WorldWideScience

Sample records for thrust bearings

  1. Lateral dampers for thrust bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibner, D. H.; Szafir, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The development of lateral damping schemes for thrust bearings was examined, ranking their applicability to various engine classes, selecting the best concept for each engine class and performing an in-depth evaluation. Five major engine classes were considered: large transport, military, small general aviation, turboshaft, and non-manrated. Damper concepts developed for evaluation were: curved beam, constrained and unconstrained elastomer, hybrid boost bearing, hydraulic thrust piston, conical squeeze film, and rolling element thrust face.

  2. Investigation of hydrostatic radial thrust bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrostatic radial thrust bearing design is described. Specific throttles are provided in the design to simplify the bearing unit adjustment. Loading characteristics of bearings obtained theoretically by the method of electrohydromechanical analogies have been confirmed experimentally. In the experiments, a contactless pheumatic loading device has been used. The hardness of bearings meets the requirements. The pressure field in a radial bearing has been experimentally investigated, and pressure drops in the lubricating layer at the slot inlet and outlet of the bearing have been determined. Stability of the shaft being in equilibrium in a thrust bearing has been investigated theoretically and experimentally. The parameters of the lubricating system adjustment providing for stability have been determined

  3. Thrust Bearing with Rough Surfaces Lubricated by an Ellis Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walicka, A.; Walicki, E.; Jurczak, P.; Falicki, J.

    2014-11-01

    In the paper the influence of bearing surfaces roughness on the pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity of a thrust bearing is discussed. The equations of motion of an Ellis pseudo-plastic fluid are used to derive the Reynolds equation. After general considerations on the flow in a bearing clearance and using the Christensen theory of hydrodynamic rough lubrication the modified Reynolds equation is obtained. The analytical solutions of this equation for the cases of a squeeze film bearing and an externally pressurized bearing are presented. As a result one obtains the formulae expressing pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity. A thrust radial bearing is considered as a numerical example.

  4. Performance of Simple Gas Foil Thrust Bearings in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Foil bearings are self-acting hydrodynamics devices used to support high speed rotating machinery. The advantages that they offer to process fluid lubricated machines include: high rotational speed capability, no auxiliary lubrication system, non-contacting high speed operation, and improved damping as compared to rigid hydrodynamic bearings. NASA has had a sporadic research program in this technology for almost 6 decades. Advances in the technology and understanding of foil journal bearings have enabled several new commercial products in recent years. These products include oil-free turbochargers for both heavy trucks and automobiles, high speed electric motors, microturbines for distributed power generation, and turbojet engines. However, the foil thrust bearing has not received a complimentary level of research and therefore has become the weak link of oil-free turbomachinery. In an effort to both provide machine designers with basic performance parameters and to elucidate the underlying physics of foil thrust bearings, NASA Glenn Research Center has completed an effort to experimentally measure the performance of simple gas foil thrust bearing in air. The database includes simple bump foil supported thrust bearings with full geometry and manufacturing techniques available to the user. Test conditions consist of air at ambient pressure and temperatures up to 500 C and rotational speeds to 55,000 rpm. A complete set of axial load, frictional torque, and rotational speed is presented for two different compliant sub-structures and inter-pad gaps. Data obtained from commercially available foil thrust bearings both with and without active cooling is presented for comparison. A significant observation made possible by this data set is the speed-load capacity characteristic of foil thrust bearings. Whereas for the foil journal bearing the load capacity increases linearly with rotational speed, the foil thrust bearing operates in the hydrodynamic high speed limit. In this case, the load capacity is constant and in fact often decreases with speed if other factors such as thermal conditions and runner distortions are permitted to dominate the bearing performance.

  5. Research on Service Life Prediction Model of Thrust Needle Bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wei

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Needle roller thrust bear is small in size and of high ability in load bearing, therefore it is widely used in fields of aviation and automobile etc.  But the relation between their service life and pre-tightening torque is not very clear, so the using design of the bear depends mainly on experience of engineer, because of lack of references. In the paper, the theoretical analysis on relation between torque and load is done, special wearing test instrument is developed and wearing test of thrust needle bear is conducted. Based on the results of the test, mathematical model of relation between the losing amount of pre-tightening torque and the pre-tightening torque is built, based on which use of the bear in engineering will be more reasonable, and their pre-tightening torque will be given more accurately.

  6. Frictional Characteristics of Thrust Bearing in Scroll Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hajime; Itoh, Takahide; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki

    This paper presents frictional characteristics of thrust bearing in scroll compressor focusing on the behavior of sliding portion which affects the generation of oil film. The coefficient of friction and tilt angle of sliding portion in the thrust bearing are obtained through both elemental friction test and cylinder pressure measurement of actual scroll compressor. Both tests showed that the coefficient of friction in low contact pressure rose with increase of tilt angle of sliding portion. The value of contact pressure which the coefficient of friction turns into increase was in agreement of the value which tilt angle become to increase. Numerical analysis using mixed lubrication theory was also performed. Analytical result indicated the same characteristics as the experiments, and the correlation between the coefficient of friction and the behavior of sliding portion was confirmed. Based on the experimental and the analytical results obtained here, the optimization of thrust bearing for commercial scroll compressor was applied. 2% improvement of total efficiency in rated condition was archived by optimization of thrust bearing.

  7. Effect of the Surface Texture on Friction Thrust Bearing Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suárez-Bustamante F.A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows a theoretical model which stablishes relations among the operational conditions of a thrust bearing, its conditioned microtopography and the friction coeficient when it works under Hydrodynamic Lubrication conditions. Among the most outstanding results obtained from an exploration made with the model are: building of a map where the performance of these components is characterized and the obtention of some relations among several adimentional groups that show the possiblility to enhance the hydrodynamic lubrication regime for this sort of bearings by artificial conditioning of their surfaces.

  8. On the Design of Tilting-Pad Thrust Bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrichson, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Pockets are often machined in the surfaces of tilting-pad thrust bearings to allow for hydrostatic jacking in the start-up phase. Pockets and other recesses in the surfaces of bearing pads influence the pressure distribution and thereby the position of the pivot resulting in the most advantageous pad convergence ratio. In this thesis, a theoretical approach is applied in the attempt to quantify the influence of recesses in the pad surfaces. The recesses may be relatively deep and enclosed as is the case with pockets designed for hydrostatic jacking. Such recesses are characterized by low friction and a small pressure build-up. As in parallel-step bearings the recesses may also have a depth of the same order of magnitude as the oil film thickness. Such recesses are characterized by a strong pressure build-up caused by the reduction of the flow area at the end of the recess. Numerical models based on the Reynolds equation are used. They include the effects of variations of viscosity with temperature and the deformation of the bearing pads due to pressure and thermal gradients. The models are validated using measurements. Tilting-pad bearings of standard design are studied and the influences of the bearing length-to-width ratio, pad deformation and injection pocket size are quantified. Suggestions for the design of energy efficient bearings are given. The results show that correctly dimensioned, bearings with oil injection pockets have smaller friction coefficients than bearings with plain pads. Placing the pockets in the high-pressure zones close to the trailing edges of the bearing pads causes a substantial reduction in the friction coefficient. The design of the recess sizes and positions leading to the largest improvements is studied and design suggestions for various pad geometries are given. Parallel-step bearings theoretically have smaller friction coefficients than tilting-pad bearings. A design of a tilting-pad bearing is suggested which combines the benefits of the two types of bearings in a tilting-pad bearing with inlet pockets. This design results in a substantial reduction of the friction loss. Both this bearing and the bearing design with enclosed recesses in the high-pressure regions of the pads suffer from a higher sensitivity to the position of the pivot. The design of such bearing is therefore no trivial task.

  9. Foil Gas Thrust Bearings for High-Speed Turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Brian; DellaCorte, Christopher; Dykas, Brian

    2010-01-01

    A methodology has been developed for the design and construction of simple foil thrust bearings intended for parametric performance testing and low marginal costs, supporting continued development of oil-free turbomachinery. A bearing backing plate is first machined and surface-ground to produce flat and parallel faces. Partial-arc slots needed to retain the foil components are then machined into the plate by wire electrical discharge machining. Slot thicknesses achievable by a single wire pass are appropriate to accommodate the practical range of foil thicknesses, leaving a small clearance in this hinged joint to permit limited motion. The backing plate is constructed from a nickel-based superalloy (Inconel 718) to allow heat treatment of the entire assembled bearing, as well as to permit hightemperature operation. However, other dimensionally stable materials, such as precipitation-hardened stainless steel, can also be used for this component depending on application. The top and bump foil blanks are cut from stacks of annealed Inconel X-750 foil by the same EDM process. The bump foil has several azimuthal slits separating it into five individual bump strips. This configuration allows for variable bump spacing, which helps to accommodate the effects of the varying surface velocity, thermal crowning, centrifugal dishing, and misalignment. Rectangular tabs on the foil blanks fit into the backing plate slots. For this application, a rather traditional set of conventionally machined dies is selected, and bump foil blanks are pressed into the dies for forming. This arrangement produces a set of bump foil dies for foil thrust bearings that provide for relatively inexpensive fabrication of various bump configurations, and employing methods and features from the public domain.

  10. Analysis of pneumatic hammer in rectangular aerostatic thrust bearing with groove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Tan, Jiubin; Cui, Jiwen; Liu, Yongmeng

    2015-02-01

    The pneumatic hammer in rectangular aerostatic thrust bearings with groove is analyzed using perturbation theory. Routh stability criterion was used to evaluate the critical condition of pneumatic hammer in rectangular aerostatic thrust bearings with groove, and the influence of supply pressure, throttle area, groove area, and thickness of film on aerostatic thrust bearings. It was found through analysis that the change rate of stiffness and the volume ratio of aerostatic bearing could be used to analyze the pneumatic hammer in rectangular aerostatic thrust bearings with groove. At a certain film thickness, the stability of aerostatic bearings could be improved by reducing supply pressure, increasing throttle area and decreasing groove area to facilitate the design of a general aerostatic thrust bearing.

  11. An Experimental Study on Lubrication Mechanism at Thrust Slide-Bearing of Scroll Compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Tatsuya; Anami, Keiko; Ishii, Noriaki; Sawai, Kiyoshi; Morimoto, Takashi; Hiwata, Akira

    This study focuses on the significant effect that a pressure difference across the orbiting thrust plate of a thrust-slide bearing has on the improved lubrication of the bearing in scroll compressor applications. A thrust slide-bearing model submerged in a refrigerant oil VG-56 was operated under pressurized conditions using R-22 as the pressurizing gas, where the pressure difference across the friction surface of the thrust bearing was adjusted from 0 to 1.0 MPa and the friction force and friction coefficient at the thrust slide-bearing were measured over a range of orbiting speeds. As a result, a significant improvement in lubrication at the thrust slide-bearing due to the pressure difference was addressed. Furthermore, a careful observation of wear state at the thrust slide-bearing addressed a significant formation of fluid wedge between the sliding surfaces due to axial loadings, which will definitely induce the addressed significant improvement in lubrication. In addition, the wedge formation was quantitatively addressed with FEM analysis of elastic deformation of the thrust plate, which was verified for its validity with measured strains on the thrust plate.

  12. An Experimental Study of Lubrication at Thrust Slide-Bearing of Scroll Compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Noriaki; Oku, Tatsuya; Anami, Keiko; Tsuji, Takuma; Ozasa, Toshihiro; Sawai, Kiyoshi; Morimoto, Takashi; Iida, Noboru

    The previous studies have revealed that the wedge formation at the periphery of the thrust plate, caused by the elastic deformation due to pressure difference across the orbiting thrust plate, is a significant key factor to keep and improve the high performance in lubrication of the thrust-slide bearing. The present study focuses on the effect of the thickness and inner form of the thrust plate upon the lubrication features. A simplified model of cylindrical thrust slide-bearing with thinner thrust plate submerged in a refrigerant oil VG-56 was operated under pressurized conditions using R-22 as the pressurizing gas, where the pressure difference was adjusted from 0 to 1.0 MPa and the friction force and coefficient of friction were measured over a wide range of orbiting speeds, first. The wedge angle by elastic deformation is naturally increased with decreasing the thrust plate thickness, thus resulting in a clear improvement in lubrication at the thrust slide-bearing. On the contrast, secondly, the similar lubrication tests were conducted for the thrust plate with a real inner form, as complicated as in the real scroll compressors, where the thickness of the thrust plate was kept as in the original tests. As a result, no significant change in lubrication features, from those for the simplified cylindrical model, was not addressed, thus confirming that the test results addressed from the simplified cylindrical model tests can be effectively used to examine the basic characteristics in lubrication of thrust slide bearing of scroll compressors.

  13. Experimental Performance Study of a High Speed Oil Lubricated Polymer Thrust Bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the demand for turbomachinery to operate at higher speeds, loads, and power, fluid film bearings that support turbomachinery must be capable of operating in these more demanding applications. Thrust bearings operating at high speeds and loads can experience high surface temperatures and thin fluid film thickness. Typically, babbitt (white metal is the bearing lining material for most turbomachinery bearings but is limited in operating temperature and allowable film thickness. Polymer based materials are alternative materials that can operate at high temperatures and with thin films and have been in use for many decades in high load applications, such as electric submersible pumps (ESP. Test results of polymer lined thrust bearings subjected to modern turbomachinery speeds and loads are presented and compared to babbitt lined bearings of the same design and under similar conditions. The test results show polymer lined thrust bearings can operate at higher bearing unit loads than babbitt.

  14. Oil-Free Turbomachinery Research Enhanced by Thrust Bearing Test Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Steven W.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center s Oil-Free Turbomachinery research team is developing aircraft turbine engines that will not require an oil lubrication system. Oil systems are required today to lubricate rolling-element bearings used by the turbine and fan shafts. For the Oil-Free Turbomachinery concept, researchers combined the most advanced foil (air) bearings from industry with NASA-developed high-temperature solid lubricant technology. In 1999, the world s first Oil-Free turbocharger was demonstrated using these technologies. Now we are working with industry to demonstrate Oil-Free turbomachinery technology in a small business jet engine, the EJ-22 produced by Williams International and developed during Glenn s recently concluded General Aviation Propulsion (GAP) program. Eliminating the oil system in this engine will make it simpler, lighter (approximately 15 percent), more reliable, and less costly to purchase and maintain. Propulsion gas turbines will place high demands on foil air bearings, especially the thrust bearings. Up until now, the Oil-Free Turbomachinery research team only had the capability to test radial, journal bearings. This research has resulted in major improvements in the bearings performance, but journal bearings are cylindrical, and can only support radial shaft loads. To counteract axial thrust loads, thrust foil bearings, which are disk shaped, are required. Since relatively little research has been conducted on thrust foil air bearings, their performance lags behind that of journal bearings.

  15. A Theoretical Development on Lubrication Mechanism at Thrust Slide-Bearing of Scroll Compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Tatsuya; Ishii, Noriaki; Anami, Keiko; Sawai, Kiyoshi; Morimoto, Takashi; Hiwata, Akira

    This study presents a theoretical development of excellent lubrication at the thrust slide-bearing of scroll compressors, caused by a wedge formation due to elastic deformation of the thrust plate at its periphery. In theoretical calculations, the average Reynolds equation by Patir & Cheng for rough sliding surfaces of the thrust slide-bearing was applied to analyze the fluid lubrication, while the solid contact theory by Greenwood & Williamson was applied to analyze the plastic and elastic contacts between the orbiting and fixed thrust plates. With the FEM-calculated wedge angle between the sliding surfaces, the oil film pressure, the solid contact force, the fluid frictional force and the solid shearing drag force were calculated to determine the resultant friction coefficient at the thrust slide-bearing. As a result, it was shown that the theoretical results have a good agreement with the lubrication test results, thus unveiling the essential contents of excellent fluid lubrication at the thrust slide-bearing, caused by the wedge formation due to large thrust loads.

  16. Design, Fabrication, and Performance of Foil Gas Thrust Bearings for Microturbomachinery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykas, Brian; Bruckner, Robert; DellaCorte, Christopher; Edmonds, Brian; Prahl, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    A methodology for the design and construction of simple foil thrust bearings intended for parametric performance testing and low marginal costs is presented. Features drawn from a review of the open literature are discussed as they relate to bearing performance. The design of fixtures and tooling required to fabricate foil thrust bearings is presented, using conventional machining processes where possible. A prototype bearing with dimensions drawn from the literature is constructed, with all fabrication steps described. A load-deflection curve for the bearing is presented to illustrate structural stiffness characteristics. Start-top cycles are performed on the bearing at a temperature of 425 C to demonstrate early-life wear patterns. A test of bearing load capacity demonstrates useful performance when compared with data obtained from the open literature.

  17. Numerical simulation and experimental study of thrust air bearings with multiple orifices

    OpenAIRE

    Charki, Abderafi; Diop, Khadim; Champmartin, Ste?phane; Ambari, Abdelhak

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a numerical simulation and an experimental study in order to assess stiffness and damping characteristics of thrust air bearings with multiple orifices. Finite element modeling is used to solve the non-linear Reynolds equation while taking into account the movement equation for the bearing. The numerical results obtained show that performance characteristics are related to bearing design type. An experimental investigation allows us to analyze the beh...

  18. Thrust bearing made of new material realizing superior bearing performance; Sugureta jikuuke seino wo jitsugenshita shinsozai surasuto jikuuke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takesue, Y.; Abe, T. [Electric Power Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kito, A.; Otsuka, M.; Ogata, K.; Oyabu, S. [Meidensha Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-09-06

    A soft metal material such as white metal is conventionally used for the surface of thrust bearings for a water-wheel generator; however, in this kind of bearing material, liable to be generated are friction and surface roughness due to metallic contact in a boundary lubrication state at the time of low speed revolution in starting and stopping, as is damage like burning due to a local metallic contact at the time of rotary ascending/descending; therefore, the liability has prevented stretching of the overhaul check up period. As a result, some thrust bearings were equipped with an oil lifter. In the meantime, in recent years, a new type metallic material has been employed to which a tetra-fluoroethylene resin (PTFE) material is applied, instead of a conventionally used material. The thrust bearings of PTFE based materials are provided with characteristics such as low loss/high efficiency, high bearing/small size, and long service life because of high lubricity and wear resistance. Further, since the base material per se is an insulation, the conventional bearing insulation process is unnecessitated, enabling the structure to be simplified. This time, Electric Power Development Co.,Ltd. and Meidensha Corp. developed PTFE based bearings and put them to practical use; hence, its outline was introduced in this paper. (NEDO)

  19. Analysis of a Thrust Bearing with Flexible Pads and Flexible Supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Peder; Thomsen, Kim

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of a hydrodynamic thrust bearing is presented. The bearing investigated is used in an ndustrial product. The lubricant is water, but the results are valid also for other lubricants.At first the results from a 1-dimensional model for the fluid film forces and the associated deformation of the bearing geometry is presented. This model enlightens the influence of pad flexibility and support location and flexibility. Subsequently results from a 2-dimensional model of the bearing is presented. The model is used to carry out an optimization of the bearing design, and the obtained improvements in load carrying capacity is presented.

  20. A rotary microactuator supported on encapsulated microball bearings using an electro-pneumatic thrust balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a rotary microactuator supported on encapsulated microball bearings and driven by electro-pneumatic actuation is reported. The encapsulated bearing provides full support to an encased rotor, while an electro-pneumatic thrust balance is used to minimize rotor normal load. By minimizing normal load, bearing friction is reduced leading to increased speed and performance. Experimental results show that the microactuator is capable of repeatable operation and continuous 360° motion at speeds of 5–2000 rpm. This is the first demonstration of a ball bearing supported electrostatic microactuator with a fully encased rotor, capable of direct mechanical attachment or reliable interaction with external media

  1. The Chevron Foil Thrust Bearing: Improved Performance Through Passive Thermal Management and Effective Lubricant Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    An improved foil thrust bearing is described that eliminates or reduces the need for forced cooling of the bearing foils while at the same time improves the load capacity of the bearing, enhances damping, provides overload tolerance, and eliminates the high speed load capacity drop-off that plagues the current state of the art. The performance improvement demonstrated by the chevron foil thrust bearing stems from a novel trailing edge shape that splays the hot lubricant in the thin film radially, thus preventing hot lubricant carry-over into the ensuing bearing sector. Additionally, the chevron shaped trailing edge induces vortical mixing of the hot lubricant with the gas that is naturally resident within the inter-pad region of a foil thrust bearing. The elimination of hot gas carry-over in combination with the enhanced mixing has enabled a completely passive thermally managed foil bearing design. Laboratory testing at NASA has confirmed the original analysis and reduced this concept to practice.

  2. Laminar Motion of the Incompressible Fluids in Self-Acting Thrust Bearings with Spiral Grooves

    OpenAIRE

    Cornel Velescu; Nicolae Calin Popa

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the laminar motion of incompressible fluids in self-acting thrust bearings with spiral grooves with inner or external pumping. The purpose of the study is to find some mathematical relations useful to approach the theoretical functionality of these bearings having magnetic controllable fluids as incompressible fluids, in the presence of a controllable magnetic field. This theoretical study approaches the permanent motion regime. To validate the theoretical results, we compare them ...

  3. Optimization of residual heat removal pump axial thrust and axial bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, F.

    1996-12-01

    The residual heat removal (RHR) pumps of German 1300 megawatt pressurized-water reactor (PWR) power plants are of the single stage end suction type with volute casing or with diffuser and forged circular casing. Due to the service conditions the pumps have to cover the full capacity range as well as a big variation in suction static pressure. This results in a big difference in the axial thrust that has to be borne by the axial bearing. Because these pumps are designed to operate without auxiliary systems (things that do not exist can not fail), they are equipped with antifriction bearings and sump oil lubrication. To minimize the heat production within the bearing casing, a number of PWR plants have pumps with combined axial/radial bearings of the ball type. Due to the fact that the maximum axial thrust caused by static pressure and hydrodynamic forces on the impeller is too big to be borne by that type of axial bearing, the impellers were designed to produce a hydrodynamic axial force that counteracts the static axial force. Thus, the resulting axial thrust may change direction when the static pressure varies.

  4. Optimization of residual heat removal pump axial thrust and axial bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The residual heat removal (RHR) pumps of German 1300 megawatt pressurized-water reactor (PWR) power plants are of the single stage end suction type with volute casing or with diffuser and forged circular casing. Due to the service conditions the pumps have to cover the full capacity range as well as a big variation in suction static pressure. This results in a big difference in the axial thrust that has to be borne by the axial bearing. Because these pumps are designed to operate without auxiliary systems (things that do not exist can not fail), they are equipped with antifriction bearings and sump oil lubrication. To minimize the heat production within the bearing casing, a number of PWR plants have pumps with combined axial/radial bearings of the ball type. Due to the fact that the maximum axial thrust caused by static pressure and hydrodynamic forces on the impeller is too big to be borne by that type of axial bearing, the impellers were designed to produce a hydrodynamic axial force that counteracts the static axial force. Thus, the resulting axial thrust may change direction when the static pressure varies

  5. The Effect of Additives on The Performance of HydrostaticThrust Bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Abdul Sattar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with, the behavior of the hydrostatic thrust bearings lubricated with liquid-solid lubricants using Einstein viscosity formula, and taking into account the centrifugal force resulting from high speed. Also studied is the effect of the bearing dimensions on the pressure, flow rate, load capacity, shear stress, power consumption and stiffness. The theoretical results show an increase in load capacity by (8.3% in the presence of solid graphite particles with concentration of (16% by weight as compared with pure oil, with increasing shear stress. . In general the performance of hydrostatic thrust bearings improve for load carrying capacity, volume flow rate, pumping power subjected to centrifugal parameter (S, recess position (r1, film thickness ratio (?, particle concentration (?.

  6. Hydrodynamic optimization of trust ring pump and lubricating oil system for large hydroelectric units thrust bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, X.; Lu, Z.; Zhang, X.; Yang, S.

    2014-03-01

    Thrust-ring-pump is a kind of extreme-low specific speed centrifugal pump with special structure as numerous restrictions form thrust bearing and operation conditions of hydro turbine generator unit. Because the oil circulating and cooling system with thrust-ring- pump has a lot of advantages in maintenance and compactness in structure, it has widely been used in large and medium-sized hydro-generator units. Since the diameter and the speed of the thrust ring is limited by the generator set, the matching relationship between the flow passage inside the thrust ring (equivalent to impeller) and oil bath (equivalent to volute) has great influence on hydrodynamic performance of thrust-ring-pump, additionally, the head and discharge are varying with the operation conditions of hydro-generator unit and characteristic of the oil circulating and cooling system. As so far, the empirical calculation method is employed during the actual engineering design, in order to guarantee the operating performance of the oil circulating and cooling system with thrust-ring-pump at different conditions, a collaborative hydrodynamic design and optimization of both the oil circulating and cooling system and thrust-ring-pump is purposed in this paper. Firstly, the head and discharge required at different conditions are decided by 1D flow numerical simulation of the oil circulating and cooling system. Secondly, the flow passages of thrust-ring-pump are empirically designed under the restrictions of diameter and the speed of the thrust ring according to the head and discharge from the simulation. Thirdly, the flow passage geometry matching optimization between holes inside the thrust ring and oil bath is implemented by means of 3D flow simulation and performance prediction. Then, the pumps and the oil circulating and cooling system are collaborative hydrodynamic optimized with predicted head- discharge curve and the efficiency-discharge curve of thrust-ring-pump. The presented methodology has been adopted by DFEM in design process of thrust-ring-pump and it shown that can effectively improve and guarantee the performance of the oil circulating and cooling system.

  7. Investigation of the performance of high-speed thrust hydrostatic bearings with a jet compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of hydrostatic thrust bearings (HB) for footstep bearings with circular centre chambers of various width, various dam lengths and gaps have been investigated. During the experiments, average pressures have been measured in the chamber and on the footstep dams which enable the effect of centrifugal forces on the bearing load carrying capacity to be estimated according to pressure fields. Evaluated are an effect of the chamber width and, cosequently, that of the dam width at the same total bearing width (b=26 mm) on the bearing load carrying capacity, and the working liquid flow rate as well as an effect of the rotation rate on the above-mentioned characteristics. Water with low viscosity has been used as a working fluid

  8. An Optimal Performance Design on Lubrication Mechanism at Thrust Slide-Bearing of Scroll Compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Tatsuya; Ishii, Noriaki; Anami, Keiko; Sawai, Kiyoshi; Morimoto, Takashi; Iida, Noboru

    This study presents an establishment of optimal design method for lubrication at the thrust slide-bearing of scroll compressors, where, the analysis method using the average Reynolds equation by Patir & Cheng and the solid contact theory by Greenwood & Williamson were applied to calculate the resultant lubrication performance. For given values of friction area, thrust load and orbiting speed, the oil film pressure, the solid contact force and the friction forces were calculated to determine the friction coefficient. The friction coefficient decreased gradually with decreasing the friction area, because of decreased oil viscous force. When the friction area became quite small, however, the influence of the effect of surface roughness became large, thus resulting in increased friction coefficient. Thereby, the optimum performance appeared, which changes according to the friction area. In addition, the optimal friction area changed with the orbiting speed, the thrust load, the oil viscosity and the wedge angle. It was concluded that the optimal design values of the thrust slide-bearing can be calculated for given working conditions of the compressor.

  9. Defect diagnosis and root cause analysis for thrust roller bearing of centrifugal charging pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The centrifugal charging pump is one of the most important equipment for Nuclear power plant which requires very high reliability, during C9 fuel-cycle, the continuous high level vibration alarm happened on the centrifugal charging pump B, we diagnosed its faults correctly and selected the right operation mode and right time to dismantle it which ensure the safety and economic benefits of Nuclear power plant, and through deeply analysis the root causes of thrust bearing defaults, we can learn much from it especially for the diagnosis and analysis to the bearing faults which is common for rotating equipment. (author)

  10. Hydrologic data for the Cache Creek-Bear Thrust environmental impact statement near Jackson, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, G.S., Jr.; Ringen, B.H.; Cox, E.R.

    1981-01-01

    Information on the quantity and quality of surface and ground water in an area of concern for the Cache Creek-Bear Thrust Environmental Impact Statement in northwestern Wyoming is presented without interpretation. The environmental impact statement is being prepared jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Forest Service and concerns proposed exploration and development of oil and gas on leased Federal land near Jackson, Wyoming. Information includes data from a gaging station on Cache Creek and from wells, springs, and miscellaneous sites on streams. Data include streamflow, chemical and suspended-sediment quality of streams, and the occurrence and chemical quality of ground water. (USGS)

  11. The influence of Injection Pockets on the Performance of Tilting-Pad Thrust Bearings: Part I - Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrichson, Niels; Santos, Ilmar

    2006-01-01

    This is Part I of a two-part series of papers describing the effects of high pressure injection pockets on the operating conditions of tilting-pad thrust bearings. A numerical model based on the Reynolds equation is developed extending the three dimensional thermo-elasto-hydrodynamic (TEHD) analysis of tilting-pad thrust bearings to include the effects of high pressure injection and recesses in the bearing pad. The model is applied to the analysis of an existing bearing of large dimensions and the influence of the pocket is analyzed. It is shown that a shallow pocket positively influences the performance of the bearing as it has characteristics similar to those of a parallel step bearing.

  12. Effects of Gas Rarefaction on Dynamic Characteristics of Micro Spiral-Grooved Thrust Bearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ren; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Qing

    2012-04-01

    The effects of gas-rarefaction on dynamic characteristics of micro spiral-grooved-thrust-bearing are studied. The Reynolds equation is modified by the first order slip model, and the corresponding perturbation equations are then obtained on the basis of the linear small perturbation method. In the converted spiral-curve-coordinates system, the finite-volume-method (FVM) is employed to discrete the surface domain of micro bearing. The results show, compared with the continuum-flow model, that under the slip-flow regime, the decrease in the pressure and stiffness become obvious with the increasing of the compressibility number. Moreover, with the decrease of the relative gas-film-thickness, the deviations of dynamic coefficients between slip-flow-model and continuum-flow-model are increasing. PMID:23904692

  13. Rheodynamic Lubrication of an Externally Pressured Thrust Bearing Using Herschel-Bulkley Fluid with Sinusoidal Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.J. Amalraj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lubricants with variable viscosity are assuming greater importance for its application in polymer industry, thermal reactors and in biomechanics. With the bearing operations in machines being subject to high speeds, loads, increasing mechanical shearing forces and continually increasing pressure, there has been an increasing interest to use non-Newtonian fluids characterized by a yield value. Some of them, which fit into this class, are Bingham, Casson and Herchel-Bulkley models. In the present work, the problem of an externally pressurized thrust bearing lubricated with Herschel-Bulkley fluid under the sinusoidal flow rate has been investigated. Herschel-Bulkley fluids are characterized by a yield value, which leads to the formation of rigid core in the flow region. The shape and extent of the core has been determined numerically for various values of the Herschel-Bulkley number, power-law index, amplitude of sinusoidal fluid film and time. Numerical solutions have been obtained for the bearing performances such as pressure distribution and load capacity for different values of the Herschel-Bulkley number, power-law index, amplitude of sinusoidal fluid film and time. The effects of sinusoidal injection of the lubricant and the non-Newtonian characteristics on the bearing performances have been discussed.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Friction Effect on Liner Model Rolling Bearings for Large Diameter Thrust Bearing Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Babu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Studying friction coefficient has significant importance, especially when dealing with high load and temperature applications that have frequent starting and stopping points. Towards that, two sets of angular contact Linear Model Mockup Bearings (LMMB were designed and fabricated. This linear model assembly was made up of high precision, grounded raceways (AISI 4140 and commercially purchased balls (AISI 52100. The experimental studies were carried out by placing different number of balls between the raceways under different loads at dry lubricating condition. The static friction coefficients were measured using two different experiments: viz gravitation-based experiment and direct linear force measurement experiment. And Digital Image Correlation (DIC technique was used to find the stiffness of LMMB set.

  15. Numerical modelling of the flow in the annular multi-recess hydrostatic thrust bearing using CFD methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozdera, M.; Drbáková, S.

    2013-04-01

    The current research of hydrostatic bearings and hydrostatic slide-ways is far from being over. The topic is constantly evolving, creating new geometries of the sliding bearings, developing new types of friction materials and lubricants. The control elements of hydraulic mechanisms that serve to regulation of the hydrostatic bearings tipping are still in progress. Almost every application has different requirements for the bearings, whether in terms of loading capacity, speed rotation, and also the price. All these aspects should be included in the design of hydrostatic thrust bearings. Thanks to great advances in the development of computer technology and software for numerical modelling, we can simulate real movement of viscous fluids. To create a numerical model of hydrostatic thrust bearing, Ansys Fluent 14.0 software package has been applied. The article describes the basic methods of numerical modelling of the given problem and evaluates the pressure field and the loading capacity of annular multi-recess hydrostatic thrust bearing and its dependence on the change in static pressure.

  16. Numerical modelling of the flow in the annular multi-recess hydrostatic thrust bearing using CFD methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drbáková S.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The current research of hydrostatic bearings and hydrostatic slide-ways is far from being over. The topic is constantly evolving, creating new geometries of the sliding bearings, developing new types of friction materials and lubricants. The control elements of hydraulic mechanisms that serve to regulation of the hydrostatic bearings tipping are still in progress. Almost every application has different requirements for the bearings, whether in terms of loading capacity, speed rotation, and also the price. All these aspects should be included in the design of hydrostatic thrust bearings. Thanks to great advances in the development of computer technology and software for numerical modelling, we can simulate real movement of viscous fluids. To create a numerical model of hydrostatic thrust bearing, Ansys Fluent 14.0 software package has been applied. The article describes the basic methods of numerical modelling of the given problem and evaluates the pressure field and the loading capacity of annular multi-recess hydrostatic thrust bearing and its dependence on the change in static pressure.

  17. Optimal design of Tilting-Pad Thrust Bearings with High Pressure Injection Pockets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrichson, Niels; Santos, Ilmar

    2006-01-01

    A thermo-elasto-hydrodynamic(TEHD) model based on the Reynolds equation has been used to study the effect of oil injection pockets on the performance of tilting pad thrust bearings. The optimal position of the pivot both with respect to load carrying capacity and minimal power consumption is seen to move towards the leading edge of the pads as the pocket size is increased. A large pocket is seen to negatively influence the performance with respect to friction loss at most operating conditions while at some operating conditions it has a small positive influence. The small pocket has a slight positive influence on the friction loss at most operating conditions. Moderate thermal crowning is shown to have a positive effect on performance, reducing friction loss.

  18. The Influence of Injection Pockets on the Performance of Tilting-Pad Thrust Bearings - Part I: Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrichson, Niels; Santos, Ilmar

    2007-01-01

    This is Part I of a two-part series of papers describing the effects of high-pressure injection pockets on the operating conditions of tilting-pad thrust bearings. In Part I a numerical model based on the Reynolds equation is developed extending the threedimensional thermoelastohydrodynamic (TEHD) analysis of tilting-pad thrust bearings to include the effects of high-pressure injection and recesses in the bearing pads. The model is applied to the analysis of an existing bearing of large dimensions and the influence of the pocket is analyzed. In the analysis, the high-pressure oil injection used for hydrostatic jacking is turned off (i.e., only the effect of the pocket is studied). It is shown that a shallow pocket positively influences the performance of the bearing because it has characteristics similar to those of a Rayleigh-step bearing. In Part II of the paper (Heinrichson, N., Fuerst, A., and Santos, I. F., 2007, ASME J. Tribol., 129(4), pp. 904–912) measurements of pressure profiles and oil film thickness for a test-pad are compared to theoretical results. The analysis of Part II deals both with flow situations, where the high-pressure injection is turned off, as well as with situations where it is turned on for hydrostatic jacking.

