WorldWideScience

Sample records for time bioluminescence imaging

  1. Bioluminescence Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Sadikot, Ruxana T.; Blackwell, Timothy S.

    2005-01-01

    Bioluminescence refers to the process of visible light emission in living organisms. Bioluminescence imaging is a powerful methodology that has been developed over the last decade as a tool for molecular imaging of small laboratory animals, enabling the study of ongoing biological processes in vivo. This form of optical imaging is low cost and noninvasive and facilitates real-time analysis of disease processes at the molecular level in living organisms. In this article, we provide a brief int...

  2. Bioanalytical Applications of Real-Time ATP Imaging Via Bioluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason Alan Gruenhagen

    2003-12-12

    The research discussed within involves the development of novel applications of real-time imaging of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). ATP was detected via bioluminescence and the firefly luciferase-catalyzed reaction of ATP and luciferin. The use of a microscope and an imaging detector allowed for spatially resolved quantitation of ATP release. Employing this method, applications in both biological and chemical systems were developed. First, the mechanism by which the compound 48/80 induces release of ATP from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was investigated. Numerous enzyme activators and inhibitors were utilized to probe the second messenger systems involved in release. Compound 48/80 activated a G{sub q}-type protein to initiate ATP release from HUVECs. Ca{sup 2+} imaging along with ATP imaging revealed that activation of phospholipase C and induction of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} signaling were necessary for release of ATP. Furthermore, activation of protein kinase C inhibited the activity of phospholipase C and thus decreased the magnitude of ATP release. This novel release mechanism was compared to the existing theories of extracellular release of ATP. Bioluminescence imaging was also employed to examine the role of ATP in the field of neuroscience. The central nervous system (CNS) was dissected from the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the neurons of the Lymnaea were not damaged by any of the components of the imaging solution. ATP was continuously released by the ganglia of the CNS for over eight hours and varied from ganglion to ganglion and within individual ganglia. Addition of the neurotransmitters K{sup +} and serotonin increased release of ATP in certain regions of the Lymnaea CNS. Finally, the ATP imaging technique was investigated for the study of drug release systems. MCM-41-type mesoporous nanospheres were loaded with ATP and end-capped with mercaptoethanol functionalized CdS monocrystals. Aggregates of nanospheres were bathed in imaging solution, and ATP bioluminescence was monitored to investigated the release kinetics of the nanosphere drug delivery systems. Addition of disulfide bond-cleaving molecules induced uncapping of the nanospheres and subsequently, the release of ATP. Increasing the concentration of the uncapping molecule decreased the temporal maximum and increased the magnitude of release of encapsulated ATP from the nanospheres. Furthermore, the release kinetics from the nanospheres varied with the size of the particle aggregates.

  3. Bioluminescent Bacterial Imaging In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Baban, Chwanrow K; Cronin, Michelle; Akin, Ali R.; O'Brien, Anne; Gao, Xuefeng; Tabirca, Sabin; Francis, Kevin P.; Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This video describes the use of whole body bioluminesce imaging (BLI) for the study of bacterial trafficking in live mice, with an emphasis on the use of bacteria in gene and cell therapy for cancer. Bacteria present an attractive class of vector for cancer therapy, possessing a natural ability to grow preferentially within tumors following systemic administration. Bacteria engineered to express the lux gene cassette permit BLI detection of the bacteria and concurrently tumor sites. The locat...

  4. Bioluminescence imaging characteristics and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) by luciferase gene marked cells or DNA, in the presence of ATP and oxygen, catalytic oxidation reaction of fluorescein luminescence. So that it can directly monitor in vivo cell activity and gene behavior. In this paper, by comparing the BLI and MRI, PET, radiography of the similarities and differences, as well as about their cancer, stem cells and immune cells transportation, apoptosis and other aspects of the application, in order to better provide the basis for promoting the application of BLI. (authors)

  5. Real-time in vivo bioluminescence imaging of lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer in mouse testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T S; Choi, H S; Ryu, B Y; Gang, G T; Kim, S U; Koo, D B; Kim, J M; Han, J H; Park, C K; Her, S; Lee, D S

    2010-01-01

    Although much research has focused on transferring exogenous genes into living mouse testis to investigate specific gene functions in spermatogenic, Sertoli, and Leydig cells, relatively little is known regarding real-time gene expression in vivo. In this study, we constructed a bicistronic lentiviral vector (LV) encoding firefly luciferase and enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP); this was a highly efficient in vivo gene transfer tool. After microinjecting LV into the seminiferous tubules the ICR mouse testis, we detected luciferase and EGFP expression in vivo and ex vivo in the injected tubules using bioluminescence imaging (BLI) with the IVIS-200 system and fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy (CellViZio), respectively. In addition, with an in vivo BLI system, luciferase expression in the testis was detected for approximately 3 mo. Furthermore, EGFP expression in seminiferous tubules was confirmed in excised testes via three-dimensional fluorescent imaging with a confocal laser-scanning microscope. With immunostaining, EGFP expression was confirmed in several male germ cell types in the seminiferous tubules, as well as in Sertoli and Leydig cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that real-time in vivo BLI analysis can be used to noninvasively (in vivo) monitor long-term luciferase expression in mouse testis, and we verified that EGFP expression is localized in seminiferous tubules after bicistronic LV-mediated gene transfer into mouse testes. Furthermore, we anticipate the future use of in vivo BLI technology for real-time study of specific genes involved in spermatogenesis. PMID:19837451

  6. Bioluminescence in vivo imaging of autoimmune encephalomyelitis predicts disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinman Lawrence

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a widely used animal model to understand not only multiple sclerosis but also basic principles of immunity. The disease is scored typically by observing signs of paralysis, which do not always correspond with pathological changes. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in transgenic mice expressing an injury responsive luciferase reporter in astrocytes (GFAP-luc. Bioluminescence in the brain and spinal cord was measured non-invasively in living mice. Mice were sacrificed at different time points to evaluate clinical and pathological changes. The correlation between bioluminescence and clinical and pathological EAE was statistically analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis. Results Bioluminescence from the brain and spinal cord correlates strongly with severity of clinical disease and a number of pathological changes in the brain in EAE. Bioluminescence at early time points also predicts severity of disease. Conclusion These results highlight the potential use of bioluminescence imaging to monitor neuroinflammation for rapid drug screening and immunological studies in EAE and suggest that similar approaches could be applied to other animal models of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

  7. Bioluminescent system for dynamic imaging of cell and animal behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara-Miyauchi, Chikako [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Laboratory for Cell Function Dynamics, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Tsuji, Osahiko [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hanyu, Aki [Division of Biochemistry, The Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okada, Seiji [Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yasuda, Akimasa [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Fukano, Takashi [Laboratory for Cell Function Dynamics, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Akazawa, Chihiro [Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakamura, Masaya [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Imamura, Takeshi [Department of Molecular Medicine for Pathogenesis, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Toon, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, The Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Yumi [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Okano, Hirotaka James, E-mail: hjokano@jikei.ac.jp [Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Division of Regenerative Medicine Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo 150-8461 (Japan); and others

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We combined a yellow variant of GFP and firefly luciferase to make ffLuc-cp156. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 showed improved photon yield in cultured cells and transgenic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely-moving animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled tracking real-time drug delivery in conscious animals. -- Abstract: The current utility of bioluminescence imaging is constrained by a low photon yield that limits temporal sensitivity. Here, we describe an imaging method that uses a chemiluminescent/fluorescent protein, ffLuc-cp156, which consists of a yellow variant of Aequorea GFP and firefly luciferase. We report an improvement in photon yield by over three orders of magnitude over current bioluminescent systems. We imaged cellular movement at high resolution including neuronal growth cones and microglial cell protrusions. Transgenic ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely moving animals, which may provide a reliable assay for drug distribution in behaving animals for pre-clinical studies.

  8. Bioluminescent system for dynamic imaging of cell and animal behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ? We combined a yellow variant of GFP and firefly luciferase to make ffLuc-cp156. ? ffLuc-cp156 showed improved photon yield in cultured cells and transgenic mice. ? ffLuc-cp156 enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely-moving animals. ? ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled tracking real-time drug delivery in conscious animals. -- Abstract: The current utility of bioluminescence imaging is constrained by a low photon yield that limits temporal sensitivity. Here, we describe an imaging method that uses a chemiluminescent/fluorescent protein, ffLuc-cp156, which consists of a yellow variant of Aequorea GFP and firefly luciferase. We report an improvement in photon yield by over three orders of magnitude over current bioluminescent systems. We imaged cellular movement at high resolution including neuronal growth cones and microglial cell protrusions. Transgenic ffLuc-cp156 mice enabled video-rate bioluminescence imaging of freely moving animals, which may provide a reliable assay for drug distribution in behaving animals for pre-clinical studies.

  9. Dynamic bioluminescence imaging for quantitative tumour burden assessment using IV or IP administration of d-luciferin: effect on intensity, time kinetics and repeatability of photon emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a promising technique for non-invasive tumour imaging. d-luciferin can be administrated intraperitonealy or intravenously. This will influence its availability and, therefore, the bioluminescent signal. The aim of this study is to compare the repeatability of BLI measurement after IV versus IP administration of d-luciferin and assess the correlation between photon emission and histological cell count both in vitro and in vivo. Fluc-positive R1M cells were subcutaneously inoculated in nu/nu mice. Dynamic BLI was performed after IV or IP administration of d-luciferin. Maximal photon emission (PEmax) was calculated. For repeatability assessment, every acquisition was repeated after 4 h and analysed using Bland-Altman method. A second group of animals was serially imaged, alternating IV and IP administration up to 21 days. When mice were killed, PEmax after IV administration was correlated with histological cell number. The coefficients of repeatability were 80.2% (IV) versus 95.0% (IP). Time-to-peak is shorter, and its variance lower for IV (p max was 5.6 times higher for IV. A trend was observed towards lower photon emission per cell in larger tumours. IV administration offers better repeatability and better sensitivity when compared to IP. In larger tumours, multiple factors may contribute to underestimation of tumour burden. It might, therefore, be beneficial to test novel therapeutore, be beneficial to test novel therapeutics on small tumours to enable an accurate evaluation of tumour burden. (orig.)

  10. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of the Murine Pathogen Citrobacter rodentium

    OpenAIRE

    Wiles, Siouxsie; Pickard, Karen M.; Peng, Katian; Macdonald, Thomas T.; Frankel, Gad

    2006-01-01

    Citrobacter rodentium is a natural mouse pathogen related to enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. We have previously utilized bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to determine the in vivo colonization dynamics of C. rodentium. However, due to the oxygen requirement of the bioluminescence system and the colonic localization of C. rodentium, in vivo localization studies were performed using harvested organs. Here, we report the detection of bioluminescent C. rodentium and commensal...

  11. Bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. Gail

    1993-01-01

    Describes bioluminescence and the chemistry of how it occurs. Presents information for conducting the following classroom activities: (1) firefly mimic; (2) modeling deep-sea fish; (3) sea fireflies; and (4) the chemistry of light. (PR)

  12. Triple Bioluminescence Imaging for In Vivo Monitoring of Cellular Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Maguire, Casey A; Bovenberg, M Sarah; Crommentuijn, Matheus HW; Niers, Johanna M; Kerami, Mariam; Teng, Jian; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Badr, Christian E.; Bakhos A. Tannous

    2013-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has shown to be crucial for monitoring in vivo biological processes. So far, only dual bioluminescence imaging using firefly (Fluc) and Renilla or Gaussia (Gluc) luciferase has been achieved due to the lack of availability of other efficiently expressed luciferases using different substrates. Here, we characterized a codon-optimized luciferase from Vargula hilgendorfii (Vluc) as a reporter for mammalian gene expression. We showed that Vluc can be multiplexed with...

  13. Robust image modeling technique with a bioluminescence image segmentation application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianghong; Wang, Ruiping; Tian, Jie

    2009-02-01

    A robust pattern classifier algorithm for the variable symmetric plane model, where the driving noise is a mixture of a Gaussian and an outlier process, is developed. The veracity and high-speed performance of the pattern recognition algorithm is proved. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has recently gained wide acceptance in the field of in vivo small animal molecular imaging. So that it is very important for BLT to how to acquire the highprecision region of interest in a bioluminescence image (BLI) in order to decrease loss of the customers because of inaccuracy in quantitative analysis. An algorithm in the mode is developed to improve operation speed, which estimates parameters and original image intensity simultaneously from the noise corrupted image derived from the BLT optical hardware system. The focus pixel value is obtained from the symmetric plane according to a more realistic assumption for the noise sequence in the restored image. The size of neighborhood is adaptive and small. What's more, the classifier function is base on the statistic features. If the qualifications for the classifier are satisfied, the focus pixel intensity is setup as the largest value in the neighborhood.Otherwise, it will be zeros.Finally,pseudo-color is added up to the result of the bioluminescence segmented image. The whole process has been implemented in our 2D BLT optical system platform and the model is proved.

  14. Bioluminescence tomography improves quantitative accuracy for pre-clinical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenheim, James A.; Basevi, Hector R. A.; Styles, Iain B.; Frampton, Jon; Dehghani, Hamid

    2013-06-01

    A study is presented that demonstrates that bioluminescence tomography can reconstruct accurate 3D images of internal light sources placed at a range of depths within a physical phantom and that it provides more reliable quantitative data than standard bioluminescence imaging. Specifically, it is shown that when imaging sources at depths ranging from 5 to 15mm, estimates of total source strength are stable to within +/-11% using tomography whilst values deduced by traditional methods vary 10-fold. Additionally, the tomographic approach correctly localises sources to within 1.5mm error in all cases considered.

  15. Continuous, real-time bioimaging of chemical bioavailability and toxicology using autonomously bioluminescent human cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan M.; Webb, James D.; Price, Sarah L.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2013-05-01

    Bioluminescent imaging is an emerging biomedical surveillance strategy that uses external cameras to detect in vivo light generated in small animal models of human physiology or in vitro light generated in tissue culture or tissue scaffold mimics of human anatomy. The most widely utilized of reporters is the firefly luciferase (luc) gene; however, it generates light only upon addition of a chemical substrate, thus only generating intermittent single time point data snapshots. To overcome this disadvantage, we have demonstrated substrate-independent bioluminescent imaging using an optimized bacterial bioluminescence (lux) system. The lux reporter produces bioluminescence autonomously using components found naturally within the cell, thereby allowing imaging to occur continuously and in real-time over the lifetime of the host. We have validated this technology in human cells with demonstrated chemical toxicological profiling against exotoxin exposures at signal strengths comparable to existing luc systems (~1.33 × 107 photons/second). As a proof-in-principle demonstration, we have engineered breast carcinoma cells to express bioluminescence for real-time screening of endocrine disrupting chemicals and validated detection of 17?-estradiol (EC50 = ~ 10 pM). These and other applications of this new reporter technology will be discussed as potential new pathways towards improved models of target chemical bioavailability, toxicology, efficacy, and human safety.

  16. Filtering and deconvolution for bioluminescence imaging of small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is devoted to analysis of bioluminescence images applied to the small animal. This kind of imaging modality is used in cancerology studies. Nevertheless, some problems are related to the diffusion and the absorption of the tissues of the light of internal bioluminescent sources. In addition, system noise and the cosmic rays noise are present. This influences the quality of the images and makes it difficult to analyze. The purpose of this thesis is to overcome these disturbing effects. We first have proposed an image formation model for the bioluminescence images. The processing chain is constituted by a filtering stage followed by a deconvolution stage. We have proposed a new median filter to suppress the random value impulsive noise which corrupts the acquired images; this filter represents the first block of the proposed chain. For the deconvolution stage, we have performed a comparative study of various deconvolution algorithms. It allowed us to choose a blind deconvolution algorithm initialized with the estimated point spread function of the acquisition system. At first, we have validated our global approach by comparing our obtained results with the ground truth. Through various clinical tests, we have shown that the processing chain allows a significant improvement of the spatial resolution and a better distinction of very close tumor sources, what represents considerable contribution for the users of bioluminescence images. (author)

  17. Space application research of EMCCDs for bioluminescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao

    The detection of bioluminescense is widely used on the ground, while the detection of bioluminescence in space is still at the stage of detecting bright bioluminescense. With the rapid development of research in Space Life Sciences, it will be necessary to develop a detection technology to detect weak bioluminescense. Compared to other low-light detection techniques for ground, there are more advantages of EMCCDs for space application. Build a space bioluminescence imaging detection system, analysis the feasibility and capability of its will be significant. Co-Author:Xie Zongbao,Zheng Weibo

  18. Development of Quantification Method for Bioluminescence Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical molecular luminescence imaging is widely used for detection and imaging of bio-photons emitted by luminescent luciferase activation. The measured photons in this method provide the degree of molecular alteration or cell numbers with the advantage of high signal-to-noise ratio. To extract useful information from the measured results, the analysis based on a proper quantification method is necessary. In this research, we propose a quantification method presenting linear response of measured light signal to measurement time. We detected the luminescence signal by using lab-made optical imaging equipment of animal light imaging system (ALIS) and different two kinds of light sources. One is three bacterial light-emitting sources containing different number of bacteria. The other is three different non-bacterial light sources emitting very weak light. By using the concept of the candela and the flux, we could derive simplified linear quantification formula. After experimentally measuring light intensity, the data was processed with the proposed quantification function. We could obtain linear response of photon counts to measurement time by applying the pre-determined quantification function. The ratio of the re-calculated photon counts and measurement time present a constant value although different light source was applied. The quantification function for linear response could be applicable to the standard quantification process. The proposed method could be used focess. The proposed method could be used for the exact quantitative analysis in various light imaging equipment with presenting linear response behavior of constant light emitting sources to measurement time

  19. Development of Quantification Method for Bioluminescence Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeon Sik; Min, Jung Joon; Lee, Byeong Il [Chonnam National University Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Seo [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Tak, Yoon O; Choi, Heung Kook; Lee, Ju Young [Inje University, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Optical molecular luminescence imaging is widely used for detection and imaging of bio-photons emitted by luminescent luciferase activation. The measured photons in this method provide the degree of molecular alteration or cell numbers with the advantage of high signal-to-noise ratio. To extract useful information from the measured results, the analysis based on a proper quantification method is necessary. In this research, we propose a quantification method presenting linear response of measured light signal to measurement time. We detected the luminescence signal by using lab-made optical imaging equipment of animal light imaging system (ALIS) and different two kinds of light sources. One is three bacterial light-emitting sources containing different number of bacteria. The other is three different non-bacterial light sources emitting very weak light. By using the concept of the candela and the flux, we could derive simplified linear quantification formula. After experimentally measuring light intensity, the data was processed with the proposed quantification function. We could obtain linear response of photon counts to measurement time by applying the pre-determined quantification function. The ratio of the re-calculated photon counts and measurement time present a constant value although different light source was applied. The quantification function for linear response could be applicable to the standard quantification process. The proposed method could be used for the exact quantitative analysis in various light imaging equipment with presenting linear response behavior of constant light emitting sources to measurement time

  20. In vivo fluorescence imaging of the reticuloendothelial system using quantum dots in combination with bioluminescent tumour monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yusuke; Yamada, Haruyasu [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo (Japan); Izawa, Kiyoko; Tojo, Arinobu [University of Tokyo, Division of Molecular Therapy, Advanced Clinical Research Centre, Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo (Japan); Yoshikawa, Kohki [Komazawa University, Department of Radiotechnical Sciences, Faculty of Radiological Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2007-12-15

    We characterised in vivo fluorescence imaging (FLI) of the reticuloendothelial system using quantum dots (QD) and investigated its use in combination with in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI). In vivo FLI was performed in five mice repeatedly after the intravenous administration of QD without conjugation to targeting ligands. Ex vivo FLI of the excised organs was performed 24 h after QD injection in three mice. Seven days after intravenous inoculation of luciferase-expressing model cells of a haematological malignancy, mice were injected with the QD or saline (n = 5 each), and combined BLI/FLI was performed repeatedly. Additional five mice inoculated with the tumour cells were examined by in vivo BLI/FLI, and the structures harbouring bioluminescent foci were determined by ex vivo BLI. The utility of combining FLI with bioluminescent tumour monitoring was evaluated. In vivo FLI after QD injection allowed long-term, repeated observation of the reticuloendothelial system in individual mice, although fluorescence intensity and image contrast gradually decreased over time. Ex vivo FLI verified selective accumulation in reticuloendothelial structures. The administration of QD did not affect whole-body bioluminescent signal intensities during longitudinal tumour monitoring. In vivo BLI/FLI, accompanied by fusion of both images, improved the accuracy and confidence level of the localisation of the bioluminescent foci. In vivo FLI using QD provides an overview of the reticuloendothelial system in living mice. In combination with bioluminescent tumour monitoring, fluorescent reticuloendothelial imaging is expected to provide valuable information for lesion localisation. (orig.)

  1. Effects of the time dependence of a bioluminescent source on the tomographic reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcin Unlu, Mehmet; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2008-02-01

    There are two goals in this simulation study: (1) to show that the time variation of the bioluminescence source can cause artifacts in the tomographic images such that quantification and localization becomes impossible; and (2) to show that the a priori knowledge of the light kinetics can be used to eliminate these artifacts. These goals are motivated by the fact that the half-life of luciferase has been reported as 30 min to 2 h in vivo. We perform two-dimensional simulations. We consider a 40 mm diameter circular region with an inclusion of 6 mm diameter located 10 mm away from the center. The measurement data is simulated using a finite-element-based forward solver. We model the noncontact measurements such that four-wavelength data is collected from four 90° apart views. The results show that the ratio of the total imaging time to the half-life of the exponentially decaying bioluminescent source is the deciding factor in the reconstruction of the source. It is also demonstrated that a priori knowledge of the source kinetics is required to perform tomographic bioluminescence imaging of short half-life bioluminescent sources and the use of spatial a priori information alone is not adequate.

  2. Hyperspectral and multispectral bioluminescence optical tomography for small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For bioluminescence imaging studies in small animals, it is important to be able to accurately localize the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the underlying bioluminescent source. The spectrum of light produced by the source that escapes the subject varies with the depth of the emission source because of the wavelength-dependence of the optical properties of tissue. Consequently, multispectral or hyperspectral data acquisition should help in the 3D localization of deep sources. In this paper, we describe a framework for fully 3D bioluminescence tomographic image acquisition and reconstruction that exploits spectral information. We describe regularized tomographic reconstruction techniques that use semi-infinite slab or FEM-based diffusion approximations of photon transport through turbid media. Singular value decomposition analysis was used for data dimensionality reduction and to illustrate the advantage of using hyperspectral rather than achromatic data. Simulation studies in an atlas-mouse geometry indicated that sub-millimeter resolution may be attainable given accurate knowledge of the optical properties of the animal. A fixed arrangement of mirrors and a single CCD camera were used for simultaneous acquisition of multispectral imaging data over most of the surface of the animal. Phantom studies conducted using this system demonstrated our ability to accurately localize deep point-like sources and show that a resolution of 1.5 to 2.2 mm for depths up to 6 mmion of 1.5 to 2.2 mm for depths up to 6 mm can be achieved. We also include an in vivo study of a mouse with a brain tumour expressing firefly luciferase. Co-registration of the reconstructed 3D bioluminescent image with magnetic resonance images indicated good anatomical localization of the tumour

  3. Bioluminescence Imaging of Stem Cell-Based Therapeutics for Vascular Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Ngan F Huang, Janet Okogbaa

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapeutics show promise for treatment of vascular diseases. However, the survival of the cells after in vivo injection into diseased tissues remains a concern. In the advent of non-invasive optical imaging techniques such as bioluminescence imaging (BLI), cell localization and survival can be easily monitored over time. This approach has recently been applied towards monitoring stem cell treatments for vascular regeneration of the coronary or peripheral arteries. In this rev...

  4. Filtering and deconvolution for bioluminescence imaging of small animals; Filtrage et deconvolution en imagerie de bioluminescence chez le petit animal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkoul, S.

    2010-06-22

    This thesis is devoted to analysis of bioluminescence images applied to the small animal. This kind of imaging modality is used in cancerology studies. Nevertheless, some problems are related to the diffusion and the absorption of the tissues of the light of internal bioluminescent sources. In addition, system noise and the cosmic rays noise are present. This influences the quality of the images and makes it difficult to analyze. The purpose of this thesis is to overcome these disturbing effects. We first have proposed an image formation model for the bioluminescence images. The processing chain is constituted by a filtering stage followed by a deconvolution stage. We have proposed a new median filter to suppress the random value impulsive noise which corrupts the acquired images; this filter represents the first block of the proposed chain. For the deconvolution stage, we have performed a comparative study of various deconvolution algorithms. It allowed us to choose a blind deconvolution algorithm initialized with the estimated point spread function of the acquisition system. At first, we have validated our global approach by comparing our obtained results with the ground truth. Through various clinical tests, we have shown that the processing chain allows a significant improvement of the spatial resolution and a better distinction of very close tumor sources, what represents considerable contribution for the users of bioluminescence images. (author)

  5. Analysis of Neurogenesis during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Reveals Pitfalls of Bioluminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzdorf, Judith; Stahlke, Sarah; Pedreitturia, Xiomara; Hunfeld, Anika; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Kleiter, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is a sensitive approach for longitudinal neuroimaging. Transgenic mice expressing luciferase under the promoter of doublecortin (DCX-luc), a specific marker of neuronal progenitor cells (NPC), allow monitoring of neurogenesis in living mice. Since the extent and time course of neurogenesis during autoimmune brain inflammation are controversial, we investigated neurogenesis in MOG-peptide induced experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) using DCX-luc reporter mice. We observed a marked, 2- to 4-fold increase of the bioluminescence signal intensity 10 days after EAE induction and a gradual decline 1–2 weeks thereafter. In contrast, immunostaining for DCX revealed no differences between EAE and control mice 2 and 4 weeks after immunization in zones of adult murine neurogenesis such as the dentate gyrus. Ex vivo bioluminescence imaging showed similar luciferase expression in brain homogenates of EAE and control animals. Apart from complete immunization including MOG-peptide also incomplete immunization with complete Freund´s adjuvant and pertussis toxin resulted in a rapid increase of the in vivo bioluminescence signal. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage was demonstrated 10 days after both complete and incomplete immunization and might explain the increased bioluminescence signal in vivo. We conclude, that acute autoimmune inflammation in EAE does not alter neurogenesis, at least at the stage of DCX-expressing NPC. Effects of immunization on the BBB integrity must be considered when luciferase is used as a reporter within the CNS during the active stage of EAE. Models with stable CNS-restricted luciferase expression could serve as technically convenient way to evaluate BBB integrity in a longitudinal manner. PMID:25780928

  6. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of Cell Differentiation in Biomaterials: A Platform for Scaffold Development

    OpenAIRE

    Bago?, Juli R.; Aguilar, Elisabeth; Alieva, Maria; Soler-botija, Carolina; Vila, Olaia F.; Claros, Silvia; Andrades, Jose? A.; Becerra, Jose?; Rubio, Nuria; Blanco, Jero?nimo

    2013-01-01

    In vivo testing is a mandatory last step in scaffold development. Agile longitudinal noninvasive real-time monitoring of stem cell behavior in biomaterials implanted in live animals should facilitate the development of scaffolds for tissue engineering. We report on a noninvasive bioluminescence imaging (BLI) procedure for simultaneous monitoring of changes in the expression of multiple genes to evaluate scaffold performance in vivo. Adipose tissue-derived stromal mensenchymal cells were duall...

  7. Video-rate bioluminescence imaging of protein secretion from a living cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Inouye, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    We have established a method of video-rate bioluminescence imaging to visualize exocytotic protein secretion from a single living cell using Gaussia luciferase (GLase) as a reporter protein. The luminescence signals produced by the enzymatic reaction of secreted GLase (luciferase) and coelenterazine (luciferin) are detected with an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device camera. An exocytotic event of protein secretion can be visualized using the protein fused to GLase with a time resolution of 30-500 ms. Signal analyses of the bioluminescence video images reveal a number of exocytotic sites, the frequency of exocytotic events, and the amount of secreted protein on a whole cell. Furthermore, the method can distinguish between secreted and cell surface-bound proteins. Our method is a direct approach to investigate the secretion and localization of proteins on the whole surface of living cells. PMID:24166369

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A DUAL MODALITY TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING SYSTEM FOR BIOLUMINESCENCE AND PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHATZIIOANNOU, ARION

    2011-12-21

    The goal of this proposal was to develop a new hybrid imaging modality capable to simultaneously image optical bioluminescence signals, as well as radionuclide emissions from the annihilation of positrons originating from molecular imaging probes in preclinical mouse models. This new technology enables the simultaneous in-vivo measurements of both emissions that could be produced from a single or a combination of two different biomarkers. It also facilitates establishing the physical limitations of bioluminescence imaging, its tomographic and spectral image reconstruction potential and the quantification of bioluminescence signals.

  9. Assessing laser-tissue damage with bioluminescent imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmink, Gerald J.; Opalenik, Susan R.; Beckham, Josh T.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Jansen, Eric D.

    2006-07-01

    Effective medical laser procedures are achieved by selecting laser parameters that minimize undesirable tissue damage. Traditionally, human subjects, animal models, and monolayer cell cultures have been used to study wound healing, tissue damage, and cellular effects of laser radiation. Each of these models has significant limitations, and consequently, a novel skin model is needed. To this end, a highly reproducible human skin model that enables noninvasive and longitudinal studies of gene expression was sought. In this study, we present an organotypic raft model (engineered skin) used in combination with bioluminescent imaging (BLI) techniques. The efficacy of the raft model was validated and characterized by investigating the role of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) as a sensitive marker of thermal damage. The raft model consists of human cells incorporated into an extracellular matrix. The raft cultures were transfected with an adenovirus containing a murine hsp70 promoter driving transcription of luciferase. The model enables quantitative analysis of spatiotemporal expression of proteins using BLI. Thermal stress was induced on the raft cultures by means of a constant temperature water bath or with a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (?=10.6 µm, 0.679 to 2.262 W/cm2, cw, unfocused Gaussian beam, ?L=4.5 mm, 1 min exposure). The bioluminescence was monitored noninvasively with an IVIS 100 Bioluminescent Imaging System. BLI indicated that peak hsp70 expression occurs 4 to 12 h after exposure to thermal stress. A minimum irradiance of 0.679 W/cm2 activated the hsp70 response, and a higher irradiance of 2.262 W/cm2 was associated with a severe reduction in hsp70 response due to tissue ablation. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that hsp70 mRNA levels increased with prolonged heating exposures. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent protein assays confirmed that luciferase was an accurate surrogate for hsp70 intracellular protein levels. Hematoxylin and eosin stains verified the presence of the thermally denatured tissue regions. Immunohistochemical analyses confirmed that maximal hsp70 expression occurred at a depth of 150 µm. Bioluminescent microscopy was employed to corroborate these findings. These results indicate that quantitative BLI in engineered tissue equivalents provides a powerful model that enables sequential gene expression studies. Such a model can be used as a high throughput screening platform for laser-tissue interaction studies.

  10. ATP binding cassette transporters modulate both coelenterazine- and D-luciferin- based bioluminescence imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Ruimin; Vider, Jelena; Serganova, Inna; Blasberg, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of luciferase reporters provides a cost-effective and sensitive means to image biological processes. However, transport of luciferase substrates across the cell membrane does affect BLI-readout-intensity from intact living cells.

  11. In vivo fluorescence imaging of the reticuloendothelial system using quantum dots in combination with bioluminescent tumour monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We characterised in vivo fluorescence imaging (FLI) of the reticuloendothelial system using quantum dots (QD) and investigated its use in combination with in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI). In vivo FLI was performed in five mice repeatedly after the intravenous administration of QD without conjugation to targeting ligands. Ex vivo FLI of the excised organs was performed 24 h after QD injection in three mice. Seven days after intravenous inoculation of luciferase-expressing model cells of a haematological malignancy, mice were injected with the QD or saline (n = 5 each), and combined BLI/FLI was performed repeatedly. Additional five mice inoculated with the tumour cells were examined by in vivo BLI/FLI, and the structures harbouring bioluminescent foci were determined by ex vivo BLI. The utility of combining FLI with bioluminescent tumour monitoring was evaluated. In vivo FLI after QD injection allowed long-term, repeated observation of the reticuloendothelial system in individual mice, although fluorescence intensity and image contrast gradually decreased over time. Ex vivo FLI verified selective accumulation in reticuloendothelial structures. The administration of QD did not affect whole-body bioluminescent signal intensities during longitudinal tumour monitoring. In vivo BLI/FLI, accompanied by fusion of both images, improved the accuracy and confidence level of the localisation of the bioluminescent foci. In vivo FLI using QD provides an overview of the reticuling QD provides an overview of the reticuloendothelial system in living mice. In combination with bioluminescent tumour monitoring, fluorescent reticuloendothelial imaging is expected to provide valuable information for lesion localisation. (orig.)

  12. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging of Tumor Cells Using Optimized Firefly Luciferase luc2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Klementyeva

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed to establish a tumor cell line stably expressing luciferase luc2, and to develop the technique to observe primary tumor nodes and metastases using in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Materials and Methods. In this research we used pLuc2-N plasmid, lentiviral vector pLVT-1, Colo 26 cell line and BALB/c mice to generate new bioluminescent tumor model. Bioluminescence imaging in vitro ? in vivo was carried out on IVIS-Spectrum system (Caliper Life Sciences, USA. Primary tumor model was created by subcutaneous injection of 500 000 Colo 26-luc2 cells. Model of metastases was generated by i.v. injection of 75 000 Colo 26-luc2 cells. Histological analysis was performed to verify the results of the imaging. Results. We created the lentiviral vector containing luc2 gene using molecular cloning. Then Colo 26-luc2 tumor cell line was generated. We assessed the sensitivity of luc2-based bioluminescence imaging. The intensity of bioluminescent signal in vitro averaged about 5000 photon/s per cell, in vivo — 250 photon/sec per cell. In vivo monitoring of Colo 26-luc2 primary tumor and metastases was demonstrated. The results of bioluminescence imaging correlated with histological analysis data. Conclusion. The present work shows the possibility of bioluminescent system based on optimized luciferase luc2 for in vivo noninvasive high-sensitive whole-body imaging of tumors.

  13. Rat model of metastatic breast cancer monitored by MRI at 3 tesla and bioluminescence imaging with histological correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Klaunberg Brenda; Ganjei Justin; Liu Wei; Lewis Bobbi K; Jordan Elaine K; Song Ho-Taek; Despres Daryl; Palmieri Diane; Frank Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Establishing a large rodent model of brain metastasis that can be monitored using clinically relevant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques is challenging. Non-invasive imaging of brain metastasis in mice usually requires high field strength MR units and long imaging acquisition times. Using the brain seeking MDA-MB-231BR transfected with luciferase gene, a metastatic breast cancer brain tumor model was investigated in the nude rat. Serial MRI and bioluminescence ima...

  14. Monitoring and quantitative assessment of tumor burden using in vivo bioluminescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating tumor growth. In this study, the kinetic of tumor growth has been assessed in C26 colon carcinoma bearing BALB/c mouse model. The ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth of subcutaneous tumors transplanted with C26 cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (C26/tk-luc). A good correlation (R 2=0.998) of photon emission to the cell number was found in vitro. Tumor burden and tumor volume were monitored in vivo over time by quantitation of photon emission using Xenogen IVIS 50 and standard external caliper measurement, respectively. At various time intervals, tumor-bearing mice were imaged to determine the correlation of in vivo BLI to tumor volume. However, a correlation of BLI to tumor volume was observed when tumor volume was smaller than 1000 mm3 (R 2=0.907). ? Scintigraphy combined with [131I]FIAU was another imaging modality used for verifying the previous results. In conclusion, this study showed that bioluminescence imaging is a powerful and quantitative tool for the direct assay to monitor tumor growth in vivo. The dual reporter genes transfected tumor-bearing animal model can be applied in the evaluation of the efficacy of new developed anti-cancer drugsr drugs

  15. Multimodal imaging of orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma using small animal PET, bioluminescence and contrast enhanced CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging with small-animal PET and bioluminescence imaging has been used as an important tool in cancer research. One of the disadvantages of these imaging modalities is the lack of anatomic information. To obtain fusion images with both molecular and anatomical information, small-animal PET and bioluminescence images fused with contrast enhance CT image in orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model. We retrovially transfected dual gene (HSV1-tk and firefly luciferase) to morris hepatoma cells. The expression of HSV1-tk and luciferase was checked by optical imager and in vitro radiolabeled FIAU uptake, respectively and also checked by RT-PCR analysis. MCA-TL cells (5X105/ 0.05 ml) mixed with matrigel (1: 10) injected into left lobe of liver in nude mice. 124I-FIAU-PET, bioluminescence and contrast enhanced CT images were obtained in the orthotopic HCC model and digital whole body autoradiography (DWBA) was performed. Small animal PET image was obtained at 2 h post injection of 124I-FIAU and contrast enhanced CT image was obtained at 3 h post injection of Fenestra LC (0.3 ml). MCA-TL cells showed more specific 124I-FIAU uptake and higher luminescent activity than parental cells. The orthotopic HCC was detected by 124I-FIAU PET, contrast enhanced CT, and BLI and confirmed by DWBA. Registered image in orthotopic HCC t models showed a good correlation of images from both PET and CT. Contrast enhanced CT rom both PET and CT. Contrast enhanced CT image delineated margin of HCC. Multimodal imaging with 124I-FIAU PET, bioluminescence and contrast enhanced CT allows a precise and improved detection of tumor in orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model. Multimodal imaging is potentially useful for monitoring progression of hepatic metastasis and for the evaluation of cancer treatments

  16. Self-illuminating in vivo lymphatic imaging using a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer quantum dot nano-particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Bhattacharyya, Sukanta; Miller, Steven C; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2011-01-01

    Autofluorescence arising from normal tissues can compromise the sensitivity and specificity of in vivo fluorescence imaging by lowering the target-to-background signal ratio. Since bioluminescence resonance energy transfer quantum dot (BRET-QDot) nano-particles can self-illuminate in near-infrared in the presence of the substrate, coelenterazine, without irradiating excitation lights, imaging using BRET-QDots does not produce any autofluorescence. In this study, we applied this BRET-QDot nano-particle to the in vivo lymphatic imaging in mice in order to compare with BRET, fluorescence or bioluminescence lymphatic imaging. BRET-QDot655, in which QDot655 is contained as a core, was injected at different sites (e.g. chin, ear, forepaws and hind paws) in mice followed by the intravenous coelenterazine injection, and then bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging were serially performed. In all mice, each lymphatic basin was clearly visualized in the BRET imaging with minimal background signals. The BRET signal in the lymph nodes lasted at least 30 min after coelenterazine injections. Furthermore, the BRET signal demonstrated better quantification than the fluorescence signal emitting from QDot655, the core of this BRET particle. These advantages of BRET-QDot allowed us to perform real-time, quantitative lymphatic imaging without image processing. BRET-Qdots have the potential to be a robust nano-material platform for developing optical molecular imaging probes. PMID:21351373

  17. Let There Be Light! Bioluminescent Imaging to Study Bacterial Pathogenesis in Live Animals and Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Issmat I; Splitter, Gary A; Miller, Sally; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2014-11-14

    : Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of bacteria was primarily designed to permit real-time, sensitive, and noninvasive monitoring of the progression of infection in live animals. Generally, BLI relies on the construction of bacterial strains that possess the lux operon. The lux operon is composed of a set of genes that encode the luciferase enzyme and its cognate substrate, which interact to produce light-a phenomenon that is referred to as bioluminescence. Bioluminescence emitted by the bacteria can then be detected and imaged within a living host using sensitive charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras. In comparison to traditional host-pathogen studies, BLI offers the opportunity for extended monitoring of infected animals without resorting to euthanasia and extensive tissue processing at each time point. Therefore, BLI can reduce the number of animals required to generate meaningful data, while significantly contributing to the understanding of pathogenesis in the host and, subsequently, the development and evaluation of adequate vaccines and therapeutics. BLI is also useful in characterizing the interactions of pathogens with plants and the para-host environment. In this chapter, we demonstrate the broad application of BLI for studying bacterial pathogens in different niches. Furthermore, we will specifically focus on the use of BLI to characterize the following: (1) the pathogenesis of Brucella melitensis in mice (animal host), and (2) the progression of infection of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis in tomatoes (plant host). These studies will provide an overview of the wide potential of BLI and its role in enhancing the study of unique-and sometimes difficult-to-characterize-bacterial pathogens. PMID:25395174

  18. Use of a highly sensitive two-dimensional luminescence imaging system to monitor endogenous bioluminescence in plant leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flor-Henry Michel

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All living organisms emit spontaneous low-level bioluminescence, which can be increased in response to stress. Methods for imaging this ultra-weak luminescence have previously been limited by the sensitivity of the detection systems used. Results We developed a novel configuration of a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD for 2-dimensional imaging of light emission from biological material. In this study, we imaged photon emission from plant leaves. The equipment allowed short integration times for image acquisition, providing high resolution spatial and temporal information on bioluminescence. We were able to carry out time course imaging of both delayed chlorophyll fluorescence from whole leaves, and of low level wound-induced luminescence that we showed to be localised to sites of tissue damage. We found that wound-induced luminescence was chlorophyll-dependent and was enhanced at higher temperatures. Conclusions The data gathered on plant bioluminescence illustrate that the equipment described here represents an improvement in 2-dimensional luminescence imaging technology. Using this system, we identify chlorophyll as the origin of wound-induced luminescence from leaves.

  19. Bioluminescence imaging to monitor the prolongation of stem cell survival by pharmaceutical intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rapid donor cell death and rejection owing to humoral and cellular immune reactions are a basic limitation encountered in stem cell therapy for treatment of cardiovascular disease. We investigated the potential for longitudinal bioluminescence imaging to monitor the survival of transplanted stem cells prolonged by immunosuppressive agents. Embryonic rat H9c2 cardio myoblasts were transfected with adenovirus containing luciferase reporter gene (Ad-CMV-Fluc) in different MOI (1,10,100) and various cell doses (1x105 - 5x106)followed by injection in the thigh muscle of nude mice (n=6 per group), Other mice (n = 18) were undergone transient immunosuppression provided by either Cyclosporine (5mg/kg) or Tacrolimus (1mg/kg) or Dexamethasone (4mg/kg) beginning 3 days prior to and continuing to 2 weeks after transplantation. Optical bioluminescent imaging was then daily carried out using cooled CCD camera (Xenogen) Viral transfection at MOI 100 and the 5x106 cell dose implantation resulted in optimal transgene efficiency. Mice received immunosuppressive agents displayed long-term in vivo reporter gene expression for a time course of 14 days. Tacrolimus (Prograf) and Cyclosporine successfully suppressed the transplanted cell loss in animals, that obviously observed until day 8 as compared to Dexamethasone-treated and non-treated mice (day 1: 1.00E+08 (Prograf), 9.47E+07 (Cys), 5.25E+07 (Dex), and 1.25E+07 p/s/cm2/sr (control); day E+07 p/s/cm2/sr (control); day 8: 3.27E+05 (Prograf), 1.02E+05 (Cys), 6.17E+04 (Dex) and 2.73E+04 p/s/cm2/sr (control)) and continued expressing bioluminescence until day 13 ( 6.42E+05 (Prograf), 4.99E+05 (Cys), and 4.10E+04 p/s/cm2/sr. Induction of immune tolerance using pharmaceutical agents during cardio myoblast transplantation improved long-term donor cell survival in murine muscles. Optical imaging technique is capable of being used for tracking implanted stem cells in myocardium of living subjects over time

  20. Evaluation of biolistic gene transfer methods in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniell Henry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene therapy continues to hold great potential for treating many different types of disease and dysfunction. Safe and efficient techniques for gene transfer and expression in vivo are needed to enable gene therapeutic strategies to be effective in patients. Currently, the most commonly used methods employ replication-defective viral vectors for gene transfer, while physical gene transfer methods such as biolistic-mediated ("gene-gun" delivery to target tissues have not been as extensively explored. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of biolistic gene transfer techniques in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging (BLI methods. Results Plasmid DNA carrying the firefly luciferase (LUC reporter gene under the control of the human Cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter/enhancer was transfected into mouse skin and liver using biolistic methods. The plasmids were coupled to gold microspheres (1 ?m diameter using different DNA Loading Ratios (DLRs, and "shot" into target tissues using a helium-driven gene gun. The optimal DLR was found to be in the range of 4-10. Bioluminescence was measured using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS-50 at various time-points following transfer. Biolistic gene transfer to mouse skin produced peak reporter gene expression one day after transfer. Expression remained detectable through four days, but declined to undetectable levels by six days following gene transfer. Maximum depth of tissue penetration following biolistic transfer to abdominal skin was 200-300 ?m. Similarly, biolistic gene transfer to mouse liver in vivo also produced peak early expression followed by a decline over time. In contrast to skin, however, liver expression of the reporter gene was relatively stable 4-8 days post-biolistic gene transfer, and remained detectable for nearly two weeks. Conclusions The use of bioluminescence imaging techniques enabled efficient evaluation of reporter gene expression in vivo. Our results demonstrate that different tissues show different expression kinetics following gene transfer of the same reporter plasmid to different mouse tissues in vivo. We evaluated superficial (skin and abdominal organ (liver targets, and found that reporter gene expression peaked within the first two days post-transfer in each case, but declined most rapidly in the skin (3-4 days compared to liver (10-14 days. This information is essential for designing effective gene therapy strategies in different target tissues.

  1. Functional imaging of interleukin 1 beta expression in inflammatory process using bioluminescence imaging in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhihui

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin 1 beta (IL-1? plays an important role in a number of chronic and acute inflammatory diseases. To understand the role of IL-1? in disease processes and develop an in vivo screening system for anti-inflammatory drugs, a transgenic mouse line was generated which incorporated the transgene firefly luciferase gene driven by a 4.5-kb fragment of the human IL-1? gene promoter. Luciferase gene expression was monitored in live mice under anesthesia using bioluminescence imaging in a number of inflammatory disease models. Results In a LPS-induced sepsis model, dramatic increase in luciferase activity was observed in the mice. This transgene induction was time dependent and correlated with an increase of endogenous IL-1? mRNA and pro-IL-1? protein levels in the mice. In a zymosan-induced arthritis model and an oxazolone-induced skin hypersensitivity reaction model, luciferase expression was locally induced in the zymosan injected knee joint and in the ear with oxazolone application, respectively. Dexamethasone suppressed the expression of luciferase gene both in the acute sepsis model and in the acute arthritis model. Conclusion Our data suggest that the transgenic mice model could be used to study transcriptional regulation of the IL-1? gene expression in the inflammatory process and evaluation the effect of anti-inflammatory drug in vivo.

  2. Bioluminescence imaging of fungal biofilm development in live animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Velde, Greetje; Kucharíková, So?a; Van Dijck, Patrick; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Fungal biofilms formed on various types of medical implants represent a major problem for hospitalized patients. These biofilms and related infections are usually difficult to treat because of their resistance to the classical antifungal drugs. Animal models are indispensable for investigating host-pathogen interactions and for identifying new antifungal targets related to biofilm development. A limited number of animal models is available that can be used for testing novel antifungal drugs in vivo against C. albicans, one of the most common pathogens causing fungal biofilms. Fungal load in biofilms in these models is traditionally analyzed postmortem, requiring host sacrifice and enumeration of microorganisms from individual biofilms in order to evaluate the amount of colony forming units and the efficacy of antifungal treatment. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) made compatible with small animal models for in vivo biofilm formation is a valuable noninvasive tool to follow-up biofilm development and its treatment longitudinally, reducing the number of animals needed for such studies. Due to the nondestructive and noninvasive nature of BLI, the imaging procedure can be repeated in the same animal, allowing follow-up of the biofilm growth in vivo without removing the implanted device or detaching the biofilm from its substrate. The method described here introduces BLI of C. albicans biofilm formation in vivo on subcutaneously implanted catheters in mice. One of the main challenges to overcome for BLI of fungi is the hampered intracellular substrate delivery through the fungal cell wall, which is managed by using extracellularly located Gaussia luciferase. Although detecting a quantifiable in vivo BLI signal from biofilms formed on the inside of implanted catheters is challenging, BLI proved to be a practical tool in the study of fungal biofilms. This method describing the use of BLI for in vivo follow-up of device-related fungal biofilm formation has the potential for efficient in vivo screening for interesting genes of the pathogen and the host involved in C. albicans biofilm formation as well as for testing novel antifungal therapies. PMID:24166376

  3. Development of Optical Molecular Imaging System for the Acquisition of Bioluminescence Signals from Small Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical imaging is providing great advance and improvement in genetic and molecular imaging of animals and humans. Optical imaging system consists of optical imaging devices, which carry out major function for monitoring, tracing, and imaging in most of molecular in-vivo researches. In bio-luminescent imaging, small animals containing luciferase gene locally irradiate light, and emitted photons transmitted through skin of the small animals are imaged by using a high sensitive charged coupled device (CCD) camera. In this paper, we introduced optical imaging system for the image acquisition of bio-luminescent signals emitted from small animals. In the system, Nikon lens and four LED light sources were mounted at the inside of a dark box. A cooled CCD camera equipped with a control module was used. We tested the performance of the optical imaging system using effendorf tube and light emitting bacteria which injected intravenously into CT26 tumor bearing nude mouse. The performance of implemented optical imaging system for bio-luminescence imaging was demonstrated and the feasibility of the system in small animal imaging application was proved. We anticipate this system could be a useful tool for the molecular imaging of small animals adaptable for various experimental conditions in future

  4. Development of Optical Molecular Imaging System for the Acquisition of Bioluminescence Signals from Small Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byeong Il; Kim, Hyeon Sik; Jeong, Hye Jin; Lee, Hyung Jae; Moon, Seung Min; Kwon, Seung Young; Jeong, Shin Young; Bom, Hee Seung; Min, Jung Joon [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eun Seo [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    Optical imaging is providing great advance and improvement in genetic and molecular imaging of animals and humans. Optical imaging system consists of optical imaging devices, which carry out major function for monitoring, tracing, and imaging in most of molecular in-vivo researches. In bio-luminescent imaging, small animals containing luciferase gene locally irradiate light, and emitted photons transmitted through skin of the small animals are imaged by using a high sensitive charged coupled device (CCD) camera. In this paper, we introduced optical imaging system for the image acquisition of bio-luminescent signals emitted from small animals. In the system, Nikon lens and four LED light sources were mounted at the inside of a dark box. A cooled CCD camera equipped with a control module was used. We tested the performance of the optical imaging system using effendorf tube and light emitting bacteria which injected intravenously into CT26 tumor bearing nude mouse. The performance of implemented optical imaging system for bio-luminescence imaging was demonstrated and the feasibility of the system in small animal imaging application was proved. We anticipate this system could be a useful tool for the molecular imaging of small animals adaptable for various experimental conditions in future

  5. Bioluminescence imaging of chondrocytes in rabbits by intraarticular injection of D-luciferin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luciferase is one of the most commonly used reporter enzymes in the field of in vivo optical imaging. D-luciferin, the substrate for firefly luciferase has very high cost that allows this kind of experiment limited to small animals such as mice and rats. In this current study, we validated local injection of D-luciferin in the articular capsule for bioluminescence imaging in rabbits. Chondrocytes were cultured and infected by replication-defective adenoviral vector encoding firefly luciferase (Fluc). Chondrocytes expressing Fluc were injected or implanted in the left knee joint. The rabbits underwent optical imaging studies after local injection of D-luciferin at 1, 5, 7, 9 days after cellular administration. We sought whether optimal imaging signals was could be by a cooled CCD camera after local injection of D-luciferin. Imaging signal was not observed from the left knee joint after intraperitoneal injection of D-luciferin (15 mg/kg), whereas it was observed after intraarticular injection. Photon intensity from the left knee joint of rabbits was compared between cell injected and implanted groups after intraarticular injection of D-luciferin. During the period of imaging studies, photon intensity of the cell implanted group was 5-10 times higher than that of the cell injected group. We successfully imaged chondrocytes expressing Fluc after intraarticular injection of D-luciferin. This technique may be further applied to develop new drugs for knee joint diseaselop new drugs for knee joint disease

  6. Novel registration for microcomputed tomography and bioluminescence imaging based on iterated optimal projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xibo; Deng, Kexin; Xue, Zhenwen; Liu, Xueyan; Zhu, Shouping; Qin, Chenghu; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2013-02-01

    As a high-sensitivity imaging modality, bioluminescence tomography can reconstruct the three-dimensional (3-D) location of an internal luminescent source based on the 3-D surface light distribution. However, we can only get the multi-orientation two-dimensional (2-D) bioluminescence distribution in the experiments. Therefore, developing an accurate universal registration method is essential for following bioluminescent source reconstruction. We can then map the multi-orientation 2-D bioluminescence distribution to the 3-D surface derived from anatomical information with it. We propose a 2-D -to-3-D registration method based on iterated optimal projection and applied it in a registration and reconstruction study of three transgenic mice. Compared with traditional registration methods based on the fixed points, our method was independent of the markers and the registration accuracy of the three experiments was improved by 0.3, 0.5, and 0.4 pixels, respectively. In addition, based on the above two registration results using the two registration methods, we reconstructed the 3-D location of the inner bioluminescent source in the three transgenic mice. The reconstruction results showed that the average error distance between the center of the reconstructed element and the center of the real element were reduced by 0.32, 0.48, and 0.39 mm, respectively.

  7. Uptake kinetics and biodistribution of 14C-d-luciferin - a radiolabeled substrate for the firefly luciferase catalyzed bioluminescence reaction: impact on bioluminescence based reporter gene imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firefly luciferase catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of d-luciferin to oxyluciferin in the presence of cofactors, producing bioluminescence. This reaction is used in optical bioluminescence-based molecular imaging approaches to detect the expression of the firefly luciferase reporter gene. Biokinetics and distribution of the substrate most likely have a significant impact on levels of light signal and therefore need to be investigated. Benzene ring 14C(U)-labeled d-luciferin was utilized. Cell uptake and efflux assays, murine biodistribution, autoradiography and CCD-camera based optical bioluminescence imaging were carried out to examine the in vitro and in vivo characteristics of the tracer in cell culture and in living mice respectively. Radiolabeled and unlabeled d-luciferin revealed comparable levels of light emission when incubated with equivalent amounts of the firefly luciferase enzyme. Cell uptake assays in pCMV-luciferase-transfected cells showed slow trapping of the tracer and relatively low uptake values (up to 22.9-fold higher in firefly luciferase gene-transfected vs. nontransfected cells, p=0.0002). Biodistribution studies in living mice after tail-vein injection of 14C-d-luciferin demonstrated inhomogeneous tracer distribution with early predominant high radioactivity levels in kidneys (10.6% injected dose [ID]/g) and liver (11.9% ID/g), followed at later time points by the bladder (up to 81.3% ID/g) and small intestine (6.5%p to 81.3% ID/g) and small intestine (6.5% ID/g), reflecting the elimination routes of the tracer. Kinetics and uptake levels profoundly differed when using alternate injection routes (intravenous versus intraperitoneal). No clear trapping of 14C-d-luciferin in firefly luciferase-expressing tissues could be observed in vivo. The data obtained with 14C-d-luciferin provide insights into the dynamics of d-luciferin cell uptake, intracellular accumulation, and efflux. Results of the biodistribution and autoradiographic studies should be useful for optimizing and adapting optical imaging protocols to specific experimental settings when utilizing the firefly luciferase and d-luciferin system. (orig.)

  8. Bioluminescence in vivo imaging of autoimmune encephalomyelitis predicts disease

    OpenAIRE

    Steinman Lawrence; Ho Peggy; Luo Jian; Wyss-Coray Tony

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a widely used animal model to understand not only multiple sclerosis but also basic principles of immunity. The disease is scored typically by observing signs of paralysis, which do not always correspond with pathological changes. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in transgenic mice expressing an injury responsive luciferase reporter in astrocytes (GFAP-luc). Bioluminescence in the brain and spinal co...

  9. Rapid and Quantitative Assessment of Cancer Treatment Response Using In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Current assessment of orthotopic tumor models in animals utilizes survival as the primary therapeutic end point. In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating antineoplastic therapies [1 ]. Using human tumor cell lines constitutively expressing luciferase, the kinetics of tumor growth and response to therapy have been assessed in intraperitoneal [2], subcutaneous, and intravascular [3] cancer models. However, use of this approach for evaluating orthotopic tumor models has not been demonstrated. In this report, the ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth and therapeuticinduced cell kill of orthotopic rat brain tumors derived from 9L gliosarcoma cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase (9LLuc was investigated. Intracerebral tumor burden was monitored over time by quantitation of photon emission and tumor volume using a cryogenically cooled CCD camera and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, respectively. There was excellent correlation (r=0.91 between detected photons and tumor volume. A quantitative comparison of tumor cell kill determined from serial MRI volume measurements and BLI photon counts following 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU treatment revealed that both imaging modalities yielded statistically similar cell kill values (P=.951. These results provide direct validation of BLI imaging as a powerful and quantitative tool for the assessment of antineoplastic therapies in living animals.

  10. Non-invasive visualisation of the development of peritoneal carcinomatosis and tumour regression after 213Bi-radioimmunotherapy using bioluminescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-invasive imaging of tumour development remains a challenge, especially for tumours in the intraperitoneal cavity. Therefore, the aim of this study was the visualisation of both the development of peritoneal carcinomatosis and tumour regression after radioimmunotherapy with tumour-specific 213Bi-Immunoconjugates, via in vivo bioluminescence imaging of firefly luciferase-transfected cells. Human diffuse-type gastric cancer cells expressing mutant d9-E-cadherin were stably transfected with firefly luciferase (HSC45-M2-luc). For bioluminescence imaging, nude mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with 1 x 107 HSC45-M2-luc cells. On days 4 and 8 after tumour cell inoculation, imaging was performed following D-luciferin injection using a cooled CCD camera with an image intensifier unit. For therapy, mice were injected with 2.7 MBq 213Bi-d9MAb targeting d9-E-cadherin on day 8 after tumour cell inoculation. Bioluminescence images were taken every 4 days to monitor tumour development. After i.p. inoculation of HSC45-M2-luc cells into nude mice, development as well as localisation of peritoneal carcinomatosis could be visualised using bioluminescence imaging. Following 213Bi-d9MAb therapy on day 8 after intraperitoneal inoculation of HSC45-M2-luc cells, small tumour nodules were totally eliminated and larger nodules showed a clear reduction in size on day 12 after tumour cell inoculation. Subsequently a recurrence of tumour mass wSubsequently a recurrence of tumour mass was observed, starting from the remaining tumour spots. By measuring the mean grey level intensity, tumour development over time could be demonstrated. Non-invasive bioluminescence imaging permits visualisation of the development of peritoneal carcinomatosis, localisation of tumour in the intraperitoneal cavity and evaluation of therapeutic success after 213Bi-d9MAb treatment. (orig.)

  11. Bioluminescent imaging: a critical tool in pre-clinical oncology research.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Karen

    2010-02-01

    Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) is a non-invasive imaging modality widely used in the field of pre-clinical oncology research. Imaging of small animal tumour models using BLI involves the generation of light by luciferase-expressing cells in the animal following administration of substrate. This light may be imaged using an external detector. The technique allows a variety of tumour-associated properties to be visualized dynamically in living models. The increasing use of BLI as a small-animal imaging modality has led to advances in the development of xenogeneic, orthotopic, and genetically engineered animal models expressing luciferase genes. This review aims to provide insight into the principles of BLI and its applications in cancer research. Many studies to assess tumour growth and development, as well as efficacy of candidate therapeutics, have been performed using BLI. More recently, advances have also been made using bioluminescent imaging in studies of protein-protein interactions, genetic screening, cell-cycle regulators, and spontaneous cancer development. Such novel studies highlight the versatility and potential of bioluminescent imaging in future oncological research.

  12. Bioluminescence imaging in a medium-sized animal by local injection of d-luciferin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luciferase is one of the most commonly used reporter enzymes in the field of molecular imaging. D-luciferin is known as the substrate for luciferase enzyme and its cost is very expensive. Therefore, the bioluminescence molecular imaging study has been allowed in small animals such as mice and rats. In this current study, we validated local injection of D-luciferin in articular capsule for bioluminescence imaging in rabbits. Chondrocytes were cultured and infected by replication-defective adenoviral vector encoding firefly luciferase. And then was performed different method of chondrocyte cell injection and transplantation into the knee of rabbits. The rabbits underwent imaging by cooled CCD camera after local injection of D-luciferin (3mg) into experimental knee joint as well as contralateral normal knee joint on days 1, 5, 7, 9. We sought whether optimal imaging signal was acquired by using cooled CCD camera after local injection of D-luciferin. We successfully visualized injected or transplanted cells in knee joint by local injection of D-luciferin. Total photon flux (7.86E+08 p/s/cm2/sr) from the knee joint transplanted with cells approximately increased 10-fold more than (9.43E+07p/s/cm2/sr) that from injected knee joints until 7 day. Imaging signal was observed in transplanted joints until day 9 after surgery while signal from injected knee was observed by day 7 after injection. We successfully carried out bioluminescence imaging study with ed out bioluminescence imaging study with medium sized animal by local injection of small amount of D-luciferin. Survival of chondrocytes were prolonged when surgically transplanted in joints than when directly injected in joint space

  13. Construction of a bioluminescence reporter plasmid for Francisella tularensis

    OpenAIRE

    Bina, Xiaowen R.; Miller, Mark A.; Bina, James E.

