditioning coaches also rated each subject's effort--at each time point--so that a more valid measure of this construct could be attained. Results were analyzed using a multilevel approach and revealed that self-efficacy was positively, and significantly, related to the current effort that athletes exerted in strength training sessions. Consequently, practitioners are advised to structure strength and conditioning training sessions and the overall environment in ways that will positively impact the 4 proven sources of self-efficacy.

Gilson TA; Cisco Reyes GF; Curnock LE

2012-02-01

385

Primary Pre-Serv?ce Teachers’ Computer Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Att?tudes Toward Educat?onal Technologies  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study aims to investigate primary pre-service teachers’ computer self-efficacy beliefs and attitudes towards educational technologies. The study was performed on 217 primary pre-service teachers in the Faculty of Education in Rize University. Data were collected through the applications of Computer Self-Efficacy Scale (A?kar and Umay, 2001) and Technology Attitude Scale (Yavuz, 2005). Pre-service teachers’ computer self-efficacy beliefs and attitudes towards educational technologies were compared based on the variables such as class level, gender, computer ownership, and computer experiences. Moreover, pre-service teachers’ computer self-efficacy beliefs were predicted from their attitudes toward educational technologies. The study results revealed that male pre-service teachers have higher computer self-efficacy beliefs than their female counter parts and pre-service teachers owning personal computer have higher computer self-efficacy beliefs than those do not have personal computer. The study results also indicated that the pre-service teachers’ computer self-efficacy beliefs can be predicted from their attitudes towards educational technologies.

Cemalettin ?PEK; H. Yusuf ACUNER

2011-01-01

386

The Effects of Cognitive Learning Style and Prior Computer Experience on Taiwanese College Students' Computer Self-Efficacy in Computer Literacy Courses  

Science.gov (United States)

|This study examines the influences of learners' characteristics on the development of computer self-efficacy using the GOMS (goal, operators, methods, and selection rules) model. Students' learning style, prior computer course experience, and computer self-efficacy were measured in the pretest, and computer self-efficacy was measured in the…

Shiue, Ya-Ming

2003-01-01

387

The Transculturing Self II. Constructing Identity through Identification  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article, I try to further develop my notion of the "transculturing self." Firstly, I discuss Nietzsche's positions on "self" and "subject," arguing for the idea that "there is no self." Hence, I try to show that "identity" is the outcome of a (co-)construction originating in the circumstance that each individual needs to meet external…

Monceri, Flavia

2009-01-01