  19. The Experimental Analyses of the Effects of the Geometric and Working Parameters on the Circular Hydrostatic Thrust Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canbulut, Fazıl

    In this paper, the characteristics of disk-type hydrostatic thrust bearings supporting concentric loads; simulating the major bearing/seal parts of axial piston pumps and motors were investigated. An experimental setup was designed to determine the performance of slippers, which are capable of increasing the efficiency of axial piston pumps and motors, for different conditions. The working parameters and the slipper geometry causing the minimum frictional power loss and leakage oil loss were determined. Since slippers affect the performance of the system considerably, the effects of surface roughnesses on lubrication were studied in slippers with varying hydrostatic bearing areas and surface roughness. The results of the study suggest that the frictional power loss and leakage oil loss were caused by the surface roughness, the relative velocity, the size of the hydrostatic bearing area, supply pressure and capillary tube diameter.

  20. A Computer Based Approach for the Design of the Orifice-Compensated with Feeding Pocket Annular Hydrostatic Thrust Bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Al-Ajlouni

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The orifice-compensated with feeding pocket annular hydrostatic (OCFPAH thrust bearing is a unique type of gas bearingwith many distinguishing characteristics. It is finding many applications in ultra high-speed rotors. A computer code waswritten to overcome the difficulties involved in the design of such a bearing. Initially, the design charts were converted intothe alternative equations using a curve-fitting technique. The program, which is based on these equations, was designed sothat mechanical and physical properties of the lubricant and the main dimensions of the bearing can be entered in a userfriendlymanner. Many runs of the code have been carried out successfully. The code has proven to be fast, compatible with CAD and CAD/CAM packages as well as the ability of linking it with data banks and the Internet.

  1. Inertia Effects in Rheodynamic Lubrication of an Externally Pressurized Thrust Bearing Using Bingham Lubricant with Sinusoidal Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.J. Amalraj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present theoretical investigation, the combined effects of fluid inertia forces and sinusoidal injection of the Bingham lubricant, on the performance of an externally pressurized thrust bearing with circular geometry are studied. Using the conventional two-constant Bingham model and by adopting the method of averaging inertia terms, the reduced Navier-Stokes equations are modified and numerical solutions have been obtained for the bearing performances such as the pressure distribution and the load carrying capacity for different values of Bingham number, Reynolds number, time and amplitude. The effects of fluid inertia forces and the non-Newtonian characteristics of the Bingham lubricant on the bearing performances for different sinusoidal conditions are discussed.

  2. Performance of integrated retainer rings in silicon micro-turbines with thrust style micro-ball bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergert, Robert J.; Hanrahan, Brendan; Ghodssi, Reza; Holmes, Andrew S.

    2013-06-01

    This work explores the performance of different silicon retainer ring designs when integrated into silicon micro-turbines (SMTs) incorporating thrust style bearings supported on 500 µm diameter steel balls. Experimental performance curves are presented for SMTs with rotor diameters of 5 mm and 10 mm, each with five different retainer designs varying in mechanical rigidity, ball pocket shape and ball complement. It was found that the different retainer designs yielded different performance curves, with the closed pocket designs consistently requiring lower input power for a given rotation speed, and the most rigid retainers giving the best performance overall. Both 5 mm and 10 mm diameter devices have shown repeatable performance at rotation speeds up to and exceeding 20?000 RPM with input power levels below 2 W, and devices were tested for over 2.5 million revolutions without failure. Retainer rings are commonly used in macro-scale bearings to ensure uniform spacing between the rolling elements. The integration of retainers into micro-bearings could lower costs by reducing the number of balls required for stable operation, and also open up the possibility of ‘smart’ bearings with integrated sensors to monitor the bearing status.

  3. Comparison of Models for the Steady-State Analysis of Tilting-Pad Thrust Bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrichson, Niels; Santos, Ilmar

    2005-01-01

    Prediction of the minimum oil film thickness and the maximum temperature on the surface of the bearing pad is crucial in the design and dimensioning of bearings. Friction loss, oil bath temperature and pad deflection are other parameters of interest. Depending on the desired information a numerical model requires different levels of detail. The two dimensional Reynolds equation for pressure in the oil film can be solved isothermally or considering viscosity variations in two or three dimensions, requiring solution of the equations for thermal equilibrium in oil and pad. Knowing the temperature distribution the deflection of the pad due to pressure and thermal bending can be calculated using a flat plate approximation. At the five free sides of the pad heat transfer can be modelled. The temperature distribution at the inlet to the pad can be calculated through equilibrium of thermal energy for the groove between pads and the oil bath temperature from energy equilibrium for the entire bearing. The main theoretical contribution of this paper is the elaboration and comparison of 7 different mathematical models of increasing complexity. The results are compared to experimental data for steady-state operation of a 228 mm outer diameter bearing. It is found that for the given bearing a two dimensional model is sufficient to estimate the minimum oil film thickness and the maximum temperature on the pad surface. Three dimensional modelling does not improve the quality of the results.

  4. Heterogeneous strength and fault zone complexity of carbonate-bearing thrusts with possible implications for seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesei, Telemaco; Collettini, Cristiano; Barchi, Massimiliano R.; Carpenter, Brett M.; Di Stefano, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of fault-slip behaviour in carbonates has an important societal impact due to the widespread occurrence and propagation of earthquakes in these rocks. Fault rock variations in carbonates are systematically controlled by the lithology of the faulted protolith: cataclasis and hydraulic fracturing with evidence of past seismic slip commonly affect fault rocks in competent limestone formations whereas widespread pressure-solution and sliding along clay foliation are observed in marly rocks. We performed a series of friction experiments on carbonatic fault rocks sampled from mature thrusts (>2 km displacement) in the Apennines of Italy. We sheared both intact wafers and powdered fault materials at low (10 MPa) and in situ (53 MPa) normal stress under room-humidity and water-saturated conditions. We used velocity steps (1 to 300 ?m/s) and slide-hold-slide (3-1000 s holds) to assess the frictional stability and healing behaviour of these rocks. We observe that cataclastic fault rocks derived from competent limestones are characterized by high friction coefficients coupled with significant post-slip restrengthening and velocity-weakening behaviour. Conversely, intact foliated marly tectonites, sheared under the same conditions, show low friction, null post-slip healing and stable velocity-strengthening behaviour suggesting that these rocks deform aseismically. To extrapolate these opposite mechanical behaviours to the entire fault surface we developed a fault model integrating our mechanical data, field observations and balanced geological cross-sections. The mechanical heterogeneities highlighted in the model provide constraints for the distribution of fault patches with higher seismogenic potential.

  5. Measuring axial pump thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchoza, Bernard P. (McMurray, PA); Becse, Imre (Washington, PA)

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.

  6. Numerical simulation of flow in thrust bearing rotor-stator wheel space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the use of a computational fluid dyanamics code for solving the navier-stokes equations for the flow of air in a sealed rotor-stator cavity having a tight clearance. Presented also is a description of the computational code which uses a calculation procedure that solves the govering differential equations by a finite-voume method, and simulates the turbulent streesses by a mixing length turbulence model. The code is validated for a static case with experimental data. Results are presented and discussed for static and rotaing test cases showing the influence of various individual parameters (mass flow, seal clearance, and rotor speeds) on the fluid danamics of the rotor-stator cavity. The numerical results of the static test cases have indicated that the cavity pressure varies nontinearly with a variable seal clearance at a fixed mass flow rate resulting in a nonlinear bearing stiffness. Moreover, the cavity radial pressure distribution is not constant in the rotational test cases, especially at high rotational reynolds numbers. (author). 23 refs., 13 figs., 1 table

  7. The Development of Open Water-lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Thrust Bearings for Use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooley, Craig, H.; Khonsari, Michael,, M; Lingwall, Brent

    2012-11-28

    Polycrstalline diamond (PCD) bearings were designed, fabricated and tested for marine-hydro-kinetic (MHK) application. Bearing efficiency and life were evaluated using the US Synthetic bearing test facility. Three iterations of design, build and test were conducted to arrive at the best bearing design. In addition life testing that simulated the starting and stopping and the loading of real MHK applications were performed. Results showed polycrystalline diamond bearings are well suited for MHK applications and that diamond bearing technology is TRL4 ready. Based on life tests results bearing life is estimated to be at least 11.5 years. A calculation method for evaluating the performance of diamond bearings of round geometry was also investigated and developed. Finally, as part of this effort test bearings were supplied free of charge to the University of Alaska for further evaluation. The University of Alaska test program will subject the diamond bearings to sediment laden lubricating fluid.

  8. 2D THD and 3D TEHD analysis of large spindle supported thrust bearings with pins and double layer system used in the three gorges hydroelectric generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 2D THD model and a 3DTEHD model for large spindle supported thrust bearings were set up and used to analyze the lubrication performance of the Three Gorges test thrust beating withpins and double layer system developed by Alstom Power. The finite difference method was employed to solve the THD model, and the thermal-elasticdeformations in the pad and runner were obtained by the finite element software ANSYS11.0. The data transfer between the THD model and ANSYS11.0 was carried out automatically by an interface program.A detailed comparison between the experimental results and numerical predictions by the two different modelsset up in this paper was carried out. Poor agreement has been found between the theoretical results obtained by 2D THD model and experimental data, while 3D TEHD provides fairly good agreement, confirming the importance of thermal effects and thermal-elastic deformations in both pad and runner.

  9. Numerical modelling of the flow in the annular multi-recess hydrostatic thrust bearing using CFD methods

    OpenAIRE

    Drbáková S.; Kozdera M.

    2013-01-01

    The current research of hydrostatic bearings and hydrostatic slide-ways is far from being over. The topic is constantly evolving, creating new geometries of the sliding bearings, developing new types of friction materials and lubricants. The control elements of hydraulic mechanisms that serve to regulation of the hydrostatic bearings tipping are still in progress. Almost every application has different requirements for the bearings, whether in terms of loading capacity, speed rotation, and al...

  10. Bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miss Bledsoe

    2011-04-07

    What are the characteristics of grizzly/brown bears and black bears? As you view the websites, please use this chart to record what you are learning about grizzly bears and black bears. For each bear, you should list 5 characteristics. Grizzly Bear and Black Bear Chart We will first begin by learning about black bears. Please go to these websites to learn some important facts about black bears. Black Bears Facts and Image Black Bear Facts for Kids Now that you have learned ...

  11. The influence of Injection Pockets on the Performance of Tilting-Pad Thrust Bearings: Part II - Comparison Between Theory and Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrichson, Niels; Fuerst, Axel

    2006-01-01

    This is Part II of a two-part series of papers describing the effects of high pressure injection pockets on the operating conditions of tilting-pad thrust bearings. Measurements of the distribution of pressure and oil film thickness are presented for tilting-pad thrust bearing pads of approximately 100 cm2 surface area. Two pads are measured in a laboratory test-rig at loads of approximately 0.5, 1.5 and 4.0 MPa and velocities of up to 33 m/s. One pad has a plain surface. The other pad has a conical injection pocket at the pivot point and a leading edge taper. The measurements are compared to theoretical values obtained using a three dimensional thermo-elasto-hydrodynamic (TEHD) numerical model. At low and intermediate loads the theoretical pressure distribution corresponds well to the measured values for both pads although the influence of the pocket is slightly underestimated. At high loads large discrepancies exist for the pad with an injection pocket. It is argued that this is likely to be due to the unevenness of the collar surface. The measured and theoretical values of oil film thickness compare well at low loads. At high loads discrepancies grow to up to 25 %. It is argued that this is due to the accuracy of the measurements.

  12. Efecto de la textura superficial en el desempeño a fricción de cojinetes de empuje / Effect of the Surface Texture on Friction Thrust Bearing Performance

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    F.A., Suárez-Bustamante; F.M., Toro-Botero; J.M., Vélez-Restrepo.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se presenta un modelo teórico que establece relaciones entre las condiciones de operación de un cojinete de empuje, su micro-topografía acondicionada y el coeficiente de fricción, cuando opera en condiciones de Lubricación Hidrodinámica (HL). Entre los resultados más sobresalientes o [...] btenidos en una exploración efectuada con el modelo están: la construcción de un mapa donde se caracteriza el desempeño de estos componentes y la obtención de algunas relaciones entre diversos grupos adimensionales, los cuales muestran que es factible ampliar el régimen de lubricación hidrodinámica de este tipo de cojinetes mediante el acondicionamiento artificial de sus superficies. Abstract in english This paper shows a theoretical model which stablishes relations among the operational conditions of a thrust bearing, its conditioned microtopography and the friction coeficient when it works under Hydrodynamic Lubrication conditions. Among the most outstanding results obtained from an exploration m [...] ade with the model are: building of a map where the performance of these components is characterized and the obtention of some relations among several adimentional groups that show the possiblility to enhance the hydrodynamic lubrication regime for this sort of bearings by artificial conditioning of their surfaces.

  13. The Influence of Injection Pockets on the Performance of Tilting-Pad Thrust Bearings - Part II: Comparison Between Theory and Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrichson, Niels; Fuerst, Axel

    2007-01-01

    This is Part II of a two-part series of papers describing the effects of high-pressure injection pockets on the operating conditions of tilting-pad thrust bearings. The paper has two main objectives. One is an experimental investigation of the influence of an oil injection pocket on the pressure distribution and oil film thickness. Two situations are analyzed: (i) when the high-pressure oil injection is turned off and (ii) when the highpressure injection is turned on. The other objective is to validate a numerical model with respect to its ability to predict the influence of such a pocket (with and without oil injection) on the pressure distribution and oil film thickness. Measurements of the distribution of pressure and oil film thickness are presented for tilting-pad thrust bearing pads of approx. 100 cm^2 surface area. Two pads are measured in a laboratory test rig at loads of approx. 1.5 MPa and approx. 4.0 MPa and velocities of up to 33 m/s. One pad has a plain surface. The other pad has a conical injection pocket at the pivot point and a leading-edge taper. The measurements are compared to theoretical values obtained using a three-dimensional thermoelastohydrodynamic (TEHD) numerical model. At the low load, the theoretical pressure distribution corresponds well with the measured values for both pads, although the influence of the pocket is slightly underestimated. At the high load, large discrepancies exist for the pad with an injection pocket. It is argued that the discrepancies are due mainly to geometric inaccuracies of the collar surface, although they may to some extent be due to the simplifications employed in a Reynolds equation description of the pocket flow. The measured and theoretical values of oil film thickness compare well at low loads and velocities. At high loads and velocities, discrepancies grow to up to 25%. This is due to the accuracy of the measurements. When using hydrostatic jacking the model predicts the start-up behavior well.

  14. 1-Way Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A one-way bearing is provided having sprags and rolling bearings both disposed between an inner and an outer race. The sprags may comprise three-dimensional sprags for preventing rotation in a non-preferential direction. The roll- ing bearings may comprise thrust rollers for transmitting axial, tilt, and radial loads between the inner and outer races.

  15. Variable thrust cartridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-11-07

    The present invention is a variable thrust cartridge comprising a water-molten aluminum reaction chamber from which a slug is propelled. The cartridge comprises a firing system that initiates a controlled explosion from the reaction chamber. The explosive force provides a thrust to a slug, preferably contained within the cartridge.

  16. PPT thrust stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Thomas W.

    1995-11-01

    A torsional-type thrust stand has been designed and built to test Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT's) in both single shot and repetitive operating modes. Using this stand, momentum per pulse was determined strictly as a function of thrust stand deflection, spring constant, and natural frequency. No empirical corrections were required. The accuracy of the method was verified using a swinging impact pendulum. Momentum transfer data between the thrust stand and the pendulum were consistent to within 1%. Following initial calibrations, the stand was used to test a Lincoln Experimental Satellite (LES-8/9) thruster. The LES-8/9 system had a mass of approximately 7.5 kg, with a nominal thrust to weight ratio of 1.3 x 10(exp -5). A total of 34 single shot thruster pulses were individually measured. The average impulse bit per pulse was 266 microN-s, which was slightly less than the value of 300 microN-s published in previous reports on this device. Repetitive pulse measurements were performed similar to ordinary steady-state thrust measurements. The thruster was operated for 30 minutes at a repetition rate of 132 pulses per minute and yielded an average thrust of 573 microN. Using average thrust, the average impulse bit per pulse was estimated to be 260 microN-s, which was in agreement with the single shot data. Zero drift during the repetitive pulse test was found to be approximately 1% of the measured thrust.

  17. A MICRO TURBINE DEVICE WITH ENHANCED MICRO AIR-BEARINGS

    OpenAIRE

    Shan, X. -c; Zhang, Qide; Sun, Y. F.; Maeda, R.

    2006-01-01

    As part of progress in developing a micro gas turbine engine, this paper presents the design, fabrication and testing of a silicon-based micro turbine device, which is driven by compressed air. To improve its rotational speed and stability, the turbine device has enhanced journal air bearing and thrust air bearings. The thrust air bearings are utilized for supporting the rotor from both its top- and bottom- sides. The top thrust air bearing employs pump-in type spiral grooves, and the bottom ...

  18. Hydrostatic and hybrid bearing design

    CERN Document Server

    Rowe, W B

    1983-01-01

    Hydrostatic and Hybrid Bearing Design is a 15-chapter book that focuses on the bearing design and testing. This book first describes the application of hydrostatic bearings, as well as the device pressure, flow, force, power, and temperature. Subsequent chapters discuss the load and flow rate of thrust pads; circuit design, flow control, load, and stiffness; and the basis of the design procedures and selection of tolerances. The specific types of bearings, their design, dynamics, and experimental methods and testing are also shown. This book will be very valuable to students of engineering des

  19. Bearing construction for refrigeration compresssor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Marc G. (Wyoming, MI); Nelson, Richard T. (Worthington, OH)

    1988-01-01

    A hermetic refrigeration compressor has a cylinder block and a crankshaft rotatable about a vertical axis to reciprocate a piston in a cylinder on the cylinder block. A separate bearing housing is secured to the central portion of the cylinder block and extends vertically along the crankshaft, where it carries a pair of roller bearings to journal the crankshaft. The crankshaft has a radially extending flange which is journaled by a thrust-type roller bearing above the bearing housing to absorb the vertical forces on the crankshaft so that all three of the roller bearings are between the crankshaft and the bearing housing to maintain and control the close tolerances required by such bearings.

  20. Recommended Practices in Thrust Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, James E.; Pancotti, Anthony; Haag, Thomas; King, Scott; Walker, Mitchell; Blakely, Joseph; Ziemer, John

    2013-01-01

    Accurate, direct measurement of thrust or impulse is one of the most critical elements of electric thruster characterization, and one of the most difficult measurements to make. The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics has started an initiative to develop standards for many important measurement processes in electric propulsion, including thrust measurements. This paper summarizes recommended practices for the design, calibration, and operation of pendulum thrust stands, which are widely recognized as the best approach for measuring micro N- to mN-level thrust and micro Ns-level impulse bits. The fundamentals of pendulum thrust stand operation are reviewed, along with its implementation in hanging pendulum, inverted pendulum, and torsional balance configurations. Methods of calibration and recommendations for calibration processes are presented. Sources of error are identified and methods for data processing and uncertainty analysis are discussed. This review is intended to be the first step toward a recommended practices document to help the community produce high quality thrust measurements.

  1. Thrust modeling for hypersonic engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggins, D. W.; Mcclinton, C. R.

    1995-01-01

    Expressions for the thrust losses of a scramjet engine are developed in terms of irreversible entropy increases and the degree of incomplete combustion. A method is developed which allows the calculation of the lost vehicle thrust due to different loss mechanisms within a given flow-field. This analysis demonstrates clearly the trade-off between mixing enhancement and resultant increased flow losses in scramjet combustors. An engine effectiveness parameter is defined in terms of thrust loss. Exergy and the thrust-potential method are related and compared.

  2. Finite thrust orbital transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    The finite thrust optimal transfer in the presence of the Earth's shadow and oblate planet perturbations is a problem of strong interest in modern telecommunication satellite design with plasmic propulsion. The Maximum Principle cannot be used in its standard form to deal with the Earth's shadow. In this paper, using a regularization of the Hamiltonian which expands the Maximum Principle application domain, we provide for the first time, the necessary conditions in a very general context for the finite thrust optimal transfer with limited power around an oblate planet. The costate in such problems is generally discontinuous. To obtain fast numerical solutions, the averaging of the Hamiltonian is introduced. Two classes of boundary conditions are analyzed and numerically solved: the minimum time and the minimum fuel at a fixed time. These two problems are the basic tools for designing the orbit raising of a satellite after the launcher injection into its separation orbit. Numerical solutions have been calculated for the more important applications of LEO to GEO/MEO missions and the results have been reported and discussed.

  3. Army (MANTECH) thrust area concept: Optics thrust area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacz, Stanley P.

    1992-04-01

    With the shrinking of the U.S. Army's material needs and the compression of defense requirements, the Army Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) Program has the opportunity to advance the manufacturing state-of-the-art and solve near term production problems of the U.S. industrial base. To exploit this opportunity, the Army restructured its MANTECH efforts in FY 90 based on a thrust area concept. Each of the ten current thrusts, directed by a thrust area manager, has a broad technical objective selected to improve specific manufacturing processes. The manager is charged with setting objectives, selecting tasks, monitoring execution, leveraging external resources, and establishing microfactories to promote technology transfer. The Optics Manufacturing Thrust is an example of the concept. It is currently directed at revitalizing the domestic precision optics manufacturing base, now characterized by high labor costs and 1940's technology, through introduction of revolutionary machines, new processes, and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) principles. Leveraging of MANTECH dollars with those of industry, academia, and state governments led to the establishment of the center for Optics Manufacturing and plans for regional centers. Recognition of the U.S. as a world leader in precision optics manufacturing and a dramatic reduction of both manufacturing time and cost should accrue from thrust area efforts.

  4. Centrifuge modelling of fold—thrust structures in a tripartite stratigraphic succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, John M.; Tirrul, Rein

    Analog models measuring 127 × 76 mm in plan were deformed at 2500-4000 g in a centrifuge. Scaled stratigraphic sequences were constructed of anisotropic multilayers with individual layers of Plasticine and silicone putty as thin as 40 ?m. The plasticine—silicone putty multilayers are analogs for interbedded competent carbonates and clastics, and incompetent pelites, given the model ratios of acceleration, 2500 g; length, 5 × 10 -6; specific gravity, 0.6; time 10 -10. Modelling of fold—thrust tectonics emphasizes the influence of stratigraphic succession on structural evolution. The models are constructed with a tripartite stratigraphic succession comprising basal and upper, well-laminated and incompetent units, and a middle, somewhat more isotropic and competent unit. The models deform by three mechanisms: layer-parallel shortening, folding and thrust faulting. They reproduce a number of fold—thrust relationships that have been observed in nature. Folds are typically periclinal, in en échelon arrays. Folds and thrusts are arcuate in plan, reflecting differential shortening. Fold attitudes grade from upright at high levels to overturned at deeper levels within a structural panel, reflecting drag against the basal décollement; fold axial surfaces and thrust faults are listric. While competent units may be offset by localized displacement on thrust faults, the discrete faults may die out both upwards and downwards into regions of ductile strain in less-competent units. Thrust faults appear to follow staircase trajectories through the strata, transecting incompetent units at shallow angles to bedding and competent units at steeper angles. However, the apparent staircase pattern results from propagation of a fault along a relatively straight trajectory through previously-folded strata. Foreland-verging thrusts are more common than back thrusts; the latter have steeper dips. The models suggest a mechanism of thrust-ramp nucleation following detachment folding: long-wavelength buckling of a competent unit can initiate localized strain (folding and layer-parallel shear) in an underlying incompetent unit, beneath the anticlines of the competent unit; thrust faults propagate up-section from these high-strain zones through the foreland-dipping limbs of buckle-folds in the competent unit. This mechanism may explain the commonly-observed spatial periodicity of thrust ramps. The model results bear similarities to natural fold—thrust belts in which the stratigraphic succession consists of three mechanical units, for example, the Asiak Foreland and Bear Creek Hills fold—thrust belts of the Slave Province, Northwest Territories, Canada.

  5. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  6. High Thrust-Density Electrostaic Engines Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — These issues are addressable by: increasing the thrust, power, and thrust-to-power ratio capability of EP systems; reducing the non-recurring engineering systems...

  7. Polar Bear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, S.D.; DeMaster

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  8. Thrust-Vector-Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jonathan

    1992-01-01

    Control gains computed via matrix Riccati equation. Software-based system controlling aim of gimbaled rocket motor on spacecraft adaptive and optimal in sense it adjusts control gains in response to feedback, according to optimizing algorithm based on cost function. Underlying control concept also applicable, with modifications, to thrust-vector control on vertical-takeoff-and-landing airplanes, control of orientations of scientific instruments, and robotic control systems.

  9. Failure of GIMBAL bearing in directional GYRO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper relates to the directional gyro of a sensing device used in indigenously developed surface-to-surface missile. The assembling of more than one thousand components in the form of several sub assemblies including hundreds of silver solders of this device was done in the hundred-thousands-class clean room according to assembly procedure. Whereas more than twenty bearings including gimbals bearings were assembled in the ten-thousands-class clean room after inspection/ testing them on beating testing system as per routine. The device was entered in testing and adjustment phase after successful completion of assembly work. The directional gyro qualified all the tests except the most critical one, the drift-rate. The drift-rate of outer gimbal was 60% more than permissible limit whereas drift-rate of inner gimbal was found O.K. It was diagnosed that at least one inner gimbal bearing out of two had some problem. The results were same after rebalancing of gimbals three times. The directional gyro was disassembled in clean room and the radial-thrust-bearing was recovered and flange bearing which are inner gimbal bearings. They were checked on bearing testing system and it was found that flange-bearing had more friction than permissible limit and hence rejected but radial thrust bearing were declared O.K. The gyro was reassembled with new O.K. flange bearing and the assembly work was completed in all respects. The sensing device qualified all the tests including the dce qualified all the tests including the drift-rate. This case study is being presented to emphasize the importance of careful assembly of gyro in clean environment. (author)

  10. Multiplicity with a thrust cut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluate the multiplicity of hadrons in the e+e--annihilation at a given thrust T in the modified leading-log approximation, including O(??s) corrections. The calculation is done at a large value of ?=1-T by the use of the factorisation which takes place in the one-particle-inclusive cross section at a given ?. At a small ?, a different type of factorisation takes place, which also enable us to evaluate the multiplicity. Two approaches are compares numerically. Measuring this quantity near ?=1/3, we can determine the multiplicity ratio between a gluon-jet and a quark-jet. (orig.)

  11. Static Load Distribution in Ball Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Mario

    2010-01-01

    A numerical procedure for computing the internal loading distribution in statically loaded, single-row, angular-contact ball bearings when subjected to a known combined radial and thrust load is presented. The combined radial and thrust load must be applied in order to avoid tilting between inner and outer rings. The numerical procedure requires the iterative solution of Z + 2 simultaneous nonlinear equations - where Z is the number of the balls - to yield an exact solution for axial and radial deflections, and contact angles. Numerical results for a 218 angular-contact ball bearing have been compared with those from the literature and show significant differences in the magnitudes of the ball loads, contact angles, and the extent of the loading zone.

  12. Computer-aided selection of materials for cryogenic turbopump bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, R. E.; Pallini, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The life requirement for the angular contact ball bearings in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high-pressure-oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) is 7.5 hours. In actual operation, significantly shorter service life has been experienced. The objective of this current program is to identify bearing materials and/or materials processing techniques offering significant potential for extending HPOTP bearing performance life. A thermomechanical analysis of the HPOTP shaft/bearing system was performed with the SHABERTH (SHaft-BEaring-THermal) computer program. Bearing fatigue life, ball-race contact stress, heat generation rate, bulk ring temperatures, and circumferential stress in the inner rings were quantified as functions of radial load, thrust load, and ball-race contact friction. The analysis results were used to formulate criteria that are being used for the selection of special materials for future turbopump bearings.

  13. Operation and design selection of high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axial and radial high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnetic bearings are evaluated by their parameters. Journal bearings possess advantages over thrust bearings. High magnetic gradients in a multi-pole permanent magnet (PM) configuration, the surrounding melt textured YBCO stator and adequate designs are the key features for increasing the overall bearing stiffness. The gap distance between rotor and stator determines the specific forces and has a strong impact on the PM rotor design. We report on the designing, building and measuring of a 200 mm prototype 100 kg HTS bearing with an encapsulated and thermally insulated melt textured YBCO ring stator. The encapsulation requires a magnetically large-gap (4-5 mm) operation but reduces the cryogenic effort substantially. The bearing requires 3 l of LN2 for cooling down, and about 0.2 l LN2 h-1 under operation. This is a dramatic improvement of the efficiency and in the practical usage of HTS magnetic bearings

  14. Thrust-Vector Deflectors For Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, William C.

    1990-01-01

    Rotating shield steers thrust in desired direction. Report discusses use of thrust-vector deflectors (TVD's) to enhance controllability and reduce number of small rocket engines (thrustors) needed to control attitudes of artificial satellites. Developed in aircraft industry for use in jet engines. Principal advantages gained, lower cost and greater simplicity.

  15. AXIAL THRUST IN THE IMPELLER PUMPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Jankowski

    1972-01-01

    Full Text Available The system of forces acting at the pump rotors and also the influence of the working conditions on the dimensions and distribution of the axial thrust are presented.The essential formulas, for the calculation of the axial thrust value are given on the basis of the most recent research.

  16. Thrust vectoring for Eurofighter - The first steps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikaza, D. [Project Manager, Nozzles With Industria de Turbo Propulsores, Muenchen (Germany); Rausch, Ch. [Project Manager, Thrust Vector Engine Control With MTU Motoren-und Turbinen-Union, Muenchen (Germany)

    2000-02-01

    Thrust vectoring has the potential to provide significant improvements in combat aircraft performance and stability. As Eurofighter Typhoon moves into production, ITP and MTU are pursing a research and technology acquisition project to investigate the design of a thrust vectoring nozzle system suitable for future application to the EJ2000 engine. This paper describes the current status and progress of this project. (authors)

  17. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  18. Hydrodynamic bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Bonneau, Dominique; Souchet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    This Series provides the necessary elements to the development and validation of numerical prediction models for hydrodynamic bearings. This book describes the rheological models and the equations of lubrication. It also presents the numerical approaches used to solve the above equations by finite differences, finite volumes and finite elements methods.

  19. High power thrust vector actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittock, M. J.

    1993-06-01

    Modern missile programs are frequently favoring electro-mechanical (EM) thrust vector actuation (TVA) over hydraulic for a variety of reasons. However, actuation system performance requirements are not relaxed for EM systems. Thus the development of EM systems with greater power output is required. The configuration of EM actuator studied consists of a DC brushless motor driving a spur gear train, which drives a ballscrew that converts rotary motion to rectilinear motion. This design produces an actuator with high levels of performance in a compact mechanical package. Design for manufacturability and assembly (DFMA) was part of the design process, resulting in an actuator that can be assembled easily and will operate reliably. This paper will discuss the mechanical details of the resultant actuator and report test results on a prototype derivative.

  20. System for testing bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, John C. (inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Disclosed here is a system for testing bearings wherein a pair of spaced bearings provides support for a shaft on which is mounted a bearing to be tested, this bearing being mounted in a bearing holder spaced from and in alignment with the pair of bearings. The bearing holder is provided with an annular collar positioned in an opening in the bearing holder for holding the bearing to be tested. A screw threaded through the bearing holder into engagement with the annular collar can be turned to force the collar radially out of alignment with the pair of bearings to apply a radial load to the bearing.

  1. Bearing structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hydrostatic bearing for the lower end of the vertical shaft of a sodium pump comprises a support shell encircling the shaft and a bush located between the shell and shaft. Liquid sodium is fed from the pump outlet to the bush/shaft and bush/shell interfaces to provide hydrostatic support. The bush outer surface and the shell inner surface are of complementary part-spherical shape and the bush floats relative to the shaft so that the bush can align itself with the shaft axis. Monitoring of the relative rotational speed of the bush with respect to the shaft (such rotation being induced by the viscous drag forces present) is also performed for the purposes of detecting abnormal operation of the bearing or partial seizure, at least one magnet is rotatable with the bush, and a magnetic sensor provides an output having a frequency related to the speed of the bush. (author)

  2. Pulsed Ejector Thrust Amplification Tested and Modeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jack

    2004-01-01

    There is currently much interest in pulsed detonation engines for aeronautical propulsion. This, in turn, has sparked renewed interest in pulsed ejectors to increase the thrust of such engines, since previous, though limited, research had indicated that pulsed ejectors could double the thrust in a short device. An experiment has been run at the NASA Glenn Research Center, using a shrouded Hartmann-Sprenger tube as a source of pulsed flow, to measure the thrust augmentation of a statistically designed set of ejectors. A Hartmann- Sprenger tube directs the flow from a supersonic nozzle (Mach 2 in the present experiment) into a closed tube. Under appropriate conditions, an oscillation is set up in which the jet flow alternately fills the tube and then spills around flow emerging from the tube. The tube length determines the frequency of oscillation. By shrouding the tube, the flow was directed out of the shroud as an axial stream. The set of ejectors comprised three different ejector lengths, three ejector diameters, and three nose radii. The thrust of the jet alone, and then of the jet plus ejector, was measured using a thrust plate. The arrangement is shown in this photograph. Thrust augmentation is defined as the thrust of the jet with an ejector divided by the thrust of the jet alone. The experiments exhibited an optimum ejector diameter and length for maximizing the thrust augmentation, but little dependence on nose radius. Different frequencies were produced by changing the length of the Hartmann-Sprenger tube, and the experiment was run at a total of four frequencies. Additional measurements showed that the major feature of the pulsed jet was a starting vortex ring. The size of the vortex ring depended on the frequency, as did the optimum ejector diameter.

  3. Low thrust chemical rocket technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    An on-going technology program to improve the performance of low thrust chemical rockets for spacecraft on-board propulsion applications is reviewed. Improved performance and lifetime is sought by the development of new predictive tools to understand the combustion and flow physics, introduction of high temperature materials and improved component designs to optimize performance, and use of higher performance propellants. Improved predictive technology is sought through the comparison of both local and global predictions with experimental data. Predictions are based on both the RPLUS Navier-Stokes code with finite rate kinetics and the JANNAF methodology. Data were obtained with laser-based diagnostics along with global performance measurements. Results indicate that the modeling of the injector and the combustion process needs improvement in these codes and flow visualization with a technique such as 2-D laser induced fluorescence (LIF) would aid in resolving issues of flow symmetry and shear layer combustion processes. High temperature material fabrication processes are under development and small rockets are being designed, fabricated, and tested using these new materials. Rhenium coated with iridium for oxidation protection was produced by the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process and enabled an 800 K increase in rocket operating temperature. Performance gains with this material in rockets using Earth storable propellants (nitrogen tetroxide and monomethylhydrazine or hydrazine) were obtained through component redesign to eliminate fuel film cooling and its associated combustion inefficiency while managing head end thermal soakback. Material interdiffusion and oxidation characteristics indicated that the requisite lifetimes of tens of hours were available for thruster applications. Rockets were designed, fabricated, and tested with thrusts of 22, 62, 440 and 550 N. Performance improvements of 10 to 20 seconds specific impulse were demonstrated. Higher performance propellants were evaluated: Space storable propellants, including liquid oxygen (LOX) as the oxidizer with nitrogen hydrides or hydrocarbon as fuels. Specifically, a LOX/hydrazine engine was designed, fabricated, and shown to have a 95 pct theoretical c-star which translates into a projected vacuum specific impulse of 345 seconds at an area ratio of 204:1. Further performance improvment can be obtained by the use of LOX/hydrogen propellants, especially for manned spacecraft applications, and specific designs must be developed and advanced through flight qualification.