    2010-01-01

    A Francisella tularensis shuttle vector that constitutively expresses the Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon in type A and type B strains of F. tularensis was constructed. The bioluminescence reporter plasmid was introduced into the live vaccine strain of F. tularensis and used to follow F. tularensis growth in a murine intranasal challenge model in real time by bioluminescence imaging. The results show that the new bioluminescence reporter plasmid represents a useful tool for tularemia rese...

  14. Bioluminescence imaging of leukemia cell lines in vitro and in mouse xenografts: effects of monoclonal and polyclonal cell populations on intensity and kinetics of photon emission

    OpenAIRE

    Christoph Sandra; Schlegel Jennifer; Alvarez-Calderon Francesca; Kim Yong-Mi; Brandao Luis N; DeRyckere Deborah; Graham Douglas K

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background We investigated the utility of bioluminescence imaging (BLI) using firefly luciferase in monoclonal and polyclonal populations of leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods Monoclonal and polyclonal human lymphoid and myeloid leukemia cell lines transduced with firefly luciferase were used for BLI. Results Kinetics and dynamics of bioluminescence signal were cell line dependent. Luciferase expression decreased significantly over time in polyclonal leukemia cells in vitro...

  15. Real time detection of live microbes using a highly sensitive bioluminescent nitroreductase probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Roger H F; Kwong, Thomas; Yau, Kwok-Hei; Au-Yeung, Ho Yu

    2015-03-14

    A highly sensitive and selective nitroreductase probe, showing a rapid and strong bioluminescence enhancement (>100-fold in 5 minutes), and its initial application in the real time detection of both Gram positive and Gram negative live bacteria and monitoring of their growth has been reported. PMID:25680085

  16. Self-calibrated algorithms for diffuse optical tomography and bioluminescence tomography using relative transmission images

    OpenAIRE

    Naser, Mohamed A.; Patterson, Michael S.; Wong, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction algorithms for diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and bioluminescence tomography (BLT) have been developed based on diffusion theory. The algorithms numerically solve the diffusion equation using the finite element method. The direct measurements of the uncalibrated light fluence rates by a camera are used for the reconstructions. The DOT is self-calibrated by using all possible pairs of transmission images obtained with external sources along with the relative val...

  17. Quantitative Bioluminescent Imaging of Pre-Erythrocytic Malaria Parasite Infection Using Luciferase-Expressing Plasmodium yoelii

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Jessica L.; Murray, Sara; Vaughan, Ashley M.; Harupa, Anke; Sack, Brandon; Baldwin, Michael; Crispe, Ian N.; Kappe, Stefan H. I.

    2013-01-01

    The liver stages of Plasmodium parasites are important targets for the development of anti-malarial vaccine candidates and chemoprophylaxis approaches that aim to prevent clinical infection. Analyzing the impact of interventions on liver stages in the murine malaria model system Plasmodium yoelii has been cumbersome and requires terminal procedures. In vivo imaging of bioluminescent parasites has previously been shown to be an effective and non-invasive alternative to monitoring liver stage b...

  18. Bioluminescence imaging of leukemia cell lines in vitro and in mouse xenografts: effects of monoclonal and polyclonal cell populations on intensity and kinetics of photon emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the utility of bioluminescence imaging (BLI using firefly luciferase in monoclonal and polyclonal populations of leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods Monoclonal and polyclonal human lymphoid and myeloid leukemia cell lines transduced with firefly luciferase were used for BLI. Results Kinetics and dynamics of bioluminescence signal were cell line dependent. Luciferase expression decreased significantly over time in polyclonal leukemia cells in vitro. Transplantation of polyclonal luciferase-tagged cells in mice resulted in inconsistent signal intensity. After selection of monoclonal cell populations, luciferase activity was stable, equal kinetic and dynamic of bioluminescence intensity and strong correlation between cell number and light emission in vitro were observed. We obtained an equal development of leukemia burden detected by luciferase activity in NOD-scid-gamma mice after transplantation of monoclonal populations. Conclusion The use of monoclonal leukemia cells selected for stable and equal luciferase activity is recommended for experiments in vitro and xenograft mouse models. The findings are highly significant for bioluminescence imaging focused on pre-clinical drug development.

  19. Optimizing reporter constructs for in vivo bioluminescence imaging of interferon-? stimulated mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Galarza, Jorge; Carlotti, Françoise; Rabelink, Martijn J; Cramer, Steve; Hoeben, Rob C; Fibbe, Willem E; van Pel, Melissa

    2014-09-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a promising treatment modality for a variety of diseases. Strategies to investigate the fate of MSCs in vivo are important to unravel their therapeutic mechanisms. However, currently available techniques are hampered by their low sensitivity. We therefore aimed to optimize in vivo bioluminescence imaging of MSCs. We compared MSCs transduced with firefly luciferase (Fluc) and transmembrane-bound Gaussia luciferase driven by the human cytomegalovirus, spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV), and elongation factor 1-? (EF1?) promoters. Although cytomegalovirus-transmembrane-bound Gaussia luciferase-transduced MSCs showed the highest light intensity in vitro, the signal was almost undetectable in vivo. Spleen focus-forming virus-Fluc-transduced MSCs revealed a bright signal in vivo, but transgene expression was silenced upon in vitro stimulation with interferon (IFN)-?. Therefore, the SFFV promoter was replaced by the EF1? promoter. Light emission of Fluc under the control of EF1? was similar to SFFV-Fluc. Although EF1?-Fluc light emission was decreased tenfold in the presence of IFN-? when compared with unstimulated MSCs, the bioluminescent signal could still be detected and was clearly distinguishable from untransduced MSCs. Furthermore, stimulation of MSCs with tumor necrosis factor-? hardly affected transgene expression in EF1?-Fluc-transduced MSCs. Thus, the use of the EF1? promoter partially overcomes silencing and allows in vivo bioluminescence imaging of IFN-?-stimulated MSCs. PMID:24746876

  20. Investigating real-time activation of adenosine receptors by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Zheng, Liqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2013-02-01

    Adenosine receptors play important roles in many physiological and pathological processes, for example regulating myocardial oxygen consumption and the release of neurotransmitters. The activations of adenosine receptors have been studied by some kinds of techniques, such as western blot, immunohistochemistry, etc. However, these techniques cannot reveal the dynamical response of adenosine receptors under stimulation. In this paper, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique was introduced to study the real-time activation of adenosine receptors by monitoring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level. The results showed that there were significant differences between adenosine receptors on real-time responses under stimulation. Moreover, the dynamics of cAMP level demonstrated that competition between adenosine receptors existed. Taken together, our study indicates that monitoring the dynamics of cAMP level using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique could be one potential approach to investigate the mechanism of competitions between adenosine receptors.

  1. Tomographic bioluminescence imaging by use of a combined optical-PET (OPET) system: a computer simulation feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility and limits in performing tomographic bioluminescence imaging with a combined optical-PET (OPET) system were explored by simulating its image formation process. A micro-MRI based virtual mouse phantom was assigned appropriate tissue optical properties to each of its segmented internal organs at wavelengths spanning the emission spectrum of the firefly luciferase at 37 deg. C. The TOAST finite-element code was employed to simulate the diffuse transport of photons emitted from bioluminescence sources in the mouse. OPET measurements were simulated for single-point, two-point and distributed bioluminescence sources located in different organs such as the liver, the kidneys and the gut. An expectation maximization code was employed to recover the intensity and location of these simulated sources. It was found that spectrally resolved measurements were necessary in order to perform tomographic bioluminescence imaging. The true location of emission sources could be recovered if the mouse background optical properties were known a priori. The assumption of a homogeneous optical property background proved inadequate for describing photon transport in optically heterogeneous tissues and led to inaccurate source localization in the reconstructed images. The simulation results pointed out specific methodological challenges that need to be addressed before a practical implementation of OPET-based bioluminescence tomography is achieveds achieved

  2. Quantification of bioluminescence images of point source objects using diffusion theory models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple approach for estimating the location and power of a bioluminescent point source inside tissue is reported. The strategy consists of using a diffuse reflectance image at the emission wavelength to determine the optical properties of the tissue. Following this, bioluminescence images are modelled using a single point source and the optical properties from the reflectance image, and the depth and power are iteratively adjusted to find the best agreement with the experimental image. The forward models for light propagation are based on the diffusion approximation, with appropriate boundary conditions. The method was tested using Monte Carlo simulations, Intralipid tissue-simulating phantoms and ex vivo chicken muscle. Monte Carlo data showed that depth could be recovered within 6% for depth 4-12 mm, and the corresponding relative source power within 12%. In Intralipid, the depth could be estimated within 8% for depth 4-12 mm, and the relative source power, within 20%. For ex vivo tissue samples, source depths of 4.5 and 10 mm and their relative powers were correctly identified

  3. Real-time monitoring of Escherichia coli O157:H7 adherence to beef carcass surface tissues with a bioluminescent reporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siragusa, G R; Nawotka, K; Spilman, S D; Contag, P R; Contag, C H

    1999-04-01

    A method for studying bacteria that are attached to carcass surfaces would eliminate the need for exogenous sampling and would facilitate understanding the interaction of potential human food-borne pathogens with food animal tissue surfaces. We describe such a method in which we used a bioluminescent reporter strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7 that was constructed by transformation with plasmid pCGLS1, an expression vector that contains a complete bacterial luciferase (lux) operon. Beef carcass surface tissues were inoculated with the bioluminescent strain, and adherent bacteria were visualized in real time by using a sensitive photon-counting camera to obtain in situ images. The reporter strain was found to luminesce from the tissue surfaces whether it was inoculated as a suspension in buffer or as a suspension in a bovine fecal slurry. With this method, areas of tissues inoculated with the reporter strain could be studied without obtaining, excising, homogenizing, and culturing multiple samples from the tissue surface. Use of the complete lux operon as the bioluminescent reporter eliminated the need to add exogenous substrate. This allowed detection and quantitation of bacterial inocula and rapid evaluation of adherence of a potential human pathogen to tissue surfaces. Following simple water rinses of inoculated carcass tissues, the attachment duration varied with different carcass surface types. On average, the percent retention of bioluminescent signal from the reporter strain was higher on lean fascia-covered tissue (54%) than on adipose fascia-covered tissue (18%) following water washing of the tissues. Bioluminescence and culture-derived viable bacterial counts were highly correlated (r2 = 0.98). Real-time assessment of microbial attachment to this complex menstruum should facilitate evaluation of carcass decontamination procedures and mechanistic studies of microbial contamination of beef carcass tissues. PMID:10103275

  4. In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging (BLI: Noninvasive Visualization and Interrogation of Biological Processes in Living Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Ripp

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI is increasingly being utilized as a method for modern biological research. This process, which involves the noninvasive interrogation of living animals using light emitted from luciferase-expressing bioreporter cells, has been applied to study a wide range of biomolecular functions such as gene function, drug discovery and development, cellular trafficking, protein-protein interactions, and especially tumorigenesis, cancer treatment, and disease progression. This article will review the various bioreporter/biosensor integrations of BLI and discuss how BLI is being applied towards a new visual understanding of biological processes within the living organism.

  5. Bioluminescence imaging of cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cell transplanatation into myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional method of analyzing myocardial cell transplanation relies on postmortem histology. We sought to demonstrate the feasibility of longitudinal monitoring transplanted cell survival in living animals using optical imaging techniques. Umblical cord blood was collected upon delivery with informed consent. Umblical mononuclear cells were obtained by negative immuno-depletion of CD3, CD14, CD19, CD38, CD66b, and glycophorin- A positive cells, followed by Ficoll- Paque density gradient centrifugation, and plated in non-coated tissue culture flasks in expansion medium. Cells were allowed to adhere overnight, thereafter non-adherent cells were washed out with medium changes. After getting the MSCs, they were transfected [multiplicity of infection (MOl) = 40) with Ad-CMV-Fluc overnight. Rats (n=4) underwent intramyocardial injection of 5 x 105 MSCs expressing firefly luciferase (Fluc) reporter gene. Optical bioluminescence imaging was performed using the charged-coupled device camera (Xenogen) from the 1st day of transplantion. Cardiac bioluminescence signals were present from 2nd day of transplantation. Cardiac signals were clearly present at day 2 (9.2x103p/s/cm2/sr). The signal reduced from day 3. The locations, magnitude, and survival duration of cord blood derived MSCs were monitored noninvasively. With further development, molecular imaging studies should add critical insights into cardiac cell transplantationardiac cell transplantation

  6. Remote detection of human toxicants in real time using a human-optimized, bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette bioreporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan; Webb, James; Ripp, Steven; Patterson, Stacey; Sayler, Gary

    2012-06-01

    Traditionally, human toxicant bioavailability screening has been forced to proceed in either a high throughput fashion using prokaryotic or lower eukaryotic targets with minimal applicability to humans, or in a more expensive, lower throughput manner that uses fluorescent or bioluminescent human cells to directly provide human bioavailability data. While these efforts are often sufficient for basic scientific research, they prevent the rapid and remote identification of potentially toxic chemicals required for modern biosecurity applications. To merge the advantages of high throughput, low cost screening regimens with the direct bioavailability assessment of human cell line use, we re-engineered the bioluminescent bacterial luciferase gene cassette to function autonomously (without exogenous stimulation) within human cells. Optimized cassette expression provides for fully endogenous bioluminescent production, allowing continuous, real time monitoring of the bioavailability and toxicology of various compounds in an automated fashion. To access the functionality of this system, two sets of bioluminescent human cells were developed. The first was programed to suspend bioluminescent production upon toxicological challenge to mimic the non-specific detection of a toxicant. The second induced bioluminescence upon detection of a specific compound to demonstrate autonomous remote target identification. These cells were capable of responding to ?M concentrations of the toxicant n-decanal, and allowed for continuous monitoring of cellular health throughout the treatment process. Induced bioluminescence was generated through treatment with doxycycline and was detectable upon dosage at a 100 ng/ml concentration. These results demonstrate that leveraging autonomous bioluminescence allows for low-cost, high throughput direct assessment of toxicant bioavailability.

  7. Relation between deep bioluminescence and oceanographic variables: A statistical analysis using time-frequency decompositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, S.; Nerini, D.; Tamburini, C.

    2014-09-01

    We consider the statistical analysis of a 1.7-year high-frequency sampled time series, between 2009 and 2010, recorded at the ANTARES observatory in the deep NW Mediterranean Sea (2475 m depth). The objective was to estimate relationships between bioluminescence and environmental time series (temperature, salinity and current speed). As this entire dataset is characterized by non-linearity and non-stationarity, two time-frequency decomposition methods (wavelet and Hilbert-Huang) were used. These mathematical methods are dedicated to the analysis of a signal at various time and frequencies scales. This work propose some statistical tools dedicated to the study of relationships between two time series. Our study highlights three events of high bioluminescence activity in March 2009, December 2009 and March 2010. We demonstrate that the two events occurring in March 2009 and 2010 are correlated to the arrival of newly formed deep water masses at frequencies of approximately 4.8×10-7 (period of 24.1 days). In contrast, the event in December 2009 is only correlated with current speed at frequencies of approximately 1.9×10-6 (period of 6.0 days). The use of both wavelet and Hilbert-Huang transformations has proven to be successful for the analysis of multivariate time series. These methods are well-suited in a context of the increasing number of long time series recorded in oceanography.

  8. The Bioluminescence Web Page

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioluminescence is "simply light produced by a chemical reaction which originates in an organism." This Web sitefrom the University of California at Santa Barbara intends to provide a reliable source of information on this somewhat obscure subject. The site contains a lot of basic information about the chemistry of bioluminescence and specific bioluminescent organisms, along with some fabulous images. More specific information can be obtained through research abstracts and citations posted in the Research Forum and recently added workshop section. This is an attractive site that will appeal to a wide variety of audiences.

  9. A fast full-body fluorescence/bioluminescence imaging system for small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Hyun Keol; Jia, Jingfei; Fong, Christopher; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2013-03-01

    Whole body in vivo optical imaging of small animals has widened its applications and increased the capabilities for preclinical researches. However, most commercial and prototype optical imaging systems are camera-based systems using epi- or trans- illumination mode, with limited views of small animals. And for more accurate tomographic image reconstruction, additional data and information of a target animal is necessary. To overcome these issues, researchers have suggested several approaches such as maximizing the detection area or using the information of other highresolution modalities such as CT, MRI or Ultrasound, or using multi-spectral signals. As one of ways to maximizing the detection area of a target animal, we present a new fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging system for small animals, which can image entire surface of a target animal simultaneously. This system uses double mirror reflection scheme and it consists of input unit, imaging unit with two conical mirrors, the source illumination part and the surface scanner, and the detection unit with an intensified CCD camera system. Two conical mirrors are configured that a larger size mirror captures a target animal surface, and a smaller size mirror projects this captured image onto a CCD camera with one acquisition. With this scheme, we could capture entire surface of a target animal simultaneously and improve back reflection issue between a mirror and an animal surface of a single conical mirror scheme. Additionally, we could increase accessibility to an animal for multi-modality integration by providing unobstructed space around a target animal.

  10. Establishing an in vivo p48ZnF bioluminescence mouse brain imaging model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heese, Klaus

    2013-05-10

    p48ZnF is a C3H1 zinc finger domain-containing protein that is involved in the control of gene transcription and translation. In the present study a novel transgenic p48ZnF mouse model is described that is useful for in vivo brain imaging using luciferase as bioluminescence-mediating reporter gene. Yeast two-hybrid screening and western blot analyses revealed Drg1 (developmentally regulated GTP binding protein 1) and Pcbp1 (poly (rC)-binding protein 1) as p48ZnF-associated proteins. Interestingly, p48ZnF' cellular location of action depends on the cell's differentiation status: nuclear in proliferating cells and cytoplasmic in differentiated neurons. PMID:23470633

  11. Self-illuminating in vivo lymphatic imaging using a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer quantum dot nano-particle

    OpenAIRE

    Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Bhattacharyya, Sukanta; Miller, Steven C.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2010-01-01

    Autofluorescence arising from normal tissues can compromise the sensitivity and specificity of in vivo fluorescence imaging by lowering the target-to-background signal ratio. Since bioluminescence resonance energy transfer quantum dot (BRET-QDot) nano-particles can self-illuminate in near-infrared in the presence of the substrate, coelenterazine, without irradiating excitation lights, imaging using BRET-QDots does not produce any autofluorescence. In this study, we applied this BRET-QDot nano...

  12. Assessing the effect of EPO on tumor oxygenation and radioresponsiveness via in vivo bioluminescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluating tumor kill by volume measurement lacks sensitivity while in vivo-in vitro and histological assays are unsuitable for serial measurements. In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BI) nondestructively measures the number of metabolically active cells containing luciferase (LUC) over time. In this paper, the effect of erythropoietin (EPO) on tumor oxygenation and radioresponsivenessis is studied using BI and conventional methods. Murine adenocarcinoma cells, transfected with the LUC gene, were placed in the flank of BALB/C mice. EPO 1 u/g or saline was injected sc tiw for two weeks, starting the day of transplant. Mice then underwent irradiation (XRT) or pO2 measurement with an optical probe. In BI, mice were injected with luciferin and total photon flux (TPF) measured with a CCD camera. In vitro, cells were plated, irradiated and incubated at 37 deg C. Initial hematocrit was 47% (n=119) vs. 61% in EPO-treated mice (n=23, p2 (6.4 vs. 4.7 mm Hg, p=0.04) than controls. For 1-3x7 Gy, TPF was stable for 2 days after the start of XRT, then fell precipitously. Two weeks post XRT, TPF was 10-5 the initial value and a nidus of LUC activity persisted for months in most tumors. Tumor volume decreased only 1-2 orders of magnitude. For 3x7 Gy, tumor regrew in 1/11 EPO-TM and controls (p=NS.) For 1x7 Gy, tumors regrew in 4/6 EPO-TM and 2/4 controls (p=NS). TPF did not increase with tumor re(p=NS). TPF did not increase with tumor regrowth. Recurrent tumors exhibited lower median pO2 (2.1 mm Hg, p=.003) and higher hypoxic fraction than controls. A clonogenic assay yielded D10 = 3.7 Gy with all colonies expressing LUC. The TPF of 0-Gy treated wells rose significantly over incubation, while that of wells treated to 10 Gy was unchanged. Though EPO improved tumor oxygenation, no effect on XRT-mediated cell kill was seen. BI measured tumor killing in vivo over a broad dynamic range. The results suggest that cell killing in vivo is a multistep process, amplified by humoral factors

  13. Effect of source decay in bioluminescence tomography: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Han; Unlu, Mehmet B.; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2009-07-01

    Recent studies in bioluminescence tomography have been mainly focusing on the ill-posedness and non-uniqueness nature of the problem. In this paper, we demonstrate the significance of the effect of bioluminescence source decay on the reconstruction results with both simulations and phantom studies. Time variation of the bioluminescence source can cause artifacts in the tomographic images. The results show that source dynamic information is pivotal for accurate reconstruction when the decay half-life is comparable to the duration of the data acquisition.

  14. Functional imaging of interleukin 1 beta expression in inflammatory process using bioluminescence imaging in transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Zhihui; Sun Ruilin; Fei Zhaoliang; Ren Jianke; Li Limei; Sheng Zhejin; Wang Long; Sun Xia; Yu Jun; Wang Zhugang; Fei Jian

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Interleukin 1 beta (IL-1?) plays an important role in a number of chronic and acute inflammatory diseases. To understand the role of IL-1? in disease processes and develop an in vivo screening system for anti-inflammatory drugs, a transgenic mouse line was generated which incorporated the transgene firefly luciferase gene driven by a 4.5-kb fragment of the human IL-1? gene promoter. Luciferase gene expression was monitored in live mice under anesthesia using bioluminesc...

  15. Development of bioluminescent Salmonella strains for use in food safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey R Hartford

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella can reside in healthy animals without the manifestation of any adverse effects on the carrier. If raw products of animal origin are not handled properly during processing or cooked to a proper temperature during preparation, salmonellosis can occur. In this research, we developed bioluminescent Salmonella strains that can be used for real-time monitoring of the pathogen's growth on food products. To accomplish this, twelve Salmonella strains from the broiler production continuum were transformed with the broad host range plasmid pAKlux1, and a chicken skin attachment model was developed. Results Salmonella strains carrying pAKlux1 constitutively expressed the luxCDABE operon and were therefore detectable using bioluminescence. Strains were characterized in terms of bioluminescence properties and plasmid stability. To assess the usefulness of bioluminescent Salmonella strains in food safety studies, we developed an attachment model using chicken skin. The effect of washing on attachment of Salmonella strains to chicken skin was tested using bioluminescent strains, which revealed the attachment properties of each strain. Conclusion This study demonstrated that bioluminescence is a sensitive and effective tool to detect Salmonella on food products in real-time. Bioluminescence imaging is a promising technology that can be utilized to evaluate new food safety measures for reducing Salmonella contamination on food products.

  16. Metabolic imaging in microregions of tumors and normal tissues with bioluminescence and photon counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method has been developed for metabolic imaging on a microscopic level in tumors, tumor spheroids, and normal tissues. The technique makes it possible to determine the spatial distribution of glucose, lactate, and ATP in absolute terms at similar locations within tissues or cell aggregates. The substrate distributions are registered in serial cryostat sections from tissue cryobiopsies or from frozen spheroids with the use of bioluminescence reactions. The light emission is measured directly by a special imaging photon counting system enabling on-line image analysis. The technique has been applied to human breast cancer xenografts, to spheroids originating from a human colon adenocarcinoma, and to skeletal rat muscle. Preliminary data obtained indicate that heterogeneities in the substrate distributions measured are much more pronounced in tumors than in normal tissue. There was no obvious correlation among the three quantities measured at similar locations within the tissues. The distribution of ATP corresponded well with the histological structure of larger spheroids; values were low in the necrotic center and high in the viable rim of these cell aggregates

  17. Fast iterative image reconstruction methods for fully 3D multispectral bioluminescence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate fast iterative image reconstruction methods for fully 3D multispectral bioluminescence tomography for applications in small animal imaging. Our forward model uses a diffusion approximation for optically inhomogeneous tissue, which we solve using a finite element method (FEM). We examine two approaches to incorporating the forward model into the solution of the inverse problem. In a conventional direct calculation approach one computes the full forward model by repeated solution of the FEM problem, once for each potential source location. We describe an alternative on-the-fly approach where one does not explicitly solve for the full forward model. Instead, the solution to the forward problem is included implicitly in the formulation of the inverse problem, and the FEM problem is solved at each iteration for the current image estimate. We evaluate the convergence speeds of several representative iterative algorithms. We compare the computation cost of those two approaches, concluding that the on-the-fly approach can lead to substantial reductions in total cost when combined with a rapidly converging iterative algorithm

  18. Physicochemical characterization and in vivo bioluminescence imaging of nanostructured lipid carriers for targeting the brain: apomorphine as a model drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Shu-Hui [Department of Pharmacy, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan 717, Taiwan (China); Wen, Chih-Jen; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Animal Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Al-Suwayeh, S A; Fang, Jia-You [Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Chang, Hui-Wen, E-mail: fajy@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Pharmaceutics Laboratory, Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-08

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were prepared to investigate whether the duration of brain targeting and accumulation of drugs in the brain can be improved by intravenous delivery. NLCs were developed using cetyl palmitate as the lipid matrix, squalene as the cationic surfactant, and Pluronic F68, polysorbate 80 and polyethylene glycol as the interfacial additives. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and lipid emulsions (LEs) were also prepared for comparison. An anti-Parkinson's drug, apomorphine, was used as the model drug. Nuclear magnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry showed possible interactions between the solid and liquid lipids in the inner core. The lipid nanoparticles with different compositions were characterized by mean size, zeta potential, apomorphine encapsulation and in vitro drug release. NLCs were 370-430 nm in size, which was between the sizes of the SLNs and LEs. A cationic surfactant was used to produce a positive surface charge of 42-50 mV. The base form of apomorphine was successfully entrapped by NLCs with an entrapment percentage of > 60%. The loading of apomorphine in nanoparticles resulted in a slower release behavior compared to the aqueous solution, with LEs showing the lowest release. In vivo real-time bioluminescence imaging of the rat brain revealed that NLCs could be targeted, through certain vessels, to selected brain regions. This effect was further confirmed by imaging the entire brain and brain slices. The results indicated that NLCs with moderate additives are a promising controlled-release and drug-targeting system.

  19. Physicochemical characterization and in vivo bioluminescence imaging of nanostructured lipid carriers for targeting the brain: apomorphine as a model drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Wen, Chih-Jen; Al-Suwayeh, S. A.; Chang, Hui-Wen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Fang, Jia-You

    2010-10-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were prepared to investigate whether the duration of brain targeting and accumulation of drugs in the brain can be improved by intravenous delivery. NLCs were developed using cetyl palmitate as the lipid matrix, squalene as the cationic surfactant, and Pluronic F68, polysorbate 80 and polyethylene glycol as the interfacial additives. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and lipid emulsions (LEs) were also prepared for comparison. An anti-Parkinson's drug, apomorphine, was used as the model drug. Nuclear magnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry showed possible interactions between the solid and liquid lipids in the inner core. The lipid nanoparticles with different compositions were characterized by mean size, zeta potential, apomorphine encapsulation and in vitro drug release. NLCs were 370-430 nm in size, which was between the sizes of the SLNs and LEs. A cationic surfactant was used to produce a positive surface charge of 42-50 mV. The base form of apomorphine was successfully entrapped by NLCs with an entrapment percentage of > 60%. The loading of apomorphine in nanoparticles resulted in a slower release behavior compared to the aqueous solution, with LEs showing the lowest release. In vivo real-time bioluminescence imaging of the rat brain revealed that NLCs could be targeted, through certain vessels, to selected brain regions. This effect was further confirmed by imaging the entire brain and brain slices. The results indicated that NLCs with moderate additives are a promising controlled-release and drug-targeting system.

  20. Correction for source decay in bioluminescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcin Unlu, Mehmet; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2008-02-01

    Time variation of the bioluminescence source can cause artifacts in the tomographic images. We showed that the a priori knowledge of the light kinetics could be used to eliminate these artifacts. We performed two-dimensional simulations. We considered a 40-mm-diameter circular region with an inclusion of 6-mm-diameter located 10-mm away from the center. The measurement data was simulated using a finite element based forward solver. We modeled the non-contact measurements such that four-wavelength data was collected from four 90-degree-apart views. The results showed that the ratio of the total imaging time to the half-life of the exponentially decaying bioluminescent source was the deciding factor in the reconstruction of the source. It was also demonstrated that a priori knowledge of the source kinetics was required to perform tomographic bioluminescence imaging of short half-life bioluminescent sources and the use of spatial a priori information alone was not adequate.

  1. Dynamic bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging of the effects of the antivascular agent Combretastatin-A4P (CA4P) on brain tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Mason, Ralph P; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-01-28

    Combretastatin A-4 (CA4) is a natural product isolated from Combretum caffrum that inhibits tubulin polymerization by binding to the colchicine-binding site. A corresponding water soluble pro-drug (referred to as CA4P), has undergone extensive clinical trials and has been evaluated in pre-clinical studies using multiple modalities. We previously reported a novel assay based on dynamic bioluminescent imaging to assess tumor vascular disruption and now present its application to assessing multiple tumors simultaneously. The current study evaluated the vascular-disrupting activity of CA4P on subcutaneous 9L rat brain tumor xenografts in mice using dynamic bioluminescence imaging. A single dose of CA4P (120?mg/kg, intraperitoneally) induced rapid, temporary tumor vascular shutdown revealed by a rapid and reproducible decrease of light emission from luciferase-expressing 9L tumors following administration of luciferin as a substrate. A time-dependent reduction of tumor perfusion after CA4P treatment was confirmed by immunohistological assessment of the perfusion marker Hoechst 33342 and the tumor vasculature marker CD31. The vasculature showed distinct recovery within 24?h post therapy. Multiple tumors behaved similarly, although a size dependent vascular inhibition was observed. In conclusion, CA4P caused rapid, temporary tumor vascular shutdown and led to reduction of tumor perfusion in rat brain tumor xenografts and the multiple tumor approach should lead to more efficient studies requiring fewer animals and greater consistency. PMID:25305449

  2. Physicochemical characterization and in vivo bioluminescence imaging of nanostructured lipid carriers for targeting the brain: apomorphine as a model drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were prepared to investigate whether the duration of brain targeting and accumulation of drugs in the brain can be improved by intravenous delivery. NLCs were developed using cetyl palmitate as the lipid matrix, squalene as the cationic surfactant, and Pluronic F68, polysorbate 80 and polyethylene glycol as the interfacial additives. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and lipid emulsions (LEs) were also prepared for comparison. An anti-Parkinson's drug, apomorphine, was used as the model drug. Nuclear magnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry showed possible interactions between the solid and liquid lipids in the inner core. The lipid nanoparticles with different compositions were characterized by mean size, zeta potential, apomorphine encapsulation and in vitro drug release. NLCs were 370-430 nm in size, which was between the sizes of the SLNs and LEs. A cationic surfactant was used to produce a positive surface charge of 42-50 mV. The base form of apomorphine was successfully entrapped by NLCs with an entrapment percentage of > 60%. The loading of apomorphine in nanoparticles resulted in a slower release behavior compared to the aqueous solution, with LEs showing the lowest release. In vivo real-time bioluminescence imaging of the rat brain revealed that NLCs could be targeted, through certain vessels, to selected brain regions. This effect was further confirmed by imaging the entire brain and brain slices. The resule entire brain and brain slices. The results indicated that NLCs with moderate additives are a promising controlled-release and drug-targeting system.

  3. Establishment of cell strains stably-transfected with luciferase gene mediated by retrovirus and their detection with bioluminescence imaging system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-juan WANG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective ?To establish cell strains stably transfected with Luciferase gene (Luc2, which was mediated by retrovirus, and explore the relationship between the number of Luc2-positive cells and light flux from bioluminescence imaging system by experiments in vitro and in vivo. Methods ?We co-transfected pMX-Luc2 plasmid and pMD.G plasmid into 293T gag-pol cells to get retrovirus expressing Luc2 gene. Stable Luc2 positive cell lines were generated and screened by transduction of Retro-Luc2 in mouse colon cancer cell line CT26, human non-small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H446, human colon cancer cell line HT-29, human ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV3 and human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line SMMC-7721, all of them were identified by bioluminescence imaging system. Different numbers of SKOV3-Luc2 cells ranging from 10 to 10000 were plated onto culture dishes. Two xenograft models of ovarian cancer were reproduced by subcutaneous injection of 200?l SKOV3-Luc2 cell suspension with different concentrations (1×107, 5×106, 2.5×106, 1×106, 5×105, 2.5×105, 1×105 and 5×104/ml into 16 sites on the back of 4 nude mice, or intravenous injection of 1×106 or 3 ×106 SKOV3-Luc2 cells into the tail vein. Light flux value of SKOV3-Luc2 cells in dishes and in mice was measured by bioluminescence imaging system. Results ?Retro-Luc2 was constructed successfully and expressed Luc2 stably in transduced CT26, NCI-H446, HT-29, SKOV3 and SMMC-7721 cell lines. Light flux was correlated in a linear manner with the number of Luc2-positive cells in dishes and in mice (R2=0.944, ?=0.972; R2=0.991, ?=0.996; R2=0.351, ?=0.628; P < 0.01. Conclusion ?Luc2-positive cell lines could be established rapidly and accurately by infecting tumor cells with retrovirus expressing Luc2. The number of Luc2 positive cells is significantly related in a linear manner to light flux from bioluminescence imaging system in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Effect of optical property estimation accuracy on tomographic bioluminescence imaging: simulation of a combined optical-PET (OPET) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inevitable discrepancies between the mouse tissue optical properties assumed by an experimenter and the actual physiological values may affect the tomographic localization of bioluminescent sources. In a previous work, the simplifying assumption of optically homogeneous tissues led to inaccurate localization of deep sources. Improved results may be obtained if a mouse anatomical map is provided by a high-resolution imaging modality and optical properties are assigned to segmented tissues. In this work, the feasibility of this approach was explored by simulating the effect of different magnitude optical property errors on the image formation process of a combined optical-PET system. Some comparisons were made with corresponding simulations using higher spatial resolution data that are typically attainable by CCD cameras. In addition, simulation results provided insights on some of the experimental conditions that could lead to poor localization of bioluminescent sources. They also provided a rough guide on how accurately tissue optical properties need to be known in order to achieve correct localization of point sources with increasing tissue depth under low background noise conditions

  5. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael S. (Knoxville, TN); Rakesh, Gupta (New Delhi, IN); Gary, Sayler S. (Blaine, TN)

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  6. A Bone Metastasis Nude Mouse Model Created by Ultrasound Guided Intracardiac Injection of Breast Cancer Cells: the Micro-CT, MRI and Bioluminescence Imaging Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to develop a nude mouse model of bone metastasis by performing intracardiac injection of breast cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance and we wanted to evaluate the development and the distribution of metastasis in vivo using micro-CT, MRI and bioluminescence imaging. Animal experiments were performed in 6-week-old female nude mice. The animals underwent left ventricular injection of 2x105 MDA-MB-231Bo-Luc cells. After injection of the tumor cells, serial bioluminescence imaging was performed for 7 weeks. The findings of micro-CT, MRI and the histology were correlated with the 'hot' lesions seen on the bioluminescence imaging. Metastasis was found in 62.3% of the animals. Two weeks after intracardiac injection, metastasis to the brain, spine and femur was detected with bioluminescence imaging with an increasing intensity by week 7. Micro-CT scan confirmed multiple osteolytic lesions at the femur, spine and skull. MRI and the histology were able to show metastasis in the brain and extraskeletal metastasis around the femur. The intracardiac injection of cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance is a safe and highly reproducible method to produce bone metastasis in nude mice. This bone metastasis nude mouse model will be useful to study the mechanism of bone metastasis and to validate new therapeutics

  7. A Bone Metastasis Nude Mouse Model Created by Ultrasound Guided Intracardiac Injection of Breast Cancer Cells: the Micro-CT, MRI and Bioluminescence Imaging Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Jin; Song, Eun Hye; Kim, Seol Hwa; Song, Ho Taek; Suh, Jin Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang Hyun [Korean Minjok Leadership Academy, Heongsung (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop a nude mouse model of bone metastasis by performing intracardiac injection of breast cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance and we wanted to evaluate the development and the distribution of metastasis in vivo using micro-CT, MRI and bioluminescence imaging. Animal experiments were performed in 6-week-old female nude mice. The animals underwent left ventricular injection of 2x105 MDA-MB-231Bo-Luc cells. After injection of the tumor cells, serial bioluminescence imaging was performed for 7 weeks. The findings of micro-CT, MRI and the histology were correlated with the 'hot' lesions seen on the bioluminescence imaging. Metastasis was found in 62.3% of the animals. Two weeks after intracardiac injection, metastasis to the brain, spine and femur was detected with bioluminescence imaging with an increasing intensity by week 7. Micro-CT scan confirmed multiple osteolytic lesions at the femur, spine and skull. MRI and the histology were able to show metastasis in the brain and extraskeletal metastasis around the femur. The intracardiac injection of cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance is a safe and highly reproducible method to produce bone metastasis in nude mice. This bone metastasis nude mouse model will be useful to study the mechanism of bone metastasis and to validate new therapeutics

  8. Chemiluminescence and bioluminescence microbe detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R. E.; Chappelle, E.; Picciolo, G. L.; Jeffers, E. L.; Thomas, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Automated biosensors for online use with NASA Water Monitoring System employs bioluminescence and chemiluminescence techniques to rapidly measure microbe contamination of water samples. System eliminates standard laboratory procedures requiring time duration of 24 hours or longer.

  9. A novel triple-modality reporter gene for whole-body fluorescent, bioluminescent, and nuclear noninvasive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two genetic reporter systems were developed for multimodality reporter gene imaging of different molecular-genetic processes using fluorescence, bioluminescence (BLI), and nuclear imaging techniques. The eGFP cDNA was fused at the N-terminus with HSV1-tk cDNA bearing a nuclear export signal from MAPKK (NES-HSV1-tk) or with truncation at the N-terminus of the first 45 amino acids (?45HSV1-tk) and with firefly luciferase at the C-terminus. A single fusion protein with three functional subunits is formed following transcription and translation from a single open reading frame. The NES-TGL (NES-TGL) or ?45HSV1-tk/GFP/luciferase (?45-TGL) triple-fusion gene cDNAs were cloned into a MoMLV-based retrovirus, which was used for transduction of U87 human glioma cells. The integrity, fluorescence, bioluminescence, and enzymatic activity of the TGL reporter proteins were assessed in vitro. The predicted molecular weight of the fusion proteins (130 kDa) was confirmed by western blot. The U87-NES-TGL and U87-?45-TGL cells had cytoplasmic green fluorescence. The in vitro BLI was 7- and 13-fold higher in U87-NES-TGL and U87-?45-TGL cells compared to nontransduced control cells. The Ki of 14C-FIAU was 0.49±0.02, 0.51±0.03, and 0.003±0.001 ml/min/g in U87-NES-TGL, U87-?45-TGL, and wild-type U87 cells, respectively. Multimodality in vivo imaging studies were performed in nu/nu mice bearing multiple s.c. xenografts established from U87-NES-TGL, U87-?45-TGL, and wild--NES-TGL, U87-?45-TGL, and wild-type U87 cells. BLI was performed after administration of d-luciferin (150 mg/kg i.v.). Gamma camera or PET imaging was conducted at 2 h after i.v. administration of [131I]FIAU (7.4 MBq/animal) or [124I]FIAU (7.4 MBq/animal), respectively. Whole-body fluorescence imaging was performed in parallel with the BLI and radiotracer imaging studies. In vivo BLI and gamma camera imaging showed specific localization of luminescence and radioactivity to the TGL transduced xenografts with background levels of activity in the wild-type xenografts. Tissue sampling yielded values of 0.47%±0.08%, 0.86%±0.06%, and 0.03%±0.01%dose/g [131I]FIAU in U87-NES-TGL, U87-?45-TGL, and U87 xenografts, respectively. The TGL triple-fusion reporter gene preserves the functional activity of its subunits and is very effective for multimodality imaging. It provides for the seamless transition from fluorescence microscopy and FACS to whole-body bioluminescence imaging, to nuclear (PET, SPET, gamma camera) imaging, and back to in situ fluorescence image analysis. (orig.)

  10. Candida albicans biofilm development on medically-relevant foreign bodies in a mouse subcutaneous model followed by bioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharíková, So?a; Vande Velde, Greetje; Himmelreich, Uwe; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans biofilm development on biotic and/or abiotic surfaces represents a specific threat for hospitalized patients. So far, C. albicans biofilms have been studied predominantly in vitro but there is a crucial need for better understanding of this dynamic process under in vivo conditions. We developed an in vivo subcutaneous rat model to study C. albicans biofilm formation. In our model, multiple (up to 9) Candida-infected devices are implanted to the back part of the animal. This gives us a major advantage over the central venous catheter model system as it allows us to study several independent biofilms in one animal. Recently, we adapted this model to study C. albicans biofilm development in BALB/c mice. In this model, mature C. albicans biofilms develop within 48 hr and demonstrate the typical three-dimensional biofilm architecture. The quantification of fungal biofilm is traditionally analyzed post mortem and requires host sacrifice. Because this requires the use of many animals to perform kinetic studies, we applied non-invasive bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to longitudinally follow up in vivo mature C. albicans biofilms developing in our subcutaneous model. C. albicans cells were engineered to express the Gaussia princeps luciferase gene (gLuc) attached to the cell wall. The bioluminescence signal is produced by the luciferase that converts the added substrate coelenterazine into light that can be measured. The BLI signal resembled cell counts obtained from explanted catheters. Non-invasive imaging for quantifying in vivo biofilm formation provides immediate applications for the screening and validation of antifungal drugs under in vivo conditions, as well as for studies based on host-pathogen interactions, hereby contributing to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of catheter-associated infections. PMID:25651138

  11. Boosting Bioluminescence Neuroimaging: An Optimized Protocol for Brain Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Hoehn, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is widely used for optical cell tracking approaches. However, reliable and quantitative bioluminescence of transplanted cells in the brain is highly challenging. In this study we established a new bioluminescence imaging protocol dedicated for neuroimaging, which increases sensitivity especially for noninvasive tracking of brain cell grafts. Different D-Luciferin concentrations (15, 150, 300 and 750 mg/kg), injection routes (iv, ip, sc), types of anesthesia (Isoflurane, Ketamine/Xylazine, Pentobarbital) and timing of injection were compared using DCX-Luc transgenic mice for brain specific bioluminescence. Luciferase kinetics was quantitatively evaluated for maximal photon emission, total photon emission and time-to-peak. Photon emission followed a D-Luciferin dose-dependent relation without saturation, but with delay in time-to-peak increasing for increasing concentrations. The comparison of intravenous, subcutaneous and intraperitoneal substrate injection reflects expected pharmacokinetics with fastest and highest photon emission for intravenous administration. Ketamine/Xylazine and Pentobarbital anesthesia showed no significant beneficial effect on maximal photon emission. However, a strong difference in outcome was observed by injecting the substrate pre Isoflurane anesthesia. This protocol optimization for brain specific bioluminescence imaging comprises injection of 300 mg/kg D-Luciferin pre Isoflurane anesthesia as an efficient and stable method with a signal gain of approx. 200% (compared to 150 mg/kg post Isoflurane). Gain in sensitivity by the novel imaging protocol was quantitatively assessed by signal-to-noise calculations of luciferase-expressing neural stem cells grafted into mouse brains (transplantation of 3,000–300,000 cells). The optimized imaging protocol lowered the detection limit from 6,000 to 3,000 cells by a gain in signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:23405190

  12. In vivo micro-CT imaging of untreated and irradiated orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts in mice: capabilities, limitations and a comparison with bioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Stefanie; Felix, Manuela C; Hartmann, Linda; Bierbaum, Miriam; Maros, Máté E; Kerl, Hans U; Wenz, Frederik; Glatting, Gerhard; Kramer, Martin; Giordano, Frank A; Brockmann, Marc A

    2015-04-01

    Small animal imaging is of increasing relevance in biomedical research. Studies systematically assessing the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced in vivo micro-CT of orthotopic glioma xenografts in mice do not exist. NOD/SCID/?c(-/-) mice (n = 27) underwent intracerebral implantation of 2.5 × 10(6) GFP-Luciferase-transduced U87MG cells. Mice underwent bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to detect tumor growth and afterwards repeated contrast-enhanced (300 µl Iomeprol i.v.) micro-CT imaging (80 kV, 75 µAs, 360° rotation, 1,000 projections, 33 s scan time, resolution 40 × 40 × 53 µm, 0.5 Gy/scan). Presence of tumors, tumor diameter and tumor volume in micro-CT were rated by two independent readers. Results were compared with histological analyses. Six mice with tumors confirmed by micro-CT received fractionated irradiation (3 × 5 Gy every other day) using the micro-CT (5 mm pencil beam geometry). Repeated micro-CT scans were tolerated well. Tumor engraftment rate was 74 % (n = 20). In micro-CT, mean tumor volume was 30 ± 33 mm(3), and the smallest detectable tumor measured 360 × 620 µm. The inter-rater agreement (n = 51 micro-CT scans) for the item tumor yes/no was excellent (Spearman-Rho = 0.862, p < 0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of micro-CT were 0.95 and 0.71, respectively (PPV = 0.91, NPV = 0.83). BLI on day 21 after tumor implantation had a sensitivity and specificity of 0.90 and 1.0, respectively (PPV = 1.0, NPV = 0.5). Maximum tumor diameter and volume in micro-CT and histology correlated excellently (tumor diameter: 0.929, p < 0.001; tumor volume: 0.969, p < 0.001, n = 17). Irradiated animals showed a large central tumor necrosis. Longitudinal contrast enhanced micro-CT imaging of brain tumor growth in live mice is feasible at high sensitivity levels and with excellent inter-rater agreement and allows visualization of radiation effects. PMID:25605299

  13. Bio-luminescent imaging and characterization of organ-specific metastasis of human cancer in NOD/SCID mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Nicole A. L.; Murakami, Takashi

    2010-02-01

    Many clinical evidences demonstrate that the sites of distant metastasis are not random and certain malignant tumors show a tendency to develop metastases in specific organs (e.g., brain, liver, and lungs). However, an appropriate animal model to characterize the metastatic nature of transplantable human cancer cell lines has not been reported well. Recent advances in bio-luminescent imaging (BLI) technologies have facilitated the quantitative analysis of various cellular processes in vivo. To visualize the fate of tumor progression in the living mice, we are constructing a luciferaseexpressing human cancer cell library (including melanoma, colon, breast, and prostate cancer). Herein we demonstrate that the BLI technology in couple with a fine ultrasonic guidance realizes cancer cell-type dependent metastasis to the specific organs. For example, some melanoma cell lines showed frequent metastasis to brain, lungs, and lymph nodes in the mouse model. Notably, reflecting the clinical features of melanoma, breast, and prostate cancer, some of the cell lines showed preferential metastasis to the brain. Moreover, these cellular resources for BLI allow a high throughput screening for potential anti-cancer drugs. Thus, this BLI-mediated additional strategy with the luciferase-expressing cancer cell resources should promote many translational studies for human cancer therapy.

  14. Bioluminescent Web Page

    Science.gov (United States)

    This highly acclaimed website includes information on bioluminescence research, myths, photos, organisms, chemistry, physiology, distribution and more. Features an absolute must-see bioluminescence photo gallery. Also includes submitted abstracts and journal citations concerning bioluminescence, as well as proceedings from several related symposia. The chemistry section has molecular diagrams and several animated illustrations that explain the reaction behind fluorescence.

  15. Luciferase expression and bioluminescence does not affect tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Ej, Rasko John; Ng Cynthia; Bailey Charles G; Tiffen Jessamy C; Holst Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Live animal imaging is becoming an increasingly common technique for accurate and quantitative assessment of tumor burden over time. Bioluminescence imaging systems rely on a bioluminescent signal from tumor cells, typically generated from expression of the firefly luciferase gene. However, previous reports have suggested that either a high level of luciferase or the resultant light reaction produced upon addition of D-luciferin substrate can have a negative influence on tumor cell g...

  16. Boosting Bioluminescence Neuroimaging: An Optimized Protocol for Brain Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Aswendt, Markus; Adamczak, Joanna; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Hoehn, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is widely used for optical cell tracking approaches. However, reliable and quantitative bioluminescence of transplanted cells in the brain is highly challenging. In this study we established a new bioluminescence imaging protocol dedicated for neuroimaging, which increases sensitivity especially for noninvasive tracking of brain cell grafts. Different D-Luciferin concentrations (15, 150, 300 and 750 mg/kg), injection routes (iv, ip, sc), types of anesthesia (Isoflurane...

  17. Real-time, continuous detection of maltose using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) on a microfluidic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nam Cao Hoai; Gel, Murat; Zhu, Yonggang; Dacres, Helen; Anderson, Alisha; Trowell, Stephen C

    2014-12-15

    We have previously shown that a genetically encoded bioluminescent resonance energy transfer (BRET) biosensor, comprising maltose binding protein (MBP) flanked by a green fluorescent protein (GFP(2)) at the N-terminus and a variant of Renilla luciferase (RLuc2) at the C-terminus, has superior sensitivity and limits of detection for maltose, compared with an equivalent fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor. Here, we demonstrate that the same MBP biosensor can be combined with a microfluidic system for detection of maltose in water or beer. Using the BRET-based biosensor, maltose in water was detected on a microfluidic chip, either following a pre-incubation step or in real-time with similar sensitivity and dynamic range to those obtained using a commercial 96-well plate luminometer. The half-maximal effective concentrations (EC50) were 2.4×10(-7)M and 1.3×10(-7) M for maltose detected in pre-incubated and real-time reactions, respectively. To demonstrate real-time detection of maltose in a complex medium, we used it to estimate maltose concentration in a commercial beer sample in a real-time, continuous flow format. Our system demonstrates a promising approach to in-line monitoring for applications such as food and beverage processing. PMID:24999995

  18. In vivo bioluminescence imaging to evaluate systemic and topical antibiotics against community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-infected skin wounds in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yi; Ramos, Romela Irene; Cho, John S; Donegan, Niles P; Cheung, Ambrose L; Miller, Lloyd S

    2013-02-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) frequently causes skin and soft tissue infections, including impetigo, cellulitis, folliculitis, and infected wounds and ulcers. Uncomplicated CA-MRSA skin infections are typically managed in an outpatient setting with oral and topical antibiotics and/or incision and drainage, whereas complicated skin infections often require hospitalization, intravenous antibiotics, and sometimes surgery. The aim of this study was to develop a mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection to compare the efficacy of commonly used systemic and topical antibiotics. A bioluminescent USA300 CA-MRSA strain was inoculated into full-thickness scalpel wounds on the backs of mice and digital photography/image analysis and in vivo bioluminescence imaging were used to measure wound healing and the bacterial burden. Subcutaneous vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid similarly reduced the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral linezolid, clindamycin, and doxycycline all decreased the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole decreased the bacterial burden but did not decrease the lesion size. Topical mupirocin and retapamulin ointments both reduced the bacterial burden. However, the petrolatum vehicle ointment for retapamulin, but not the polyethylene glycol vehicle ointment for mupirocin, promoted wound healing and initially increased the bacterial burden. Finally, in type 2 diabetic mice, subcutaneous linezolid and daptomycin had the most rapid therapeutic effect compared with vancomycin. Taken together, this mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection, which utilizes in vivo bioluminescence imaging to monitor the bacterial burden, represents an alternative method to evaluate the preclinical in vivo efficacy of systemic and topical antimicrobial agents. PMID:23208713

  19. Rational development of an attenuated recombinant cyprinid herpesvirus 3 vaccine using prokaryotic mutagenesis and in vivo bioluminescent imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutier, Maxime; Ronsmans, Maygane; Ouyang, Ping; Fournier, Guillaume; Reschner, Anca; Rakus, Krzysztof; Wilkie, Gavin S; Farnir, Frédéric; Bayrou, Calixte; Lieffrig, François; Li, Hong; Desmecht, Daniel; Davison, Andrew J; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2015-02-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV 3) is causing severe economic losses worldwide in common and koi carp industries, and a safe and efficacious attenuated vaccine compatible with mass vaccination is needed. We produced single deleted recombinants using prokaryotic mutagenesis. When producing a recombinant lacking open reading frame 134 (ORF134), we unexpectedly obtained a clone with additional deletion of ORF56 and ORF57. This triple deleted recombinant replicated efficiently in vitro and expressed an in vivo safety/efficacy profile compatible with use as an attenuated vaccine. To determine the role of the double ORF56-57 deletion in the phenotype and to improve further the quality of the vaccine candidate, a series of deleted recombinants was produced and tested in vivo. These experiments led to the selection of a double deleted recombinant lacking ORF56 and ORF57 as a vaccine candidate. The safety and efficacy of this strain were studied using an in vivo bioluminescent imaging system (IVIS), qPCR, and histopathological examination, which demonstrated that it enters fish via skin infection similar to the wild type strain. However, compared to the parental wild type strain, the vaccine candidate replicated at lower levels and spread less efficiently to secondary sites of infection. Transmission experiments allowing water contamination with or without additional physical contact between fish demonstrated that the vaccine candidate has a reduced ability to spread from vaccinated fish to naïve sentinel cohabitants. Finally, IVIS analyses demonstrated that the vaccine candidate induces a protective mucosal immune response at the portal of entry. Thus, the present study is the first to report the rational development of a recombinant attenuated vaccine against CyHV 3 for mass vaccination of carp. We also demonstrated the relevance of the CyHV 3 carp model for studying alloherpesvirus transmission and mucosal immunity in teleost skin. PMID:25700279

  20. Development of a novel liposomal nanodelivery system for bioluminescence imaging and targeted drug delivery in ErbB2-overexpressing metastatic ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao-Jian; Wei, Yong-Fang; Wan, Yu-Ying; Jiang, Li-Ping; Zhang, Jian-Feng; Xin, Hong-Bo

    2014-11-01

    Liposomes as targeted drug delivery systems are an emerging strategy in the treatment of cancer to selectively target tumors or genes. In this study, we generated the recombinant protein, EC1-GLuc, by fusing the EC1 peptide, an artificial ligand of ErbB2, with Gaussia luciferase (GLuc). The purified EC1-GLuc was conjugated with a nickel-chelating liposome to construct the EC1-GLuc-liposome. In vitro experiments revealed that the EC1-GLuc-liposome selectively targeted and internalized into ErbB2-overexpressing SKOv3 cells for bioluminescence imaging. A cell-impermeable fluorescence dye (HPTS) encapsulated in the EC-GLuc-liposome was efficiently delivered into the SKOv3 cells. In addition, the EC1-GLuc-liposome also targeted metastatic SKOv3 tumors for bioluminescence imaging and effectively delivered HPTS into metastatic tumors in vivo. Therefore, the present study demonstrates the novel EC1-GLuc-liposome to be an effective theranostic system for monitoring and treating ErbB2-overexpressing metastatic ovarian carcinoma through a combination of targeted molecular imaging and DDS. PMID:25190023

  1. GMO detection using a bioluminescent real time reporter (BART of loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP suitable for field use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiddle Guy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing need for quantitative technologies suitable for molecular detection in a variety of settings for applications including food traceability and monitoring of genetically modified (GM crops and their products through the food processing chain. Conventional molecular diagnostics utilising real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and fluorescence-based determination of amplification require temperature cycling and relatively complex optics. In contrast, isothermal amplification coupled to a bioluminescent output produced in real-time (BART occurs at a constant temperature and only requires a simple light detection and integration device. Results Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP shows robustness to sample-derived inhibitors. Here we show the applicability of coupled LAMP and BART reactions (LAMP-BART for determination of genetically modified (GM maize target DNA at low levels of contamination (0.1-5.0% GM using certified reference material, and compare this to RT-PCR. Results show that conventional DNA extraction methods developed for PCR may not be optimal for LAMP-BART quantification. Additionally, we demonstrate that LAMP is more tolerant to plant sample-derived inhibitors, and show this can be exploited to develop rapid extraction techniques suitable for simple field-based qualitative tests for GM status determination. We also assess the effect of total DNA assay load on LAMP-BART quantitation. Conclusions LAMP-BART is an effective and sensitive technique for GM detection with significant potential for quantification even at low levels of contamination and in samples derived from crops such as maize with a large genome size. The resilience of LAMP-BART to acidic polysaccharides makes it well suited to rapid sample preparation techniques and hence to both high throughput laboratory settings and to portable GM detection applications. The impact of the plant sample matrix and genome loading within a reaction must be controlled to ensure quantification at low target concentrations.

  2. Geometric Regularization in Bioluminescence Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Kreutzmann, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bioluminescence tomography is a recent biomedical imaging technique which allows to study molecular and cellular activities in vivo. From a mathematical point of view, it is an ill-posed inverse source problem: the location and the intensity of a photon source inside an organism have to be determined, given the photon count on the organism's surface. To face the ill-posedness of this problem, a geometric regularization approach is introduced, analyzed and numerically verified in this book.

  3. Creatures of Darkness: Bioluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this activity students investigate bioluminescence, which is light given off by living organisms and is common among creatures of the sea. Students discover that in the deep sea, where little or no sunlight penetrates, a variety of fishes live out their lives dependent upon bioluminescence, and that among these fishes, light organs have evolved to serve a number of purposes. Students will learn about the function of bioluminescence among some marine animals and conduct an experiment to test the function of bioluminescence as camouflage. Included is background information, materials, procedures, and a follow-up evaluation.

  4. Effect of electromagnetic fields on the bacteria bioluminescent activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of electromagnetic field with frequency from 36.2 to 55.9 GHz on bioluminescence activity of bacterium were investigated. Electromagnetic field results in decrease of bioluminescence, which depends from frequency. The electromagnetic field adaptation time is higher of intrinsic time parameters of bioluminescence system. The effect has nonthermal nature. It is suggested that electromagnetic field influence connects with structure rearrangements near cell emitter. 8 refs.; 3 figs

  5. Theranostic Protein Targeting ErbB2 for Bioluminescence Imaging and Therapy for Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Xiao-Jian; Sun, Ling-Fei; Nishiyama, Yuki; Feng, Bin; Michiue, Hiroyuki; Seno, Masaharu; Matsui, Hideki; Tomizawa,Kazuhito

    2013-01-01

    A combination of molecular-targeted cancer imaging and therapy is an emerging strategy to improve cancer diagnosis and minimize the side effects of conventional treatments. Here, we generated a recombinant protein, EC1-GLuc-p53C, by fusing EC1 peptide, an artificial ligand of ErbB2, with Gaussia luciferase (GLuc) and a p53-activating peptide, p53C. EC1-GLuc-p53C was expressed and purified from E. coli BL21. In vitro experiments showed that EC1-GLuc-p53c was stable in luminescent activity and ...

  6. Luciferase expression and bioluminescence does not affect tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasko John EJ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Live animal imaging is becoming an increasingly common technique for accurate and quantitative assessment of tumor burden over time. Bioluminescence imaging systems rely on a bioluminescent signal from tumor cells, typically generated from expression of the firefly luciferase gene. However, previous reports have suggested that either a high level of luciferase or the resultant light reaction produced upon addition of D-luciferin substrate can have a negative influence on tumor cell growth. To address this issue, we designed an expression vector that allows simultaneous fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS, we generated clonal cell populations from a human breast cancer (MCF-7 and a mouse melanoma (B16-F10 cell line that stably expressed different levels of luciferase. We then compared the growth capabilities of these clones in vitro by MTT proliferation assay and in vivo by bioluminescence imaging of tumor growth in live mice. Surprisingly, we found that neither the amount of luciferase nor biophotonic activity was sufficient to inhibit tumor cell growth, in vitro or in vivo. These results suggest that luciferase toxicity is not a necessary consideration when designing bioluminescence experiments, and therefore our approach can be used to rapidly generate high levels of luciferase expression for sensitive imaging experiments.

  7. Bioluminescence in the high Arctic during the polar night

    OpenAIRE

    Berge, Jørgen; Ba?tnes, Anna Solvang; Johnsen, Geir; Blackwell, Susan; Moline, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the composition and activity of the planktonic community during the polar night in the high Arctic Kongsfjord, Svalbard. Our results are the first published evidence of bioluminescence among zooplankton during the Arctic polar night. The observations were collected by a bathyphotometer detecting bioluminescence, integrated into an autonomous underwater vehicle, to determine the concentration and intensity of bioluminescent flashes as a function of time of day and depth. To...