  4. Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Counts, Richard H. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Lackey, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Peters, Warren (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor); Lawrence, Timothy W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A thrust chamber assembly for liquid fueled rocket engines and the method of making it wherein a two-piece mandrel having the configuration of an assembly having a combustion chamber portion connected to a nozzle portion through a throat portion is wrapped with a silica tape saturated with a phenolic resin, the tape extending along the mandrel and covering the combustion chamber portion of the mandrel to the throat portion. The width of the tape is positioned at an angle of 30 to 50 deg. to the axis of the mandrel such that one edge of the tape contacts the mandrel while the other edge is spaced from the mandrel. The phenolic in the tape is cured and the end of the wrap is machined to provide a frusto-conical surface extending at an angle of 15 to 30 deg. with respect to the axis of the mandrel for starting a second wrap on the mandrel to cover the throat portion. The remainder of the mandrel is wrapped with a third silica tape having its width positioned at a angle of 5 to 20 deg. from the axis of the mandrel. The resin in the third tape is cured and the assembly is machined to provide a smooth outer surface. The entire assembly is then wrapped with a tow of graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and, after the epoxy resin is cured, the graphite is machined to final dimensions.

  5. Fuel Optimal Thrust Allocation In Dynamic Positioning

    OpenAIRE

    Rindarøy, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This thesis gives a short introduction to the Dynamic Positioning(DP) domain and focuses on developing a fuel optimal thrust allocation algorithm for marine DP vessels with a diesel electric power plant. Obtained data is used to develop a static model for the fuel consumption of a diesel generator, as a function of its produced power. This model is used to formulate a convex Quadratic Programming(QP)-problem that finds fuel optimal solutions to the thrust allocation problem. This is possible ...

  6. Misalignment in Gas Foil Journal Bearings: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    As gas foil journal bearings become more prevalent in production machines, such as small gas turbine propulsion systems and microturbines, system-level performance issues must be identified and quantified in order to provide for successful design practices. Several examples of system-level design parameters that are not fully understood in foil bearing systems are thermal management schemes, alignment requirements, balance requirements, thrust load balancing, and others. In order to address some of these deficiencies and begin to develop guidelines, this paper presents a preliminary experimental investigation of the misalignment tolerance of gas foil journal bearing systems. Using a notional gas foil bearing supported rotor and a laser-based shaft alignment system, increasing levels of misalignment are imparted to the bearing supports while monitoring temperature at the bearing edges. The amount of misalignment that induces bearing failure is identified and compared to other conventional bearing types such as cylindrical roller bearings and angular contact ball bearings. Additionally, the dynamic response of the rotor indicates that the gas foil bearing force coefficients may be affected by misalignment.

  7. Laser plasma thruster continuous thrust experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, James R.; Phipps, Claude R.; McDuff, G. Glen

    2002-09-01

    The laser plasma thruster (LPT) is a new microthruster for small satellites. We report on development and testing of a prototype LPT. Some advantages of the LPT are: thruster voltage 4 V, mass less than 1 kg, power-to-thrust ratio 10 kW/newton and Isp up to 1000 seconds. Typical thrust level is 250 (mu) N with PVC fuel. Thrust of 1 mN is expected with energetic fuel. The pre-prototype continuous thrust experiment includes the laser mount and heat sink, lens mounts, and focusing mechanism, which are coupled to the target material transport mechanism. The target material is applied to a transparent plastic tape, and the laser is focused on a series of tracks on the tape. The tape drive hardware and laser drive electronics, are described, as well as the control and diagnostic software. Design, construction, and calibration of the thrust stand are described. During continuous operation, the exhaust plume is deflected in the direction of the moving tape. When the laser is operated in pulsed mode, the exhaust plume is perpendicular to the tape (parallel to the optical axis). This provides some thrust vector control.

  8. A thrust balance for low power hollow cathode thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frollani, D.; Coletti, M.; Gabriel, S. B.

    2014-06-01

    A hanging thrust balance has been designed, manufactured and tested at the University of Southampton. The current design allows for direct steady thrust measurements ranging from 0.1 to 3 mN but this can be easily extended to measure thrust in a different range. Moreover the chosen balance design and the thrust measurement procedure allow for the cancellation of thermal drifts. The thrust balance was tested with a T6 hollow cathode thruster providing measurements with an uncertainty of about 9.7%. The thrust data were compared to those obtained with another direct thrust balance and they are in quantitative agreement—the maximum difference being only 6%.

  9. Effect of blade outlet angle on radial thrust of single-blade centrifugal pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Y.; Fukutomi, J.; Fujiwara, R.

    2012-11-01

    Single-blade centrifugal pumps are widely used as sewage pumps. However, a large radial thrust acts on a single blade during pump operation because of the geometrical axial asymmetry of the impeller. This radial thrust causes vibrations of the pump shaft, reducing the service life of bearings and shaft seal devices. Therefore, to ensure pump reliability, it is necessary to quantitatively understand the radial thrust and clarify the behavior and generation mechanism. This study investigated the radial thrust acting on two kinds of single-blade centrifugal impellers having different blade outlet angles by experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Furthermore, the radial thrust was modeled by a combination of three components, inertia, momentum, and pressure, by applying an unsteady conservation of momentum to this impeller. As a result, the effects of the blade outlet angle on both the radial thrust and the modeled components were clarified. The total head of the impeller with a blade outlet angle of 16 degrees increases more than the impeller with a blade outlet angle of 8 degrees at a large flow rate. In this case, since the static pressure of the circumference of the impeller increases uniformly, the time-averaged value of the radial thrust of both impellers does not change at every flow rate. On the other hand, since the impeller blade loading becomes large, the fluctuation component of the radial thrust of the impeller with the blade outlet angle of 16 degrees increases. If the blade outlet angle increases, the fluctuation component of the inertia component will increase, but the time-averaged value of the inertia component is located near the origin despite changes in the flow rate. The fluctuation component of the momentum component becomes large at all flow rates. Furthermore, although the time-averaged value of the pressure component is almost constant, the fluctuation component of the pressure component becomes large at a large flow rate. In addition to the increase of the fluctuation component of this pressure component, because the fluctuation component of the inertia and momentum components becomes large (as mentioned above), the radial thrust increases at a large flow rate, as is the case for the impeller with a large blade outlet angle.

  10. A six degree-of-freedom thrust sensor for a labscale hybrid rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ann M.; Wright, Andrew B.; Born, Traig; Strickland, Ryan

    2013-12-01

    A six degree-of-freedom thrust sensor was designed, constructed, calibrated, and tested using the labscale hybrid rocket at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. The system consisted of six independent legs: one parallel to the axis of symmetry of the rocket for main thrust measurement, two vertical legs near the nozzle end of the rocket, one vertical leg near the oxygen input end of the rocket, and two separated horizontal legs near the nozzle end. Each leg was composed of a rotational bearing, a load cell, and a universal joint above and below the load cell. The leg was designed to create point contact along only one direction and minimize the non-axial forces applied to the load cell. With this system, force in each direction and moments for roll, pitch, and yaw can be measured. The system was calibrated and tested using a labscale hybrid rocket using gaseous oxygen and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene solid fuel. The thrust stand proved to be stable during calibration tests. Thrust force vector components and roll, pitch, and yaw moments were calculated for test firings with an oxygen mass flow rate range of 0.0174-0.0348 kg s-1.

  11. Conceptual Design and Feasibility of Foil Bearings for Rotorcraft Engines: Hot Core Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in gas foil bearing technology have led to numerous advanced high-speed rotating system concepts, many of which have become either commercial products or experimental test articles. Examples include oil-free microturbines, motors, generators and turbochargers. The driving forces for integrating gas foil bearings into these high-speed systems are the benefits promised by removing the oil lubrication system. Elimination of the oil system leads to reduced emissions, increased reliability, and decreased maintenance costs. Another benefit is reduced power plant weight. For rotorcraft applications, this would be a major advantage, as every pound removed from the propulsion system results in a payload benefit.. Implementing foil gas bearings throughout a rotorcraft gas turbine engine is an important long-term goal that requires overcoming numerous technological hurdles. Adequate thrust bearing load capacity and potentially large gearbox applied radial loads are among them. However, by replacing the turbine end, or hot section, rolling element bearing with a gas foil bearing many of the above benefits can be realized. To this end, engine manufacturers are beginning to explore the possibilities of hot section gas foil bearings in propulsion engines. This overview presents a logical follow-on activity by analyzing a conceptual rotorcraft engine to determine the feasibility of a foil bearing supported core. Using a combination of rotordynamic analyses and a load capacity model, it is shown to be reasonable to consider a gas foil bearing core section. In addition, system level foil bearing testing capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented along with analysis work being conducted under NRA Cooperative Agreements.

  12. Thrust Vector Control using movable probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalleri, Robert; Tiarn, Weihnurng; Readey, Harvey

    1990-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine if movable probes or struts positioned in the nozzle can be used to provide Thrust Vector Control of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. The study employed CFD to determine estimates of the shock standoff distance from the probe. An empirical correlation was used to construct the shock shape and the pressure distribution generated by the probe. The TVC performance for a single and multiple number of probes was then used to determine requirements for a maximum thrust angle offset of 7.5 degrees. Consideration was given to what materials would be suitable for the probe and if active cooling is required. Based on the performance analysis and thermal requirements, a Probe Thrust Vector Control (PTVC) system was sized. Indications are that a PTVC system weight is in the 1500 1bm weight range, compared to the existing weight of 7500 1bm for the SRB nozzle gimble system.

  13. Axisymmetric thrust-vectoring nozzle performance prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throat-hinged geometrically variable converging-diverging thrust-vectoring nozzles directly affect the jet flow geometry and rotation angle at the nozzle exit as a function of the nozzle geometry, the nozzle pressure ratio and flight velocity. The consideration of nozzle divergence in the effective-geometric nozzle relation is theoretically considered here for the first time. In this study, an explicit calculation procedure is presented as a function of nozzle geometry at constant nozzle pressure ratio, zero velocity and altitude, and compared with experimental results in a civil thrust-vectoring scenario. This procedure may be used in dynamic thrust-vectoring nozzle design performance predictions or analysis for civil and military nozzles as well as in the definition of initial jet flow conditions in future numerical VSTOL/TV jet performance studies

  14. Test plan pressure fed thrust chamber technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Aerojet is developing the technology for the design of a reliable, low cost, efficient, and lightweight LOX/RP-1 pressure fed engine. This technology program is a direct result of Aerojet's liquid rocket booster (LRB) study and previous NASA studies that identified liquid engines using high bulk density hydrocarbon fuels as very attractive for a space transportation system (STS). Previous large thrust LOX/RP-1 engine development programs were characterized by costly development problems due to combustion instability damage. The combustion stability solution was typically obtained through trial and error methods of minimizing instability damage by degrading engine performance. The approach to this program was to utilize existing and newly developed combustion analysis models and design methodology to create a thrust chamber design with features having the potential of producing reliable and efficient operation. This process resulted in an engine design with a unique high thrust-per-element OFO triplet injector utilizing a low cost modular approach. Cost efficient ablative materials are baselined for the injector face and chamber. Technology demonstration will be accomplished through a hot fire test program using appropriately sized subscale hardware. This subscale testing will provide a data base to supplement the current industry data bank and to anchor and validate the applied analysis models and design methodology. Once anchored and validated, these analysis models and design methodology can be applied with greatly increased confidence to design and characterize a large scale pressure fed LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. The objective of this test program is to generate a data base that can be used to anchor and validate existing analysis models and design methodologies and to provide early concept demonstration of a low cost, efficient LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. Test conditions and hardware instrumentation were defined to provide data sufficient to characterize combustion stability, performance, and thermal operation over a wide thrust chamber throttling range.

  15. A ?Newton thrust-stand for LISA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of the LISA project depends on the ability of the disturbance reduction system to shield the proof masses from all external forces and to maintain tight pointing requirements relative to the other two spacecrafts. ?N-thrusters are required to compensate for the solar radiation pressure acting on the spacecraft. The force noise from these thrusters must be low enough not to disturb the freely floating proof masses. To date, these noise requirements have not been demonstrated, mostly because no thrust-stand exists with sufficient sensitivity. We present the status of our ?Newton thrust-stand that will verify that the thrusters proposed for LISA will meet the noise requirements

  16. Spiral Groove Aerodynamic Bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Chen-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to research the conical spiral groove aerodynamic bearings, the bearing's lubrication analysis mathematical model is established. The Reynolds equation of the laminar flow condition is used to calculate the 3D pressure distribution by the locally finite difference method. The influence law of the gas film pressure distribution on the bearing performance is revealed by researching the nonlinear dynamic characteristic of gas film. It reveals the laws that the effect of the bearing structural parameters on the gas film pressure distribution and the bearing capacity. The results show that the spiral groove change the gas film thickness distribution and the gas film pressure distribution and achieve good bearing dynamic pressure effect, which improve the bearing performance and the bearing stability; The structure parameters affect the gas film pressure distribution and the static characteristics. Therefore, a reasonable choice of bearing structural parameters contributes to improve the bearing's static characteristics and bearing capacity.

  17. Conical Magnetic Bearings Developed for Active Stall Control in Gas Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudell, Jeffrey J.; Kascak, Albert F.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Buccieri, Carl J.

    2004-01-01

    Active stall control is a current research area at the NASA Glenn Research Center that offers a great benefit in specific fuel consumption by allowing the gas turbine to operate beyond the onset of stall. Magnetic bearings are being investigated as a new method to perform active stall control. This enabling global aviation safety technology would result in improved fuel efficiency and decreased carbon dioxide emissions, as well as improve safety and reliability by eliminating oil-related delays and failures of engine components, which account for 40 percent of the commercial aircraft departure delays. Active stall control works by perturbing the flow in front of the compressor stage such that it cancels the pressure wave, which causes the compressor to go into stall. Radial magnetic bearings are able to whirl the shaft so that variations in blade tip leakage would flow upstream causing a perturbation wave that could cancel the rotating stall cell. Axial or thrust magnetic bearings cannot be used to cancel the surge mode in the compressor because they have a very low bandwidth and thus cannot modulate at a high enough frequency. Frequency response is limited because the thrust runner cannot be laminated. To improve the bandwidth of magnetic thrust bearings, researchers must use laminations to suppress the eddy currents. A conical magnetic bearing can be laminated, resulting in increased bandwidth in the axial direction. In addition, this design can produce both radial and thrust force in a single bearing, simplifying the installation. The proposed solution combines the radial and thrust bearing into one design that can be laminated--a conical magnetic bearing. The new conical magnetic bearing test rig, funded by a Glenn fiscal year 2002 Director's Discretionary Fund, was needed because none of the existing rigs has an axial degree of freedom. The rotor bearing configuration will simulate that of the main shaft on a gas turbine engine. One conical magnetic bearing replaces the ball bearing in front of the compressor, and the second replaces the roller bearing behind the burner. The rig was made operational to 10,000 rpm under Smart Efficient Components funding, and both position and current adaptive vibration control have been demonstrated. Upon program completion, recommendations will be made as to the efficacy of the conical magnetic bearing for active stall control.

  18. Recent research and development of bearings for helium circulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper mainly describes recent studies and successful applications of water lubricated bearing and gas lubricated bearing. Both types of bearing seem to be suitable for a turbo machine installed in an atomic energy plant - such as the helium circulator of a HTGR - not to be affected by radioactivity, so we have been attracted by them for about 10 years. The former was investigated theoretically taking account of turbulent flow due to the low viscosity of water, and compared with the experimental data. Good agreement was obtained, and a successful example applied to a small-sized high speed air compressor is shown. The latter was investigated using a large-sized bearing test rig simulated to an actual machine. The tilting pad journal bearing and the tilting pad thrust bearing were taken and improved for some aspects. These bearings have been taken into service on an actual circulator and are now operating successfully. Currently, a magnetic bearing is being studied to pay special attention to endurance for an earthquake and catcher bearing system. We would like to have an opportunity to present these results in the near future. (author). 5 refs, 15 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Early Cenozoic thrust in Qiangtang block, Northern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z.; Ye, P.; Hu, D.; Lu, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Huge thrust systems, North Qiangtang Thrust (NQT) and South Qiangtang Thrust (SQT), were discovered in Qiangtang block, northern Tibetan Plateau. North Qiangtang thrust (NQT), including Dogai Coren thrust (DCT) and Longwei Co Thrust (LCT) formed in northern Qiangtang block. Triassic shale, sandstone and slate were thrusted southward over Late Cretaceous-Early Cenozoic conglomerate and sandstone (simplified as red-beds) along thrust faults of DCT, and Jurassic limestone and sandstone were thrusted over Late Cretaceous-Paleogene red-beds and Paleozoic metamorphic rocks along thrust faults of LCT in north of Central Qiangtang Uplift (CQU). South Qiangtang Thrust (SQT), including Xiaocaka-Shuanghu thrust (XST), Doma-Qixiang Co thrust (DQT) and Saibu Co-Zagya thrust (SZT), formed in southern Qiangtang block, accompanied by Nima-Silin thrust (NST) in northern Lhasa block. Permian marbleized limestone and dolomite, Triassic sandstone and shale, Jurassic limestone and ophiolite were thrusted southward over Paleogene red-beds along thrust faults of XST, DQT and SZT. Early Cenozoic thrust along NQT and SQT formed variety of tectonic slices, outliers and nappes of Permian-Jurassic rocks overlying Late Cretaceous-Paleogene red-beds in northern, central and southern Qiangtang block. Minimal estimation on southward offsets of DCT and LCT is 25km and 50km respectively, corresponding to 43% shortening in northern Qiangtang block, and minimal estimation on southward thrust offsets of XST, DQT and SZT yields ~90km southward thrust displacement of SQT, corresponding to ~47% shortening in southern Qiangtang block. Major thrust faults of NQT and SQT formed in upper crust according to seismic reflection profile, and such thrust and shortening were geodynamically related to northward subduction of India continental plate. Intensive thrust of NQT and SQT stopped before Early Miocene, followed by regional peneplanation, widespread lacustrine deposits in Early Miocene and crust extension as Shuanghu graben in Mid Miocene. Tectonic transition from Early Cenozoic contraction to Mid-Late Miocene extension of crust indicates Late Oligocene-Early Miocene uplift of Qiangtang block, northern Tibetan Plateau.

  20. Development of an indirect counterbalanced pendulum optical-lever thrust balance for micro- to millinewton thrust measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the design and testing of an indirect hanging pendulum thrust balance using a laser-optical-lever principle to provide micro- to millinewton thrust measurement for the development of electric propulsion systems. The design philosophy allows the selection of the total thrust range in order to maximize resolution through a counterbalanced pendulum principle, as well as passive magnetic damping in order to allow relatively rapid transient thrust measurement. The balance was designed for the purpose of hollow cathode microthruster characterization, but could be applied to other electric propulsion devices in the thrust range of micro- to millinewtons. An initial thrust characterization of the T5 hollow cathode is presented

  1. Ascent thrust vector control system test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Testing of the Ascent Thrust Vector Control System in support of the Ares 1-X program at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. This image is extracted from a high definition video file and is the highest resolution available

  2. Application of thrust vector control on airships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ?.?. ???????

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available  Concepts of manual and automatic thrust vector control of a modern airship are investigated and compared by simulation of the vehicle movement dynamics. Airship movement simulation with application of the mathematical apparatus of differential transformations is carried out.

  3. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  4. Precise Thrust Actuation by a Micro RF Ion Engine Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek proposes to develop a radio-frequency discharge, gridded micro ion engine that produces 5N level of thrust precisely adjustable over a wide dynamic thrust...

  5. Passive magnetic bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a special design of a passive magnetic bearing with permanent magnets on the fixed and the rotating part of the bearing. Peculiarity of the presented passive magnetic bearing is its ability to take radial and axial loads in both directions by using axially magnetized permanent magnets. A 3D finite element method (3D FEM) is used for analysis of magnetic conditions in the bearing. The performance of the presented magnetic bearing was determined by the Maxwell Stress Method

  6. Analysis of thrust/torque signature of MOV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the evaluation of operability of MOV(Motor Operated Valve), the precision prediction of thrust/torque acting on the valve is important. In this paper, the analytical prediction method of thrust/torque was proposed. The design basis stem thrust calculation typically considers the followings: packing thrust, stem rejection load, design basis differential pressure load. In general, test results show that temperature, pressure, fluid type, and differential pressure, independently and combination, all have an effect on the friction factor. The prediction results of thrust/torque are well agreement with dynamic test results

  7. MATERIALS PERFORMANCE TARGETED THRUST FY 2004 PROJECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Yucca Mountain site was recommended by the President to be a geological repository for commercial spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The multi-barrier approach was adopted for assessing and predicting system behavior, including both natural barriers and engineered barriers. A major component of the long-term strategy for safe disposal of nuclear waste is first to completely isolate the radionuclides in waste packages for long times and then to greatly retard the egress and transport of radionuclides from penetrated packages. The goal of the Materials Performance Targeted Thrust program is to further enhance the understanding of the role of engineered barriers in waste isolation. In addition, the Thrust will explore technical enhancements and seek to offer improvements in materials costs and reliability

  8. Thrust vector control using electric actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, Robert T.; Hall, David K.

    1995-01-01

    Presently, gimbaling of launch vehicle engines for thrust vector control is generally accomplished using a hydraulic system. In the case of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters and main engines, these systems are powered by hydrazine auxiliary power units. Use of electromechanical actuators would provide significant advantages in cost and maintenance. However, present energy source technologies such as batteries are heavy to the point of causing significant weight penalties. Utilizing capacitor technology developed by the Auburn University Space Power Institute in collaboration with the Auburn CCDS, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Auburn are developing EMA system components with emphasis on high discharge rate energy sources compatible with space shuttle type thrust vector control requirements. Testing has been done at MSFC as part of EMA system tests with loads up to 66000 newtons for pulse times of several seconds. Results show such an approach to be feasible providing a potential for reduced weight and operations costs for new launch vehicles.

  9. Electromechanical actuator for thrust vector control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkow, Zygmunt

    Attention is given to the development and testing of electromechanical actuator (EMA) systems for use in first- and second-stage thrust vector control of rocket engines. An overview of the test program is also presented. Designs for both first- and second-stage actuators employ redundant dc brushless, three-phase rare-earth permanent magnet motors. The first-stage actuator is about 28 hp per motor and uses a roller screw. Second-stage thrust vector control is implemented with a much smaller actuator of about 1 hp per motor. This actuator uses a gear drive with a recycling ball screw mechanism. An operational EMA is presented. This 6.5-in. actuator is capable of a stall force of 1350 pounds per motor and a frequency response of about 5 HZ.

  10. Solar electric propulsion thrust subsystem development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek, T. D.

    1973-01-01

    The Solar Electric Propulsion System developed under this program was designed to demonstrate all the thrust subsystem functions needed on an unmanned planetary vehicle. The demonstration included operation of the basic elements, power matching input and output voltage regulation, three-axis thrust vector control, subsystem automatic control including failure detection and correction capability (using a PDP-11 computer), operation of critical elements in thermal-vacuum-, zero-gravity-type propellant storage, and data outputs from all subsystem elements. The subsystem elements, functions, unique features, and test setup are described. General features and capabilities of the test-support data system are also presented. The test program culminated in a 1500-h computer-controlled, system-functional demonstration. This included simultaneous operation of two thruster/power conditioner sets. The results of this testing phase satisfied all the program goals.

  11. MATERIALS PERFORMANCE TARGETED THRUST FY 2004 PROJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE

    2005-09-13

    The Yucca Mountain site was recommended by the President to be a geological repository for commercial spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The multi-barrier approach was adopted for assessing and predicting system behavior, including both natural barriers and engineered barriers. A major component of the long-term strategy for safe disposal of nuclear waste is first to completely isolate the radionuclides in waste packages for long times and then to greatly retard the egress and transport of radionuclides from penetrated packages. The goal of the Materials Performance Targeted Thrust program is to further enhance the understanding of the role of engineered barriers in waste isolation. In addition, the Thrust will explore technical enhancements and seek to offer improvements in materials costs and reliability.

  12. THRUST PREDICTION PROGRAM FOR MARINE JET POWER

    OpenAIRE

    Bergsek, Mattias

    2011-01-01

    Marine Jet Power, MJP wishes to investigate the possibility of transforming their current Thrust Prediction Program, TPP written in C++ source code into a more up to date tool for their sales staff. The old TPP, though an accurate and precise tool, is not documented and lacks commentaries in the source code. Therefore the beginning of this master thesis was about documenting and investigates what methods were used to calculate the performance of the water jet system.The next step was splittin...

  13. Lightweight Chambers for Thrust Cell Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, S.; Effinger, M.; Holmes, R.; Lee, J.; Jaskowiak, M.

    2000-01-01

    Traditional metals like steel and copper alloys have been used for many years to fabricate injector and chamber components of thruster assemblies. While the materials perform well, reducing engine weights would help existing and future vehicles gain performance and payload capability. It may now be possible to reduce current thruster weights up to 50% by applying composite materials. In this task, these materials are being applied to an existing thrust cell design to demonstrate new fabrication processes and potential weight savings. Two ceramic matrix composite (CMC) designs, three polymer matrix composite (PMC) designs, and two metal matrix composite (MMC) designs are being fabricated as small chamber demonstration units. In addition, a new alloy of copper, chrome, and niobium (Cu-8Cr-4Nb) is being investigated for thrust chamber liners since it offers higher strength and increased cycle life over traditional alloys. This new alloy is being used for the liner in each MMC and PMC demonstration unit. During June-August of 2000, hot-fire testing of each unit is planned to validate designs in an oxygen/hydrogen environment at chamber pressures around 850 psi. Although the weight savings using CMC materials is expected to be high, they have proven to be much harder to incorporate into chamber designs based on current fabrication efforts. However, the PMC & MMC concepts using the Cu-8Cr-4Nb liner are nearly complete and ready for testing. Additional efforts intend to use the PMC & MMC materials to fabricate a full size thrust chamber (60K lb(sub f) thrust class). The fabrication of this full size unit is expected to be complete by October 2000, followed by hot-fire testing in November-December 2000.

  14. Thrust Vector Control for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensworth, Clinton B. F.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions may use Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) stages for human and cargo missions to Mars and other destinations. The vehicles are likely to require engine thrust vector control (TVC) to maintain desired flight trajectories. This paper explores requirements and concepts for TVC systems for representative NTR missions. Requirements for TVC systems were derived using 6 degree-of-freedom models of NTR vehicles. Various flight scenarios were evaluated to determine vehicle attitude control needs and to determine the applicability of TVC. Outputs from the models yielded key characteristics including engine gimbal angles, gimbal rates and gimbal actuator power. Additional factors such as engine thrust variability and engine thrust alignment errors were examined for impacts to gimbal requirements. Various technologies are surveyed for TVC systems for the NTR applications. A key factor in technology selection is the unique radiation environment present in NTR stages. Other considerations including mission duration and thermal environments influence the selection of optimal TVC technologies. Candidate technologies are compared to see which technologies, or combinations of technologies best fit the requirements for selected NTR missions. Representative TVC systems are proposed and key properties such as mass and power requirements are defined. The outputs from this effort can be used to refine NTR system sizing models, providing higher fidelity definition for TVC systems for future studies.

  15. Effect of Coflow on Counterflow Thrust Vectoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvi, F. S.; Krothapalli, A.; Strykowski, P. J.

    1997-11-01

    A unique, fluidic-based thrust vectoring technique known as CounterFlow Thrust Vector Control (CFTVC) has been investigated at the Fluid Mechanics Research Laboratory (FMRL) over the past few years. These studies have demonstrated that CFTVC is a simple, robust and efficient method for thrust vectoring of supersonic jets of various geometries. In an effort to better evaluate the system performance under real flight conditions, a study of the CFTVC system under "wind-on" conditions, using a rectangular Mach 1.4 jet, is currently in progress. The wind-on condition is simulated by providing a coflowing stream (i.e. flowing in the same direction as the primary jet) at the periphery of the countercurrent stream which surrounds the primary jet. Coflowing streams over a range of Mach numbers, from 0.3 to 0.7, will be tested. Preliminary results show that the coflowing stream has a relatively minor influence on CFTVC and that the jet can be easily vectored to large angles in the presence of coflow. These encouraging reuslts further demonstrate the potential of this system for future propulsion applications.

  16. Thrust evaluation of magneto plasma sail that obtains an electromagnetic thrust from the solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magneto Plasma Sail (MPS) is a propulsion system used in space, which generates its force by the interaction between the solar wind and an inflated magnetic field via a plasma injection. The quantitative evaluation of the thrust increment generated by injecting a plasma jet with a ?in less than unity was conducted by three-dimensional hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in an ion inertia scale. The injected plasma ?in is 0.02 and the ratio of Larmor radius of injected ion to the representative length of the magnetic field is 0.5 at the injection point. In this situation, the obtained thrust of the MPS is 1.6 mN compared with the 0.2 mN of the thrust obtained by the pure magnetic sail since the induced current region on magnetosphere expanded by the magnetic inflation. (author)

  17. High-power, null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kunning G; Walker, Mitchell L R

    2009-05-01

    This article presents the theory and operation of a null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand. The thrust stand design supports thrusters having a total mass up to 250 kg and measures thrust over a range of 1 mN to 5 N. The design uses a conventional inverted pendulum to increase sensitivity, coupled with a null-type feature to eliminate thrust alignment error due to deflection of thrust. The thrust stand position serves as the input to the null-circuit feedback control system and the output is the current to an electromagnetic actuator. Mechanical oscillations are actively damped with an electromagnetic damper. A closed-loop inclination system levels the stand while an active cooling system minimizes thermal effects. The thrust stand incorporates an in situ calibration rig. The thrust of a 3.4 kW Hall thruster is measured for thrust levels up to 230 mN. The uncertainty of the thrust measurements in this experiment is +/-0.6%, determined by examination of the hysteresis, drift of the zero offset and calibration slope variation. PMID:19485530

  18. The technology of the bearings used in the nuclear power generation system turbine generator units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bearing consists of all the stationary part which allow the relative motion in rotation or in translation, of a shaft line. Inside the bearing there is a journal bearing with a metallic anti-friction coating (the babbitt metal). The high power turbine generator unit rotors are supported by smooth transversal journal bearings fed with oil which fills the empty space and runs along the shaft. The technologies used for the bearings and the thrust bearings of the turbine generator units and the various shaft lines of the French CP0/CP1- and CP2/1300 MW-type nuclear power plants are described. The experience feedback is then discussed in terms of the dynamics of the shaft line, i.e. vibrational problems, the influence of the alignment and the babbitt metal incidents. (author)

  19. Teddy Bear Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Caldas-Coulthardt, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a semiotic analysis of a key cultural artefact, the teddy bear. After introducing the iconography of the teddy bear, it analyses different kinds of stories to show how teddy bears are endowed with meaning in everyday life: stories from children's books, reminiscenses by adults about their childhood teddy bears, and children's accounts of what they do with teddy bears, both written for school and told 'out of school', The chapter sees teddy bears as artefacts that provide a cultural channeling for the child's need of a transitional object and argues that the meanings of teddy bears have traditionally centred on interpersonal relations within the nuclear family, but have recently been institutionalized and commercialized.

  20. Factorization and resummation for transverse thrust

    CERN Document Server

    Becher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We analyze transverse thrust in the framework of Soft Collinear Effective Theory and obtain a factorized expression for the cross section that permits resummation of terms enhanced in the dijet limit to arbitrary accuracy. The factorization theorem for this hadron-collider event-shape variable involves collinear emissions at different virtualities and suffers from a collinear anomaly. We compute all its ingredients at the one-loop order, and show that the two-loop input for next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy can be extracted numerically, from existing fixed-order codes.

  1. Factorization and resummation for transverse thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Thomas; i Tormo, Xavier Garcia

    2015-06-01

    We analyze transverse thrust in the framework of Soft Collinear Effective Theory and obtain a factorized expression for the cross section that permits resummation of terms enhanced in the dijet limit to arbitrary accuracy. The factorization theorem for this hadron-collider event-shape variable involves collinear emissions at different virtualities and suffers from a collinear anomaly. We compute all its ingredients at the one-loop order, and show that the two-loop input for next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy can be extracted numerically, from existing fixed-order codes.

  2. Optimum Staging with Varying Thrust Attitude Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Srivastava

    1966-07-01

    Full Text Available Optimum staging programme for step rockets of arbitrary number of stages having different specific impulses and mass fractions with stages is derived, the optimization criterion being minimum take-off weight for a desired burntout velocity at an assigned altitude. Variation of thrust attitude angle from stage to stage and effects of gravity factor are taken into account. Analysis is performed for a degenerate problem obtained by relaxing the altitude constraint and it has been shown that problems of Weisbord, Subotowicz, Hall & Zambelli and Malina & Summerfield are the particular cases of the degenerate problem.

  3. Reduced-length scarfed-nozzles for thrust vector adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Jay S.

    1993-04-01

    The results of an investigation into the utilization of scarfed, truncated perfect-nozzles for thrust vector adjustment in tactical strap-on boosters is presented. The use of truncated perfect-nozzle expansion contours was evaluated as a means of achieving significant nozzle length reductions over conical nozzle designs without degrading axial thrust or thrust vector adjustment capability. Previously developed perfect-nozzle and scarfed-nozzle performance analysis computer codes were used to generate an extensive parametric study which characterized the influence of nozzle length and expansion ratio on axial thrust and thrust vector adjustment capability. Comparisons were made against the results obtained for scarfed-nozzles with conical expansion contours. The parametric study was utilized to develop a general scarfed truncated perfect-nozzle design. The axial performance and thrust vector adjustment capability of the nozzle design was experimentally verified through solid rocket motor static firings.

  4. Precision thrust cumulant moments at N[superscript 3]LL

    OpenAIRE

    Abbate, Riccardo; Barreda, Vicent Mateu; Stewart, Iain W.; Fickinger, Michael; Hoang, Andre H.

    2012-01-01

    We consider cumulant moments (cumulants) of the thrust distribution using predictions of the full spectrum for thrust including O(?[subscript s][superscript 3]) fixed order results, resummation of singular N[superscript 3]LL logarithmic contributions, and a class of leading power corrections in a renormalon-free scheme. From a global fit to the first thrust moment we extract the strong coupling and the leading power correction matrix element ?[subscript 1]. We obtain ?[subscript s](m[subscrip...

  5. Explicit Low-Thrust Guidance for Reference Orbit Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Try; Udwadia, Firdaus E.

    2013-01-01

    The problem of a low-thrust spacecraft controlled to a reference orbit is addressed in this paper. A simple and explicit low-thrust guidance scheme with constrained thrust magnitude is developed by combining the fundamental equations of motion for constrained systems from analytical dynamics with a Lyapunov-based method. Examples are given for a spacecraft controlled to a reference trajectory in the circular restricted three body problem.

  6. Quadratic Programming Thrust Allocation and Management for Dynamic Positioning Ships

    OpenAIRE

    Yushi Wei; Mingyu Fu; Jipeng Ning; Xingyan Sun

    2013-01-01

    To solve the complex thrust allocation problems of dynamic positioning ship with azimuth thrusters, the quadratic programming thrust allocation and management system was built. The power optimal thrust allocation was formulated as a quadratic programming problem by the linear treatments of inequality constraints and the optimal solution could be found in a finite amount of time. And some influence factors of thruster allocation were separated from algorithms and treated as a superstratum mana...

  7. Fluid storage and transport in thrust belts: the Gavarnie Thrust system revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaig, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    There has been renewed interest in the pressure and movement of fluids in thrust systems in recent years with the discovery and increasing importance of slow slip earthquakes. Unfortunately the overpressured regime thought to be the source region for both normal and slow-slip earthquakes is inaccessible to direct observation, so information about the actual water content, flow regimes and permeability structure at the time of thrusting can only be obtained in exhumed rocks. The Gavarnie Thrust System in the Pyrenees (including the immediate footwall of the thrust and overlying thrust sheets) is exceptionally well studied in terms of structural and microstructural work, fluid inclusions, and isotopic tracing of fluid flow. Southward thrusting by 12-15 km occurred during the Eocene, and the current geometry of the thrust is a broad dome, allowing sampling at many locations. There is abundant evidence for near-lithostatic fluid pressures at depths of 8-15 km in the crust and temperatures of 300-400 °C, and fluids at these levels are dominated by hypersaline brines with Cl/Br ratios indicating evaporation of seawater. They are inferred to be derived from widespread Triassic evaporates, and stored in underlying redbeds and fractured basement rocks. There is also evidence from fluid inclusions for periodic pressure cycling down to near-hydrostatic values. This is thought to be related to co-seismic fault valve behaviour with release of fluid both into the shallow thrust and into steeply dipping shear zones in the hangingwall. Isotopic studies of carbonate mylonites along the Gavarnie thrust indicate unidirectional southward (structurally upward) flow of fluid , again probably mainly during transient veining events. These relatively slow moving fluids appear to have fed into a hydrostatic regime with topographically driven flow at higher levels. If time averaged permeability was high, most of the fluid would have rapidly escaped, since there is little opportunity to replenish fluid by metamorphic dehydration in the Pyrenees. This does not appear to have occurred, suggesting that any enhanced permeability events were shortlived and perhaps form patches of limited size. Fluid can be stored at various scales: in fluid inclusions in vein minerals and on grain boundaries (eg. pressure shadows in cleaved rocks); in veins and pull-aparts in competent layers such as dolomite within calcite mylonites; and in structural culminations such as the Pic de Port Vieux, where development of fold-thrust structures allowed slow dilation with evidence from fluid inclusions for influx of fluid from both footwall and hangingwall. This latter can be considered a dynamic form of storage generated by deviatoric stress and strain at high fluid pressure (not "hydraulic fracture"), whereas fluid inclusions can be considered passive storage. Stored fluid in such sites can be expelled during seismic events (both slow and fast slip) where the pressure regime in large volumes of crust will change dramatically.

  8. Unsteady thrust measurement techniques for pulse detonation engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Dibesh Dhoj

    Thrust is a critical performance parameter and its correct determination is necessary to characterize an engine. Many conventional thrust measurement techniques prevail. However, further developments are required for correct measurement of thrust in the case of a pulse detonation engine (PDE), since the entire thrust generation process is intermittent. The significant effect of system dynamics in the form of inertial forces, stress wave propagation and reflections initiated in the structure due to detonations and pulse-to-pulse interaction in a fast operating PDE further complicate the thrust measurement process. These complications call for a further, detailed study of the unsteady thrust characteristics. A general approach was first developed to recover actual thrust from the measured thrust generated by the PDE. The developed approach consisted of two steps. The first step incorporated a deconvolution procedure using a pre-established system transfer function and measured input to reconstruct the output yielding the deconvolved thrust. The second step accounted for inertial forces through an acceleration compensation procedure. These two steps allowed the actual thrust to be determined. A small scale PDE operating at 10 and 20 Hz with varied filling fractions and mixture equivalence ratios was used for the experimental application of the general approach. The analytical study of gas dynamics in the PDE while in operation and the measured pressure histories at the exit of the engine allowed the generated thrust during a cycle to be determined semi-empirically. The thrust values determined semi-empirically were compared against the experimental results. A dynamical model of the PDE was created for the study of the unsteady thrust characteristics using finite element analysis. The results from finite element analysis were compared against semi-empirical and experimental results. In addition, finite element analysis also facilitated to numerically determine the unsteady thrust generated by the PDE at higher operating frequencies of 50 and 100 Hz. The actual thrust estimated experimentally, semi-empirically and numerically were expressed in the form of specific impulse for comparison. The results obtained via semi-empirical method and finite element analysis were found to be in good agreement with each other. However, the results obtained experimentally were slightly lower than the other two. Finally, the results obtained in this research work were also compared against the findings reported in literature. The comparison gave satisfying results. The developed general approach used to recover actual thrust generated by a PDE was also used to recover actual aerodynamic drag experienced by a blunt nose cone model in a nominal Mach 8-9 flow. The limited validation against modified Newtonian theory was provided as the results obtained after applying the developed approach matched the predicted values.

  9. Versatile and Extensible, Continuous-Thrust Trajectory Optimization Tool Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop an innovative, versatile and extensible, continuous-thrust trajectory optimization tool for planetary mission design and optimization of...

  10. A 3-D Model of Stacked Thrusts in the Sevier Thrust Belt, Eastern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R. W.; Clayton, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Using published and new geologic map data and two exploratory wells for control, we constructed a three-dimensional geological model of the Pine Creek area in the Big Hole Mountains of eastern Idaho, where stacked Sevier thrust sheets are exposed at the surface. In this area, Cretaceous crustal shortening displaced and folded strata from Cambrian to Cretaceous in age. Using geologic map data as a primary input to a 3-D model presents a number of challenges, especially representing fault geometries at depth and maintaining strata thicknesses. The highly variable attitudes measured at the surface are also difficult to represent in a subsurface model because they require extensive extrapolation to depth. To overcome these challenges we EarthVision software, which has tools for model construction with minimal data inputs and uses a minimum tension algorithm to create geologically realistic surfaces. We also constructed two primary cross-sections to constrain strata and fault geometries according to structural principles, and used these to guide construction of fault and horizon surfaces. We then designated horizons with the best control as reference horizons to constrain strata geometries, and built the remaining horizons using isochores to add or subtract from those surfaces. The model shows classic flat-ramp thrust geometries as seen farther southeast in the Wyoming section of the thrust belt. The model also shows uniform southwestward tilting of faults and strata in the north end above younger thrusts, but strong effects from a duplex on a younger thrust fault encountered in the southern well, which rotated the strata and older faults above it.

  11. OMV/VTE variable thrust engine analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larosillere, Louis; Litchford, Ron; Jeng, San-Mou

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a predictive CFD based analytical tool for the variable thrust engine (VTE) in the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV). This objective is being accomplished within the framework of the Los Alamos KIVA computer code for chemically reactive flows with sprays. For the OMV application, the main structure of KIVA is to be retained while reformulating many of the phenomenological submodels, enhancing some of the numerics, and adding more features. The analytical model consists of the general conservation equations for two phase reactive flows and of submodels for turbulence, chemical reactions, and bipropellant sprays. Tailoring this model to the OMV engine brings about the added complexities of combustion and flow processes that occur in a liquid hypergolic propellant rocket chamber. This report exposes the foundation upon which the analytical tool is being constructed and developed. Results from a cursory computational exercise involving the simulation of the flow and combustion processes in a hypothetical N2H4/N2O4 rocket engine thrust chamber is presented and discussed.

  12. The Incredible Water Bear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin Mach

    This image-rich Micscape Magazine article explores how water bears can be found almost everywhere yet are still unknown to almost everybody, why there are relatively few light microscope photographs of water bears in the literature and on the Web, and how light microscopy can outperform scanning electron microscopy when viewing these animals. It includes a list of historical references, early sketches, and colorful images of water bears, also known as tardigrades.

  13. Optimal Synchronizability of Bearings

    OpenAIRE

    Ara Xfajo, N.; Seybold, H.; Baram, R.; Herrmann, H.; Andrade, J.

    2013-01-01

    Bearings are mechanical dissipative systems that, when perturbed, relax toward a synchronized (bearing) state. Here we find that bearings can be perceived as physical realizations of complex networks of oscillators with asymmetrically weighted couplings. Accordingly, these networks can exhibit optimal synchronization properties through fine tuning of the local interaction strength as a function of node degree [Motter, Zhou, and Kurths, Phys. Rev. E 71, 016116 (2005)]. We sho...

  14. Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Area report FY'84

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the work of the Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Areas for FY'84: diagnostics and microelectronic engineering; signal and control engineering; microwave and pulsed power engineering; computer-aided engineering; engineering modeling and simulation; and systems engineering. For each Thrust Area, an overview and a description of the goals and achievements of each project is provided

  15. A Target Indirect Thrust Measurement Method of Pulse Detonation Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiqiao; Xiong, Yuefei; Li, Chao; Zheng, Longxi; Li, Qing

    2015-05-01

    An indirect thrust measurement method based on impulse of a target plate was developed, and a new thrust measurement system (TMS) was successfully designed and constructed. A series of multi-cycle experiments on thrust measurement were conducted to investigate the feasibility of this method with the newly-built indirect TMS. The thrust measurement of PDE was made at different plate target axial positions and operating frequencies. All the experiments were conducted using gasoline as fuel and air as oxidant. The experimental results implied that the thrust of PDE by using the indirect impulse method was a function of the target plate axial position, and there existed an optimum measurement position for PDE with a diameter of 60 mm. The optimum target plate position located at 3.33. According to the experimental results, the thrusts obtained by using indirect TMS were less than the actual values, and so the observed value of thrust was modified in order to make the thrust more reliable. A relative accurate calibration formula depending on the operating frequency was found.

  16. Thrust augmentation nozzle (TAN) concept for rocket engine booster applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Scott; Bulman, Mel; Neill, Todd

    2006-07-01

    Aerojet used the patented thrust augmented nozzle (TAN) concept to validate a unique means of increasing sea-level thrust in a liquid rocket booster engine. We have used knowledge gained from hypersonic Scramjet research to inject propellants into the supersonic region of the rocket engine nozzle to significantly increase sea-level thrust without significantly impacting specific impulse. The TAN concept overcomes conventional engine limitations by injecting propellants and combusting in an annular region in the divergent section of the nozzle. This injection of propellants at moderate pressures allows for obtaining high thrust at takeoff without overexpansion thrust losses. The main chamber is operated at a constant pressure while maintaining a constant head rise and flow rate of the main propellant pumps. Recent hot-fire tests have validated the design approach and thrust augmentation ratios. Calculations of nozzle performance and wall pressures were made using computational fluid dynamics analyses with and without thrust augmentation flow, resulting in good agreement between calculated and measured quantities including augmentation thrust. This paper describes the TAN concept, the test setup, test results, and calculation results.

  17. Morphological Considerations of Fish Fin Shape on Thrust Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Kikuchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to determine the relationship between thrust generation and fish fin shape. To compare the effect fin shape had on thrust generation, we categorized the morphological shapes of fish fins into equilateral polygonal shapes. Polygonal fins were used to generate thrust that depended only on shape. These fins were constructed of a hard elastic material to eliminate any influence of shape deformation. A servomotor with a reciprocal rotation moved a fin cyclically, and thrust was experimentally measured using a strain gage system. Thrust tended to be proportional to the inertia moment of a fin, which indicated difficulty with rotation. Moreover, this trend for thrust generation was directly related to the number of apexes of a polygonal fin. The force translated ratio, which was thrust divided by the force required for fin rotation, was evaluated to determine the hydrodynamic characteristics of fins. This finding showed that the force translated ratio of a fin increased with increased movable perimeter length. The greatest thrust was generated by a triangular fin rotated at its apex, which is often seen in general fish tail fins, whereas the hydrodynamic characteristics were the worst in polygonal fins.

  18. Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Area report FY'84

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minichino, C.; Phelps, P.L. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the work of the Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Areas for FY'84: diagnostics and microelectronic engineering; signal and control engineering; microwave and pulsed power engineering; computer-aided engineering; engineering modeling and simulation; and systems engineering. For each Thrust Area, an overview and a description of the goals and achievements of each project is provided.

  19. Hot gas thrust vector control motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdoyes, Michel; Ellis, Russell A.

    1992-07-01

    A hot gas thrust vector control (HGTVC) motor developed in the framework of a Foreign Weapon Evaluation program is discussed. Two HGTVC versions were evaluated on the two nozzles of the program, normal injection with a blunt pintle and 10 deg upstream injection with a tapered pintle. The HGTVC system was tested on a modified ORBUS-1 motor which is based on two technologies, namely, a composite chamber polar boss (CPB) and a two-piece C-C nozzle which threads to the CPB and receives two HGVs embedded into its exit cone, 180 deg apart. It is concluded that the composite polar bosses and C-C nozzles performed successfully in both firings.

  20. Secondary production of massive quarks in thrust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Andre H. [Wien Univ. (Austria). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Vienna Univ. (Austria). Erwin Schroedinger International Institute for Mathematical Physics; Mateu, Vicent [Wien Univ. (Austria). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Pietrulewicz, Piotr [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Gruppe Theorie

    2014-12-15

    We present a factorization framework that takes into account the production of heavy quarks through gluon splitting in the thrust distribution for e{sup +}e{sup -}?hadrons. The explicit factorization theorems and some numerical results are displayed in the dijet region where the kinematic scales are widely separated, which can be extended systematically to the whole spectrum. We account for the necessary two-loop matrix elements, threshold corrections, and include resummation up to N{sup 3}LL order. We include nonperturbative power corrections through a field theoretical shape function, and remove the O(?{sub QCD}) renormalon in the partonic soft function by appropriate mass-dependent subtractions. Our results hold for any value of the quark mass, from an infinitesimally small (merging to the known massless result) to an infinitely large one (achieving the decoupling limit). This is the first example of an application of a variable flavor number scheme to final state jets.

  1. Secondary Production of Massive Quarks in Thrust

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Andre H; Pietrulewicz, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    We present a factorization framework that takes into account the production of heavy quarks through gluon splitting in the thrust distribution for e+ e- --> hadrons. The explicit factorization theorems and some numerical results are displayed in the dijet region where the kinematic scales are widely separated, which can be extended systematically to the whole spectrum. We account for the necessary two-loop matrix elements, threshold corrections, and include resummation up to N3LL order. We include nonperturbative power corrections through a field theoretical shape function, and remove the O(Lambda_QCD) renormalon in the partonic soft function by appropriate mass-dependent subtractions. Our results hold for any value of the quark mass, from an infinitesimally small (merging to the known massless result) to an infinitely large one (achieving the decoupling limit). This is the first example of an application of a variable flavor number scheme to final state jets.

  2. Axial thrust behavior in LOX-pump of rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Junichi; Kamijo, Kenjiro; Shimura, Takashi

    1994-03-01

    The LOX pump of the first stage of the H-2 rocket, the next generation of large launch vehicle in Japan, has shown fairly good axial thrust performance. However, the behavior of the axial thrust is not well known because of the complicated mechanism of the thrust-balancing device. In order to elucidate the flow characteristic of the complicated thrust balancing device and to improve it, the internal flow in the device was fully analyzed by developing a method of boundary value determination at each element composing the device. The analysis developed here was confirmed to give satisfactory results by comparison with actual measurements. Using the present analysis, the axial thrust of the LOX pump was revealed for various combinations of balancing piston, balancing holes, swirl breaker, etc.

  3. Thrust Measurements for a Pulse Detonation Engine Driven Ejector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pak, Sibtosh; Shehadeh, R.; Saretto, S. R.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Results of an experimental effort on pulse detonation driven ejectors aimed at probing different aspects of PDE ejector processes, are presented and discussed. The PDE was operated using ethylene as the fuel and an equimolar oxygen/nitrogen mixture as the oxidizer at an equivalence ratio of one. The thrust measurements for the PDE alone are in excellent agreement with experimental and modeling results reported in the literature and serve as a Baseline for the ejector studies. These thrust measurements were then used as a basis for quantifying thrust augmentation for various PDE/ejector setups using constant diameter ejector tubes and various detonation tube/ejector tube overlap distances. The results show that for the geometries studied here, a maximum thrust augmentation of 24% is achieved. The thrust augmentation results are complemented by shadowgraph imaging of the flowfield in the ejector tube inlet area and high frequency pressure transducer measurements along the length of the ejector tube.

  4. Passive Magnetic Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Magnetic bearing for limited rotation devices requires no feedback control system to sense and correct shaft position. Passive Magnetic Torsion Bearing requires no power supply and has no rubbing parts. Torsion wire restrains against axial instability. Magnetic flux geometry chosen to assure lateral stability with radial restoring force that maintains alignment.

  5. Bearing Rigidity and Almost Global Bearing-Only Formation Stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Shiyu; Zelazo, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the problem of distributed control of bearing-constrained multi-agent formations using bearing-only measurements. We first propose a bearing rigidity theory that is applicable to frameworks in arbitrary dimensions. The proposed bearing rigidity theory is then used to solve two bearing-only formation control problems. In the first, each agent can measure the relative bearings to their neighbors in a global reference frame, while in the second problem, each ...

  6. Early history and reactivation of the rand thrust, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postlethwaite, Clay E.; Jacobson, Carl E.

    The Rand thrust of the Rand Mountains in the northwestern Mojave Desert separates an upper plate of quartz monzonite and quartzofeldspathic to amphibolitic gneiss from a lower plate of metagraywacke and mafic schist (Rand Schist). The Rand thrust is considered part of the regionally extensive Vincent/Chocolate Mountain thrust system, which is commonly believed to represent a Late Cretaceous subduction zone. The initial direction of dip and sense of movement along the Vincent/Chocolate Mountain thrust are controversial. Microfabrics of mylonites and quartzites from the Rand Mountains were analyzed in an attempt to determine transport direction for this region, but the results are ambiguous. In addition, the southwestern portion of the Rand thrust was found to have been reactivated as a low-angle normal fault after subduction. Reactivation might have occurred shortly after subduction, in which case it could account for the preservation of high-pressure mineral assemblages in the Rand Schist, or it could be related to mid-Tertiary extension in the western United States. In either event, the reactivation might be responsible for the complicated nature of the microfabrics. The Rand Schist exhibits an inverted metamorphic zonation. Isograds in the schist are not significantly truncated by the reactivated segment of the Rand thrust. This indicates that other segments of the Vincent/Chocolate Mountain thrust should be re-evaluated for the possibility of late movement, even if they show an apparently undisturbed inverted metamorphic zonation.

  7. Electric sail control mode for amplified transverse thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivanen, P.; Janhunen, P.; Envall, J.

    2015-01-01

    The electric solar wind sail produces thrust by centrifugally spanned high voltage tethers interacting with the solar wind protons. The sail attitude can be controlled and attitude maneuvers are possible by tether voltage modulation synchronous with the sail rotation. Especially, the sail can be inclined with respect to the solar wind direction to obtain transverse thrust to change the osculating orbit angular momentum. Such an inclination has to be maintained by a continual control voltage modulation. Consequently, the tether voltage available for the thrust is less than the maximum voltage provided by the power system. Using a spherical pendulum as a model for a single rotating tether, we derive analytical estimations for the control efficiency for two separate sail control modes. One is a continuous control modulation that corresponds to strictly planar tether tip motion. The other is an on-off modulation with the tether tip moving along a closed loop on a saddle surface. The novel on-off mode is introduced here to both amplify the transverse thrust and reduce the power consumption. During the rotation cycle, the maximum voltage is applied to the tether only over two thrusting arcs when most of the transverse thrust is produced. In addition to the transverse thrust, we obtain the thrusting angle and electric power consumption for the two control modes. It is concluded that while the thrusting angle is about half of the sail inclination for the continuous modulation it approximately equals to the inclination angle for the on-off modulation. The efficiency of the on-off mode is emphasized when power consumption is considered, and the on-off mode can be used to improve the propulsive acceleration through the reduced power system mass.

  8. Propeller thrust analysis using Prandtl's lifting line theory, a comparison between the experimental thrust and the thrust predicted by Prandtl's lifting line theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Steven R.

    The lifting line theory was first developed by Prandtl and was used primarily on analysis of airplane wings. Though the theory is about one hundred years old, it is still used in the initial calculations to find the lift of a wing. The question that guided this thesis was, "How close does Prandtl's lifting line theory predict the thrust of a propeller?" In order to answer this question, an experiment was designed that measured the thrust of a propeller for different speeds. The measured thrust was compared to what the theory predicted. In order to do this experiment and analysis, a propeller needed to be used. A walnut wood ultralight propeller was chosen that had a 1.30 meter (51 inches) length from tip to tip. In this thesis, Prandtl's lifting line theory was modified to account for the different incoming velocity depending on the radial position of the airfoil. A modified equation was used to reflect these differences. A working code was developed based on this modified equation. A testing rig was built that allowed the propeller to be rotated at high speeds while measuring the thrust. During testing, the rotational speed of the propeller ranged from 13-43 rotations per second. The thrust from the propeller was measured at different speeds and ranged from 16-33 Newton's. The test data were then compared to the theoretical results obtained from the lifting line code. A plot in Chapter 5 (the results section) shows the theoretical vs. actual thrust for different rotational speeds. The theory over predicted the actual thrust of the propeller. Depending on the rotational speed, the error was: at low speeds 36%, at low to moderate speeds 84%, and at high speeds the error increased to 195%. Different reasons for these errors are discussed.

  9. Correlate Life Predictions and Condition Indicators in Helicopter Tail Gearbox Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Bolander, Nathan; Haynes, Chris; Branning, Jeremy; Wade, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    Research to correlate bearing remaining useful life (RUL) predictions with Helicopter Health Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) condition indicators (CI) to indicate the damage state of a transmission component has been developed. Condition indicators were monitored and recorded on UH-60M (Black Hawk) tail gearbox output shaft thrust bearings, which had been removed from helicopters and installed in a bearing spall propagation test rig. Condition indicators monitoring the tail gearbox output shaft thrust bearings in UH-60M helicopters were also recorded from an on-board HUMS. The spal-lpropagation data collected in the test rig was used to generate condition indicators for bearing fault detection. A damage progression model was also developed from this data. Determining the RUL of this component in a helicopter requires the CI response to be mapped to the damage state. The data from helicopters and a test rig were analyzed to determine if bearing remaining useful life predictions could be correlated with HUMS condition indicators (CI). Results indicate data fusion analysis techniques can be used to map the CI response to the damage levels.

  10. Experimental investigation of hybrid bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shangxian

    1994-04-01

    A new type of bearing test rig has been set up for static and dynamic tests of oil-film journal bearings. Micro pressure and displacement transducers contained in the shaft measure the distribution of oil film pressure and thickness, and two electromagnetic exciters are located under and behind the test bearing to excite the test bearing in order to obtain its eight dynamic stiffness and damping coefficients. A misalignment jig was employed to align or misalign the test bearing with respect to the axis of the shaft. Valuable performance results were obtained for a recessed hydrostatic bearing, a slot-entry hybrid bearing, and a hole-entry hybrid bearing.

  11. Multiphysics Thrust Chamber Modeling for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ten-See; Cheng, Gary; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for a solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation. A two-pronged approach is employed in this effort: A detailed thermo-fluid analysis on a multi-channel flow element for mid-section corrosion investigation; and a global modeling of the thrust chamber to understand the effect of heat transfer on thrust performance. Preliminary results on both aspects are presented.

  12. Thrust Vectoring Flow Control Using Plasma Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jamey; Bolitho, Michael

    2007-11-01

    Thrust vectoring flow control is demonstrated using plasma synthetic jet actuators (PSJA). The PSJA is a geometric variant of a plasma actuator, consisting of a symmetric electrode array that results in a circular region of dielectric barrier discharge plasma. Quiescent flow PIV measurements of the PSJA reveal that the flowfield on actuation resembles that of a zero-mass flux or synthetic jet that is useful for flow control, particularly separation reduction. Like synthetic jets, unsteady pulsed actuator operation results in formation of multiple vortex rings. The output jet momentum is found to be affected by the power input, actuator dimension and pulsing frequency. While increasing the input power increases the maximum jet velocity, an optimum range of pulsing frequencies and actuator dimensions are observed to exist in order to maximize jet momentum. By asymmetrically varying the plasma input parameters, such as frequency, amplitude and duty cycle, it is possible to control the jet angle. Vectoring using high frequency pusling akin to synthetic jets is more effective than vectoring by modifying steady control inputs and differences in control effectiveness are due primarily to the time scales associated with the vortex formation.

  13. High efficiency thrust vector control allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    The design of control mixing algorithms for launch vehicles with multiple vectoring engines yields competing objectives for which no straightforward solution approach exists. The designer seeks to optimally allocate the effector degrees of freedom such that maneuvering capability is maximized subject to constraints on available control authority. In the present application, such algorithms are generally restricted to linear transformations so as to minimize adverse control-structure interaction and maintain compatibility with industry-standard methods for control gain design and stability analysis. Based on the application of the theory of ellipsoids, a complete, scalable, and extensible framework is developed to effect rapid analysis of launch vehicle capability. Furthermore, a control allocation scheme is proposed that simultaneously balances attainment of the maximum maneuvering capability with rejection of internal loads and performance losses resulting from thrust vectoring in the null region of the admissible controls. This novel approach leverages an optimal parametrization of the weighted least squares generalized inverse and exploits the analytic properties of the constraint geometry so as to enable recovery of more than ninety percent of the theoretical capability while maintaining linearity over the majority of the attainable set.

  14. Electronegative Gas Thruster - Direct Thrust Measurement Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John (Principal Investigator); Aanesland, Ane; Polzin, Kurt; Walker, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    This effort is an international collaboration and academic partnership to mature an innovative electric propulsion (EP) thruster concept to TRL 3 through direct thrust measurement. The initial target application is for Small Satellites, but can be extended to higher power. The Plasma propulsion with Electronegative GASES (PEGASES) concept simplifies ion thruster operation, eliminates a neutralizer requirement and should yield longer life capabilities and lower cost implementation over conventional gridded ion engines. The basic proof-of concept has been demonstrated and matured to TRL 2 over the past several years by researchers at the Laboratoire de Physique des Plasma in France. Due to the low maturity of the innovation, there are currently no domestic investments in electronegative gas thrusters anywhere within NASA, industry or academia. The end product of this Center Innovation Fund (CIF) project will be a validation of the proof-of-concept, maturation to TRL 3 and technology assessment report to summarize the potential for the PEGASES concept to supplant the incumbent technology. Information exchange with the foreign national will be one-way with the exception of the test results. Those test results will first go through a standard public release ITAR/export control review, and the results will be presented in a public technical forum, and the results will be presented in a public technical forum.

  15. Optimal synchronizability of bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Araújo, N A M; Baram, R M; Herrmann, H J; Andrade, J S

    2013-01-01

    Bearings are mechanical dissipative systems that, when perturbed, relax toward a synchronized (bearing) state. Here we find that bearings can be perceived as physical realizations of complex networks of oscillators with asymmetrically weighted couplings. Accordingly, these networks can exhibit optimal synchronization properties through fine tuning of the local interaction strength as a function of node degree [Motter, Zhou, and Kurths, Phys. Rev. E 71, 016116 (2005)]. We show that, in analogy, the synchronizability of bearings can be maximized by counterbalancing the number of contacts and the inertia of their constituting rotor disks through the mass-radius relation, $m\\sim r^{\\alpha}$, with an optimal exponent $\\alpha=\\alpha_{\\times}$ which converges to unity for a large number of rotors. Under this condition, and regardless of the presence of a long-tailed distribution of disk radii composing the mechanical system, the average participation per disk is maximized and the energy dissipation rate is homogeneo...

  16. PCs and Polar Bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessica Fries-Gaither

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at the growing energy consumption from consumer electronics and the increases it may cause in greenhouse gases and global warming. The article appears in the free, online magazine Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears.

  17. Hydrostatic bearing support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, R. E. (inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A hydrostatic bearing support system is provided which comprises a bearing housing having a polygonally configured outer surface which defines at least three symmetrically disposed working faces and a plurality of pressure plates, each of which is disposed relatively opposite a corresponding working face and spaced therefrom to define a gap therebetween. A hydrostatic support film is created in the gap for supporting the housing in spaced relationship to the pressure plates.

  18. Gear bearing drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  19. Thrust Balance Characterization of a 200W Quad Confinement Thruster for High Thrust Regimes

    OpenAIRE

    Knoll, Ak; Lamprou, D.; Lappas, V.; Pollard, M.; Bianco, P.

    2013-01-01

    A thrust balance characterization of a low powered Quad Confinement Thruster is presented for high levels of propellant flow. The nominal flow rate for this device is between 1sccm and 2sccm of Xenon propellant. This study extends the operating range, and investigates the performance at two high flow conditions of 10sccm and 20sccm. Power is varied incrementally between 20W and 200W in order to characterize the performance versus power trends of the device. It was found that for these high fl...

  20. An Assessment of Gas Foil Bearing Scalability and the Potential Benefits to Civilian Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past several years the term oil-free turbomachinery has been used to describe a rotor support system for high speed turbomachinery that does not require oil for lubrication, damping, or cooling. The foundation technology for oil-free turbomachinery is the compliant foil bearing. This technology can replace the conventional rolling element bearings found in current engines. Two major benefits are realized with this technology. The primary benefit is the elimination of the oil lubrication system, accessory gearbox, tower shaft, and one turbine frame. These components account for 8 to 13 percent of the turbofan engine weight. The second benefit that compliant foil bearings offer to turbofan engines is the capability to operate at higher rotational speeds and shaft diameters. While traditional rolling element bearings have diminished life, reliability, and load capacity with increasing speeds, the foil bearing has a load capacity proportional to speed. The traditional applications for foil bearings have been in small, lightweight machines. However, recent advancements in the design and manufacturing of foil bearings have increased their potential size. An analysis, grounded in experimentally proven operation, is performed to assess the scalability of the modern foil bearing. This analysis was coupled to the requirements of civilian turbofan engines. The application of the foil bearing to larger, high bypass ratio engines nominally at the 120 kN (approx.25000 lb) thrust class has been examined. The application of this advanced technology to this system was found to reduce mission fuel burn by 3.05 percent.

  1. Experimental Study On Counter Flow Thrust Vector Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madruga, Maria S.; Das, Debopam; Strykowski, Paul J.

    2000-11-01

    Counter Flow Thrust Vectoring (CFTV) is possibly the most promising fluidic thrust vector control method for deflecting the exhaust thrust of a jet engine. CFTV works by generating a countercurrent shear layer in one side of a planar jet and hence by altering the transverse pressure gradient across the jet. Prediction and control of vector angle is the most important aspect in any thrust vectoring system. Experiments are conducted to obtain pressure distribution on the collar surface, which is used with a vacuum system to generate counter flow on one side of a rectangular (aspect ratio 4:1) jet. The exit Mach number of the ideally expanded jet considered here is 1.44. Gap height between the nozzle and collar surface is varied and vector angle for different mass flow rate has been obtained. The condition at which the jet attaches with the collar surface is found and compared with the predicted theoretical results.

  2. Rapid prototype fabrication processes for high-performance thrust cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, K.; Chwiedor, T.; Diab, J.; Williams, R.

    1994-01-01

    The Thrust Cell Technologies Program (Air Force Phillips Laboratory Contract No. F04611-92-C-0050) is currently being performed by Rocketdyne to demonstrate advanced materials and fabrication technologies which can be utilized to produce low-cost, high-performance thrust cells for launch and space transportation rocket engines. Under Phase 2 of the Thrust Cell Technologies Program (TCTP), rapid prototyping and investment casting techniques are being employed to fabricate a 12,000-lbf thrust class combustion chamber for delivery and hot-fire testing at Phillips Lab. The integrated process of investment casting directly from rapid prototype patterns dramatically reduces design-to-delivery cycle time, and greatly enhances design flexibility over conventionally processed cast or machined parts.

  3. Optimal Thrust Vectoring for an Annular Aerospike Nozzle Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recent success of an annular aerospike flight test by NASA Dryden has prompted keen interest in providing thrust vector capability to the annular aerospike nozzle...

  4. Quadratic Programming Thrust Allocation and Management for Dynamic Positioning Ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushi Wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To solve the complex thrust allocation problems of dynamic positioning ship with azimuth thrusters, the quadratic programming thrust allocation and management system was built. The power optimal thrust allocation was formulated as a quadratic programming problem by the linear treatments of inequality constraints and the optimal solution could be found in a finite amount of time. And some influence factors of thruster allocation were separated from algorithms and treated as a superstratum management module. In this system, online adjustment of input constraints and singularity avoidance could be realized, and the reliability and adaptability of thrust allocation were improved consequently. Finally, the validity and excellent performance of this method was proved by the simulation.

  5. Nitrous Oxide Liquid Injection Thrust Vector Control System Testing Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Nitrous Oxide-fed Liquid Thrust Vector Control system is proposed as an efficient method for vehicle attitude control during powered flight. Pulled from a N2O...

  6. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers for In-Space Propulsion Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation-cooled, bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for the ascent/descent engines and reaction control systems (RCS) for future NASA missions such...

  7. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers for In-Space Propulsion Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation-cooled, bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for the ascent/descent engines and reaction control systems for NASA missions such as Mars...

  8. Thrust distributions and decays of the UPSILON bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the topologies of hadronic events in e+e- annihilation data taken in the region of the upsilon resonances with the non-magnetic CUSB detector at CESR. Using thrust-like variable we compare the decays of tau, tau' and tau'', and find for tau'' a significant excess of high thrust events, which we interpret as evidence for electric dipole transitions. (orig.)

  9. Exploring fold and thrust belts in Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack Loveless

    Google Earth enhances traditional geologic maps by allowing the viewer to explore three-dimensional map patterns and the interaction between structure and topography in dictating those map patterns. This activity overlays 4, 7.5' USGS quadrangles on Google Earth terrain and imagery data and encourages students to investigate common features of fold-and-thrust belts. Keywords: Google Earth, fold-and-thrust belt, visualization

  10. Correlating the Ultrasonic Thrust Force with Acoustic Streaming Velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Alfred C. H.; Hover, Franz S.

    2009-01-01

    The UltraSonic Thruster (UST) is an actuator which employs a piezoelectric transducer to generate a highly directive ultrasonic wave so as to produce bulk fluid movement. This streaming phenomenon can be utilized underwater for thrusting or maneuvering purposes in marine applications, and particularly at very small scale. We make a new connection between fluid flow and forces, establishing a specific formula for estimating overall thrust from the velocity field. Using Par...

  11. Design of Low-Thrust Gravity Assist Trajectories to Europa

    OpenAIRE

    Vasile, Massimiliano; Campagnola, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a mission to Europa using solar electric propulsion as main source of thrust. A direct transcription method based on Finite Elements in Time was used for the design and optimisation of the entire low-thrust gravity assist transfer from the Earth to Europa. Prior to that, a global search algorithm was used to generate a set of suitable first guess solutions for the transfer to Jupiter, and for the capture in the Jovian system. In particular, ...

  12. Acoustically shielded exhaust system for high thrust jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John P. (Inventor); Lee, Robert (Inventor); Majjigi, Rudramuni K. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A flade exhaust nozzle for a high thrust jet engine is configured to form an acoustic shield around the core engine exhaust flowstream while supplementing engine thrust during all flight conditions, particularly during takeoff. The flade airflow is converted from an annular 360.degree. flowstream to an arcuate flowstream extending around the lower half of the core engine exhaust flowstream so as to suppress exhaust noise directed at the surrounding community.