  8. High-throughput and quantitative approaches for measuring circadian rhythms in cyanobacteria using bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultzaberger, Ryan K; Paddock, Mark L; Katsuki, Takeo; Greenspan, Ralph J; Golden, Susan S

    2015-01-01

    The temporal measurement of a bioluminescent reporter has proven to be one of the most powerful tools for characterizing circadian rhythms in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. Primarily, two approaches have been used to automate this process: (1) detection of cell culture bioluminescence in 96-well plates by a photomultiplier tube-based plate-cycling luminometer (TopCount Microplate Scintillation and Luminescence Counter, Perkin Elmer) and (2) detection of individual colony bioluminescence by iteratively rotating a Petri dish under a cooled CCD camera using a computer-controlled turntable. Each approach has distinct advantages. The TopCount provides a more quantitative measurement of bioluminescence, enabling the direct comparison of clock output levels among strains. The computer-controlled turntable approach has a shorter set-up time and greater throughput, making it a more powerful phenotypic screening tool. While the latter approach is extremely useful, only a few labs have been able to build such an apparatus because of technical hurdles involved in coordinating and controlling both the camera and the turntable, and in processing the resulting images. This protocol provides instructions on how to construct, use, and process data from a computer-controlled turntable to measure the temporal changes in bioluminescence of individual cyanobacterial colonies. Furthermore, we describe how to prepare samples for use with the TopCount to minimize experimental noise and generate meaningful quantitative measurements of clock output levels for advanced analysis. PMID:25662451

  9. In vivo bioluminescence tomography with a blocking-off finite-difference SP3 method and MRI?CT coregistration

    OpenAIRE

    Klose, Alexander D.; Beattie, Bradley J.; Dehghani, Hamid; Vider, Lena; Le, Carl; Ponomarev, Vladimir; Blasberg, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Bioluminescence imaging is a research tool for studying gene expression levels in small animal models of human disease. Bioluminescence light, however, is strongly scattered in biological tissue and no direct image of the light-emitting reporter probe’s location can be obtained. Therefore, the authors have developed a linear image reconstruction method for bioluminescence tomography (BLT) that recovers the three-dimensional spatial bioluminescent source distribution in small animals.

  10. Bioluminescence in Plankton and Nekton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Peter J.

    This article, written by Peter J. Herring and Edith Widder of the International Society for Bioluminescence and Chemilumenescence, features an excerpt about bioluminescence from the Encyclopedia of Ocean Science. It includes an introduction to bioluminescence and the biochemistry behind it, information about bioluminescent organisms including a table of typical genera and their type of luminescence, a discussion of measurement and applications of bioluminescence, and resources for further reading.

  11. Stimulated bioluminescence by fluid shear stress associated with pipe flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinoflagellate can be stimulated bioluminescence by hydrodynamic agitation. Two typical dinoflagellate (Lingulodinium polyedrum and Pyrocystis noctiluca) was choosed to research stimulated bioluminescence. The bioluminescence intensity and shear stress intensity were measured using fully developed pipe flow. There is shear stress threshold to agitate organism bioluminescence. From these experiment, the response thresholds of the stimulated bioluminscence always occurred in laminar flows at a shear stress level of 0.6-3 dyn/cm2. At the same time, the spectral characteristc of dinoflagellate was recorded, the wavelength of them is about 470nm, and the full width at half maximum is approximate 30nm.

  12. Stimulated bioluminescence by fluid shear stress associated with pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Jing; Wang Jiangan; Wu Ronghua, E-mail: caojing981@126.com [Col. of Electronic Eng., Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan 430033 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Dinoflagellate can be stimulated bioluminescence by hydrodynamic agitation. Two typical dinoflagellate (Lingulodinium polyedrum and Pyrocystis noctiluca) was choosed to research stimulated bioluminescence. The bioluminescence intensity and shear stress intensity were measured using fully developed pipe flow. There is shear stress threshold to agitate organism bioluminescence. From these experiment, the response thresholds of the stimulated bioluminscence always occurred in laminar flows at a shear stress level of 0.6-3 dyn/cm{sup 2}. At the same time, the spectral characteristc of dinoflagellate was recorded, the wavelength of them is about 470nm, and the full width at half maximum is approximate 30nm.

  13. Bioluminescence imaging of point sources implanted in small animals post mortem: evaluation of a method for estimating source strength and depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of a simple approach for the in vivo reconstruction of bioluminescent point sources in small animals was evaluated. The method uses the diffusion approximation as a forward model of light propagation from a point source in a homogeneous tissue to find the source depth and power. The optical properties of the tissue are estimated from reflectance images obtained at the same location on the animal. It was possible to localize point sources implanted in mice, 2-8 mm deep, to within 1 mm. The same performance was achieved for sources implanted in rat abdomens when the effects of tissue surface curvature were eliminated. The source power was reconstructed within a factor of 2 of the true power for the given range of depths, even though the apparent brightness of the source varied by several orders of magnitude. The study also showed that reconstructions using optical properties measured in situ were superior to those based on data in the literature

  14. A new liposomal formulation of Gemcitabine is active in an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer accessible to bioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornmann, C; Graeser, R; Esser, N; Ziroli, V; Jantscheff, P; Keck, T; Unger, C; Hopt, U T; Adam, U; Schaechtele, C; Massing, U; von Dobschuetz, E

    2008-03-01

    Despite its rapid enzymatic inactivation and therefore limited activity in vivo, Gemcitabine is the standard drug for pancreatic cancer treatment. To protect the drug, and achieve passive tumor targeting, we developed a liposomal formulation of Gemcitabine, GemLip (Ø: 36 nm: 47% entrapment). Its anti-tumoral activity was tested on MIA PaCa-2 cells growing orthotopically in nude mice. Bioluminescence measurement mediated by the stable integration of the luciferase gene was employed to randomize the mice, and monitor tumor growth. GemLip (4 and 8 mg/kg), Gemcitabine (240 mg/kg), and empty liposomes (equivalent to 8 mg/kg GemLip) were injected intravenously once weekly for 5 weeks. GemLip (8 mg/kg) stopped tumor growth, as measured via in vivo bioluminescence, reducing the primary tumor size by 68% (SD +/- 8%; p < 0.02), whereas Gemcitabine hardly affected tumor size (-7%; +/- 1.5%). In 80% of animals, luciferase activity in the liver indicated the presence of metastases. All treatments, including the empty liposomes, reduced the metastatic burden. Thus, GemLip shows promising antitumoral activity in this model. Surprisingly, empty liposomes attenuate the spread of metastases similar to Gemcitabine and GemLip. Further, luciferase marked tumor cells are a powerful tool to observe tumor growth in vivo, and to detect and quantify metastases. PMID:17554540

  15. New class of bioluminogenic probe based on bioluminescent enzyme-induced electron transfer: BioLeT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Hideo; Kojima, Ryosuke; Kamiya, Mako; Kobayashi, Eiji; Komatsu, Toru; Ueno, Tasuku; Terai, Takuya; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Nagano, Tetsuo; Urano, Yasuteru

    2015-04-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has advantages for investigating biological phenomena in deep tissues of living animals, but few design strategies are available for functional bioluminescent substrates. We propose a new design strategy (designated as bioluminescent enzyme-induced electron transfer: BioLeT) for luciferin-based bioluminescence probes. Luminescence measurements of a series of aminoluciferin derivatives confirmed that bioluminescence can be controlled by means of BioLeT. Based on this concept, we developed bioluminescence probes for nitric oxide that enabled quantitative and sensitive detection even in vivo. Our design strategy should be applicable to develop a wide range of practically useful bioluminogenic probes. PMID:25761130

  16. Bioluminescence: Living Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Geographic Xpeditions

    This National Geographic lesson plan explores bioluminescent creatures and the underwater world in which they live. Using shoeboxes and black paint, students are directed to build a deep-sea model and inhabit it with fish made out of black construction paper. Students then use the model to describe how organisms use bioluminescence and learn about its use as camouflage. In addition to a detailed protocol, the lesson plan includes suggestions for assessments and links to additional information.

  17. Action of ?-radiation on bioluminescence of Noctiluca miliaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the study in the action of various doses of irradiation on the bioluminescence of Noctiluca miliaris are presented. The doses are found that stimulate the bioluminescence and the dose - effect curves are obtained. It has been shown that stimulation of Noctiluca luminescence by ?-radiation is not of a constant character and extinguishes after a period of time determined by a dose rate

  18. Multispectral Bioluminescence Tomography: Methodology and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Wang

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescent imaging has proven to be a valuable tool for monitoring physiological and pathological activities at cellular and molecular levels in living small animals. Using biological techniques, target cells can be tagged with reporters encoding several kinds of luciferase enzymes, which generate characteristic photons in a wide spectrum covering the infrared range. Part of the diffused light can reach the body surface of the small animal, be separated into several spectral bands using appropriate filters, and collected by a sensitive CCD camera. Here we present a bioluminescence tomography (BLT method for a bioluminescent source reconstruction from multispectral data measured on the external surface, and demonstrate the advantages of multispectral BLT in a numerical study using a heterogeneous mouse chest phantom. The results show that the multispectral approach significantly improves the accuracy and stability of the BLT reconstruction even if the data are highly noisy.

  19. Bioluminescence patterns among North American Armillaria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihail, Jeanne D

    2015-06-01

    Bioluminescence is widely recognized among white-spored species of Basidiomycota. Most reports of fungal bioluminescence are based upon visual light perception. When instruments such as photomultipliers have been used to measure fungal luminescence, more taxa have been discovered to produce light, albeit at a range of magnitudes. The present studies were undertaken to determine the prevalence of bioluminescence among North American Armillaria species. Consistent, constitutive bioluminescence was detected for the first time for mycelia of Armillaria calvescens, Armillaria cepistipes, Armillaria gemina, Armillaria nabsnona, and Armillaria sinapina and confirmed for mycelia of Armillaria gallica, Armillaria mellea, Armillaria ostoyae, and Armillaria tabescens. Emission spectra of mycelia representing all species had maximum intensity in the range 515-525 nm confirming that emitted light was the result of bioluminescence rather than chemiluminescence. Time series analysis of 1000 consecutive luminescence measurements revealed a highly significant departure from random variation. Mycelial luminescence of eight species exhibited significant, stable shifts in magnitude in response to a series of mechanical disturbance treatments, providing one mechanism for generating observed luminescence variation. PMID:25986550

  20. Thoughts on the diversity of convergent evolution of bioluminescence on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldenmaier, Hans E.; Oliveira, Anderson G.; Stevani, Cassius V.

    2012-10-01

    The widespread independent evolution of analogous bioluminescent systems is one of the most impressive and diverse examples of convergent evolution on earth. There are roughly 30 extant bioluminescent systems that have evolved independently on Earth, with each system likely having unique enzymes responsible for catalysing the bioluminescent reaction. Bioluminescence is a chemical reaction involving a luciferin molecule and a luciferase or photoprotein that results in the emission of light. Some independent systems utilize the same luciferin, such as the use of tetrapyrrolic compounds by krill and dinoflagellates, and the wide use of coelenterazine by marine organisms, while the enzymes involved are unique. One common thread among all the different bioluminescent systems is the requirement of molecular oxygen. Bioluminescence is found in most forms of life, especially marine organisms. Bioluminescence in known to benefit the organism by: attraction, repulsion, communication, camouflage, and illumination. The marine ecosystem is significantly affected by bioluminescence, the only light found in the pelagic zone and below is from bioluminescent organisms. Transgenic bioluminescent organisms have revolutionized molecular research, medicine and the biotechnology industry. The use of bioluminescence in studying molecular pathways and disease allows for non-invasive and real-time analysis. Bioluminescence-based assays have been developed for several analytes by coupling luminescence to many enzyme-catalysed reactions.

  1. An Advanced Preclinical Mouse Model for Acute Myeloid Leukemia Using Patients' Cells of Various Genetic Subgroups and In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Binje; Rothenberg, Maja; Sandhöfer, Nadine; Carlet, Michela; Finkenzeller, Cornelia; Krupka, Christina; Grunert, Michaela; Trumpp, Andreas; Corbacioglu, Selim; Ebinger, Martin; André, Maya C.; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Schneider, Stephanie; Subklewe, Marion; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Spiekermann, Karsten; Jeremias, Irmela

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clinically and molecularly heterogeneous disease with poor outcome. Adequate model systems are required for preclinical studies to improve understanding of AML biology and to develop novel, rational treatment approaches. Xenografts in immunodeficient mice allow performing functional studies on patient-derived AML cells. We have established an improved model system that integrates serial retransplantation of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) cells in mice, genetic manipulation by lentiviral transduction, and essential quality controls by immunophenotyping and targeted resequencing of driver genes. 17/29 samples showed primary engraftment, 10/17 samples could be retransplanted and some of them allowed virtually indefinite serial transplantation. 5/6 samples were successfully transduced using lentiviruses. Neither serial transplantation nor genetic engineering markedly altered sample characteristics analyzed. Transgene expression was stable in PDX AML cells. Example given, recombinant luciferase enabled bioluminescence in vivo imaging and highly sensitive and reliable disease monitoring; imaging visualized minimal disease at 1 PDX cell in 10000 mouse bone marrow cells and facilitated quantifying leukemia initiating cells. We conclude that serial expansion, genetic engineering and imaging represent valuable tools to improve the individualized xenograft mouse model of AML. Prospectively, these advancements enable repetitive, clinically relevant studies on AML biology and preclinical treatment trials on genetically defined and heterogeneous subgroups. PMID:25793878

  2. Dynamic Imaging of Pancreatic Nuclear Factor ?B (NF-?B) Activation in Live Mice Using Adeno-associated Virus (AAV) Infusion and Bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orabi, Abrahim I; Sah, Swati; Javed, Tanveer A; Lemon, Kathryn L; Good, Misty L; Guo, Ping; Xiao, Xiangwei; Prasadan, Krishna; Gittes, George K; Jin, Shunqian; Husain, Sohail Z

    2015-05-01

    Nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) is an important signaling molecule that plays a critical role in the development of acute pancreatitis. Current methods for examining NF-?B activation involve infection of an adenoviral NF-?B-luciferase reporter into cell lines or electrophoretic mobility shift assay of lysate. The use of adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) has proven to be an effective method of transfecting whole organs in live animals. We examined whether intrapancreatic duct infusion of AAV containing an NF-?B-luciferase reporter (AAV-NF-?B-luciferase) can reliably measure pancreatic NF-?B activation. We confirmed the infectivity of the AAV-NF-?B-luciferase reporter in HEK293 cells using a traditional luciferase readout. Mice were infused with AAV-NF-?B-luciferase 5 weeks before induction of pancreatitis (caerulein, 50 ?g/kg). Unlike transgenic mice that globally express NF-?B-luciferase, AAV-infused mice showed a 15-fold increase in pancreas-specific NF-?B bioluminescence following 12 h of caerulein compared with baseline luminescence (p < 0.05). The specificity of the NF-?B-luciferase signal to the pancreas was confirmed by isolating the pancreas and adjacent organs and observing a predominant bioluminescent signal in the pancreas compared with liver, spleen, and stomach. A complementary mouse model of post-ERCP-pancreatitis also induced pancreatic NF-?B signals. Taken together these data provide the first demonstration that NF-?B activation can be examined in a live, dynamic fashion during pancreatic inflammation. We believe this technique offers a valuable tool to study real-time activation of NF-?B in vivo. PMID:25802340

  3. Bioluminescence tomography with structural and functional a priori information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Han; Unlu, Mehmet B.; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2010-02-01

    Multispectral bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is one of the seemingly promising approaches to recover 3D tomographic images of bioluminescence source distribution in vivo. In bioluminescence tomography, internal light source, such as luciferase is activated within a volume and multiple wavelength emission data from the internal bioluminescence sources is acquired for reconstruction. The underline non-uniqueness problem associated with non-spectrally resolved intensity-based bioluminescence tomography was demonstrated by Dehghani et al. and it also shown that using a spectrally resolved technique, an accurate solution for the source distribution can be calculated from the measured data if both functional and anatomical a priori information are at hand. Thus it is of great desire to develop an imaging system that is capable of simultaneously acquiring both the optical and structural a priori information as well as acquiring the bioluminescence data. In this paper we present our first combined optical tomography and CT system which constitutes with a cool CCD camera ( perkin elmer "cold blue"), laser launching units and Xray CT( Dxray proto-type). It is capable of acquiring non contact diffuse optical tomography (DOT) data which is used for functional a priori; X-ray CT images which yields the structure information; and BLT images. Physical phantom experiments are designed to verify the system accuracy, repeatability and resolution. These studies shows the feasibility of such imaging system and its potential.

  4. Time encoded radiation imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  5. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sayler, Gary S. (Blaine, TN); Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are monolithic bioelectronic devices comprising a bioreporter and an OASIC. These bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit are useful in detecting substances such as pollutants, explosives, and heavy-metals residing in inhospitable areas such as groundwater, industrial process vessels, and battlefields. Also disclosed are methods and apparatus for environmental pollutant detection, oil exploration, drug discovery, industrial process control, and hazardous chemical monitoring.

  6. Bioluminescence lights the way to food safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovko, Lubov Y.; Griffiths, Mansel W.

    2003-07-01

    The food industry is increasingly adopting food safety and quality management systems that are more proactive and preventive than those used in the past which have tended to rely on end product testing and visual inspection. The regulatory agencies in many countries are promoting one such management tool, Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP), as a way to achieve a safer food supply and as a basis for harmonization of trading standards. Verification that the process is safe must involve microbiological testing but the results need not be generated in real-time. Of all the rapid microbiological tests currently available, the only ones that come close to offering real-time results are bioluminescence-based methods. Recent developments in application of bioluminescence for food safety issues are presented in the paper. These include the use of genetically engineered microorganisms with bioluminescent and fluorescent phenotypes as a real time indicator of physiological state and survival of food-borne pathogens in food and food processing environments as well as novel bioluminescent-based methods for rapid detection of pathogens in food and environmental samples. Advantages and pitfalls of the methods are discussed.

  7. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  8. Naturally occurring bioluminescence on the deep-sea floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Jessica; Jamieson, Alan J.; Bagley, Philip M.; Priede, Imants G.

    2011-12-01

    In the deep sea, bioluminescence that is not stimulated by the observer is estimated to be extremely low. Observations of naturally occurring bioluminescence, using an ultra-low-light video camera, at a solitary rock populated with sessile fauna revealed bioluminescent activity was 155 times higher than predicted background levels at 2000-3000 m. These findings, from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (49.022°N, 27.693°W), suggest that, at depths below the penetration of sunlight, complexity in the physical environment may influence the visual environment, with potential effects on the behaviour of mobile deep sea fauna, prompting a reappraisal of the visual environment in the deep sea.

  9. Circadian regulation of bioluminescence in Gonyaulax involves translational control.

    OpenAIRE

    Morse, D.; Milos, P. M.; Roux, E.; Hastings, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    A 10-fold circadian variation in the amount of luciferin binding protein (LBP) in the marine dinoflagellate Gonyaulax polyedra is reported. This protein binds and stabilizes luciferin, the bioluminescence substrate. In early night phase, when bioluminescence is increasing and LBP levels are rising in the cell, pulse labeling experiments show that LBP is being rapidly synthesized in vivo. At other times, the rate of LBP synthesis is at least 50 times lower, while the rate of synthesis of most ...

  10. Information-theoretic method for wavelength selection in bioluminescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basevi, Hector R. A.; Guggenheim, James A.; Dehghani, Hamid; Styles, Iain B.

    2013-06-01

    Practical imaging constraints restrict the number of wavelengths that can be measured in a single Biolumines- cence Tomography imaging session, but it is unclear which set of measurement wavelengths is optimal, in the sense of providing the most information about the bioluminescent source. Mutual Information was used to integrate knowledge of the type of bioluminescent source likely to be present, the optical properties of tissue and physics of light propagation, and the noise characteristics of the imaging system, in order to quantify the information contained in measurements at different sets of wavelengths. The approach was applied to a two-dimensional sim- ulation of Bioluminescence Tomography imaging of a mouse, and the results indicate that different wavelengths and sets of wavelengths contain different amounts of information. When imaging at a single wavelength, 580nm was found to be optimal, and when imaging at two wavelengths, 570nm and 580nm were found to be optimal. Examination of the dispersion of the posterior distributions for single wavelengths suggests that information regarding the location of the centre of the bioluminescence distribution is relatively independent of wavelength, whilst information regarding the width of the bioluminescence distribution is relatively wavelength specific.

  11. Construction of a bioluminescent mycobacterium and its use for assay of antimycobacterial agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew, P. W.; Roberts, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    To show, as a model system, that mycobacteria can express heterologous luciferase genes and that bioluminescence can be a rapid method of measuring antimycobacterial activity, a bioluminescent form of Mycobacterium smegmatis was made by transformation with a Mycobacterium-Escherichia coli shuttle vector containing the luxAB genes from Vibrio harveyi. The antimycobacterial effects of antibiotics and biocides could be assayed in real time by using bioluminescent M. smegmatis.

  12. Bioluminescent bacteria: lux genes as environmental biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes-Halldorson Vânia da Silva; Duran Norma Letícia

    2003-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminescent genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in env...

  13. Bathyphotometer bioluminescence potential measurements: A framework for characterizing flow agitators and predicting flow-stimulated bioluminescence intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latz, Michael I.; Rohr, Jim

    2013-07-01

    Bathyphotometer measurements of bioluminescence are used as a proxy for the abundance of luminescent organisms for studying population dynamics; the interaction of luminescent organisms with physical, chemical, and biological oceanographic processes; and spatial complexity especially in coastal areas. However, the usefulness of bioluminescence measurements has been limited by the inability to compare results from different bathyphotometer designs, or even the same bathyphotometer operating at different volume flow rates. The primary objective of this study was to compare measurements of stimulated bioluminescence of four species of cultured dinoflagellates, the most common source of bioluminescence in coastal waters, using two different bathyphotometer flow agitators as a function of bathyphotometer volume flow rate and dinoflagellate concentration. For both the NOSC and BIOLITE flow agitators and each species of dinoflagellate tested, there was a critical volume flow rate, above which average bioluminescence intensity, designated as bathyphotometer bioluminescence potential (BBP), remained relatively constant and scaled directly with dinoflagellate cell concentration. At supra-critical volume flow rates, the ratio of BIOLITE to NOSC BBP was nearly constant for the same species studied, but varied between species. The spatial pattern and residence time of flash trajectories within the NOSC flow agitator indicated the presence of dominant secondary recirculating flows, where most of the bioluminescence was detected. A secondary objective (appearing in the Appendix) was to study the feasibility of using NOSC BBP to scale flow-stimulated bioluminescence intensity across similar flow fields, where the contributing composition of luminescent species remained the same. Fully developed turbulent pipe flow was chosen because it is hydrodynamically well characterized. Average bioluminescence intensity in a 2.54-cm i.d. pipe was highly correlated with wall shear stress and BBP. This correlation, when further scaled by pipe diameter, effectively predicted bioluminescence intensity in fully developed turbulent flow in a 0.83-cm i.d. pipe. Determining similar correlations between other bathyphotometer flow agitators and flow fields will allow bioluminescence potential measurements to become a more powerful tool for the oceanographic community.

  14. Space-Time Quantum Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald E. Meyers

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on an experimental and theoretical investigation of quantum imaging where the images are stored in both space and time. Ghost images of remote objects are produced with either one or two beams of chaotic laser light generated by a rotating ground glass and two sensors measuring the reference field and bucket field at different space-time points. We further observe that the ghost images translate depending on the time delay between the sensor measurements. The ghost imaging experiments are performed both with and without turbulence. A discussion of the physics of the space-time imaging is presented in terms of quantum nonlocal two-photon analysis to support the experimental results. The theoretical model includes certain phase factors of the rotating ground glass. These experiments demonstrated a means to investigate the time and space aspects of ghost imaging and showed that ghost imaging contains more information per measured photon than was previously recognized where multiple ghost images are stored within the same ghost imaging data sets. This suggests new pathways to explore quantum information stored not only in multi-photon coincidence information but also in time delayed multi-photon interference. The research is applicable to making enhanced space-time quantum images and videos of moving objects where the images are stored in both space and time.

  15. In vitro validation of bioluminescent monitoring of disease progression and therapeutic response in leukaemia model animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of in vivo bioluminescence imaging to non-invasive, quantitative monitoring of tumour models relies on a positive correlation between the intensity of bioluminescence and the tumour burden. We conducted cell culture studies to investigate the relationship between bioluminescent signal intensity and viable cell numbers in murine leukaemia model cells. Interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent murine pro-B cell line Ba/F3 was transduced with firefly luciferase to generate cells expressing luciferase stably under the control of a retroviral long terminal repeat. The luciferase-expressing cells were transduced with p190 BCR-ABL to give factor-independent proliferation. The cells were cultured under various conditions, and bioluminescent signal intensity was compared with viable cell numbers and the cell cycle stage. The Ba/F3 cells showed autonomous growth as well as stable luciferase expression following transduction with both luciferase and p190 BCR-ABL, and in vivo bioluminescence imaging permitted external detection of these cells implanted into mice. The bioluminescence intensities tended to reflect cell proliferation and responses to imatinib in cell culture studies. However, the luminescence per viable cell was influenced by the IL-3 concentration in factor-dependent cells and by the stage of proliferation and imatinib concentration in factor-independent cells, thereby impairing the proportionality between viable cell number and bioluminescent signal intensitynumber and bioluminescent signal intensity. Luminescence per cell tended to vary in association with the fraction of proliferating cells. Although in vivo bioluminescence imaging would allow non-invasive monitoring of leukaemia model animals, environmental factors and therapeutic interventions may cause some discrepancies between tumour burden and bioluminescence intensity. (orig.)

  16. Bioluminescence imaging to track bacterial dissemination of Yersinia pestis using different routes of infection in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez Rodrigo J; Weening Eric H; Frothingham Richard; Sempowski Gregory D; Miller Virginia L

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Plague is caused by Yersinia pestis, a bacterium that disseminates inside of the host at remarkably high rates. Plague bacilli disrupt normal immune responses in the host allowing for systematic spread that is fatal if left untreated. How Y. pestis disseminates from the site of infection to deeper tissues is unknown. Dissemination studies for plague are typically performed in mice by determining the bacterial burden in specific organs at various time points. To follow bact...

  17. Bioluminescence Imaging Study of Spatial and Temporal Persistence of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactococcus lactis in Living Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel, Catherine; Poiret, Sabine; Dennin, Véronique; Boutillier, Denise; Pot, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria, especially lactobacilli, are common inhabitants of the gastrointestinal tract of mammals, for which they have received considerable attention due to their putative health-promoting properties. In this study, we describe the development and application of luciferase-expressing Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactococcus lactis strains for noninvasive in vivo monitoring in the digestive tract of mice. We report for the first time the functional in vitro expression in Lactobaci...

  18. Visualizing cell proximity with genetically encoded bioluminescent reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Krysten A; Li, David J; Hui, Elliot; Sellmyer, Mark A; Prescher, Jennifer A

    2015-04-17

    Cell-cell interactions underlie diverse physiological processes ranging from immune function to cell migration. Dysregulated cellular crosstalk also potentiates numerous pathologies, including infections and metastases. Despite their ubiquity in organismal biology, cell-cell interactions are difficult to examine in tissues and whole animals without invasive procedures. Here, we report a strategy to noninvasively image cell proximity using engineered bioluminescent probes. These tools comprise "split" fragments of Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) fused to the leucine zipper domains of Fos and Jun. When cells secreting the fragments draw near one another, Fos and Jun drive the assembly of functional, light-emitting Gluc. Photon production thus provides a readout on the distance between two cell types. We used the split fragments to visualize cell-cell interactions over time in vitro and in macroscopic models of cell migration. Further application of these tools in live organisms will refine our understanding of cell contacts relevant to basic biology and disease. PMID:25643167

  19. The rapid bioluminescence assay method for content of bacteria in dehydrated vegetable and condiment before radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microbial colony-forming unit (cfu) in dehydrated vegetable and condiment was determined by using ATP bioluminescence method. The result showed that bioluminescence of ATP was correlative to the microbial cfu obviously. The detecting time was within 1-2 h. This method could be applied to determine micro load of products before irradiation sterilization. (authors)

  20. A fast bioluminescent source localization method based on generalized graph cuts with mouse model validations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Tian, Jie; Lu, Yujie; Qin, Chenghu; Yang, Xin; Zhu, Shouping; Zhang, Xing

    2010-02-15

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) makes it possible to elucidate molecular and cellular signatures to better understand the effects of human disease in small animal models in vivo. The unambiguous three-dimensional bioluminescent source information obtained by bioluminescence tomography (BLT) could further facilitate its applications in biomedicine. However, to the best of our knowledge, the existing gradient-type reconstruction methods in BLT are inefficient, and often require a relatively small volume of interest (VOI) for feasible results. In this paper, a fast generalized graph cuts based reconstruction method for BLT is presented, which is to localize the bioluminescent source in heterogeneous mouse tissues via max-flow/min-cut algorithm. Since the original graph cuts theory can only handle graph-representable problem, the quadratic pseudo-boolean optimization is incorporated to make the graph representable and tractable, which is called generalized graph cuts (GGC). The internal light source can be reconstructed from the whole domain, so a priori knowledge of VOI can be avoided in this method. In the simulation validations, the proposed method was validated in a heterogeneous mouse atlas, and the source can be localized reliably and efficiently by GGC; and compared with gradient-type method, the proposed method is about 25-50 times faster. Moreover, the experiments for sensitivity to the measurement errors of tissue optical properties demonstrate that, the reconstruction quality is not much affected by mismatch of parameters. In what follows, in vivo mouse BLT reconstructions further demonstrated the potential and effectiveness of the generalized graph cut based reconstruction method. PMID:20389383

  1. Real-Time Monitoring of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Adherence to Beef Carcass Surface Tissues with a Bioluminescent Reporter

    OpenAIRE

    Siragusa, Gregory R.; Nawotka, Kevin; Spilman, Stanley D.; Contag, Pamela R.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-01-01

    A method for studying bacteria that are attached to carcass surfaces would eliminate the need for exogenous sampling and would facilitate understanding the interaction of potential human food-borne pathogens with food animal tissue surfaces. We describe such a method in which we used a bioluminescent reporter strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7 that was constructed by transformation with plasmid pCGLS1, an expression vector that contains a complete bacterial luciferase (lux) operon. Beef carca...

  2. GMO detection using a bioluminescent real time reporter (BART) of loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) suitable for field use

    OpenAIRE

    Kiddle Guy; Hardinge Patrick; Buttigieg Neil; Gandelman Olga; Pereira Clint; McElgunn Cathal J; Rizzoli Manuela; Jackson Rebecca; Appleton Nigel; Moore Cathy; Tisi Laurence C; Ah, Murray James

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background There is an increasing need for quantitative technologies suitable for molecular detection in a variety of settings for applications including food traceability and monitoring of genetically modified (GM) crops and their products through the food processing chain. Conventional molecular diagnostics utilising real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and fluorescence-based determination of amplification require temperature cycling and relatively complex optics. In contra...

  3. Random matrix-based dimensionality reduction for bioluminescence tomography reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, Iain B.; Basevi, Hector R. A.; Guggenheim, James A.; Dehghani, Hamid

    2013-06-01

    We show how a random matrix can be used to reduce the dimensionality of the bioluminescence tomography reconstruction problem. A randomised low-rank approximation for the sensitivity matrix is computed, and we show how this can be used to reconstruct the bioluminescence source distribution on a randomised basis for the mesh nodes. The distribution on the original mesh can be found easily via a simple matrix multiplication. The majority of the computation required can be performed in advance of the reconstruction, and the reconstruction time itself is of the order milliseconds. This could allow for high frame rate real-time reconstructions to be performed.

  4. Gombrich on image and time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristóf Nyíri

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a very close, indeed intrinsic, connection between the notions of image and time. Images are incomplete unless they are moving ones – unless, that is, they happen in time. On the other hand, time cannot be conceptualized except by metaphors, and so ultimately by images, of movement in space. That only the moving image is a full-fledged one is a fact that was fully recognized and articulated by Ernst Gombrich. Also, Gombrich entertained, and argued for, a rich and well-balanced view of the relationships between pictorial and verbal representation. An antidote to the unholy influence of Goodman, Gombrich deserves to be rediscovered as the figure whose work is ideally suited to providing a founding paradigm for a truly successful philosophy of images.

  5. Time out (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Time out is a form of punishment used by parents or teachers in response to undesired behaviors amongst children. When children are put in time out, they are put in a certain designated place to sit for a certain amount of ...

  6. Effect of irradiation on bioluminescence spectrum of microbial ATP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of irradiation on bioluminescence spectrum of dehydrated cabbage microbial ATP was studied. The results showed that the spectral bandwidth of ATP standard was from 490 to 640 nm and the peak wavelength was at 563 nm. The spectral bandwidths of irradiated dehydrated cabbage microbial ATP and CK did not change. Peak wavelengths of dehydrated cabbage irradiated at different dosages were not significantly different from that of CK. The peaks of bioluminescence spectrum of irradiated samples were higher than that of CK, which may be because of the increasing concentration of ATP, and this effect would be kept for quite a long time after irradiation. (authors)

  7. Chemiluminescent and bioluminescent techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kricka, L J

    1991-09-01

    Light-emitting chemical reactions (chemiluminescence, CL) and biological reactions (bioluminescence, BL) have a diverse range of analytical applications but relatively few have been adopted by routine clinical laboratories. Advantages of CL and BL assays include sensitivity (attomole and sub-attomole detection limits), speed (signal generated in a few seconds and in some cases stable for several hours), nonhazardous reagents, and simple procedures. The most promising clinical applications are in immunoassay, protein blotting, and DNA probe assays. Chemiluminescent molecules exploited as labels include luminol, isoluminol, acridinium esters, thioesters and sulfonamides, and phenanthridinium esters. Separation and nonseparation assays have been devised, based on isoluminol and acridinium ester labels. The combination of the amplification properties of an enzyme and a CL or BL detection reaction provides a highly sensitive analytical system. Since 1983, CL and BL methods have been developed for many enzyme labels, e.g., alkaline phosphatase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, horseradish peroxidase, Renilla luciferase, and xanthine oxidase. Currently, the most successful enzyme assays are the enhanced CL method for a peroxidase label involving a mixture of luminol, hydrogen peroxide, and an enhancer (e.g., p-iodophenol) and the direct CL method for alkaline phosphatase, with an adamantyl 1,2-dioxetane phenyl phosphate as substrate. Both systems are very sensitive (the detection limit for alkaline phosphatase when using the dioxetane reagent is 0.001 amol) and produce long-lived light emission (greater than 30 min), which is ideal for membrane applications in which light emission is detected with photographic film or a charge-coupled device camera. PMID:1893571

  8. Bioluminescent virion shells: New tools for quantitation of AAV vector dynamics in cells and live animals

    OpenAIRE

    Asokan, Aravind; Johnson, Jarrod S; Li, Chengwen; Samulski, R. Jude

    2008-01-01

    Current technologies for visualizing infectious pathways of viruses rely on fluorescent labeling of capsid proteins by chemical conjugation or genetic manipulation. For non-invasive in vivo imaging of such agents in mammalian tissue, we engineered bioluminescent Gaussia luciferase-tagged Adeno-Associated Viral (gLuc/AAV) vectors. The enzyme was incorporated into recombinant AAV serotype 1, 2, and 8 capsids by fusion to the N-terminus of the VP2 capsid subunit to yield bioluminescent virion sh...

  9. A gantry-based tri-modality system for bioluminescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Han; Lin, Yuting; Barber, William C.; Unlu, Mehmet Burcin; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2012-04-01

    A gantry-based tri-modality system that combines bioluminescence (BLT), diffuse optical (DOT), and x-ray computed tomography (XCT) into the same setting is presented here. The purpose of this system is to perform bioluminescence tomography using a multi-modality imaging approach. As parts of this hybrid system, XCT and DOT provide anatomical information and background optical property maps. This structural and functional a priori information is used to guide and restrain bioluminescence reconstruction algorithm and ultimately improve the BLT results. The performance of the combined system is evaluated using multi-modality phantoms. In particular, a cylindrical heterogeneous multi-modality phantom that contains regions with higher optical absorption and x-ray attenuation is constructed. We showed that a 1.5 mm diameter bioluminescence inclusion can be localized accurately with the functional a priori information while its source strength can be recovered more accurately using both structural and the functional a priori information.

  10. Automatic Segmentation Framework of Building Anatomical Mouse Model for Bioluminescence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Alali

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence tomography is known as a highly ill-posed inverse problem. To improve the reconstruction performance by introducing anatomical structures as a priori knowledge, an automatic segmentation framework has been proposed in this paper to extract the mouse whole-body organs and tissues, which enables to build up a heterogeneous mouse model for reconstruction of bioluminescence tomography. Finally, an in vivo mouse experiment has been conducted to evaluate this framework by using an X-ray computed tomography system and a multi-view bioluminescence imaging system. The findings suggest that the proposed method can realize fast automatic segmentation of mouse anatomical structures, ultimately enhancing the reconstruction performance of bioluminescence tomography.

  11. A Nisin Bioassay Based on Bioluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlstro?m, G.; Saris, P. E. J.

    1999-01-01

    A Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain that can sense the bacteriocin nisin and transduce the signal into bioluminescence was constructed. By using this strain, a bioassay based on bioluminescence was developed for quantification of nisin, for detection of nisin in milk, and for identification of nisin-producing strains. As little as 0.0125 ng of nisin per ml was detected within 3 h by this bioluminescence assay. This detection limit was lower than in previously described methods.

  12. Bacterial Bioluminescence: Its Control and Ecological Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, J. Woodland (John Woodland), 1927-

    This Microbiological Reviews scholarly article (23-page PDF) presents an overview of data relevant to the ecology of bioluminescent bacteria and the functional importance of light emission. The review article discusses the biochemistry of bioluminescence, taxonomic relationships of luminous bacteria, control of the synthesis and activity of the luminescent system, habitats and distribution of luminous bacteria, functions of bioluminescence, and new perspectives. These perspectives and other specific postulates presented in the article provide new approaches for data collection and experimental work.

  13. Mathematical Study and Numerical Simulation of Multispectral Bioluminescence Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Ge Wang; Wenxiang Cong; Weimin Han

    2006-01-01

    Multispectral bioluminescence tomography (BLT) attracts increasingly more attention in the area of optical molecular imaging. In this paper, we analyze the properties of the solutions to the regularized and discretized multispectral BLT problems. First, we show the solution existence, uniqueness, and its continuous dependence on the data. Then, we introduce stable numerical schemes and derive error estimates for numerical solutions. We report some numerical results to illust...

  14. Comparison of human optimized bacterial luciferase, firefly luciferase, and green fluorescent protein for continuous imaging of cell culture and animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan M.; Hahn, Ruth E.; Patterson, Stacey S.; Baek, Seung J.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-04-01

    Bioluminescent and fluorescent reporter systems have enabled the rapid and continued growth of the optical imaging field over the last two decades. Of particular interest has been noninvasive signal detection from mammalian tissues under both cell culture and whole animal settings. Here we report on the advantages and limitations of imaging using a recently introduced bacterial luciferase (lux) reporter system engineered for increased bioluminescent expression in the mammalian cellular environment. Comparison with the bioluminescent firefly luciferase (Luc) system and green fluorescent protein system under cell culture conditions demonstrated a reduced average radiance, but maintained a more constant level of bioluminescent output without the need for substrate addition or exogenous excitation to elicit the production of signal. Comparison with the Luc system following subcutaneous and intraperitoneal injection into nude mice hosts demonstrated the ability to obtain similar detection patterns with in vitro experiments at cell population sizes above 2.5 × 104 cells but at the cost of increasing overall image integration time.

  15. Spectrally resolved bioluminescence tomography with the third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioluminescence imaging has been extensively applied to in vivo small animal imaging. Quantitative three-dimensional bioluminescent source information obtained by using bioluminescence tomography can directly and much more accurately reflect biological changes as opposed to planar bioluminescence imaging. Preliminary simulated and experimental reconstruction results demonstrate the feasibility and promise of bioluminescence tomography. However, the use of multiple approximations, particularly the diffusion approximation theory, affects the quality of in vivo small animal-based image reconstructions. In the development of new reconstruction algorithms, high-order approximation models of the radiative transfer equation and spectrally resolved data introduce new challenges to the reconstruction algorithm and speed. In this paper, an SP3-based (the third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation) spectrally resolved reconstruction algorithm is proposed. The simple linear relationship between the unknown source distribution and the spectrally resolved data is established in this algorithm. A parallel version of this algorithm is realized, making BLT reconstruction feasible for the whole body of small animals especially for fine spatial domain discretization. In simulation validations, the proposed algorithm shows improved reconstruction quality compared with diffusion approximation-based methods when high absorption, superficial sources and detection motion, superficial sources and detection modes are considered. In addition, comparisons between fine and coarse mesh-based BLT reconstructions show the effects of numerical errors in reconstruction image quality. Finally, BLT reconstructions using in vivo mouse experiments further demonstrate the potential and effectiveness of the SP3-based reconstruction algorithm.

  16. Spectrally resolved bioluminescence tomography with the third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Yujie; Douraghy, Ali; Stout, David; Herschman, Harvey; Chatziioannou, Arion F [Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Machado, Hidevaldo B [Department of Biological Chemistry, Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Tian Jie [Medical Image Processing Group, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 2728, Beijing 100190 (China)], E-mail: archatziioann@mednet.ucla.edu, E-mail: hherschman@mednet.ucla.edu

    2009-11-07

    Bioluminescence imaging has been extensively applied to in vivo small animal imaging. Quantitative three-dimensional bioluminescent source information obtained by using bioluminescence tomography can directly and much more accurately reflect biological changes as opposed to planar bioluminescence imaging. Preliminary simulated and experimental reconstruction results demonstrate the feasibility and promise of bioluminescence tomography. However, the use of multiple approximations, particularly the diffusion approximation theory, affects the quality of in vivo small animal-based image reconstructions. In the development of new reconstruction algorithms, high-order approximation models of the radiative transfer equation and spectrally resolved data introduce new challenges to the reconstruction algorithm and speed. In this paper, an SP{sub 3}-based (the third-order simplified spherical harmonics approximation) spectrally resolved reconstruction algorithm is proposed. The simple linear relationship between the unknown source distribution and the spectrally resolved data is established in this algorithm. A parallel version of this algorithm is realized, making BLT reconstruction feasible for the whole body of small animals especially for fine spatial domain discretization. In simulation validations, the proposed algorithm shows improved reconstruction quality compared with diffusion approximation-based methods when high absorption, superficial sources and detection modes are considered. In addition, comparisons between fine and coarse mesh-based BLT reconstructions show the effects of numerical errors in reconstruction image quality. Finally, BLT reconstructions using in vivo mouse experiments further demonstrate the potential and effectiveness of the SP{sub 3}-based reconstruction algorithm.

  17. Preclinical evaluation of destruxin B as a novel Wnt signaling target suppressing proliferation and metastasis of colorectal cancer using non-invasive bioluminescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In continuation to our studies toward the identification of direct anti-cancer targets, here we showed that destruxin B (DB) from Metarhizium anisopliae suppressed the proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest in human colorectal cancer (CRC) HT29, SW480 and HCT116 cells. Additionally, DB induced apoptosis in HT29 cells by decreased expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL while increased pro-apoptotic Bax. On the other hand, DB attenuated Wnt-signaling by downregulation of ?-catenin, Tcf4 and ?-catenin/Tcf4 transcriptional activity, concomitantly with decreased expression of ?-catenin target genes cyclin D1, c-myc and survivin. Furthermore, DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through suppressed MMPs-2 and -9 enzymatic activities. We also found that DB targeted the MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt pathway by reduced expression of Akt, IKK-?, JNK, NF-?B, c-Jun and c-Fos while increased that of I?B?. Finally, we demonstrated that DB inhibited tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice using non-invasive bioluminescence technique. Consistently, tumor samples from DB-treated mice demonstrated suppressed expression of ?-catenin, cyclin D1, survivin, and endothelial marker CD31 while increased caspase-3 expression. Collectively, our data supports DB as an inhibitor of Wnt/?-catenin/Tcf signaling pathway that may be beneficial in the CRC management. Highlights: ? Destruxin B (DB) inhibited colorectal cancer cells growth and induced apoptosis. ? MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt cascade cooperates in DB induced apoptosis. ? DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through MMP-9. ? DB attenuated Wnt-signaling components ?-catenin, Tcf4. ? DB attenuated cyclin D1, c-myc, survivin and tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice.

  18. Preclinical evaluation of destruxin B as a novel Wnt signaling target suppressing proliferation and metastasis of colorectal cancer using non-invasive bioluminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Chi-Tai [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Center of Excellence for Cancer Research, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Rao, Yerra Koteswara [Institute of Biochemical Sciences and Technology, Chaoyang University of Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Ye, Min [Department of Natural Medicine, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China); Wu, Wen-Shi [Department of Horticulture and Biotechnology, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Tung-Chen [Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Liang-Shun [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-Hsiung [Center of Excellence for Cancer Research, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Surgery, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wu, Alexander T.H., E-mail: chaw1211@tmu.edu.tw [Ph.D. Program for Translational Medicine, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Yew-Min, E-mail: ymtzeng@cyut.edu.tw [Institute of Biochemical Sciences and Technology, Chaoyang University of Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2012-05-15

    In continuation to our studies toward the identification of direct anti-cancer targets, here we showed that destruxin B (DB) from Metarhizium anisopliae suppressed the proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest in human colorectal cancer (CRC) HT29, SW480 and HCT116 cells. Additionally, DB induced apoptosis in HT29 cells by decreased expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL while increased pro-apoptotic Bax. On the other hand, DB attenuated Wnt-signaling by downregulation of ?-catenin, Tcf4 and ?-catenin/Tcf4 transcriptional activity, concomitantly with decreased expression of ?-catenin target genes cyclin D1, c-myc and survivin. Furthermore, DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through suppressed MMPs-2 and -9 enzymatic activities. We also found that DB targeted the MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt pathway by reduced expression of Akt, IKK-?, JNK, NF-?B, c-Jun and c-Fos while increased that of I?B?. Finally, we demonstrated that DB inhibited tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice using non-invasive bioluminescence technique. Consistently, tumor samples from DB-treated mice demonstrated suppressed expression of ?-catenin, cyclin D1, survivin, and endothelial marker CD31 while increased caspase-3 expression. Collectively, our data supports DB as an inhibitor of Wnt/?-catenin/Tcf signaling pathway that may be beneficial in the CRC management. Highlights: ? Destruxin B (DB) inhibited colorectal cancer cells growth and induced apoptosis. ? MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt cascade cooperates in DB induced apoptosis. ? DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through MMP-9. ? DB attenuated Wnt-signaling components ?-catenin, Tcf4. ? DB attenuated cyclin D1, c-myc, survivin and tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice.

  19. Bacterial bioluminescence and Gumbel statistics: From quorum sensing to correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Side, Domenico; Velardi, Luciano; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Pennetta, Cecilia; Alifano, Pietro; Talà, Adelfia; Salvatore Tredici, Maurizio

    2013-12-01

    We show that, in particular experimental conditions, the time course of the radiant fluxes, measured from a bioluminescent emission of a Vibrio harveyi related strain, collapse after suitable rescaling onto the Gumbel distribution of extreme value theory. We argue that the activation times of the strain luminous emission follow the universal behavior described by this statistical law, in spite of the fact that no extremal process is known to occur.

  20. REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS OF BIOLUMINESCENCE MEASUREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review of the recent literature on environmental applications of bioluminescence systems will focus on in vivo and in vitro bioluminescence methods that have been utilized to elucidate properties of chemicals, toxic and mutagenic effects, and to estimate biomass. he unifying...

  1. Monsters of the Deep: Deep Sea Bioluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.D. Knight

    This award-winning Sea and Sky website uses creative graphics to explore deep sea bioluminescence. It defines the phenomenon of bioluminescence, explains the chemical reactions involved, describes organisms with this adaptation, and investigates possible reasons for this dazzling light show. Links direct users to similar pages about hydrothermal vents, ocean layers, and more.

  2. Bioluminescence tomography based on the phase approximation model

    OpenAIRE

    Cong, W.; Wang, G.

    2010-01-01

    A reconstruction method of bioluminescence sources is proposed based on a phase approximation model. Compared with the diffuse approximation, this phase approximation model more correctly predicts bioluminescence photon propagation in biological tissues, so that bioluminescence tomography can accurately locate and quantify the distribution of bioluminescence sources. The compressive sensing (CS) technique is applied to regularize the inverse source reconstruction to enhance numerical stabilit...

  3. Increased bioassay sensitivity of bioactive molecule discovery using metal-enhanced bioluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golberg, Karina, E-mail: karingo@bgu.ac.il; Elbaz, Amit [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering (Israel); McNeil, Ronald [The Institute of Fluorescence, University of Maryland Baltimore County (United States); Kushmaro, Ariel [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering (Israel); Geddes, Chris D. [The Institute of Fluorescence, University of Maryland Baltimore County (United States); Marks, Robert S., E-mail: rsmarks@bgu.ac.il [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering (Israel)

    2014-12-15

    We report the use of bioluminescence signal enhancement via proximity to deposited silver nanoparticles for bioactive compound discovery. This approach employs a whole-cell bioreporter harboring a plasmid-borne fusion of a specific promoter incorporated with a bioluminescence reporter gene. The silver deposition process was first optimized to provide optimal nanoparticle size in the reaction time dependence with fluorescein. The use of silver deposition of 350 nm particles enabled the doubling of the bioluminescent signal amplitude by the bacterial bioreporter when compared to an untouched non-silver-deposited microtiter plate surface. This recording is carried out in the less optimal but necessary far-field distance. SEM micrographs provided a visualization of the proximity of the bioreporter to the silver nanoparticles. The electromagnetic field distributions around the nanoparticles were simulated using Finite Difference Time Domain, further suggesting a re-excitation of non-chemically excited bioluminescence in addition to metal-enhanced bioluminescence. The possibility of an antiseptic silver effect caused by such a close proximity was eliminated disregarded by the dynamic growth curves of the bioreporter strains as seen using viability staining. As a highly attractive biotechnology tool, this silver deposition technique, coupled with whole-cell sensing, enables increased bioluminescence sensitivity, making it especially useful for cases in which reporter luminescence signals are very weak.

  4. Increased bioassay sensitivity of bioactive molecule discovery using metal-enhanced bioluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the use of bioluminescence signal enhancement via proximity to deposited silver nanoparticles for bioactive compound discovery. This approach employs a whole-cell bioreporter harboring a plasmid-borne fusion of a specific promoter incorporated with a bioluminescence reporter gene. The silver deposition process was first optimized to provide optimal nanoparticle size in the reaction time dependence with fluorescein. The use of silver deposition of 350 nm particles enabled the doubling of the bioluminescent signal amplitude by the bacterial bioreporter when compared to an untouched non-silver-deposited microtiter plate surface. This recording is carried out in the less optimal but necessary far-field distance. SEM micrographs provided a visualization of the proximity of the bioreporter to the silver nanoparticles. The electromagnetic field distributions around the nanoparticles were simulated using Finite Difference Time Domain, further suggesting a re-excitation of non-chemically excited bioluminescence in addition to metal-enhanced bioluminescence. The possibility of an antiseptic silver effect caused by such a close proximity was eliminated disregarded by the dynamic growth curves of the bioreporter strains as seen using viability staining. As a highly attractive biotechnology tool, this silver deposition technique, coupled with whole-cell sensing, enables increased bioluminescence sensitivity, making it especially useful for cases in which reporter luminescence signals are very weak

  5. Autofluorescence imaging device for real-time detection and tracking of pathogenic bacteria in a mouse skin wound model: preclinical feasibility studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yichao Charlie; Kulbatski, Iris; Medeiros, Philip J.; Maeda, Azusa; Bu, Jiachuan; Xu, Lizhen; Chen, Yonghong; DaCosta, Ralph S.

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial infection significantly impedes wound healing. Clinical diagnosis of wound infections is subjective and suboptimal, in part because bacteria are invisible to the naked eye during clinical examination. Moreover, bacterial infection can be present in asymptomatic patients, leading to missed opportunities for diagnosis and treatment. We developed a prototype handheld autofluorescence (AF) imaging device (Portable Real-time Optical Detection, Identification and Guidance for Intervention-PRODIGI) to noninvasively visualize and measure bacterial load in wounds in real time. We conducted preclinical pilot studies in an established nude mouse skin wound model inoculated with bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. We tested the feasibility of longitudinal AF imaging for in vivo visualization of bacterial load in skin wounds, validated by bioluminescence imaging. We showed that bacteria (S. aureus), occult to standard examination, can be visualized in wounds using PRODIGI. We also detected quantitative changes in wound bacterial load over time based on the antibiotic treatment and the correlation of bacterial AF intensity with bacterial load. AF imaging of wounds offers a safe, noninvasive method for visualizing the presence, location, and extent of bacteria as well as measuring relative changes in bacterial load in wounds in real time.

  6. Experimental Study on Bioluminescence Tomography with Multimodality Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Lv

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available To verify the influence of a priori information on the nonuniqueness problem of bioluminescence tomography (BLT, the multimodality imaging fusion based BLT experiment is performed by multiview noncontact detection mode, which incorporates the anatomical information obtained by the microCT scanner and the background optical properties based on diffuse reflectance measurements. In the reconstruction procedure, the utilization of adaptive finite element methods (FEMs and a priori permissible source region refines the reconstructed results and improves numerical robustness and efficiency. The comparison between the absence and employment of a priori information shows that multimodality imaging fusion is essential to quantitative BLT reconstruction.

  7. Shedding Light on the Bioluminescence "Paradox"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric V. Stabb

    This ASM News article explores biochemistry, genetics, and cell density-dependent regulation of bacterial bioluminescence, addressing the question: What good is it to bioluminescent bacteria? The article reviews the symbiosis between the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri and the Hawaiian bobtail squid, and examines how progress in understanding the genetics of V. fischeri, including genomic sequencing of a squid symbiont, is enabling researchers to analyze how luminescence integrates with the physiology of this bacterial species. The article includes a link to a detailed author profile.

  8. Circadian control sheds light on fungal bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Anderson G; Stevani, Cassius V; Waldenmaier, Hans E; Viviani, Vadim; Emerson, Jillian M; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2015-03-30

    Bioluminescence, the creation and emission of light by organisms, affords insight into the lives of organisms doing it. Luminous living things are widespread and access diverse mechanisms to generate and control luminescence [1-5]. Among the least studied bioluminescent organisms are phylogenetically rare fungi-only 71 species, all within the ?9,000 fungi of the temperate and tropical Agaricales order-are reported from among ?100,000 described fungal species [6, 7]. All require oxygen [8] and energy (NADH or NADPH) for bioluminescence and are reported to emit green light (?max 530 nm) continuously, implying a metabolic function for bioluminescence, perhaps as a byproduct of oxidative metabolism in lignin degradation. Here, however, we report that bioluminescence from the mycelium of Neonothopanus gardneri is controlled by a temperature-compensated circadian clock, the result of cycles in content/activity of the luciferase, reductase, and luciferin that comprise the luminescent system. Because regulation implies an adaptive function for bioluminescence, a controversial question for more than two millennia [8-15], we examined interactions between luminescent fungi and insects [16]. Prosthetic acrylic resin "mushrooms," internally illuminated by a green LED emitting light similar to the bioluminescence, attract staphilinid rove beetles (coleopterans), as well as hemipterans (true bugs), dipterans (flies), and hymenopterans (wasps and ants), at numbers far greater than dark control traps. Thus, circadian control may optimize energy use for when bioluminescence is most visible, attracting insects that can in turn help in spore dispersal, thereby benefitting fungi growing under the forest canopy, where wind flow is greatly reduced. PMID:25802150

  9. An adaptive regularization parameter choice strategy for multispectral bioluminescence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) provides an effective tool for monitoring physiological and pathological activities in vivo. However, the measured data in bioluminescence imaging are corrupted by noise. Therefore, regularization methods are commonly used to find a regularized solution. Nevertheless, for the quality of the reconstructed bioluminescent source obtained by regularization methods, the choice of the regularization parameters is crucial. To date, the selection of regularization parameters remains challenging. With regards to the above problems, the authors proposed a BLT reconstruction algorithm with an adaptive parameter choice rule. Methods: The proposed reconstruction algorithm uses a diffusion equation for modeling the bioluminescent photon transport. The diffusion equation is solved with a finite element method. Computed tomography (CT) images provide anatomical information regarding the geometry of the small animal and its internal organs. To reduce the ill-posedness of BLT, spectral information and the optimal permissible source region are employed. Then, the relationship between the unknown source distribution and multiview and multispectral boundary measurements is established based on the finite element method and the optimal permissible source region. Since the measured data are noisy, the BLT reconstruction is formulated as l2 data fidelity and a general regularization term. When choosing the regularization parameters for BLTsing the regularization parameters for BLT, an efficient model function approach is proposed, which does not require knowledge of the noise level. This approach only requests the computation of the residual and regularized solution norm. With this knowledge, we construct the model function to approximate the objective function, and the regularization parameter is updated iteratively. Results: First, the micro-CT based mouse phantom was used for simulation verification. Simulation experiments were used to illustrate why multispectral data were used rather than monochromatic data. Furthermore, the study conducted using an adaptive regularization parameter demonstrated our ability to accurately localize the bioluminescent source. With the adaptively estimated regularization parameter, the reconstructed center position of the source was (20.37, 31.05, 12.95) mm, and the distance to the real source was 0.63 mm. The results of the dual-source experiments further showed that our algorithm could localize the bioluminescent sources accurately. The authors then presented experimental evidence that the proposed algorithm exhibited its calculated efficiency over the heuristic method. The effectiveness of the new algorithm was also confirmed by comparing it with the L-curve method. Furthermore, various initial speculations regarding the regularization parameter were used to illustrate the convergence of our algorithm. Finally, in vivo mouse experiment further illustrates the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. Conclusions: Utilizing numerical, physical phantom and in vivo examples, we demonstrated that the bioluminescent sources could be reconstructed accurately with automatic regularization parameters. The proposed algorithm exhibited superior performance than both the heuristic regularization parameter choice method and L-curve method based on the computational speed and localization error.

  10. An adaptive regularization parameter choice strategy for multispectral bioluminescence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Jinchao; Qin Chenghu; Jia Kebin; Han Dong; Liu Kai; Zhu Shouping; Yang Xin; Tian Jie [Medical Image Processing Group, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2728, Beijing 100190 (China); College of Electronic Information and Control Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Medical Image Processing Group, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2728, Beijing 100190 (China); Medical Image Processing Group, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 2728, Beijing 100190 (China) and School of Life Sciences and Technology, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) provides an effective tool for monitoring physiological and pathological activities in vivo. However, the measured data in bioluminescence imaging are corrupted by noise. Therefore, regularization methods are commonly used to find a regularized solution. Nevertheless, for the quality of the reconstructed bioluminescent source obtained by regularization methods, the choice of the regularization parameters is crucial. To date, the selection of regularization parameters remains challenging. With regards to the above problems, the authors proposed a BLT reconstruction algorithm with an adaptive parameter choice rule. Methods: The proposed reconstruction algorithm uses a diffusion equation for modeling the bioluminescent photon transport. The diffusion equation is solved with a finite element method. Computed tomography (CT) images provide anatomical information regarding the geometry of the small animal and its internal organs. To reduce the ill-posedness of BLT, spectral information and the optimal permissible source region are employed. Then, the relationship between the unknown source distribution and multiview and multispectral boundary measurements is established based on the finite element method and the optimal permissible source region. Since the measured data are noisy, the BLT reconstruction is formulated as l{sub 2} data fidelity and a general regularization term. When choosing the regularization parameters for BLT, an efficient model function approach is proposed, which does not require knowledge of the noise level. This approach only requests the computation of the residual and regularized solution norm. With this knowledge, we construct the model function to approximate the objective function, and the regularization parameter is updated iteratively. Results: First, the micro-CT based mouse phantom was used for simulation verification. Simulation experiments were used to illustrate why multispectral data were used rather than monochromatic data. Furthermore, the study conducted using an adaptive regularization parameter demonstrated our ability to accurately localize the bioluminescent source. With the adaptively estimated regularization parameter, the reconstructed center position of the source was (20.37, 31.05, 12.95) mm, and the distance to the real source was 0.63 mm. The results of the dual-source experiments further showed that our algorithm could localize the bioluminescent sources accurately. The authors then presented experimental evidence that the proposed algorithm exhibited its calculated efficiency over the heuristic method. The effectiveness of the new algorithm was also confirmed by comparing it with the L-curve method. Furthermore, various initial speculations regarding the regularization parameter were used to illustrate the convergence of our algorithm. Finally, in vivo mouse experiment further illustrates the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. Conclusions: Utilizing numerical, physical phantom and in vivo examples, we demonstrated that the bioluminescent sources could be reconstructed accurately with automatic regularization parameters. The proposed algorithm exhibited superior performance than both the heuristic regularization parameter choice method and L-curve method based on the computational speed and localization error.