  13. Thrust vector control of satellites using smart parallel manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kougen; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents the concept, control strategy, and simulations of thrust vector control of satellites. First, an innovative thrust vector control concept is introduced, which utilizes the UHM multifunctional smart parallel manipulator to provide precision position control of the thruster vector and vibration suppression capability while the thruster fires. The configuration of the thrust vector control system is then illustrated, and the satellite attitude dynamic model is built. Third, the UHM smart parallel manipulator is introduced and its kinematics and controller design are discussed. The fuzzy logic controller is employed to precisely position the smart parallel manipulator and to compensate the non-linearities due to the friction and backlash of the actuators and the tolerance of the joints. Finally, the satellite attitude controller and the fuzzy logic controller are designed, and simulations are carried out to realize the thrust vector control of a satellite. The results indicate that the smart parallel manipulator can precisely achieve the thrust vector control, the misalignment of the trust vector of the satellite can be corrected effectively, and the position accuracy of the thrust vector is 0.68 arc minutes.

  14. Thrust Stand for Vertically Oriented Electric Propulsion Performance Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Trevor; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    A variation of a hanging pendulum thrust stand capable of measuring the performance of an electric thruster operating in the vertical orientation is presented. The vertical orientation of the thruster dictates that the thruster must be horizontally offset from the pendulum pivot arm, necessitating the use of a counterweight system to provide a neutrally-stable system. Motion of the pendulum arm is transferred through a balance mechanism to a secondary arm on which deflection is measured. A non-contact light-based transducer is used to measure displacement of the secondary beam. The members experience very little friction, rotating on twisting torsional pivots with oscillatory motion attenuated by a passive, eddy current damper. Displacement is calibrated using an in situ thrust calibration system. Thermal management and self-leveling systems are incorporated to mitigate thermal and mechanical drifts. Gravitational restoring force and torsional spring constants associated with flexure pivots provide restoring moments. An analysis of the design indicates that the thrust measurement range spans roughly four decades, with the stand capable of measuring thrust up to 12 N for a 200 kg thruster and up to approximately 800 mN for a 10 kg thruster. Data obtained from calibration tests performed using a 26.8 lbm simulated thruster indicated a resolution of 1 mN on 100 mN-level thrusts, while those tests conducted on 200 lbm thruster yielded a resolution of roughly 2.5 micro at thrust levels of 0.5 N and greater.

  15. Thrust stand for vertically oriented electric propulsion performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Trevor; Polzin, Kurt A

    2010-11-01

    A variation of a hanging pendulum thrust stand capable of measuring the performance of an electric thruster operating in the vertical orientation is presented. The vertical orientation of the thruster dictates that the thruster must be horizontally offset from the pendulum pivot arm, necessitating the use of a counterweight system to provide a neutrally stable system. Motion of the pendulum arm is transferred through a balance mechanism to a secondary arm on which deflection is measured. A noncontact light-based transducer is used to measure displacement of the secondary beam. The members experience very little friction, rotating on twisting torsional pivots with oscillatory motion attenuated by a passive, eddy-current damper. Displacement is calibrated using an in situ thrust calibration system. Thermal management and self-leveling systems are incorporated to mitigate thermal and mechanical drifts. Gravitational force and torsional spring constants associated with flexure pivots provide restoring moments. An analysis of the design indicates that the thrust measurement range spans roughly four decades, with the stand capable of measuring thrust up to 12 N for a 200 kg thruster and up to approximately 800 mN for a 10 kg thruster. Data obtained from calibration tests performed using a 26.8 lbm simulated thruster indicated a resolution of 1 mN on 100 mN level thrusts, while those tests conducted on a 200 lbm thruster yielded a resolution of roughly 2.5 mN at thrust levels of 0.5 N and greater. PMID:21133502

  16. Gas Foil Bearing Misalignment and Unbalance Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of misalignment and unbalance on gas foil bearings are presented. The future of U.S. space exploration includes plans to conduct science missions aboard space vehicles, return humans to the Moon, and place humans on Mars. All of these endeavors are of long duration, and require high amounts of electrical power for propulsion, life support, mission operations, etc. One potential source of electrical power of sufficient magnitude and duration is a nuclear-fission-based system. The system architecture would consist of a nuclear reactor heat source with the resulting thermal energy converted to electrical energy through a dynamic power conversion and heat rejection system. Various types of power conversion systems can be utilized, but the Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) turboalternator is one of the leading candidates. In the CBC, an inert gas heated by the reactor drives a turboalternator, rejects excess heat to space through a heat exchanger, and returns to the reactor in a closed loop configuration. The use of the CBC for space power and propulsion is described in more detail in the literature (Mason, 2003). In the CBC system just described, the process fluid is a high pressure inert gas such as argon, krypton, or a helium-xenon mixture. Due to the closed loop nature of the system and the associated potential for damage to components in the system, contamination of the working fluid is intolerable. Since a potential source of contamination is the lubricant used in conventional turbomachinery bearings, Gas Foil Bearings (GFB) have high potential for the rotor support system. GFBs are compliant, hydrodynamic journal and thrust bearings that use a gas, such as the CBC working fluid, as their lubricant. Thus, GFBs eliminate the possibility of contamination due to lubricant leaks into the closed loop system. Gas foil bearings are currently used in many commercial applications, both terrestrial and aerospace. Aircraft Air Cycle Machines (ACMs) and ground-based microturbines have demonstrated histories of successful long-term operation using GFBs (Heshmat et al., 2000). Small aircraft propulsion engines, helicopter gas turbines, and high-speed electric motors are potential future applications.

  17. Rotordynamics of Automotive Turbochargers Linear and Nonlinear Rotordynamics – Bearing Design – Rotor Balancing

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen-Schäfer, Hung

    2012-01-01

    This book deals with rotordynamics of automotive turbochargers while encompassing the analysis of the dynamics of rotating machines at very high rotor speeds of 300,000 rpm and above. This interdisciplinary field involves 1. thermodynamics and turbo-matching knowledge to compute working conditions of turbochargers, 2. fluid and bearing dynamics to calculate various operating thrust loads and to design the rotating floating ring bearings (two-oil-film bearings), and 3. tribology to improve the rotor stability and to reduce the bearing friction. Mathematical background in modeling and simulation methods is necessary; however, the prerequisites have been kept to a minimum. The book addresses both practitioners working in the field of rotordynamics of automotive turbochargers and graduate students in mechanical engineering.

  18. Partial tooth gear bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  19. Losses in magnetic bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of HTSC bulk materials in magnetic bearings requires an understanding and minimization of the friction in such systems. Since the rotors in these bearings are not completely axially symmetric, their rotation generates an AC magnetic field acting on the superconductors and the metallic components of the arrangement. This results in hysteresis and eddy current losses. In this paper we present systematic experimental investigations of these loss mechanisms obtained from various arrangements with well defined deviations from the axial symmetry of the rotor. Theoretical models of the loss contributions have been developed and compared with the experimental results. The basis of these models is to describe deviations from the axial symmetry of the rotor as a distribution of magnetic dipoles and to calculate the force on such dipoles caused by hysteresis or eddy currents. These models allow the estimation of the losses of a given arrangement and can be used for the design of superconducting magnetic bearings. (orig.)

  20. Thrust stand for vertically oriented electric propulsion performance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variation of a hanging pendulum thrust stand capable of measuring the performance of an electric thruster operating in the vertical orientation is presented. The vertical orientation of the thruster dictates that the thruster must be horizontally offset from the pendulum pivot arm, necessitating the use of a counterweight system to provide a neutrally stable system. Motion of the pendulum arm is transferred through a balance mechanism to a secondary arm on which deflection is measured. A noncontact light-based transducer is used to measure displacement of the secondary beam. The members experience very little friction, rotating on twisting torsional pivots with oscillatory motion attenuated by a passive, eddy-current damper. Displacement is calibrated using an in situ thrust calibration system. Thermal management and self-leveling systems are incorporated to mitigate thermal and mechanical drifts. Gravitational force and torsional spring constants associated with flexure pivots provide restoring moments. An analysis of the design indicates that the thrust measurement range spans roughly four decades, with the stand capable of measuring thrust up to 12 N for a 200 kg thruster and up to approximately 800 mN for a 10 kg thruster. Data obtained from calibration tests performed using a 26.8 lbm simulated thruster indicated a resolution of 1 mN on 100 mN level thrusts, while those tests conducted on a 200 lbm thruster yielded a resolution of roughly 2.5 mN at thrust levelsolution of roughly 2.5 mN at thrust levels of 0.5 N and greater.

  1. Methods for determining atypical gate valve thrust requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluating the performance of rising stem, wedge type, gate valves used in nuclear power plant is not a problem when the valves can be design-basis tested and their operability margins determined diagnostically. The problem occurs when they cannot be tested because of plant system limitations or when they can be tested only at some less-than-design-basis condition. To evaluate the performance of these valves requires various analytical and/or extrapolation methods by which the design-basis stem thrust requirement can be determined. This has been typically accomplished with valve stem thrust models used to calculate the requirements or by extrapolating the results from a less-than-design-basis test. The stem thrust models used by the nuclear industry to determine the opening or closing stem thrust requirements for these gate valves have generally assumed that the highest load the valve experiences during closure (but before seating) is at flow isolation and during unwedging or before flow initiation in the opening direction. However, during full-scale valve testing conducted for the USNRC, several of the valves produced stem thrust histories that showed peak closing stem forces occurring before flow isolation in the closing direction and after flow initiation in the opening direction. All of the valves that exhibited this behavior in the closing direction also showed signs of internal damage. Initially, we dismissed the early peak in the closing stem thrust requirementeak in the closing stem thrust requirement as damage-induced and labeled it nonpredictable behavior. Opening responses were not a priority in our early research, so that phenomenon was set aside for later evaluation

  2. Bilateral and multiple cavitation sounds during upper cervical thrust manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunning James

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The popping produced during high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA thrust manipulation is a common sound; however to our knowledge, no study has previously investigated the location of cavitation sounds during manipulation of the upper cervical spine. The primary purpose was to determine which side of the spine cavitates during C1-2 rotatory HVLA thrust manipulation. Secondary aims were to calculate the average number of pops, the duration of upper cervical thrust manipulation, and the duration of a single cavitation. Methods Nineteen asymptomatic participants received two upper cervical thrust manipulations targeting the right and left C1-2 articulation, respectively. Skin mounted microphones were secured bilaterally over the transverse process of C1, and sound wave signals were recorded. Identification of the side, duration, and number of popping sounds were determined by simultaneous analysis of spectrograms with audio feedback using custom software developed in Matlab. Results Bilateral popping sounds were detected in 34 (91.9% of 37 manipulations while unilateral popping sounds were detected in just 3 (8.1% manipulations; that is, cavitation was significantly (P Conclusions Cavitation was significantly more likely to occur bilaterally than unilaterally during upper cervical HVLA thrust manipulation. Most subjects produced 3–4 pops during a single rotatory HVLA thrust manipulation targeting the right or left C1-2 articulation; therefore, practitioners of spinal manipulative therapy should expect multiple popping sounds when performing upper cervical thrust manipulation to the atlanto-axial joint. Furthermore, the traditional manual therapy approach of targeting a single ipsilateral or contralateral facet joint in the upper cervical spine may not be realistic.

  3. Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Mary Ellen

    At present, actuation systems for the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) for launch vehicles are hydraulic systems. The Advanced Launch System (ALS), a joint initiative between NASA and the Air Force, is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost effective, highly reliable and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. As part of this initiative, an electromechanical actuation system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems used today. NASA-Lewis is developing and demonstrating an Induction Motor Controller Actuation System with a 40 hp peak rating. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) technology and Pulse Population Modulation (PPM) techniques to implement Field Oriented Vector Control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. Through PPM, multiphase variable frequency, variable voltage waveforms can be synthesized from the 20 kHz source. FOVC shows that varying both the voltage and frequency and their ratio (V/F), permits independent control of both torque and speed while operating at maximum efficiency at any point on the torque-speed curve. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a Built-in Test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA TVC system. The design and fabrication of the motor controller is being done by General Dynamics Space Systems Division. The University of Wisconsin-Madison will assist in the design of the advanced induction motor and in the implementation of the FOVC theory. A 75 hp electronically controlled dynamometer will be used to test the motor controller in all four quadrants of operation using flight type control algorithms. Integrated testing of the controller and actuator will be conducted at a facility yet to be named. The EMA system described above is discussed in detail.

  4. Thrusting and back-thrusting as post-emplacement kinematics of the Almora klippe: Insights from Low-temperature thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. C.; Singh, Paramjeet; Lal, Nand

    2015-06-01

    Crystalline klippen over the Lesser Himalayan Sequence (LHS) in the Kumaon and Garhwal regions of NW-Himalaya, are the representative of southern portion of the Main Central Thrust (MCT) hanging wall. These were tectonically transported over the juxtaposed thrust sheets (Berinag, Tons and Ramgarh) of the LHS zone along the MCT. These klippen comprise of NW-SE trending synformal folded thrust sheet bounded by thrusts in the south and north. In the present study, the exhumation histories of two well-known klippen namely Almora and Baijnath, and the Ramgarh thrust sheet, in the Kumaon and Garhwal regions vis-a-vis Himalayan orogeny have been investigated using Apatite Fission Track (AFT) ages. Along a ~ 60 km long orogen perpendicular transect across the Almora klippe and the Ramgarh thrust sheet, 16 AFT cooling ages from the Almora klippe and 2 from the Ramgarh thrust sheet have been found to range from 3.7 ± 0.8 to 13.2 ± 2.7 Ma, and 6.3 ± 0.8 to 7.2 ± 1.0 Ma respectively. From LHS meta-sedimentary rocks only a single AFT age of 3.6 ± 0.8 Ma could be obtained. Three AFT ages from the Baijnath klippe range between 4.7 ± 0.5 and 6.6 ± 0.8 Ma. AFT ages and exhumation rates of different klippen show a dynamic coupling between tectonic and erosion processes in the Kumaon and Garhwal regions of NW-Himalaya. However, the tectonic processes play a dominant role in controlling the exhumation. Thrusting and back thrusting within the Almora klippe and Ramgarh thrust sheet are the post-emplacement kinematics that controlled the exhumation of the Almora klippe. Combining these results with the already published AFT ages from the crystalline klippen and the Higher Himalayan Crystalline (HHC), the kinematics of emplacement of the klippen over the LHS and exhumation pattern across the MCT in the Kumaon and Garhwal regions of NW-Himalaya have been investigated.

  5. Modular gear bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A gearing system using modular gear bearing components. Each component is composed of a core, one or more modules attached to the core and two or more fastening modules rigidly attaching the modules to the core. The modules, which are attached to the core, may consist of gears, rollers or gear bearing components. The core orientation affects the orientation of the modules attached to the core. This is achieved via the keying arrangement of the core and the component modules that attach to the core. Such an arrangement will also facilitate the phase tuning of gear modules with respect to the core and other gear modules attached to the core.

  6. Bearing-Cartridge Damping Seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggins, David G.; Scharrer, Joseph K.; Chen, Wei C.

    1991-01-01

    In proposed design for improved ball-bearing cartridge, damping seal in form of thin-layer fluid journal bearing incorporated into cartridge. Damping seal acts as auxiliary bearing, relieving bearing balls of significant portions of both static and dynamic bearing loads. Damping from seal reduces dynamic loads even further by reducing amplitude of vibrations in second vibrational mode of rotor, which mode occurs when rotor turning at nearly full operating speed. Intended for use in high-pressure-oxygen turbopump of Space Shuttle main engine, also applicable to other turbomachinery bearings.

  7. Thrust Augmentation Measurements Using a Pulse Detonation Engine Ejector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pal, Sibtosh

    2005-01-01

    Results of an experimental effort on pulse detonation driven ejectors are presented and discussed. The experiments were conducted using a pulse detonation engine (PDE)/ejector setup that was specifically designed for the study and operated at frequencies up to 50 Hz. The results of various experiments designed to probe different aspects of the PDE/ejector setup are reported. The baseline PDE was operated using ethylene (C2H4) as the fuel and an oxygen/nitrogen O2 + N2) mixture at an equivalence ratio of one. The PDE only experiments included propellant mixture characterization using a laser absorption technique, high fidelity thrust measurements using an integrated spring-damper system, and shadowgraph imaging of the detonation/shock wave structure emanating from the tube. The baseline PDE thrust measurement results at each desired frequency agree with experimental and modeling results reported in the literature. These PDE setup results were then used as a basis for quantifying thrust augmentation for various PDE/ejector setups with constant diameter ejector tubes and various ejector lengths, the radius of curvature for the ejector inlets and various detonation tube/ejector tube overlap distances. For the studied experimental matrix, the results showed a maximum thrust augmentation of 106% at an operational frequency of 30 Hz. The thrust augmentation results are complemented by shadowgraph imaging of the flowfield in the ejector tube inlet area and high frequency pressure transducer measurements along the length of the ejector tube.

  8. Thrust Augmentation Measurements for a Pulse Detonation Engine Driven Ejector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, S.; Santoro, Robert J.; Shehadeh, R.; Saretto, S.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Thrust augmentation results of an ongoing study of pulse detonation engine driven ejectors are presented and discussed. The experiments were conducted using a pulse detonation engine (PDE) setup with various ejector configurations. The PDE used in these experiments utilizes ethylene (C2H4) as the fuel, and an equi-molar mixture of oxygen and nitrogen as the oxidizer at an equivalence ratio of one. High fidelity thrust measurements were made using an integrated spring damper system. The baseline thrust of the PDE engine was first measured and agrees with experimental and modeling results found in the literature. Thrust augmentation measurements were then made for constant diameter ejectors. The parameter space for the study included ejector length, PDE tube exit to ejector tube inlet overlap distance, and straight versus rounded ejector inlets. The relationship between the thrust augmentation results and various physical phenomena is described. To further understand the flow dynamics, shadow graph images of the exiting shock wave front from the PDE were also made. For the studied parameter space, the results showed a maximum augmentation of 40%. Further increase in augmentation is possible if the geometry of the ejector is tailored, a topic currently studied by numerous groups in the field.

  9. Engineering research, development and technology: Thrust area report FY 91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence, Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff and the technology needed to support current and future LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) to identify key technologies and (2) conduct high quality work to enhance our capabilities in these key technologies. To help focus our efforts, we identify technology thrust areas and select technical leaders for each area. The thrust areas are integrated engineering activities and, rather than being based on individual disciplines, they are staffed by personnel from Electronics Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and other LLNL organizations, as appropriate. The thrust area leaders are expected to establish strong links to LLNL program leaders and to industry; to use outside and inside experts to review the quality and direction of the work; to use university contacts to supplement and complement their efforts; and to be certain that we are not duplicating the work of others. The thrust area leader is also responsible for carrying out the work that follows from the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program so that the results can be applied as early as possible to the needs of LLNL programs. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes activities conducted within the Program for the fiscal year, 1991. Its intent is to provide timely summaries of objectives, theories, methods, and results

  10. Bear vs Bee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This interactive Java applet is a game that challenges a student to solve problems by using logic and rudimentary engineering skills. The goal in each case is to create a conveyance that gets the bear to the pot of honey, avoiding the bees. The game has 32 stages of increasing complexity.

  11. Tardigrada (Water Bears)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micrographia

    This reference page offers a brief description of Tardigrades, also known as water bears. It includes information about their physical appearance, an explanation of their name, likely habitats, internal organs and other distinguishing features, and a few images. A diagram of a common tardigrade, Macrobiotus macronyx, is also provided via an internal link.

  12. History of ball bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowson, D.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    The familiar precision rolling-element bearings of the twentieth century are products of exacting technology and sophisticated science. Their very effectiveness and basic simplicity of form may discourage further interest in their history and development. Yet the full story covers a large portion of recorded history and surprising evidence of an early recognition of the advantages of rolling motion over sliding action and progress toward the development of rolling-element bearings. The development of rolling-element bearings is followed from the earliest civilizations to the end of the eighteenth century. The influence of general technological developments, particularly those concerned with the movement of large building blocks, road transportation, instruments, water-raising equipment, and windmills are discussed, together with the emergence of studies of the nature of rolling friction and the impact of economic factors. By 1800 the essential features of ball and rolling-element bearings had emerged and it only remained for precision manufacture and mass production to confirm the value of these fascinating machine elements.

  13. Development of Flexible Bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.S.Mohanraj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Elastomeric base isolation systems are proven to be effective in reducing seismic forces transmitted to buildings. However, due to their cost, the use of these devices is currently limited to large and expensive buildings. A fiber reinforced elastomeric isolator utilizes fiber fabric, such as carbon fiber, glass fibre, and etc. as the reinforcement material instead of solid steel plates. The fibre fabric reinforcement is extensible in tension and has no flexural rigidity. Elastomers normally used in the isolator are natural rubber; neoprene, butyl rubber and nit rile rubber etc. These devices were fabricated by binding alternating layers of rubber and fibre mesh. The fibre mesh is used to increase the vertical stiffness of the bearings while maintaining low lateral stiffness. Characterizing the behaviour of a fibre reinforced bearing “shape factor” of the bearing, Poisson’s ratio of the elastomeric material and flexibility of the reinforcing sheets and investigate the effect of reinforcement flexibility on compressive behaviour of elastomeric bearings with different geometrical and material properties. Bonding with fibre reinforcements can increase the stiffness of elastic layers only when the elastic layer is compressed.

  14. Medium-frequency impulsive-thrust-activated liquid hydrogen reorientation with Geyser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Efficient technique are studied for accomplishing propellant resettling through the minimization of propellant usage through impulsive thrust. A comparison between the use of constant-thrust and impulsive-thrust accelerations for the activation of propellant resettlement shows that impulsive thrust is superior to constant thrust for liquid reorientation in a reduced-gravity environment. This study shows that when impulsive thrust with 0.1-1.0-, and 10-Hz frequencies for liquid-fill levels in the range between 30-80 percent is considered, the selection of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive thrust over the other frequency ranges of impulsive thrust is the optimum. Characteristics of the slosh waves excited during the course of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive-thrust liquid reorientation were also analyzed.

  15. Characteristics of a confined jet thrust vector control nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porzio, A. J.

    1984-12-01

    A study of confined jet thrust vector control (CJTVC) is presented. By isolating an area of flow separation within the body of a nozzle, CJTVC has the advantage over other thrust vector controls using secondary injection (SI) in that it can operate independent of altitude. This makes it ideal for applications in small missiles and spacecraft attitude control. In this study, axial thrust, side force, and pressure distribution across the nozzle were measured. The parameters were SI pressure, primary short supply pressure, and SI port area. Results indicate that there is a lower limit to the supply pressure ratio (SI pressure to primary pressure) and SI mass flow below which, the nozzle will not produce side force. Also, above a primary pressure of 200 psig, the undeflected jet exhibits instabilities. Without SI, a 4 Hz oscillation occurs in the nozzle and switching jet attachment occurs near the throat.

  16. Parametric study of thermal behavior of thrust chamber cooling channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karima E. Amori

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation is adopted for two dimensional thermal analysis of rocket thrust chamber wall (RL10, employing finite difference model with iterative scheme (implemented under relaxation factor of 0.9 for convergence to compute temperature distribution within thrust chamber wall (which is composed of Nickel and Copper layers. The analysis is conducted for different boundary conditions: only convection boundary conditions then combined radiation, convection boundary conditions also for different aspect ratio (AR of cooling channel. The results show that Utilizing cooling channels of high aspect ratio leads to decrease in temperature variation across thrust chamber wall, while no effects on heat transferred to the coolant is indicated. The radiation has a considerable effect on the computed wall temperature values.

  17. Optimization of Flapping Airfoils for Maximum Thrust and Propulsive Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. H. Tuncer

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical optimization algorithm based on the steepest decent along the variation of the optimization function is implemented for maximizing the thrust and/or propulsive efficiency of a single flapping airfoil. Unsteady, low speed laminar flows are computed using a Navier-Stokes solver on moving overset grids. The flapping motion of the airfoil is described by a combined sinusoidal plunge and pitching motion. Optimization parameters are taken to be the amplitudes of the plunge and pitching motions, and the phase shift between them. Computations are performed in parallel in a work station cluster. The numerical simulations show that high thrust values may be obtained at the expense of reduced efficiency. For high efficiency in thrust generation, the induced angle of attack of the airfoil is reduced and large scale vortex formations at the leading edge are prevented. 

  18. Demand thrust pumped propulsion with automatic warm gas valving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, John C.

    1992-07-01

    A thrust-on-demand, monopropellant rocket propulsion system is described which is based on lightweight low-pressure tankage, free-piston pumps, and a small high-pressure thrust chamber. This tightly-packaged automatic valving design enables pairs of warm-gas-driven reciprocating pumps to deliver storable propellants on demand, at any rate up to the pumps' own mass per second at 7 MPa. The objective of the technology under consideration is to make pumped propellant performance available to spacecraft which must thrust on demand, while retaining the characteristic high mass ratios of pumped systems and minimizing associated complexity. This technology makes it possible to increase the useful payload and enhance safety due to the lower tankage pressures by decreasing the size of satellite propulsion system. The shutdown capability offers possibilities for orbital maneuvering scenarios.

  19. Separability of drag and thrust in undulatory animals and machines

    CERN Document Server

    Bale, Rahul; Neveln, Izaak D; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; MacIver, Malcolm A; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2014-01-01

    For nearly a century, researchers have tried to understand the swimming of aquatic animals in terms of a balance between the forward thrust from swimming movements and drag on the body. Prior approaches have failed to provide a separation of these two forces for undulatory swimmers such as lamprey and eels, where most parts of the body are simultaneously generating drag and thrust. We nonetheless show that this separation is possible, and delineate its fundamental basis in undulatory swimmers. Our approach unifies a vast diversity of undulatory aquatic animals (anguilliform, sub-carangiform, gymnotiform, bal- istiform, rajiform) and provides design principles for highly agile bioinspired underwater vehicles. This approach has practical utility within biology as well as engineering. It is a predictive tool for use in understanding the role of the mechanics of movement in the evolutionary emergence of morphological features relating to locomotion. For example, we demonstrate that the drag-thrust separation fram...

  20. Dynamic Model for Thrust Generation of Marine Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens; Lindegaard, Karl-Petter

    2000-01-01

    Mathematical models of propeller thrust and torque are traditionally based on steady state thrust and torque characteristics obtained in model basin or cavitation tunnel tests. Experimental results showed that these quasi steady state models do not accurately describe the transient phenomena in a thruster. A recently published dynamic model was based on the experimental observations. Describing zero advance speed conditions accurately, this model, however, does not work for a vessel at non- zero relative water speed. This paper derives a large signal dynamic model of propeller that includes the eects of transients in the ow over a wide range of operation. The results are essential for accurate thrust control in dynamic positioning and in underwater robotics.

  1. Radial loads and axial thrusts on centrifugal pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of a seminar organised by the Power Industries Division of the IMechE are presented in this text. Complete contents: Review of parameters influencing hydraulic forces on centrifugal impellers; The effect of fluid forces at various operation conditions on the vibrations of vertical turbine pumps; A review of the pump rotor axial equilibrium problem - some case studies; Dynamic hydraulic loading on a centrifugal pump impeller; Experimental research on axial thrust loads of double suction centrifugal pumps; A comparison of pressure distribution and radial loads on centrifugal pumps; A theoretical and experimental investigation of axial thrusts within a multi-stage centrifugal pump

  2. Thrust loss on azimuthing thrusters due to Coanda effect

    OpenAIRE

    Fjørtoft, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    The main objectives in this master's thesis is to investigate how the Coanda effect influences a thruster jet which further causes a thrust loss.

    The tendency of a thruster slipstream to be deflected towards a nearby surface, for most practical situations the hull of a vessel, is called the Coanda effect and is likely to produce a significant thrust loss under certain geometric conditions.

    The approach in this master's thesis is to perform an experiment measuring...

  3. Low thrust minimum-fuel orbital transfer: a homotopic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Haberkorn, Thomas; Martinon, Pierre; Gergaud, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    We describe in this paper the study of an earth orbital transfer with a low thrust (typically electro-ionic) propulsion system. The objective is the maximization of the final mass, which leads to a discontinuous control with a huge number of thrust arcs. The resolution method is based on single shooting, combined to a homotopic approach in order to cope with the problem of the initial guess, which is actually critical for non-trivial problems. An important aspect of this choice is that we mak...

  4. Beryllium satellite thrust cone design, manufacture and test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pre-formed beryllium sheet material has been used in the design, manufacturing and test of a satellite thrust cone structure. Adhesive bonding was used for attachment of aluminium flanges and conical segment lap strips. Difficulties in beryllium structure design such as incompatibilities with aluminium and handling problems are discussed. Testing to optimize beryllium-beryllium and beryllium-aluminium adhesive bonds is described. The completed thrust cone assembly has been subjected to static load testing and the results are presented. A summary of the relative merits of the use of beryllium in satellite structures is given with recommendations for future users. (author)

  5. Low-thrust chemical propulsion system pump technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabiers, R. L.; Siebenhaar, A.

    1981-01-01

    Candidate pump and driver systems for low thrust cargo orbit transfer vehicle engines which deliver large space structures to geosynchronous equatorial orbit and beyond are evaluated. The pumps operate to 68 atmospheres (1000 psi) discharge pressure and flowrates suited to cryogenic engines using either LOX/methane or LOX/hydrogen propellants in thrust ranges from 445 to 8900 N (100 to 2000 lb F). Analysis of the various pumps and drivers indicate that the low specific speed requirement will make high fluid efficiencies difficult to achieve. As such, multiple stages are required. In addition, all pumps require inducer stages. The most attractive main pumps are the multistage centrifugal pumps.

  6. Government Risk-Bearing

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The u.s. government bulks large in the nation's financial markets. The huge volume of government-issued and -sponsored debt affects the pricing and volume ofprivate debt and, consequently, resource allocation between competing alternatives. What is often not fully appreciated is the substantial influence the federal government wields overresource allocation through its provisionofcreditandrisk-bearing services to the private economy. Because peopleand firms generally seekto avoid risk, atsomeprice they are willing to pay another party to assume the risk they would otherwise face. Insurance companies are a class of private-sector firms one commonly thinks of as providing these services. As the federal government has expanded its presence in the U.S. economy during this century, it has increasingly developed programs aimed at bearing risks that the private sector either would not take on at any price, or would take on but atapricethoughtto besogreatthatmostpotentialbeneficiarieswouldnotpurchase the coverage. To...

  7. Passive magnetic bearing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F.

    2014-09-02

    An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

  8. Centrifugally decoupling touchdown bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Richard F

    2014-06-24

    Centrifugally decoupling mechanical bearing systems provide thin tensioned metallic ribbons contained in a support structure. This assembly rotates around a stationary shaft being centered at low speeds by the action of the metal ribbons. Tension springs are connected on one end to the ribbons and on the other end to the support structure. The ribbons pass through slots in the inner ring of the support structure. The spring preloading thus insures contact (or near-contact) between the ribbons and the shaft at rotation speeds below the transition speed. Above this speed, however, the centrifugal force on the ribbons produces a tensile force on them that exceeds the spring tensile force so that the ribbons curve outward, effectively decoupling them from mechanical contact with the shaft. They still remain, however, in position to act as a touchdown bearing in case of abnormally high transverse accelerations.

  9. Integration of magnetic bearings in the design of advanced gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storace, Albert F.; Sood, Devendra K.; Lyons, James P.; Preston, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings provide revolutionary advantages for gas turbine engine rotor support. These advantages include tremendously improved vibration and stability characteristics, reduced power loss, improved reliability, fault-tolerance, and greatly extended bearing service life. The marriage of these advantages with innovative structural network design and advanced materials utilization will permit major increases in thrust to weight performance and structural efficiency for future gas turbine engines. However, obtaining the maximum payoff requires two key ingredients. The first key ingredient is the use of modern magnetic bearing technologies such as innovative digital control techniques, high-density power electronics, high-density magnetic actuators, fault-tolerant system architecture, and electronic (sensorless) position estimation. This paper describes these technologies. The second key ingredient is to go beyond the simple replacement of rolling element bearings with magnetic bearings by incorporating magnetic bearings as an integral part of the overall engine design. This is analogous to the proper approach to designing with composites, whereby the designer tailors the geometry and load carrying function of the structural system or component for the composite instead of simply substituting composites in a design originally intended for metal material. This paper describes methodologies for the design integration of magnetic bearings in gas turbine engines.

  10. Night of the Bear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey Debenham

    2002-08-25

    The NOAA Ocean Exploration program strives to engage broad audiences to enhance America's environmental literacy through the excitement of ocean discovery. Increasing this literacy requires high-quality, effective collaborations between ocean explorers and America's teachers. NOAA is forming such collaborations to reach out in new ways to the public to improve the literacy of learners with respect to ocean issues. This site is a daily log of exploration in the Arctic and research on the Polar Bear.

  11. Anti-backlash gear bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A gear bearing having a first gear and a second gear, each having a plurality of teeth. Each gear operates on two non-parallel surfaces of the opposing gear teeth to perform both gear and bearing functions simultaneously. The gears are moving at substantially the same speed at their contact points. The gears may be roller gear bearings or phase-shifted gear bearings, and may be arranged in a planet/sun system or used as a transmission. One preferred embodiment discloses and describes an anti-backlash feature to counter ''dead zones'' in the gear bearing movement.

  12. BALANCING OF THE AXIAL THRUST IN THE IMPELLER PUMPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Jankowski

    1972-01-01

    Full Text Available The methods of calculations of various axial thrust - balancing are described, with particular attention to the balance discs. Advantages and disadvantages of the real constructions are shown and the principles of the basic geometrical dimensions choice are also given.

  13. Precision Thrust Cumulant Moments at N^3LL

    CERN Document Server

    Abbate, Riccardo; Hoang, Andre H; Mateu, Vicent; Stewart, Iain W

    2012-01-01

    We consider cumulant moments (cumulants) of the thrust distribution using predictions of the full spectrum for thrust including O(alpha_s^3) fixed order results, resummation of singular N^3LL logarithmic contributions, and a class of leading power corrections in a renormalon-free scheme. From a global fit to the first thrust moment we extract the strong coupling and the leading power correction matrix element Omega_1. We obtain alpha_s(m_Z) = 0.1141 \\pm (0.0004)_exp \\pm (0.0014)_hadr \\pm (0.0007)_pert, where the 1-sigma uncertainties are experimental, from hadronization (related to Omega_1) and perturbative, respectively, and Omega_1 = 0.372 \\pm (0.044)_exp \\pm (0.039)_pert GeV. The n-th thrust cumulants for n > 1 are completely insensitive to Omega_1, and therefore a good instrument for extracting information on higher order power corrections, Omega'_n/Q^n, from moment data. We find (\\tilde Omega'_2)^(1/2) = 0.74 \\pm (0.11)_exp \\pm (0.09)_pert GeV.

  14. Effect of Operating Frequency on PDE Driven Ejector Thrust Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pal, Sibtosh; Landry, K.; Shehadeh, R.; Bouvet, N.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Results of an on-going study of pulse detonation engine driven ejectors are presented and discussed. The experiments were conducted using a pulse detonation engine (PDE) designed to operate at frequencies up to 50 Hz. The PDE used in these experiments utilizes an equi-molar mixture of oxygen and nitrogen as the oxidizer, and ethylene (C2H4) as the fuel, with the propellant mixture having an equivalence ratio of one. A line of sight laser absorption technique was used to determine the time needed for proper filling of the tube. Thrust measurements were made using an integrated spring damper system coupled with a linear variable displacement transducer. The baseline thrust of the PDE was first measured at each desired frequency and agrees with experimental and modeling results found in the literature. Thrust augmentation measurements were then made for constant diameter ejectors. The ejectors had varying lengths, and two different inlet geometries were tested for each ejector configuration. The parameter space for the study included PDE operation frequency, ejector length, overlap distance and the radius of curvature for the ejector inlets. For the studied experimental matrix, the results showed a maximum thrust augmentation of 106% at an operational frequency of 30 Hz.

  15. Engineering Research, Development and Technology, FY95: Thrust area report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through their collaboration with US industry in pursuit of the most cost-effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where they can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance their capabilities and establish themselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts, technology thrust areas are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1995. The report provides timely summaries of objectives methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: computational electronics and electromagnetics; computational mechanics; microtechnology; manufacturing technology; materials science and engineering; power conversion technologies; nondestructive evaluation; and information engineering.

  16. Separability of drag and thrust in undulatory animals and machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Rahul; Shirgaonkar, Anup A.; Neveln, Izaak D.; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Maciver, Malcolm A.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2014-12-01

    For nearly a century, researchers have tried to understand the swimming of aquatic animals in terms of a balance between the forward thrust from swimming movements and drag on the body. Prior approaches have failed to provide a separation of these two forces for undulatory swimmers such as lamprey and eels, where most parts of the body are simultaneously generating drag and thrust. We nonetheless show that this separation is possible, and delineate its fundamental basis in undulatory swimmers. Our approach unifies a vast diversity of undulatory aquatic animals (anguilliform, sub-carangiform, gymnotiform, bal-istiform, rajiform) and provides design principles for highly agile bioinspired underwater vehicles. This approach has practical utility within biology as well as engineering. It is a predictive tool for use in understanding the role of the mechanics of movement in the evolutionary emergence of morphological features relating to locomotion. For example, we demonstrate that the drag-thrust separation framework helps to predict the observed height of the ribbon fin of electric knifefish, a diverse group of neotropical fish which are an important model system in sensory neurobiology. We also show how drag-thrust separation leads to models that can predict the swimming velocity of an organism or a robotic vehicle.

  17. Introgressive hybridization: brown bears as vectors for polar bear alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailer, Frank

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics and consequences of introgression can inform about numerous evolutionary processes. Biologists have therefore long been interested in hybridization. One challenge, however, lies in the identification of nonadmixed genotypes that can serve as a baseline for accurate quantification of admixture. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Cahill et al. (2015) analyse a genomic data set of 28 polar bears, eight brown bears and one American black bear. Polar bear alleles are found to be introgressed into brown bears not only near a previously identified admixture zone on the Alaskan Admiralty, Baranof and Chichagof (ABC) Islands, but also far into the North American mainland. Elegantly contrasting admixture levels at autosomal and X chromosomal markers, Cahill and colleagues infer that male-biased dispersal has spread these introgressed alleles away from the Late Pleistocene contact zone. Compared to a previous study on the ABC Island population in which an Alaskan brown bear served as a putatively admixture-free reference, Cahill et al. (2015) utilize a newly sequenced Swedish brown bear as admixture baseline. This approach reveals that brown bears have been impacted by introgression from polar bears to a larger extent (up to 8.8% of their genome), than previously known, including the bear that had previously served as admixture baseline. No evidence for introgression of brown bear into polar bear is found, which the authors argue could be a consequence of selection. Besides adding new exciting pieces to the puzzle of polar/brown bear evolutionary history, the study by Cahill and colleagues highlights that wildlife genomics is moving from analysing single genomes towards a landscape genomics approach. PMID:25775930

  18. Testing of Bearing Materials for Large Two-stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Peder; Persson, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    In large two-stroke marine diesel engines bearings are designed with the intention that these need not be replaced during the life of the engine. The design has shown very good service experiences. The design parameters of the main bearings are, among others, based on the average maximum specific load which the bearing should operate under. In general, the frictional loss is less than 1% of the nominal power of the engine but is still a target for optimization. Fatigue mechanisms of bearing lining material are not fully understood and the design limits with regards to minimum oil film thickness, max oil film pressure and oil film pressure gradient is not established. Large two-stroke journal bearings are not suitable for fatigue test due to the size, the low rotational speed and the complexity of such test-rig. The Disc Fatigue Test Rig (DFTR) was designed with the purpose to test white metal coatings under realistic bearing conditions, in a confined time-frame. The test-rig simulates a scale model of a thrust bearing, in contrary to standard design the bearing lining material is applied to the rotating collar. On each side of the disc three stationary tilting-pads applies a load to the test disc, with a rotational speed of 2000 rpm. Parameters, such as bearing load, rotational speed, oil temperature, oil contamination is controlled/monitored in order to achieve repeatability and a systematic approach to the experiments. Test performed on the test-rig shows good correlation on the fatigue cracks with those experienced on large two-stroke journal bearings.

  19. Thrust Area Report, Engineering Research, Development and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langland, R. T.

    1997-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through our collaboration with U.S. industry in pursuit of the most cost- effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where we can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance our capabilities and establish ourselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts technology {ital thrust areas} are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1996. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Microtechnology; Manufacturing Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Information Engineering. Readers desiring more information are encouraged to contact the individual thrust area leaders or authors. 198 refs., 206 figs., 16 tabs.

  20. The effect of wedged insoles on the thrust of osteoarthritic knees

    OpenAIRE

    Ogata, K; Yasunaga, M.; Nomiyama, H.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a method of quantifying the lateral/medial thrust of the knee which occurs in the early phase of walking. We have used this method to evaluate the effects of wedged insoles on the lateral and medial thrust for normal knees and knees with unicompartment osteoarthritis (OA). A laterally elevated (valgus) insole decreased the lateral thrust of both normal and osteoarthritic knees. A medially elevated (varus) insole increased the lateral thrust. In 50 symptomat...

  1. EVALUATION OF A LOW FRICTION - HIGH EFFICIENCY ROLLER BEARING ENGINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolarik, Robert V. II; Shattuck, Charles W.; Copper, Anthony P.

    2009-06-30

    This Low Friction (High Efficiency Roller Bearing) Engine (LFE) report presents the work done by The Timken Company to conduct a technology demonstration of the benefits of replacing hydrodynamic bearings with roller bearings in the crankshaft and camshaft assemblies of an internal combustion engine for the purpose of collecting data sufficient to prove merit. The engines in the present study have been more extensively converted to roller bearings than any previous studies (40 needle roller bearings per engine) to gain understanding of the full potential of application of bearing technology. The project plan called for comparative testing of a production vehicle which was already respected for having demonstrated low engine friction levels with a rollerized version of that engine. Testing was to include industry standard tests for friction, emissions and fuel efficiency conducted on instrumented dynamometers. Additional tests for fuel efficiency, cold start resistance and other measures of performance were to be made in the actual vehicle. Comparative measurements of noise, vibration and harshness (NVH), were planned, although any work to mitigate the suspected higher NVH level in the rollerized engine was beyond the scope of this project. Timken selected the Toyota Avalon with a 3.5L V-6 engine as the test vehicle. In an attempt to minimize cost and fabrication time, a ‘made-from’ approach was proposed in which as many parts as possible would be used or modified from production parts to create the rollerized engine. Timken commissioned its test partner, FEV Engine Technology, to do a feasibility study in which they confirmed that using such an approach was possible to meet the required dimensional restrictions and tolerances. In designing the roller bearing systems for the crank and cam trains, Timken utilized as many production engine parts as possible. The crankshafts were produced from production line forgings, which use Timken steel, modified with special machining and heat treatment. Timken designed and manufactured all of the roller bearing related components such as the thrust bearing package. The production connecting rods and camshafts could not be used for the roller bearing engine, so new ones were produced according to the team’s designs using Timken steel. The remaining miscellaneous components were designed and procured by FEV. Timken prepared a display version of the crankshaft portion of the production engine without connecting rods which could be driven by a motor through a cogged-belt and electrically actuated clutch arrangement. A modified version was also made in which the engine was outfitted with roller bearings on the main bearing positions. Preliminary tests showed that the rollerized engine was running with 1/3 less friction than the standard display engine. Additional friction testing and noise characterization was cut short because of shipping damage to the rollerized engine display and because of other project priorities. The team did successfully demonstrate the ability to package roller bearings satisfactorily in numerous locations in a typical automotive engine. The scope of this project did not include durability demonstration and that subject would have to be addressed in any follow-on work. In the actual test phase, the rollerized engine did show significantly less friction in motored dynamometer tests compared to its production equivalent. The 5-10% improvement measured in this study was about half that seen in other studies. However, the fired test results did not show a reduction in friction which did not match prior experience or expectations. Subsequent teardown and inspection of the rollerized engine revealed potential sources of excessive friction in the experimental application. These features would be eliminated in a design not based on modification of production parts. The team is confident (based on experience) that friction reduction would be realized with proper modifications.

  2. Segmented Hybrid Gasostatic Bearing Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prodan Nikolay Vasilevich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of research-development of methods of numerical optimization rotatable support pads gasostatic hybrid bearing. In the world‘s aerospace engineering the gas-dynamic bearings are currently most common. They are characterized by the supporting layer of different designs, which ensures the workability of the rotors during starts and stops. The main problem of this bearing type, apart from the construction complexity is the wear of this supporting layer. Gas-static bearing has no such defect, since there is no physical contact between solid surfaces. This study presents the results of the hybrid bearing’s calculation, combining both technologies. The slotted nozzle of non-conventional shape that mirrors the solution of Reynolds equation’s isoline is studied. The dependences of the main parameters on the speed of the shaft’s rotation are discussed. The aerodynamic resistance of pads for different regimes of operation is investigated.

  3. Nanoprecipitation in bearing steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrow, A.T.W. [SKF University Technology Centre, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J., E-mail: pejr2@cam.ac.uk [SKF University Technology Centre, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    {theta}-phase is the main hardening species in bearing steels and appears in both martensitically and bainitically hardened microstructures. This work presents a survey of the microstrucural features accompanying nanoprecipitation in bearing steels. Nanoprecipitate structures formed in 1C-1.5Cr wt.% with additions of Cr, Mn, Mo, Si and Ni are studied. The work is combined with thermodynamic calculations and neural networks to predict the expected matrix composition, and whether this will transform martensitically or bainitically. Martensite tetragonality, composition and the amount of retained austenite are related to hardness and the type of nanoprecipitate structures in martensitic grades. The {theta}-phase volume fraction, the duration of the bainite to austenite transformation and the amount of retained austenite are related to hardness and a detailed quantitative description of the precipitate nanostructures. Such description includes compositional studies using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, which shows that nanoprecipitate formation takes place under paraequilibrium. Special attention is devoted to a novel two-step bainite tempering process which shows maximum hardness; we prove that this is the most effective process for incorporating solute into the precipitates, which are finer than those resulting from one-step banitic transformation processes.

  4. Nanoprecipitation in bearing steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ?-phase is the main hardening species in bearing steels and appears in both martensitically and bainitically hardened microstructures. This work presents a survey of the microstrucural features accompanying nanoprecipitation in bearing steels. Nanoprecipitate structures formed in 1C-1.5Cr wt.% with additions of Cr, Mn, Mo, Si and Ni are studied. The work is combined with thermodynamic calculations and neural networks to predict the expected matrix composition, and whether this will transform martensitically or bainitically. Martensite tetragonality, composition and the amount of retained austenite are related to hardness and the type of nanoprecipitate structures in martensitic grades. The ?-phase volume fraction, the duration of the bainite to austenite transformation and the amount of retained austenite are related to hardness and a detailed quantitative description of the precipitate nanostructures. Such description includes compositional studies using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, which shows that nanoprecipitate formation takes place under paraequilibrium. Special attention is devoted to a novel two-step bainite tempering process which shows maximum hardness; we prove that this is the most effective process for incorporating solute into the precipitates, which are finer than those resulting from one-step banitic transformation processes.

  5. Grease lubrication in rolling bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Lugt, Piet M

    2012-01-01

    The definitive book on the science of grease lubrication for roller and needle bearings in industrial and vehicle engineering. Grease Lubrication in Rolling Bearings provides an overview of the existing knowledge on the various aspects of grease lubrication (including lubrication systems) and the state of the art models that exist today. The book reviews the physical and chemical aspects of grease lubrication, primarily directed towards lubrication of rolling bearings. The first part of the book covers grease composition, properties and rheology, including thermal

  6. Primarily Pro-bear-bility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    In this probability lesson plan students make predictions about the color of the bear they are likely to draw from a bag, and then draw and record the color of the bear they actually draw. Students complete this activity in cooperative learning groups and take turns removing a bear, without replacing it, and seeing if their predictions become more accurate. The lesson plan includes four student activity worksheets and extension questions and suggestions (PDF).

  7. Predicting bearing states in three dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Stäger, D. V.; N. A. M. Araújo; H. J. Herrmann

    2015-01-01

    Bichromatic bearings have an infinite number of sliding-free states, so called bearing states. For three-dimensional bichromatic bearings whose bearing states have four degrees of freedom, we show how the bearing state can be analytically predicted from the initial state without any information about the nature of the contact forces. We provide a systematic way of constructing such bearings and also show how the bearing state is modified by blocking a single sphere and that ...

  8. Engineering research, development and technology. Thrust area report, FY93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff, tools, and facilities needed to support current and future LLNL programs. The efforts are guided by a dual-benefit research and development strategy that supports Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence and economic competitiveness through partnerships with U.S. industry. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes the activities for the fiscal year 1993. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and results from nine thrust areas for this fiscal year: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; Remote Sensing, Imaging, and Signal Engineering; and Emerging Technologies. Separate abstracts were prepared for 47 papers in this report.

  9. An experimental investigation of flow mixing on thrust ejection efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfitt, Donald J., Jr.

    1988-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect flow mixing has on the thrust augmentation of an ejector. The experimental studies were divided into four phases. The four phases were baseline verification, a nozzle tip inclination study, a primary flow pulsing study, and a study of the quality of the ejector. The baseline verification study showed that thrust augmentation is dependent upon the injection angle and height of the primary nozzles. The nozzle tip inclination study investigated the effects of having the tips inclined from the inlet surface of the ejector. The nozzle tips were inclined in four different configurations. The different configurations established a baseline or attempted to promote flow mixing and swirling.

  10. Dating of movements along thrusts and faults in the Himalaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiometric dating of movements along the MCT (Vaikrita Thrust), two local but deep seated thrust and the Sumdoh Fault Zone bordering the Kinnar Kailas Granite in the Baspa and Satluj valleys, NE Himachal Himalaya, has been attempted for the first time by fission track method. Garnet and apatite fission track ages suggest the age of the latest phase of movements around 14 and 7 m.y. respectively along the MCT and Sumdoh Fault. The vertical uplift rates along them were 1.1mm/year from 14 to 7 m.y. and 0.6 mm/year from 7 m.y. to recent geologic past respectively, as against the value 0.036 mm/year during the period from 210 to 17 m.y. in the undisturbed area. (author)

  11. Low-thrust trajectory optimization in a full ephemeris model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xing-Shan; Chen, Yang; Li, Jun-Feng

    2014-10-01

    The low-thrust trajectory optimization with complicated constraints must be considered in practical engineering. In most literature, this problem is simplified into a two-body model in which the spacecraft is subject to the gravitational force at the center of mass and the spacecraft's own electric propulsion only, and the gravity assist (GA) is modeled as an instantaneous velocity increment. This paper presents a method to solve the fuel-optimal problem of low-thrust trajectory with complicated constraints in a full ephemeris model, which is closer to practical engineering conditions. First, it introduces various perturbations, including a third body's gravity, the nonspherical perturbation and the solar radiation pressure in a dynamic equation. Second, it builds two types of equivalent inner constraints to describe the GA. At the same time, the present paper applies a series of techniques, such as a homotopic approach, to enhance the possibility of convergence of the global optimal solution.

  12. Design of Low-Thrust Gravity Assist Trajectories to Europa

    CERN Document Server

    Vasile, Massimiliano

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a mission to Europa using solar electric propulsion as main source of thrust. A direct transcription method based on Finite Elements in Time was used for the design and optimisation of the entire low-thrust gravity assist transfer from the Earth to Europa. Prior to that, a global search algorithm was used to generate a set of suitable first guess solutions for the transfer to Jupiter, and for the capture in the Jovian system. In particular, a fast deterministic search algorithm was developed to find the most promising set of swing-bys to reach Jupiter A second fast search algorithm was developed to find the best sequence of swing-bys of the Jovian moons. After introducing the global search algorithms and the direct transcription through Finite Elements in Time, the paper presents a number of first guess Solutions and a fully optimised transfer from the Earth to Europa.

  13. Bearing development program for a 25 kWe solar-powered organic Rankine-cycle engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesmith, B.

    1985-01-01

    The bearing development program is summarized for a 25-kWe power conversion subsystem (PCS) consisting of an organic Rankine-cycle engine, and permanent magnetic alternator (PMA) and rectifier to be used in a 100-kWe point-focusing distributed receiver solar power plant. The engine and alternator were hermetically sealed and used toluene as the working fluid. The turbine, alternator, and feed pump (TAP) were mounted on a single shaft operating at speeds up to 60,000 rev/min. Net thermal-to-electric efficiencies in the range of 21 to 23% were demonstrated at the maximum working fluid temperature of 400 C (750 F). A chronological summary of the bearing development program is presented. The primary causes of bearing wear problems were traced to a combination of rotordynamic instability and electrodynamic discharge across the bearing surfaces caused by recirculating currents from the PMA. These problems were resolved by implementing an externally supplied, flooded-bearing lubrication system and by electrically insulating all bearings from the TAP housing. This program resulted in the successful development of a stable, high-speed, toluene-lubricated five-pad tilting-pad journal bearing and Rayleigh step thrust bearing system capable of operating at all inclinations between horizontal and vertical.

  14. Low-thrust chemical propulsion system pump technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadville, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    A study was conducted within the thrust range 450 to 9000 N (100 to 2000 pounds). Performance analyses were made on centrifugal, pitot, Barske, drag, Tesla, gear, piston, lobe, and vane pumps with liquid hydrogen, liquid methane, and liquid oxygen as propellants. Gaseous methane and hydrogen driven axial impulse turbines, vane expanders, piston expanders, and electric motors were studied as drivers. Data are presented on performance, sizes, weights, and estimated service lives and costs.

  15. The Prevalence of Tongue Thrusting in Patients with Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Miremadi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Tongue thrust and/or its consequent swallowing pattern are amongst the parafunctional habits that have always been considered as etiological factors for dental disorders by different investigators.Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of tongue thrusting and the incidence of periodontal disorders associated with this habit among patients referred to the Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences.Material and Methods: Two hundred and eighty patients, undergoing first phase of periodontal therapy, were selected. Among them, those who had tongue thrusting were diagnosed and periodontal indices (probing depth, gingival recession, spacing and gingival enlargement were measured. Also, crown-root ratio was assessed for each anterior tooth.Results: Tongue thrusting was seen in 27.3%of patients, whereas 29.8% and 33.8% of them showed an increase in periodontal pocket depths in their upper and lower jaws,respectively. Gingival recession was found in the upper jaw in 12.98% and in the lowerjaw in 49.35% of the cases. Crown to root length ratio in 24.6% of the upper incisors and 35.1% of the lower incisors were found to be higher than normal. Spacing was observed between the incisors in 31.2% and 41.6% of the patients in the upper and lower jaws, respectively. Finally 31.2% of the patients showed gingival enlargement.Conclusion: The results of the present study revealed a considerable increase in the prevalence of various periodontal diseases among these subjects. To minimize the clinical problems of such patients, prevention of periodontal diseases through excellent oral hygiene and regular dental visits are suggested.

  16. Displaced Geostationary Orbits Using Hybrid Low-Thrust Propulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Heiligers, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, displaced geostationary orbits using hybrid low-thrust propulsion, a complementary combination of Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) and solar sailing, are investigated to increase the capacity of the geostationary ring that is starting to become congested. The SEP propellant consumption is minimized in order to maximize the mission lifetime by deriving semi-analytical formulae for the optimal steering laws for the SEP and solar sail accelerations. By considering the spacecraft ma...

  17. Jet-Engine Exhaust Nozzle With Thrust-Directing Flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, David J.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent/divergent jet-engine exhaust nozzle has cruciform divergent passage containing flaps that move to deflect flow of exhaust in either or both planes perpendicular to main fore-and-aft axis of undeflected flow. Prototype of thrust-vector-control nozzles installed in advanced, high-performance airplanes to provide large pitching (usually, vertical) and yawing (usually, horizontal) attitude-control forces independent of attitude-control forces produced by usual aerodynamic control surfaces.

  18. Development of Trent 700 Thrust Reverser Overhaul Package

    OpenAIRE

    Milton, Johan; Johansson, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a thesis project in aeronautical engineering carried out during April and May 2011 at ST Aerospace Solutions, Arlanda. The company is one of Europe’s leading aviation component maintenance companies. The task for this thesis project has been to develop a baseline overhaul work package for the thrust reverser system of the Rolls-Royce Trent 700 jet engine. An overhaul work package is a collection of maintenance work sheets (MWS) used by the maintenance organization to c...

  19. Kinematic evolution of fold and thrust belts. Insights from experimental modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical experiments were performed to gain a better understanding on the kinematic evolution of fold and thrust belts. The present study focuses on deformation of sedimentary cover caused by thrust and reverse movements along the basement fault. Our physical models comprise dry quartz sand representing brittle sedimentary rock and viscous silicone polymer representing overpressured mudstone. Computerized X-ray tomography was applied to the experiments to analyze the kinematic evolution of fold and thrust belts. In the sand models, the width of deformation zone above thrust was wider than that above reverse fault, because back thrust developed on the hanging wall of reverse fault. Within the physical models composed of dry sand and silicone polymer, minor folds and thrusts with minor displacement developed on the footwall of the major monoclinal flexure. These results compare well with the geometry and kinematic evolution of the fold and thrust belts in Japan. (author)

  20. Evaluation of an Outer Loop Retrofit Architecture for Intelligent Turbofan Engine Thrust Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Sowers, T. Shane

    2006-01-01

    The thrust control capability of a retrofit architecture for intelligent turbofan engine control and diagnostics is evaluated. The focus of the study is on the portion of the hierarchical architecture that performs thrust estimation and outer loop thrust control. The inner loop controls fan speed so the outer loop automatically adjusts the engine's fan speed command to maintain thrust at the desired level, based on pilot input, even as the engine deteriorates with use. The thrust estimation accuracy is assessed under nominal and deteriorated conditions at multiple operating points, and the closed loop thrust control performance is studied, all in a complex real-time nonlinear turbofan engine simulation test bed. The estimation capability, thrust response, and robustness to uncertainty in the form of engine degradation are evaluated.

  1. Electric sail control mode for amplified transverse thrust

    CERN Document Server

    Toivanen, Petri; Envall, Jouni

    2014-01-01

    The electric solar wind sail produces thrust by centrifugally spanned high voltage tethers interacting with the solar wind protons. The sail attitude can be controlled and attitude maneuvers are possible by tether voltage modulation synchronous with the sail rotation. Especially, the sail can be inclined with respect to the solar wind direction to obtain transverse thrust to change the osculating orbit angular momentum. Such an inclination has to be maintained by a continual control voltage modulation. Consequently, the tether voltage available for the thrust is less than the maximum voltage provided by the power system. Using a spherical pendulum as a model for a single rotating tether, we derive analytical estimations for the control efficiency for two separate sail control modes. One is a continuous control modulation that corresponds to strictly planar tether tip motion. The other is an on-off modulation with the tether tip moving along a closed loop on a saddle surface. The novel on-off mode is introduce...

  2. Paleogene thrust tectonics in northwestern Venezuela: Petroleum system implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quijada, E.; Oropeza, S. [Maraven, S.A., Caracas (Venezuela)

    1996-08-01

    Oil exploration in northeastern Perija Mountains, northwestern Maracaibo basin, has been difficult, mainly due to the various tectonic events that have strongly deformed this area. This study is an attempt at better understanding the effect of a Paleogene thrusting event on the petroleum system development in the area. Subsidence analysis interpretation at both sides of the NNE directed Tigre fault (which separates the northern Perija Mountains from the rest of the Maracaibo basin) suggests the onset of a foreland basin during, at least, Paleocene-Early Eocene time. Continuous sedimentation occurred from Late Cretaceous to Early Eocene, as long as it kept pace with subsidence, in the west block of the fault, while the east block acted as an obstacle against the thrust-sheet movement, delaying its subsidence. Sedimentation for this time is associated with a thick unit of mainly paralic sediments west of that fault and thinner continental (fluvial) to shallow marine sediments, with an intra-Paleocene/Early Eocene unconformity, east of it. So, this tectonic event, associated with convergence from the north, caused a south-verging thrust sheet giving rise to differences in the evolution of the petroleum system on both sides of the Tigre fault, mainly regarding the existence of source rocks and their generation/migration of hydrocarbons, preservation time and critical moment. Finally, in order to evaluate the oil exploration opportunities in northeastern Perija mountains, it is advisable that any integrated interpretation of the petroleum system processes (generation-migration-accumulation) take into account this tectonic event.

  3. Strain analysis in a cover thrust zone, external French Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Alastair

    1982-10-01

    The La Grave thrust zone is situated in the external French Alps north of the Pelvoux basement massif. Jurassic cover rocks are deformed and imbricated in a region some 15 km square. Strains have been measured using the statistical reorientation of belemnites, the extension of belemnites and the shapes of pyrite pressure shadows. Orientation data are treated statistically, following Sanderson (1977). Groups of 100 measurements do not provide very accurate results and generally underestimate the strain when compared with more accurate determinations from extension measurements. In addition to providing reliable finite strain markers, pyrite pressure shadows allow interpretation of the incremental strain history. In the area studied, strains accumulated irrotationally in the plane of the bedding. The deformed autochthon to the basement massif and the lower thrust sheets were deformed by layer parallel shear and extensional flow, which produced LS fabrics with a down dip lineation. The higher thrust sheets were deformed by layer parallel shear and compressive flow, which produced LS to L fabrics with a strike-parallel lineation.

  4. Superconducting bearings for flywheel applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    A literature study on the application of superconducting bearings in energy storage flywheel systems. The physics of magnetic levitation and superconductors are presented in the first part of the report, followed by a discussion of the literature found onthe applications of superconducting bearings in flywheels.

  5. Heat pipe controls bearing temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormack, A., III; Notti, J. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Major design problem in integrated Power/Attitude Control System (IPACS) is effective method for transporting heat from bearing inner race of the rotating assembly to minimize inner-race temperatures and temperature differential across bearing. High-speed rotating assembly in this application is essentially device for storing energy in electrically-driven rotating flywheel.

  6. Permanent and active magnetic bearings.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozánek, Jan; Stola?ík, M.; Šafr, M.

    Brno : Ústav termomechaniky AV ?R, 2000 - (Kratochvíl, C.; Fuis, V.; Houfek, L.), s. 29-30 ISBN 80-214-1665-3. [Kolokvium Diagnostika a aktivní ?ízení 2000. T?ešt´ (CZ), 09.10.2000-11.10.2000] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA101/00/1471 Keywords : contactless bearings * magnetic bearings Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  7. 77 FR 70423 - Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC and Black Bear Development Holdings, LLC and Black Bear SO, LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ...Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project Nos. 2710-061; 2712-078] Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC and Black Bear Development Holdings, LLC and Black Bear SO, LLC; Notice of Application for Partial Transfer of Licenses, and...

  8. Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) for high heat flux thrust chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Christopher M.

    The last 30 years materials engineers have been under continual pressure to develop materials with a greater temperature potential or to produce configurations that can be effectively cooled or otherwise protected at elevated temperature conditions. Turbines and thrust chambers produce some of the harshest service conditions for materials which lead to the challenges engineers face in order to increase the efficiencies of current technologies due to the energy crisis that the world is facing. The key tasks for the future of gas turbines are to increase overall efficiencies to meet energy demands of a growing world population and reduce the harmful emissions to protect the environment. Airfoils or blades tend to be the limiting factor when it comes to the performance of the turbine because of their complex design making them difficult to cool as well as limitations of their thermal properties. Key tasks for space transportation it to lower costs while increasing operational efficiency and reliability of our space launchers. The important factor to take into consideration is the rocket nozzle design. The design of the rocket nozzle or thrust chamber has to take into account many constraints including external loads, heat transfer, transients, and the fluid dynamics of expanded hot gases. Turbine engines can have increased efficiencies if the inlet temperature for combustion is higher, increased compressor capacity and lighter weight materials. In order to push for higher temperatures, engineers need to come up with a way to compensate for increased temperatures because material systems that are being used are either at or near their useful properties limit. Before thermal barrier coatings were applied to hot-section components, material alloy systems were able to withstand the service conditions necessary. But, with the increased demand for performance, higher temperatures and pressures have become too much for those alloy systems. Controlled chemistry of hot-section components has become critical, but at the same time the service conditions have put our best alloy systems to their limits. As a result, implementation of cooling holes and thermal barrier coatings are new advances in hot-section technologies now looked at for modifications to reach higher temperature applications. Current thermal barrier coatings used in today's turbine applications is known as 8%yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and there are no coatings for current thrust chambers. Current research is looking at the applicability of 8%yttria-stabilized hafnia (YSH) for turbine applications and the implementation of 8%YSZ onto thrust chambers. This study intends to determine if the use of thermal barrier coatings are applicable for high heat flux thrust chambers using industrial YSZ will be advantageous for improvements in efficiency, thrust and longer service life by allowing the thrust chambers to be used more than once.

  9. Why do airlines want and use thrust reversers? A compilation of airline industry responses to a survey regarding the use of thrust reversers on commercial transport airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    1995-01-01

    Although thrust reversers are used for only a fraction of the airplane operating time, their impact on nacelle design, weight, airplane cruise performance, and overall airplane operating and maintenance expenses is significant. Why then do the airlines want and use thrust reversers? In an effort to understand the airlines need for thrust reversers, a survey of the airline industry was made to determine why and under what situations thrust reversers are currently used or thought to be needed. The survey was intended to help establish the cost/benefits trades for the use of thrust reversers and airline opinion regarding alternative deceleration devices. A compilation and summary of the responses given to the survey questionnaire is presented.

  10. Bears, Big and Little. Young Discovery Library Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Pierre

    This book is written for children 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume describes: (1) the eight species of bears, including black bear, brown bear, grizzly bear, spectacled bear, sun bear, sloth bear, polar bear, and giant panda; (2) geographical habitats of bears; (3)…

  11. Fault-related fluid flow, Beech Mountain thrust sheet, Blue Ridge Province, Tennessee-North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waggoner, W.K.; Mora, C.I. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The latest proterozoic Beech Granite is contained within the Beech Mountain thrust sheet (BMTS), part of a middle-late Paleozoic thrust complex located between Mountain City and Grandfather Mountain windows in the western Blue Ridge of TN-NC. At the base of the BMTS, Beech Granite is juxtaposed against lower Paleozoic carbonate and elastics of the Rome Fm. along the Stone Mountain thrust on the southeaster margin of the Mountain City window. At the top of the BMTS, Beech Granite occurs adjacent to Precambrian mafic rocks of the Pumpkin Patch thrust sheet (PPTS). The Beech Granite is foliated throughout the BMTS with mylonitization and localized cataclasis occurring within thrust zones along the upper and lower margins of the BMTS. Although the degree of mylonitization and cataclasis increases towards the thrusts, blocks of relatively undeformed granite also occur within these fault zones. Mylonites and thrusts are recognized as conduits for fluid movement, but the origin of the fluids and magnitude and effects of fluid migration are not well constrained. This study was undertaken to characterize fluid-rock interaction within the Beech Granite and BMTS. Extensive mobility of some elements/compounds within the thrust zones, and the isotopic and mineralogical differences between the thrust zones and interior of the BMTS indicate that fluid flow was focused within the thrust zones. The wide range of elevated temperatures (400--710 C) indicated by qz-fsp fractionations suggest isotopic disequilibrium. Using a more likely temperature range of 300--400 C for Alleghanian deformation, calculated fluid compositions indicate interactions with a mixture of meteoric-hydrothermal and metamorphic water with delta O-18 = 2.6--7.5[per thousand] for the upper thrust zone and 1.3 to 6.2[per thousand] for the lower thrust zone. These ranges are similar to isotopic data reported for other Blue Ridge thrusts and may represent later periods of meteoric water influx.

  12. Hybrid Hydrostatic/Transient Roller Bearing Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justak, John F.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed bearing assembly for shaft of high-speed turbopump includes both hydrostatic and rolling-element bearings. Rolling-element bearing unloaded at high speed by centrifugal expansion of outer race and transient retainer.

  13. EFFECT OF BEARING MACROGEOMETRY ON BEARING PERFORMANCE IN ELASTOHYDRODYNAMIC LUBRICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin GÜLLÜ

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available During manufacturing, ideal dimension and mutual positioning of machine elements proposed in project desing can be achieved only within certain range of tolerances. These tolerances, being classified in two groups, related to micro and macro geometry of machine elements, don't have to effect the functioning of these elements. So, as for all machine elements, investigation of the effects of macro and micro tolerances for journal bearings is important. In this study, we have investigated the effect of macro geometric irregularities of journal bearings on performance characteristics. In this regard, we have studied the change of bearing performance in respect to deviation from ideal circle for an elliptic shaft with small ovality rolling in circular journal bearing.

  14. Control of Ducted Fan Flying Object Using Thrust Vectoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Masafumi; Shigematsu, Yuki; Yamashita, Takashi

    Recently, R/C helicopter is used in fields of aerial photography and aerial investigation. But helicopter rotor blades are not covered, and the thrust is generated by high rotational speed. Thus R/C helicopter has a high risk of damage. In this study, we developed a new flying object using ducted fans instead of rotor blades. At first, PD control was employed for pitch and roll attitude control, but it caused steady state error. Moreover, PI-D control was used instead of PD control, and it reduced the steady state error. We succeeded to achieve stable hovering by 3-axes (roll, pitch and yaw axis) attitude control.

  15. Thrust vector control algorithm design for the Cassini spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Paul J.

    1993-02-01

    This paper describes a preliminary design of the thrust vector control algorithm for the interplanetary spacecraft, Cassini. Topics of discussion include flight software architecture, modeling of sensors, actuators, and vehicle dynamics, and controller design and analysis via classical methods. Special attention is paid to potential interactions with structural flexibilities and propellant dynamics. Controller performance is evaluated in a simulation environment built around a multi-body dynamics model, which contains nonlinear models of the relevant hardware and preliminary versions of supporting attitude determination and control functions.

  16. Design of high power electromechanical actuator for thrust vector control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, J. R.; Myers, W. N.

    1991-01-01

    NASA-Marshall has undertaken the development of electromechanical actuators (EMAs) for thrust vector control (TVC) augmentation system implementation. The TVC EMA presented has as its major components two three-phase brushless dc motors, a two-pass gear-reduction system, and a roller screw for rotary-to-linear motion conversion. System control is furnished by a solid-state electronic controller and power supply; a pair of resolvers deliver position feedback to the controller, such that precise positioning is achieved. Peformance comparisons have been conducted between the EMA and comparable-performance hydraulic systems applicable to TVCs.

  17. Light gluino effects in thrust at NNLL order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent progress in computations of event shape distributions have reduced uncertainties in the strong coupling from fits to available experimental data to the percent level. It is therefore reasonable to ask for possible effects of new physics. We consider the effects of light gluinos in the thrust distribution at the NNLL order level in the framework of Soft-Collinear-Effective-Theory (SCET). This involves modifications of the standard QCD renormalization group evolution and the computation of additional corrections to the hard, jet and soft functions that appear in the SCET factorization theorem.