  11. Optical Data Compression in Time Stretch Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Time stretch imaging offers real-time image acquisition at millions of frames per second and subnanosecond shutter speed, and has enabled detection of rare cancer cells in blood with record throughput and specificity. An unintended consequence of high throughput image acquisition is the massive amount of digital data generated by the instrument. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of real-time optical image compression applied to time stretch imaging. By exploiting the sparsity of the image, we reduce the number of samples and the amount of data generated by the time stretch camera in our proof-of-concept experiments by about three times. Optical data compression addresses the big data predicament in such systems. PMID:25906244

  12. Small animal fluorescence and bioluminescence tomography: a review of approaches, algorithms and technology update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darne, Chinmay; Lu, Yujie; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging fluorescence and bioluminescence tomography approaches have several common, yet several distinct features from established emission tomographies of PET and SPECT. Although both nuclear and optical imaging modalities involve counting of photons, nuclear imaging techniques collect the emitted high energy (100-511 keV) photons after radioactive decay of radionuclides while optical techniques count low-energy (1.5-4.1 eV) photons that are scattered and absorbed by tissues requiring models of light transport for quantitative image reconstruction. Fluorescence imaging has been recently translated into clinic demonstrating high sensitivity, modest tissue penetration depth, and fast, millisecond image acquisition times. As a consequence, the promise of quantitative optical tomography as a complement of small animal PET and SPECT remains high. In this review, we summarize the different instrumentation, methodological approaches and schema for inverse image reconstructions for optical tomography, including luminescence and fluorescence modalities, and comment on limitations and key technological advances needed for further discovery research and translation.

  13. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagozdzon Agnieszka M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study. Results A new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10?weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10?weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal. Conclusions We have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  14. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zagozdzon, Agnieszka M

    2012-05-30

    AbstractBackgroundNumerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study.ResultsA new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice) expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10?weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10?weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal.ConclusionsWe have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and\\/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  15. Bacteria bioluminescent activity as an indicator of geomagnetic disturbances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of geomagnetic disturbances and storms on bioluminescence activity of bacterium were investigated. The bioluminescence intensity change depended on amplitude and continuous of geomagnetic storms. It is assumed, that the synchronization of luminous radiation take place in cellos when frequency of geomagnetic disturbances approached to an intrinsic one of a bioluminescence system. High sensitivity of bioluminescence of geomagnetic storms was detected. 5 refs., 4 figs

  16. Understanding Bioluminescence in Dinoflagellates—How Far Have We Come?

    OpenAIRE

    Martha Valiadi; Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez

    2013-01-01

    Some dinoflagellates possess the remarkable genetic, biochemical, and cellular machinery to produce bioluminescence. Bioluminescent species appear to be ubiquitous in surface waters globally and include numerous cosmopolitan and harmful taxa. Nevertheless, bioluminescence remains an enigmatic topic in biology, particularly with regard to the organisms’ lifestyle. In this paper, we review the literature on the cellular mechanisms, molecular evolution, diversity, and ecology of bioluminescenc...

  17. Fluorescence and bioluminescence of bacterial luciferase intermediates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intermediate in the luciferase-catalyzed bioluminescent oxidation of FMNH2, isolated and purified by chromatography at --200, was postulated to be an oxygenated reduced flavine-luciferase. Maintained and studied at --20 to --300, this material exhibits a relatively weak fluorescence emission peaking at about 505 nm when excited at 370 nm. It may comprise more than one species. Upon continued exposure to light at 370 nm, the intensity of this fluorescence increases, often by a factor of 5 or more, and its emission spectrum is blue shifted to a maximum at about 485 nm. Upon warming this fluorescence is lost and the fluorescence of flavine mononucleotide appears. If warming is carried out in the presence of a long chain aldehyde, bioluminescence occurs, with the appearance of a similar amount of flavine fluorescence. The bioluminescence yield is about the same with irradiated and nonirradiated samples. The bioluminescence emission spectrum corresponds exactly to the fluorescence emission spectrum of the intermediate formed by irradiation, implicating the latter as being structurally close to the emitting species in bioluminescence. (auth)

  18. Modeling bioluminescent photon transport in tissue based on Radiosity-diffusion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Wang, Pu; Tian, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Han, Dong; Yang, Xin

    2010-03-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is one of the most important non-invasive optical molecular imaging modalities. The model for the bioluminescent photon propagation plays a significant role in the bioluminescence tomography study. Due to the high computational efficiency, diffusion approximation (DA) is generally applied in the bioluminescence tomography. But the diffusion equation is valid only in highly scattering and weakly absorbing regions and fails in non-scattering or low-scattering tissues, such as a cyst in the breast, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layer of the brain and synovial fluid layer in the joints. A hybrid Radiosity-diffusion model is proposed for dealing with the non-scattering regions within diffusing domains in this paper. This hybrid method incorporates a priori information of the geometry of non-scattering regions, which can be acquired by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or x-ray computed tomography (CT). Then the model is implemented using a finite element method (FEM) to ensure the high computational efficiency. Finally, we demonstrate that the method is comparable with Mont Carlo (MC) method which is regarded as a 'gold standard' for photon transportation simulation.

  19. Sparsity reconstruction for bioluminescence tomography based on an augmented Lagrangian method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Jia, Kebin; Tian, Jie; Han, Dong; Liu, Xueyan; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Qian; Feng, Jinchao; Qin, Chenghu

    2012-03-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is an optical molecular imaging modality for monitoring physiological and pathological activities at the molecular level. The information of bioluminescent probe distribution in small animals can be threedimensionally and quantitatively obtained by bioluminescence tomography (BLT). Due to ill-posed nature, BLT may bear multiple solutions and aberrant reconstruction in the presence of measurement noise and optical parameter mismatches. Among different regularization methods, L2-type regularization strategy is the most popular and commonly-applied method, which minimizes the output-least-square formulation incorporated with the l2-norm regularization term to stabilize the problem. However, it often imposes over-smoothing on the reconstruction results. In contrast, for many practical applications, such as early detection of tumors, the volumes of the bioluminescent sources are very small compared with the whole body. In this paper, L1 regularization is used to fully take advantage of the sparsity prior knowledge and improve both efficiency and stability. And then a reconstruction method based on the augmented Lagrangian approach is proposed, which considers the BLT problem as the constrained optimization problem and employs the Bregman iterative method to deal with it. By using "divide and conquer" approach, the optimization problem can be exactly and fast solved by iteratively solving a sequence of unconstrained subproblems. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method in turbid mouse geometry, stimulate experiments with a heterogeneous 3D mouse atlas are conducted. In addition, physical experiments further demonstrate the potential of the proposed algorithm in practical applications.

  20. Chemistry and biology of insect bioluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic aspects on the Chemistry and Biology of bioluminescence are reviewed, with emphasis on insects. Data from the investigation of Lampyridae (fireflies) are collected from literature. With regard to Elateridae (click beetles) and Phengodidae (rail road worms), the least explored families of luminescent insects, new data are presented on the following aspects: (i) 'in vivo' emission spectra, (ii) chemical nature of the luciferin, (iii) conection between bioluminescence and 'oxygen toxicity' as a result of molecular oxygen storage and (iv) the role of light emission by larvae and pupae. (Author)

  1. A review of the measurement and modelling of dinoflagellate bioluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinko, Charlotte L. J.; Painter, Stuart C.; Martin, Adrian P.; Allen, John T.

    2013-02-01

    Bioluminescence is a striking phenomenon that is ubiquitous throughout the world's oceans. Here we bring together the findings of in situ observations of bioluminescence in the upper ocean (bioluminescence within the upper ocean, as well as its relationships with other environmental parameters. As dinoflagellates are often the dominant source of stimulated bioluminescence in the upper ocean we review current knowledge regarding the bioluminescence of these organisms including its potential ecological function. Modelling and prediction of the bioluminescent field has previously had only limited success, especially over timescales greater than a few days. We suggest that the potential exists to improve the forecasting of upper ocean bioluminescence potential on longer, seasonal, timescales by utilising and improving methods to model dinoflagellates.

  2. In vivo bioluminescence tomography based on multi-view projection and 3D surface reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Kun; Leng, Chengcai; Deng, Kexin; Hu, Yifang; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is a powerful optical molecular imaging modality, which enables non-invasive realtime in vivo imaging as well as 3D quantitative analysis in preclinical studies. In order to solve the inverse problem and reconstruct inner light sources accurately, the prior structural information is commonly necessary and obtained from computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. This strategy requires expensive hybrid imaging system, complicated operation protocol and possible involvement of ionizing radiation. The overall robustness highly depends on the fusion accuracy between the optical and structural information. In this study we present a pure optical bioluminescence tomographic system (POBTS) and a novel BLT method based on multi-view projection acquisition and 3D surface reconstruction. The POBTS acquired a sparse set of white light surface images and bioluminescent images of a mouse. Then the white light images were applied to an approximate surface model to generate a high quality textured 3D surface reconstruction of the mouse. After that we integrated multi-view luminescent images based on the previous reconstruction, and applied an algorithm to calibrate and quantify the surface luminescent flux in 3D.Finally, the internal bioluminescence source reconstruction was achieved with this prior information. A BALB/C mouse with breast tumor of 4T1-fLuc cells mouse model were used to evaluate the performance of the new system and technique. Compared with the conventional hybrid optical-CT approach using the same inverse reconstruction method, the reconstruction accuracy of this technique was improved. The distance error between the actual and reconstructed internal source was decreased by 0.184 mm.

  3. A Finite Element Mesh Aggregating Approach to Multiple-Source Reconstruction in Bioluminescence Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Shuyuan Yang; Jiao, L. C.; Fang Liu; Jingjing Yu; Xiaowei He

    2011-01-01

    A finite element mesh aggregating approach is presented to reconstruct images of multiple internal bioluminescence sources. Rather than assuming independence between mesh nodes, the proposed reconstruction strategy exploits spatial structure of nodes and aggregation feature of density distribution on the finite element mesh to adaptively determine the number of sources and to improve the quality of reconstructed images. With the proposed strategy integrated in the regularization-based reconst...

  4. Real-Time Imaging of Quantum Entanglement

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Fickler; Mario Krenn; Radek Lapkiewicz; Sven Ramelow; Anton Zeilinger

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Entanglement is widely regarded as one of the most prominent features of quantum mechanics and quantum information science. Although, photonic entanglement is routinely studied in many experiments nowadays, its signature has been out of the grasp for real-time imaging. Here we show that modern technology, namely triggered intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) cameras are fast and sensitive enough to image in real-time the effect of the measurement of one photon on...

  5. COMPUTATION OF IMAGE SIMILARITY WITH TIME SERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Balamurugan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Searching for similar sequence in large database is an important task in temporal data mining. Similarity search is concerned with efficiently locating subsequences or whole sequences in large archives of sequences. It is useful in typical data mining applications and it can be easily extended to image retrieval. In this work, time series similarity analysis that involves dimensionality reduction and clustering is adapted on digital images to find similarity between them. The dimensionality reduced time series is represented as clusters by the use of K-Means clustering and the similarity distance between two images is found by finding the distance between the signatures of their clusters. To quantify the extent of similarity between two sequences, Earth Mover’s Distance (EMD is used. From the experiments on different sets of images, it is found that this technique is well suited for measuring the subjective similarity between two images.

  6. Enhanced Landweber algorithm via Bregman iterations for bioluminescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi; Zhang, Meng

    2014-09-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is an important optical molecular imaging modality aimed at visualizing physiological and pathological processes at cellular and molecular levels. While the forward process of light propagation is described by the diffusion approximation to radiative transfer equation, BLT is the inverse problem to reconstruct the 3D localization and quantification of internal bioluminescent sources distribution. Due to the inherent ill-posedness of the BLT problem, regularization is generally indispensable to obtain more favorable reconstruction. In particular, total variation (TV) regularization is known to be effective for piecewise-constant source distribution which can permit sharp discontinuities and preserve edges. However, total variation regularization generally suffers from the unsatisfactory staircasing effect. In this work, we introduce the Bregman iterative regularization to alleviate this degeneration and enhance the numerical reconstruction of BLT. Based on the existing Landweber method (LM), we put forward the Bregman-LM-TV algorithm for BLT. Numerical experiments are carried out and preliminary simulation results are reported to evaluate the proposed algorithms. It is found that Bregman-LM-TV can significantly outperform the individual Landweber method for BLT when the source distribution is piecewise-constant.

  7. Bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit detection methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.; Sayler, Gary S.; Applegate, Bruce M.; Ripp, Steven A.

    2005-06-14

    Disclosed are monolithic bioelectronic devices comprising a bioreporter and an OASIC. These bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit are useful in detecting substances such as pollutants, explosives, and heavy-metals residing in inhospitable areas such as groundwater, industrial process vessels, and battlefields. Also disclosed are methods and apparatus for detection of particular analytes, including ammonia and estrogen compounds.

  8. Coherent interferometric imaging, time gating and beamforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coherent interferometric imaging is based on the backpropagation of local spacetime cross-correlations of array data and was introduced in order to improve images when the medium between the array and the object to be imaged is inhomogeneous and unknown (Borcea et al 2005 Inverse Problems 21 1419). Although this method has been shown to be effective and is well founded theoretically, the coherent interferometric imaging function is computationally expensive and therefore difficult to use. In this paper, we show that this function is equivalent to a windowed beamformer energy function, that is, a quadratic function that involves only time gating and time delaying signals in emission and in reception. In this form the coherent interferometric imaging can be implemented efficiently both in hardware and software, that is, at a computational cost that is comparable to the usual beamforming and migration imaging methods. We also revisit the trade-off between enhanced image stability and loss of resolution in coherent interferometry from the point of view of its equivalence to a windowed beamformer energy imaging function

  9. Real-time multiple image manipulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are many situations in which it is desired to manipulate two or more images under real-time operator control. The authors have investigated a number of such cases in order to determine their value and applicability in clinical medicine and laboratory research. Several examples are presented in detail. The DICOM-8 video image computer system was used due to its capability of storing two 512 x 512 x 8 bit images and operating on them, and/or an incoming video frame, with any of a number of real time operations including addition, subtraction, inversion, averaging, logical AND, NAND, OR, NOR, NOT, XOR and XNOR, as well as combinations of these. Some applications involve manipulations of or among the stored images. In others, a stored image is used as a mask or template for positioning or adjusting a second image to be grabbed via a video camera. The accuracy of radiotherapy treatment is verified by comparing port films with the original radiographic planning film, which is previously digitized and stored. Moving the port film on the light box while viewing the real-time subtraction image allows for adjustments of zoom, translation and rotation, together with contrast and edge enhancement

  10. Can compression reduce forensic image time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Cusack

    Full Text Available Creating a forensic copy (image of a hard disk drive is one of the fundamental tasks a computer forensic analyst must perform. Time is often critical, and there is a need to consider a trade-off between a number of factors to achieve best results. This paper reports the results from an exploratory study into the impact of using disk drive compression on the time needed to image (and verify a hard disk drive. It was found that time reduction may be achieved once the trade-off of contributing variables was properly estimated. The findings led the investigators to suggest a step-by-step decision making process for analysts when considering disk compression as a means for reducing total image processing time.

  11. Bacterial bioluminescence response to long-term exposure to reverse osmosis treated effluents from dye industries

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ravindran, J.; Manikandan, B.; Shirodkar, P.V.; Francis, K.X.; ManiMurali, R.; Vethamony, P.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial bioluminescence assay is one of the novel means for toxicity detection. The bioluminescence response of 2 marine bioluminescent bacteria was tested upon their long-term exposure to 9 different reverse osmosis (RO) rejects with varying...

  12. Doubling time of liver metastase images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For our study, where clinical and scintigraphic observation seldom lasts more than two years and where measurable metastases always exceed 1 cm3, the exponential model was adopted and our results were all calculated with GERSTENBERG's formula which gives an apparent doubling time. The liver metastases were measured on the scintigraphic image obtained, a more or less sharply limited blank which makes for a first difficulty of judgement. Two magnascanner V type PICKER 5-inch crystal scintigraphs were used, giving three images simultaneously by a transcriber made up of a stylus and a light spot built into the detection system. The isotope used is colloidal gold (198Au) phagocytized by the Kuepfferian reticulo-endothelial system. The doubling time for liver metastase scintigraphic images calculated for fifteen patients having undergone one or more isotopic checks after a first metastase image was discovered range from 10 to 103 days

  13. Real-time imaging of quantum entanglement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickler, Robert; Krenn, Mario; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Ramelow, Sven; Zeilinger, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Entanglement is widely regarded as one of the most prominent features of quantum mechanics and quantum information science. Although, photonic entanglement is routinely studied in many experiments nowadays, its signature has been out of the grasp for real-time imaging. Here we show that modern technology, namely triggered intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) cameras are fast and sensitive enough to image in real-time the effect of the measurement of one photon on its entangled partner. To quantitatively verify the non-classicality of the measurements we determine the detected photon number and error margin from the registered intensity image within a certain region. Additionally, the use of the ICCD camera allows us to demonstrate the high flexibility of the setup in creating any desired spatial-mode entanglement, which suggests as well that visual imaging in quantum optics not only provides a better intuitive understanding of entanglement but will improve applications of quantum science. PMID:23715056

  14. Influence of the temperature at the Black Sea ctenophores-aliens bioluminescence characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokarev Yuriy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Successful invasion of Mnemiopsis leidyi A. Agassiz, 1865 and Beroe ovata Mayer, 1912 into the Black Sea and their important role in this region pelagic ecosystem is stipulated mainly by the considerable eurythermy of these species. Many ecological-physiological characteristics of ctenophores—aliens are studied quite well. However, bioluminescence, one of the most important elements of the ctenophores ecology and the bioluminescence reaction temperature optimum for these individuals under different environment temperatures were not studied sufficiently. Therefore our researches in this scientific field are significant and conceptually novel for ctenophores ecology study. Experimental investigations were carried out in the period of 2008-2009 in the IBSS. Uni-sized (40 mm ctenophores were collected in the Sevastopol coastal zone and divided in several groups, contained under different temperatures: from 10°C ± 1°C to 30°C ± 1°C. Ctenophore bioluminescence was investigated under chemical and mechanical stimulation. M. leidyi light emission maximal amplitude (1432.94 ± 71.64 × 108 quantum·s–1·cm–2 with duration of 3.54 ± 0.15 s is fixed under the temperature of 26°C ± 1°C. Temperature increase up to 30°C ± 1°C led to the 4 times decrease of the bioluminescence intensity. Under temperature decrease up to 10°C ± 1°C this parameter decreased 20 times (p < 0.05. Bioluminescence emission intensity characteristics of B. ovata achieved maximal values under the temperature of 22°C ± 1°C (1150.12 ± 57.51 × 108 quantum·s–1·cm–2 with duration of 3.03 ± 0.15 s. The luminescence intensity decreased under the temperature increase to 30°C ± 1°C more than 20 times. Temperature decrease to the values of 10°C ± 1°C impacted decreasing the amplitude of bioluminescence up to the minimal –4.92 ± 0.22 × 108 quantum·s–1·cm–2. The data obtained testify that characteristics of the ctenophores bioluminescence can be conditioned not only by the modification the environment temperature but by the variability of their physiological condition.

  15. Bioluminescence enhancement through an added washing protocol enabling a greater sensitivity to carbofuran toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kun; Eltzov, Evgeni; Marks, Robert S; Ionescu, Rodica E

    2013-10-01

    The effects of carbofuran toxicity on a genetically modified bacterial strain E. coli DPD2794 were enhanced using a new bioluminescent protocol which consisted of three consecutive steps: incubation, washing and luminescence reading. Specifically, in the first step, several concentrations of carbofuran aqueous solutions were incubated with different bacterial suspensions at recorded optical densities for different lengths of time. Thereafter, the resulting bacterial/toxicant mixtures were centrifuged and the aged cellular supernatant replaced with fresh medium. In the final step, the carbofuran- induced bioluminescence to the exposed E. coli DPD2794 bacteria was shown to provide a faster and higher intensity when recorded at a higher temperature at30°C which is not usually used in the literature. It was found that the incubation time and the replacement of aged cellular medium were essential factors to distinguish different concentrations of carbofuran in the bioluminescent assays. From our results, the optimum incubation time for a "light ON" bioluminescence detection of the effect of carbofuran was 6h. Thanks to the replacement of the aged cellular medium, a group of additional peaks starting around 30min were observed and we used the corresponding areas under the curve (AUC) at different contents of carbofuran to produce the calibration curve. Based on the new protocol, a carbofuran concentration of 0.5pg/mL can be easily determined in a microtiter plate bioluminescent assay, while a non-wash protocol provides an unexplainable order of curve evolutionswhich does not allow the user to determine the concentration. PMID:23867093

  16. Reliability of a bioluminescence ATP assay for detection of bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Selan, L.; Berlutti, F.; Passariello, C.; Thaller, M. C.; Renzini, G.

    1992-01-01

    The reliability of bioluminescence assays which employ the luciferin-luciferase ATP-dependent reaction to evaluate bacterial counts was studied, both in vitro and on urine specimens. Bioluminescence and cultural results for the most common urinary tract pathogens were analyzed. Furthermore, the influence of the culture medium, of the assaying method, and of the phase of growth on bioluminescence readings was studied. Results show that Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella strains are not corre...

  17. Near Real-Time Image Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, C.; Yang, G.; Wang, H.

    2001-08-01

    In recent years, post-facto image-processing algorithms have been developed to achieve diffraction-limited observations of the solar surface. We present a combination of frame selection, speckle-masking imaging, and parallel computing which provides real-time, diffraction-limited, 256×256 pixel images at a 1-minute cadence. Our approach to achieve diffraction limited observations is complementary to adaptive optics (AO). At the moment, AO is limited by the fact that it corrects wavefront abberations only for a field of view comparable to the isoplanatic patch. This limitation does not apply to speckle-masking imaging. However, speckle-masking imaging relies on short-exposure images which limits its spectroscopic applications. The parallel processing of the data is performed on a Beowulf-class computer which utilizes off-the-shelf, mass-market technologies to provide high computational performance for scientific calculations and applications at low cost. Beowulf computers have a great potential, not only for image reconstruction, but for any kind of complex data reduction. Immediate access to high-level data products and direct visualization of dynamic processes on the Sun are two of the advantages to be gained.

  18. Bioluminescence ATP Monitoring for the Routine Assessment of Food Contact Surface Cleanliness in a University Canteen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osimani, Andrea; Garofalo, Cristiana; Clementi, Francesca; Tavoletti, Stefano; Aquilanti, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    ATP bioluminescence monitoring and traditional microbiological analyses (viable counting of total mesophilic aerobes, coliforms and Escherichia coli) were used to evaluate the effectiveness of Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures (SSOP) at a university canteen which uses a HACCP-based approach. To that end, 10 cleaning control points (CPs), including food contact surfaces at risk of contamination from product residues or microbial growth, were analysed during an 8-month monitoring period. Arbitrary acceptability limits were set for both microbial loads and ATP bioluminescence readings. A highly significant correlation (r = 0.99) between the means of ATP bioluminescence readings and the viable counts of total mesophilic aerobes was seen, thus revealing a strong association of these parameters with the level of surface contamination. Among CPs, the raw meat and multi-purpose chopping boards showed the highest criticalities. Although ATP bioluminescence technology cannot substitute traditional microbiological analyses for the determination of microbial load on food contact surfaces, it has proved to be a powerful tool for the real time monitoring of surface cleanliness at mass catering plants, for verify the correct application of SSOP, and hence for their implementation/revision in the case of poor hygiene. PMID:25329534

  19. Bioluminescence ATP Monitoring for the Routine Assessment of Food Contact Surface Cleanliness in a University Canteen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Osimani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP bioluminescence monitoring and traditional microbiological analyses (viable counting of total mesophilic aerobes, coliforms and Escherichia coli were used to evaluate the effectiveness of Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures (SSOP at a university canteen which uses a HACCP-based approach. To that end, 10 cleaning control points (CPs, including food contact surfaces at risk of contamination from product residues or microbial growth, were analysed during an 8-month monitoring period. Arbitrary acceptability limits were set for both microbial loads and ATP bioluminescence readings. A highly significant correlation (r = 0.99 between the means of ATP bioluminescence readings and the viable counts of total mesophilic aerobes was seen, thus revealing a strong association of these parameters with the level of surface contamination. Among CPs, the raw meat and multi-purpose chopping boards showed the highest criticalities. Although ATP bioluminescence technology cannot substitute traditional microbiological analyses for the determination of microbial load on food contact surfaces, it has proved to be a powerful tool for the real time monitoring of surface cleanliness at mass catering plants, for verify the correct application of SSOP, and hence for their implementation/revision in the case of poor hygiene.

  20. Bioluminescence ATP monitoring for the routine assessment of food contact surface cleanliness in a university canteen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osimani, Andrea; Garofalo, Cristiana; Clementi, Francesca; Tavoletti, Stefano; Aquilanti, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    ATP bioluminescence monitoring and traditional microbiological analyses (viable counting of total mesophilic aerobes, coliforms and Escherichia coli) were used to evaluate the effectiveness of Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures (SSOP) at a university canteen which uses a HACCP-based approach. To that end, 10 cleaning control points (CPs), including food contact surfaces at risk of contamination from product residues or microbial growth, were analysed during an 8-month monitoring period. Arbitrary acceptability limits were set for both microbial loads and ATP bioluminescence readings. A highly significant correlation (r = 0.99) between the means of ATP bioluminescence readings and the viable counts of total mesophilic aerobes was seen, thus revealing a strong association of these parameters with the level of surface contamination. Among CPs, the raw meat and multi-purpose chopping boards showed the highest criticalities. Although ATP bioluminescence technology cannot substitute traditional microbiological analyses for the determination of microbial load on food contact surfaces, it has proved to be a powerful tool for the real time monitoring of surface cleanliness at mass catering plants, for verify the correct application of SSOP, and hence for their implementation/revision in the case of poor hygiene. PMID:25329534

  1. Dual monitoring using 124I-FIAU and bioluminescence for HSV1-tk suicide gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herpes simplex virus type I thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) is the most common reporter gene and is used in cancer gene therapy with a prodrug nucleoside analog, ganciclovir (GCV). The aim of this study is to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of suicide gene therapy with 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-[124I] iodouracil (124I - FIAU) and bioluminescence in retrovirally HSV -tk and firefly luciferase transduced hepatoma model. The HSV -tk and firefly luciferase (Luc) was retrovirally transduced and expressed in MCA rat Morris hepatoma cells. Nude mice with subcutaneous tumors, MCA and MCA-TK-Luc, were subjected to GCV treatment (50mg/Kg/d intraperitoneally) for 5 day. PET imaging and biodistribution with (124I-FIAU) were performed at before and after initiation of therapy with GCV. Bioluminescent signal was also measured during GCV treatment. Before GCV treatment, no significant difference in tumor volume was found in tumors between MCA and MCA-TK-Luc. After GCV treatment, tumor volume of MCA-TK-Luc markedly reduced compared to that of MCA. In biodistribution study, 124I-FIAU uptake after GCV therapy significantly decreased compared with pretreatment levels (34.8 13.67 %ID/g vs 7.6 2.59 %ID/g) and bioluminescent signal was also significantly decreased compared with pretreatment levels. In small animal PET imaging, 124I-FIAU selectively localized in HSV -tk expressing tumor and the therapeutic efficacy of GCV treatmand the therapeutic efficacy of GCV treatment was evaluated by 124I-FIAU PET imaging. 124I-FIAU PET and bioluminescence imaging in HSV-tk suicide gene therapy were effective to evaluate the therapeutic response. 124I-FIAU may serve as an efficient and selective agent for monitoring of transduced HSV1-tk gene expression in vivo in clinical trials

  2. Real-Time Imaging of Quantum Entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Fickler, Robert; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Ramelow, Sven; Zeilinger, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Entanglement - correlations between at least two systems that are stronger than classically explainable - is widely regarded as one of the most prominent features of quantum mechanics and quantum information science. Although, the creation of entanglement between two systems has become possible in laboratories, it has been out of the grasp of one of the most natural ways to investigate nature: direct visual observation. Here we show that modern imaging technology, namely a triggered intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera, is fast and sensitive enough to image in real-time the influence of the measurement of one photon on its entangled partner. To demonstrate the non-classicality of the measurements quantitatively from the registered intensity we develop a novel method to statistically analyze the image and precisely quantify the number of photons within a certain region. In addition, we show the high flexibility of our experimental setup in creating any desired spatial-mode entanglement, even...

  3. Iterative reconstruction for bioluminescence tomography with total variation regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wenma; He, Yonghong

    2012-12-01

    Bioluminescence tomography(BLT) is an instrumental molecular imaging modality designed for the 3D location and quantification of bioluminescent sources distribution in vivo. In our context, the diffusion approximation(DA) to radiative transfer equation(RTE) is utilized to model the forward process of light propagation. Mathematically, the solution uniqueness does not hold for DA-based BLT which is an inverse source problem of partial differential equations and hence is highly ill-posed. In the current work, we concentrate on a general regularization framework for BLT with Bregman distance as data fidelity and total variation(TV) as regularization. Two specializations of the Bregman distance, the least squares(LS) distance and Kullback-Leibler(KL) divergence, which correspond to the Gaussian and Poisson environments respectively, are demonstrated and the resulting regularization problems are denoted as LS+TV and KL+TV. Based on the constrained Landweber(CL) scheme and expectation maximization(EM) algorithm for BLT, iterative algorithms for the LS+TV and KL+TV problems in the context of BLT are developed, which are denoted as CL-TV and EM-TV respectively. They are both essentially gradient-based algorithms alternatingly performing the standard CL or EM iteration step and the TV correction step which requires the solution of a weighted ROF model. Chambolle's duality-based approach is adapted and extended to solving the weighted ROF subproblem. Numerical experiments for a 3D heterogeneous mouse phantom are carried out and preliminary results are reported to verify and evaluate the proposed algorithms. It is found that for piecewise-constant sources both CL-TV and EM-TV outperform the conventional CL and EM algorithms for BLT.

  4. Ultrasensitive detection of cellular protein interactions using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer quantum dot-based nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones, Gabriel A; Miller, Steven C; Bhattacharyya, Sukanta; Sobek, Daniel; Stephan, Jean-Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Sensitive detection of protein interactions is a critical step toward understanding complex cellular processes. As an alternative to fluorescence-based detection, Renilla reniformis luciferase conjugated to quantum dots results in self-illuminating bioluminescence resonance energy transfer quantum dot (BRET-Qdot) nanoprobes that emit red to near-infrared bioluminescence light. Here, we report the development of an ultrasensitive technology based on BRET-Qdot conjugates modified with streptavidin ([BRET-Qdot]-SA) to detect cell-surface protein interactions. Transfected COS7 cells expressing human cell-surface proteins were interrogated with a human Fc tagged protein of interest. Specific protein interactions were detected using a biotinylated anti-human Fc region specific antibody followed by incubation with [BRET-Qdot]-SA. The luciferase substrate coelenterazine activated bioluminescence light emission was detected with an ultra-fast and -sensitive imager. Protein interactions barely detectable by the fluorescence-based approach were readily quantified using this technology. The results demonstrate the successful application and the flexibility of the BRET-Qdot-based imaging technology to the ultrasensitive investigation of cell-surface proteins and protein-protein interactions. PMID:22573556

  5. Use of the liquid scintillation spectrometer in bioluminescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review covers publications concerning analytical bioluminescence which in the main have appeared between mid-1973 and mid-1976. Outlines of some new assays and techniques are given together with modifications of existing procedures. Comments are presented on the use of the liquid scintillation spectrometer and other equipment for measuring bioluminescence. New applications are detailed and discussed

  6. A REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS OF BIOLUMINESCENCE MEASUREMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review of the recent literature on environmental applications of bioluminescence systems will focus on in vivo and in vitro bioluminescence methods that have been utilized to elucidate properties of chemicals, toxic and mutagenic effects, and to estimate biomass. The unifyin...

  7. Real-time imaging of acoustic rectification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danworaphong, S.; Kelf, T. A.; Matsuda, O.; Tomoda, M.; Tanaka, Y.; Nishiguchi, N.; Wright, O. B.; Nishijima, Y.; Ueno, K.; Juodkazis, S.; Misawa, H.

    2011-11-01

    We image gigahertz surface acoustic waves normally incident on a microscopic linear array of triangular holes—a generic "acoustic diode" geometry—with a real-time ultrafast optical technique. Spatiotemporal Fourier transforms reveal wave diffraction orders in k-space. Squared amplitude reflection and transmission coefficients for incidence on both sides of the array are evaluated and compared with numerical simulations. We thereby directly demonstrate acoustic rectification with an asymmetric structure.

  8. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence in response to mechanical stimuli in water flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Cussatlegras

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence of plankton organisms induced by water movements has long been observed and is still under investigations because of its great complexity. In particular, the exact mechanism occurring at the level of the cell has not been yet fully understood. This work is devoted to the study of the bioluminescence of the dinoflagellates plankton species Pyrocystis noctiluca in response to mechanical stimuli generated by water flows. Several experiments were performed with different types of flows in a Couette shearing apparatus. All of them converge to the conclusion that stationary homogeneous laminar shear does not trigger massive bioluminescence, but that acceleration and shear are both necessary to stimulate together an intense bioluminescence response. The distribution of the experimental bioluminescence thresholds is finally calculated from the light emission response for the Pyrocystis noctiluca species.

  9. Bioluminescent bacteria: lux genes as environmental biosensors Bactérias bioluminescentes: os genes lux como biosensores ambientais

    OpenAIRE

    Vânia da Silva Nunes-Halldorson; Norma Letícia Duran

    2003-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminescent genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in env...

  10. NDE Imaging of Time Differential Terahertz Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Long B.

    2008-01-01

    Natural voids are present in the vicinity of a conathane interface that bonds two different foam materials. These voids are out of focus with the terahertz imaging system and multiple optical reflections also make it difficult to determine their depths. However, waves passing through the top foam article at normal incidence are partially reflected at the denser conathane layer prior to total reflection at the tank s wall. Reflections embedded in the oscillating noise segment prior to the main signals can be extracted with dual applications of filtering and time derivative. Void's depth is computed from direct path's time of flight.

  11. Interactive Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau

    2013-01-01

    Real-time acquisition, reconstruction and interactively changing the slice position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been possible for years. However, the current clinical use of interactive real-time MRI is limited due to an inherent low spatial and temporal resolution. This PhD project seeks to implement and assess existing reconstruction algorithms using multi-processors of modern graphics cards and many-core computer processors and to cover some of the potential clinical applications which might benefit from using an interactive real-time MRI system. First an off-line, but interactive, slice alignment tool was used to support the notion that 3D blood flow quantification in the heart possesses the ability to obtain curves and volumes which are not statistical different from standard 2D flow. Secondly, the feasibility of an interactive real-time MRI system was exploited with regard to optimal sampling strategy for detecting motion in four different anatomies on two different MRI scanner brands. A fully implemented interactive real-time MRI system was exploited in a group of healthy fetuses and proved its eligibility as an alternative diagnostic tool for fetal imaging. Finally, the system was used for 3D motion tracking of the liver, and its use was proposed for future integrations of MRI scanners and linear accelerators in the field of radiotherapy treatment.

  12. Detection of dichloromethane with a bioluminescent (lux) bacterial bioreporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Nicholas; Hawkins, Shawn A; Jegier, Patricia; Menn, Fu-Min; Sayler, Gary S; Ripp, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this research effort was to develop an autonomous, inducible, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter for the real-time detection of dichloromethane. Dichloromethane (DCM), also known as methylene chloride, is a volatile organic compound and one of the most commonly used halogenated solvents in the U.S., with applications ranging from grease and paint stripping to aerosol propellants and pharmaceutical tablet coatings. Predictably, it is released into the environment where it contaminates air and water resources. Due to its classification as a probable human carcinogen, hepatic toxin, and central nervous system effector, DCM must be carefully monitored and controlled. Methods for DCM detection usually rely on analytical techniques such as solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and capillary gas chromatography or photoacoustic environmental monitors, all of which require trained personnel and/or expensive equipment. To complement conventional monitoring practices, we have created a bioreporter for the self-directed detection of DCM by taking advantage of the evolutionary adaptation of bacteria to recognize and metabolize chemical agents. This bioreporter, Methylobacterium extorquens DCM( lux ), was engineered to contain a bioluminescent luxCDABE gene cassette derived from Photorhabdus luminescens fused downstream to the dcm dehalogenase operon, which causes the organism to generate visible light when exposed to DCM. We have demonstrated detection limits down to 1.0 ppm under vapor phase exposures and 0.1 ppm under liquid phase exposures with response times of 2.3 and 1.3 h, respectively, and with specificity towards DCM under relevant industrial environmental monitoring conditions. PMID:21688172

  13. Algorithm for localized adaptive diffuse optical tomography and its application in bioluminescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser, Mohamed A.; Patterson, Michael S.; Wong, John W.

    2014-04-01

    A reconstruction algorithm for diffuse optical tomography based on diffusion theory and finite element method is described. The algorithm reconstructs the optical properties in a permissible domain or region-of-interest to reduce the number of unknowns. The algorithm can be used to reconstruct optical properties for a segmented object (where a CT-scan or MRI is available) or a non-segmented object. For the latter, an adaptive segmentation algorithm merges contiguous regions with similar optical properties thereby reducing the number of unknowns. In calculating the Jacobian matrix the algorithm uses an efficient direct method so the required time is comparable to that needed for a single forward calculation. The reconstructed optical properties using segmented, non-segmented, and adaptively segmented 3D mouse anatomy (MOBY) are used to perform bioluminescence tomography (BLT) for two simulated internal sources. The BLT results suggest that the accuracy of reconstruction of total source power obtained without the segmentation provided by an auxiliary imaging method such as x-ray CT is comparable to that obtained when using perfect segmentation.

  14. Papyrus imaging with terahertz time domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaune, J.; Jackson, J. B.; Pagès-Camagna, S.; Duling, I. N.; Menu, M.; Mourou, G. A.

    2010-09-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopic imaging (THz-TDSI) is a non-ionizing, non-contact and non-destructive measurement technique that has been recently utilized to study cultural heritage artifacts. We will present this technique and the results of non-contact measurements of papyrus texts, including images of hidden papyri. Inks for modern papyrus specimens were prepared using the historical binder, Arabic gum, and two common pigments used to write ancient texts, carbon black and red ochre. The samples were scanned in reflection at normal incidence with a pulse with a spectral range between 0.1 and 1.5 THz. Temporal analysis of the signals provides the depths of the layers, and their frequency spectra give information about the inks.

  15. Real-Time Imaging of Quantum Entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Photonic entanglement of spatial modes is routinely studied in many experiments and offers interesting features for quantum optical and quantum information experiments. To investigate the properties of these complex modes, it is crucial to gain information about the transversal structure with high precision and in an efficient way. We show that modern technology, namely triggered intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) cameras are fast and sensitive enough to image in real-time the effect of the measurement of one photon on the spatial mode of its entangled partner photon. We determine from imaged intensity pattern the number of photons within a certain region, evaluate its error margin and thereby quantitatively verify the non-classicality of the measurements. In addition, the use of the ICCD camera allows us to demonstrate visually the enhanced remote angular sensing and the high flexibility of our setup in creating any desired spatial-mode entanglement. (author)

  16. Chemiluminescence and bioluminescence past, present and future

    CERN Document Server

    Roda, Aldo; Hastings, J Woodland

    2010-01-01

    This complete and well-organized overview of chemiluminescence and bioluminescence is divided into two parts. The first covers historical developments and the fundamental principles of these phenomena before going on to review recent advances and instrumentation. The second part deals with the applications in a variety of research fields including life sciences, drug discovery, diagnostics, environment, agrofood, and forensics. The book is suitable not only for researchers currently employing detection techniques in their research activity, but also for those approaching the subject for the fi

  17. Vector processing enhancements for real-time image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A real-time image analysis system was developed for beam imaging diagnostics. An Apple Power Mac G5 with an Active Silicon LFG frame grabber was used to capture video images that were processed and analyzed. Software routines were created to utilize vector-processing hardware to reduce the time to process images as compared to conventional methods. These improvements allow for more advanced image processing diagnostics to be performed in real time.

  18. An ebCMOS camera system for marine bioluminescence observation: The LuSEApher prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominjon, A.; Ageron, M.; Barbier, R.; Billault, M.; Brunner, J.; Cajgfinger, T.; Calabria, P.; Chabanat, E.; Chaize, D.; Doan, Q. T.; Guérin, C.; Houlès, J.; Vagneron, L.

    2012-12-01

    The ebCMOS camera, called LuSEApher, is a marine bioluminescence recorder device adapted to extreme low light level. This prototype is based on the skeleton of the LUSIPHER camera system originally developed for fluorescence imaging. It has been installed at 2500 m depth off the Mediterranean shore on the site of the ANTARES neutrino telescope. The LuSEApher camera is mounted on the Instrumented Interface Module connected to the ANTARES network for environmental science purposes (European Seas Observatory Network). The LuSEApher is a self-triggered photo detection system with photon counting ability. The presentation of the device is given and its performances such as the single photon reconstruction, noise performances and trigger strategy are presented. The first recorded movies of bioluminescence are analyzed. To our knowledge, those types of events have never been obtained with such a sensitivity and such a frame rate. We believe that this camera concept could open a new window on bioluminescence studies in the deep sea.

  19. Spectrally resolved bioluminescence tomography with adaptive finite element analysis: methodology and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a molecular imaging technique, bioluminescence tomography (BLT) with its highly sensitive detection and facile operation can significantly reveal molecular and cellular information in vivo at the whole-body small animal level. However, because of complex photon transportation in biological tissue and boundary detection data with high noise, bioluminescent sources in deeper positions generally cannot be localized. In our previous work, we used achromatic or monochromatic measurements and an a priori permissible source region strategy to develop a multilevel adaptive finite-element algorithm. In this paper, we propose a spectrally solved tomographic algorithm with a posteriori permissible source region selection. Multispectral measurements, and anatomical and optical information first deal with the nonuniqueness of BLT and constrain the possible solution of source reconstruction. The use of adaptive mesh refinement and permissible source region based on a posteriori measures not only avoids the dimension disaster arising from the multispectral measured data but also reduces the ill-posedness of BLT and therefore improves the reconstruction quality. Reconsideration of the optimization method and related modifications further enhance reconstruction robustness and efficiency. We also incorporate into the method some improvements for reducing computational burdens. Finally, using a whole-body virtual mouse phantom, we demonstrate the capability of the proposed BLT algori the capability of the proposed BLT algorithm to reconstruct accurately bioluminescent sources in deeper positions. In terms of optical property errors and two sources of discernment in deeper positions, this BLT algorithm represents the unique predominance for BLT reconstruction

  20. An ebCMOS camera system for marine bioluminescence observation: The LuSEApher prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominjon, A., E-mail: a.dominjon@ipnl.in2p3.fr [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Ageron, M. [CNRS/IN2P3, Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, Marseille, F-13288 (France); Barbier, R. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Lyon F-69003 (France); Billault, M.; Brunner, J. [CNRS/IN2P3, Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, Marseille, F-13288 (France); Cajgfinger, T. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Lyon F-69003 (France); Calabria, P. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Chabanat, E. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France); Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Lyon F-69003 (France); Chaize, D.; Doan, Q.T.; Guerin, C.; Houles, J.; Vagneron, L. [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne F-69622 (France)

    2012-12-11

    The ebCMOS camera, called LuSEApher, is a marine bioluminescence recorder device adapted to extreme low light level. This prototype is based on the skeleton of the LUSIPHER camera system originally developed for fluorescence imaging. It has been installed at 2500 m depth off the Mediterranean shore on the site of the ANTARES neutrino telescope. The LuSEApher camera is mounted on the Instrumented Interface Module connected to the ANTARES network for environmental science purposes (European Seas Observatory Network). The LuSEApher is a self-triggered photo detection system with photon counting ability. The presentation of the device is given and its performances such as the single photon reconstruction, noise performances and trigger strategy are presented. The first recorded movies of bioluminescence are analyzed. To our knowledge, those types of events have never been obtained with such a sensitivity and such a frame rate. We believe that this camera concept could open a new window on bioluminescence studies in the deep sea.

  1. Photo-real rendering of bioluminescence and iridescence in creatures from the abyss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusten, Mark

    2008-08-01

    The generation of photo-real renderings of bioluminescence is developed for creatures from the abyss. Bioluminescence results from a chemical reaction with examples found in deep-sea marine environments including: algae, copepods, jellyfish, squid, and fish. In bioluminescence, the excitation energy is supplied by a chemical reaction, not by a source of light. The greatest transparency window in seawater is in the blue region of the visible spectrum. From small creatures like single-cell algae, to large species of siphonophore Praya dubia (40m), luminescent phenomena can be produced by mechanical excitement from disturbances of objects passing by. Deep sea fish, like the Pacific Black Dragonfish are covered with photophores along the upper and lower surfaces which emits light when disturbed. Other animals like small squids have several different types of light organs oscillating at different rates. Custom shaders and material phenomena incorporate indirect lighting like: global illumination, final gathering, ambient occlusion and subsurface scattering to provide photo real images. Species like the Hydomedusae jellyfish, produce colors that are also generated by iridescence of thin tissues. The modeling and rendering of these tissues requires thin film multilayer stacks. These phenomena are simulated by semi-rigid body dynamics in a procedural animation environment. These techniques have been applied to develop spectral rendering of scenes outside the normal visible window in typical computer animation render engines.

  2. An ebCMOS camera system for marine bioluminescence observation: The LuSEApher prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ebCMOS camera, called LuSEApher, is a marine bioluminescence recorder device adapted to extreme low light level. This prototype is based on the skeleton of the LUSIPHER camera system originally developed for fluorescence imaging. It has been installed at 2500 m depth off the Mediterranean shore on the site of the ANTARES neutrino telescope. The LuSEApher camera is mounted on the Instrumented Interface Module connected to the ANTARES network for environmental science purposes (European Seas Observatory Network). The LuSEApher is a self-triggered photo detection system with photon counting ability. The presentation of the device is given and its performances such as the single photon reconstruction, noise performances and trigger strategy are presented. The first recorded movies of bioluminescence are analyzed. To our knowledge, those types of events have never been obtained with such a sensitivity and such a frame rate. We believe that this camera concept could open a new window on bioluminescence studies in the deep sea.

  3. Optical imaging of Renilla luciferase reporter gene expression in living mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bhaumik, S.; Gambhir, S. S.

    2001-01-01

    Imaging reporter gene expression in living subjects is a rapidly evolving area of molecular imaging research. Studies have validated the use of reporter genes with positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), MRI, fluorescence with wild-type and mutants of green fluorescent protein, as well as bioluminescence using Firefly luciferase enzyme/protein (FL). In the current study, we validate for the first time the ability to i...

  4. [Effect of surface-active substances on bioluminescence intensity of bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsev, A M; Starodub, N F

    2003-01-01

    The study of sensitivity of luminous bacteria isolated from the Black and Azov seas to surfactants from various classes was carried out. It was shown that cationic surfactants had a strong inhibition effect on bacterial luminescence in contrast to anionic and in particular nonionic surfactants. To increase the luminous bacteria sensitivity to the action of OP-10 (nonionic surfactant) and ABS (anionic surfactant), which are widely used in industry, several approaches have been developed. They include modulation of bacterial sensitivity by the additives of cationic substances, use of luminous bacteria at a logarithmic stage of growth, realization of biotesting at low pH = 5.5. The use of these approaches allows to lower effective concentrations of OP-10 and ABS, which caused a decrease of bioluminescence by 50%, 3-200 times and opens perspectives for the use of the bioluminescent method to study these surfactants toxicity on the principle of biosensorics. PMID:14577178

  5. Bioluminescence-Activated Deep-Tissue Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yi Rang; Kim, Seonghoon; Choi, Jin Woo; Choi, Sung Yong; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Homin; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Koh, Gou Young; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Optical energy can trigger a variety of photochemical processes useful for therapies. Owing to the shallow penetration of light in tissues, however, the clinical applications of light-activated therapies have been limited. Bioluminescence resonant energy transfer (BRET) may provide a new way of inducing photochemical activation. Here, we show that efficient bioluminescence energy-induced photodynamic therapy (PDT) of macroscopic tumors and metastases in deep tissue. For monolayer cell culture in vitro incubated with Chlorin e6, BRET energy of about 1 nJ per cell generated as strong cytotoxicity as red laser light irradiation at 2.2 mW/cm2 for 180 s. Regional delivery of bioluminescence agents via draining lymphatic vessels killed tumor cells spread to the sentinel and secondary lymph nodes, reduced distant metastases in the lung and improved animal survival. Our results show the promising potential of novel bioluminescence-activated PDT. PMID:26000054

  6. Imaging and Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Swarming and Rhamnolipid Production ? †

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Joshua D.; Hewitt, Jessica L.; Wolfe, Lawrence G.; Kamatkar, Nachiket G.; Chapman, Sarah M.; Diener, Justin M.; Courtney, Andrew J.; Leevy, W. Matthew; Shrout, Joshua D.

    2011-01-01

    Many bacteria spread over surfaces by “swarming” in groups. A problem for scientists who study swarming is the acquisition of statistically significant data that distinguish two observations or detail the temporal patterns and two-dimensional heterogeneities that occur. It is currently difficult to quantify differences between observed swarm phenotypes. Here, we present a method for acquisition of temporal surface motility data using time-lapse fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging. We...

  7. Deep-Sea Bioluminescence Blooms after Dense Water Formation at the Ocean Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Houpert, Loïc; Lefèvre, Dominique; Martini, Séverine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Samarai, Imen Al; Albert, Arnaud; André, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stéphane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C.; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, José; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Cârloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q.; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galatà, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gómez-González, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J.; Hello, Yann; Hernández-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hößl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Presti, Domenico Lo; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; P?v?la?, Gabriela E.; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Rivière, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G.; Salesa, Francisco; Sánchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schöck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J. M.; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G. F.; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Véronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; De Dios Zornoza, Juan; Zúñiga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 2010 at the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope in the deep NW Mediterranean Sea, jointly with synchronous hydrological records. This is the longest continuous time-series of deep-sea bioluminescence ever recorded. Our record reveals several weeks long, seasonal bioluminescence blooms with light intensity up to two orders of magnitude higher than background values, which correlate to changes in the properties of deep waters. Such changes are triggered by the winter cooling and evaporation experienced by the upper ocean layer in the Gulf of Lion that leads to the formation and subsequent sinking of dense water through a process known as “open-sea convection”. It episodically renews the deep water of the study area and conveys fresh organic matter that fuels the deep ecosystems. Luminous bacteria most likely are the main contributors to the observed deep-sea bioluminescence blooms. Our observations demonstrate a consistent and rapid connection between deep open-sea convection and bathypelagic biological activity, as expressed by bioluminescence. In a setting where dense water formation events are likely to decline under global warming scenarios enhancing ocean stratification, in situ observatories become essential as environmental sentinels for the monitoring and understanding of deep-sea ecosystem shifts. PMID:23874425

  8. Shedding light on bioluminescence regulation in Vibrio fischeri

    OpenAIRE

    Miyashiro, Tim; Ruby, Edward G.

    2012-01-01

    The bioluminescence emitted by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri is a particularly striking result of individual microbial cells coordinating a group behavior. The genes responsible for light production are principally regulated by the LuxR-LuxI quorum-sensing system. In addition to LuxR-LuxI, numerous other genetic elements and environmental conditions control bioluminescence production. Efforts to mathematically model the LuxR-LuxI system are providing insight into the dynamics of this a...

  9. Dinoflagellate bioluminescence in response to mechanical stimuli in water flows

    OpenAIRE

    Cussatlegras, A. S.; Le Gal, P.

    2005-01-01

    Bioluminescence of plankton organisms induced by water movements has long been observed and is still under investigations because of its great complexity. In particular, the exact mechanism occurring at the level of the cell has not been yet fully understood. This work is devoted to the study of the bioluminescence of the dinoflagellates plankton species Pyrocystis noctiluca in response to mechanical stimuli generated by water flows. Several experiments were performed with different types of ...

  10. Monitoring Neural Activity with Bioluminescence during Natural Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Naumann, Eva Aimable; Kampff, Adam R.; Prober, David A.; Schier, Alexander F; Engert, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Existing techniques for monitoring neural activity in awake, freely behaving vertebrates are invasive and difficult to target to genetically identified neurons. We used bioluminescence to non-invasively monitor the activity of genetically specified neurons in freely behaving zebrafish. Transgenic fish with the Ca\\(^{2+}\\)-sensitive photoprotein green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Aequorin in most neurons generated large and fast bioluminescent signals that were related to neural activity, neurolu...

  11. Using bacterial bioluminescence to evaluate the impact of biofilm on porous media hydraulic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorg, Ali; Gates, Ian D; Sen, Arindom

    2015-02-01

    Biofilm formation in natural and engineered porous systems can significantly impact hydrodynamics by reducing porosity and permeability. To better understand and characterize how biofilms influence hydrodynamic properties in porous systems, the genetically engineered bioluminescent bacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 was used to quantify microbial population characteristics and biofilm properties in a translucent porous medium. Power law relationships were found to exist between bacterial bioluminescence and cell density, fraction of void space occupied by biofilm (i.e. biofilm saturation), and hydraulic conductivity. The simultaneous evaluation of biofilm saturation and porous medium hydraulic conductivity in real time using a non-destructive approach enabled the construction of relative hydraulic conductivity curves. Such information can facilitate simulation studies related to biological activity in porous structures, and support the development of new models to describe the dynamic behavior of biofilm and fluid flow in porous media. The bioluminescence based approach described here will allow for improved understanding and control of industrially relevant processes such as biofiltration and bioremediation. PMID:25479429

  12. Phase Time and Envelope Time in Time-Distance Analysis and Acoustic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sun, Ming-Tsung; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Jimenez, Antonio; Rabello-Soares, Maria Cristina; Ai, Guoxiang; Wang, Gwo-Ping; Goode Philip; Marquette, William; Ehgamberdiev, Shuhrat; Landenkov, Oleg

    1999-01-01

    Time-distance analysis and acoustic imaging are two related techniques to probe the local properties of solar interior. In this study, we discuss the relation of phase time and envelope time between the two techniques. The location of the envelope peak of the cross correlation function in time-distance analysis is identified as the travel time of the wave packet formed by modes with the same w/l. The phase time of the cross correlation function provides information of the phase change accumulated along the wave path, including the phase change at the boundaries of the mode cavity. The acoustic signals constructed with the technique of acoustic imaging contain both phase and intensity information. The phase of constructed signals can be studied by computing the cross correlation function between time series constructed with ingoing and outgoing waves. In this study, we use the data taken with the Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON) instrument and the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument. The analysis is carried out for the quiet Sun. We use the relation of envelope time versus distance measured in time-distance analyses to construct the acoustic signals in acoustic imaging analyses. The phase time of the cross correlation function of constructed ingoing and outgoing time series is twice the difference between the phase time and envelope time in time-distance analyses as predicted. The envelope peak of the cross correlation function between constructed ingoing and outgoing time series is located at zero time as predicted for results of one-bounce at 3 mHz for all four data sets and two-bounce at 3 mHz for two TON data sets. But it is different from zero for other cases. The cause of the deviation of the envelope peak from zero is not known.

  13. Basic and Applied Aspects of Color Tuning of Bioluminescence Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmiya, Yoshihiro

    2005-09-01

    V. Viviani et al. [Biochemistry 38 (1999) 8271] were the first to succeed in cloning the red-emitting enzyme from the South American railroad worm, which is the only bioluminescent organism known to emit a red-colored light. The application of red bioluminescence has been our goal because the transmittance of longer-wavelength light is superior to that of the other colors for visualization of biological functions in living cells. Now, different color luciferases, which emit with wavelength maxima ranging from 400 to 630 nm, are available and are being used. For example, based on different color luciferases, Nakajima et al. developed a tricolor reporter in vitro assay system based on these different color luciferases in which the expression of three genes can be monitored simultaneously. On the other hand, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) is a natural phenomenon caused by the intermolecular interaction between a bioluminescent protein and a fluorophore on a second protein, resulting in the light from the bioluminescence reaction having the spectrum of the fluorophore. Otsuji et al. [Anal. Biochem. 329 (2004) 230] showed that the change in the efficiency of energy transfer in intramolecular BRET can quantify cellular functions in living cells. In this review, I introduce the basic mechanisms of color tuning in bioluminescent systems and new applications based on color tuning in the life sciences.

  14. Dual monitoring using {sup 124}I-FIAU and bioluminescence for HSV1-tk suicide gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T. S.; Kim, J. H.; Kwon, H. C. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2007-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type I thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) is the most common reporter gene and is used in cancer gene therapy with a prodrug nucleoside analog, ganciclovir (GCV). The aim of this study is to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of suicide gene therapy with 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-[{sup 124}I] iodouracil ({sup 124}I - FIAU) and bioluminescence in retrovirally HSV -tk and firefly luciferase transduced hepatoma model. The HSV -tk and firefly luciferase (Luc) was retrovirally transduced and expressed in MCA rat Morris hepatoma cells. Nude mice with subcutaneous tumors, MCA and MCA-TK-Luc, were subjected to GCV treatment (50mg/Kg/d intraperitoneally) for 5 day. PET imaging and biodistribution with ({sup 124}I-FIAU) were performed at before and after initiation of therapy with GCV. Bioluminescent signal was also measured during GCV treatment. Before GCV treatment, no significant difference in tumor volume was found in tumors between MCA and MCA-TK-Luc. After GCV treatment, tumor volume of MCA-TK-Luc markedly reduced compared to that of MCA. In biodistribution study, {sup 124}I-FIAU uptake after GCV therapy significantly decreased compared with pretreatment levels (34.8 13.67 %ID/g vs 7.6 2.59 %ID/g) and bioluminescent signal was also significantly decreased compared with pretreatment levels. In small animal PET imaging, {sup 124}I-FIAU selectively localized in HSV -tk expressing tumor and the therapeutic efficacy of GCV treatment was evaluated by {sup 124}I-FIAU PET imaging. {sup 124}I-FIAU PET and bioluminescence imaging in HSV-tk suicide gene therapy were effective to evaluate the therapeutic response. {sup 124}I-FIAU may serve as an efficient and selective agent for monitoring of transduced HSV1-tk gene expression in vivo in clinical trials.

  15. Phaseless Imaging by Reverse Time Migration: Acoustic Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhiming; Huang, Guanghui

    2015-01-01

    We propose a reliable direct imaging method based on the reverse time migration for finding extended obstacles with phaseless total field data. We prove that the imaging resolution of the method is essentially the same as the imaging results using the scattering data with full phase information. The imaginary part of the cross-correlation imaging functional always peaks on the boundary of the obstacle. Numerical experiments are included to illustrate the powerful imaging qua...

  16. Time-domain flaw imaging system

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    L., Medina.

    Full Text Available Ensayos no destructivos con ultrasonido es una herramienta comúnmente usada para la detección y caracterización de fallas en materiales. Un sistema típico de imágenes ultrasónicas consiste en un solo transductor o arreglo de sensores que operan bajo el modo de rastreo B. Este modo consiste en transm [...] itir un pulso o un tren de pulsos desde distintas posiciones, y para cada posición recibir ecos que pueden provenir de inhomogeneidades dentro del material inspeccionado. La energía reflejada puede desplegarse como un mapa de intensidades ultrasónicas. Uno de los métodos que han tenido gran éxito en la reconstrucción de imágenes y localización de inhomogeneidades es la llamada formación de haces, proceso digital en el dominio del tiempo. Esta técnica consiste en aplicar corrimientos en el tiempo específicos a cada serial registrada, para después sumar estas, encontrando así las zonas donde las señales se suman constructivamente. Sin embargo, esta técnica requiere largos periodos para su procesamiento así como la restricción de la distancia entre elementos no debe exceder de A/2. El trabajo que se presenta propone un algoritmo en el dominio del tiempo, que opera sobre la envolvente de las señales recibidas, disminuyendo el nú mero de operaciones computacionales sin perder información relevante de la localización de inhomogeneidades. Resultados comparativos entre la técnica clásica y la propuesta son presentados cuando ambas son aplicadas a un conjunto de señales simuladas. También resoluciones laterales y longitudinales han sido calculadas en el caso de que existan dos fallas puntuales en el medio inspeccionado. Abstract in english Ultrasonic Non Destructive Evaluation of materials is a useful tool for flaw detection and characterization. A typical ultrasonic imaging system may consist of a single transducer or an array of sensors working in a B-scan mode. This mode operates by transmitting a pulse of train of pulses from seve [...] ral locations and detecting the echoes coming from in-homogeneities. The reflected energy can be represented as a map of ultrasonic reflectivity. A time-delay beamformer has been successfully used to reconstruct the image, and localize the in-homogeneities within the scanned medium, by time shifting the signals, and summing them up. This process enables to locate regions at which signals are added constructively. It is however, a time consuming process and requires A/2 distance of motor steps or inter-element distance between array elements. An algorithm based on time-domain envelope beamformer is presented here. This algorithm is able to diminish the number of computational operations without losing relevant information about the location of in-homogeneities. A comparison between classical and envelope beam-formers is presented when applied to sets of simulated signals. Lateral and longitudinal resolutions are also computed when two targets are within the scanned medium.

  17. Image-based EPI real time ghost correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shunshan; Buonocore, Michael H.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a new, real-time, ghost correction method for echo planar imaging (EPI) that has been implemented using the Imaging Calculation Environment (ICE) on a 3T Siemens MRI System. Conventional methods for correcting EPI image ghost are based on image phase correction or on a reference scan. This new method is also based on image phase correction, but uses a new algorithm for automatic determination of the phase correction, which allows entirely automated operation. With implementation of the new correction method in ICE, ghost-corrected images are automatically generated and loaded into the system's image database immediately after completion of each EPI scan. Experiments showed that this real time ghost correction method consistently reduced the ghost intensity in EPI images and improved overall image quality. On average, the ghost to signal ratio (GSR) improved from 13.0% to 3.2% using the new method.