  18. Trajectory control with continuous thrust applied to a rendezvous maneuver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rendezvous mission can be divided into the following phases: launch, phasing, far range rendezvous, close range rendezvous and mating (docking or berthing). This paper aims to present a close range rendezvous with closed loop controlled straight line trajectory. The approaching is executed on V-bar axis. A PID controller and continuous thrust are used to eliminate the residual errors in the trajectory. A comparative study about the linear and nonlinear dynamics is performed and the results showed that the linear equations become inaccurate insofar as the chaser moves away from the target

  19. Direct thrust measurements and modelling of a radio-frequency expanding plasma thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, T.; Takahashi, K.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.

    2011-08-01

    It is shown analytically that the thrust from a simple plasma thruster (in the absence of a magnetic field) is given by the maximum upstream electron pressure, even if the plasma diverges downstream. Direct thrust measurements of a thruster are then performed using a pendulum thrust balance and a laser displacement sensor. A maximum thrust of about 2 mN is obtained at 700 W for a thruster length of 17.5 cm and a flow rate of 0.9 mg s-1, while a larger thrust of 4 mN is obtained at a similar power for a length of 9.5 cm and a flow rate of 1.65 mg s-1. The measured thrusts are in good agreement with the maximum upstream electron pressure found from measurements of the plasma parameters and in fair agreement with a simple global approach used to model the thruster.

  20. Direct thrust measurements and modelling of a radio-frequency expanding plasma thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Takahashi, K. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    It is shown analytically that the thrust from a simple plasma thruster (in the absence of a magnetic field) is given by the maximum upstream electron pressure, even if the plasma diverges downstream. Direct thrust measurements of a thruster are then performed using a pendulum thrust balance and a laser displacement sensor. A maximum thrust of about 2 mN is obtained at 700 W for a thruster length of 17.5 cm and a flow rate of 0.9 mg s{sup -1}, while a larger thrust of 4 mN is obtained at a similar power for a length of 9.5 cm and a flow rate of 1.65 mg s{sup -1}. The measured thrusts are in good agreement with the maximum upstream electron pressure found from measurements of the plasma parameters and in fair agreement with a simple global approach used to model the thruster.

  1. Thrust Ripples Reduction for a Vector Controlled Permanent Magnet Linear Synchronous Motor with IMC Controller

    OpenAIRE

    RAMESH BABU.DEVA; MRS. B.ARUNDHATI; ALICE MARY.K

    2013-01-01

    The significant drawback of PMLSM is thrust ripples, which is mainly generated by the detent force caused by the interaction of the permanent magnet and iron core without input current in armature winding. It is the function of mover position relative to the stator. This will deteriorate the performance of the drive system in high precision applications. This paper focus on the thrust ripples reduction. To minimize the thrust ripples and realize the high-precision control, the components of t...

  2. Morphotectonics of the central Muertos thrust belt and Muertos Trough (northeastern Caribbean)

    OpenAIRE

    Granja Bruña, José Luis; Ten Brink, Uri S.; Carbó Gorosabel, Andrés; Muñoz Martín, Alfonso; Gómez Ballesteros, María

    2009-01-01

    Multibeam bathymetry data acquired during the 2005 Spanish R/V Hespérides cruise and reprocessed multichannel seismic profiles provide the basis for the analysis of the morphology and deformation in the central Muertos Trough and Muertos thrust belt. The Muertos Trough is an elongated basin developed where the Venezuelan Basin crust is thrusted under the Muertos fold-and-thrust belt. Structural variations along the Muertos Trough are suggested to be a consequence of the overburden...

  3. Experimental progress towards the MicroThrust MEMS electrospray electric propulsion system

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Charles; Daykin-iliopoulos, A.; Stark, John; Salaverri, Anna; Vargas, Ernesto; Rangsten, Pelle; Dandavino, Simon; Ataman, Caglar; Chakraborty, Subha; Courtney, Daniel; Shea, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental progress towards an operational microfabricated electrospray thruster, as part of the EU FP7 “MicroThrust” Project. Microfabrication of an electrospray multiplexed thruster allows the seamless manufacturing of arrays of emitters, combining high specific impulse with sizeable thrust. The resulting thruster can thus be extremely efficient with a thrust approaching ?100µN, depending on array size. We are working within the European FP7 project MicroTh...

  4. Three-dimensional geometry of thrust surfaces and the origin of sinuous thrust traces in orogenic belts: Insights from scaled sandbox experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, A.; Jain, M.; Bhattacharjee, D.

    2014-12-01

    Sinuous traces of emerging thrust tips, comprising multiple salients and recesses, are commonly observed in orogenic belts (e.g. Lesser Himalayas of India, Nepal and Bhutan) and in accretionary prisms (e.g. Nankai Trough off the coast of Japan). Lateral (along the strike of the deformation zone) variation in the depths of foreland basins (i.e. variable sediment thickness) or in the strength of the basal detachment, or presence of a curved indenter has been traditionally cited to explain the formation of salients in fold-and-thrust belts, although they are not applicable in all cases. In the present work, we have carried out four series of scaled analog model experiments using dry quartz sand, changing the dip of the basal decollément (? = 0° or 5°) and the basal friction (?b = 0.5 or 0.3) to investigate the 3D shape of thrust surfaces under varying overall boundary conditions, but without any lateral variation of these parameters, within the models. The experimental results show that under all boundary conditions, thrust surfaces are curved both in their dip and strike directions (i.e. spoon-shaped in 3D). Multiple concave-upward and convex-upward segments constitute a thrust surface, which produces a sinuous trace when the tip line intersects the Earth's surface. It is also shown that thrust surface curvatures occur at different scales, and the overall thrust surface roughness (corrugations) has a self-affine fractal geometry.

  5. Random bearings and their stability

    OpenAIRE

    Baram, R. Mahmoodi; Herrmann, H. J.

    2005-01-01

    Self-similar space-filling bearings have been proposed some time ago as models for the motion of tectonic plates and appearance of seismic gaps. These models have two features which, however, seem unrealistic, namely, high symmetry in the arrangement of the particles, and lack of a lower cutoff in the size of the particles. In this work, an algorithm for generating random bearings in both two and three dimensions is presented. Introducing a lower cutoff for the sizes of the ...

  6. An experimental study of blowdown thrust and jet forces by 6-inch pipe under BWR LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The blowdown thrust and jet impingement forces are examined simultaneously in the jet discharge tests relating to the instantaneous pipe rupture accident. The tests were performed with a 6-inch pipe under the BWR LOCA conditions. The initial pressure of the hot saturated water was 6.86 MPa. The following items are made clear; 1) the time history of the blowdown thrust force just after the break, 2) the jet thrust parameter of the pipe, 3) the jet impingement force, 4) the pressure and temperature distributions of the impinging jet and 5) the relationship between the thermalhydraulic quantities and the thrust forces

  7. Thrust Ripples Reduction for a Vector Controlled Permanent Magnet Linear Synchronous Motor with IMC Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAMESH BABU.DEVA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The significant drawback of PMLSM is thrust ripples, which is mainly generated by the detent force caused by the interaction of the permanent magnet and iron core without input current in armature winding. It is the function of mover position relative to the stator. This will deteriorate the performance of the drive system in high precision applications. This paper focus on the thrust ripples reduction. To minimize the thrust ripples and realize the high-precision control, the components of thrust ripples are extracted first and then compensate with PI and IMC (Internal Model Control controller

  8. Control techniques of thrust vector for magnetic nozzle in laser fusion rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of plasma behavior in a magnetic nozzle would be very useful for designing plasma propulsion systems using a laser fusion. We examine by using a three-dimensional (3D) hybrid code how a thrust vector varies with changing positions of the fusion explosion (off-axis explosion) for the one-coil system of a laser fusion rocket. Furthermore, we investigate plasma behaviors and the thrust efficiency, and optimize the thrust efficiency by changing the current and the position of a rear coil for two-coil system. We also discuss the possibility of control techniques of the thrust vector for a two-coil system

  9. Development of a two-dimensional dual pendulum thrust stand for Hall thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-dimensional dual pendulum thrust stand was developed to measure thrust vectors (axial and horizontal (transverse) direction thrusts) of a Hall thruster. A thruster with a steering mechanism is mounted on the inner pendulum, and thrust is measured from the displacement between inner and outer pendulums, by which a thermal drift effect is canceled out. Two crossover knife-edges support each pendulum arm: one is set on the other at a right angle. They enable the pendulums to swing in two directions. Thrust calibration using a pulley and weight system showed that the measurement errors were less than 0.25 mN (1.4%) in the main thrust direction and 0.09 mN (1.4%) in its transverse direction. The thrust angle of the thrust vector was measured with the stand using the thruster. Consequently, a vector deviation from the main thrust direction of ±2.3 deg. was measured with the error of ±0.2 deg. under the typical operating conditions for the thruster

  10. Finite-thrust optimization of interplanetary transfers of space vehicle with bimodal nuclear thermal propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharytonov, Oleksii M.; Kiforenko, Boris M.

    2011-08-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion is one of the leading promising technologies for primary space propulsion for manned exploration of the solar system due to its high specific impulse capability and sufficiently high thrust-to-weight ratio. Another benefit of NTR is its possible bimodal design, when nuclear reactor is used for generation of a jet thrust in a high-thrust mode and (with an appropriate power conversion system) as a source of electric power to supply the payload and the electric engines in a low-thrust mode. The model of the NTR thrust control was developed considering high-thrust NTR as a propulsion system of limited power and exhaust velocity. For the proposed model the control of the thrust value is accomplished by the regulation of reactor thermal power and propellant mass flow rate. The problem of joint optimization of the combination of high- and low-thrust arcs and the parameters of bimodal NTR (BNTR) propulsion system is considered for the interplanetary transfers. The interplanetary trajectory of the space vehicle is formed by the high-thrust NTR burns, which define planet-centric maneuvers and by the low-thrust heliocentric arcs where the nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) is used. The high-thrust arcs are analyzed using finite-thrust approach. The motion of the corresponding dynamical system is realized in three phase spaces concerning the departure planet-centric maneuver by means of high-thrust NTR propulsion, the low-thrust NEP heliocentric maneuver and the approach high-thrust NTR planet-centric maneuver. The phase coordinates are related at the time instants of the change of the phase spaces due to the relations between the space vehicle masses. The optimal control analysis is performed using Pontryagin's maximum principle. The numerical results are analyzed for Earth-Mars "sprint" transfer. The optimal values of the parameters that define the masses of NTR and NEP subsystems have been evaluated. It is shown that the low-thrust NEP subsystem with Brayton cycle power conversion system is preferable in comparison with NEP subsystem with thermoemission power conversion system.

  11. Research on axial thrust of the waterjet pump based on CFD under cavitation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Z. H.; Pan, Z. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Based on RANS equations, performance of a contra-rotating axial-flow waterjet pump without hydrodynamic cavitation state had been obtained combined with shear stress transport turbulence model. Its cavitation hydrodynamic performance was calculated and analysed with mixture homogeneous flow cavitation model based on Rayleigh-Plesset equations. The results shows that the cavitation causes axial thrust of waterjet pump to drop. Furthermore, axial thrust and head cavitation characteristic curve is similar. However, the drop point of the axial thrust is postponed by 5.1% comparing with one of head, and the critical point of the axial thrust is postponed by 2.6%.

  12. Structural style of the Okcheon fold-thrust belt in the Taebaeksan Zone, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yirang; Kwon, Sanghoon; Yi, Keewook

    2015-06-01

    Structural interpretation of the distinct map pattern defined by highly connected thrust traces in the map view of the Taebaeksan Zone provides insight into the structural style of the northeastern Okcheon Belt. The map pattern can generally be explained by either a folded imbricate fan or a hinterland dipping duplex. The same geometry could also be formed by a complex combination of major imbricate thrusts and their connecting splays, having the structural architecture of a typical fold-thrust belt. However, a folded imbricate fan model is not adequate to explain the absence of late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic strata (i.e. the Pyeongan Supergroup) between two major thrusts (viz. the Pyeongchang and Machari thrusts) in this area. This result further suggests that the Yeongwol area, the western part of the Taebaeksan Zone, is a duplex that corresponds to a more internal and deeper hinterland part of the fold-thrust belt, while the imbricate thrusts with low connectivity in the Taebaek area, the eastern part of the Taebaeksan Zone, indicate a more external and shallower foreland portion of the belt. In addition, cross-cutting relations and newly obtained sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb zircon ages from a cross-cutting dike and syntectonic sedimentary rocks suggest limited thrust reactivation after the early Jurassic and early Tertiary, respectively. In spite of this, the original geometry of the fold-thrust wedge in the Taebaeksan Zone remained well preserved.

  13. Effectiveness of Nitrous Oxide as a Liquid Injection Thrust Vector Control Fluid Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nitrous Oxide is proposed as an energetic liquid injection thrust vector control fluid for vehicle attitude control during dynamic vehicle maneuvers. Pulled from...

  14. Seafloor expression and shallow structure of a fold-and-thrust system, Isfjorden, west Spitsbergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Blinova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A detailed map of the structure of the west Spitsbergen fold-and-thrust belt in the Isfjorden area, Spitsbergen, is presented. The map was constructed from a dense grid of two-dimensional multichannel reflection seismic and bathymetric data. Joint interpretation of two data sets allowed a comparison of tectonic structures detected along the uppermost parts of the seismic sections and those reflected in the morphology of the seafloor. Three major, predominantly north-west–south-east striking faults were identified. The westernmost fault (T1 is a hinterland-directed (most likely out of sequence thrust, while the central and easternmost faults (T2 and T3 are foreland-directed (in-sequence thrusts. The thrusts divide Isfjorden into three subareas. Subarea 1 is bounded by thrust faults T1 and T2 and comprises Tertiary rocks surrounded by Jurassic–Cretaceous strata. The structural signature of Subarea 1 is that of a system of hinterland- and foreland-directed thrust faults, resulting in a seafloor relief characterized by parallel ridges and troughs. Subarea 2 is limited by thrust faults T2 and T3 and shows Jurassic–Cretaceous outcrops on the seafloor. Subarea 3 is situated east of the main thrust fault T3 and mainly involves outcrops of Triassic–Jurassic rocks. Together, Subareas 2 and 3 are dominated by foreland-directed, north-west–south-east and NNW–SSE-striking thrusts that are hardly detectable in bathymetric data.

  15. Designing Rolling-Element Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, James D., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Bearing Analysis Tool (BAT) is a computer program for designing rolling-element bearings for cryogenic turbomachines. BAT provides a graphical user interface (GUI) that guides the entry of data to develop mathematical models of bearings. The GUI breaks model data into logical subsets that are entered through logic-driven input screens. The software generates a threedimensional graphical model of a bearing as the data are entered. Most dataentry errors become immediately obvious in the graphical model. BAT provides for storage of all the data on a shaft/bearing system, enabling the creation of a library of proven designs. Data from the library can be transferred to subsequent projects by use of simple cut-and-paste routines. BAT includes a library of temperature- dependent cryogenic bearing-material properties for use in the mathematical models. BAT implements algorithms that (1) enable the user to select combinations of design and/or operating-condition parameters, and then (2) automatically optimize the design by performing trade studies over all of the parameter combinations. This feature enables optimization over a large trade space in a fraction of the time taken when using prior bearingmodel software.

  16. Design and test of electromechanical actuators for thrust vector control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, J. R.; Weir, Rae Ann

    1993-05-01

    New control mechanisms technologies are currently being explored to provide alternatives to hydraulic thrust vector control (TVC) actuation systems. For many years engineers have been encouraging the investigation of electromechanical actuators (EMA) to take the place of hydraulics for spacecraft control/gimballing systems. The rationale is to deliver a lighter, cleaner, safer, more easily maintained, as well as energy efficient space vehicle. In light of this continued concern to improve the TVC system, the Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is involved in a program to develop electromechanical actuators for the purpose of testing and TVC system implementation. Through this effort, an electromechanical thrust vector control actuator has been designed and assembled. The design consists of the following major components: Two three-phase brushless dc motors, a two pass gear reduction system, and a roller screw, which converts rotational input into linear output. System control is provided by a solid-state electronic controller and power supply. A pair of resolvers and associated electronics deliver position feedback to the controller such that precise positioning is achieved. Testing and evaluation is currently in progress. Goals focus on performance comparisons between EMA's and similar hydraulic systems.

  17. An Autonomous Onboard Targeting Algorithm Using Finite Thrust Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarritt, Sara K.; Marchand, Belinda G.; Brown, Aaron J.; Tracy, William H.; Weeks, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    In earlier investigations, the adaptation and implementation of a modified two-level corrections (or targeting) process as the onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion is presented. The objective of that targeting algorithm is to generate the times of ignition and magnitudes of the required maneuvers such that the desired state at entry interface is achieved. In an actual onboard flight software implementation, these times of ignition and maneuvers are relayed onto Flight Control for command and execution. Although this process works well when the burn durations or burn arcs are small, this might not be the case during a contingency situation when lower thrust engines are employed to perform the maneuvers. Therefore, a new model for the two-level corrections process is formulated here to accommodate finite burn arcs. This paper presents the development and formulation of the finite burn two-level corrector, used as an onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion. A performance comparison between the impulsive and finite burn models is also presented. The present formulation ensures all entry constraints are met, without violating the available fuel budget, while allowing for low-thrust scenarios with long burn durations.

  18. Shock unsteadiness in a thrust optimized parabolic nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, S. B.

    2009-07-01

    This paper discusses the nature of shock unsteadiness, in an overexpanded thrust optimized parabolic nozzle, prevalent in various flow separation modes experienced during start up {(? P0 /? t > 0)} and shut down {(? P0/? t Kulite pressure transducers, high-speed schlieren (2 kHz) of the exhaust flow-field and from strain-gauges installed on the nozzle bending tube. Shock unsteadiness in the separation region is seen to increase significantly just before the onset of each flow transition, even during steady nozzle operation. The intensity of this measure ( rms level) is seen to be strongly influenced by relative locations of normal and overexpansion shock, the decrease in radial size of re-circulation zone in the back-flow region, and finally, the local nozzle wall contour. During restricted shock separation, the pressure fluctuations in separation region exhibit periodic characteristics rather than the usually observed characteristics of intermittent separation. The possible physical mechanisms responsible for the generation of flow unsteadiness in various separation modes are discussed. The results are from an experimental study conducted in P6.2 cold-gas subscale test facility using a thrust optimized parabolic nozzle of area-ratio 30.

  19. Compact and High Thrust Air Turbo Ram Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Kitahara, Kazuki; Inukai, Yasuo

    The Air Turbo Ramjet (ATR) is a combined cycle engine which performs like a turbojet engine at subsonic speeds and a ramjet at supersonic speeds and therefore the ATR is an attractive propulsion system for the wide operation range (e.g. Mach 0 to Mach 4). The ATR can provide a higher specific impulse than a solid fuel rocket engine and a higher thrust per frontal area than a turbojet engine. The major ATR components are the inlet, fan (compressor), turbine, gas generator, combustor and exhaust nozzle. In the ATR, the turbine drive gas is generated by a decomposed liquid or solid fuel gas generator. In order to carry heavier payloads and to attain shorter flight time, the compact and high thrust engine is required. In this study, the ram combustor with the double-staged flameholders and the fan with tandem blade were introduced to shorten the engine length and to increase the fan pressure ratio, respectively. Furthermore, the engine testing was carried out on sea level static condition to confirm the engine component integration technologies for the ATR propulsion system.

  20. Thrust and efficiency model for electron-driven magnetic nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A performance model is presented for magnetic nozzle plasmas driven by electron thermal expansion to investigate how the thrust coefficient and beam divergence efficiency scale with the incoming plasma flow and magnetic field geometry. Using a transformation from cylindrical to magnetic coordinates, an approximate analytical solution is derived to the axisymmetric two-fluid equations for a collisionless plasma flow along an applied magnetic field. This solution yields an expression for the half-width at half-maximum of the plasma density profile in the far-downstream region, from which simple scaling relations for the thrust coefficient and beam divergence efficiency are derived. It is found that the beam divergence efficiency is most sensitive to the density profile of the flow into the nozzle throat, with the highest efficiencies occurring for plasmas concentrated along the nozzle axis. Increasing the expansion ratio of the magnetic field leads to efficiency improvements that are more pronounced for incoming plasmas that are not concentrated along the axis. This implies that the additional magnet required to increase the expansion ratio may be worth the added complexity for plasma sources that exhibit poor confinement

  1. Status and tendencies for low to medium thrust propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmann, Helmut; Pitt, Richard; Schwende, Manfred; Zewen, Helmut

    The previous use of space liquid propulsion systems in the low thrust range (up to approx. 400 N) has been almost entirely devoted to providing the attitude and orbit control of satellites, including apogee injection. The use of hydrazine peroxide gave way to monopropellant hydrazine in the late sixties whilst the advent of bipropellant systems came with the launch of the Symphonie satellite in 1974. In general, these propulsion systems, together with their feed system components, are more or less standardized with only minor changes required in terms of configuration or propellant mass (tank size) for each satellite. The future, however, promises much greater diversification for the low and medium thrust propulsion systems with increasing technical demands on the engines and their associated equipment. Space Station programs, like Columbus with its in-orbit servicing requirement, will require longer life components and increased modularity whilst manned launch vehicles, such as Ariane 5 with Hermes or Space Planes such as Sänger or Hotol, will demand much higher safety and reliability requirements together with maximum reusability.

  2. Use of structured surfaces for friction and wear control on bearing surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling

    2014-10-01

    Surface texturing with purposely made regular micropatterns on flat or curved surfaces, as opposed to random roughness inherited from machining processes, has attracted significant attention in recent years. At the 2013 World Tribology Congress in Turin alone there were over 40 presentations related to surface texturing for tribological applications, from magnetic hard discs and hydrodynamic bearings to artificial joints. Although surface texturing has been reported being successfully applied in industrial applications such as seals, pistons, and thrust pad bearings, the demand for robust design is still high. Etsion has recently reviewed the modeling research mainly conducted by his group Etsion I (2013 Friction 1 195–209). This paper aims to review the state-of-the-art development of surface texturing made by a wider range of researchers.

  3. Use of structured surfaces for friction and wear control on bearing surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface texturing with purposely made regular micropatterns on flat or curved surfaces, as opposed to random roughness inherited from machining processes, has attracted significant attention in recent years. At the 2013 World Tribology Congress in Turin alone there were over 40 presentations related to surface texturing for tribological applications, from magnetic hard discs and hydrodynamic bearings to artificial joints. Although surface texturing has been reported being successfully applied in industrial applications such as seals, pistons, and thrust pad bearings, the demand for robust design is still high. Etsion has recently reviewed the modeling research mainly conducted by his group Etsion I (2013 Friction 1 195–209). This paper aims to review the state-of-the-art development of surface texturing made by a wider range of researchers. (topical review)

  4. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincke, James R. (Rigby, ID)

    1982-01-01

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  5. Damping Seals And Bearings For A Turbomachine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Pragenau, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Improved design for support of rotor in turbopump integrates ball bearings with damping seals and damping bearings. Reduces radial (side) loads on ball bearings, making it possible to increase contact angles to withstand increased transient axial loads. Service lives of bearings prolonged.

  6. Ultrasonic measurement of lubricant film thickness in sliding bearings with thin liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Tao; Meng, Qingfeng; Zhang, Kai; Yuan, Xiaoyang; Jia, Qian

    2015-02-01

    When conducting ultrasonic measurements of the lubricant film thickness in sliding bearings with thin liners, the ultrasonic pulse reflected from the bearing liner–lubricant film interface will superimpose on the pulse reflected from the bearing substrate–liner interface. The thickness information of the lubricant film is contained in the reflected pulse from the liner–lubricant film interface. In this case, the film thickness could not be obtained directly from the superimposed reflected signals. The thin liner indicates that the thickness of the bearing liner is less than half the ultrasonic pulse width. Based on the spectrum analysis method of superimposed signals, a new method is proposed to measure the lubricant film thickness in sliding bearings with thin liners. The frequency-domain amplitude ratio between the echo component containing thickness information and the steady echo component from the bearing substrate–liner interface is extracted from the superimposed signal. The reflection coefficient of the liner–lubricant film interface is obtained by this amplitude ratio to determine the film thickness. The lubricant films of different thicknesses in a thin-liner thrust pad were measured in a high-precision experimental apparatus. The measurement results were compared with the known film thickness set by the experimental apparatus. In the thinner film region, the measurement results agreed well with the set film thickness. In the thicker film region, the mean values of the multiple measurement results represented the film thickness. The experimental results show that the method can be used to measure the lubricant film thickness in sliding bearings with thin liners.

  7. Static internal performance of a single-engine onaxisymmetric-nozzle vaned-thrust-reverser design with thrust modulation capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, L. D.; Burley, J. R., II

    1985-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted at wind-off conditions in the stati-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The tests were conducted on a single-engine reverser configuration with partial and full reverse-thrust modulation capabilities. The reverser design had four ports with equal areas. These ports were angled outboard 30 deg from the vertical impart of a splay angle to the reverse exhaust flow. This splaying of reverser flow was intended to prevent impingement of exhaust flow on empennage surfaces and to help avoid inlet reingestion of exhaust gas when the reverser is integrated into an actual airplane configuration. External vane boxes were located directly over each of the four ports to provide variation of reverser efflux angle from 140 deg to 26 deg (measured forward from the horizontal reference axis). The reverser model was tested with both a butterfly-type inner door and an internal slider door to provide area control for each individual port. In addition, main nozzle throat area and vector angle were varied to examine various methods of modulating thrust levels. Other model variables included vane box configuration (four or six vanes per box), orientation of external vane boxes with respect to internal port walls (splay angle shims), and vane box sideplates. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2.0 approximately 7.0.

  8. Development of porous-ceramic hydrostatic bearings

    OpenAIRE

    Durazo-cardenas, Isidro Sergio

    2003-01-01

    Porous-ceramic hydrostatic bearings have been recently developed. These bearings have demonstrated an exceptional overall performance when compared with conventional technology bearings. However, despite all the benefits, porous-ceramic hydrostatic bearings have yet to find widespread acceptance due to the problems found in tailoring the bearings geometry and size to suit precision engineering applications, while producing porous-structures with consistent and reproducible p...

  9. Bearing Cartridge Designed To Reduce Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Eric J.

    1992-01-01

    Bearing cartridge holding outer races of two ball bearings in turbopump designed to prevent unloading of bearings during operating transients. Cartridge and bearings replace two ball bearings, whose outer races mounted in cylinder called "isolator" and preloaded by single spring mount holding isolator and reacting radial loads. Cartridge slides axially in bore of isolator during transients and forces outer races to move as pair. Necessary to eliminate unloading because unloading initiates wear.

  10. Future Bearing Surfaces in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Jun-Dong

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom...

  11. Development of porous ceramic air bearings

    OpenAIRE

    Roach, Christopher James

    2001-01-01

    Porous air bearings enjoy some important advantages over conventional air bearing types such as increased load carrying capacity, higher stiffness and improved damping. However, these types of bearings have yet to find widespread acceptance due to problems with obtaining materials with consistent permeability, instability issues relating to the volume of gas trapped at the bearing surface in the pores, and manufacturing the bearing without altering the permeability. Using...

  12. Tectonometamorphic evolution of the gneissic Kidal assemblage related to the Pan-African thrust tectonics (Adrar des Iforas, Mali)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champenois, M.; Boullier, A. M.; Sautter, V.; Wright, L. I.; Barbey, P.

    In the central part of the Adrar des Iforas (Mali), the 2 Ba Eburnean granulatic unit has been thrust above a high-grade gneissic unit, the so-called 'Kidal assemblage', during an early event of the Pan-African orogeny. The Kidal assemblage can be defined as a tectonic mixing of an Eburnean granulitic basement, its sedimentary cover of Middle to Upper Proterozoic age (quartzites, marbles, basalts and metavolcanics) and various pretectonic rocks: ultrabasic to basic rocks, diorites, tonalites. All these rocks have been deformed during at least four main events and metamorphosed together. Thrusting of the Iforas Granulitic Unit above the Kidal assemblage happened during the first event D1. The movement direction was roughly N-S, as shown by the stretching lineation. Some field criteria indicate a sense of displacement towards the north. The lattice preferred orientation of quartz c- and axes indicate that the slip was dominantly on prismatic and probably pyramidal planes along an direction; consequently D1 deformation was achieved at high temperature or low-strain rate. The quartz c- and axes do not show any constant asymmetry, so they do not indicate a sense of shear. Two metamorphic stages have been found in the Kidal assemblage: the first one is characterized by kyanite in aluminous metasediments and by the occurrence of garnet-clinopyroxene-bearing boundis of basic rocks. The P-T range of this event is located at 700 ± 50°C and around 10 Kb. The second event is a syntectonic high temperature (600-650°C) low pressure (3.5 Kb) stage accompanied by migmatization. Such a tangential deformation in barrowian-type metamorphic conditions and with N-S transport direction is known along the entire Trans-Saharan belt and cannot be related in a simple way to the collision between West African Craton and the mobile belt.

  13. Evidence for a far-traveled thrust sheet in the Greater Himalayan thrust system, and an alternative model to building the Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, S.; Robinson, D. M.; Kohn, M. J.; Mandal, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Galchhi shear zone underlies the Kathmandu klippe in central Nepal and has emerged as a key structure for discriminating competing models for the formation of the Himalayan orogenic wedge. New chronologic data from the Galchhi area suggest a new structural and orogenic interpretation. Zircons from quartzites and an orthogneiss restrict protolith deposition to between 467 + 7/ - 10 Ma and ~570 Ma, with metamorphic zircon growth at 23-29 Ma. Comparable data from the Greater Himalayan Sequence (GHS) at the intra-GHS Langtang thrust, north of Galchhi, similarly restrict GHS deposition to between 475 + 7/ - 3 and ~660 Ma. Undeformed pegmatites near Galchhi constrain movement of the Galchhi shear zone to ?22.5 ± 2.3 Ma, long before slip of the Main Central Thrust in the region (?17 Ma). Shear sense indicators in the Galchhi area indicate both top-to-the-south and top-to-the-north shears. The old age of movement, Neoproterozoic youngest detrital zircons, occurrence of top-to-the-south shear sense indicators, and intrusive Paleozoic granites, all suggest that the Galchhi shear zone is an intra-GHS top-to-the-south thrust, rather than either a thrust involving Lesser Himalayan rocks, or a top-to-the-north shear zone that juxtaposed Tethyan and GHS rocks during coeval movement of the Main Central Thrust. The GHS in Nepal was not emplaced as a single body of rock but consists of at least two ductile "thrust sheets," present in both the hinterland at Langtang and toward the foreland at Galchhi. GHS thrust sheets sequentially underplated during southward propagation of the thrust belt.

  14. Non-contact thrust stand calibration method for repetitively pulsed electric thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andrea R.; Toftul, Alexandra; Polzin, Kurt A.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2012-02-01

    A thrust stand calibration technique for use in testing repetitively pulsed electric thrusters for in-space propulsion has been developed and tested using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand. In the implementation of this technique, current pulses are applied to a solenoid to produce a pulsed magnetic field that acts against a permanent magnet mounted to the thrust stand pendulum arm. The force on the magnet is applied in this non-contact manner, with the entire pulsed force transferred to the pendulum arm through a piezoelectric force transducer to provide a time-accurate force measurement. Modeling of the pendulum arm dynamics reveals that after an initial transient in thrust stand motion the quasi-steady average deflection of the thrust stand arm away from the unforced or "zero" position can be related to the average applied force through a simple linear Hooke's law relationship. Modeling demonstrates that this technique is universally applicable except when the pulsing period is increased to the point where it approaches the period of natural thrust stand motion. Calibration data were obtained using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand previously used for steady-state thrust measurements. Data were obtained for varying impulse bit at constant pulse frequency and for varying pulse frequency. The two data sets exhibit excellent quantitative agreement with each other. The overall error on the linear regression fit used to determine the calibration coefficient was roughly 1%.

  15. Modeling two sequential coaxial phases of shortening in a foreland thrust belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hongling; Koyi, Hemin A.; Froitzheim, Nikolaus

    2014-09-01

    Analog sandbox models are used to simulate two sequential coaxial phases of shortening in a foreland thrust belt. A sufficient hiatus is considered so that erosion and sedimentation after the first phase create an angular unconformity that is subsequently deformed. The effect of variation in thickness of post-erosional sediment package and presence of a weak layer at the unconformity level are analyzed. During the second phase, some first phase thrusts are reactivated and new thrusts are also initiated. Thrust reactivation results in a structure spacing that is smaller than the expected spacing for a thicker sediment package. Reactivation of pre-existing structures prevents the weak layer from acting as an intermediate décollement. An increase in thickness ratio tends to weaken reactivation of pre-existing thrusts. Model results also show that total displacement along individual reactivated thrusts generally increases downwards across the unconformity, which could be used to distinguish thrust reactivation in the field. Two regional examples from the northern Eastern Cordillera in Colombia and from the Variscan frontal zone in Western Europe, respectively, where multiphase coaxial shortening occurred, are compared with model results. Both natural cases show features, such as partially eroded first-generation folds and truncated first-generation thrusts that are indicators for two sequential phases of deformation as observed in the models.

  16. Tongue Strength: Its Relationship to Tongue Thrusting, Open-Bite, and Articulatory Proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, James P.; Culatta, Richard A.

    1980-01-01

    No significant differences in tongue strength were found between any of the three groups of 7- to 16-year old children: normal speaking with anterior tongue thrusting during swallow and open bite malocclusion, frontal lisping with anterior tongue thrusting during swallow and open bite malocclusion, and normal controls. (Author/DLS)

  17. Nutational stability of a spinning spacecraft with internal mass motion and axial thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingori, D. L.; Yam, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Stability conditions are developed for a spinning spacecraft with internal mass motion and axial thrust. The results show that rapid cone angle growth is possible if the thrust magnitude is sufficiently large and the moving mass is aft of the system mass center. The instability does not rely on internal or external dissipation.

  18. Design and fabrication of a hydrogen/oxygen thrust chamber assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernacki, Thomas R.; Smith, Timothy D.

    1993-06-01

    The combustion system for the Advance Expander Test Bed engine consists of a thrust mount, an injector with a H2-O2 torch igniter, a combustion chamber, and a conical nozzle extension. These components constitute the thrust chamber assembly. The design, fabrication, and testing of these components are described in detail.

  19. Second-Order QCD Corrections to the Thrust Distribution in Electron-Positron Annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compute the next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) QCD corrections to the thrust distribution in electron-positron annihilation. The corrections turn out to be sizable, enhancing the previously known next-to-leading-order prediction by about 15%. Inclusion of the NNLO corrections significantly reduces the theoretical renormalization scale uncertainty on the prediction of the thrust distribution

  20. Thrust Measurements in Ballistic Pendulum Ablative Laser Propulsion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazolin, H.; Rodrigues, N. A. S.; Minucci, M. A. S.

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes a setup for thrust measurement in ablative laser propulsion experiments, based on a simple ballistic pendulum associated to an imaging system, which is being assembled at IEAv. A light aluminium pendulum holding samples is placed inside a 100 liters vacuum chamber with two optical windows: the first (in ZnSe) for the laser beam and the second (in fused quartz) for the pendulum visualization. A TEA-CO2 laser beam is focused to the samples providing ablation and transferring linear moment to the pendulum as a whole. A CCD video camera captures the oscillatory movement of the pendulum and the its trajectory is obtained by image processing. By fitting the trajectory of the pendulum to a dumped sinusoidal curve is possible to obtain the amplitude of the movement which is directly related to the momentum transfered to the sample.