  18. Time-delay compensation for stabilization imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yueting; Xu, Zhihai; Li, Qi; Feng, Huajun

    2014-05-01

    The spatial resolution of imaging systems for airborne and space-borne remote sensing are often limited by image degradation resulting from mechanical vibrations of platforms during image exposure. A straightforward way to overcome this problem is to actively stabilize the optical axis or drive the focal plane synchronous to the motion image during exposure. Thus stabilization imaging system usually consists of digital image motion estimation and micromechanical compensation. The performance of such kind of visual servo system is closely related to precision of motion estimation and time delay. Large time delay results in larger phase delay between motion estimation and micromechanical compensation, and leads to larger uncompensated residual motion and limited bandwidth. The paper analyzes the time delay caused by image acquisition period and introduces a time delay compensation method based on SVM (Support Vector Machine) motion prediction. The main idea to cancel the time delay is to predict the current image motion from delayed measurements. A support vector machine based method is designed to predict the image motion. A prototype of stabilization imaging system has been implemented in the lab. To analyze the influences of time delay on system performance and to verify the proposed time delay cancelation method, comparative experiments over various frequencies of vibration are taken. The experimental results show that, the accuracy of motion compensation and the bandwidth of the system can be significantly improved with time delay cancelation.

  19. Time resolved single photon imaging in Nanometer Scale CMOS technology

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Justin Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Time resolved imaging is concerned with the measurement of photon arrival time. It has a wealth of emerging applications including biomedical uses such as fluorescence lifetime microscopy and positron emission tomography, as well as laser ranging and imaging in three dimensions. The impact of time resolved imaging on human life is significant: it can be used to identify cancerous cells in-vivo, how well new drugs may perform, or to guide a robot around a factory or hospital. ...

  20. Signal restoration for NMR imaging using time-dependent gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR imaging experiments that employ linear but time-dependent gradients for encoding spatial information in the time-domain signals result in distorted images when treated with conventional image reconstruction techniques. It is shown here that the phase and amplitude distortions can be entirely removed if the timeshape of the gradient is known. The method proposed is of great theoretical and experimental simplicity. It consists of a retransformation of the measured time-domain signal and corresponds to synchronisation of the signal sampling with the time-development of the gradient field strength. The procedure complements other treatments of periodically oscillating gradients in NMR imaging. (author)

  1. Vegetable seed radiosensitivity and kinetic analysis of super-weak bioluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioluminescence of several vegetable seeds induced by ?-rays was studied. The results show that positive relation exists between seeds bioluminescence and irradiation dose, which fits with equation Y=Y0eKD. The higher the K value is, the more intense the bioluminescence induced by ?-rays is. Significant differences among K values were found with different varieties. The bioluminescence and exterior measurement value of seed radiosensitivity showed good consistency

  2. Rapid detection (4 h) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by a bioluminescence method.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, C. H.; Hixon, D. L.; Mclaughlin, C. M.; Cook, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    A 4-h bioluminescence method for methicillin susceptibility determination was compared with reference methods. Of the Staphylococcus aureus strains tested, 80 were methicillin resistant, 180 were methicillin susceptible, and 10 were borderline susceptible. There was 100% correlation between bioluminescence and reference methods for methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant strains. All borderline-susceptible strains were identified as methicillin resistant by bioluminescence.

  3. Local statistical analysis of real-time NRG images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of real-time neutron images, taken with the cyclotron-based neutron radiography system of Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., which uses a set of neutron-photon converter, LiF + ZnS (Ag) scintillation screen, and a high sensitive SIT television camera, is described. The fluctuation of image intensity at a constant neutron flux domain is well represented by a Poisson distribution and ripple noise appearing in the real-time image can be attributed to the deficiency of neutron flux. The image integration technique, therefore, would be effective for improvement of the statistical quality of neutron image. Some digital image processing techniques based on statistical method would be effective for a ruffled image like real-time neutron radiography. (author)

  4. Digital Image Processing: An Overview of Computational Time Requirement.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahaiwe J

    2013-01-01

    Image processing is a growing field covering a wide range of techniques for the manipulation of digital images [1].Many image processing tasks can be characterized as being computationally intensive. One reason for this is the vast amount of data that requires processing, more than seven million pixels per second for typical image sources. To keep up with these data rates and demanding computations in real-time, the processing engine must provide specialized data paths, application-specific o...

  5. Volumetric real-time imaging using a CMUT ring array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Jung Woo; Oralkan, Ömer; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Gencel, Mustafa; Stephens, Douglas N; O'Donnell, Matthew; Sahn, David J; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2012-06-01

    A ring array provides a very suitable geometry for forward-looking volumetric intracardiac and intravascular ultrasound imaging. We fabricated an annular 64-element capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array featuring a 10-MHz operating frequency and a 1.27-mm outer radius. A custom software suite was developed to run on a PC-based imaging system for real-time imaging using this device. This paper presents simulated and experimental imaging results for the described CMUT ring array. Three different imaging methods--flash, classic phased array (CPA), and synthetic phased array (SPA)--were used in the study. For SPA imaging, two techniques to improve the image quality--Hadamard coding and aperture weighting--were also applied. The results show that SPA with Hadamard coding and aperture weighting is a good option for ring-array imaging. Compared with CPA, it achieves better image resolution and comparable signal-to-noise ratio at a much faster image acquisition rate. Using this method, a fast frame rate of up to 463 volumes per second is achievable if limited only by the ultrasound time of flight; with the described system we reconstructed three cross-sectional images in real-time at 10 frames per second, which was limited by the computation time in synthetic beamforming. PMID:22718870

  6. A fast reconstruction algorithm for bioluminescence tomography based on smoothed l0 norm regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaowei; Yu, Jingjing; Geng, Guohua; Guo, Hongbo

    2013-10-01

    As an important optical molecular imaging technique, bioluminescence tomography (BLT) offers an inexpensive and sensitive means for non-invasively imaging a variety of physiological and pathological activities at cellular and molecular levels in living small animals. The key problem of BLT is to recover the distribution of the internal bioluminescence sources from limited measurements on the surface. Considering the sparsity of the light source distribution, we directly formulate the inverse problem of BLT into an l0-norm minimization model and present a smoothed l0-norm (SL0) based reconstruction algorithm. By approximating the discontinuous l0 norm with a suitable continuous function, the SL0 norm method solves the problem of intractable computational load of the minimal l0 search as well as high sensitivity of l0-norm to noise. Numerical experiments on a mouse atlas demonstrate that the proposed SL0 norm based reconstruction method can obtain whole domain reconstruction without any a priori knowledge of the source permissible region, yielding almost the same reconstruction results to those of l1 norm methods.

  7. A look at some systemic properties of self-bioluminescent emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creath, Katherine

    2008-08-01

    Self-bioluminescent emission (SBE) is a type of biological chemiluminescence where photons are emitted as part of chemical reactions occurring during metabolic processes. This emission is also known as biophoton emission, ultraweak photon emission and ultraweak bioluminescence. This paper outlines research over the past century on some systemic properties of SBE as measured with biological detectors, photomultiplier detectors and ultra-sensitive imaging arrays. There is an apparent consensus in the literature that emission in the deep blue and ultraviolet (150-450nm) is related to DNA / RNA processes while emission in the red and near infrared (600-1000nm) is related to mitochondria and oxidative metabolisms involving reactive oxygen species, singlet oxygen and free radicals in plant, animal and human cells along with chlorophyll fluorescent decay in plants. Additionally, there are trends showing that healthy, unstressed and uninjured samples have less emission than samples that are unhealthy, stressed or injured. Mechanisms producing this emission can be narrowed down by isolating the wavelength region of interest and waiting for short-term fluorescence to decay leaving the ultraweak long-term metabolic emission. Examples of imaging this emission in healthy versus unhealthy, stressed versus unstressed, and injured versus uninjured plant parts are shown. Further discussion poses questions still to be answered related to properties such as coherence, photon statistics, and methodological means of isolating mechanisms.

  8. Real-time image quality assessment with mixed Lagrange time delay estimation autoregressive (MLTDEAR) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, K S; Tso, C P; Tan, Y Y; Lim, W K

    2007-06-01

    A proposal to assess the quality of scanning electron microscope images using mixed Lagrange time delay estimation technique is presented. With optimal scanning electron microscope scan rate information, online images can be quantified and improved. The online quality assessment technique is embedded onto a scanning electron microscope frame grabber card for real-time image processing. Different images are captured using scanning electron microscope and a database is built to optimally choose filter parameters. An optimum choice of filter parameters is obtained. With the optimum choice of scan rate, noise can be removed from real-time scanning electron microscope images without causing any sample contamination or increasing scanning time. PMID:17535262

  9. Multimodal MR imaging of acute and subacute experimental traumatic brain injury: Time course and correlation with cerebral energy metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of death and permanent disability world-wide. The predominant cause of death after TBI is brain edema which can be quantified by non-invasive diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI). To provide a better understanding of the early onset, time course, spatial development, and type of brain edema after TBI and to correlate MRI data and the cerebral energy state reflected by the metabolite adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The spontaneous development of lateral fluid percussion-induced TBI was investigated in the acute (6 h), subacute (48 h), and chronic (7 days) phase in rats by MRI of quantitative T2 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping as well as perfusion was combined with ATP-specific bioluminescence imaging and histology. An induced TBI led to moderate to mild brain damages, reflected by transient, pronounced development of vasogenic edema and perfusion reduction. Heterogeneous ADC patterns indicated a parallel, but mixed expression of vasogenic and cytotoxic edema. Cortical ATP levels were reduced in the acute and subacute phase by 13% and 27%, respectively, but were completely normalized at 7 days after injury. The partial ATP reduction was interpreted to be partially caused by a loss of neurons in parallel with transient dilution of the regional ATP concentration by pronounced vasogenic edema. The normalization of energy metabolism after 7 days was likely due to infiltrating glia and not to recovery. The MRI combined with metabolite measurement further improves the understanding and evaluation of brain damages after TBI

  10. Time-Scale Dependencies for Image Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittoria Bruni

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The definition of an atomic representation of the wavelet transform of a signal allows us to write the evolution law through scales for modulus maxima of the transform. Although this result is very general and useful for various fields of image processing, we focus on its application to signal and image compression. We propose a simple trick for taking advantage from the law without directly solving its corresponding partial differential equation. Preliminary experimental results show that the proposed approach outperforms available compression techniques.

  11. Bioluminescence and Deep Sea Life: All That Glitters... (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this lesson, students will investigate absorption, reflection, and scattering of light in the deep sea and discover the concept of bioluminescence. As they proceed, they will learn that white light (visible light) is comprised of all colors of the spectrum, that the quantity of light decreases with increasing depth in the ocean, the quality of light changes with increasing depth, and that red light penetrates water the least and that blue light penetrates water the most. They will also learn that many ocean organisms are bioluminescent, why organisms bioluminesce, and that bioluminescent light is usually blue. In addition, students will learn about several bioluminescent animals through independent research.

  12. An excitation potential imaging condition for elastic reverse time migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bingluo; Liu, Youshan; Li, Zhiyuan; Ma, Xiaona; Liang, Guanghe

    2014-09-01

    Elastic reverse time migration (ERTM) has been demonstrated to be more accurate than scalar RTM. However, low efficiency (large storage and heavy calculated amount) and strong artifacts caused by the crosstalk between different wave modes are the two primary barriers to the application of the ERTM during the processing of real data. The scalar (P) and vector (S) potentials of the elastic wavefield and the arrival times corresponding to the first energy extremum of the wavefield are saved at each grid point during the forward modeling of the source wavefield. The angle-dependent reflection coefficient images are subsequently obtained by dividing the scalar and vector potentials of the backward extrapolated receiver wavefield by the saved scalar and vector potentials at the grid points that satisfy the image time at each time step, respectively. The proposed imaging condition does not need to store the snapshots of the source wavefield, while it can considerably improve the computational efficiency and decrease the amount of storage and Input/Output manipulation (compared with the cross-correlation imaging condition) in addition to suppressing the crosstalk between compressive and shear wave modes. Compared with the excitation time imaging condition, the proposed imaging condition reduces the energy loss caused by the opposite polarity of the horizontal component at opposite sides of the source in stacked images. Numerical tests with synthetic data of the Sigsbee2a model have demonstrated that this imaging condition is a cost-effective and practical imaging condition for use in prestack ERTM.

  13. Real-time digital x-ray subtraction imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of producing visible difference images derived from an x-ray image of an anatomical subject is described. X-rays are directed through the subject, and the image is converted into television fields comprising trains of analog video signals. The analog signals are converted into digital signals, which are then integrated over a predetermined time corresponding to several television fields. Difference video signals are produced by performing a subtraction between the ongoing video signals and the corresponding integrated signals, and are converted into visible television difference images representing changes in the x-ray image

  14. Real-time video-image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskenazi, R.; Rayfield, M. J.; Yakimovsky, Y.

    1979-01-01

    Digitizer and storage system allow rapid random access to video data by computer. RAPID (random-access picture digitizer) uses two commercially-available, charge-injection, solid-state TV cameras as sensors. It can continuously update its memory with each frame of video signal, or it can hold given frame in memory. In either mode, it generates composite video output signal representing digitized image in memory.

  15. Real-time viewpoint image synthesis using strips of multi-camera images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Munekazu; Takada, Hideaki; Kojima, Akira

    2015-03-01

    A real-time viewpoint image generation method is achieved. Video communications with a high sense of reality are needed to make natural connections between users at different places. One of the key technologies to achieve a sense of high reality is image generation corresponding to an individual user's viewpoint. However, generating viewpoint images requires advanced image processing, which is usually too heavy to use for real-time and low-latency purposes. In this paper we propose a real-time viewpoint image generation method using simple blending of multiple camera images taken at equal horizontal intervals and convergence obtained by using approximate information of an object's depth. An image generated from the nearest camera images is visually perceived as an intermediate viewpoint image due to the visual effect of depth-fused 3D (DFD). If the viewpoint is not on the line of the camera array, a viewpoint image could be generated by region splitting. We made a prototype viewpoint image generation system and achieved real-time full-frame operation for stereo HD videos. The users can see their individual viewpoint image for left-and-right and back-and-forth movement toward the screen. Our algorithm is very simple and promising as a means for achieving video communication with high reality.

  16. Sensitive in vivo imaging of T cells utilizing a membrane bound Gaussia princeps luciferase enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Elmer B; Yeh, Raymond; LEE, James; Nikhamin, Yan; Punzalan, Blesida; Punzalan, Bleserene; La Perle, Krista; Larson, Steven M.; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier J.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a novel approach to bioluminescent T cell imaging (BLI) using a membrane-anchored form of the Gaussia luciferase (GLuc) enzyme, termed extGLuc, which we could stably express in both mouse and human primary T cells. In vitro, extGLuc+ cells emitted significantly higher bioluminescent signal when compared to cells expressing GLuc, Renilla luciferase (RLuc), and membrane-anchored RLuc (extRLuc). In vivo, mouse extGLuc+ T cells exhibited higher bioluminescent signal when compared to ...

  17. Real-time digital x-ray subtraction imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention provides a method of producing visible difference images derived from an X-ray image of an anatomical subject, comprising the steps of directing X-rays through the anatomical subject for producing an image, converting the image into television fields comprising trains of on-going video signals, digitally storing and integrating the on-going video signals over a time interval corresponding to several successive television fields and thereby producing stored and integrated video signals, recovering the video signals from storage and producing integrated video signals, producing video difference signals by performing a subtraction between the integrated video signals and the on-going video signals outside the time interval, and converting the difference signals into visible television difference images representing on-going changes in the X-ray image

  18. Biological tissues imaging with time domain topological energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahuguet, Perrine; Chouippe, Agathe; Gibiat, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Time Domain Topological Energy (TDTE) is a new imaging method that comes from the field of shape optimisation under constraints. The adjoint problem in time domain shows a link with the refocusing properties of time reversal, giving thus an efficient solution of the inverse problem of acoustical imaging. It has been first employed for Non Destructive Testing (NDT) where the performances have proved to be higher than classical tools. This method has given good results for the detection of high acoustic impedance defects and has been successfully adapted to the imaging of low impedance variations such as biological tissues.

  19. Real-Time Image Composition with Correction of Drift Distortion

    CERN Document Server

    Cizmar, Petr; Postek, Michael T

    2009-01-01

    In this article, a new scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image composition technique is described, which can significantly reduce drift-distortion related image corruptions. Drift-distortion commonly causes blur and distortions in the SEM images. Such corruption ordinarily appears when conventional image-acquisition methods, i.e. "slow scan" and "fast scan", are applied. The corruption is often very significant; it may render images unusable for metrology applications, especially, when sub-nanometer accuracy is required. The described correction technique works with a large number of quickly taken frames, which are properly aligned and then composed into a single image. Such image contains much less noise than the individual frames, whilst the blur and deformation is minimized. Also, this technique provides useful information about changes of the sample position in time, which may be well used to investigate the drift properties of the instrument.

  20. Detection of heterogeneous substrate distributions in tumors and spheroids by bioluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heterogeneous cell populations within solid tumors often limit non-surgical tumor therapies. Partially, the biological variability among cancer cells in vivo is attributable to a non-uniform oxygenation and pH distribution as a consequence of spatial and temporal heterogeneities in the tumor microcirculation. In order to evaluate whether such inhomogeneities may also be found in the distribution of nutrients and metabolites, a method, originally developed for the determination of regional substrate distributions in brain tissue; has been applied to cryobiopsies of human tumor xenografts and of tumors in patients. In addition, this method has been adapted to multicellular tumor spheroids of human origin. The bioluminescence reactions are enzymatically linked to the substrate of interest. A cold cyrostat section of the frozen enzyme solution is laid upon a frozen cryostat section of a tumor or of a spheroid. Bioluminescence recorded by film exposure occurs upon thawing these sections. The exposed film is then evaluated by microdensitometry and by special image analysis. The regional distributions of glucose, lactate and ATP are obtained in relative units. The results show that all substances investigated exhibit large regional differences reflecting a great heterogeneity of the metabolic micromilieu in malignant tumors and even within tumor spheroids

  1. Real-time lucky imaging in FastCam project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Ramos, L. F.; Piqueras Meseguer, J. J.; Martin Hernando, Y.; Oscoz, A.; Rebolo, R.

    2008-07-01

    Lucky imaging techniques implemented by the FastCam group (see http://www.iac.es/proyecto/fastcam/) at the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias have demonstrated its ability to obtain spectacular diffraction limited images in telescopes ranging from 1 to 4.2 m in visible wavelengths (mainly in the I band), at the expense of using only a small percentage of the available images. This work presents the development of a real-time processor, FPGA-based, capable of performing all the required processing involved in the lucky imaging technique: Bias and flat-field correction, quality evaluation of images, quality threshold for image selection, image recentering and accumulation, and finally sending through Gigabit Ethernet both raw and processed images to a PC computer. Furthermore, a real time display is generated directly from FPGA showing both types of images, plus a histogram of the computed quality values and the threshold used. All processes can co-exist physically located in separated places inside the FPGA, using its natural parallel approach, and can easily handle the 512x512 pixels at 30 fps found at the sensor camera output (an Andor Ixon+ DU-897ECSO EMCCD). Flexibility and parallel processing features of the reconfigurable logic have been used to implement a novel imaging strategy for segmented-mirror telescopes, allowing separate evaluation of every segment and posterior accumulation to achieve the resolution limit of a single segment with the integration capability of the full primary mirror.

  2. Imager Evaluation of Diabetic Retinopathy at the Time of Imaging in a Telemedicine Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallerano, Jerry D.; Silva, Paolo S.; Tolson, Ann M.; Francis, Taniya; Tolls, Dorothy; Patel, Bina; Eagan, Sharon; Aiello, Lloyd M.; Aiello, Lloyd P.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the ability of certified retinal imagers to identify presence versus absence of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (stDR) (moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy or worse or diabetic macular edema) at the time of retinal imaging in a telemedicine program. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Diabetic patients in a primary care setting or specialty diabetes clinic received Joslin Vision Network protocol retinal imaging as part of their care. Trained nonphysician imagers graded the presence versus absence of stDR at the time of imaging. These gradings were compared with masked gradings of certified readers. RESULTS Of 158 patients (316 eyes) imaged, all cases of stDR (42 eyes [13%]) were identified by the imagers at the time of imaging. Six eyes with mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy were graded by the imagers to have stDR (sensitivity 1.00, 95% CI 0.90–1.00; specificity 0.97, 0.94–0.99). CONCLUSIONS Appropriately trained imagers can accurately identify stDR at the time of imaging. PMID:22238278

  3. Near infrared bioluminescence resonance energy transfer from firefly luciferase—quantum dot bionanoconjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Rabeka; Karam, Liliana M.; Doane, Tennyson L.; Zylstra, Joshua; Fontaine, Danielle M.; Branchini, Bruce R.; Maye, Mathew M.

    2014-12-01

    The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between firefly luciferase enzymes and semiconductive quantum dots (QDs) with near infrared emission is described. The QD were phase transferred to aqueous buffers using a histidine mediated phase transfer route, and incubated with a hexahistidine tagged, green emitting variant of firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis (PPyGRTS). The PPyGRTS were bound to the QD interface via the hexahistidine tag, which effectively displaces the histidine layer and binds directly to the QD interfaces, allowing for short donor–acceptor distances (˜5.5 nm). Due to this, high BRET efficiency ratios of ˜5 were obtained. These PPyGRTS-QD bio-nano conjugates were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and BRET emission studies. The final optimized conjugate was easily observable by night vision imaging, demonstrating the potential of these materials in imaging and signaling/sensing applications.

  4. Near infrared bioluminescence resonance energy transfer from firefly luciferase--quantum dot bionanoconjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Rabeka; Karam, Liliana M; Doane, Tennyson L; Zylstra, Joshua; Fontaine, Danielle M; Branchini, Bruce R; Maye, Mathew M

    2014-12-12

    The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) between firefly luciferase enzymes and semiconductive quantum dots (QDs) with near infrared emission is described. The QD were phase transferred to aqueous buffers using a histidine mediated phase transfer route, and incubated with a hexahistidine tagged, green emitting variant of firefly luciferase from Photinus pyralis (PPyGRTS). The PPyGRTS were bound to the QD interface via the hexahistidine tag, which effectively displaces the histidine layer and binds directly to the QD interfaces, allowing for short donor-acceptor distances (?5.5 nm). Due to this, high BRET efficiency ratios of ?5 were obtained. These PPyGRTS-QD bio-nano conjugates were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and BRET emission studies. The final optimized conjugate was easily observable by night vision imaging, demonstrating the potential of these materials in imaging and signaling/sensing applications. PMID:25414169

  5. Bioluminescence determination of active caspase-3 in single apoptotic cells.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lišková, Marcela; Klepárník, Karel; Matalová, Eva; Hegrová, Jitka; P?ikryl, Jan; Švandová, Eva; Foret, František

    2013-01-01

    Ro?. 34, ?. 12 (2013), s. 1772-1777. ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ?R GAP206/11/2377 Grant ostatní: GA ?R(CZ) GAP502/12/1285 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 ; RVO:67985904 Keywords : apoptosis * bioluminescence * caspase-3 Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.161, year: 2013

  6. Bioluminescence characteristics of a tropical terrestrial fungus (Basidiomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deheyn, Dimitri D; Latz, Michael I

    2007-01-01

    Freshly collected samples of luminous mycelium of a terrestrial fungus from Panama were investigated for their bioluminescence characteristics. Taxonomic identification of fungal species could not be determined because of the lack of fruiting bodies. Fluorescence excited by 380 nm illumination had an emission spectrum with a main peak at 480 nm and additional chlorophyll peaks related to the wood substrate. Bioluminescence appeared as a continuous glow that did not show any diel variation. The light production was sensitive to temperature and decreased with temperatures higher or lower than ambient. Bioluminescence intensity was sensitive to hydration, increasing by a factor of 400 immediately after exposure to water and increasing by a factor of 1 million after several hours. This increase may have occurred through dilution of superoxide dismutase, which is a suppressive factor of bioluminescence in fungus tissue. The mycelium typically transports nutritive substances back to the fruiting body. The function of luminescent mycelium may be to increase the intensity of light from the fungus and more effectively attract nocturnal insects and other animals that serve as disseminating vectors for fungal spores. PMID:17610297

  7. The influence of SHFEMF on bioluminescence of V. Harveyi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of bacteria V. harveyi grown on agar medium to 7 HHz electromagnetic field changes the intensity of their luminescence. It is suggested that the dynamics of the luminescence change reflects the adaptation processes in the microorganisms which accompany the electromao.netic field effect. The changes observed may be attributed to the temperature dependence of bioluminescence

  8. Bioluminescence: a fungal nightlight with an internal timer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechara, Etelvino J H

    2015-03-30

    A recent study shows that green light emission by Neonothopanus gardneri mushrooms, endemic to coconut forests of Northern Brazil, is controlled by a circadian clock. Furthermore, insects are attracted by the light, raising the possibility that bioluminescence functions in spore dispersal and fungal dissemination. PMID:25829013

  9. The mechanism of electronic excitation in the bacterial bioluminescent reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current state of the problem of formation of the electron-excited product in the chemiluminescent reaction that underlies the bacterial luminescence is analysed. Various schemes of chemical transformations capable of producing a bacterial bioluminescence emitter are presented. The problem of excitation of secondary emitters is considered; two possible mechanisms of their excitation are analysed.

  10. Integrated CMOS photodetectors and signal processing for very low-level chemical sensing with the bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Eric K.; Sayler, Gary S.; Nivens, David E.; Rochelle, James M.; Ripp, Steven; Simpson, Michael L.

    2002-01-01

    We report an integrated CMOS microluminometer optimized for the detection of low-level bioluminescence as part of the bioluminescent bioreporter integrated circuit (BBIC). This microluminometer improves on previous devices through careful management of the sub-femtoampere currents, both signal and leakage, that flow in the front-end processing circuitry. In particular, the photodiode is operated with a reverse bias of only a few mV, requiring special attention to the reset circuitry of the current-to-frequency converter (CFC) that forms the front-end circuit. We report a sub-femtoampere leakage current and a minimum detectable signal (MDS) of 0.15 fA (1510 s integration time) using a room temperature 1.47 mm2 CMOS photodiode. This microluminometer can detect luminescence from as few as 5000 fully induced Pseudomonas fluorescens 5RL bacterial cells. c2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of cardiopulmonary circulation time with functional images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional images of circulation time, peak time image and half time image, were generated using a scintillation camera with a minicomputer system. Peak time image represents the progression of a bolus through heart, lungs and great vessels. Half time image is considered to reflect the regional clearance of the tracer. Normal values of peak time and half time were determined from subjects without evidence of cardiopulmonary disease. Normal values (n = 20) of peak time were: superior vena cava (SVC), always designated to 1 sec; right ventricle (RV), 2.0 +- 0.3 (SD) sec; lungs 4.5 +- 0.5 sec; left ventricle (LV), 7.6 +- 0.7 sec and that of half time were: RV, 2.0 +- 0.6 (SD) sec; right lung, 3.2 +- 0.5 sec; left lung, 3.3 +- 0.6 sec; LV, 3.8 +- 0.9 sec. In case of ischemic heart disease, these parameters were significantly delayed and supposed to be useful for the evaluations of cardiopulmonary hemodynamics. (author)

  12. Improving the Image Quality of Synthetic Transmit Aperture Ultrasound Images - Achieving Real-Time In-Vivo Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, Kim

    2004-01-01

    Synthetic transmit aperture (STA) imaging has the potential to increase the image quality of medical ultrasound images beyond the levels obtained by conventional imaging techniques (linear, phased, and convex array imaging). Currently, however, in-vivo applications of STA imaging is limited by a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), due to the application of a single transducer element at each emission, and higher susceptibility to tissue motion, produced by the summation of sequentially acquired low resolution images. In order to make real-time STA imaging feasible for in-vivo applications, these issues need to solved. The goal of this PhD study has been to find methods that can be used to overcome the above mentioned limitations, and hereby improve the image quality of STA imaging to a clinically desirable level, enabling real-time in-vivo STA imaging. The thesis investigates a new method to increase the SNR, which employs multi-element subapertures and linearly frequency modulated (FM) signals at each emission.The subaperture is applied to emulate a high power spherical wave transmitted by a virtual point source positioned behind the subaperture, and the linear FM signal replaces the conventional short excitation signal to increase the transmitted temporal energy. This approach, named Temporally encoded Multi-element Synthetic transmit aperture (TMS) imaging, is evaluated in detail for linear array and convex array imaging applications using simulations, and phantom and in-vivo experiments. The thesis contains summaries of four journal articles and four corresponding conference publications, which comprise the primary contributions of the PhD. The first two papers give elaborated evaluations of TMS imaging for linear array and convex array imaging, respectively. The results, including initial in-vivo experiments, showed, that TMS imaging can increase the SNR by as much as 17 dB compared to the traditional imaging techniques, which improves the in-vivo image quality to a highly competitive level. An in-vivo evaluation of convex array TMS imaging for abdominal imaging applications is presented in the third paper, based on a clinical trial with 7 healthy male volunteers. Real-time movie sequences of 3 seconds duration were acquired and analyzed by experienced medical doctors using blinded clinical evaluation. The results showed a statistically significant improvement in image quality of convex array TMS imaging compared to conventional convex array imaging. Only minor motion artifacts causing subtle image brightness fluctuations were reported in TMS imaging, which did not depreciate the diagnostic value of the images. The influence of tissue motion and a method for two-dimensional motion compensation is investigated in the fourth and final paper. The method estimates the tissue velocity and motion vii Abstract direction at each image point by correlating image lines beamformed along a set of motion directions and selects the direction and velocity corresponding to the highest correlation. Using these estimates, motion compensation is obtained by tracking the location of each pixel, when reconstructing the low resolution images. The presented phantom and in-vivo results showed, that severe tissue motion has a negative influence on the image quality of STA imaging as expected, but, most importantly, that the proposed method successfully compensates for the motion, thus, retaining the image quality of TMS imaging, when scanning moving tissue. In conclusion, the results of the research presented in this thesis have demonstrated, that TMS imaging is feasible for real-time in-vivo imaging, and that the obtained image quality is highly competitive with the techniques applied in current medical ultrasound scanners. Hereby, the goals of the PhD have been successfully achieved.

  13. Real-time movie image enhancement in NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical NMR motion picture (movie) images can now be produced routinely in real-time by ultra-high-speed echo-planar imaging (EPI). The single-shot image quality depends on both pixel resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), both factors being intertradeable. If image S/N is sacrificed rather than resolution, it is shown that S/N may be greatly enhanced subsequently without vitiating spatial resolution or foregoing real motional effects when the object motion is periodic. This is achieved by a Fourier filtering process. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate the technique for a normal functioning heart. (author)

  14. Real time neutron image processing system in NRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron radiography facility was installed at the neutron radiography beam tube of the HANARO research reactor. The NRF is used for the nondestructive test to inspect and evaluate the material defect and homogeneity by detecting the transmitted neutron image in the nuclear as well as non-nuclear industry. To analyze the dynamical neutron image effectively and efficiently, the real-time image processing system was developed in background subtraction, normalization, geometry correction and beam uniformity, contrast control, filtering. The image quality test and dimension measurements were performed for the neutron beam purity and sensitivity indication. The NRF beam condition represents the highest beam quality for neutron radiography.

  15. In Vivo Real-Time, Multicolor, Quantum Dot Lymphatic Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Mikako; Sato, Noriko; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2009-01-01

    The lymphatic network is complex and difficult to visualize in real-time in vivo. Moreover, the direction of flow within lymphatic networks is often unpredictable especially in areas with well-developed “watershed” or overlapping lymphatics. Herein, we report a method of in vivo real-time multicolor lymphatic imaging using cadmium–selenium quantum dots (Qdots) with a fluorescence imaging system that enables the simultaneous visualization of up to five distinct lymphatic basins in real-t...

  16. BLProt: Prediction of bioluminescent proteins based on support vector machine and relieff feature selection

    KAUST Repository

    Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar

    2011-08-17

    Background: Bioluminescence is a process in which light is emitted by a living organism. Most creatures that emit light are sea creatures, but some insects, plants, fungi etc, also emit light. The biotechnological application of bioluminescence has become routine and is considered essential for many medical and general technological advances. Identification of bioluminescent proteins is more challenging due to their poor similarity in sequence. So far, no specific method has been reported to identify bioluminescent proteins from primary sequence.Results: In this paper, we propose a novel predictive method that uses a Support Vector Machine (SVM) and physicochemical properties to predict bioluminescent proteins. BLProt was trained using a dataset consisting of 300 bioluminescent proteins and 300 non-bioluminescent proteins, and evaluated by an independent set of 141 bioluminescent proteins and 18202 non-bioluminescent proteins. To identify the most prominent features, we carried out feature selection with three different filter approaches, ReliefF, infogain, and mRMR. We selected five different feature subsets by decreasing the number of features, and the performance of each feature subset was evaluated.Conclusion: BLProt achieves 80% accuracy from training (5 fold cross-validations) and 80.06% accuracy from testing. The performance of BLProt was compared with BLAST and HMM. High prediction accuracy and successful prediction of hypothetical proteins suggests that BLProt can be a useful approach to identify bioluminescent proteins from sequence information, irrespective of their sequence similarity. 2011 Kandaswamy et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  17. Validation of constitutively expressed bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a rapid microbiological quantification tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, N; Naseby, D C

    2015-06-15

    Whole cell biosensors have been extensively used for monitoring toxicity and contamination of various compounds and xenobiotics in environmental biology and microbial ecology; their application in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries has been limited. According to several pharmacopoeias, pharmaceutical products must be tested for microbial activity using traditional viable count techniques; the use of whole cell microbial biosensors potentially provides an alternative, fast, and efficient method. However there is a lack of a validated bioluminescence method. Prototype whole cell microbial biosensors have already been developed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027. Validation of the bioluminescent strains was performed in accordance with the pharmacopoeia, Parenteral Drug Association and International Organisation of Standardisation. These strains demonstrated that the bioluminescent method was accurate, precise and equivalent, as compared with plate counting at a range of 10(3)-10(7) CFU/mL. Percentage recoveries using the bioluminescent method were between 70% and 130% for all bioluminescent strains and therefore the bioluminescent method was accurate according to the criteria set in PDA technical report 33. The method was also more precise (relative standard deviation less than 15%) than the traditional plate counting method or the ATP bioluminescent method. The lower limit of detection was 10(3) CFU/mL. Two-way ANOVA showed no significant difference between the traditional plate counting and the novel bioluminescent method for all bioluminescent strains. The bioluminescent constructs passed/exceeded pharmacopoeia-specified criteria for range, limit of detection, accuracy, precision and equivalence. PMID:25618377

  18. Acoustic imaging with time reversal methods: From medicine to NDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Mathias

    2015-03-01

    This talk will present an overview of the research conducted on ultrasonic time-reversal methods applied to biomedical imaging and to non-destructive testing. We will first describe iterative time-reversal techniques that allow both focusing ultrasonic waves on reflectors in tissues (kidney stones, micro-calcifications, contrast agents) or on flaws in solid materials. We will also show that time-reversal focusing does not need the presence of bright reflectors but it can be achieved only from the speckle noise generated by random distributions of non-resolved scatterers. We will describe the applications of this concept to correct distortions and aberrations in ultrasonic imaging and in NDT. In the second part of the talk we will describe the concept of time-reversal processors to get ultrafast ultrasonic images with typical frame rates of order of 10.000 F/s. It is the field of ultrafast ultrasonic imaging that has plenty medical applications and can be of great interest in NDT. We will describe some applications in the biomedical domain: Quantitative Elasticity imaging of tissues by following shear wave propagation to improve cancer detection and Ultrafast Doppler imaging that allows ultrasonic functional imaging.

  19. Antimicrobial properties of cyclodextrin-antiseptics-complexes determined by microplate laser nephelometry and ATP bioluminescence assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Susanne; Wiegand, Cornelia; Buschmann, Hans-Jürgen; Hipler, Uta-Christina

    2012-10-15

    Antimicrobial effects of substances can be determined with different methods that measure distinct parameters. Thus, a comparison of the results obtained can be difficult. In this study, two in vitro methods were employed to determine concentration and time dependent effects of cyclodextrin (CD)-complexes with the antiseptics chlorhexidine diacetate (CHX), iodine (IOD) and polihexanide (PHMB) on Candida albicans and Malassezia pachydermatis. Using both, microplate laser nephelometry and the ATP bioluminescence assay, it could be shown that CD-antiseptics-complexes tested exhibited significant antifungal effects with the exception of ?-CD-CHX in the case of C. albicans. Microplate laser nephelometry (MLN) is an optical method and enables a quantitative determination of particle concentrations in solution. By means of this method, microbial growth under influence of potential antimicrobial substances can be monitored over a prolonged time period. In addition, the antimicrobial activity was analyzed by measurement of the microbial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content with a bioluminescent assay. The luminescent signal is directly proportional to the amount of ATP, and thus, a linear function of the number of living microbial cells present. Both methods were compared according to the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) calculated and the statistical evaluation of Pearson's correlation coefficient (r). In summary, it could be demonstrated that both methods yield similar results although they differ in the parameter. PMID:22877865

  20. Coherent temporal imaging with analog time-bandwidth compression

    CERN Document Server

    Asghari, Mohammad H

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the concept of coherent temporal imaging and its combination with the anamorphic stretch transform. The new system can measure both temporal profile of fast waveforms as well as their spectrum in real time and at high-throughput. We show that the combination of coherent detection and warped time-frequency mapping also performs time-bandwidth compression. By reducing the temporal width without sacrificing spectral resolution, it addresses the Big Data problem in real time instruments. The proposed method is the first application of the recently demonstrated Anamorphic Stretch Transform to temporal imaging. Using this method narrow spectral features beyond the spectrometer resolution can be captured. At the same time the output bandwidth and hence the record length is minimized. Coherent detection allows the temporal imaging and dispersive Fourier transform systems to operate in the traditional far field as well as in near field regimes.

  1. Application of the real-time Retinex image enhancement for endoscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuhata, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hajime; Hara, Shinsuke; Tsutsui, Hiroshi; Onoye, Takao

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a real-time image enhancement technique for gastric endoscopy, which is based on the variational approach of the Retinex theory. In order to efficiently reduce the computational cost required for image enhancement, processing layers and repeat counts of iterations are determined in accordance with software evaluation result, and as for processing architecture, the pipelining architecture can handle high resolution pictures in real-time. To show its potential, performance comparison between with and without the proposed image enhancement technique is shown using several video images obtained by endoscopy for different parts of digestive organ. PMID:24110460

  2. Application of image processing for terahertz time domain spectroscopy imaging quantitative detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-juan; Wang, Sheng; Ren, Jiao-jiao; Zhou, Ming-xing; Zhao, Duo

    2015-03-01

    According to nondestructive testing principle for the terahertz time domain spectroscopy Imaging, using digital image processing techniques, through Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system collected images and two-dimensional datas and using a range of processing methods, including selecting regions of interest, contrast enhancement, edge detection, and defects being detected. In the paper, Matlab programming is been use to defect recognition of Terahertz, by figuring out the pixels to determine defects defect area and border length, roundness, diameter size. Through the experiment of the qualitative analysis and quantitative calculation of Matlab image processing, this method of detection of defects of geometric dimension of the sample to get a better result.

  3. A Short Image Series Based Scheme for Time Series Digital Image Correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xian

    2014-01-01

    A new scheme for digital image correlation, i.e., short time series DIC (STS-DIC) is proposed. Instead of processing the original deformed speckle images individually, STS-DIC combines several adjacent deformed speckle images from a short time series and then processes the averaged image, for which deformation continuity over time is introduced. The deformation of several adjacent images is assumed to be linear in time and a new spatial-temporal displacement representation method with eight unknowns is presented based on the subset-based representation method. Then, the model of STS-DIC is created and a solving scheme is developed based on the Newton-Raphson iteration. The proposed method is verified for numerical and experimental cases. The results show that the proposed STS-DIC greatly improves the accuracy of traditional DIC, both under simple and complicated deformation conditions, while retaining acceptable actual computational cost.

  4. Real-time time-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging including single-shot acquisition with a segmented optical image intensifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-speed (video-rate) fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is reported using two different time-domain approaches based on gated optical image intensifier technology. The first approach utilizes a rapidly switchable variable delay generator with sequential image acquisition, while the second employs a novel segmented gated optical imager to acquire lifetime maps in a single shot. Lifetimes are fitted using both a non-linear least-squares fit analysis and the rapid lifetime determination method. Monte Carlo simulations were used to optimize the acquisition parameters and a comparison between theory and experiment is presented. The importance of single-shot imaging to minimize the deleterious impact of sample movements is highlighted. Real-time FLIM movies of multi-well plate samples and tissue autofluorescence are presented

  5. Exploration time of static images implying different body movements causes time distortions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nather, F C; Bueno, J L O

    2012-08-01

    Studies of subjective time have adopted different methods to understand different processes of time perception. Four sculptures, with implied movement ranked as 1.5-, 3.0-, 4.5-, and 6.0-point stimuli on the Body Movement Ranking Scale, were randomly presented to 42 university students untrained in visual arts and ballet. Participants were allowed to observe the images for any length of time (exploration time) and, immediately after each image was observed, recorded the duration as they perceived it. The results of temporal ratio (exploration time/time estimation) showed that exploration time of images also affected perception of time, i.e., the subjective time for sculptures representing implied movement were overestimated. PMID:23033748

  6. Time-lapse imaging of necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wållberg, Fredrik; Tenev, Tencho; Meier, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The processes of dying are as tightly regulated as those of growth and proliferation. Recent work into the molecular pathways that regulate and execute cell death have uncovered a plethora of signalling cascades that lead to distinct modes of cell death, including "apoptosis," "necrosis," "autophagic cell death," and "mitotic catastrophe." Given that cells can readily switch from one form of death to another, it is vital to carefully monitor the form of death under investigation. Particularly, end-point techniques are intrinsically unsuitable for assessing apoptosis versus necrosis, as they cannot reconstruct the sequence of events that have led to cell death. Since apoptotic cells frequently undergo secondary necrosis under in vitro culture conditions, novel methods relying on high-throughput time-lapse fluorescence video microscopy have been developed. Here we describe the use of this technique to reliably distinguish necrosis from apoptosis and secondary necrosis. PMID:23733566

  7. Modelling dinoflagellates as an approach to the seasonal forecasting of bioluminescence in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinko, Charlotte L. J.; Martin, Adrian P.; Allen, John T.

    2014-11-01

    Bioluminescence within ocean surface waters is of significant interest because it can enhance the study of subsurface movement and organisms. Little is known about how bioluminescence potential (BPOT) varies spatially and temporally in the open ocean. However, light emitted from dinoflagellates often dominates the stimulated bioluminescence field. As a first step towards forecasting surface ocean bioluminescence in the open ocean, a simple ecological model is developed which simulates seasonal changes in dinoflagellate abundance. How forecasting seasonal changes in BPOT may be achieved through combining such a model with relationships derived from observations is discussed and an example is given. The study illustrates a potential new approach to forecasting BPOT through explicitly modelling the population dynamics of a prolific bioluminescent phylum. The model developed here offers a promising platform for the future operational forecasting of the broad temporal changes in bioluminescence within the North Atlantic. Such forecasting of seasonal patterns could provide valuable information for the targeting of scientific field campaigns.

  8. Image Segmentation in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Detector

    CERN Document Server

    P?o?ski, Piotr; Sulej, Robert; Zaremba, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    The Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) detectors provide excellent imaging and particle identification ability for studying neutrinos. An efficient and automatic reconstruction procedures are required to exploit potential of this imaging technology. Herein, a novel method for segmentation of images from LAr-TPC detectors is presented. The proposed approach computes a feature descriptor for each pixel in the image, which characterizes amplitude distribution in pixel and its neighbourhood. The supervised classifier is employed to distinguish between pixels representing particle's track and noise. The classifier is trained and evaluated on the hand-labeled dataset. The proposed approach can be a preprocessing step for reconstructing algorithms working directly on detector images.

  9. Precision cosmology with time delay lenses: high resolution imaging requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Meng, Xiao-Lei; Agnello, Adriano; Auger, Matthew W; Liao, Kai; Marshall, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Lens time delays are a powerful probe of cosmology, provided that the gravitational potential of the main deflector can be modeled with sufficient precision. Recent work has shown that this can be achieved by detailed modeling of the host galaxies of lensed quasars, which appear as "Einstein Rings" in high resolution images. We carry out a systematic exploration of the high resolution imaging required to exploit the thousands of lensed quasars that will be discovered by current and upcoming surveys with the next decade. Specifically, we simulate realistic lens systems as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and ground based adaptive optics images taken with Keck or the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). We compare the performance of these pointed observations with that of images taken by the Euclid (VIS), Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) surveys. We use as our metric the precision with which the slope $\\gamma'$ of the...

  10. Dynamic image reconstruction in time-resolved diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Samuel; Cooper, Robert J.; Hebden, Jeremy C.; Arridge, Simon R.

    2015-03-01

    Optical imaging techniques provide a means of monitoring haemodynamics and tissue oxygenation by virtue of the differing absorption spectra of relevant endogenous chromophores. Whilst time-domain diffuse optical tomography offers sufficient sensitivity to produce full three dimensional images of such properties through the entire infant brain, standard approaches to the imaging protocol and reconstruction methods limit the temporal resolution which can be achieved without an unacceptable degradation in the image quality. In this work we employ spatio-temporal regularisation by means of a variational form Kalman filter to achieve significantly improved temporal resolution whilst maintaining image quality. We demonstrate this approach in a dynamic phantom study where we successfully track moving absorbing and scattering targets using the MONSTIR II instrument developed at University College London.

  11. Mathematical methods in time series analysis and digital image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Kurths, J; Maass, P; Timmer, J

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this volume is to bring together research directions in theoretical signal and imaging processing developed rather independently in electrical engineering, theoretical physics, mathematics and the computer sciences. In particular, mathematically justified algorithms and methods, the mathematical analysis of these algorithms, and methods as well as the investigation of connections between methods from time series analysis and image processing are reviewed. An interdisciplinary comparison of these methods, drawing upon common sets of test problems from medicine and geophysical/enviromental sciences, is also addressed. This volume coherently summarizes work carried out in the field of theoretical signal and image processing. It focuses on non-linear and non-parametric models for time series as well as on adaptive methods in image processing.

  12. Fre Is the Major Flavin Reductase Supporting Bioluminescence from Vibrio harveyi Luciferase in Escherichia coli*

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Zachary T.; Baldwin, Thomas O.

    2009-01-01

    Unlike the vast majority of flavoenzymes, bacterial luciferase requires an exogenous source of reduced flavin mononucleotide for bioluminescence activity. Within bioluminescent bacterial cells, species-specific oxidoreductases are believed to provide reduced flavin for luciferase activity. The source of reduced flavin in Escherichia coli-expressing bioluminescence is not known. There are two candidate proteins potentially involved in this process in E. coli, a homolog ...

  13. High-Throughput Bioluminescence-Based Mutant Screening Strategy for Identification of Bacterial Virulence Genes?

    OpenAIRE

    Karsi, Attila; Gu?lsoy, Nagihan; Corb, Erin; Dumpala, Pradeep R.; Lawrence, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    A high-throughput bioluminescence screening procedure for identification of virulence genes in bacteria was developed and applied to the fish pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri. A random transposon mutant library expressing bioluminescence was constructed and robotically arrayed on 384-well plates. Mutants were cultivated and mixed with catfish serum and neutrophils in 96-well plates, and bioluminescence was used to detect mutants that are more susceptible to killing by these host factors. The vi...

  14. Investigations on time stability of passive THz imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Marcin; Palka, Norbert; Zyczkowski, Marek; Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw

    2014-10-01

    Terahertz radiation is within the frequency range from 100 GHz to 10THz. This radiation has specific characteristics in terms of imaging. The radiation is harmless to the human body because the energy transferred by electromagnetic waves in this range of frequencies are very small thus there is no ionization of matter. The development of imaging devices and exploration of new spectral bands is a chance to introduce new equipment for assuring public safety. It has been proved that objects hidden under clothing can be detected and visualized using terahertz (THz) cameras. However, passive THz cameras still offer too low image resolution for objects recognition. In order to determine the properties of terahertz imaging for detection of hidden objects several aspects need to be considered. Taking into account the fact that the image captured by the terahertz camera reflects the spatial distribution of the relative temperature of the observed objects, the effect of the measurement time on the imaging capabilities should be examined. A very important aspect is the influence of the type (material composition) of coating material, as well as the type of an object hidden under clothing (size and material). The purpose of the studies is to investigate the time stability of passive THz imaging on 250 GHz for detection of concealed objects. In the article, we present the measurement setup, the measurement methodology as well as the initial results of measurements with various types of clothing and test objects.

  15. Time-Reversal Acoustics and Maximum-Entropy Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, J G

    2001-08-22

    Target location is a common problem in acoustical imaging using either passive or active data inversion. Time-reversal methods in acoustics have the important characteristic that they provide a means of determining the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the scattering operator for either of these problems. Each eigenfunction may often be approximately associated with an individual scatterer. The resulting decoupling of the scattered field from a collection of targets is a very useful aid to localizing the targets, and suggests a number of imaging and localization algorithms. Two of these are linear subspace methods and maximum-entropy imaging.

  16. L1/2 regularization based numerical method for effective reconstruction of bioluminescence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even though bioluminescence tomography (BLT) exhibits significant potential and wide applications in macroscopic imaging of small animals in vivo, the inverse reconstruction is still a tough problem that has plagued researchers in a related area. The ill-posedness of inverse reconstruction arises from insufficient measurements and modeling errors, so that the inverse reconstruction cannot be solved directly. In this study, an l1/2 regularization based numerical method was developed for effective reconstruction of BLT. In the method, the inverse reconstruction of BLT was constrained into an l1/2 regularization problem, and then the weighted interior-point algorithm (WIPA) was applied to solve the problem through transforming it into obtaining the solution of a series of l1 regularizers. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method were demonstrated with numerical simulations on a digital mouse. Stability verification experiments further illustrated the robustness of the proposed method for different levels of Gaussian noise

  17. L1/2 regularization based numerical method for effective reconstruction of bioluminescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueli; Yang, Defu; Zhang, Qitan; Liang, Jimin

    2014-05-01

    Even though bioluminescence tomography (BLT) exhibits significant potential and wide applications in macroscopic imaging of small animals in vivo, the inverse reconstruction is still a tough problem that has plagued researchers in a related area. The ill-posedness of inverse reconstruction arises from insufficient measurements and modeling errors, so that the inverse reconstruction cannot be solved directly. In this study, an l1/2 regularization based numerical method was developed for effective reconstruction of BLT. In the method, the inverse reconstruction of BLT was constrained into an l1/2 regularization problem, and then the weighted interior-point algorithm (WIPA) was applied to solve the problem through transforming it into obtaining the solution of a series of l1 regularizers. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method were demonstrated with numerical simulations on a digital mouse. Stability verification experiments further illustrated the robustness of the proposed method for different levels of Gaussian noise.

  18. Seasonal variation of deep-sea bioluminescence in the Ionian Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ICDeep (Image Intensified Charge Coupled Device for Deep sea research) profiler was used to measure the density of deep bioluminescent animals (BL) through the water column in the east, west and mid-Ionian Sea and in the Algerian Basin. A west to east decrease in BL density was found. Generalized additive modelling was used to investigate seasonal variation in the east and west Ionian Sea (NESTOR and NEMO neutrino telescope sites, respectively) from BL measurements in autumn 2008 and spring 2009. A significant seasonal effect was found in the west Ionian Sea (p<0.001), where a deep autumnal peak in BL density occurred between 500 and 2400 m. No significant seasonal variation in BL density was found in the east Ionian Sea (p=0.07). In both spring and autumn, significant differences in BL density were found through the water column between the east and west Ionian Sea (p<0.001).

  19. Seasonal variation of deep-sea bioluminescence in the Ionian Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, Jessica, E-mail: j.craig@abdn.ac.u [University of Aberdeen, Oceanlab, Main Street, Newburgh, Aberdeenshire, AB41 6AA (United Kingdom); Jamieson, Alan J.; Bagley, Philip M.; Priede, Imants G. [University of Aberdeen, Oceanlab, Main Street, Newburgh, Aberdeenshire, AB41 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-21

    The ICDeep (Image Intensified Charge Coupled Device for Deep sea research) profiler was used to measure the density of deep bioluminescent animals (BL) through the water column in the east, west and mid-Ionian Sea and in the Algerian Basin. A west to east decrease in BL density was found. Generalized additive modelling was used to investigate seasonal variation in the east and west Ionian Sea (NESTOR and NEMO neutrino telescope sites, respectively) from BL measurements in autumn 2008 and spring 2009. A significant seasonal effect was found in the west Ionian Sea (p<0.001), where a deep autumnal peak in BL density occurred between 500 and 2400 m. No significant seasonal variation in BL density was found in the east Ionian Sea (p=0.07). In both spring and autumn, significant differences in BL density were found through the water column between the east and west Ionian Sea (p<0.001).

  20. Visible light induced ocular delayed bioluminescence as a possible origin of negative afterimage

    CERN Document Server

    Bokkon, I; Wang, C; Dai, J; Salari, V; Grass, F; Antal, I

    2011-01-01

    The delayed luminescence of biological tissues is an ultraweak reemission of absorbed photons after exposure to external monochromatic or white light illumination. Recently, Wang, B\\'okkon, Dai and Antal (Brain Res. 2011) presented the first experimental proof of the existence of spontaneous ultraweak biophoton emission and visible light induced delayed ultraweak photon emission from in vitro freshly isolated rat's whole eye, lens, vitreous humor and retina. Here, we suggest that the photobiophysical source of negative afterimage can also occur within the eye by delayed bioluminescent photons. In other words, when we stare at a colored (or white) image for few seconds, external photons can induce excited electronic states within different parts of the eye that is followed by a delayed reemission of absorbed photons for several seconds. Finally, these reemitted photons can be absorbed by nonbleached photoreceptors that produce a negative afterimage. Although this suggests the photobiophysical source of negativ...

  1. Time-Frequency and Time-Scale-Based Fragile Watermarking Methods for Image Authentication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sattar Farook

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Two fragile image watermarking methods are proposed for image authentication. The first method is based on time-frequency analysis and the second one is based on time-scale analysis. For the first method, the watermark is chosen as an arbitrary nonstationary signal with a particular signature in the time-frequency plane. Experimental results show that this technique is very sensitive to many attacks such as cropping, scaling, translation, JPEG compression, and rotation, making it very effective in image authentication. For the second method, based on a wavelet-domain multiresolution analysis, quantization index modulation (QIM embedding scheme and arbitrary frequency-modulated (FM chirp watermarks are used in the implementation. In this blind technique, the original watermark is needed neither for the content integrity verification of the original image nor for the content quality assessment of the distorted image.

  2. Real-time particle image velocimetry based on FPGA technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV), based on laser sheet, is a method for image processing and calculation of distributed velocity fields.It is well established as a fluid dynamics measurement tool, being applied to liquid, gases and multiphase flows.Images of particles are processed by means of computationally demanding algorithms, what makes its real-time implementation difficult.The most probable displacements are found applying two dimensional cross-correlation function. In this work, we detail how it is possible to achieve real-time visualization of PIV method by designing an adaptive embedded architecture based on FPGA technology.We show first results of a physical field of velocity calculated by this platform system in a real-time approach.

  3. Monitoring Neural Activity with Bioluminescence during Natural Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Eva A.; Kampff, Adam R.; Prober, David A.; Schier, Alexander F.; Engert, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Existing techniques for monitoring neural activity in awake, freely behaving vertebrates are invasive and difficult to target to genetically identified neurons. Here we describe the use of bioluminescence to non-invasively monitor the activity of genetically specified neurons in freely behaving zebrafish. Transgenic fish expressing the Ca2+-sensitive photoprotein GFP-apoAequorin (GA) in most neurons generated large and fast bioluminescent signals related to neural activity, neuroluminescence, that could be recorded continuously for many days. To test the limits of this technique, GA was specifically targeted to the hypocretin-positive neurons of the hypothalamus. We found that neuroluminescence generated by this group of ~20 neurons was associated with periods of increased locomotor activity and identified two classes of neural activity corresponding to distinct swim latencies. Thus, our neuroluminescence assay can report, with high temporal resolution and sensitivity, the activity of small subsets of neurons during unrestrained behavior. PMID:20305645

  4. D City Transformations by Time Series of Aerial Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, A.

    2015-02-01

    Recent photogrammetric applications, based on dense image matching algorithms, allow to use not only images acquired by digital cameras, amateur or not, but also to recover the vast heritage of analogue photographs. This possibility opens up many possibilities in the use and enhancement of existing photos heritage. The research of the original figuration of old buildings, the virtual reconstruction of disappeared architectures and the study of urban development are some of the application areas that exploit the great cultural heritage of photography. Nevertheless there are some restrictions in the use of historical images for automatic reconstruction of buildings such as image quality, availability of camera parameters and ineffective geometry of image acquisition. These constrains are very hard to solve and it is difficult to discover good dataset in the case of terrestrial close range photogrammetry for the above reasons. Even the photographic archives of museums and superintendence, while retaining a wealth of documentation, have no dataset for a dense image matching approach. Compared to the vast collection of historical photos, the class of aerial photos meets both criteria stated above. In this paper historical aerial photographs are used with dense image matching algorithms to realize 3d models of a city in different years. The models can be used to study the urban development of the city and its changes through time. The application relates to the city centre of Verona, for which some time series of aerial photographs have been retrieved. The models obtained in this way allowed, right away, to observe the urban development of the city, the places of expansion and new urban areas. But a more interesting aspect emerged from the analytical comparison between models. The difference, as the Euclidean distance, between two models gives information about new buildings or demolitions. As considering accuracy it is necessary point out that the quality of final observations from model comparison depends on several aspects such as image quality, image scale and marker accuracy from cartography.

  5. Real-Time Ellipsometry-Based Transmission Ultrasound Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallman, J S; Poco, J F; Ashby, A E

    2007-02-14

    Ultrasonic imaging is a valuable tool for non-destructive evaluation and medical diagnosis. Reflection mode is exclusively used for medical imaging, and is most frequently used for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) because of the relative speed of acquisition. Reflection mode imaging is qualitative, yielding little information about material properties, and usually only about material interfaces. Transmission imaging can be used in 3D reconstructions to yield quantitative information: sound speed and attenuation. Unfortunately, traditional scanning methods of acquiring transmission data are very slow, requiring on the order of 20 minutes per image. The sensing of acoustic pressure fields as optical images can significantly speed data acquisition. An entire 2D acoustic pressure field can be acquired in under a second. The speed of data acquisition for a 2D view makes it feasible to obtain multiple views of an object. With multiple views, 3D reconstruction becomes possible. A fast, compact (no big magnets or accelerators), inexpensive, 3D imaging technology that uses no ionizing radiation could be a boon to the NDE and medical communities. 2D transmission images could be examined in real time to give the ultrasonic equivalent of a fluoroscope, or accumulated in such a way as to acquire phase and amplitude data over multiple views for 3D reconstruction (for breast cancer imaging, for example). Composite panels produced for the aircraft and automobile industries could be inspected in near real time, and inspection of attenuating materials such as ceramics and high explosives would be possible. There are currently three optical-readout imaging transmission ultrasound technologies available. One is based on frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) [1,2], one on Fabry-Perot interferometry [3], and another on critical angle modulation [4]. Each of these techniques has its problems. The FTIR based system cannot currently be scaled to large aperture sizes, the Fabry-Perot system has never been fully implemented for area imaging, and the critical angle modulation system is not sensitive enough for medical imaging. We proposed an entirely new way of using acoustic pressure to modulate a light beam. This new technology should be sensitive enough to be useful for medical imaging and have a large enough aperture to speed acquisition by orders of magnitude over point sampling. Unfortunately, we were unable to bring this technology to fruition.

  6. Bioluminescence for USP sterility testing of pharmaceutical suspension products.

    OpenAIRE

    Bussey, D. M.; Tsuji, K.

    1986-01-01

    Bioluminescence measurement significantly improved the accuracy, sensitivity, precision, and reliability of the current visual endpoint determination for the USP sterility test and eliminated the day 7 transfer/dilution step required for testing suspension products. Thirteen strains of bacteria and fungi (representing potential contaminants in sterile products), three pharmaceutical suspension products, and four media were used in the experiment. No interference from suspension products was e...

  7. Leukocyte esterase-nitrite and bioluminescence assays as urine screens.

    OpenAIRE

    Males, B M; Bartholomew, W R; Amsterdam, D

    1985-01-01

    The 1-min leukocyte esterase (LE)-nitrite test (Chemstrip 9; Biodynamics, Division of Boehringer Mannheim Biochemicals, Indianapolis, Ind.) and a bioluminescence assay (Monolight centrifugation method; Analytical Luminescence Laboratory, Inc., San Diego, Calif.) were tested for their efficacy as urine screens among 453 patients at a tertiary-care teaching hospital. Both methods had the capacity to exclude significant bacteriuria (greater than or equal to 10(5) CFU/ml) when compared with the r...

  8. [Effect of mycotoxin T-2 on bioluminescence intensity of bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsev, A M; Go?ster, O S; Starodub, N F

    2003-01-01

    The acute and chronic toxicity of T-2 was studied by bioluminescent method with the use of two strains of luminous bacteria--P. phosphorum Sq3 u V. fischeri F1 as biological objects. It was shown that in acute experiments after 10 min incubation of bacteria in the presence of T-2 the bioluminescence inhibition on the 50% level was observed at the toxin concentration equal to 12 mg/mL. In chronic experiments such a level of bioluminescence inhibition was registered after 16 hours incubation at the toxin concentration of 18 mg/mL. T-2 toxicity was also investigated in the presence of different serum albumin concentrations. It decreases with the increase of albumin concentration at the short term of incubation (5 min) of the mixture to be analyzed. In case of the longer term of incubation (up to 30 min) of this mixture T-2 toxicity was restored. Probably, it is a result of destruction of protein-toxin complex, which is, evidently, reversible and may be characterized by some index. It is necessary to emphasize that the sensitivity of T-2 analysis increases under the decrease of pH value up to lower bacterial physiological level, i.e. to 5-5.5. The revealed abilities of T-2 toxin effect on the intensity of bacterial bioluminescence may be used under the development of instrumental analytical approach on the basis of biosensor technology for testing this toxin in the environment. Taking into account the analysis simplicity and rapidity, such analytical device may have a perspective for wide practical application. PMID:14577159

  9. Magneto-optical system for high speed real time imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baziljevich, M.; Barness, D.; Sinvani, M.; Perel, E.; Shaulov, A.; Yeshurun, Y.

    2012-08-01

    A new magneto-optical system has been developed to expand the range of high speed real time magneto-optical imaging. A special source for the external magnetic field has also been designed, using a pump solenoid to rapidly excite the field coil. Together with careful modifications of the cryostat, to reduce eddy currents, ramping rates reaching 3000 T/s have been achieved. Using a powerful laser as the light source, a custom designed optical assembly, and a high speed digital camera, real time imaging rates up to 30 000 frames per seconds have been demonstrated.

  10. Segmentation of Time-Lapse Images with Focus on Microscopic Images of Cells.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Jind?ich; Císa?, P.; Šroubek, Filip

    Berlin : Springer-Verlag, 2013 - (Petrosino, A.), s. 71-80 ISBN 978-3-642-41183-0. - (Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Image Processing, Computer Vision , Pattern Recognition, and Graphics. 8157). [International Conference on Image Analysis and Processing. Naples (IT), 11.09.2013-13.09.2013] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA13-29225S Grant ostatní: Grantová agentura UK(CZ) GAUK 914813/2013; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/01.0024 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : segmentation * time-lapse * microscopy imaging * phase constrast Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/ZOI/soukup-segmentation of time-lapse images with focus on microscopic images of cells.pdf

  11. Time of Flight Diffraction and Imaging (tofdi) Combining B-Scans and Cross-Sectional Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petcher, P. A.; Dixon, S.

    2011-06-01

    Time of Flight Diffraction and Imaging (ToFDI), based on Time of Flight Diffraction (ToFD), uses a sparse transducer array (laser-EMAT for non-contact applications), and adds an imaging stage based on multiple wave mode (and mode-converted) ultrasound scattering by defects. B-scans are processed to remove direct and reflected surface waves, enhance parabolas, and combine multiple B-scans. Outputting an improved B-scan and a cross-sectional image, the final objective is the automated detection, identification, positioning and sizing for all defects in a sample.

  12. Experimental ultrasound system for real-time synthetic imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, JØrgen Arendt; Holm, Ole

    1999-01-01

    Digital signal processing is being employed more and more in modern ultrasound scanners. This has made it possible to do dynamic receive focusing for each sample and implement other advanced imaging methods. The processing, however, has to be very fast and cost-effective at the same time. Dedicated chips are used in order to do real time processing. This often makes it difficult to implement radically different imaging strategies on one platform and makes the scanners less accessible for research purposes. Here flexibility is the prime concern, and the storage of data from all transducer elements over 5 to 10 seconds is needed to perform clinical evaluation of synthetic and 3D imaging. This paper describes a real-time system specifically designed for research purposes. The purpose of the system is to make it possible to acquire multi-channel data in real-time from clinical multi-element ultrasound transducers, and to enable real-time or near realtime processing of the acquired data. The system will be capable of performing the processing for the currently available imaging methods, and will make it possible to perform initial trials in a clinical environment with new imaging modalities for synthetic aperture imaging, 2D and 3D B-mode and velocity imaging. The system can be used with 128 element transducers and can excite 128 channels and receive and sample data from 64 channels simultaneously at 40 MHz with 12 bits precision. Data can be processed in real time using the system's 80 signal processing units or it can be stored directly in RAM. The system has 24 GBytes RAM and can thus store 8 seconds of multi-channel data. It is fully software programmable and its signal processing units can also be reconfigured under software control. The control of the system is done over an Ethernet using C and Matlab. Programs for doing e.g. B-mode imaging can directly be written in Matlab and executed on the system over the net from any workstation running Matlab. The overall system concept is presented and an example ofa 20 lines script for doing phased array B-mode imaging is presented.

  13. Real-time portal imaging of megavoltage therapeutic photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of a real-time digital imaging system for radiation therapy localization and verification has been evaluated. Two different imaging approaches were investigated, one based upon a video-fluoroscopic system and the other upon a coded aperture device. The fluoroscopic system utilized a fluoro screen, a low-light video camera and a frame grabber to digitize an image. The image was processed to optimize anatomical visibility. This system produced images with similar contrast to those of port films. The other prototype imaging device utilized a strip ion chamber, 22 cm in length, 2 mm in width, with a separation of 2 mm between the front and near electrodes. Strip projections of the radiation portal were collected by translation of the detector in 1.98 mm intervals across the radiation field. Multiple views were obtained by rotating the detector strip and taking a projection at angular increments from 0 to 180 degrees. A minicomputer was used to control the data acquisition electronics and detector movements. The images were reconstructed from the projection data by use of a filtered back-projection algorithm

  14. Real-Time Air Pollutants Rendering based on Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demin Wang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method for realistic real-time rendering of air pollutants based on image processing. The air pollutants’ variable density can create many shapes of mist what can add a realistic environment to virtual scene. In order to achieve a realistic effect, we further enhance thus obtained air pollution data getting from monitor in spatial domain. In the proposed method we map the densities of air pollutants to different gray levels, and visualize them by blending those gray levels with background images. The proposed method can also visualize large-scale air pollution data from different viewpoints in real-time and provide the resulting image with any resolution theoretically, which is very important and favorable for the Internet transmission.

  15. Time-resolved neutron imaging at ANTARES cold neutron beamline

    CERN Document Server

    Tremsin, A S; Tittelmeier, K; Schillinger, B; Schulz, M; Lerche, M; Feller, W B

    2015-01-01

    In non-destructive evaluation with X-rays light elements embedded in dense, heavy (or high-Z) matrices show little contrast and their structural details can hardly be revealed. Neutron radiography, on the other hand, provides a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross section on the atomic number. The majority of neutron imaging experiments at the present time is conducted with static objects mainly due to the limited flux intensity of neutron beamline facilities and sometimes due to the limitations of the detectors. However, some applications require the studies of dynamic phenomena and can now be conducted at several high intensity beamlines such as the recently rebuilt ANTARES beam line at the FRM-II reactor. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of time resolved imaging for repetitive processes, where different phases of the process can be imaged simultaneously and...

  16. Real-Time Video Imaging of Protease Expression In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhu, Jin Xie, Magdalena Swierczewska, Fan Zhang, Qimeng Quan, Ying Ma, Xuexun Fang, Kwangmeyung Kim, Seulki Lee, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the first true real-time in vivo video imaging of extracellular protease expression using an ultrafast-acting and extended-use activatable probe. This simple, one-step technique is capable of boosting fluorescent signals upon target protease cleavage as early as 30 minutes from injection in a small animal model and is able to sustain the strong fluorescent signal up to 24 hours. Using this method, we video imaged the expression and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs in a tumor-bearing mouse model. The current platform can be universally applied to any target protease of interest with a known peptide substrate and is adaptable to a wide range of real-time imaging applications with high throughputs such as for in vivo drug screening, examinations of the therapeutic efficacy of drugs, and monitoring of disease onset and development in animal models.

  17. In vivo real-time volumetric synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Rasmussen, Morten F.; Brandt, Andreas H.; Stuart, Matthias B.; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen A.

    2015-03-01

    Synthetic aperture (SA) imaging can be used to achieve real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D array transducers. The sensitivity of SA imaging is improved by maximizing the acoustic output, but one must consider the limitations of an ultrasound system, both technical and biological. This paper investigates the in vivo applicability and sensitivity of volumetric SA imaging. Utilizing the transmit events to generate a set of virtual point sources, a frame rate of 25 Hz for a 90° × 90° field-of-view was achieved. data were obtained using a 3.5 MHz 32 × 32 elements 2-D phased array transducer connected to the experimental scanner (SARUS). Proper scaling is applied to the excitation signal such that intensity levels are in compliance with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations for in vivo ultrasound imaging. The measured Mechanical Index and spatial-peak-temporal-average intensity for parallel beam-forming (PB) are 0.83 and 377.5mW/cm2, and for SA are 0.48 and 329.5mW/cm2. A human kidney was volumetrically imaged with SA and PB techniques simultaneously. Two radiologists for evaluation of the volumetric SA were consulted by means of a questionnaire on the level of details perceivable in the beam-formed images. The comparison was against PB based on the in vivo data. The feedback from the domain experts indicates that volumetric SA images internal body structures with a better contrast resolution compared to PB at all positions in the entire imaged volume. Furthermore, the autocovariance of a homogeneous area in the in vivo SA data, had 23.5% smaller width at the half of its maximum value compared to PB.

  18. In Vivo Real Time Volumetric Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic aperture (SA) imaging can be used to achieve real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D array transducers. The sensitivity of SA imaging is improved by maximizing the acoustic output, but one must consider the limitations of an ultrasound system, both technical and biological. This paper investigates the in vivo applicability and sensitivity of volumetric SA imaging. Utilizing the transmit events to generate a set of virtual point sources, a frame rate of 25 Hz for a 90° x 90° field-of-view was achieved. Data were obtained using a 3.5 MHz 32 x 32 elements 2-D phased array transducer connected to the experimental scanner (SARUS). Proper scaling is applied to the excitation signal such that intensity levels are in compliance with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations for in vivo ultrasound imaging. The measured Mechanical Index and spatial-peak- temporal-average intensity for parallel beamforming (PB) are 0.83 and 377.5mW/cm2, and for SA are 0.48 and 329.5mW/cm2. A human kidney was volumetrically imaged with SA and PB techniques simultaneously. Two radiologists for evaluation of the volumetric SA were consulted by means of a questionnaire on the level of details perceivable in the beamformed images. The comparison was against PB based on the in vivo data. The feedback from the domain experts indicates that volumetric SA images internal body structures with a better contrast resolution compared to PB at all positions in the entire imaged volume. Furthermore, the autocovariance of a homogeneous area in the in vivo SA data, had 23.5% smaller width at the half of its maximum value compared to PB.

  19. Radiofrequency transmission line for bioluminescent Vibrio sp. irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassisi, V.; Alifano, P.; Talà, A.; Velardi, L.

    2012-07-01

    We present the study and the analyses of a transmission line for radiofrequency (RF) irradiation of bacteria belonging to Vibrio harveyi-related strain PS1, a bioluminescent bacterium living in symbiosis with many marine organisms. The bioluminescence represents a new biologic indicator which is useful for studying the behaviour of living samples in the presence of RF waves due to the modern communication systems. A suitable transmission line, used as an irradiating cell and tested up to the maximum frequency used by the global system for mobile communications and universal mobile telecommunications system transmissions, was characterized. In this experiment, the RF voltage applied to the transmission line was 1 V. Due to short dimensions of the line and the applied high frequencies, standing waves were produced in addition to progressing waves and the electric field strength varies particularly along the longitudinal direction. The magnetic field map was not strongly linked to the electric one due to the presence of standing waves and of the outgoing irradiation. RF fields were measured by two homemade suitable probes able to diagnostic fields of high frequency. The field measurements were performed without any specimens inside the line. Being our sample made of living matter, the real field was modified and its value was estimated by a simulation code. The bioluminescence experiments were performed only at 900 MHz for two different measured electric fields, 53 and 140 V/m. The light emission was measured right from the beginning and after 7 and 25 h. Under RF irradiation, we found that the bioluminescence activity decreased. Compared with the control sample, the diminution was 6.8% and 44% after 7 and 25 h of irradiation, respectively, both with the low or high field. No changes of the survival factor for all the samples were observed. Besides, to understand the emission processes, we operated the deconvolution of the spectra by two Gaussian curves. The Gaussian peaks were approximately centered at 460 nm and 490 nm. The 490 nm peak was higher than the control one. Under RF, the 490 nm peak decreased compared to the 460 nm one. The decreasing was stronger for the sample in the higher field. The ratio of the emission area of the 490 nm to 460 nm was 5 for the control sample. It decreased up to 1.6 for the samples under RF. The bioluminescence improves the DNA repair by photoreactivation, and there is evidence that photolyase is preferentially activated by blue/violet light. Our finding suggests that RF exposure may stimulate DNA repair by shifting the emission spectra from blue/green (490 nm) to blue/violet (460 nm).

  20. Ultrasonic Time Reversal and Intermodulation Techniques for Defective Zone Imaging.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    P?evorovský, Zden?k; Vejvodová, Šárka; Krofta, Josef; P?evorovský, David

    2009-01-01

    Ro?. 19, ?. 2 (2009), s. 13-13. ISSN 1213-3825. [NDT in PROGRESS. 12.11.2009-14.11.2009, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA106/07/1393 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy * time reversal tomography * nonlinear wave modulation * ultrasonic imaging of defects Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  1. Time-resolved fast neutron imaging: simulation of detector performance

    CERN Document Server

    Vartsky, D; Goldberg, M B; Mardor, I; Feldman, G; Bar, D; Shor, A; Dangendorf, V; Laczko, G; Breskin, Amos; Chechik, R

    2004-01-01

    We have analyzed and compared the performance of two novel fast-neutron imaging methods with time-of-flight spectroscopy capability. Using MCNP and GEANT code simulations of neutron and charged-particle transport in the detectors, key parameters such as detection efficiency, the amount of energy deposited in the converter and the spatial resolution of both detector variants have been evaluated.

  2. Optimal Stopping Time Formulation of Adaptive Image Filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an approach to image filtering based on an optimal stopping time problem for the evolution equation describing the filtering kernel. This approach allows us to obtain easily an adaptivity of the filter with respect to the noise level. Well-posedness of the problem and convergence of fully discrete approximations are proved and numerical examples are presented and discussed

  3. Real-time operator interactive MR imaging of the heart with ultrashort repetition time techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to generate in real-time a MR imaging sequence of the heart using snapshot techniques. A fast MR pulse sequence is triggered by the electrocardiographic (ECG) signal. Data acquisition begins following a controllable delay after the R wave. The authors use 32 to 64 phase encodings with ultrashort (6.0-msec) TR times, yielding an image-acquisition time of 192 to 384 msec. To suppress the signal from blood in the cardiac chambers, saturation pulses are applied. For image reconstruction, the authors use the MR fluoroscopic apparatus previously developed. For each cardiac cycle, an image is reconstructed and displayed within 120 msec after the termination of acquisition

  4. In vivo bioluminescence imaging in preclinical trials of genetic vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Petkov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    DNA immunization is a rapidly developing vaccine platform for cancer, infectious disease, and allergies. The efficiency of DNA vaccination is largely determined by the efficiency of delivery and subsequent expression of the HIV-1 genes in the cells. DNA immunogens are generally administered by intramuscular or intradermal injections, followed by electroporation to enhance the DNA uptake into the cells. An intense debate on the pros and cons of different routes of DNA delivery is still ongoing...

  5. Molecular detection of bioluminescent dinoflagellates in surface waters of the Patagonian Shelf during early austral summer 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Valiadi, M.; Painter, S. C.; Allen, J T; Balch, W.M.; Iglesias-Rodriguez, M.D.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of bioluminescent dinoflagellates in the Patagonian Shelf region using “universal” PCR primers for the dinoflagellate luciferase gene. Luciferase gene sequences and single cell PCR tests, in conjunction with taxonomic identification by microscopy, allowed us to identify and quantify bioluminescent dinoflagellates. We compared these data to coincidental discrete optical measurements of stimulable bioluminescence intensity. Molecular detection of the lucifer...

  6. Time-of-flight PET image reconstruction using origin ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wülker, Christian; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Prevrhal, Sven

    2015-03-01

    The origin ensemble (OE) algorithm is a novel statistical method for minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE) reconstruction of emission tomography data. This method allows one to perform reconstruction entirely in the image domain, i.e. without the use of forward and backprojection operations. We have investigated the OE algorithm in the context of list-mode (LM) time-of-flight (TOF) PET reconstruction. In this paper, we provide a general introduction to MMSE reconstruction, and a statistically rigorous derivation of the OE algorithm. We show how to efficiently incorporate TOF information into the reconstruction process, and how to correct for random coincidences and scattered events. To examine the feasibility of LM-TOF MMSE reconstruction with the OE algorithm, we applied MMSE-OE and standard maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (ML-EM) reconstruction to LM-TOF phantom data with a count number typically registered in clinical PET examinations. We analyzed the convergence behavior of the OE algorithm, and compared reconstruction time and image quality to that of the EM algorithm. In summary, during the reconstruction process, MMSE-OE contrast recovery (CRV) remained approximately the same, while background variability (BV) gradually decreased with an increasing number of OE iterations. The final MMSE-OE images exhibited lower BV and a slightly lower CRV than the corresponding ML-EM images. The reconstruction time of the OE algorithm was approximately 1.3 times longer. At the same time, the OE algorithm can inherently provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the acquired data. This characterization can be utilized for further data processing, e.g. in kinetic analysis and image registration, making the OE algorithm a promising approach in a variety of applications. PMID:25668558

  7. A miniature real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wygant, Ira O.; Yeh, David T.; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Oralkan, Omer; Ergun, Arif S.; Karaman, Mustafa; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2005-04-01

    Progress made in the development of a miniature real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging system is presented. This system is targeted for use in a 5-mm endoscopic channel and will provide real-time, 30-mm deep, volumetric images. It is being developed as a clinically useful device, to demonstrate a means of integrating the front-end electronics with the transducer array, and to demonstrate the advantages of the capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) technology for medical imaging. Presented here is the progress made towards the initial implementation of this system, which is based on a two-dimensional, 16x16 CMUT array. Each CMUT element is 250 um by 250 um and has a 5 MHz center frequency. The elements are connected to bond pads on the back side of the array with 400-um long through-wafer interconnects. The transducer array is flip-chip bonded to a custom-designed integrated circuit that comprises the front-end electronics. The result is that each transducer element is connected to a dedicated pulser and low-noise preamplifier. The pulser generates 25-V, 100-ns wide, unipolar pulses. The preamplifier has an approximate transimpedance gain of 500 kOhm and 3-dB bandwidth of 10 MHz. In the first implementation of the system, one element at a time can be selected for transmit and receive and thus synthetic aperture images can be generated. In future implementations, 16 channels will be active at a given time. These channels will connect to an FPGA-based data acquisition system for real-time image reconstruction.

  8. Time-of-flight PET image reconstruction using origin ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wülker, Christian; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Prevrhal, Sven

    2015-03-01

    The origin ensemble (OE) algorithm is a novel statistical method for minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE) reconstruction of emission tomography data. This method allows one to perform reconstruction entirely in the image domain, i.e. without the use of forward and backprojection operations. We have investigated the OE algorithm in the context of list-mode (LM) time-of-flight (TOF) PET reconstruction. In this paper, we provide a general introduction to MMSE reconstruction, and a statistically rigorous derivation of the OE algorithm. We show how to efficiently incorporate TOF information into the reconstruction process, and how to correct for random coincidences and scattered events. To examine the feasibility of LM-TOF MMSE reconstruction with the OE algorithm, we applied MMSE-OE and standard maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (ML-EM) reconstruction to LM-TOF phantom data with a count number typically registered in clinical PET examinations. We analyzed the convergence behavior of the OE algorithm, and compared reconstruction time and image quality to that of the EM algorithm. In summary, during the reconstruction process, MMSE-OE contrast recovery (CRV) remained approximately the same, while background variability (BV) gradually decreased with an increasing number of OE iterations. The final MMSE-OE images exhibited lower BV and a slightly lower CRV than the corresponding ML-EM images. The reconstruction time of the OE algorithm was approximately 1.3 times longer. At the same time, the OE algorithm can inherently provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the acquired data. This characterization can be utilized for further data processing, e.g. in kinetic analysis and image registration, making the OE algorithm a promising approach in a variety of applications.

  9. Bubble masks for time-encoded imaging of fast neutrons.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, Erik; Brennan, James S.; Marleau, Peter; Nowack, Aaron B.; Steele, John; Sweany, Melinda; Throckmorton, Daniel J.

    2013-09-01

    Time-encoded imaging is an approach to directional radiation detection that is being developed at SNL with a focus on fast neutron directional detection. In this technique, a time modulation of a detected neutron signal is induced-typically, a moving mask that attenuates neutrons with a time structure that depends on the source position. An important challenge in time-encoded imaging is to develop high-resolution two-dimensional imaging capabilities; building a mechanically moving high-resolution mask presents challenges both theoretical and technical. We have investigated an alternative to mechanical masks that replaces the solid mask with a liquid such as mineral oil. Instead of fixed blocks of solid material that move in pre-defined patterns, the oil is contained in tubing structures, and carefully introduced air gaps-bubbles-propagate through the tubing, generating moving patterns of oil mask elements and air apertures. Compared to current moving-mask techniques, the bubble mask is simple, since mechanical motion is replaced by gravity-driven bubble propagation; it is flexible, since arbitrary bubble patterns can be generated by a software-controlled valve actuator; and it is potentially high performance, since the tubing and bubble size can be tuned for high-resolution imaging requirements. We have built and tested various single-tube mask elements, and will present results on bubble introduction and propagation as a function of tubing size and cross-sectional shape; real-time bubble position tracking; neutron source imaging tests; and reconstruction techniques demonstrated on simple test data as well as a simulated full detector system.

  10. Ultrasound time-reversal MUSIC imaging of extended targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labyed, Yassin; Huang, Lianjie

    2012-11-01

    Ultrasound time-reversal imaging with multiple signal classification (TR-MUSIC) can produce images with subwavelength spatial resolution when the targets are point scatterers. In this experimental study, we evaluate the performance of the TR-MUSIC algorithm when the interrogated medium contains extended targets that cannot be considered as point scatterers, i.e., the size of the targets is on the order of the ultrasound wavelength or larger. We construct four tissue-mimicking phantoms, each of which contains glass spheres of a given size. We show that the quality of the phantom images obtained using the TR-MUSIC algorithm decreases with increasing sphere size. However, significant improvement is achieved when the image plane is divided into subregions, where each subregion is imaged separately. In this method, the TR-MUSIC calculations are performed on the windowed backscattered signals originating from each subregion. Our study demonstrates that the TR-MUSIC algorithm with time windowing can accurately locate extended targets but cannot provide the shape and reflectivity of the targets. We scan an inhomogeneous commercial tissue-mimicking phantom using an investigational synthetic-aperture ultrasound system, and show that the TR-MUSIC algorithm is capable of detecting small targets with high spatial resolution in inhomogeneous media. PMID:22929651

  11. Monitoring Therapeutic Treatments against Burkholderia Infections Using Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany M. Mott

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders, are Category B select agents with biothreat potential, and yet effective therapeutic treatments are lacking. In this study, we showed that CpG administration increased survival, demonstrating protection in the murine glanders model. Bacterial recovery from infected lungs, liver and spleen was significantly reduced in CpG-treated animals as compared with non-treated mice. Reciprocally, lungs of CpG-treated infected animals were infiltrated with higher levels of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes, as compared to control animals. Employing the B. mallei bioluminescent strain CSM001 and the Neutrophil-Specific Fluorescent Imaging Agent, bacterial dissemination and neutrophil trafficking were monitored in real-time using multimodal in vivo whole body imaging techniques. CpG-treatment increased recruitment of neutrophils to the lungs and reduced bioluminescent bacteria, correlating with decreased bacterial burden and increased protection against acute murine glanders. Our results indicate that protection of CpG-treated animals was associated with recruitment of neutrophils prior to infection and demonstrated, for the first time, simultaneous real time in vivo imaging of neutrophils and bacteria. This study provides experimental evidence supporting the importance of incorporating optimized in vivo imaging methods to monitor disease progression and to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic treatment during bacterial infections.

  12. Real-time synthetic aperture imaging: opportunities and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2006-01-01

    Synthetic aperture (SA) ultrasound imaging has not been introduced in commercial scanners mainly due to the computational cost associated with the hardware implementation of this imaging modality. SA imaging redefines the term beamformed line. Since the acquired information comes from all points in the region of interest it is possible to beamform the signals along a desired path, thus, improving the estimation of blood flow. The transmission of coded excitations makes it possible to achieve higher contrast and larger penetration depth compared to "conventional" scanners. This paper presents the development and implementation of the signal processing stages employed in SA imaging: compression of received data acquired using codes, and beamforming. The goal was to implement the system using commercially available field programmable gate arrays. The compression filter operates on frequency modulated pulses with duration of up to 50 mus sampled at 70 MHz. The beamformer can process data from 256 channels at a pulse repetition frequency of 5000 Hz and produces 192 lines of 1024 complex samples in real time. The lines are described by their origin, direction, length and distance between two samples in 3D. This parametric description makes it possible to quickly change the image geometry during scanning, thus enabling adaptive imaging and precise flow estimation. The paper addresses problems such as large bandwidth and computational load and gives the solutions that have been adopted for the implementation.

  13. Automatic multimodal real-time tracking for image plane alignment in interventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) aims at performing minimally invasive percutaneous interventions, such as tumor ablations and biopsies, under MRI guidance. During such interventions, the acquired MR image planes are typically aligned to the surgical instrument (needle) axis and to surrounding anatomical structures of interest in order to efficiently monitor the advancement in real-time of the instrument inside the patient's body. Object tracking inside the MRI is expected to facilitate and accelerate MR-guided interventions by allowing to automatically align the image planes to the surgical instrument. In this PhD thesis, an image-based work-flow is proposed and refined for automatic image plane alignment. An automatic tracking work-flow was developed, performing detection and tracking of a passive marker directly in clinical real-time images. This tracking work-flow is designed for fully automated image plane alignment, with minimization of tracking-dedicated time. Its main drawback is its inherent dependence on the slow clinical MRI update rate. First, the addition of motion estimation and prediction with a Kalman filter was investigated and improved the work-flow tracking performance. Second, a complementary optical sensor was used for multi-sensor tracking in order to decouple the tracking update rate from the MR image acquisition rate. Performance of the work-flow was evaluated with both computer simulations and experiments using an MR compatible test bed. Results show a high robustness of the multi-sensor tracking approach for dynamic image plane alignment, due to the combination of the individual strengths of each sensor. (author)

  14. Rapid Antimicrobial Susceptibility Determination of Uropathogens in Clinical Urine Specimens by Use of ATP Bioluminescence?

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanc?ic?, Vesna; Mastali, Mitra; Percy, Neil; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Babbitt, Jane T.; Li, Yang; Landaw, Elliot M.; Bruckner, David A.; Churchill, Bernard M.; Haake, David A.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the first direct testing of the antimicrobial susceptibilities of bacterial pathogens in human clinical fluid samples by the use of ATP bioluminescence. We developed an ATP bioluminescence assay that eliminates somatic sources of ATP to selectively quantify the bacterial load in clinical urine specimens with a sensitivity of

  15. Imaging the time sequence of latent electrostatic fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, P.; Prance, R. J.; Prance, H.; Beardsmore-Rust, S. T.

    2010-10-01

    Biometric identification for forensic investigations and security continues to depend on classic fingerprinting in many instances. Existing techniques rely on either visible deposits or hidden (latent) fingerprints resulting from the transfer of residues from the finger to the surface. However, one of the limitations of classic fingerprinting, for use as forensic evidence, is in determining a time sequence of events. It is extremely difficult to establish a timeline, from fingerprint evidence alone. We present the capability of a new technique which images the electrical charge deposited by tribocharging when a finger contacts an electrically insulated surface. The method is applicable to insulating surfaces and has been tested on PVC, PTFE, Acetate and PVDF sheets. The latent electrostatic charge pattern is detected using a novel, microscopic, electric potential sensor. The sensor is capable of imaging static charge distributions non-invasively, with no discharging effect on the sample. We present data showing the decay of the charge image with time, over a period up to 14 days. This capability has two major implications. First this technique does not suffer from ambiguities caused by a history of old fingerprints and second it has the potential to allow the time sequence of recent charge fingerprint images to be determined.

  16. Image reconstruction in time-of-flight positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five algorithms for image reconstruction in time-of-flight assisted positron emission tomography have been studied. These algorithms include three approaches previously described in the literature and two new methods recently developed in our institute. Computer simulation studies have been performed to evaluate the relative merits of these various techniques. Performance indices such as computational efficiency, reconstructed image resolution, and signal-to-noise ratio have been investigated. Results from the analysis suggest that the two new methods may offer some potential advantages over other algorithms. (Auth.)

  17. Time-Lapse Imaging of Glial-Axonal Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Kalliopi; Edgar, Julia M; Barnett, Susan C

    2015-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), myelin is formed by oligodendrocytes that are derived from precursor cells, known as oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). Successive stages of OPC interactions with the axons can be visualized in vitro and ex vivo using mixed neural cell cultures and pieces of intact spinal cord, respectively. OPCs and their differentiation can be imaged using cell-type-specific markers or green fluorescent protein (GFP) tags. This protocol describes methodology for generating these two systems for time-lapse imaging of dynamic cell interactions using fluorescent and 2-photon microscopy. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26131661

  18. [Study of the binding between bacterial lipopolysaccharides and polymyxin by a bioluminescent method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsev, A M; Onuchina, I G; Gordienko, A I; Beloglazov, V A

    2002-01-01

    For rating the interaction of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) with polymixin B (PmB) a bacterial bioluminescence is offered to be used. Bioluminescence level of bacteria decreases under free antibiotic amounts action. It is shown, that as a result of interaction with LPS antibiotic properties of PmB are reduced, and the intensity of bacterial bioluminescence is restored. The bioluminescence level in such system characterizes the LPS quantity. Kinetic properties of bacterial light emission at the presence of LPS and PmB are investigated as well as equilibrium state of the system. Kinetic and equilibrium constants describing this reaction are determined. The conditions of quantitative bioluminescent definition of LPS in an interval of concentration 0.166-10 micrograms/ml have been chosen and calibration curves are presented. PMID:12924022

  19. Super-resolved imaging with ultimate time resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ashida, Yuto

    2015-01-01

    Precisely and accurately locating point objects is a long-standing common thread in science. Super-resolved imaging of single molecules has revolutionized our view of quasi-static nanostructures $\\it{in-vivo}$. A wide-field approach based on localizing individual fluorophores has emerged as a versatile method to surpass the standard resolution limit. In those techniques, the super-resolution is realized by sparse photoactivation and localization together with the statistical analysis based on point spread functions. Nevertheless, the slow temporal resolution of super-resolved imaging severely restricts the utility to the study of live-cell phenomena. Clearly, a major breakthrough to observe fast, nanoscale dynamics needs to be made. Here we present a super-resolved imaging method that achieves the theoretical-limit time resolution. By invoking information theory, we can achieve the robust localization of overlapped light emitters at an order of magnitude faster speed than the conventional super-resolution mic...

  20. Cellular Neural Network for Real Time Image Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since their introduction in 1988, Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNNs) have found a key role as image processing instruments. Thanks to their structure they are able of processing individual pixels in a parallel way providing fast image processing capabilities that has been applied to a wide range of field among which nuclear fusion. In the last years, indeed, visible and infrared video cameras have become more and more important in tokamak fusion experiments for the twofold aim of understanding the physics and monitoring the safety of the operation. Examining the output of these cameras in real-time can provide significant information for plasma control and safety of the machines. The potentiality of CNNs can be exploited to this aim. To demonstrate the feasibility of the approach, CNN image processing has been applied to several tasks both at the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) and the Joint European Torus (JET)

  1. Real-time digital X-ray subtraction imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diagnostic anatomical X-ray apparatus comprising a converter and a television camera for converting an X-ray image of a subject into a series of television fields of video signals is described in detail. A digital memory system stores and integrates the video signals over a time interval corresponding to a plurality of successive television fields. The integrated video signals are recovered from storage and fed to a digital or analogue subtractor, the resulting output being displayed on a television monitor. Thus the display represents on-going changes in the anatomical X-ray image. In a modification, successive groups of fields are stored and integrated in three memories, cyclically, and subtractions are performed between successive pieces of integrated signals to provide a display of successive alterations in the X-ray image. For investigations of the heart, the integrating interval should be of the order of one cardiac cycle. (author)

  2. Instrumentation for real-time fluorescence lifetime imaging in endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizeret, Jérôme; Stepinac, Thomas; Hansroul, Marc; Studzinski, André; van den Bergh, Hubert; Wagnières, Georges

    1999-12-01

    The fluorescence lifetime of living tissues is, in certain cases, related to their pathologic state and is therefore of interest for cancer detection. Measuring fluorescence lifetime in vivo during an endoscopic examination has thus been a challenging objective for several years. The present article deals with the development and first clinical trails of an instrumentation producing fluorescence lifetime images in real time. The acquisition of such fast phenomenon (nanosecond time scale) on an image has been made possible by using the homodyne detection approach, in which the excitation light and the detection gain are modulated in a phase-coherent way. Based on images acquired at different phase between the excitation and detection modulation, the fluorescence lifetime is calculated for each pixel of the image. Different configurations of excitation modulation characteristics (pulse train versus sine-wave amplitude modulation) have been investigated and compared using Fourier transforms. Interestingly, a pulsed excitation combined with a sine-wave modulation detection gives valuable results. The expected auto-fluorescence signal emitted by human tissues under subthermal light excitation irradiance has been estimated at the wavelengths of interest. The limited number of auto-fluorescence photons results in relatively high noise on the lifetime calculated. The typical standard deviation is about 125 ps for lifetimes of 2.5 ns with a 322-pixel image (spatial integration). An in vivo image in the bronchi illustrates the potentiality of the new instrumentation. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the healthy bronchial mucosa, excited in the blue or in the green, fluoresces with a lifetime of 2.5 ns.

  3. A Colour Image Quantization Algorithm for Time-Constrained Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wattanapong KURDTHONGMEE

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Many techniques have been proposed to quantize a digital colour image in order to reduce the representative number of colours to be suitable for presenting on different types of display screens. In addition, the techniques have been used to significantly reduce the amount of image data required to transfer over a communication network. Most of the published techniques are targetted for implementing on a general purpose multitasking computer with low restriction on time and resource utilizations. The drawback of these techniques relies on the fact that they cannot fulfill the requirement of some applications for real-time constraint and limited resources. In addition, most of the techniques are too complex for hardware realization. In this paper, an algorithm which is more suitable for time critical applications with an additional feature of simplicity to implement on FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array platforms is proposed and the details of its implementation and experimentation are presented. The dominate point of the proposed algorithm relies on the fact that it utilizes the weighted sum of the nearest distance along the axis under consideration, which is nontrivial to calculate, instead of the squared Euclidean distance to find the axis to split during. Also, the proposed algorithm has proved that by reducing the number of subspaces to be considered during the variance representative value calculation from 8 to 2 subspaces, the quality of quantized images are comparable to the previously proposed approaches. This makes it possible to further speed up the computational time of the quantization algorithm.

  4. Time-of-flight imaging of invisibility cloaks

    CERN Document Server

    Halimeh, Jad C

    2011-01-01

    As invisibility cloaking has recently become experimental reality, it is interesting to explore ways to reveal remaining imperfections. In essence, the idea of most invisibility cloaks is to recover the optical path lengths without an object (to be made invisible) by a suitable arrangement around that object. Optical path length is proportional to the time of flight of a light ray or to the optical phase accumulated by a light wave. Thus, time-of-flight images provide a direct and intuitive tool for probing imperfections. Indeed, recent phase-sensitive experiments on the carpet cloak have already made early steps in this direction. In the macroscopic world, time-of-flight images could be measured directly by light detection and ranging (LIDAR). Here, we show calculated time-of-flight images of the conformal Gaussian carpet cloak, the conformal grating cloak, the cylindrical free-space cloak, and of the invisible sphere. All results are obtained by using a ray-velocity equation of motion derived from Fermat's ...

  5. Prey attraction as a possible function of bioluminescence in the larvae of Pyrearinus termitilluminans (Coleoptera: Elateridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent H. Redford

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available Elaterid beetle larvae. Pyrearinus termitilluminans (sp.n., Costa, 1982. live in termite mounds in central Brazil. Each larva produces light in the segment immediately behind its head. Larvae were observed to luminesce only during the first weeks of the rainy season, the same times as the ant and termite alate flights. Alates, apparently attracted to P. termitilluminans larval lights, serve as an important food source for the larvae. The prey-catching and food-storing behavior and the phenomenon of bioluminescence are apparently an evolutionary response by P. termitilluminans larvae to a short, rich pulse of food. Prey attraction as a probable cause for luminescence has been suggested only twice before.

  6. Prey attraction as a possible function of bioluminescence in the larvae of Pyrearinus termitilluminans (Coleoptera: Elateridae)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Kent H., Redford.

    Full Text Available Elaterid beetle larvae. Pyrearinus termitilluminans (sp.n., Costa, 1982.) live in termite mounds in central Brazil. Each larva produces light in the segment immediately behind its head. Larvae were observed to luminesce only during the first weeks of the rainy season, the same times as the ant and t [...] ermite alate flights. Alates, apparently attracted to P. termitilluminans larval lights, serve as an important food source for the larvae. The prey-catching and food-storing behavior and the phenomenon of bioluminescence are apparently an evolutionary response by P. termitilluminans larvae to a short, rich pulse of food. Prey attraction as a probable cause for luminescence has been suggested only twice before.

  7. Real time phase diversity advanced image processing and wavefront sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolne, Jean J.; Menicucci, Paul; Miccolis, David; Widen, Ken; Seiden, Harold; Vachss, Frederick; Schall, Harold

    2007-09-01

    This paper will describe a state-of-the-art approach to real time wavefront sensing and image enhancement. It will explore Boeing existing technology that realizes a 50 Hz frame rate (with a path to 1 KHz and higher). At this higher rate, Phase diversity will be readily applicable to compensate for distortions of large dynamic bandwidth such as those of the atmosphere. We will describe various challenges in aligning a two-camera phase diversity system. Such configurations make it almost impossible to process the captured images without additional upgrade in the algorithm to account for alignment errors. An example of an error is the relative misalignment of the two images, the "best-focus" and the diversity image where it is extremely hard to maintain alignment to less than a fraction of one pixel. We will show that the algorithm performance increases dramatically when we account for these errors in the phase diversity estimation process. Preliminary evaluation has assessed a NIIRS increase of ~ 3 from the "best-focus" to the enhanced image. Such a performance improvement would greatly increase the operating range (or, equivalently, decrease the weight) of many optical systems.

  8. Near real-time disturbance detection using satellite image time series

    OpenAIRE

    Verbesselt, J. P.; Zeileis, A.; Herold, M.

    2012-01-01

    Near real-time monitoring of ecosystem disturbances is critical for rapidly assessing and addressing impacts on carbon dynamics, biodiversity, and socio-ecological processes. Satellite remote sensing enables cost-effective and accurate monitoring at frequent time steps over large areas. Yet, generic methods to detect disturbances within newly captured satellite images are lacking. We propose a multi-purpose time-series-based disturbance detection approach that identifies and models stable his...

  9. Bioluminescência de fungos: distribuição, função e mecanismo de emissão de luz / Fungi bioluminescence: distribution, function and mechanism of light emission

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Anderson Garbuglio, Oliveira; Rodrigo Pimenta, Carvalho; Hans Eugene, Waldenmaier; Cassius Vinicius, Stevani.

    Full Text Available [...] Abstract in english The emission of light by living organisms, bioluminescence, has been studied since the nineteenth century. However, some bioluminescent systems, such as fungi, remain poorly understood. The emitter, the two enzymes involved, and the reaction mechanism have not yet been unraveled. Moreover, the ecolo [...] gical role and evolutionary significance for fungal luminescence is also unknown. It is hoped that comprehensive research on fungal bioluminescent systems will generate knowledge and tools for academic and applied sciences. This review discusses the distribution of bioluminescent fungi on Earth, attempts to elucidate the mechanism involved in light emission, and presents preliminary results on the evolution and ecological role of fungal bioluminescence.

  10. Measurement of MEMS thermal actuator time constant using image blur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of experimentally determining the time constants of MEMS thermal actuators from an analysis of blurred still camera images of high frequency motion is presented. The response of MEMS thermal actuators to harmonic excitation falls off with increasing frequency. An analytical derivation of the thermal frequency response is performed considering actuator arm conduction and conduction through air to the substrate. For the actuator in this study, the predicted time constant is 120–125 µs. Directly measuring this time constant would require sampling in the kHz range, well above the range of most cameras, which blur the image. The thermal time constant is computed by analyzing the sidewall profiles of a stationary actuator and of the actuator excited over a range of frequencies. The observed slope of the blurred sidewall profile changes with the frequency: the larger the amplitude of motion, the shallower the apparent slope. By numerically blurring the stationary profile, the relationship between the blur amplitude and the blurred slope is found. From this and the measured slopes, the blur amplitude is determined at each frequency and the time constant determined by curve fitting. The resultant measured time constant is 130 ± 12 µs, in good agreement with the predicted value.

  11. Time-Reversal MUSIC Imaging with Time-Domain Gating Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heedong; Ogawa, Yasutaka; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Ohgane, Takeo

    A time-reversal (TR) approach with multiple signal classification (MUSIC) provides super-resolution for detection and localization using multistatic data collected from an array antenna system. The theory of TR-MUSIC assumes that the number of antenna elements is greater than that of scatterers (targets). Furthermore, it requires many sets of frequency-domain data (snapshots) in seriously noisy environments. Unfortunately, these conditions are not practical for real environments due to the restriction of a reasonable antenna structure as well as limited measurement time. We propose an approach that treats both noise reduction and relaxation of the transceiver restriction by using a time-domain gating technique accompanied with the Fourier transform before applying the TR-MUSIC imaging algorithm. Instead of utilizing the conventional multistatic data matrix (MDM), we employ a modified MDM obtained from the gating technique. The resulting imaging functions yield more reliable images with only a few snapshots regardless of the limitation of the antenna arrays.

  12. Dual-reporter in vivo imaging of transient and inducible heat-shock promoter activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Pierre-Yves; Genevois, Coralie; Chapolard, Mathilde; Santalucía, Tomàs; Planas, Anna M.; Couillaud, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Gene promoter activity can be studied in vivo by molecular imaging methods using reporter gene technology. Transcription of the reporter and the reported genes occurs simultaneously. However, imaging depends on reporter protein translation, stability, and cellular fate that may differ among the various proteins. A double transgenic mouse strain expressing the firefly luciferase (lucF) and fluorescent mPlum protein under the transcriptional control of the thermo-inducible heat-shock protein (Hspa1b) promoter was generated allowing to follow up the reporter proteins by different and complementary in vivo imaging technologies. These mice were used for in vivo imaging by bioluminescence and epi fluorescence reflectance imaging (BLI & FRI) and as a source of embryonic fibroblast (MEF) for in vitro approaches. LucF, mPlum and endogenous Hsp70 mRNAs were transcribed simultaneously. The increase in mRNA was transient, peaking at 3 h and then returning to the basal level about 6 h after the thermal stimulations. The bioluminescent signal was transient and initiated with a 3 h delay versus mRNA expression. The onset of mPlum fluorescence was more delayed, increasing slowly up to 30 h after heat-shock and remaining for several days. This mouse allows for both bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) of Hsp70 promoter activation showing an early and transient lucF activity and a retrospective and persistent mPlum fluorescence. This transgenic mouse will allow following the transient local induction of Hsp-70 promoter beyond its induction time-frame and relate into subsequent dynamic biological effects of the heat-shock response. PMID:24575340

  13. Real-Time Air Pollutants Rendering based on Image Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Demin Wang; Yan Huang; Weitao Li

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for realistic real-time rendering of air pollutants based on image processing. The air pollutants’ variable density can create many shapes of mist what can add a realistic environment to virtual scene. In order to achieve a realistic effect, we further enhance thus obtained air pollution data getting from monitor in spatial domain. In the proposed method we map the densities of air pollutants to different gray levels, and visualize them by blending those gra...

  14. Wave Statistics and Space-time Extremes via Stereo Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    FEDELE, FRANCESCO; Benetazzo, Alvise; Gallego Bonet, Guillermo; Shih, Ping-Chang; Yezzi, Anthony; Barbariol, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the space-time dynamics of oceanic sea states exploiting stereo imaging techniques. In particular, a novel Wave Acquisition Stereo System (WASS) has been developed and deployed at the oceanographic tower Acqua Alta in the Northern Adriatic Sea, off the Venice coast in Italy. The analysis of WASS video measurements yields accurate estimates of the oceanic sea state dynamics, the associated directional spectra and wave surface statistics that agree well with theoretica...

  15. Real Time Image Segmentation using watershed algorithm on FPGA

    OpenAIRE

    BHUPINDER VERMA,; Dr. H.K.SARDANA

    2011-01-01

    Watershed transformation is a powerful technique that can be efficiently used for image segmentation. Its use for classifying and grading rice kernels has been discussed followed by its implementation on reconfigurable devices. In this paper, we implement a watershed based segmentation algorithm on a Virtex-6 platform. Themain contribution of this work is the low execution time and minimal internal hardware resource occupation. Watershed has been written in C-code and also in Verilog hardware...

  16. Imaging gene expression in real-time using aptamers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Il Chung [Ames Laboratory

    2012-11-02

    Signal transduction pathways are usually activated by external stimuli and are transient. The downstream changes such as transcription of the activated genes are also transient. Real-time detection of promoter activity is useful for understanding changes in gene expression, especially during cell differentiation and in development. A simple and reliable method for viewing gene expression in real time is not yet available. Reporter proteins such as fluorescent proteins and luciferase allow for non-invasive detection of the products of gene expression in living cells. However, current reporter systems do not provide for real-time imaging of promoter activity in living cells. This is because of the long time period after transcription required for fluorescent protein synthesis and maturation. We have developed an RNA reporter system for imaging in real-time to detect changes in promoter activity as they occur. The RNA reporter uses strings of RNA aptamers that constitute IMAGEtags (Intracellular MultiAptamer GEnetic tags), which can be expressed from a promoter of choice. The tobramycin, neomycin and PDC RNA aptamers have been utilized for this system and expressed in yeast from the GAL1 promoter. The IMAGEtag RNA kinetics were quantified by RT-qPCR. In yeast precultured in raffinose containing media the GAL1 promoter responded faster than in yeast precultured in glucose containing media. IMAGEtag RNA has relatively short half-life (5.5 min) in yeast. For imaging, the yeast cells are incubated with their ligands that are labeled with fluorescent dyes. To increase signal to noise, ligands have been separately conjugated with the FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) pairs, Cy3 and Cy5. With these constructs, the transcribed aptamers can be imaged after activation of the promoter by galactose. FRET was confirmed with three different approaches, which were sensitized emission, acceptor photobleaching and donor lifetime by FLIM (fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy). Real-time transcription was measured by FLIM-FRET, which was detected by the decrease in donor lifetime resulting from ligand binding to IMAGEtags that were newly synthesized from the activated GAL1 promoter. The FRET signal was specific for transcribed IMAGEtags.

  17. Imaging gene expression in real-time using aptamers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Il Chung

    2011-12-13

    Signal transduction pathways are usually activated by external stimuli and are transient. The downstream changes such as transcription of the activated genes are also transient. Real-time detection of promoter activity is useful for understanding changes in gene expression, especially during cell differentiation and in development. A simple and reliable method for viewing gene expression in real time is not yet available. Reporter proteins such as fluorescent proteins and luciferase allow for non-invasive detection of the products of gene expression in living cells. However, current reporter systems do not provide for real-time imaging of promoter activity in living cells. This is because of the long time period after transcription required for fluorescent protein synthesis and maturation. We have developed an RNA reporter system for imaging in real-time to detect changes in promoter activity as they occur. The RNA reporter uses strings of RNA aptamers that constitute IMAGEtags (Intracellular MultiAptamer GEnetic tags), which can be expressed from a promoter of choice. The tobramycin, neomycin and PDC RNA aptamers have been utilized for this system and expressed in yeast from the GAL1 promoter. The IMAGEtag RNA kinetics were quantified by RT-qPCR. In yeast precultured in raffinose containing media the GAL1 promoter responded faster than in yeast precultured in glucose containing media. IMAGEtag RNA has relatively short half-life (5.5 min) in yeast. For imaging, the yeast cells are incubated with their ligands that are labeled with fluorescent dyes. To increase signal to noise, ligands have been separately conjugated with the FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) pairs, Cy3 and Cy5. With these constructs, the transcribed aptamers can be imaged after activation of the promoter by galactose. FRET was confirmed with three different approaches, which were sensitized emission, acceptor photobleaching and donor lifetime by FLIM (fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy). Real-time transcription was measured by FLIM-FRET, which was detected by the decrease in donor lifetime resulting from ligand binding to IMAGEtags that were newly synthesized from the activated GAL1 promoter. The FRET signal was specific for transcribed IMAGEtags.

  18. IMAGING THE SOLAR TACHOCLINE BY TIME-DISTANCE HELIOSEISMOLOGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solar tachocline at the bottom of the convection zone is an important region for the dynamics of the Sun and the solar dynamo. In this region, the sound speed inferred by global helioseismology exhibits a bump of approximately 0.4% relative to the standard solar model. Global helioseismology does not provide any information on possible latitudinal variations or asymmetries between the northern and southern hemisphere. Here, we develop a time-distance helioseismology technique, including surface- and deep-focusing measurement schemes and a combination of both, for two-dimensional tomographic imaging of the solar tachocline that infers radial and latitudinal variations in the sound speed. We test the technique using artificial solar oscillation data obtained from numerical simulations. The technique successfully recovers major features of the simplified tachocline models. The technique is then applied to SOHO/MDI medium-l data and provides for the first time a full two-dimensional sound-speed perturbation image of the solar tachocline. The one-dimensional radial profile obtained by latitudinal averaging of the image is in good agreement with the previous global helioseismology result. It is found that the amplitude of the sound-speed perturbation at the tachocline varies with latitude, but it is not clear whether this is in part or fully an effect of instrumental distortion. Our initial results demonstrate that time-distance helioseismology can be used to probe the helioseismology can be used to probe the deep interior structure of the Sun, including the solar tachocline.

  19. Bioluminescence method to evaluate antimicrobial agents against Mycobacterium avium.

    OpenAIRE

    Cooksey, R C; Morlock, G P; Beggs, M; Crawford, J T

    1995-01-01

    Plasmid pLUC10, carrying the firefly luciferase gene, was transformed by electroporation into Mycobacterium avium A5. Bioluminescence production by strain A5(pLUC10), as measured in a microdilution plate luminometer, was approximately 1 relative light unit per 2 x 10(6) viable bacilli, whereas it was 0.0005 relative light unit for an equal number of parental cells. The susceptibility of strain A5(pLUC10) to eight concentrations of each of eight antimicrobial agents was evaluated by the lucife...

  20. Inhibitory effect of lipoic acid on firefly luciferase bioluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipoic acid was found to inhibit the firefly luciferin-luciferase reaction. The inhibition is competitive and is the strongest known (Ki 0.026 ± 0.013 ?M) compared with other reported inhibitors. Considering the structure-activity correlations, the mechanism of inhibition may originate from the sulfur atom and carboxyl moiety of lipoic acid giving it structural specificity. Subsequent addition of lipoic acid and nitric oxide accelerated the inhibition in vitro, suggesting that lipoic acid may have a functional role in regulating firefly bioluminescence

  1. Toxicity assessment of Hanford Site wastes by bacterial bioluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the toxicity of the nonradioactive component of low-level wastes stored in tanks on the Hanford reservation. The use of a faster, cheaper bioassay to replace the 96 hour fish acute toxicity test is examined. The new bioassay is based on loss of bioluminescence of Photobacter phosphoreum (commonly called Microtox) following exposure to toxic materials. This bioassay is calibrated and compares well to the standard fish acute toxicity test for characterization of Hanford Wastes. 4 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs

  2. Imaging vascular grafts in vivo with Indium-111-labeled platelets. Influence of timing on image interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platelets labeled with Indium-111 were used to visualize polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bypass grafts in vivo and to quantitate platelet deposition vs. time. The grafts were inserted into the femoral and carotid arteries of dogs and were first exposed to unlabeled blood for 0 to 3 hours. They were then imaged for up to 5 days. An index of activity, designed to correct for isotope decay and changing levels of background, was used to quantitate platelet deposition. Grafts exposed to unlabeled blood for, at most, 1 hour were visible immediately. When labeled platelets were administered to the circulation after at least 2 hours, grafts became visible only after 3 days. Continuous imaging of fresh implants, showing that platelet deposition does not increase monotonically with time, was used to explain this phenomenon. The interpretation of nuclear images of synthetic grafts depends on the delay between establishing flow in the grafts and the administration of labeled platelets

  3. Design of a multimodal fibers optic system for small animal optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello E; Pagliazzi, Marco; Boschi, Federico

    2015-02-01

    Small animals optical imaging systems are widely used in pre-clinical research to image in vivo the bio-distribution of light emitting probes using fluorescence or bioluminescence modalities. In this work we presented a set of simulated results of a novel small animal optical imaging module based on a fibers optics matrix, coupled with a position sensitive detector, devoted to acquire bioluminescence and Cerenkov images. Simulations were performed using GEANT 4 code with the GAMOS architecture using the tissue optics plugin. Results showed that it is possible to image a 30 × 30 mm region of interest using a fiber optics array containing 100 optical fibers without compromising the quality of the reconstruction. The number of fibers necessary to cover an adequate portion of a small animal is thus quite modest. This design allows integrating the module with magnetic resonance (MR) in order to acquire optical and MR images at the same time. A detailed model of the mouse anatomy, obtained by segmentation of 3D MRI images, will improve the quality of optical 3D reconstruction. PMID:25465071

  4. Rapid Detection of Bacillus anthracis in Complex Food Matrices Using Phage-Mediated Bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Natasha J; Vandamm, Joshua P; Molineux, Ian J; Schofield, David A

    2015-05-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is considered a high-priority agent that may be used in a food-related terrorist attack because it can be contracted by ingestion and it also forms spores with heat and chemical resistance. Thus, novel surveillance methodologies to detect B. anthracis on adulterated foods are important for bioterrorism preparedness. We describe the development of a phage-based bioluminescence assay for the detection of B. anthracis on deliberately contaminated foods. We previously engineered the B. anthracis phage W? with genes encoding bacterial luciferase (luxA and luxB) to create a "light-tagged" reporter (W?::luxAB) that is able to rapidly detect B. anthracis by transducing a bioluminescent signal response. Here, we investigate the ability of W?::luxAB to detect B. anthracis Sterne, an attenuated select agent strain, in inoculated food (ground beef) and milk (2%, baby formula, and half and half) matrices after incubation with spores for 72 h at 4°C as per AOAC testing guidelines. The majority of B. anthracis bacilli remained in spore form, and thus were potentially infectious, within each of the liquid matrices for 14 days. Detection limits were 80 CFU/ml after 7 h of enrichment; sensitivity of detection increased to 8 CFU/ml when enrichment was extended to 16 h. The limit of detection in ground beef was 3.2 × 10(3) CFU/g after 7 h of enrichment, improving to 3.2 × 10(2) CFU/g after 16 h. Because the time to result is rapid and minimal processing is required, and because gastrointestinal anthrax can be fatal, the reporter technology displays promise for the protection of our food supply following a deliberate release of this priority pathogen. PMID:25951391

  5. Time-resolved spectral imaging: better photon economy, higher accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereidouni, Farzad; Reitsma, Keimpe; Blab, Gerhard A.; Gerritsen, Hans C.

    2015-03-01

    Lifetime and spectral imaging are complementary techniques that offer a non-invasive solution for monitoring metabolic processes, identifying biochemical compounds, and characterizing their interactions in biological tissues, among other tasks. Newly developed instruments that perform time-resolved spectral imaging can provide even more information and reach higher sensitivity than either modality alone. Here we report a multispectral lifetime imaging system based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), capable of operating at high photon count rates (12 MHz) per spectral detection channel, and with time resolution of 200 ps. We performed error analyses to investigate the effect of gate width and spectral-channel width on the accuracy of estimated lifetimes and spectral widths. Temporal and spectral phasors were used for analysis of recorded data, and we demonstrated blind un-mixing of the fluorescent components using information from both modalities. Fractional intensities, spectra, and decay curves of components were extracted without need for prior information. We further tested this approach with fluorescently doubly-labeled DNA, and demonstrated its suitability for accurately estimating FRET efficiency in the presence of either non-interacting or interacting donor molecules.

  6. Real-time Image Generation for Compressive Light Field Displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the invention of integral imaging and parallax barriers in the beginning of the 20th century, glasses-free 3D displays have become feasible. Only today—more than a century later—glasses-free 3D displays are finally emerging in the consumer market. The technologies being employed in current-generation devices, however, are fundamentally the same as what was invented 100 years ago. With rapid advances in optical fabrication, digital processing power, and computational perception, a new generation of display technology is emerging: compressive displays exploring the co-design of optical elements and computational processing while taking particular characteristics of the human visual system into account. In this paper, we discuss real-time implementation strategies for emerging compressive light field displays. We consider displays composed of multiple stacked layers of light-attenuating or polarization-rotating layers, such as LCDs. The involved image generation requires iterative tomographic image synthesis. We demonstrate that, for the case of light field display, computed tomographic light field synthesis maps well to operations included in the standard graphics pipeline, facilitating efficient GPU-based implementations with real-time framerates.

  7. Image-Based Learning Approach Applied to Time Series Forecasting

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    K., Ramírez-Amáro; J. C., Chimal-Eguía.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se presenta un nuevo enfoque para obtener información de una serie de tiempo. Para implementar esta nueva técnica, se ha definido una nueva representación de los datos de entrada de una serie de tiempo. Esta nueva representación está basada en la información obtenida mediante la divi [...] sión del eje de la imagen de la serie de tiempo en cajas. La diferencia entre esta nueva técnica de representación de datos y la forma clásica, se basa en que no es dependiente del tiempo. La nueva representación se ha implementado en una nueva técnica denominada Técnica de Aprendizaje Basada en la Imagen (IBLA por su siglas en inglés) y por medio de un mecanismo probabilístico, esta técnica se aplica al muy interesante problema de predicción en una serie de tiempo. Los resultados experimentales indican que usando esta metodología es posible obtener mejores resultados que los obtenidos por medio de Redes Neuronales Artificiales y Máquinas de Soporte Vectorial. Abstract in english In this paper, a new learning approach based on time-series image information is presented. In order to implement this new learning technique, a novel time-series input data representation is also defined. This input data representation is based on information obtained by image axis division into bo [...] xes. The difference between this new input data representation and the classical is that this technique is not time-dependent. This new information is implemented in the new Image-Based Learning Approach (IBLA) and by means of a probabilistic mechanism this learning technique is applied to the interesting problem of time series forecasting. The experimental results indicate that by using the methodology proposed in this article, it is possible to obtain better results than with the classical techniques such as artificial neuronal networks and support vector machines.

  8. A portable, real-time, holographic system for imaging flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the authors describe a portable system that can be used in a field situation. Image reconstruction is accomplished mathematically in near real-time, and the image displayed in a variety of formats. The system utilizes a special purpose microcomputer designed around the 16-bit Intel 8086 and 8087 microprocessor chips. The system fits into three suitcase containers that can be shipped as excess baggage on most air-lines. The system has been tested on pressure vessel and piping samples containing machined and natural flaws, and has also been used in the field to inspect a weld in the steam generator shell of a nuclear power plant. The theory, implementation, and experimental results are presented

  9. Satellite image time series simulation for environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tao

    2014-11-01

    The performance of environmental monitoring heavily depends on the availability of consecutive observation data and it turns out an increasing demand in remote sensing community for satellite image data in the sufficient resolution with respect to both spatial and temporal requirements, which appear to be conflictive and hard to tune tradeoffs. Multiple constellations could be a solution if without concerning cost, and thus it is so far interesting but very challenging to develop a method which can simultaneously improve both spatial and temporal details. There are some research efforts to deal with the problem from various aspects, a type of approaches is to enhance the spatial resolution using techniques of super resolution, pan-sharpen etc. which can produce good visual effects, but mostly cannot preserve spectral signatures and result in losing analytical value. Another type is to fill temporal frequency gaps by adopting time interpolation, which actually doesn't increase informative context at all. In this paper we presented a novel method to generate satellite images in higher spatial and temporal details, which further enables satellite image time series simulation. Our method starts with a pair of high-low resolution data set, and then a spatial registration is done by introducing LDA model to map high and low resolution pixels correspondingly. Afterwards, temporal change information is captured through a comparison of low resolution time series data, and the temporal change is then projected onto high resolution data plane and assigned to each high resolution pixel referring the predefined temporal change patterns of each type of ground objects to generate a simulated high resolution data. A preliminary experiment shows that our method can simulate a high resolution data with a good accuracy. We consider the contribution of our method is to enable timely monitoring of temporal changes through analysis of low resolution images time series only, and usage of costly high resolution data can be reduced as much as possible, and it presents an efficient solution with great cost performance to build up an economically operational monitoring service for environment, agriculture, forest, land use investigation, and other applications.

  10. A Double-Threshold Technique for Fast Time-Correspondence Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ming-Fei; Liu, Xue-Feng; Yao, Xu-Ri; Luo, Kai-Hong; Fan, Heng; Wu, Ling-An

    2013-01-01

    We present a robust imaging method based on time-correspondence imaging and normalized ghost imaging (GI) that sets two thresholds to select the reference frame exposures for image reconstruction. This double-threshold time-correspondence imaging protocol always gives better quality and signal-to-noise ratio than previous GI schemes, and is insensitive to surrounding noise. Moreover, only simple add and minus operations are required while less data storage space and computing time are consumed, thus faster imaging speeds are attainable. The protocol offers a general approach applicable to all GI techniques, and marks a further step forward towards real-time practical applications of correlation imaging.

  11. Influence of culture conditions on mycelial growth and bioluminescence of Gerronema viridilucens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Luiz F; Bastos, Erick L; Desjardin, Dennis E; Stevani, Cassius V

    2008-05-01

    Herein we describe a procedure for measuring the total light emission of the naturally bioluminescent tropical fungus Gerronema viridilucens and the optimization of culture conditions using multivariate factorial anova. Cultures growing on an agar surface in 35 mm Petri dishes at 90% humidity show optimal bioluminescence emission at 25 degrees C in the presence of 1.0% sugar cane molasses, 0.10% yeast extract and pH 6.0 (nonbuffered). Temperature and pH are the most important factors for both mycelial growth and bioluminescence. PMID:18355288

  12. Study of firefly luciferin oxidation and isomerism as possible inhibition pathways for firefly bioluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C. G.

    2014-01-01

    Firefly bioluminescence presents a light emitting profile with a form of a flash, due to the firefly luciferase-catalyzed formation of inhibitory products. These impair the binding of the substrate luciferin to the active site of the enzyme. However, this luciferase catalyzed pathways may not be the only ones responsible for the flash profile. The oxidation and isomerisation of the substrate luciferin lead to the formation of compounds that are also known inhibitors of firefly bioluminescence. So, the objective of this Letter was to analyze if these reactions could be capable of interfering with the bioluminescence reaction.

  13. A multi-phase level set framework for source reconstruction in bioluminescence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a novel multi-phase level set algorithm for solving the inverse problem of bioluminescence tomography. The distribution of unknown interior source is considered as piecewise constant and represented by using multiple level set functions. The localization of interior bioluminescence source is implemented by tracing the evolution of level set function. An alternate search scheme is incorporated to ensure the global optimal of reconstruction. Both numerical and physical experiments are performed to evaluate the developed level set reconstruction method. Reconstruction results show that the proposed method can stably resolve the interior source of bioluminescence tomography.

  14. Results from laboratory tests of the two-dimensional Time-Encoded Imaging System.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Brubaker, Erik; Gerling, Mark D; Le Galloudec, Nathalie Joelle

    2014-09-01

    A series of laboratory experiments were undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of two dimensional time-encoded imaging. A prototype two-dimensional time encoded imaging system was designed and constructed. Results from imaging measurements of single and multiple point sources as well as extended source distributions are presented. Time encoded imaging has proven to be a simple method for achieving high resolution two-dimensional imaging with potential to be used in future arms control and treaty verification applications.

  15. High resolution crustal image of South California Continental Borderland: Reverse time imaging including multiples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, A.; Gantela, C.

    2014-12-01

    Strong multiples were observed in marine seismic data of Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment (LARSE).It is crucial to eliminate these multiples in conventional ray-based or one-way wave-equation based depth image methods. As long as multiples contain information of target zone along travelling path, it's possible to use them as signal, to improve the illumination coverage thus enhance the image quality of structural boundaries. Reverse time migration including multiples is a two-way wave-equation based prestack depth image method that uses both primaries and multiples to map structural boundaries. Several factors, including source wavelet, velocity model, back ground noise, data acquisition geometry and preprocessing workflow may influence the quality of image. The source wavelet is estimated from direct arrival of marine seismic data. Migration velocity model is derived from integrated model building workflow, and the sharp velocity interfaces near sea bottom needs to be preserved in order to generate multiples in the forward and backward propagation steps. The strong amplitude, low frequency marine back ground noise needs to be removed before the final imaging process. High resolution reverse time image sections of LARSE Lines 1 and Line 2 show five interfaces: depth of sea-bottom, base of sedimentary basins, top of Catalina Schist, a deep layer and a possible pluton boundary. Catalina Schist shows highs in the San Clemente ridge, Emery Knoll, Catalina Ridge, under Catalina Basin on both the lines, and a minor high under Avalon Knoll. The high of anticlinal fold in Line 1 is under the north edge of Emery Knoll and under the San Clemente fault zone. An area devoid of any reflection features are interpreted as sides of an igneous plume.

  16. Time-resolved gigahertz acoustic wave imaging at arbitrary frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Osamu; Kaneko, Shogo; Wright, Oliver B; Tomoda, Motonobu

    2015-03-01

    We describe a way to generate and detect arbitrary frequency components in time-resolved surface acoustic wave imaging based on optical pumping and probing with a periodic light source. The detailed theory of the technique, based on beam modulation and Fourier analysis, for a variety of possible experimental configurations is presented, followed by experimental data for a glass substrate covered with a thin gold film. We show how the acoustic dispersion relation can be obtained to arbitrary frequency resolution, not limited by the laser pulse repetition rate. PMID:25768824

  17. Time-resolved imaging for the APS linac beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The particle-beam imaging diagnostics for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) injector lime have been enhanced by the installation of optical transition radiation (OTR) screens and the use of Ce-doped YAG crystals as beam profile monitors. Both converters have improved spatial resolution and time responses compared to the standard Chromox (Al2O3:Cr) screens used elsewhere in the linac. These enhancements allow us to address the smaller beam sizes (x = 30 microm have been observed with a micropulse bunch length of ? = 2-3 ps using OTR. First results on the lower-emittance rf thermionic gun are briefly discussed

  18. Real-time low-light-level image enhancement algorithm applies to FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Si; Tian, Yijia; Jue, Jin

    2011-08-01

    A new real-time low-light-level (lll) image enhancement algorithm which applies to FPGA, is proposed in this paper. In real-time Lll image processing, the time and space domain noise is effects of real-time Lll image system precision primary factors, Seems particularly important how about to reduce Lll image noise and improve the precision at the lll image. In order to reduce lll image noise, we use the time domain recursion and the good results obtained.er

  19. Real-time endoscopic optical properties imaging using Single Snapshot of Optical Properties (SSOP) imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, J.; van de Giessen, M.; Gioux, S.

    2015-03-01

    Minimally invasive surgeries are approaching 50% of all interventional procedures in the US, yet there is a lack of objective tools to assist surgeons in this limited sensing environment. In this preliminary work, we present a novel proof of concept implementation of Single Snapshot of Optical Properties (SSOP) imaging through a rigid endoscope. In this embodiment, a stereo rigid endoscope is used with one channel to project spatially modulated illumination and the second channel to image the diffuse reflectance onto a CCD sensor. Optical property maps are then obtained for various tissue simulating phantoms and validated against standard wide-field spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI). The implementation of endoscopic SSOP creates potential for practical use of endoscopic tissue constituent quantification. The results show good agreement (within 5%) for endoscopic SSOP versus wide-field SFDI. However, endoscopic SSOP acquisition allows for video-rate imaging, limited only by the exposure time of image capture. These results show promise for an objective endoscopic tissue viability assessment tool being achievable in a clinical setting.

  20. Real-time image processing for particle tracking velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreizer, Mark; Ratner, David; Liberzon, Alex

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel high-speed particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) experimental system. Its novelty is due to the FPGA-based, real-time image processing "on camera". Instead of an image, the camera transfers to the computer using a network card, only the relevant information of the identified flow tracers. Therefore, the system is ideal for the remote particle tracking systems in research and industrial applications, while the camera can be controlled and data can be transferred over any high-bandwidth network. We present the hardware and the open source software aspects of the PTV experiments. The tracking results of the new experimental system has been compared to the flow visualization and particle image velocimetry measurements. The canonical flow in the central cross section of a a cubic cavity (1:1:1 aspect ratio) in our lid-driven cavity apparatus is used for validation purposes. The downstream secondary eddy (DSE) is the sensitive portion of this flow and its size was measured with increasing Reynolds number (via increasing belt velocity). The size of DSE estimated from the flow visualization, PIV and compressed PTV is shown to agree within the experimental uncertainty of the methods applied.

  1. Yearlong moored bioluminescence and current data at KM3NeT neutrino telescope sites in the deep Ionian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haren, Hans; de Jong, Maarten; Kooijman, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Yearlong observations are presented using stand-alone small optical sensors and current meters in the deep Ionian Sea, E-Mediterranean. At two future neutrino telescope sites, off Sicily (I) and off Peloponessos (Gr), we deployed 2500-3000 m long mooring lines with oceanographic instrumentation. At about 150 m above the sea-floor, a glass sphere was mounted to each line holding two 3?-diameter photo-multiplier-tubes 'PMTs' in opposing directions for a first deep-sea test. Due to technical problems the background optical count rate could not be well established. Here, the focus is on the variations with time of bioluminescence bursts and their correlation with currents. Spectral analysis demonstrates that the PMT data best resemble those of horizontal currents (kinetic energy), significantly peaking at near-inertial, sub-inertial mesoscale and (Gr only) at tidal frequencies. Out-of-phase differences between signals from opposing PMTs in the same optical unit indicate impacts of bioluminescent organisms as a function of current direction, rather than a bacterial glow constant with time.

  2. Imaging the Solar Tachocline by Time-Distance Helioseismology

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Junwei; Kosovichev, A G; Mansour, N N

    2009-01-01

    The solar tachocline at the bottom of the convection zone is an important region for the dynamics of the Sun and the solar dynamo. In this region, the sound speed inferred by global helioseismology exhibits a bump of approximately 0.4% relative to the standard solar model. Global helioseismology does not provide any information on possible latitudinal variations or asymmetries between the Northern and Southern hemisphere. Here, we develop a time-distance helioseismology technique, including surface- and deep-focusing measurement schemes and a combination of both, for two-dimensional tomographic imaging of the solar tachocline that infers radial and latitudinal variations in the sound speed. We test the technique using artificial solar oscillation data obtained from numerical simulations. The technique successfully recovers major features of the simplified tachocline models. The technique is then applied to SOHO/MDI medium-l data and provides for the first time a full two-dimensional sound-speed perturbation i...

  3. Real-time imaging for dose evaluation during antiproton irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantemiris, I; Angelopoulos, A

    2010-01-01

    Online monitoring of the stopping distribution of particle beams used for radiotherapy provides the possibility of detecting possible errors in dose deposition early during a given treatment session, and may therefore help to improve the quality of the therapy. Antiproton annihilation events produce several long-range secondary particles which can be detected in real time by standard high energy particle physics detector systems. In this note, Monte Carlo calculations are performed in order to study the feasibility of real-time imaging by detecting charged pions produced during antiproton irradiation of typical biological targets. A simple treatment plan in a water phantom is simulated and the results show that by detecting pi+/- the position and the size of the planned target volume can be located with precision in the order of 1 mm.

  4. Digital image processing for real-time neutron radiography and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes several digital image processing approaches for the real-time neutron radiography (neutron television-NTV), such as image integration, adaptive smoothing and image enhancement, which have beneficial effects on image improvements, and also describes how to use these techniques for applications. Details invisible in direct images of NTV are able to be revealed by digital image processing, such as reversed image, gray level correction, gray scale transformation, contoured image, subtraction technique, pseudo color display and so on. For real-time application a contouring operation and an averaging approach can also be utilized effectively. (author)

  5. Image corruption detection in diffusion tensor imaging for post-processing and real-time monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Shea, Steven M; Lorenz, Christine H; Jiang, Hangyi; Chou, Ming-Chung; Mori, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    Due to the high sensitivity of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to physiological motion, clinical DTI scans often suffer a significant amount of artifacts. Tensor-fitting-based, post-processing outlier rejection is often used to reduce the influence of motion artifacts. Although it is an effective approach, when there are multiple corrupted data, this method may no longer correctly identify and reject the corrupted data. In this paper, we introduce a new criterion called "corrected Inter-Slice Intensity Discontinuity" (cISID) to detect motion-induced artifacts. We compared the performance of algorithms using cISID and other existing methods with regard to artifact detection. The experimental results show that the integration of cISID into fitting-based methods significantly improves the retrospective detection performance at post-processing analysis. The performance of the cISID criterion, if used alone, was inferior to the fitting-based methods, but cISID could effectively identify severely corrupted images with a rapid calculation time. In the second part of this paper, an outlier rejection scheme was implemented on a scanner for real-time monitoring of image quality and reacquisition of the corrupted data. The real-time monitoring, based on cISID and followed by post-processing, fitting-based outlier rejection, could provide a robust environment for routine DTI studies. PMID:24204551

  6. Ship Sensor Observations for Bioluminescence 2009 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly measurements made by selected ship sensors on the R/V Seward Johnson during the "Bioluminescence 2009" expedition sponsored by the National Oceanic and...

  7. Bioluminescence: A Potentially Convergent Signature of Life in Future Exploration of Europa's Subsurface Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Martinez, C. L.

    2014-02-01

    This presentation deals with theoretical and evolutionary aspects pertaining to the nature and degree of biological complexity that is expectable among putative organisms on Europa. Bioluminescence is suggested as a new type of biosignature.

  8. Effect of irradiation on detection of bacteria in dehydrated vegetables with ATP bioluminescence assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ATP bioluminescence intensity of 4 kinds of irradiated dehydrated vegetables was inconsistent with the bacteria number, the reasons were investigated in this paper. Results showed that irradiation had little effect on background luminescence, and there was no effect on luciferase-luminous system. When irradiation killed the bacteria, the ATPase activity also decreased. As a result, the ATP content in bacteria didn't decreased with the killed of bacteria, which contributed to the increase of free ATP in ATP extract and finally led to the disagreement between the bioluminescence intensity and the actual number of bacteria. When the free ATP in the dehydrated vegetable was removed, the bioluminescence intensity of ATP extract was consistent with the actual number of bacteria in irradiated dehydrated vegetable and ATP bioluminescence technology could be used in bacteria detection of irradiated samples. (authors)

  9. Dive Activities for Bioluminescence 2009 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Information about dive activities were recorded by personnel during the "Bioluminescence 2009" expedition, July 20 through 31, 2009. Additional information was...

  10. Comparison of the Lumac and Monolight systems for detection of bacteriuria by bioluminescence.

    OpenAIRE

    Drow, D L; Baum, C H; Hirschfield, G

    1984-01-01

    The development of practical and rapid methods for detection of infectious-disease-producing agents in clinical specimens is the most important current goal of clinical microbiology. Bioluminescence is a technique which is rapid and potentially sensitive enough to detect significant numbers of bacteria in urine specimens. To determine whether bioluminescence is practical and cost effective for routine use, we compared two commercially available instruments and kits, Lumac and Monolight, to st...

  11. Effect of Naphthalene and Salicylate Analogues on the Bioluminescence of Bioreporter Pseudomonas Fluorescens HK44.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trögl, Josef; Kuncová, Gabriela; Kubicová, L.; Pa?ík, P.; Hálová, Jaroslava; Demnerová, K.; Ripp, S.; Sayler, G. S.

    2007-01-01

    Ro?. 52, 1 (2007) , s. 3-14. ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GA104/05/2637; GA ?R(CZ) GA203/06/1244 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 * bioluminescence * bioluminescence Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.989, year: 2007

  12. Influence of the temperature at the Black Sea ctenophores-aliens bioluminescence characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Tokarev Yuriy; Mashukova Olga

    2012-01-01

    Successful invasion of Mnemiopsis leidyi A. Agassiz, 1865 and Beroe ovata Mayer, 1912 into the Black Sea and their important role in this region pelagic ecosystem is stipulated mainly by the considerable eurythermy of these species. Many ecological-physiological characteristics of ctenophores—aliens are studied quite well. However, bioluminescence, one of the most important elements of the ctenophores ecology and the bioluminescence reaction temperature...

  13. ATP - bioluminescence as a technique to evaluate the microbiological quality of water in food industry

    OpenAIRE

    Patrícia Dolabela Costa; Nélio José Andrade; Frederico José Vieira Passos; Sebastião César Cardoso Brandão,; Carolina Gonçalves Freire Rodrigues

    2004-01-01

    ATP-bioluminescence was used to evaluate the microbiological quality of water samples collected from the water supply, the water treatment system and from a dairy plant, including ammonia-cooling water and industrial water. For industrial water, there was relation between the ATP-bioluminescence technique and microbial count. There were no differences (p>0.05) between water supply and ammonia-cooling water samples for total and free ATP concentrations nor for the microbial counts. Different m...

  14. Evaluation of bioluminescence-based assays of anti-malarial drug activity

    OpenAIRE

    Hasenkamp Sandra; Sidaway Adam; Devine Oliver; Roye Richard; Horrocks Paul

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Transgenic Plasmodium falciparum expressing luciferase offers an attractive bioluminescence-based assay platform for the investigation of the pharmacological properties of anti-malarial drugs. Here a side-by-side comparison of bioluminescence and fluorescence-based assays, utilizing a luciferase reporter cassette that confers a strong temporal pattern of luciferase expression during the S-phase of intraerythrocytic development, is reported. Methods Key assay parameters for...

  15. An improved single-step lysis protocol to measure luciferase bioluminescence in Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    Hasenkamp, S.; Wong, E. H.; Horrocks, P.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the optimization and evaluation of a simple single-step lysis protocol to measure luciferase bioluminescence from genetically modified Plasmodium falciparum. This protocol utilizes a modified commercial buffer to improve speed of assay and consistency in the bioluminescence signal measured by reducing the manipulation steps required to release the cytoplasmic fraction. The utility of this improved assay protocol is demonstrated in typical assays that explore absolute and...

  16. Foraging in the Darkness of the Southern Ocean: Influence of Bioluminescence on a Deep Diving Predator

    OpenAIRE

    Vacquie?-garcia, Jade; Royer, Franc?ois; Dragon, Anne-ce?cile; Viviant, Morgane; Bailleul, Fre?de?ric; Guinet, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    How non-echolocating deep diving marine predators locate their prey while foraging remains mostly unknown. Female southern elephant seals (SES) (Mirounga leonina) have vision adapted to low intensity light with a peak sensitivity at 485 nm. This matches the wavelength of bioluminescence produced by a large range of marine organisms including myctophid fish, SES’s main prey. In this study, we investigated whether bioluminescence provides an accurate estimate of prey occurrence for SES. To do...

  17. Circadian rhythms of cyanobacteria: monitoring the biological clocks of individual colonies by bioluminescence.

    OpenAIRE

    Kondo, T.; Ishiura, M.

    1994-01-01

    Reproducible circadian rhythms of bioluminescence from individual colonies of cyanobacteria (Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942) has been observed. Phenotypic monitoring of colonies on agar plates will enable us to genetically analyze the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock of cyanobacteria by screening for clock mutants. By the introduction of a bacterial luciferase gene, we previously developed a transformed cyanobacterial strain (AMC149) that expresses luciferase as a bioluminescent ...

  18. Evaluation of the Lumac kit for the detection of bacteriuria by bioluminescence.

    OpenAIRE

    Mackett, D.; Kessock-philip, S.; Bascomb, S.; Easmon, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    Four hundred and twenty-two urine samples were screened for significant bacteriuria using bioluminescence and microscopy of uncentrifuged urine. A smaller number of false-negatives were seen with bioluminescence (10%) than with microscopy (40%) while both techniques gave a similar number of false-positives (18%). The kit required a large amount of manual preparation, largely pipetting. With this and the short shelf-life of the reconstituted reagents, it is not suitable for small numbers of ur...

  19. Automatic Segmentation Framework of Building Anatomical Mouse Model for Bioluminescence Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Alali

    2013-01-01

    Bioluminescence tomography is known as a highly ill-posed inverse problem. To improve the reconstruction performance by introducing anatomical structures as a priori knowledge, an automatic segmentation framework has been proposed in this paper to extract the mouse whole-body organs and tissues, which enables to build up a heterogeneous mouse model for reconstruction of bioluminescence tomography. Finally, an in vivo mouse experiment has been conducted to evaluate this framework by using an X...

  20. The First Bioluminescence Tomography System for Simultaneous Acquisition of Multiview and Multispectral Data

    OpenAIRE

    Wenxiang Cong; Xin Qian; Kumar Durairaj; Haiou Shen; Ge Wang

    2006-01-01

    We describe the system design of the first bioluminescence tomography (BLT) system for parallel acquisition of multiple bioluminescent views around a mouse in a number of spectral channels simultaneously. The primary component of this BLT system is a novel mirror module and a unique mouse holder. The mirror module consists of a mounting plate and four mirrors with stages. These mirror stages are right triangular blocks symmetrically arranged and attached to the mounting plat...

  1. Use of Bioluminescence Markers To Detect Pseudomonas spp. in the Rhizosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Weger, Letty A.; Dunbar, Paul; Mahafee, Walter F.; Lugtenberg, Ben J. J.; Sayler, Gary S.

    1991-01-01

    The use of bioluminescence as a sensitive marker for detection of Pseudomonas spp. in the rhizosphere was investigated. Continuous expression of the luxCDABE genes, required for bioluminescence, was not detectable in the rhizosphere. However, when either a naphthalene-inducible luxCDABE construct or a constitutive luxAB construct (coding only for the luciferase) was introduced into the Pseudomonas cells, light emission could be initiated just prior to measurement by the addition of naphthalen...

  2. A Novel Algorithm to Perform Precalculated Tables for the Real-Time Image Processing: Illustration with Image Rotation

    OpenAIRE

    DEVY, M.; IRKI, Z.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present an approach which makes uses of precalculated tables in order to carry out a real time image processing task. This approach is very useful when the relation between the input image and the output image (after treatment) is given in the backward direction (the input image is expressed using the output image). We illustrate this approach in the case of the rotation of an image around its center. We illustrate how theses precalculated tables should be built and the ...

  3. Imaging system for obtaining space- and time-resolved plasma images on TMX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Reticon 50 x 50 photodiode array camera has been placed on Livermore's Tandem Mirror Experiment to view a 56-cm diameter plasma source of visible, vacuum-ultraviolet, and x-ray photons. The compact camera views the source through a pinhole, filters, a fiber optic coupler, a microchannel plate intensifier (MCPI), and a reducer. The images are digitized (at 3.3 MHz) and stored in a large, high-speed memory that has a capacity of 45 images. A local LSI-11 microprocessor provides immediate processing and display of the data. The data are also stored on floppy disks that can be further processed on the large Livermore Computer System. The temporal resolution is limited by the fastest MCPI gate. The number of images recorded is determined by the read-out time of the Reticon camera (minimum 0.9 msec). The spatial resolution of approximately 1.4 cm is fixed by the geometry and the pinhole of 0.025 cm. Typical high-quality color representation of some plasma images are included

  4. Bioluminescence reporter gene-based detection of microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hae Young; Lee, Young Sik; Kim, Soonhag

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of small noncoding RNA molecules that inhibit the expression of cognate genes in multicellular organisms. These small RNAs have been demonstrated to play crucial roles in a variety of biological processes including cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. Knowledge of specific expression patterns of miRNAs is critical for functional studies. Here, we describe a bioluminescence reporter gene-based method to measure miRNA activity in cultured cells and mice using a Gaussia luciferase reporter gene controlled by miRNA binding sites in its 3'untranslated region. This method can be used to noninvasively monitor the expression patterns of functionally active miRNAs involved in different biological processes or diseases in mice. PMID:24166370

  5. A method for generating high resolution satellite image time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tao

    2014-10-01

    There is an increasing demand for satellite remote sensing data with both high spatial and temporal resolution in many applications. But it still is a challenge to simultaneously improve spatial resolution and temporal frequency due to the technical limits of current satellite observation systems. To this end, much R&D efforts have been ongoing for years and lead to some successes roughly in two aspects, one includes super resolution, pan-sharpen etc. methods which can effectively enhance the spatial resolution and generate good visual effects, but hardly preserve spectral signatures and result in inadequate analytical value, on the other hand, time interpolation is a straight forward method to increase temporal frequency, however it increase little informative contents in fact. In this paper we presented a novel method to simulate high resolution time series data by combing low resolution time series data and a very small number of high resolution data only. Our method starts with a pair of high and low resolution data set, and then a spatial registration is done by introducing LDA model to map high and low resolution pixels correspondingly. Afterwards, temporal change information is captured through a comparison of low resolution time series data, and then projected onto the high resolution data plane and assigned to each high resolution pixel according to the predefined temporal change patterns of each type of ground objects. Finally the simulated high resolution data is generated. A preliminary experiment shows that our method can simulate a high resolution data with a reasonable accuracy. The contribution of our method is to enable timely monitoring of temporal changes through analysis of time sequence of low resolution images only, and usage of costly high resolution data can be reduces as much as possible, and it presents a highly effective way to build up an economically operational monitoring solution for agriculture, forest, land use investigation, environment and etc. applications.

  6. Discovery of a glowing millipede in California and the gradual evolution of bioluminescence in Diplopoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Paul E; Moore, Wendy

    2015-05-19

    The rediscovery of the Californian millipede Xystocheir bistipita surprisingly reveals that the species is bioluminescent. Using molecular phylogenetics, we show that X. bistipita is the evolutionary sister group of Motyxia, the only genus of New World bioluminescent millipedes. We demonstrate that bioluminescence originated in the group's most recent common ancestor and evolved by gradual, directional change through diversification. Because bioluminescence in Motyxia has been experimentally demonstrated to be aposematic, forewarning of the animal's cyanide-based toxins, these results are contrary to aposematic theory and empirical evidence that a warning pattern cannot evolve gradually in unpalatable prey. However, gradual evolution of a warning pattern is plausible if faint light emission served another function and was co-opted as an aposematic signal later in the diversification of the genus. Luminescence in Motyxia stem-group taxa may have initially evolved to cope with reactive oxygen stress triggered by a hot, dry environment and was repurposed for aposematism by high-elevation crown-group taxa colonizing new habitats with varying levels of predation. The discovery of bioluminescence in X. bistipita and its pivotal phylogenetic location provides insight into the independent and repeated evolution of bioluminescence across the tree of life. PMID:25941389

  7. Description of the larva of Alampoides alychnus (Kirsch, 1873), the first known species with bioluminescent immatures in Euplinthini (Elateridae, Agrypninae)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Simone Policena, Rosa; Cleide, Costa.

    Full Text Available A larva de Alampoides alychnus (Kirsch) é descrita e comparada às larvas bioluminescentes de espécies de Pyrophorini. Larvas foram coletadas vivas no solo, entre uma plantação de cana-de-açúcar e mata ciliar localizada em Campo Novo dos Parecis, Mato Grosso, Brasil. Foram mantidas em laboratório. Um [...] a larva atingiu o estágio pupal e após 14 dias o estágio adulto. Estas larvas diferem das larvas de Pyrophorini principalmente pelo padrão de bioluminescência: um par de órgãos luminescentes no mesonoto e uma série de órgãos luminescentes medianos no metanoto e no abdômen. A morfologia da larva e o padrão bioluminescente da larva e da pupa são descritos pela primeira vez para o gênero e para a tribo. O adulto não apresentou luminescência ou vestígio de órgão luminescente. Abstract in english Mature larva of Alampoides alychnus (Kirsch) is described and compared to known Pyrophorini immatures. Larvae were collected live in the soil of a region dominated by sugarcane plantation and gallery forest in Campo Novo dos Parecis, Mato Grosso, Brazil. They were maintained in laboratory and the pu [...] pal period lasted 14 days. This larva differs from other Pyrophorini larvae mainly by bioluminescent pattern: one pair of luminous spots on the mesonotum, and a longitudinal series of median spots on the metanotum and all abdominal segments. The morphology of larva and the bioluminescent pattern of larva and pupa are described for the first time to the genus and the tribe. The fact that adults show no trace of luminescence is emphasized.

  8. Evaluation of full time and half time acquired cardiac perfusion images and its correlation with coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The myocardial perfusion study takes a longer time to complete. A reduction in acquisition time would mean reduced patient motion related artifacts, improvement in camera efficiency and reduction in cost. Iterative reconstruction algorithms produce more accurate images with fewer artifacts. Materials and Methods: Seventy three patients undergoing myocardial perfusion imaging were selected for additional half time acquisition. Patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease who have undergone coronary angiography recently were preferably included. Images were analysed in 4 groups - full time FBP, half time FBP, half time OSEM and half time OSEM. Three independent observers blinded to the clinical data and the acquisition protocol analysed images for change in image quality between these groups. Semiquantitative parameters of summed stress score, summed rest score, summed difference score and left ventricular ejection fraction were also compared using appropriate statistical methods. Results: No difference was noted in SSS, SRS, SDS and LVEF calculated for full time and half time. However, significant difference was found between SSS, SRS and SDS calculated for FBP and OSEM processed half time studies and no significant difference for LVEF calculated for these two groups. Significant change in image quality was noted by 2 observers only in 1.4% and 2.7% of cases. A true positivity rate of 88% was seen in comparison with coronary angiography. Conclusiarison with coronary angiography. Conclusion: Gated myocardial perfusion SPECT images acquired in half the routine scan time provides equal diagnostic information compared to a conventional full time study, regardless of the processing protocol

  9. Real-time image acquisition and deblurring for underwater gravel extraction by smartphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Fu Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Gravel size distribution is an important aspect of stream investigation. Using water photography to determine such distribution is a simple and cost-effective approach for gathering instream gravel information. However, good-quality images of underwater gravels in shallow areas are difficult to acquire because of the flow- and wind-induced perturbation at water surface. Thus, two Lucy–Richardson iterations are applied on an averaged image to obtain a deblurred image for gravel extraction. A Matlab code for multi-frame image averaging and image deblurring is implemented on a laptop computer. Underwater gravel images are acquired using a video camera and processed offline. Thus, the usability of the images acquired during field investigation cannot be determined immediately. However, returning to the investigated streams for additional data gathering would be costly, and the cameras may accidentally be dropped into the water. This paper presents multi-frame image averaging and image deblurring smartphone-based approaches for underwater gravel extraction. A waterproof smartphone is used to acquire the images, on which image deblurring is immediately conducted to test whether the images can be used for gravel extraction. The averaged image of using mean-based filter is derived during real-time image acquisition. The deblurred image is derived block-by-block because of limited memory capacity of smartphones. The time consumed for acquiring 1500 frame images with size of 1280 × 720 pixels is approximately 6 min by Sony Xperia smartphones. Image averaging can be performed in real time during image acquisition. Image deblurring is accomplished accurately and is consistent with results of the Matlab code. The processing time for image deblurring is approximately 12 min. A compact system for underwater gravel investigation using smartphones is successfully developed in this study. Image acquisition and deblurring are completed in real time at the investigated fields. Thus, we can immediately test whether the acquired images are usable for gravel extraction, thereby improving investigation efficiency significantly. 

  10. Automated Hierarchical Time Gain Compensation for In Vivo Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    2015-01-01

    Time gain compensation (TGC) is essential to ensure the optimal image quality of the clinical ultrasound scans. When large fluid collections are present within the scan plane, the attenuation distribution is changed drastically and TGC compensation becomes challenging. This paper presents an automated hierarchical TGC (AHTGC) algorithm that accurately adapts to the large attenuation variation between different types of tissues and structures. The algorithm relies on estimates of tissue attenuation, scattering strength, and noise level to gain a more quantitative understanding of the underlying tissue and the ultrasound signal strength. The proposed algorithm was applied to a set of 44 in vivo abdominal movie sequences each containing 15 frames. Matching pairs of in vivo sequences, unprocessed and processed with the proposed AHTGC were visualized side by side and evaluated by two radiologists in terms of image quality. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to evaluate whether radiologists preferred the processed sequences or the unprocessed data. The results indicate that the average visual analogue scale (VAS) is positive ( p-value: 2.34 × 10?13) and estimated to be 1.01 (95% CI: 0.85; 1.16) favoring the processed data with the proposed AHTGC algorithm.

  11. Monitoring of historical frescoes by timed infrared imaging analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadelano, G.; Bison, P.; Bortolin, A.; Ferrarini, G.; Peron, F.; Girotto, M.; Volinia, M.

    2015-03-01

    The subflorescence and efflorescence phenomena are widely acknowledged as the major causes of permanent damage to fresco wall paintings. They are related to the occurrence of cycles of dry/wet conditions inside the walls. Therefore, it is essential to identify the presence of water on the decorated surfaces and inside the walls. Nondestructive testing in industrial applications have confirmed that active infrared thermography with continuous timed images acquisition can improve the outcomes of thermal analysis aimed to moisture identification. In spite of that, in cultural heritage investigations these techniques have not been yet used extensively on a regular basis. This paper illustrates an application of these principles in order to evaluate the decay of fresco mural paintings in a medieval chapel located in North-West of Italy. One important feature of this study is the use of a robotic system called aIRview that can be utilized to automatically acquire and process thermal images. Multiple accurate thermal views of the inside walls of the building have been produced in a survey that lasted several days. Signal processing algorithms based on Fast Fourier Transform analysis have been applied to the acquired data in order to formulate trustworthy hypotheses about the deterioration mechanisms.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of time-varying magnetic fields from therapeutic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez-Garcia, Luis; Bhatia, Vivek; Prem-Kumar, Krishan; Ulfarsson, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    While magnetic resonance imaging of static magnetic fields generated by external probes has been previously demonstrated, there is an unmet need to image time-varying magnetic fields, such as those generated by transcranial magnetic stimulators or radiofrequency hyperthermia probes. A method to image such time-varying magnetic fields is introduced in this work. This article presents the theory behind the method and provides proof of concept by imaging time-varying magnetic fields generated by...

  13. Chern numbers hiding in time-of-flight images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a technique for detecting topological invariants--Chern numbers--from time-of-flight images of ultracold atoms. We show that the Chern numbers of integer quantum Hall states of lattice fermions leave their fingerprints in the atoms' momentum distribution. We analytically demonstrate that the number of local maxima in the momentum distribution is equal to the Chern number in two limiting cases, for large hopping anisotropy and in the continuum limit. In addition, our numerical simulations beyond these two limits show that these local maxima persist for a range of parameters. Thus, an everyday observable in cold atom experiments can serve as a useful tool to characterize and visualize quantum states with nontrivial topology.

  14. Cf-252 based neutron radiography using real-time image processing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For compact Cf-252 based neutron radiography, a real-time image processing system by particle counting technique has been developed. The electronic imaging system consists of a supersensitive imaging camera, a real-time corrector, a real-time binary converter, a real-time calculator for centroid, a display monitor and a computer. Three types of accumulated NR image; ordinary, binary and centroid images, can be observed during a measurement. Accumulated NR images were taken by the centroid mode, the binary mode and ordinary mode using of Cf-252 neutron source and those images were compared. The centroid mode presented the sharpest image and its statistical characteristics followed the Poisson distribution, while the ordinary mode showed the smoothest image as the averaging effect by particle bright spots with distributed brightness was most dominant. (author)

  15. L{sub 1/2} regularization based numerical method for effective reconstruction of bioluminescence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xueli, E-mail: xlchen@xidian.edu.cn, E-mail: jimleung@mail.xidian.edu.cn; Yang, Defu; Zhang, Qitan; Liang, Jimin, E-mail: xlchen@xidian.edu.cn, E-mail: jimleung@mail.xidian.edu.cn [School of Life Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Engineering Research Center of Molecular and Neuro Imaging, Ministry of Education (China)

    2014-05-14

    Even though bioluminescence tomography (BLT) exhibits significant potential and wide applications in macroscopic imaging of small animals in vivo, the inverse reconstruction is still a tough problem that has plagued researchers in a related area. The ill-posedness of inverse reconstruction arises from insufficient measurements and modeling errors, so that the inverse reconstruction cannot be solved directly. In this study, an l{sub 1/2} regularization based numerical method was developed for effective reconstruction of BLT. In the method, the inverse reconstruction of BLT was constrained into an l{sub 1/2} regularization problem, and then the weighted interior-point algorithm (WIPA) was applied to solve the problem through transforming it into obtaining the solution of a series of l{sub 1} regularizers. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method were demonstrated with numerical simulations on a digital mouse. Stability verification experiments further illustrated the robustness of the proposed method for different levels of Gaussian noise.

  16. Broad host range fluorescence and bioluminescence expression vectors for Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsi, Attila; Lawrence, Mark L

    2007-05-01

    Tagging of bacteria with living colors and living light allows increasingly valuable new imaging and detection technologies to be accessible to researchers. In this study, we aimed to create stable broad host range expression vectors for tagging Gram-negative bacteria with fluorescence and bioluminescence. To accomplish this, a mutated form of promoterless green fluorescent protein (gfp) gene, gfpmut3a, from Aequorea victoria and promoterless bacterial luciferase genes, luxCDABE, from Photorhabdus luminescens were inserted into broad host range plasmid pBBR1MCS4. Expression of gfp and luxCDABE genes was driven by lacZ promoter. In addition, dual versions with both gfpmut3a and luxCDABE genes and inducible versions carrying lacI(q) gene were also constructed. These new broad host range vectors containing a stable broad host range origin of replication and mobility genes can be transferred to Gram-negative bacteria by either electroporation or conjugal mating and maintained stably. Availability of these expression vectors should be useful in developing new approaches to study a broad variety of Gram-negative bacteria, particularly for applications investigating host-pathogen interactions in vivo and in vitro. PMID:17207855

  17. Visible light induced ocular delayed bioluminescence as a possible origin of negative afterimage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bókkon, I; Vimal, R L P; Wang, C; Dai, J; Salari, V; Grass, F; Antal, I

    2011-05-01

    The delayed luminescence of biological tissues is an ultraweak reemission of absorbed photons after exposure to external monochromatic or white light illumination. Recently, Wang, Bókkon, Dai and Antal (2011) [10] presented the first experimental proof of the existence of spontaneous ultraweak biophoton emission and visible light induced delayed ultraweak photon emission from in vitro freshly isolated rat's whole eye, lens, vitreous humor and retina. Here, we suggest that the photobiophysical source of negative afterimage can also occur within the eye by delayed bioluminescent photons. In other words, when we stare at a colored (or white) image for few seconds, external photons can induce excited electronic states within different parts of the eye that is followed by a delayed reemission of absorbed photons for several seconds. Finally, these reemitted photons can be absorbed by non-bleached photoreceptors that produce a negative afterimage. Although this suggests the photobiophysical source of negative afterimages is related retinal mechanisms, cortical neurons have also essential contribution in the interpretation and modulation of negative afterimages. PMID:21463953

  18. Molecular detection of bioluminescent dinoflagellates in surface waters of the Patagonian shelf during early austral summer 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiadi, Martha; Painter, Stuart C; Allen, John T; Balch, William M; Iglesias-Rodriguez, M Debora

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of bioluminescent dinoflagellates in the Patagonian Shelf region using "universal" PCR primers for the dinoflagellate luciferase gene. Luciferase gene sequences and single cell PCR tests, in conjunction with taxonomic identification by microscopy, allowed us to identify and quantify bioluminescent dinoflagellates. We compared these data to coincidental discrete optical measurements of stimulable bioluminescence intensity. Molecular detection of the luciferase gene showed that bioluminescent dinoflagellates were widespread across the majority of the Patagonian Shelf region. Their presence was comparatively underestimated by optical bioluminescence measurements, whose magnitude was affected by interspecific differences in bioluminescence intensity and by the presence of other bioluminescent organisms. Molecular and microscopy data showed that the complex hydrography of the area played an important role in determining the distribution and composition of dinoflagellate populations. Dinoflagellates were absent south of the Falkland Islands where the cold, nutrient-rich, and well-mixed waters of the Falklands Current favoured diatoms instead. Diverse populations of dinoflagellates were present in the warmer, more stratified waters of the Patagonian Shelf and Falklands Current as it warmed northwards. Here, the dinoflagellate population composition could be related to distinct water masses. Our results provide new insight into the prevalence of bioluminescent dinoflagellates in Patagonian Shelf waters and demonstrate that a molecular approach to the detection of bioluminescent dinoflagellates in natural waters is a promising tool for ecological studies of these organisms. PMID:24918444

  19. High-throughput viability assay using an autonomously bioluminescent cell line with a bacterial lux reporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Class, Bradley; Thorne, Natasha; Aguisanda, Francis; Southall, Noel; McKew, John C; Zheng, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Cell viability assays are extensively used to determine cell health, evaluate growth conditions, and assess compound cytotoxicity. Most existing assays are endpoint assays, in which data are collected at one time point after termination of the experiment. The time point at which toxicity of a compound is evident, however, depends on the mechanism of that compound. An ideal cell viability assay allows the determination of compound toxicity kinetically without having to terminate the assay prematurely. We optimized and validated a reagent-addition-free cell viability assay using an autoluminescent HEK293 cell line that stably expresses bacterial luciferase and all substrates necessary for bioluminescence. This cell viability assay can be used for real-time, long-term measurement of compound cytotoxicity in live cells with a signal-to-basal ratio of 20- to 200-fold and Z-factors of ~0.6 after 24-, 48- 72-, or 96-h incubation with compound. We also found that the potencies of nine cytotoxic compounds correlated well with those measured by four other commonly used cell viability assays. The results demonstrated that this kinetic cell viability assay using the HEK293(lux) autoluminescent cell line is useful for high-throughput evaluation of compound cytotoxicity. PMID:25447977

  20. Real-time deblurring of handshake blurred images on smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourreza-Shahri, Reza; Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser

    2015-02-01

    This paper discusses an Android app for the purpose of removing blur that is introduced as a result of handshakes when taking images via a smartphone. This algorithm utilizes two images to achieve deblurring in a computationally efficient manner without suffering from artifacts associated with deconvolution deblurring algorithms. The first image is the normal or auto-exposure image and the second image is a short-exposure image that is automatically captured immediately before or after the auto-exposure image is taken. A low rank approximation image is obtained by applying singular value decomposition to the auto-exposure image which may appear blurred due to handshakes. This approximation image does not suffer from blurring while incorporating the image brightness and contrast information. The eigenvalues extracted from the low rank approximation image are then combined with those from the shortexposure image. It is shown that this deblurring app is computationally more efficient than the adaptive tonal correction algorithm which was previously developed for the same purpose.

  1. High resolution, near real-time x-ray video imaging without image intensification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses a type of x-ray camera designed to generate standard RS-170 video output that does not use x-ray or optical image intensifiers. Instead, it employs a very sensitive, very high resolution, CCD sensor which views an x-ray-to-light conversion screen directly through a high speed imaging lens. This new solid state TV camera, which will be described later, has very low readout noise plus unusually high gain which enables it to generate real-time video with incident flux levels typical of many inspection applications. Perhaps more important is an ability to integrate for multiple frame intervals on the chip followed by the output of a standard, RS-170 format video frame containing two balanced interlaced fields. In this integrating mode excellent quality images of low contrast objects can be obtained with only a few tenths of a second integrating intervals. The basic elements of this type of camera will be described and applications discussed where this approach appears to have important advantages over other methods in common use. Also included is an analytical/numerical discussion which supports some of the important points

  2. Chern Numbers Hiding in Time of Flight Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satija, Indubala; Zhao, Erhai; Ghosh, Parag; Bray-Ali, Noah

    2011-03-01

    Since the experimental realization of synthetic magnetic fields in neural ultracold atoms, transport measurement such as quantized Hall conductivity remains an open challenge. Here we propose a novel and feasible scheme to measure the topological invariants, namely the chern numbers, in the time of flight images. We study both the commensurate and the incommensurate flux, with the later being the main focus here. The central concept underlying our proposal is the mapping between the chern numbers and the size of the dimerized states that emerge when the two-dimensional hopping is tuned to the highly anisotropic limit. In a uncoupled double quantum Hall system exhibiting time reversal invariance, only odd-sized dimer correlation functions are non-zero and hence encode quantized spin current. Finally, we illustrate that inspite of highly fragmented spectrum, a finite set of chern numbers are meaningful. Our results are supported by direct numerical computation of transverse conductivity. NBA acknowledges support from a National Research Council postdoctoral research associateship.

  3. Real time cork classification method: a colour image processing approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Jose?; Costa, Paulo

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an automatic vision assortment method for cork classification. Cork is a natural material that is used to seal wine bottles due to its reliability and its chemical and mechanical properties. A colour image acquisition system is able to differentiate some cork defects. The developed and implemented system acquires images using a colour linear CCD camera, transmits that image through a fast acquisition card and processes that image to extract quantitative elements. This ...

  4. Real-time computer-generated integral imaging and 3D image calibration for augmented reality surgical navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junchen; Suenaga, Hideyuki; Liao, Hongen; Hoshi, Kazuto; Yang, Liangjing; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Sakuma, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    Autostereoscopic 3D image overlay for augmented reality (AR) based surgical navigation has been studied and reported many times. For the purpose of surgical overlay, the 3D image is expected to have the same geometric shape as the original organ, and can be transformed to a specified location for image overlay. However, how to generate a 3D image with high geometric fidelity and quantitative evaluation of 3D image's geometric accuracy have not been addressed. This paper proposes a graphics processing unit (GPU) based computer-generated integral imaging pipeline for real-time autostereoscopic 3D display, and an automatic closed-loop 3D image calibration paradigm for displaying undistorted 3D images. Based on the proposed methods, a novel AR device for 3D image surgical overlay is presented, which mainly consists of a 3D display, an AR window, a stereo camera for 3D measurement, and a workstation for information processing. The evaluation on the 3D image rendering performance with 2560×1600 elemental image resolution shows the rendering speeds of 50-60 frames per second (fps) for surface models, and 5-8 fps for large medical volumes. The evaluation of the undistorted 3D image after the calibration yields sub-millimeter geometric accuracy. A phantom experiment simulating oral and maxillofacial surgery was also performed to evaluate the proposed AR overlay device in terms of the image registration accuracy, 3D image overlay accuracy, and the visual effects of the overlay. The experimental results show satisfactory image registration and image overlay accuracy, and confirm the system usability. PMID:25465067

  5. Time-resolved computed tomography of the liver: retrospective, multi-phase image reconstruction derived from volumetric perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess feasibility and image quality (IQ) of a new post-processing algorithm for retrospective extraction of an optimised multi-phase CT (time-resolved CT) of the liver from volumetric perfusion imaging. Sixteen patients underwent clinically indicated perfusion CT using 4D spiral mode of dual-source 128-slice CT. Three image sets were reconstructed: motion-corrected and noise-reduced (MCNR) images derived from 4D raw data; maximum and average intensity projections (time MIP/AVG) of the arterial/portal/portal-venous phases and all phases (total MIP/ AVG) derived from retrospective fusion of dedicated MCNR split series. Two readers assessed the IQ, detection rate and evaluation time; one reader assessed image noise and lesion-to-liver contrast. Time-resolved CT was feasible in all patients. Each post-processing step yielded a significant reduction of image noise and evaluation time, maintaining lesion-to-liver contrast. Time MIPs/AVGs showed the highest overall IQ without relevant motion artefacts and best depiction of arterial and portal/portal-venous phases respectively. Time MIPs demonstrated a significantly higher detection rate for arterialised liver lesions than total MIPs/AVGs and the raw data series. Time-resolved CT allows data from volumetric perfusion imaging to be condensed into an optimised multi-phase liver CT, yielding a superior IQ and higher detection rate for arterialised liver lesions than the raw data series. (orig.)

  6. Real-Time Colour Doppler Imaging for HIFU Therapy Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yang Mo; Zderic, Vesna; Managuli, Ravi; Vaezy, Shahram; Kim, Yongmin

    2005-03-01

    This study is an investigation of interference and blooming artifacts in real-time color Doppler imaging during High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy to improve the field of view (FOV) and distinguish blood vessels from the artifacts. It is hypothesized that the interference and blooming artifacts are caused by incoherent interference between HIFU and imaging signals and inertial cavitation/boiling, respectively. The incoherent interference shifts the tissue velocity estimates toward the Nyquist limits in standard autocorrelation-based estimation. The interference artifact is removed by applying a threshold according to the acceleration in tissue velocity estimation. The effects of inertial cavitation and/or boiling (i.e., broadband spectrum and high amplitude) in the blooming artifact are analyzed by measuring the standard deviation of phase differences, the average difference between adjacent eigenvalues and the average power. From in vivo rabbit experiments, due to its broadband spectrum, while the standard deviation of phase differences in the blooming artifact (0.0959 ± 0.0368 PRF) is significantly increased compared to the normal blood vessels (0.0078 ± 0.0013 PRF), the average difference between adjacent eigenvalues in the blooming artifact (-35.0 ± 8.6 dB) is moderately changed compared to those in the normal blood vessels (i.e., -58.6 ± 4.6 dB). The average power in the blooming artifact (i.e., 48.0 ± 12.7) is also increased compared to the normal blood vessels (i.e., 6.2 ± 1.2). This broadband and high amplitude signature could be utilized to remove this blooming artifact by thresholding after further investigation to distinguish the target blood vessel from the artifact.

  7. Real-time sono-photoacoustic imaging of gold nanoemulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, Bastien; Wei, Chen-Wei; Perez, Camilo; Lombardo, Michael; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Pozzo, Danilo; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Phase transition contrast agents were first introduced in ultrasound (US) in the form of perfluorocarbon droplets. When their size is reduced to the nanoscale, surface tension dominates their stability and high pressure is required to vaporize them using long US emissions at high frequencies. Our group recently showed that nanoemulsion beads (100-300 nm) coated with gold nanopsheres could be used as non-linear contrast agents. Beads can be vaporized with light only, inducing stronger photoacoustic signals by increasing thermal expansion. A photoacoustic cavitation threshold study (US: 1.2 MHz, Laser 750 nm and 10-ns pulse) shows that the vaporization thresholds of NEB-GNS can be greatly reduced using simultaneous light and US excitations. The resulting signal is driven only by the pressure amplitude for a fluence higher than 2.4 mJ/cm2. At diagnostic exposures, it is possible to capture very high signals from the vaporized beads at concentrations reduced to 10 pM with optical absorption smaller than 0.01 cm-1. A real-time imaging mode selectively isolating vaporization signals was implemented on a Verasonics system. A linear US probe (L74, 3 MHz) launched short US bursts before light was emitted from the laser. Vaporization of NEB-GNS resulted in a persistent 30-dB signal enhancement compared to a dye with the same absorption. Specific vaporization signals were retrieved in phantom experiments with US scatterers. This technique, called sonophotoacoustics, has great potential for targeted molecular imaging and therapy using compact nanoprobes with potentially high-penetrability into tissue.

  8. Statistical analysis of biophoton image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Susheng

    1998-08-01

    A photon count image system has been developed to obtain the ultra-weak bioluminescence image. The photon images of some plant, animal and human hand have been detected. The biophoton image is different from usual image. In this paper three characteristics of biophoton image are analyzed. On the basis of these characteristics the detected probability and detected limit of photon count image system, detected limit of biophoton image have been discussed. These researches provide scientific basis for experiments design and photon image processing.

  9. Evaluation of a bioluminescent mouse model expressing aromatase PII-promoter-controlled luciferase as a tool for the study of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dysfunction of the enzyme aromatase (CYP19) is associated with endocrine pathologies such as osteoporosis, impaired fertility and development of hormone-dependent cancers. Certain endocrine disrupting chemicals affect aromatase expression and activity in vitro, but little is known about their ability to do so in vivo. We evaluated a bioluminescent mouse model (LPTA (registered) )CD-1-Tg(Cyp19-luc)-Xen) expressing luciferase under control of the gonadal aromatase pII promoter as an in vivo screening tool for chemicals that may affect aromatase expression. We studied the effects of forskolin, pregnant mare serum gonadotropin and atrazine in this model (atrazine was previously shown to induced pII-promoter-driven aromatase expression in H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells). About 2-4 out of every group of 10 male or female Cyp19-luc mice injected i.p. with 10 mg/kg forskolin had increased gonadal bioluminescence after 3-5 days compared to controls; the others appeared non-responsive. Similarly, about 4 per group of 9 individual females injected with pregnant mare serum gonadotropin had increased ovarian bioluminescence after 24 h. There was a statistically significant correlation between ovarian bioluminescence and plasma estradiol concentrations (n = 14; p = 0.022). Males exposed to a single dose of 100 mg/kg or males and females exposed to 5 daily injections of 30 mg/kg atrazine showed no change in gonadal bioluminescence over a 7 day period, but a significant ie over a 7 day period, but a significant interaction was found between atrazine (100 mg/kg) and time in female mice (p < 0.05; two-way ANOVA). Ex vivo luciferase activity in dissected organs was increased by forskolin in testis, epididymis and ovaries. Atrazine (30 mg/kg/day) increased (30%) luciferase activity significantly in epididymis only. In conclusion, certain individual Cyp19-luc mice are highly responsive to aromatase inducers, suggesting this model, with further optimization, may have potential as an in vivo screening tool for environmental contaminants.

  10. When should we recommend use of dual time-point and delayed time-point imaging techniques in FDG PET?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Gang [Philadelphia VA Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Torigian, Drew A.; Alavi, Abass [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Zhuang, Hongming [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2013-05-15

    FDG PET and PET/CT are now widely used in oncological imaging for tumor characterization, staging, restaging, and response evaluation. However, numerous benign etiologies may cause increased FDG uptake indistinguishable from that of malignancy. Multiple studies have shown that dual time-point imaging (DTPI) of FDG PET may be helpful in differentiating malignancy from benign processes. However, exceptions exist, and some studies have demonstrated significant overlap of FDG uptake patterns between benign and malignant lesions on delayed time-point images. In this review, we summarize our experience and opinions on the value of DTPI and delayed time-point imaging in oncology, with a review of the relevant literature. We believe that the major value of DTPI and delayed time-point imaging is the increased sensitivity due to continued clearance of background activity and continued FDG accumulation in malignant lesions, if the same diagnostic criteria (as in the initial standard single time-point imaging) are used. The specificity of DTPI and delayed time-point imaging depends on multiple factors, including the prevalence of malignancies, the patient population, and the cut-off values (either SUV or retention index) used to define a malignancy. Thus, DTPI and delayed time-point imaging would be more useful if performed for evaluation of lesions in regions with significant background activity clearance over time (such as the liver, the spleen, the mediastinum), and if used in the evaluation of the extent of tumor involvement rather than in the characterization of the nature of any specific lesion. Acute infectious and non-infectious inflammatory lesions remain as the major culprit for diminished diagnostic performance of these approaches (especially in tuberculosis-endemic regions). Tumor heterogeneity may also contribute to inconsistent performance of DTPI. The authors believe that selective use of DTPI and delayed time-point imaging will improve diagnostic accuracy and interpretation confidence in FDG PET imaging. (orig.)

  11. Time-lapse imaging of neural development: Zebrafish lead the way into the fourth dimension

    OpenAIRE

    Rieger, Sandra; Wang, Fang; Sagasti, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    Time-lapse imaging is often the only way to appreciate fully the many dynamic cell movements critical to neural development. Zebrafish possess many advantages that make them the best vertebrate model organism for live imaging of dynamic development events. This review will discuss technical considerations of time-lapse imaging experiments in zebrafish, describe selected examples of imaging studies in zebrafish that revealed new features or principles of neural development, and consider the pr...

  12. A Photoacoustic Imaging System with Optimized Real-Time Parallel Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomedical photoacoustic tomography (PAT) provides anatomical, functional, metabolic, molecular, and genetic contrasts of vasculature, hemodynamics, oxygen metabolism, biomarkers, and gene expression. These attributes bring PAT to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. We report the development of a real-time PAT imaging system, which integrates signal scanning, image reconstruction and displaying photoacoustic images in real time. An optimized back projection algorithm for PAT imaging is proposed and tested on a latest graphics process unit based card. The whole system is built and tested in an experiment for monitoring moving blood events to validate the real-time performance of this system to image moving events

  13. Image-driven cardiac left ventricle segmentation for the evaluation of multiview fused real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography images.

    OpenAIRE

    Rajpoot, K.; Noble, Ja; Grau, V.; Szmigielski, C.; Becher, H.

    2009-01-01

    Real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE) permits the acquisition and visualization of the beating heart in 3D. Despite a number of efforts to automate the left ventricle (LV) delineation from RT3DE images, this remains a challenging problem due to the poor nature of the acquired images usually containing missing anatomical information and high speckle noise. Recently, there have been efforts to improve image quality and anatomical definition by acquiring multiple single-view RT3DE ima...

  14. Development of Real-Time Image Processing Algorithm on the Positions of Multi-Object in an Image Plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is concentrated on the development of high speed multi-object image processing algorithm in real time. Recently, the use of vision system is rapidly increasing in inspection and robot's position control. To apply the vision system, it is necessary to transform the physical coordinate of object into the image information acquired by CCD camera. Thus, to use the application of the vision system to the inspection and robot's position control in real time, we have to know the position of object in the image plane. Particularly, in case of rigid body using multi-cue to identify its shape, the each position of multi-cue must be calculated in an image plane at the same time. To solve these problems, the image processing algorithm on the position of multi-cue is developed

  15. Improving the Image Quality of Synthetic Transmit Aperture Ultrasound Images - Achieving Real-Time In-Vivo Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Gammelmark, Kim

    2006-01-01

    Synthetic transmit aperture (STA) imaging has the potential to increase the image quality of medical ultrasound images beyond the levels obtained by conventional imaging techniques (linear, phased, and convex array imaging). Currently, however, in-vivo applications of STA imaging is limited by a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), due to the application of a single transducer element at each emission, and higher susceptibility to tissue motion, produced by the summation of sequent...

  16. High time-resolution sprite imaging: observations and implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H C [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 903 Koyukuk Drive, Fairbanks, Ak 99775-7320 (United States); McHarg, M G [Department of Physics, 2354 Fairchild Drive, Suite 2A31, US Air Force Academy, CO 80840 (United States)], E-mail: hnielsen@gi.alaska.edu, E-mail: matthew.mcharg@usafa.edu

    2008-12-07

    Sprites are large scale manifestations of electrical streamers triggered in the upper atmosphere by lightning in an underlying thunderstorm. Imaging of sprites at 10 000 frames per second has provided new insights into their spatial and temporal development. In this paper we discuss the experimental protocols that have been developed for performing high-speed observations of sprites and some new observations that have been obtained of relevance to laboratory experiments. Downward tendrils and upward branches, so characteristic in video recordings, are shown to be formed by very fast streamer heads with velocities up to half the speed of light. The streamer heads are spatially small, {approx}100 m or less, but very bright with emission rates up to {approx}10{sup 24} photons s{sup -1}. The sprite onset begins with a downward streamer. Then, in some sprites, at a little later time and from a lower altitude upward moving streamer heads may also appear. If there are no upward streamers the sprite would be classified as a 'C-sprite'; with both downward and upward streamers it would be a 'carrot sprite'. The optical emissions are primarily from the neutral molecular nitrogen first positive bands emitting in the near-infrared, but there are also blue emissions assumed to be from second positive bands of molecular nitrogen and from first negative bands of nitrogen ions. The streamer heads are observed at times to split into several streamer heads. This process appears to be more frequent in the core of larger sprites.

  17. Super resolution of time-lapse seismic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarantonello, Sergio E.; Smithson, Bonnie; Quan, Youli

    2011-06-01

    We present results of an on-going project to assess the applicability in reflection seismology of emerging super resolution techniques pioneered in digital photography. Our approach involves: (1) construction of a forward model connecting low resolution seismic images to high resolution ones, and (2) solution of a Tikhonov-regularized ill conditioned optimization problem to construct a high resolution image from several lower resolution counterparts; the high and low resolution images derived, respectively, from dense and sparse seismic surveys.

  18. Bioluminescent bacteria: lux genes as environmental biosensors / Bactérias bioluminescentes: os genes lux como biosensores ambientais

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Vânia da Silva, Nunes-Halldorson; Norma Letícia, Duran.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Bactérias que emitem bioluminescência são amplamente distribuídas em ambientes naturais. Ao longo dos anos vários pesquisadores vêm estudando a fisiologia, bioquímica e controle genético da bioluminescência. Essas descobertas têm revolucionado a Área de Microbiologia Ambiental através da utilização [...] dos genes lux como biosensores em estudos ambientais. Esta revisão examinará a cronologia de descobertas científicas da bioluminescência bacteriana e as aplicações atuais em estudos ambientais, salientando a utilização do teste de toxicidade Microtox. A significância ecológica da bioluminescência será também examinada. Abstract in english Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminesce [...] nt genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in environmental studies, with special emphasis on the Microtox toxicity bioassay. Also, the general ecological significance of bioluminescence will be addressed.

  19. Bioluminescent bacteria: lux genes as environmental biosensors Bactérias bioluminescentes: os genes lux como biosensores ambientais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia da Silva Nunes-Halldorson

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescent bacteria are widespread in natural environments. Over the years, many researchers have been studying the physiology, biochemistry and genetic control of bacterial bioluminescence. These discoveries have revolutionized the area of Environmental Microbiology through the use of luminescent genes as biosensors for environmental studies. This paper will review the chronology of scientific discoveries on bacterial bioluminescence and the current applications of bioluminescence in environmental studies, with special emphasis on the Microtox toxicity bioassay. Also, the general ecological significance of bioluminescence will be addressed.Bactérias que emitem bioluminescência são amplamente distribuídas em ambientes naturais. Ao longo dos anos vários pesquisadores vêm estudando a fisiologia, bioquímica e controle genético da bioluminescência. Essas descobertas têm revolucionado a Área de Microbiologia Ambiental através da utilização dos genes lux como biosensores em estudos ambientais. Esta revisão examinará a cronologia de descobertas científicas da bioluminescência bacteriana e as aplicações atuais em estudos ambientais, salientando a utilização do teste de toxicidade Microtox. A significância ecológica da bioluminescência será também examinada.

  20. Real Time Deconvolution of In-Vivo Ultrasound Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, JØrgen Arendt

    2013-01-01

    The axial resolution in medical ultrasound is directly linked to the emitted ultrasound frequency, which, due to tissue attenuation, is selected based on the depth of scanning. The resolution is etermined by the transducers impulse response, which limits the attainable resolution to be between one and two wavelengths. This can be improved by deconvolution, which increase the bandwidth and equalizes the phase to increase resolution under the constraint of the electronic noise in the received signal. A fixed interval Kalman filter based deconvolution routine written in C is employed. It uses a state based model for the ultrasound pulse and can include a depth varying pulse and spatially varying signal-to-noise ration. An autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model of orders 8 and 9 is used for the pulse, and the ARMA parameters are determined as a function of depth using a minimum variance algorithm using averaging over several RF lines. In vivo data from a 3 MHz mechanically rotating probe is used and the received signal is sampled at 20 MHz and 12 bits. In-vivo data acquired from a 16th week old fetus is used along with a scan from the liver and right kidney of a 27 years old male. The axial resolution has been determined from the in-vivo liver image using the auto-covariance function. From the envelope of the estimated pulse the axial resolution at Full-Width-Half-Max is 0.581 mm corresponding to 1.13 l at 3 MHz. The algorithm increases the resolution to 0.116 mm or 0.227 l corresponding to a factor of 5.1. The basic pulse can be estimated in roughly 0.176 seconds on a single CPU core on an Intel i5 CPU running at 1.8 GHz. An in-vivo image consisting of 100 lines of 1600 samples can be processed in roughly 0.1 seconds making it possible to perform real-time deconvolution on ultrasound data by using dual or quad core CPUs for frame-rates of 20-40 Hz.

  1. An Embedded System of Real-Time Acquisition and Display of Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Peng

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a design of an embedded system which based on CPLD (Complex Programmable Logic Device and only one chip of SRAM (Static RAM in order to acquire and display the images real-time. The system uses Omni Vision’s CMOS color image sensor OV7725 as the image acquisition chip and a 5.6-inch TFT-LCD (Thin Film Transistor Liquid Crystal Display, 18bit (RGB666 colors with resolution of 640 × 480 pixels, to display the images real-time, and the device of CPLD (EPM7160E to control the timing, image format conversion, and TFT-LCD drive signal. At the same time the embedded system use one chip of SRAM as a cache memory to save an image quickly. The experimental results show that the system designed, with high practical value but less hardware, is easy to capture and display the images stably.

  2. SU-E-T-20: A Novel Hybrid CBCT, Bioluminescence and Fluorescence Tomography System for Preclinical Radiation Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A novel standalone bioluminescence and fluorescence tomography (BLT and FT) system equipped with high resolution CBCT has been built in our group. In this work, we present the system calibration method and validate our system in both phantom and in vivo environment. Methods: The CBCT is acquired by rotating the animal stage while keeping the x-ray source and detector panel static. The optical signal is reflected by the 3-mirror system to a multispectral filter set and then delivered to the CCD camera with f/1.4 lens mounted. Nine fibers passing through the stage and in contact with the mouse skin serve as the light sources for diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and FT. The anatomical information and optical properties acquired from the CBCT and DOT, respectively, are used as the priori information to improve the BLT/FT reconstruction accuracy. Flat field correction for the optical system was acquired at multiple wavelengths. A home-built phantom is used to register the optical and CBCT coordinates. An absolute calibration relating the CCD photon counts rate to the light fluence rate emitted at animal surface was developed to quantify the bioluminescence power or fluorophore concentration. Results: An optical inhomogeneous phantom with 2 light sources (3mm separation) imbedded is used to test the system. The optical signal is mapped onto the mesh generated from CBCT for optical reconstruction. Our preliminary results show that the center of mass can be reconstructed within 2.8mm accuracy. A live mouse with the light source imbedded is also used to validate our system. Liver or lung metastatic luminescence tumor model will be used for further testing. Conclusion: This hybrid system transforms preclinical research to a level that even sub-palpable volume of cells can be imaged rapidly and non-invasively, which largely extends the scope of radiobiological research. The research is supported by the NCI grant R01CA158100-01

  3. SU-E-T-20: A Novel Hybrid CBCT, Bioluminescence and Fluorescence Tomography System for Preclinical Radiation Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, B; Eslami, S; Iordachita, I [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Yang, Y [University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Patterson, M [Hamilton Regional Cancer Ctr., Hamilton, ON (Canada); Wong, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, K [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A novel standalone bioluminescence and fluorescence tomography (BLT and FT) system equipped with high resolution CBCT has been built in our group. In this work, we present the system calibration method and validate our system in both phantom and in vivo environment. Methods: The CBCT is acquired by rotating the animal stage while keeping the x-ray source and detector panel static. The optical signal is reflected by the 3-mirror system to a multispectral filter set and then delivered to the CCD camera with f/1.4 lens mounted. Nine fibers passing through the stage and in contact with the mouse skin serve as the light sources for diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and FT. The anatomical information and optical properties acquired from the CBCT and DOT, respectively, are used as the priori information to improve the BLT/FT reconstruction accuracy. Flat field correction for the optical system was acquired at multiple wavelengths. A home-built phantom is used to register the optical and CBCT coordinates. An absolute calibration relating the CCD photon counts rate to the light fluence rate emitted at animal surface was developed to quantify the bioluminescence power or fluorophore concentration. Results: An optical inhomogeneous phantom with 2 light sources (3mm separation) imbedded is used to test the system. The optical signal is mapped onto the mesh generated from CBCT for optical reconstruction. Our preliminary results show that the center of mass can be reconstructed within 2.8mm accuracy. A live mouse with the light source imbedded is also used to validate our system. Liver or lung metastatic luminescence tumor model will be used for further testing. Conclusion: This hybrid system transforms preclinical research to a level that even sub-palpable volume of cells can be imaged rapidly and non-invasively, which largely extends the scope of radiobiological research. The research is supported by the NCI grant R01CA158100-01.

  4. Evaluation and application of a bioluminescent bacterial genotoxicity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, T S; Stahr, H M

    1993-01-01

    The Mutatox test (commercial name for the bioluminescent bacterial genotoxicity test) has been shown to be a good alternative to the Ames test. The test uses dark mutants of luminous bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) and determines the ability of various genotoxic agents to restore the luminescence by inducing mutation. It provides a rapid screening test which can be used to assay the genotoxicity of large numbers of pure and complex compounds. The test is completed in 1 day, and by serially diluting the compound, dose response data plus toxicity data can be generated for a number of samples simultaneously. For the direct assay (without exogenous metabolic activation), the positive controls selected were 3,6-diaminoacridine (proflavine) and N-methyl-N-nitro-nitrosoguanidine. For the S-9 assay, which incorporated the microsome fraction (S-9) from rat liver as an exogenous metabolic activation system, the positive controls selected were aflatoxin B1 and benzo(a)pyrene. This study also indicated that methyl-imidazo-quinoline and tryptophan pyrolysates were genotoxic in the presence of S-9 activation, aflatoxin B1 epoxide and fumonisin B1 showed direct genotoxic activity, and aflatoxin B2 and ochratoxin A were not genotoxic. PMID:8374332

  5. Real-time and Portable Microwave Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasr, Mohammed Tayeb

    2009-01-01

    Microwave and millimeter wave imaging has shown tremendous utility in a wide variety of applications. These techniques are primarily based on measuring coherent electric field distribution on the target being imaged. Mechanically scanned systems are the simple and low cost solution in microwave imaging. However, these systems are typically bulky and slow. This dissertation presents a design for a 2D switched imaging array that utilizes modulated scattering techniques for spatial multiplexing of the signal. The system was designed to be compact, coherent, possessing high dynamic range, and capable of video frame rate imaging. Various aspects of the system design were optimized to achieve the design objectives. The 2D imaging system as designed and described in this dissertation utilized PIN diode loaded resonant elliptical slot antennas as array elements. The slot antennas allow for incorporating the switching into the antennas thus reducing the cost and size of the array. Furthermore, these slots are integrated in a simple low loss waveguide network. Moreover, the sensitivity and dynamic range of this system is improved by utilizing a custom designed heterodyne receiver and matched filter. This dissertation also presents an analysis on the properties of this system. The performance of the multiplexing scheme, the noise floor and the dynamic range of the receivers are investigated. Furthermore, sources of errors such as mutual coupling and array response dispersion are also investigated. Finally, utilizing this imaging system for various applications such as 2D electric field mapping, scatterer localization, and nondestructive imaging is demonstrated.

  6. Space-time encoding for high frame rate ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misaridis, Thanssis; Jensen, JØrgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    Frame rate in ultrasound imaging can be dramatically increased by using sparse synthetic transmit aperture (STA) beamforming techniques. The two main drawbacks of the method are the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the motion artifacts, that degrade the image quality. In this paper we propose a spatio-temporal encoding for STA imaging based on simultaneous transmission of two quasi-orthogonal tapered linear FM signals. The excitation signals are an up- and a down-chirp with frequency division and a cross-talk of ?55 dB. The received signals are first cross-correlated with the appropriate code, then spatially decoded and finally beamformed for each code, yielding two images per emission. The spatial encoding is a Hadamard encoding previously suggested by Chiao et al. [in: Proceedings of the IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, 1997, p. 1679]. The Hadamard matrix has half the size of the transmit element groups, due to the orthogonality of the temporal encoded wavefronts. Thus, with this method, the frame rate is doubled compared to previous systems. Another advantage is the utilization of temporal codes which are more robust to attenuation. With the proposed technique it is possible to obtain images dynamically focused in both transmit and receive with only two firings. This reduces the problem of motion artifacts. The method has been tested with extensive simulations using Field II. Resolution and SNR are compared with uncoded STA imaging and conventional phased-array imaging. The range resolution remains the same for coded STA imaging with four emissions and is slightly degraded for STA imaging with two emissions due to the ?55 dB cross-talk between the signals. The additional proposed temporal encoding adds more than 15 dB on the SNR gain, yielding a SNR at the same order as in phased-array imaging.

  7. Distribution of bioluminescent organisms in the Mediterranean Sea and predicted effects on a deep-sea neutrino telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The density of bioluminescent organisms was measured using an ISIT camera profiler in the eastern and western Mediterranean, from the subsurface layer to the seafloor; in the Ligurian, Tyrrhenian, Ionian, Adriatic Seas and the Strait of Sicily, including neutrino telescope sites at ANTARES and NESTOR. A west-east gradient in the density of bioluminescent animals in deep water (1500-2500 m) was observed, with the average density in the Ligurian (ANTARES) Sea (0.65±0.13 m-3) an order of magnitude greater than the E Ionian (NESTOR) Sea (0.06±0.04 m-3). Additionally, an exponential relationship was found between the density of near-bed bioluminescence (0-400 mab) and depth, with greatest divergence from the trend at the extreme west and easterly sites. For small scale effects we applied flash kinetics of bioluminescent organisms to map the bioluminescent field around a sphere; we predict most light emission downstream of an optical module.

  8. Visualizing real-time influenza virus infection, transmission and protection in ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Erik A; Meliopoulos, Victoria A; Savage, Chandra; Livingston, Brandi; Mehle, Andrew; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Influenza transmission efficiency in ferrets is vital for risk-assessment studies. However, the inability to monitor viral infection and transmission dynamics in real time only provides a glimpse into transmissibility. Here we exploit a replication-competent influenza reporter virus to investigate dynamics of infection/transmission in ferrets. Bioluminescent imaging of ferrets infected with A/California/04/2009 H1N1 virus (CA/09) encoding NanoLuc (NLuc) luciferase provides the first real-time snapshot of influenza infection/transmission. Luminescence in the respiratory tract and in less well-characterized extra-pulmonary sites is observed, and imaging identifies infections in animals that would have otherwise been missed by traditional methods. Finally, the reporter virus significantly increases the speed and sensitivity of virological and serological assays. Thus, bioluminescent imaging of influenza infections rapidly determines intra-host dissemination, inter-host transmission and viral load, revealing infection dynamics and pandemic potential of the virus. These results have important implications for antiviral drug susceptibility, vaccine efficacy, transmissibility and pathogenicity studies. PMID:25744559

  9. FPGA Implementation of Discrete-Time Neuronal Network for Dynamic Image Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Ken'ichi; Musashi, Mio; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya

    We have developed a discrete-time dynamical system for dynamic image segmentation. It consists of a global inhibitor and modified chaotic neurons that can generate oscillatory responses. Dynamic image segmentation is performed using its oscillatory responses. This letter presents an implementation of our system in a field programmable gate array (FPGA) device and a successful result of dynamic image segmentation.

  10. VISTA - A Constellation for Real Time Regional Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerman, Max; Boland, Lee; da Silva Curiel, Alex; Sweeting, Martin, , Sir

    2002-01-01

    The role of satellites in medium and high-resolution reconnaissance of the Earth's surface has been well demonstrated in recent years through missions such as Landsat, SPOT, IKONOS, ImageSat and Quickbird. The market for such data products is well served and likely to become more competitive with further very-high-resolution missions. Whereas commercial markets have concentrated on enhancing resolution, the small satellite sector has concentrated on reducing the cost of data products, and the development of systems providing niche services. One such EO requirement that can be well met by smaller satellites is the need for higher temporal resolution, as this typically requires a large number of satellites to operate as a constellation - thus far financially impractical using conventional EO satellites. Surrey is currently engaged in building its first constellation that will provide daily global coverage at moderate resolution (32-metre GSD and 600km swath) in three spectral bands. Targeted at providing timely quick-look data products for disaster mitigation and monitoring, the constellation comprises 7 satellites in a single orbital plane. Each satellite has a wide swath so that successive satellites progressively cover the entire globe in a single day. The Vista constellation takes this concept a step further, and is proposed for applications requiring near-continuous surveillance of regional activity. By introducing a multiple plane constellation of small Earth observation satellites, it is possible to monitor continuously selected regions anywhere on the globe. The paper describes the system trades and outlines the scope of the performance that could be obtained from such a system. A cost model illustrates that the balance between launch and space segment costs must be reached by considering suitable replacement strategies, and that the system is highly sensitive to requirement creep. Finally, it is shown that the use of cost effective, small satellites leads to solutions previously thought to be financially beyond sensible reach.

  11. Self-illuminating quantum dots for highly sensitive in vivo real-time luminescent mapping of sentinel lymph nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Q

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Qiang Wu, Maoquan ChuSchool of Life Science and Technology, Tongji University, Shanghai, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Quantum dots (QDs show promise as novel nanomaterials for sentinel lymph node (SLN mapping through their use in noninvasive in vivo fluorescence imaging, and they have provided remarkable results. However, in vivo fluorescence imaging has limitations mainly reflected in the strong autofluorescence and low deepness of tissue penetration associated with this technique. Here, we report on the first use of self-illuminating QDs for mouse axillary SLN mapping by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, which was found to overcome these limitations. We used CdTe/CdS QDs synthesized in aqueous solution to conjugate a mutant of the bioluminescent protein, Renilla reniformis luciferase. The nanobioconjugates obtained had an average hydrodynamic diameter of 19 nm, and their luminescence catalyzed by the substrate (coelenterazine could penetrate into at least 20 mm of hairless pigskin, which could be observed using an in vivo imaging system equipped with a 700 nm emission filter. Conversely, the fluorescence of the nanobioconjugates penetrated no more than 10 mm of pigskin and was observed with a strong background. When 80 µL of the nanobioconjugates (containing about 0.5 µmol/L of QDs and 5 µL of coelenterazine (1 µg/µL were intradermally injected into a mouse paw, the axillary SLN could be imaged in real time without external excitation, and little background interference was detected. Furthermore, the decayed luminescence of QD-Luc8 in SLNs could be recovered after being intradermally reinjected with the coelenterazine. Our data showed that using self-illuminating QDs, as opposed to fluorescence QDs, has greatly enhanced sensitivity in SLN mapping, and that the SLN could be identified synchronously by the luminescence and fluorescence of the self-illuminating QDs.Keywords: self-illuminating quantum dots, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, sentinel lymph node, mapping, sensitivity

  12. Characterization of an anthraquinone fluor from the bioluminescent, pelagic polychaete Tomopteris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Warren R; Powers, Meghan L; Haddock, Steven H D

    2014-12-01

    Tomopteris is a cosmopolitan genus of polychaetes. Many species produce yellow luminescence in the parapodia when stimulated. Yellow bioluminescence is rare in the ocean, and the components of this luminescent reaction have not been identified. Only a brief description, half a century ago, noted fluorescence in the parapodia with a remarkably similar spectrum to the bioluminescence, which suggested that it may be the luciferin or terminal light-emitter. Here, we report the isolation of the fluorescent yellow-orange pigment found in the luminous exudate and in the body of the animals. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed the mass to be 270 m/z with a molecular formula of C(15)H(10)O(5), which ultimately was shown to be aloe-emodin, an anthraquinone previously found in plants. We speculate that aloe-emodin could be a factor for resonant-energy transfer or the oxyluciferin for Tomopteris bioluminescence. PMID:24760626

  13. Regulated bioluminescence as a tool for bioremediation process monitoring and control of bacterial cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlage, Robert S.; Heitzer, Armin; Digrazia, Philip M.

    1991-01-01

    An effective on-line monitoring technique for toxic waste bioremediation using bioluminescent microorganisms has shown great potential for the description and optimization of biological processes. The lux genes of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri are used by this species to produce visible light. The lux genes can be genetically fused to the control region of a catabolic gene, with the result that bioluminescence is produced whenever the catabolic gene is induced. Thus the detection of light from a sample indicates that genetic expression from a specific gene is occurring. This technique was used to monitor biodegradation of specific contaminants from waste sites. For these studies, fusions between the lux genes and the operons for naphthalene and toluene/xylene degradation were constructed. Strains carrying one of these fusions respond sensitively and specifically to target substrates. Bioluminescence from these cultures can be rapidly measured in a nondestructive and noninvasive manner. The potential for this technique in this and other biological systems is discussed.

  14. Off-axis quantitative phase imaging processing using CUDA: toward real-time applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hoa; Ding, Huafeng; Sobh, Nahil; Do, Minh; Patel, Sanjay; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-07-01

    We demonstrate real time off-axis Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI) using a phase reconstruction algorithm based on NVIDIA's CUDA programming model. The phase unwrapping component is based on Goldstein's algorithm. By mapping the process of extracting phase information and unwrapping to GPU, we are able to speed up the whole procedure by more than 18.8× with respect to CPU processing and ultimately achieve video rate for mega-pixel images. Our CUDA implementation also supports processing of multiple images simultaneously. This enables our imaging system to support high speed, high throughput, and real-time image acquisition and visualization. PMID:21750757

  15. Optimal scan timing of hepatic arterial-phase imaging of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma determined by multiphasic fast CT imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: A new multiphasic fast imaging technique, known as volume helical shuttle technique, is a breakthrough for liver imaging that offers new clinical opportunities in dynamic blood flow studies. This technique enables virtually real-time hemodynamics assessment by shuttling the patient cradle back and forth during serial scanning. Purpose: To determine optimal scan timing of hepatic arterial-phase imaging for detecting hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with maximum tumor-to-liver contrast by volume helical shuttle technique. Material and Methods: One hundred and one hypervascular HCCs in 50 patients were prospectively studied by 64-channel multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) with multiphasic fast imaging technique. Contrast medium containing 600 mg iodine per kg body weight was intravenously injected for 30 s. Six seconds after the contrast arrival in the abdominal aorta detected with bolus tracking, serial 12-phase imaging of the whole liver was performed during 24-s breath-holding with multiphasic fast imaging technique during arterial phase. By placing regions of interest in the abdominal aorta, portal vein, liver parenchyma, and hypervascular HCCs on the multiphase images, time-density curves of anatomical regions and HCCs were composed. Timing of maximum tumor-to-liver contrast after the contrast arrival in the abdominal aorta was determined. Results: For the detection of hypervascular HCC at arterial phase, mean time and value of maxirterial phase, mean time and value of maximum tumor-to-liver contrast after the contrast arrival were 21 s and 38.0 HU, respectively. Conclusion: Optimal delay time for the hepatic arterial-phase imaging maximizing the contrast enhancement of hypervascular HCCs was 21 s after arrival of contrast medium in the abdominal aorta

  16. The Storm-Time Plasmasphere by IMAGE/EUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    With the availability of routine global images of the plasmasphere from the IMAGE Mission Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUV), we now have a growing body of observations that both characterize and quantify the dynamics of the plasmasphere. Direct interactions of the plasmasphere with the ring current and indirect interaction through localized electric fields appear to be the cause of a complex array of structures in the spatial distribution of thermal plasma. This presentation will show those features in detail and discuss possible mechanisms for their cause.

  17. Quantitative Characterization of Super-Resolution Infrared Imaging Based on Time-Varying Focal Plane Coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, J.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y.

    2014-10-01

    High resolution infrared image has been the goal of an infrared imaging system. In this paper, a super-resolution infrared imaging method using time-varying coded mask is proposed based on focal plane coding and compressed sensing theory. The basic idea of this method is to set a coded mask on the focal plane of the optical system, and the same scene could be sampled many times repeatedly by using time-varying control coding strategy, the super-resolution image is further reconstructed by sparse optimization algorithm. The results of simulation are quantitatively evaluated by introducing the Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), which illustrate that the effect of compressed measurement coefficient r and coded mask resolution m on the reconstructed image quality. Research results show that the proposed method will promote infrared imaging quality effectively, which will be helpful for the practical design of new type of high resolution ! infrared imaging systems.

  18. Contribution of Reflection Terahertz Time Domain-Imaging (THz-TDI) to Imaging Analysis of Artworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Fukunaga, Kaori

    Different kind s of artefacts (easel painting, panel paintings and Asian lacquerwares) have been scanned by THz - TDI and results have been compared with those obtained by others standard imaging techniques (x-ray radiography, cross sectional imaging, technical photography) .

  19. An approach to a pseudo real-time image processing engine for hyperspectral imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Abed Abedniya; Sahar Sabbaghi Mahmouei; Dr. Shattri Mansor

    2010-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging provides an alternative way of increasing the accuracy by adding another dimension: the wavelength. Recently, hyperspectral imaging is also finding its way into many more applications, ranging from medical imaging in endoscopy for cancer detection to quality control in the sorting of fruit and vegetables. But effective use of hyperspectral imaging requires an understanding of the nature and limitations of the data and of various strategies for processing and interpreting...

  20. Rad Hard Imaging Array with Picosecond Timing Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For a wide range of remote sensing applications, there is a critical need to develop imaging arrays that simultaneously achieve high spatial resolution, high...

  1. A fiducial detection algorithm for real-time image guided IMRT based on simultaneous MV and kV imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantage of highly conformal dose techniques such as 3DCRT and IMRT is limited by intrafraction organ motion. A new approach to gain near real-time 3D positions of internally implanted fiducial markers is to analyze simultaneous onboard kV beam and treatment MV beam images (from fluoroscopic or electronic portal image devices). Before we can use this real-time image guidance for clinical 3DCRT and IMRT treatments, four outstanding issues need to be addressed. (1) How will fiducial motion blur the image and hinder tracking fiducials? kV and MV images are acquired while the tumor is moving at various speeds. We find that a fiducial can be successfully detected at a maximum linear speed of 1.6 cm/s. (2) How does MV beam scattering affect kV imaging? We investigate this by varying MV field size and kV source to imager distance, and find that common treatment MV beams do not hinder fiducial detection in simultaneous kV images. (3) How can one detect fiducials on images from 3DCRT and IMRT treatment beams when the MV fields are modified by a multileaf collimator (MLC)? The presented analysis is capable of segmenting a MV field from the blocking MLC and detecting visible fiducials. This enables the calculation of nearly real-time 3D positions of markers during a real treatment. (4) Is the analysis fast enough to track fiducials in nearly real time? Multiple methods are adopted to predict marker positions and reduce search regions. The average detection time per frame fos. The average detection time per frame for three markers in a 1024x768 image was reduced to 0.1 s or less. Solving these four issues paves the way to tracking moving fiducial markers throughout a 3DCRT or IMRT treatment. Altogether, these four studies demonstrate that our algorithm can track fiducials in real time, on degraded kV images (MV scatter), in rapidly moving tumors (fiducial blurring), and even provide useful information in the case when some fiducials are blocked from view by the MLC. This technique can provide a gating signal or be used for intra-fractional tumor tracking on a Linac equipped with a kV imaging system. Any motion exceeding a preset threshold can warn the therapist to suspend a treatment session and reposition the patient

  2. Reverse time migration of multiples for subsalt imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yike; Chang, Xu; Jin, Degang; He, Ruiqing; Sun, Hongchuan; Zheng, Yingcai

    2011-01-01

    Some hydrocarbon reservoirs are trapped beneath salt bodies, where seismic imaging is greatly challenged due to poor illumination. Multiple reflections have different propagation wave paths from primary reflections and thus can be used to complement the illuminations where primary reflections from beneath the salt are not acquired. Consequently, migration of multiples can sometimes provide better subsalt images compared to conventional migration which uses primary reflections only. In this pa...

  3. Time-lapse imaging of neural development: zebrafish lead the way into the fourth dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Sandra; Wang, Fang; Sagasti, Alvaro

    2011-07-01

    Time-lapse imaging is often the only way to appreciate fully the many dynamic cell movements critical to neural development. Zebrafish possess many advantages that make them the best vertebrate model organism for live imaging of dynamic development events. This review will discuss technical considerations of time-lapse imaging experiments in zebrafish, describe selected examples of imaging studies in zebrafish that revealed new features or principles of neural development, and consider the promise and challenges of future time-lapse studies of neural development in zebrafish embryos and adults. PMID:21305690

  4. One-Shot Color Astronomical Imaging In Less Time, For Less Money!

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, L A

    2012-01-01

    Anyone who has seen recent pictures of the many wondrous objects in space has surely been amazed by the stunning color images. Trying to capture images like these through your own telescope has always seemed too time-consuming, expensive, and complicated. However, with improvements in affordable, easy-to-use CCD imaging technology, you can now capture amazing images yourself. With today's improved "one-shot" color imagers, high-quality images can be taken in a fraction of the time and at a fraction of the cost, right from your own backyard. This book will show you how to harness the power of today's computerized telescopes and entry-level imagers to capture spectacular images that you can share with family and friends. It covers such topics as - evaluating your existing equipment, choosing the right imager, finding targets to image, telescope alignment, focusing and framing the image, exposure times, aligning and stacking multiple frames, image calibration, and enhancement techniques! - how to expand the numb...

  5. Light Stick Chemistry: Bioluminescence and Chemiluminescence (title provided or enhanced by cataloger)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael DiSpezio

    This activity will offer students an introduction to chemiluminescence and bioluminescence, an opportunity to observe the effect of temperature on reaction, and an activity that integrates art and science. Students explore how the temperature of the chemicals that combine affects a chemiluminescent reaction. They will also learn that since solar radiation does not reach the ocean depths, the bottom of the deep ocean remains largely in complete darkness. However, certain animals in this extreme environment can generate bioluminescent light to communicate with each other and even to lure prey.

  6. The application of superweak bioluminescence on freshness degree of chicken egg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The luminescence of chicken egg in storage is studied by a detection system of superweak bioluminescence. The results show that egg has the strongest vigour on the third day after it is laid, subsequently the luminescence presents decay with oscillation. These eggs, which have been stored for 3 days, are most suitable for hatching. Different eggs have different luminescence intensities depending on the vigour of the egg. The stronger the vigour of the egg is, the more intensive the luminescence is. Superweak bioluminescence as a comprehensive index of biology and biochemistry response can be used for inspecting the freshness degree of the egg, and the test is nondestructive and sensitive

  7. Theoretical tuning of the firefly bioluminescence spectra by the modification of oxyluciferin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Zhu, Jia; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Extending the firefly bioluminescence is of practical significance for the improved visualization of living cells and the development of a multicolor reporter. Tuning the color of bioluminescence in fireflies mainly involves the modification of luciferase and luciferin. In this Letter, we theoretically studied the emission spectra of 9 firefly oxyluciferin analogs in the gas phase and in solutions. Three density functionals, including B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP and M06-2X, were employed to theoretically predict the efficiently luminescent analogs. The reliable functionals for calculating the targeted systems were suggested. The luminescence efficiency, solvent effects, and substituent effects are discussed based on the calculated results.

  8. Automatic multimodal real-time tracking for image plane alignment in interventional Magnetic Resonance ImagingAutomatic multimodal real-time tracking for image plane alignment in interventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) aims at performing minimally invasive percutaneous interventions, such as tumor ablations and biopsies, under MRI guidance. During such interventions, the acquired MR image planes are typically aligned to the surgical instrument (needle) axis and to surrounding anatomical structures of interest in order to efficiently monitor the advancement in real-time of the instrument inside the patient's body. Object tracking inside the MRI is expected to facilitate and accelerate MR-guided interventions by allowing to automatically align the image planes to the surgical instrument. In this PhD thesis, an image-based work-flow is proposed and refined for automatic image plane alignment. An automatic tracking work-flow was developed, performing detection and tracking of a passive marker directly in clinical real-time images. This tracking work-flow is designed for fully automated image plane alignment, with minimization of tracking-dedicated time. Its main drawback is its inherent dependence on the slow clinical MRI update rate. First, the addition of motion estimation and prediction with a Kalman filter was investigated and improved the work-flow tracking performance. Second, a complementary optical sensor was used for multi-sensor tracking in order to decouple the tracking update rate from the MR image acquisition rate. Performance of the work-flow was evaluated with both computer simulations and experiments using an MR compatible test bed. Results show a high robustness of the multi-sensor tracking approach for dynamic image plane alignment, due to the combination of the individual strengths of each sensor. (author)Interventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) aims at performing minimally invasive percutaneous interventions, such as tumor ablations and biopsies, under MRI guidance. During such interventions, the acquired MR image planes are typically aligned to the surgical instrument (needle) axis and to surrounding anatomical structures of interest in order to efficiently monitor the advancement in real-time of the instrument inside the patient's body. Object tracking inside the MRI is expected to facilitate and accelerate MR-guided interventions by allowing to automatically align the image planes to the surgical instrument. In this PhD thesis, an image-based work-flow is proposed and refined for automatic image plane alignment. An automatic tracking work-flow was developed, performing detection and tracking of a passive marker directly in clinical real-time images. This tracking work-flow is designed for fully automated image plane alignment, with minimization of tracking-dedicated time. Its main drawback is its inherent dependence on the slow clinical MRI update rate. First, the addition of motion estimation and prediction with a Kalman filter was investigated and improved the work-flow tracking performance. Second, a complementary optical sensor was used for multi-sensor tracking in order to decouple the tracking update rate from the MR image acquisition rate. Performance of the work-flow was evaluated with both computer simulations and experiments using an MR compatible test bed. Results show a high robustness of the multi-sensor tracking approach for dynamic image plane alignment, due to the combination of the individual strengths of each sensor. (author)

  9. Real-time Microwave Imaging of Differential Temperature for Thermal Therapy Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Haynes, Mark; Stang, John; Moghaddam, Mahta

    2014-01-01

    A microwave imaging system for real-time 3D imaging of differential temperature has been developed for the monitoring and feedback of thermal therapy systems. Design parameters are constrained by features of a prototype focused microwave thermal therapy system for the breast, operating at 915 MHz. Real-time imaging is accomplished with a precomputed linear inverse scattering solution combined with continuous Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) measurements of a 36-antenna, HFSS modeled, cylindrical...

  10. The three dimensional characteristics of the equatorial plasma bubbles retrieved from TIMED/GUVI nightglow images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S.; Kil, H.; Paxton, L. J.

    2010-12-01

    We process the optical plasma bubble images observed by TIMED/GUVI during 2002-2003 by applying an image processing technique. The occurrence statistics of bubbles is examined by analyzing the 2-dimmensional bubble images that are projected to an apex height. The global distribution of bubbles observed by TIMED/GUVI is compared with that observed by ROCSAT-1, DMSP, and CHAMP satellites. We discuss the three dimensional characteristics such as shape, tilt and the hemispheric asymmetry of bubbles.

  11. Biomarkers identified with time-lapse imaging: discovery, validation, and practical application

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Alice A.; Tan, Lei; Suraj, Vaishali; Pera, Renee Reijo; Shen, Shehua

    2013-01-01

    Time-lapse markers,” which are defined by time-lapse imaging and correlated with clinical outcomes, may provide embryologists with new opportunities for improving embryo selection. This article provides an overview of noninvasive biomarkers defined by time-lapse imaging studies. In addition to comprehensively reviewing the discovery of each time-lapse marker, it focuses on the criteria necessary for their successful integration into clinical practice, including [1] statistical and biolog...

  12. Specific expression of bioluminescence reporter gene in cardiomyocyte regulated by tissue specific promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the human heart is not capable of regenerating the great numbers of cardiac cells that are lost after myocardial infarction, impaired cardiac function is the inevitable result of ischemic disease. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have gained popularity as a potentially ideal cell candidate for tissue regeneration. In particular, hESCs are capable of cardiac lineage-specific differentiation and confer improvement of cardiac function following transplantation into animal models. Although such data are encouraging, the specific strategy for in vivo and non-invasive detection of differentiated cardiac lineage is still limited. Therefore, in the present study, we established the gene construction in which the optical reporter gene Firefly luciferase was controlled by Myosin Heavy Chain promoter for specific expressing in heart cells. The vector consisting of - MHC promoter and a firefly luciferase coding sequence flanked by full-length bovine growth hormone (BGH) 3'-polyadenylation sequence based on pcDNA3.1- vector backbone. To test the specific transcription of this promoter in g of MHC-Fluc or CMV-Flue (for control) plasmid DNA in myocardial tissue, 20 phosphate-buffered saline was directly injected into mouse myocardium through a midline sternotomy and liver. After 1 week of injection, MHC-Fluc expression was detected from heart region which was observed under cooled CCD camera of in vivo imaging system but not from liver. In control group injected with rom liver. In control group injected with CMV-Flue, the bioluminescence was detected from all these organs. The expression of Flue under control of Myosin Heavy Chain promoter may become a suitable optical reporter gene for stem cell-derived cardiac lineage differentiation study

  13. In vivo bioluminescent monitoring of chemical toxicity using heme oxygenase-luciferase transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transgenic mice expressing the luciferase (luc) gene under the control of the heme oxygenase-1 promoter (Ho1) were used to measure the induction of heme oxygenase in response to known toxicants. Transgenic Ho1-luc expression was visualized in vivo using a low-light imaging system (IVIS). Ho1-luc activation was compared to Ho1-luc expression, HO1 protein levels, standard markers of toxicity, and histology. Male and female Ho1-luc transgenic mice were exposed to acute doses of cadmium chloride (CdCl2, 3.7 mg/kg), doxorubicin (15 mg/kg), and thioacetamide (300 mg/kg). These agents induced the expression of Ho1-luc in the liver and other tissues to varying degrees. The greatest increase in Ho1-luc activity was observed in the liver in response to CdCl2; intermediate responses were observed for doxorubicin and thioacetamide. Induction of the Ho1-luc transgene by these agents was similar to endogenous protein levels of heme oxygenase as assessed by Western blotting, and generally correlated with plasma levels of circulating enzymes reflecting hepatic or general tissue damage. Histopathology confirmed the toxic effects of CdCl2 on liver and kidney; doxorubicin on kidney, liver, and intestine; and thioacetamide on the liver. Tissue damage was much more pronounced than the luciferase expression following thioacetamide treatment when compared with tissue damage and bioluminescence of the other toxicants. Nevertheless, the induction of Ho1-luc ex Nevertheless, the induction of Ho1-luc expression following exposure to these agents suggests that the Ho1-luc transgenic mouse may prove useful as a model for in vivo screening of compounds that induce luciferase expression as a marker of toxicity

  14. Polarity-consistent excitation amplitude imaging condition for elastic reverse time migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qizhen; Zhang, Mingqiang; Gong, Xufei; Chen, Xiaoran

    2015-02-01

    Imaging conditions can not only affect the computational efficiency and storage cost of reverse time migration (RTM) but determine the quality of the final migrated images. This paper extends the idea of the well amplitude-preserved and highly-efficient excitation amplitude imaging condition from acoustic RTM to elastic RTM. For elastic RTM, the maximum amplitude of the separated P-wave and the corresponding image time of each grid point are saved during the forward modeling of the source wavefield and then PP and PS images are obtained by dividing the separated P- and S-waves of the backward-propagated receiver wavefield by the precomputed P-waves at each grid point that satisfies the image time. However, polarity reversals of the PS image will cause destructive interference when the stacked image is needed. In order to solve this problem, we propose the polarity-consistent excitation amplitude imaging condition by combining the excitation amplitude imaging condition with a shot-domain polarity reversal correction method. Then we provide the detailed realization process of this imaging condition in elastic RTM. By utilizing the relatively stable and well amplitude-preserved source-normalized cross-correlation imaging condition as a comparison, we testify to the feasibility and validity of the proposed imaging condition in the aspects of amplitude preservation property, imaging capability of complex structures, storage cost and computational efficiency. Considering the balance between the efficiency and image quality, the polarity-consistent excitation amplitude imaging condition can be a good choice for elastic RTM.

  15. A symmetrical image encryption scheme in wavelet and time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuling; Du, Minghui; Liu, Junxiu

    2015-02-01

    There has been an increasing concern for effective storages and secure transactions of multimedia information over the Internet. Then a great variety of encryption schemes have been proposed to ensure the information security while transmitting, but most of current approaches are designed to diffuse the data only in spatial domain which result in reducing storage efficiency. A lightweight image encryption strategy based on chaos is proposed in this paper. The encryption process is designed in transform domain. The original image is decomposed into approximation and detail components using integer wavelet transform (IWT); then as the more important component of the image, the approximation coefficients are diffused by secret keys generated from a spatiotemporal chaotic system followed by inverse IWT to construct the diffused image; finally a plain permutation is performed for diffusion image by the Logistic mapping in order to reduce the correlation between adjacent pixels further. Experimental results and performance analysis demonstrate the proposed scheme is an efficient, secure and robust encryption mechanism and it realizes effective coding compression to satisfy desirable storage.

  16. Effects of salinity, pH and temperature on the re-establishment of bioluminescence and copper or SDS toxicity in the marine dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula using bioluminescence as an endpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bioluminescence assay is not sensitive to small changes in pH, temperature or salinity. - Pyrocystis lunula is a unicellular, marine, photoautotrophic, bioluminescent dinoflagellate. This organism is used in the Lumitox[reg] bioassay with inhibition of bioluminescence re-establishment as the endpoint. Experiments determined if acute changes in pH, salinity, or temperature had an effect on the organisms' ability to re-establish bioluminescence, or on the bioassay's potential to detect sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and copper toxicity. The re-establishment of bioluminescence itself was not very sensitive to changes in pH within the pH 6-10 range, though reducing pH from 8 to levels below 6 decreased this capacity. Increasing the pH had little effect on Cu or SDS toxicity, but decreasing the pH below 7 virtually eliminated the toxicity of either compound in the bioassay. Lowering the salinity from 33 to 27%o or less resulted in a substantial decrease in re-establishment of bioluminescence, while increasing the salinity to 43 or 48 %o resulted in a small decline. Salinity had little influence on the bioassay's quantification of Cu toxicity, while the data showed a weak negative relationship between SDS toxicity and salinity. Re-establishment of bioluminescence showed a direct dependence on temperature, but only at 10 deg. C did temperature have an obvious effect on the toxicity of Cu in this bioassay

  17. Real time decision based multiple mode SEM review imaging solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huina; Sinha, Harsh; Chen, Garry; Pai, White; Yang, Jung Yan; Tsai, Charles

    2015-03-01

    Embedded defect types continue to be a challenge for scanning electron microscopes (SEM) review solutions. Though high energy beams can be used to image these defect types, they cause damage to the reviewed sites. Also, imaging all review sites at higher electron energy has often resulted in low topography surface defects to be non-visible due to high penetration depth. In this work we present a method in which defects are reviewed at non-destructive lower electron energies and only the non-visual review sites are reviewed at higher electron energies to image any potential additional defect types. The non-visual defects are identified inline during review using automatic defect classification attributes.

  18. An Internet and Intranet Based Real Time Medical Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Kumar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Today computer is an essential part of our life. The computer database is used for medical decision making. Doctors basically used to take decision on particular diesis on the help of old and current history of the patients or same diesis procured by other patients. This paper describe a tool developed in java/j2EE which enables the doctors to retrieved old record of same dieses treatment using internet and even allow them view medical image of blood slides, ECG, CT-scan, X-Ray etc. even allow them to mark and/or zoom important area of the image. It is secure and multi party medical image database consultant system.

  19. Coherent time-reversal microwave imaging for the detection and localization of breast tissue malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md. Delwar; Mohan, Ananda Sanagavarapu

    2015-02-01

    This paper deals with the coherent processing of time-reversal operator for microwave imaging in the frequency domain. In frequency domain time-reversal imaging approach, images obtained for different frequency bins over ultrawideband are incoherently processed. In highly dense and cluttered medium, the signal subspace over each narrow frequency bin varies from that obtained using the complete ultrawideband. As a result, the detection and localization from noncoherent imaging approach is often inconclusive. In order to improve the stability of time-reversal microwave imaging, we propose coherent processing using novel focusing matrix approach. The proposed focusing matrix makes possible the time-reversal imaging technique to coherently process each frequency bin to yield a consistent signal subspace. The performance of coherent focusing is investigated when combined with time-reversal robust Capon beamformer (TR-RCB). We have used numerical experiments on breast cancer detection using finite difference time domain employing anatomically realistic numerical breast phantoms that contain varying amounts of dense fibroglandular tissue content. The imaging results indicate that the proposed coherent-TR-RCB could overcome the limitations of time-reversal imaging in a highly heterogeneous and cluttered medium.

  20. Design of multi-spectral images real-time segmentation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Bo; Qu, Youshan; Han, Yameng; Zhou, Jiang

    2015-02-01

    In order to realize the real-time segmentation processing of multi spectral images in practice, a real-time multi-spectral images segmentation system composed of four TMS320C6455 DSPs, two Virtex-4 - V4 XC4VLX80 - FPGAs and one Virtex-2 Pro - V2 Pro20 - FPGA is designed. Through the optimization of the cooperation processing of the multi DSP and multi FPGA, the parallel multitask processing ability of the DSPs and the effective interface coordination ability of the FPGAs in the built system are used fully. In order to display the processing ability, the segmentation test experiments of 10 spectra visible images, with 1024×1024, segmented by the Multi-scale Image Segmentation Method, was done in the built multi spectral images segment system. The experiment results prove that the multi DSP and multi FPGA multi spectral images processing system designed in this paper satisfies the real-time processing requirement in engineering practice.

  1. Automated, real time extraction of fundus images from slit lamp fundus biomicroscope video image sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Madjarov, B.; Berger, J.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—Slit lamp fundus biomicroscopy allows for high magnification, stereoscopic diagnosis, and treatment of macular diseases. Variable contrast, narrow field of view, and specular reflections arising from the cornea, sclera, and examining lens reduce image quality; these images are of limited clinical utility for diagnosis, treatment planning, and photodocumentation when compared with fundus camera images. Algorithms are being developed to segment fundus imagery from slit lamp biomicroscopi...

  2. Collinear two colour Kerr effect based time-gate for ballistic imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Purwar, Harsh; Rozé, Claude; Blaisot, Jean-Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A novel setup is presented for ballistic imaging using an efficient ultrafast Kerr effect based optical time-gate with gating times of the order of ~0.8 picoseconds. At first, the major drawbacks of the classical non-collinear optical setup are discussed. Then, the new collinear arrangement is proposed, which overcomes these issues and improves the achievable imaging spatial resolution and gate timings. Few preliminary results for ballistic imaging of liquid sprays/jets are presented for this arrangement. It is shown that using a solid state Kerr medium (GGG crystal), instead of the classical liquid CS$_2$, allows reduction in the opening time of the optical gate.

  3. Nanoimprinted distributed feedback dye laser sensor for real-time imaging of small molecule diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannahme, Christoph; Dufva, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Label-free imaging is a promising tool for the study of biological processes such as cell adhesion and small molecule signaling processes. In order to image in two dimensions of space current solutions require motorized stages which results in low imaging frame rates. Here, a highly sensitive distributed feedback (DFB) dye laser sensor for real-time label-free imaging without any moving parts enabling a frame rate of 12 Hz is presented. The presence of molecules on the laser surface results in a wavelength shift which is used as sensor signal. The unique DFB laser structure comprises several areas of different grating periods which result in distinct laser emission wavelengths. Imaging in two dimensions of space is enabled by focusing an image of the laser surface with a cylindrical lens onto the entrance slit of an imaging spectrometer. Imaging is demonstrated by monitoring of diffusing small sucrose molecules in water.

  4. Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Near Real Time With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Megavoltage Treatment Beam Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To utilize image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in near real time by obtaining and evaluating the online positions of implanted fiducials from continuous electronic portal imaging device (EPID) imaging of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery. Methods and Materials: Upon initial setup using two orthogonal images, the three-dimensional (3D) positions of all implanted fiducial markers are obtained, and their expected two-dimensional (2D) locations in the beam's-eye-view (BEV) projection are calculated for each treatment field. During IMRT beam delivery, EPID images of the megavoltage treatment beam are acquired in cine mode and subsequently analyzed to locate 2D locations of fiducials in the BEV. Simultaneously, 3D positions are estimated according to the current EPID image, information from the setup portal images, and images acquired at other gantry angles (the completed treatment fields). The measured 2D and 3D positions of each fiducial are compared with their expected 2D and 3D setup positions, respectively. Any displacements larger than a predefined tolerance may cause the treatment system to suspend the beam delivery and direct the therapists to reposition the patient. Results: Phantom studies indicate that the accuracy of 2D BEV and 3D tracking are better than 1 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively. A total of 7330 images from prostate treatments were acquired and analyzed, showing a maximum 2D displacement of 6.7 mm and a maximum 3D displacementnt of 6.7 mm and a maximum 3D displacement of 6.9 mm over 34 fractions. Conclusions: This EPID-based, real-time IGRT method can be implemented on any external beam machine with portal imaging capabilities without purchasing any additional equipment, and there is no extra dose delivered to the patient.

  5. Tera-hertz time domain spectroscopy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tools necessary for the THz spectroscopic analysis becomes available on the general public. It is advisable in this context to remind the basic principles (resolution, not ionizing radiation, very wide bandwidth characterization is etc) of this technique and the potentialities in the industrial application field. We shall present some applications in THz spectroscopy and imaging. (authors)

  6. Iterated function systems for real-time image synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Nikiel, Slawomir

    2007-01-01

    Provides an explanation of iterated function systems and how to use them in generation of complex objects. This book provides a discussion of popular fractal models applied in the field of image synthesis and presentation of iterated function system models, including developments in IFS representation.

  7. High Time-Resolved Imaging of Targets in Turbid Media Using Ultrafast Optical Kerr Gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the ultrafast imaging of a submillimeter bar chart that is either hidden behind glass diffusers or inside a solution of polystyrene spheres, using an ultrafast optical Kerr gate (OKG). The results show that the time-resolved imaging of the target in the turbid media with an optical depth of 11.4 is achieved using the OKG with a 1.6 ps opening time. The image contrast is improved by about 70% compared with the shadowgraph imaging. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  8. Real-time terahertz imaging of nonmetallic objects for security screening and anti-counterfeiting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnken, Barry N.; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2008-10-01

    We report the use of a 160×120 pixel microbolometer camera, under illumination by a milliwatt-scale 3.6 THz quantum cascade laser, for real-time imaging of materials which are exclusively nonmetallic in character. By minimizing diffraction effects suffered by the camera system and operating the laser at bias currents approaching saturation values, an imaging scheme was developed in which overlapping samples of nonmetallic materials can be imaged with high fidelity and long persistence times. Furthermore, an examination of various security features embedded within domestic and foreign currency notes suggests that this imaging scheme could serve a future role in detection of assorted counterfeiting practices.

  9. Position and time sensitive photon counting detector with image charge delay-line readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czasch, Achim; Dangendorf, Volker; Milnes, James; Schössler, Sven; Lauck, Ronald; Spillmann, Uwe; Howorth, Jon; Jagutzki, Ottmar

    2007-09-01

    We have developed single photon counting image intensifier tubes combining position and time information read-out with at least 500x500 pixels and sub-nanosecond time resolution. This image intensifier type uses a resistive screen instead of a phosphor screen and the image charge pickup anode is placed outside the sealed tube. We present a novel delay-line anode design which allows for instance detecting simultaneously arriving pairs of photons. Due to the very low background this technique is suited for applications with very low light intensity and especially if a precise time tagging for each photon is required. We show results obtained with several anode types on a 25 mm image intensifier tube and a 40 mm open-face MCP detector and discuss the performance in neutron radiography, e.g. for homeland security, and the prospects for applications like Fluorescence Life-time Imaging Microscopy (FLIM), astronomy and X-ray polarimetry.

  10. Molecular phylogeny of Neotropical bioluminescent beetles (Coleoptera: Elateroidea) in southern and central Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, D T; Arnoldi, F G C; Rosa, S P; Viviani, V R

    2014-08-01

    Bioluminescence in beetles is found mainly in the Elateroidea superfamily (Elateridae, Lampyridae and Phengodidae). The Neotropical region accounts for the richest diversity of bioluminescent species in the world with about 500 described species, most occurring in the Amazon, Atlantic rainforest and Cerrado (savanna) ecosystems in Brazil. The origin and evolution of bioluminescence, as well as the taxonomic status of several Neotropical taxa in these families remains unclear. In order to contribute to a better understanding of the phylogeny and evolution of bioluminescent Elateroidea we sequenced and analyzed sequences of mitochondrial NADH2 and the nuclear 28S genes and of the cloned luciferase sequences of Brazilian species belonging to the following genera: (Lampyridae) Macrolampis, Photuris, Amydetes, Bicellonycha, Aspisoma, Lucidota, Cratomorphus; (Elateridae) Conoderus, Pyrophorus, Hapsodrilus, Pyrearinus, Fulgeochlizus; and (Phengodidae) Pseudophengodes, Phrixothrix, Euryopa and Brasilocerus. Our study supports a closer phylogenetic relationship between Elateridae and Phengodidae as other molecular studies, in contrast with previous morphologic and molecular studies that clustered Lampyridae/Phengodidae. Molecular data also supported division of the Phengodinae subfamily into the tribes Phengodini and Mastinocerini. The position of the genus Amydetes supports the status of the Amydetinae as a subfamily. The genus Euryopa is included in the Mastinocerini tribe within the Phengodinae/Phengodidae. PMID:23868199

  11. Bioluminescent CXCL12 Fusion Protein for Cellular Studies of CXCR4 and CXCR7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luker, Kathryn E.; Gupta, Mudit; Luker, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine CXCL12 and its two known receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7, may play a role in diseases including tumor growth and metastasis, atherosclerosis, and HIV infection. Therefore, these molecules may be promising targets for drug development. While studies of cell signaling and high-throughput screening for drug discovery increasingly are based on luminescent assays because of their high sensitivity and signal-to-background ratio, there currently is no bioluminescent assay for chemokine-chemokine receptor binding. To develop a bioluminescent probe for chemokine binding and cellular uptake, we fused CXCL12 to Gaussia luciferase, an ATP-independent enzyme that is the smallest known luciferase. Fusing CXCL12 to Gaussia luciferase (CXCL12-GL) did not alter the bioluminescence emission spectrum and only minimally affected enzyme function under varying conditions of pH, temperature, and NaCl. CXCL12-GL also activated CXCR4-dependent signaling to a comparable extent as unfused CXCL12. Using multiwell plate assays, we established that CXCR7 increases cell-associated CXCL12 to a significantly greater extent than CXCR4. We also showed that CXCL12-GL can be used to quantify inhibition of chemokine receptor binding by compounds specifically targeting CXCR7. These data validate CXCL12-GL as a bioluminescent probe to investigate molecular functions of CXCR4 and CXCR7 and screen for compounds that modulate ligand-receptor binding. PMID:19594447

  12. The use of terrestrial bacteria with natural bioluminescence in environmental toxicology.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lojek, Antonín; ?íž, Milan; Kubala, Lukáš; Hyršl, P.; Bu?ková, Radka

    2007-01-01

    Ro?. 101, ?. 14 (2007), s116-s118. ISSN 1213-7103. [Mezioborová ?esko-slovenská toxikologická konference /12./. Praha, 11.06.2007-13.06.2007] R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GA525/06/1196 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : bioluminescence * bacteria * metal ions Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  13. Detection and imaging of moving targets in wide band SAS using fast time backprojection combined with space time processing

    OpenAIRE

    Pettersson, Mats; Zetterberg, Viktoria; Claesson, Ingvar

    2005-01-01

    This paper present a method to combine SAS (Synthetic Aperture Sonar) imaging of stationary targets with moving target detection and imaging. The proposed method uses a likelihood ratio for moving target detection in a wide band (WB) SAS system. For this paper, WB is defined as any systems having a large fractional bandwidth, i.e. an ultra wide frequency band combined with a wide antenna beam. The developed method combines time domain fast backprojection SAS processing...

  14. Imaging Faults with Reverse-Time Migration for Geothermal Exploration at Jemez Pueblo in New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albrecht, Michael [TBA Power; Kaufman, Greg [Jemez Purblo; Kelley, Shari [NM Bureau of Geology and Mineral Researces; Rehfeldt, Kenneth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Zhifu [EES-17 visitor

    2011-01-01

    The fault zones at Jemez Pueblo may dominate the flow paths of hot water, or confine the boundaries of the geothermal reservoir. Therefore, it is crucial to image the geometry of these fault zones for geothermal exploration in the area. We use reverse-time migration with a separation imaging condition to image the faults at Jemez Pueblo. A finite-difference full-wave equation method with a perfectly-matching-layer absorbing boundary condition is used for backward propagation of seismic reflection data from receivers and forward propagation of wavefields from sources. In the imaging region, the wavefields are separated into the upgoing and downgoing waves, and leftgoing and rightgoing waves. The upgoing and downgoing waves are used to obtain the downward-looking image, and the leftgoing and rightgoing waves are used to form the left-looking image and right-looking image from sources. The left-looking and right-looking images are normally weaker than the downward-looking image because the reflections from the fault zones are much weaker than those from sedimentary layers, but these migration results contain the images of the faults. We apply our reverse-time migration with a wavefield separation imaging condition to seismic data acquired at Jemez Pueblo, and our preliminary results reveal many faults in the area.

  15. Effects of acquisition time and reconstruction algorithm on image quality, quantitative parameters, and clinical interpretation of myocardial perfusion imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Lotte Hahn; Menashi, Changez A K

    2013-01-01

    Recently introduced iterative reconstruction algorithms with resolution recovery (RR) and noise-reduction technology seem promising for reducing scan time or radiation dose without loss of image quality. However, the relative effects of reduced acquisition time and reconstruction software have not previously been reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of reduced acquisition time and reconstruction software on quantitative and qualitative myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) parameters using full time (FT) and half time (HT) protocols and Evolution for Cardiac Software.

  16. Human movement analysis with image processing in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvet, Eric; Paindavoine, Michel; Cannard, F.

    1991-04-01

    In the field of the human sciences, a lot of applications needs to know the kinematic characteristics of the human movements Psycology is associating the characteristics with the control mechanism, sport and biomechariics are associating them with the performance of the sportman or of the patient. So the trainers or the doctors can correct the gesture of the subject to obtain a better performance if he knows the motion properties. Roherton's studies show the children motion evolution2 . Several investigations methods are able to measure the human movement But now most of the studies are based on image processing. Often the systems are working at the T.V. standard (50 frame per secund ). they permit only to study very slow gesture. A human operator analyses the digitizing sequence of the film manually giving a very expensive, especially long and unprecise operation. On these different grounds many human movement analysis systems were implemented. They consist of: - markers which are fixed to the anatomical interesting points on the subject in motion, - Image compression which is the art to coding picture data. Generally the compression Is limited to the centroid coordinates calculation tor each marker. These systems differ from one other in image acquisition and markers detection.

  17. High-resolution functional cardiac MR imaging using density-weighted real-time acquisition and a combination of compressed sensing and parallel imaging for image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to perform high-resolution functional MR imaging using accelerated density-weighted real-time acquisition (DE) and a combination of compressed sensing (CO) and parallel imaging for image reconstruction. Materials and Methods: Measurements were performed on a 3 T whole-body system equipped with a dedicated 32-channel body array coil. A one-dimensional density-weighted spin warp technique was used, i. e. non-equidistant phase encoding steps were acquired. The two acceleration techniques, compressed sensing and parallel imaging, were performed subsequently. From a complete Cartesian k-space, a four-fold uniformly undersampled k-space was created. In addition, each undersampled time frame was further undersampled by an additional acceleration factor of 2.1 using an individual density-weighted undersampling pattern for each time frame. Simulations were performed using data of a conventional human in-vivo cine examination and in-vivo measurements of the human heart were carried out employing an adapted real-time sequence. Results: High-quality DECO real-time images using parallel acquisition of the function of the human heart could be acquired. An acceleration factor of 8.4 could be achieved making it possible to maintain the high spatial and temporal resolution without significant noise enhancement. Conclusion: DECO parallel imaging facilitates high acceleration factors, which allows real-time MR acquisition of the heart dynamics and funcacquisition of the heart dynamics and function with an image quality comparable to that conventionally achieved with clinically established triggered cine imaging. (orig.)

  18. Established rheumatoid arthritis - new imaging modalities.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, Fiona M; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    New imaging modalities are assuming an increasingly important role in the investigation and management of rheumatoid arthritis. It is now possible to obtain information about all tissues within the joint in three dimensions using tomographic techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high-resolution computerized tomography. Erosions are very clearly depicted using these modalities and MRI also allows imaging of soft tissues with assessment of joint inflammation. High-resolution ultrasound is a convenient clinical technique for the assessment of erosions, synovitis and tenosynovitis in real-time and facilitates diagnostic and therapeutic interventions such as joint aspiration and injection. Exciting experimental modalities are also being developed with the potential to provide not just morphological but functional imaging. Techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) can reveal actively metabolizing bone and the proliferation of synovial cells via radioactive labeling. Bioluminescence and fluorescence reflectance imaging are other approaches that allow imaging, and potentially the delivery of therapeutic agents, at a molecular level.

  19. Dynamic imaging with high resolution time-of-flight pet camera - TOFPET I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major design goals of the TOFPET I positron camera was to produce a high resolution whole body positron camera capable of dynamically imaging an organ such as the heart. TOFPET I is now nearing completion and preliminary images have been obtained to assess its dynamic and three dimensional imaging capabilities. Multiple gated images of the uptake of Rubidium in the dog heart and three dimensional surface displays of the distribution of the Rubidium-82 in the myocardium have been generated to demonstrate the three dimensional imaging properties. Fast dynamic images of the first pass of a bolus of radio-tracer through the heart have been collected with 4 second integration time and 50% gating (2 second equivalent integration time) with 18 mCi of Rb-82

  20. Non-invasive real-time imaging through scattering layers and around corners via speckle correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Ori; Fink, Mathias; Gigan, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Imaging with optical resolution through and inside complex samples is a difficult challenge with important applications in many fields. The fundamental problem is that inhomogeneous samples, such as biological tissues, randomly scatter and diffuse light, impeding conventional image formation. Despite many advancements, no current method enables to noninvasively image in real-time using diffused light. Here, we show that owing to the memory-effect for speckle correlations, a single image of the scattered light, captured with a standard high-resolution camera, encodes all the information that is required to image through the medium or around a corner. We experimentally demonstrate single-shot imaging through scattering media and around corners using incoherent light and various samples, from white paint to dynamic biological samples. Our lensless technique is simple, does not require laser sources, wavefront-shaping, nor time-gated detection, and is realized here using a camera-phone. It has the potential to en...