  1. Thrust vectoring control from convergent nozzles with translating side wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Kenneth C.; Lucius, Gerald A.

    1995-05-01

    Experimental measurements of side force for an underexpanded two-dimensional nozzle and an axisymmetric contraction for a three-dimensional nozzle with side wall translation demonstrate that vectored angles of 20 deg can be obtained at a pressure ratio of 11.5. For a vectored control jet the magnitude of side force can be increased by the translation of the side wall where the optimum length is dependent on the pressure ratio value. The inviscid wave equation results are in good agreement with the experimental two-dimensional measurements. The optimum length of extension for the three-dimensional nozzle occurs at 1.6 times the throat dimension with similar thrust vectoring capability. The physics of the expansion and the jet momentum turning are qualitatively described using an optical schlieren system.

  2. Minimum Thrust Load Control for Floating Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, SØren; Bak, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    — Offshore wind energy capitalizes on the higher and less turbulent wind at sea. Shallow water sites are pro?table for deployment of monopile wind turbines at water depths of up to 30 meters. Beyond 30 meters, the wind is even stronger and less turbulent. At these depths, ?oating wind turbines become pro?table, capable of accessing unexploited wind resources while reaching regions of new consumers. However, ?oating wind turbines are subject to reduced structural stiffness which results in instabilities when standard wind turbine control systems are applied. Based on optimal control, this paper presents a new minimum thrust control strategy capable of stabilizing a ?oating wind turbine. The new control strategy explores the freedom of variable generator speed above rated wind speed. A comparison to the traditional constant speed strategy, shows improvements in structural fore-aft oscillations and power stability when using the new control strategy.

  3. Mechanical properties of foliated cataclasites from the Nobeoka thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Hiroko; Takahashi, Miki; Kimura, Gaku; Yamaguchi, Asuka; Saito, Saneatsu; Hamahashi, Mari; Fukuchi, Rina; Kameda, Jun; Hamada, Yohei; Fujimoto, Koichiro; Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Kitamura, Yujin; Hina, Shoko; Eida, Mio

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the mechanics of plate boundary earthquakes requires a sound investigation of the deformation style and mechanical behavior not only within plate boundary faults but also in the surrounding rocks. It is critical to quantify the strain accumulation and accommodation in the entire subduction systems. Recent studies suggest that heterogeneous deformation and strain distribution in mélanges observed in many ancient accretionary prism outcrops are related to slow slip events and low frequency earthquakes [Fagereng and Sibson, 2010; Kitamura and Kimura, 2011]. However, there are few experimental studies to describe mechanical properties of mélanges and foliated cataclasites. Here, we report on triaxial deformation experiments on foliated cataclasites from the footwall of the Nobeoka thrust, Japan. The Nobeoka thrust, which is exhumated in Kyushu, southwest Japan, is considered as one of the ancient out-of-sequence faults. The Nobeoka thrust fault core, hanging wall, and foot wall rocks were recently cored and logged in a vertical borehole as a NOBELL project [Hamahashi et al., in press]. The Nobeoka thrust is recovered at 41.3 m from the ground. The hanging wall (0-41.3 m coring interval) is composed of the Kitagawa Group of phyllite of alternating beds of sandstone and shale, while the footwall (41.3-255 m) is composed of the Hyuga Group of foliated cataclasite consisting of scaly shale, tuffacious shale, sandstone, and acidic tuff. For deformation experiments, we used foliated catacalsite core samples, which are in better quality and less weathered than outcrop samples. Cylindrical samples with a diameter of 20 mm and a length of 30 mm were subsampled from the cores. The cylindrical specimen were deformed at an axial displacement rate of 0.05-0.5 ?m/s, corresponding to strain rates of 1.6 ×10-6-1.6 ×10-5 s-1, and at a temperature of 250 ° C and an effective pressure (Pe) of 120 MPa (confining pressure of 200 MPa and pore pressure of 80 MPa) or 20 MPa (confining pressure of 200 MPa and pore pressure of 180 MPa). The temperature was chosen based on the estimated temperature (250-300 ° C) at which the footwall foliated cataclasites were formed [Kondo et al., 2005]. The two different effective pressures of 120 MPa and 20 MPa correspond to the stress conditions at ~8 km (geothermal gradient of ~30 ° C/km) with hydrostatic pore pressure and lithostatic pore pressure, respectively. The preliminary results show that the foliated cataclasite samples, taken from the coring interval of 153 m, deform in a brittle manner at Pe = 20 MPa. The strengths reach at 80-90 MPa at peak following a strain weakening to residual strengths of 40-60 MPa. At Pe = 120 MPa, on the other hand, the foliated cataclasite deforms in a brittle-ductile transition manner and steady-state strength is ~ 300 MPa. We will present more experimental results and microstructure observations of the experimentally deformed samples.

  4. Thrust Stand Measurements of the Conical Theta Pinch FARAD Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    It is found that the impulse of a pulsed inductive plasma thruster utilizing preionization is maximized for a particular ratio of the stored energy in the capacitor to the injected propellant mass. The fact that the impulse depends on the ratio of the initial stored energy to injected propellant mass agrees with previous current sheet studies, supporting the idea that a Townsend-like breakdown process strongly influences current sheet formation, and in turn, current sheet formation strongly affects the operational efficiency of the device. The optimum in half cone angle of the inductive coil can be explained in terms of a balance between the direct axial acceleration and the radial pinching contribution to thrust. From the trends in these data we conclude that operation at the correct ratio of capacitor energy to propellant mass is essential for efficient operation of pulsed inductive plasma thrusters employing a preionized propellant.

  5. Data Archive and Portal Thrust Area Strategy Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Stephan, Eric G.; Macduff, Matt C.; Hagler, Clay D.

    2014-09-30

    This report describes the Data Archive and Portal (DAP), a key capability of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmosphere to Electron (A2e) initiative. The DAP Thrust Area Planning Group was organized to develop a plan for deploying this capability. Primarily, the report focuses on a distributed system--a DOE Wind Cloud--that functions as a repository for all A2e data. The Wind Cloud will be accessible via an open, easy-to-navigate user interface that facilitates community data access, interaction, and collaboration. DAP management will work with the community, industry, and international standards bodies to develop standards for wind data and to capture important characteristics of all data in the Wind Cloud.

  6. Hudson Valley Fold and Thrust Belt Field Trip (Structural Geology)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martha Growdon

    This structural geology field trip in the Hudson Valley region reinforces class discussions about fold and thrust belts and thin-skinned tectonics. Students observed a ramp anticline over a ramp-flat geometry fault. The anticline has minor faulting and veining in the hinge zone and folding occurred by flexural slip (evident from down-dip slickenlines on bedding surfaces). Students make observations and sketches of the outcrop and take strike and dip measurements of bedding and fault surfaces. Students can also look for a very weak cleavage. Students can use attitude measurements to reinforce key principles of stereonets including plotting lines, planes, and poles and interpreting the orientation of the fold axis (or other information) from these nets.

  7. Real-time seam tracking for rocket thrust chamber manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, D.J.; Novak, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Starr, G.P. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maslakowski, J.E. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

    1993-11-01

    A sensor-based control approach for real-time seam tracking of rocket thrust chamber assemblies has been developed to enable automation of a braze paste dispensing process. This approach utilizes a non-contact Multi-Axis Seam Tracking (MAST) sensor to track the seams. Thee MAST sensor measures capacitance variations between the sensor and the workpiece and produces four varying voltages which are read directly into the robot controller. A PID control algorithm which runs at the application program level has been designed based upon a simple dynamic model of the combined robot and sensor plant. The control algorithm acts on the incoming sensor signals in real-time to guide the robot motion along the seam path. Experiments demonstrate that seams can be tracked at 100 mm/sec within the accuracy required for braze paste dispensing.

  8. Dynamic Spin Rig Upgraded With a Five- Axis-Controlled Three-Magnetic-Bearing Support System With Forward Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Mehmed, Oral

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center Dynamic Spin Rig is used for experimental evaluation of vibration analysis methods and dynamic characteristics for rotating systems. Measurements are made while rotors are spun and vibrated in a vacuum chamber. The rig has been upgraded with a new active magnetic bearing rotor support and excitation system. This design is expected to provide operational improvements over the existing rig. The rig will be able to be operated in either the old or new configuration. In the old configuration, two ball bearings support the vertical shaft of the rig, with the test article located between the bearings. Because the bearings operate in a vacuum, lubrication is limited to grease. This limits bearing life and speed. In addition, the old configuration employs two voice-coil electromagnetic shakers to apply oscillatory axial forces or transverse moments to the rotor shaft through a thrust bearing. The excitation amplitudes that can be imparted to the test article with this system are not adequate for components that are highly damped. It is expected that the new design will overcome these limitations.

  9. Combining Countercurrent Shear Flow Control and Transverse Jets for Fluidic Thrust Vector Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echavarria Diaz-Guardamino, Ignacio; Forliti, David

    2007-11-01

    Countercurrent shear flow control has been established as an effective method for thrust vector control but has been challenged by hardware integration issues. Recent developments in fluidic thrust vector control have focused on nozzle interior methods that skew the throat of the nozzle using multiple transverse jets. The present work is motivated to combine these two flow control approaches to create a thrust vector control technique with enhanced performance. A combined computational and experimental effort was undertaken to consider the integration of these two flow control techniques. A simple configuration of a channel flow was used with consideration of various geometrical and operating conditions. It is apparent that the employment of countercurrent flow control does enhance the thrust vector control performance over a single transverse jet. The influence of countercurrent shear on the turbulence created with the transverse jet will be studied to help understand how the two flow control methodologies contribute to the pressure gradients required for thrust vectoring.

  10. Design and Optimization of Low-thrust Orbit Transfers Using Q-law and Evolutionary Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwon; vonAllmen, Paul; Fink, Wolfgang; Petropoulos, Anastassios; Terrile, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Future space missions will depend more on low-thrust propulsion (such as ion engines) thanks to its high specific impulse. Yet, the design of low-thrust trajectories is complex and challenging. Third-body perturbations often dominate the thrust, and a significant change to the orbit requires a long duration of thrust. In order to guide the early design phases, we have developed an efficient and efficacious method to obtain approximate propellant and flight-time requirements (i.e., the Pareto front) for orbit transfers. A search for the Pareto-optimal trajectories is done in two levels: optimal thrust angles and locations are determined by Q-law, while the Q-law is optimized with two evolutionary algorithms: a genetic algorithm and a simulated-annealing-related algorithm. The examples considered are several types of orbit transfers around the Earth and the asteroid Vesta.

  11. Space Shuttle Main Engine structural analysis and data reduction/evaluation. Volume 2: High pressure oxidizer turbo-pump turbine end bearing analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisk, Gregory A.

    1989-01-01

    The high-pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) consists of two centrifugal pumps, on a common shaft, that are directly driven by a hot-gas turbine. Pump shaft axial thrust is balanced in that the double-entry main inducer/impeller is inherently balanced and the thrusts of the preburner pump and turbine are nearly equal but opposite. Residual shaft thrust is controlled by a self-compensating, non-rubbing, balance piston. Shaft hang-up must be avoided if the balance piston is to perform properly. One potential cause of shaft hang-up is contact between the Phase 2 bearing support and axial spring cartridge of the HPOTP main pump housing. The status of the bearing support/axial spring cartridge interface is investigated under current loading conditions. An ANSYS version 4.3, three-dimensional, finite element model was generated on Lockheed's VAX 11/785 computer. A nonlinear thermal analysis was then executed on the Marshall Space Flight Center Engineering Analysis Data System (EADS). These thermal results were then applied along with the interference fit and bolt preloads to the model as load conditions for a static analysis to determine the gap status of the bearing support/axial spring cartridge interface. For possible further analysis of the local regions of HPOTP main pump housing assembly, detailed ANSYS submodels were generated using I-DEAS Geomod and Supertab (Appendix A).

  12. Essential Interest-Bearing Money

    OpenAIRE

    Andolfatto, David

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, I provide a rationale for why money should earn interest; or, what amounts to the same thing, why risk-free claims to non-interest-bearing money should trade at discount. I argue that interest-bearing money is essential when individual money balances are private information. The analysis also suggests one reason for why it is sufficient (as well as necessary) for interest to be paid only on large money balances; or equivalently, why bonds need only be issued in large denominati...

  13. Air bearing vacuum seal assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An air bearing vacuum seal assembly is described that is capable of rotating at the speed of several thousand revolutions per minute using an air cushion to prevent the rotating and stationary parts from touching, and a two stage differential pumping arrangment to maintain the pressure gradient between the air cushion and the vacuum so that the leak rate into the vacuum is, for example, less than 1 x 10-4Pa m3/s. The air bearing vacuum seal has particular application for mounting rotating targets to an evacuated accelerator beam tube for bombardment of the targets with high-power charged particle beams in vacuum

  14. 14 CFR 23.1155 - Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch...Controls and Accessories § 23.1155 Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime. For turbine engine installations, each...

  15. Climate Change, Polar Bears and their management

    OpenAIRE

    Derenchenko, Liza

    2010-01-01

    This is a literature study of polar bears in the context of climate change: what kind of creatures are polar bears, what are the main interpretations of current climate change, how might the polar bear adapt to these changes (feeding strategies) and how are the bears being managed (hunting)? These are relevant questions , since climate change is on the agenda, and polar bears being the apex predators of the Arctic are a key representation of the wildlife there. The third element of polar bear...

  16. Tardigrades: Bears of the Moss

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Miller

    This online PowerPoint presentation is dedicated to the phylum Tardigrada. It discusses distinguishing characteristics of Tardigrades (also known as water bears), their relationship to arthropods and nematodes, internal structures, life stages, cryptobiosis, research opportunities, classification, identification, habitat, distribution, ease of study in the lab, and more. Each slide contains illustrations and descriptions of the microscopic animal.

  17. Satellite monitoring of black bear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craighead, J. J.; Craighead, F. C., Jr.; Varney, J. R.; Cote, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a feasibility experiment recently performed to test the use of a satellite system for telemetering environmental and physiological data from the winter den of a 'hibernating' black bear, Ursus americanus. The instrumentation procedure and evaluations of the equipment performance and sensory data obtained are discussed in detail.

  18. Intelligent Engine Systems: Bearing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arnant P.

    2008-01-01

    The overall requirements necessary for sensing bearing distress and the related criteria to select a particular rotating sensor were established during the phase I. The current phase II efforts performed studies to evaluate the Robustness and Durability Enhancement of the rotating sensors, and to design, and develop the Built-in Telemetry System concepts for an aircraft engine differential sump. A generic test vehicle that can test the proposed bearing diagnostic system was designed, developed, and built. The Timken Company, who also assisted with testing the GE concept of using rotating sensors for the differential bearing diagnostics during previous phase, was selected as a subcontractor to assist General Electric (GE) for the design, and procurement of the test vehicle. A purchase order was prepared to define the different sub-tasks, and deliverables for this task. The University of Akron was selected to provide the necessary support for installing, and integrating the test vehicle with their newly designed test facility capable of simulating the operating environment for the planned testing. The planned testing with good and damaged bearings will be on hold pending further continuation of this effort during next phase.

  19. Journal and Wave Bearing Impedance Calculation Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanford, Amanda; Campbell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The wave bearing software suite is a MALTA application that computes bearing properties for user-specified wave bearing conditions, as well as plain journal bearings. Wave bearings are fluid film journal bearings with multi-lobed wave patterns around the circumference of the bearing surface. In this software suite, the dynamic coefficients are outputted in a way for easy implementation in a finite element model used in rotor dynamics analysis. The software has a graphical user interface (GUI) for inputting bearing geometry parameters, and uses MATLAB s structure interface for ease of interpreting data. This innovation was developed to provide the stiffness and damping components of wave bearing impedances. The computational method for computing bearing coefficients was originally designed for plain journal bearings and tilting pad bearings. Modifications to include a wave bearing profile consisted of changing the film thickness profile given by an equation, and writing an algorithm to locate the integration limits for each fluid region. Careful consideration was needed to implement the correct integration limits while computing the dynamic coefficients, depending on the form of the input/output variables specified in the algorithm.

  20. Upstream blockage effect on the thrust force of a marine hydrokinetic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliani, Giulio; Beninati, Maria Laura; Krane, Michael; Fontaine, Arnold

    2013-11-01

    The study evaluates the interaction of two model marine devices axially arranged one in front of the other, in a tandem configuration. Particular focus is given to the change that occurs in the thrust of the downstream marine hydrokinetic (MHK) device when the spatial arrangement of the two elements is varied. At critical spacing there is no thrust generation. The study is motivated by the need to predict the thrust behavior of MHK devices and determine the minimum separation distance to avoid the no thrust condition. The downstream element is a two-bladed, horizontal axis turbine, while the upstream blockage is a perforated disk with similar geometric properties intended to approximate the wake of the MHK device. Testing is conducted in the flume facility at Bucknell University. Experiments are performed for a fixed range of spacing between the perforated disk and the turbine. For each separation distance, the span-wise velocity profile upstream and downstream of the turbine is measured, as well as the device's rotational speed. The turbine's thrust coefficient is calculated. Plots of the thrust coefficient as a function of spacing depict the minimum separation distance to avoid the no thrust condition.

  1. Recent Mega-Thrust Tsunamigenic Earthquakes and PTHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorito, S.

    2013-05-01

    The occurrence of several mega-thrust tsunamigenic earthquakes in the last decade, including but not limited to the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman, the 2010 Maule, and 2011 Tohoku earthquakes, has been a dramatic reminder of the limitations in our capability of assessing earthquake and tsunami hazard and risk. However, the increasingly high-quality geophysical observational networks allowed the retrieval of most accurate than ever models of the rupture process of mega-thrust earthquakes, thus paving the way for future improved hazard assessments. Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) methodology, in particular, is less mature than its seismic counterpart, PSHA. Worldwide recent research efforts of the tsunami science community allowed to start filling this gap, and to define some best practices that are being progressively employed in PTHA for different regions and coasts at threat. In the first part of my talk, I will briefly review some rupture models of recent mega-thrust earthquakes, and highlight some of their surprising features that likely result in bigger error bars associated to PTHA results. More specifically, recent events of unexpected size at a given location, and with unexpected rupture process features, posed first-order open questions which prevent the definition of an heterogeneous rupture probability along a subduction zone, despite of several recent promising results on the subduction zone seismic cycle. In the second part of the talk, I will dig a bit more into a specific ongoing effort for improving PTHA methods, in particular as regards epistemic and aleatory uncertainties determination, and the computational PTHA feasibility when considering the full assumed source variability. Only logic trees are usually explicated in PTHA studies, accounting for different possible assumptions on the source zone properties and behavior. The selection of the earthquakes to be actually modelled is then in general made on a qualitative basis or remains implicit, despite different methods like event trees have been used for different applications. I will define a quite general PTHA framework, based on the mixed use of logic and event trees. I will first discuss a particular class of epistemic uncertainties, i.e. those related to the parametric fault characterization in terms of geometry, kinematics, and assessment of activity rates. A systematic classification in six justification levels of epistemic uncertainty related with the existence and behaviour of fault sources will be presented. Then, a particular branch of the logic tree is chosen in order to discuss just the aleatory variability of earthquake parameters, represented with an event tree. Even so, PTHA based on numerical scenarios is a too demanding computational task, particularly when probabilistic inundation maps are needed. For trying to reduce the computational burden without under-representing the source variability, the event tree is first constructed by taking care of densely (over-)sampling the earthquake parameter space, and then the earthquakes are filtered basing on their associated tsunami impact offshore, before calculating inundation maps. I'll describe this approach by means of a case study in the Mediterranean Sea, namely the PTHA for some locations of Eastern Sicily coasts and Southern Crete coast due to potential subduction earthquakes occurring on the Hellenic Arc.

  2. Non-Contact Thrust Stand Calibration Method for Repetitively-Pulsed Electric Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andrea R.; Toftul, Alexandra; Polzin, Kurt A.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2011-01-01

    A thrust stand calibration technique for use in testing repetitively-pulsed electric thrusters for in-space propulsion has been developed and tested using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand. In the implementation of this technique, current pulses are applied to a solenoidal coil to produce a pulsed magnetic field that acts against the magnetic field produced by a permanent magnet mounted to the thrust stand pendulum arm. The force on the magnet is applied in this non-contact manner, with the entire pulsed force transferred to the pendulum arm through a piezoelectric force transducer to provide a time-accurate force measurement. Modeling of the pendulum arm dynamics reveals that after an initial transient in thrust stand motion the quasisteady average deflection of the thrust stand arm away from the unforced or zero position can be related to the average applied force through a simple linear Hooke s law relationship. Modeling demonstrates that this technique is universally applicable except when the pulsing period is increased to the point where it approaches the period of natural thrust stand motion. Calibration data were obtained using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand previously used for steady-state thrust measurements. Data were obtained for varying impulse bit at constant pulse frequency and for varying pulse frequency. The two data sets exhibit excellent quantitative agreement with each other as the constant relating average deflection and average thrust match within the errors on the linear regression curve fit of the data. Quantitatively, the error on the calibration coefficient is roughly 1% of the coefficient value.

  3. Alex the Bear Goes to Child Care

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Watch Quality Child Care Videos Child Care Aware Public Service Announcements Meet Alex the Bear Resources Resources ... Watch Quality Child Care Videos Child Care Aware Public Service Announcements Meet Alex the Bear Child Care ...

  4. Brown bear telemetry and trapping: Special report

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Brown bear studies were continued during the 1967 field season with emphasis on development of techniques for instrumenting bears with radio transmitters and...

  5. Trends in Controllable Oil Film Bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Ilmar Technical University of Denmark,

    2011-01-01

    This work gives an overview about the theoretical and experimental achievements of mechatronics applied to oil film bearings, with the aim of: controlling the lateral vibration of flexible rotating shafts; modifying bearing dynamic characteristics, as stiffness and damping properties; increasing the rotational speed ranges by improving damping and eliminating instability problems, for example, by compensating cross-coupling destabilizing effects; reducing startup torque and energy dissipation in bearings; compensating thermal effects. It is shown that such controllable bearings can act as "smart" components and be applied to rotating machines with the goal of avoiding unexpected stops of plants, performing rotordynamic tests and identifying model parameters "on site". Emphasis is given to the controllable lubrication (active lubrication) applied to different types of oil film bearings, i.e., as tilting-pad bearings, multirecess journal bearings and plain bearings.

  6. Hunting for 'bears' in the backyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave Walker

    This Micscape Magazine article offers practical hints about how to collect and study tardigrades, or water bears, from mosses in your backyard. It features a general introduction of water bears, a video, and a section of references for further reading.

  7. A Preliminary Foil Gas Bearing Performance Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Radil, Kevin C.; Bruckner, Robert J.; Howard, S. Adam

    2006-01-01

    Recent breakthrough improvements in foil gas bearing load capacity, high temperature tribological coatings and computer based modeling have enabled the development of increasingly larger and more advanced Oil-Free Turbomachinery systems. Successful integration of foil gas bearings into turbomachinery requires a step wise approach that includes conceptual design and feasibility studies, bearing testing, and rotor testing prior to full scale system level demonstrations. Unfortunately, the current level of understanding of foil gas bearings and especially their tribological behavior is often insufficient to avoid developmental problems thereby hampering commercialization of new applications. In this paper, a new approach loosely based upon accepted hydrodynamic theory, is developed which results in a "Foil Gas Bearing Performance Map" to guide the integration process. This performance map, which resembles a Stribeck curve for bearing friction, is useful in describing bearing operating regimes, performance safety margins, the effects of load on performance and limiting factors for foil gas bearings.

  8. Unbalance Response Prediction for Rotors on Ball Bearings Using Speed- and Load-Dependent Nonlinear Bearing Stiffness

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming David P.; Poplawski J. V.

    2005-01-01

    Rolling-element bearing forces vary nonlinearly with bearing deflection. Thus, an accurate rotordynamic analysis requires that bearing forces corresponding to the actual bearing deflection be utilized. For this work, bearing forces were calculated by COBRA-AHS, a recently developed rolling-element bearing analysis code. Bearing stiffness was found to be a strong function of bearing deflection, with higher deflection producing markedly higher stiffness. Curves fitted to the bearing data for a ...

  9. Sensor-based control of rocket thrust chamber feature location for automated braze paste dispensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Dan J.; Novak, Jim L.; Maslakowski, John E.; Starr, Gregory P.

    A sensor-based control system has been developed for locating key features on rocket thrust chamber assemblies for automated braze paste dispensing. The system uses a non-contact Multi-Axis Seam Tracking (MAST) sensor to locate these features. The MAST sensor measures capacitance variations between the sensor and thrust chamber surface to produce four varying voltages for control purposes. The sensor information is used to locate the thrust chamber surface and to guide the robotic paste dispensing equipment along the seams in real-time. Experiments demonstrate that seams can be tracked at 50 mm/sec within the accuracy required for braze paste dispensing.

  10. A METHOD OF COMPUTER CALCULATION OF AXIAL THRUST AND INTERNAL LEAKAGE IN CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar J?dral

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple method of calculation of radial pressure distribution on a disc rotating in a casing and then the axial thrust in centrifugal pumps is presented. The method is based on integral relations and allows to estimate rapidly the axial thrust value with accuracy sufficient for technical applications (the error less than 15%. The method allows to compute simultaneously Internal leakage losses in centrifugal pumps. The presented method may also be useful for the calculation of the pressure distribution and the axial thrust in other rotating machines, such as compressors, gas turbines, water turbines, hydraulic torque convertors and paper-pulp mills.

  11. Performance characterization of a helicon double layer thruster using direct thrust measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Pottinger, Sabrina; Lappas, Vaios; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The performance of a Helicon Double Layer Thruster (HDLT) has been characterised using a pendulum type thrust stand and retarding field energy analyser. Data recorded for a fixed propellant flow rate of 16 sccm of krypton and fixed magnetic field topology show that the thrust generated increases linearly with increasing radio frequency input power over a range of 250 W to 650 W. Over the power range investigated thrust levels of approximately 1 to 2.8 mN were achieved. A maximum e...

  12. Is tongue thrust that develops during orthodontic treatment an unrecognized potential road block?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chawla H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of tongue thrust has often been suspected, long debated and largely dispelled as a primary etiological factor of malocclusion. However, tongue thrust may contribute to poor occlusal intercuspation both during and after treatment. A tongue thrust may also develop during orthodontic mechanotherapy as a result of the transient creation of intra and interarch spaces and this little recognized phenomenon was found to occur in many randomly followed cases. In many instances, this seemingly adaptive and secondary response of the tongue posture and function may persist and thereafter impede the resolution of intra and interarch problems.

  13. Oil film pressure in hydrodynamic journal bearings

    OpenAIRE

    Valkonen, Antti

    2009-01-01

    Hydrodynamic journal bearings are critical power transmission components that are carrying increasingly high loads because of the increasing power density in various machines. Therefore, knowing the true operating conditions of hydrodynamic journal bearings is essential to machine design. Oil film pressure is one of the key operating parameters describing the operating conditions in hydrodynamic journal bearings. Measuring the oil film pressure in bearings has been a demanding task and theref...

  14. Technology development for indigenous water lubricated bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water Lubricated Bearings (WLB) are used in various mechanisms of fuel handling systems of PHWRs and AHWR. Availability and random failures of these bearings was a major factor in refuelling operations. Indigenous development of these bearings was taken up and 7 types of antifriction bearings in various sizes (totaling 37 variants) for PHWR, AHWR and Dhruva applications were successfully developed. This paper deals with various aspects of WLB development. (author)

  15. Cartridge Bearing System for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, Edward P.; Hanson, Robert A.; Jones, William R.; Mohr, Terry W.

    1999-01-01

    Conventional spin axis ball bearings have been unreliable in spacecraft, often failing by two heretofore uncontrolled processes: ball retainer instability and lubricant breakdown. The Space Cartridge Bearing System (SCBS) addresses each of these mechanisms directly, leading to a bearing system with absolute freedom from retainer instability and negligible lubricant degradation rate. The result is a reliable plug-in bearing cartridge with a definite design life.

  16. Theory of the Ultimate Bearing Capacity Calculation

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Yi Wang; Ben Jun Wang; Shu Zun Jiang

    2012-01-01

    The traditional formula and calculation method for calculating the ultimate bearing capacity is not scientific. According to the research, the ultimate bearing capacity is equal to the real degree of the material and detection force product. Ultimate bearing capacity is not for the change of detecting the force. On the basis of this understanding, a new theory of the study bearing capacity of rock-soil and new methods is generated.

  17. A major synmetamorphic Early Devonian thrust and extensional fault system in the Mid-Norway Caledonides: Key to exhumation of HP and UHP rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P.; Tucker, R. D.; Terry, M. P.; Kamo, S. L.; Roberts, D.; Gee, D. G.; Butler, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    The northern ('Nordoyane') UHP domain of the Western Gneiss Region contains occurences of microdiamonds, coesite and quartz pseudomorphs after coesite, and petrologically based peak P estimates 3-6 GPa. The structure is dominated by post-peak, near orogen-parallel, sub-horizontal, ductile sinistral-shear and top-SW extensional fabrics, overprinted locally by amphibolite-facies mylonites. Thus, earlier features related to subduction and exhumation are greatly obscured, and complicating segmentation was created. Nevertheless, top-SE eclogite-facies fabrics are locally preserved in Nordøyane, that can be equated with subduction and earliest exhumation. Zones preserving evidence of top-NW transport in early extension are also identified. Robust U-Pb zircon chronology indicates peak UHP eclogite-facies crystallization at 415-410 Ma (Early Devonian Lochkovian to Pragian, cf. Kauffmann 2006), followed by pegmatite crystallization at 395 Ma (late Emsian) in neck lines of boudins produced in ductile subhorizontal extension, thus limiting the process to 15-20 million years. In coastal areas north and west of Trondheim, the postulated Agdenes extensional detachment is identified by a major break in titanite U-Pb geochronology. Basement gneisses below contain Mesoproterozoic igneous titanite fully reset at 395Ma, as well as significant development of Devonian pegmatites. Ordovician granitoids of the Støren Nappe of the Upper Allochthon, just above the detachment, contain igneous titanite barely influenced by Devonian recrystallization and no evidence of post-Ordovician melts, implying removal of a significant section on a very- large-scale detachment. Rocks both above and below the detachment are overprinted by the same late, subhorizontal, sinistral ductile extensional fabric, obscuring any fabrics produced during development of the detachment itself. Notably, deep-seated metamorphism overlaps the Late Emsian (403-392 Ma) age of sandstones and conglomerates determined by plant fossils that lie unconformably on parts of the Upper Allochthon. When traced as the base of the Upper Allochthon, the detachment covers a present minimum area of 450 x 180 km. The eastern part of the region in Trollheimen escaped the late strong subhorizontal overprint, and shows this sequence of deformations: 1) Early emplacement of thrust nappes of Lower and Middle Allochthons over Baltican basement with Late Neoproterozoic quartzite cover. 2) Major SE-directed recumbent folding of the entire thrust-imbricated sequence including basement. 3) Major out-of-sequence SE-directed thrusting (Storli thrust) of the recumbent-folded sequence over deeper, less deformed, lower basement gneisses and unconformable Neoproterozoic quartzite cover. This thrust has a minimum transport of 80 km across strike. Upper basement contains boudins of eclogite and garnet-corona gabbro that are lacking in lower basement. With respect to Trollheimen, similar thrust imbrication of basement is documented 190 km NE in the Tømmerås window, 240 km NE in the Grong-Olden culmination, where a minimum of 100 km across-strike transport is demonstrated, and 100 km W at Reksdalshesten. We suggest that crustal imbrication by the Storli and related thrusts, covering a conservatively estimated present minimum area of 400 x 100 km, provided gravitational potential to trigger the overlying Agdenes detachment, leading toward exhumation of a large region of eclogite-bearing rocks.

  18. Passive Thermal Management of Foil Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for passive thermal management of foil bearing systems are disclosed herein. The flow of the hydrodynamic film across the surface of bearing compliant foils may be disrupted to provide passive cooling and to improve the performance and reliability of the foil bearing system.

  19. 14 CFR 27.623 - Bearing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bearing factors. 27.623 Section 27.623...Construction General § 27.623 Bearing factors. (a) Except as provided...to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for...

  20. 14 CFR 25.623 - Bearing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bearing factors. 25.623 Section 25.623...Construction General § 25.623 Bearing factors. (a) Except as provided...to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for...

  1. 14 CFR 23.623 - Bearing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bearing factors. 23.623 Section 23.623...Design and Construction § 23.623 Bearing factors. (a) Each part that has...to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for...

  2. 14 CFR 29.623 - Bearing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bearing factors. 29.623 Section 29.623...Construction General § 29.623 Bearing factors. (a) Except as provided...to pounding or vibration, must have a bearing factor large enough to provide for...

  3. Cool Polar Bears: Dabbing on the Texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Jean

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her second-graders created their cool polar bears. The students used the elements of shape and texture to create the bears. They used Monet's technique of dabbing paint so as to give the bear some texture on his fur.

  4. Aseismic deformation of a fold-and-thrust belt imaged by synthetic aperture radar interferometry near Shahdad, southeast Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Fielding, Ej; Wright, Tj; Muller, J.; Parsons, Be; Walker, R.

    2004-01-01

    At depth, many fold-and-thrust belts are composed of a gently dipping, basal thrust fault and steeply dipping, shallower splay faults that terminate beneath folds at the surface. Movement on these buried faults is difficult to observe, but synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry has imaged slip on at least 600 km2 of the Shahdad basal-thrust and splay-fault network in southeast Iran. Approximately 70 mm of thrust motion on the 8°-dipping Shahdad basal thrust occurred 8-30 km to the eas...

  5. The relationship analysis of thrust structure and sandstone type uranium deposits at northern margin of qaidam basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thrust belt at northern margin of the Qaidam basin is prospective area for finding sandstone-type uranium deposits. The structure is complicated, post-reformation is strong and thrust structure develops in this area. Single thrust structure, opposite thrust structure, recoil structure and slope zone are the most common structural patterns. The different of tectonic style causes differences in occurrence and thickness of sedimentary strata and effects the metallogenic environment of sandstone-type uranium deposits. By analyzing the different between the tectonic style and uranium mineralization, it shows that uranium prospecting works deployment vary with the different of thrust tectonic styles. (authors)

  6. Pressure thrust and pressure shock arrestor (mixer-diffusor device)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mixer-diffusor device for use in nuclear reactors to control the heat and pressure energy resulting from an accident is attached to the end of a hollow conduit from which a gaseous medium such as steam is to be expelled under pressure. The end of the hollow conduit is submerged under the surface of a body of liquid such as water. The mixer-diffusor comprises a conical baffle having an apex extending into the open end of the conduit. A skirt member is positioned around the end of the conduit so than an annular opening is formed between the wall of the conduit and one edge of the skirt member. The skirt member is tapered outwardly at essentially the same angle as the taper of the conical baffle. When the gaseous medium is expelled from the end of the conduit, the gaseous medium flows against and over the conical baffle thereby reducing the thrust forces of the conduit. As the gaseous medium passes the edge of the end of the conduit, the gaseous medium tends to suck the liquid through the annular opening. The liquid is then mixed with the gaseous medium causing the gaseous medium to form a plurality of small bubbles which are expelled from the opening between the skirt and the conical member. In this manner, the gaseous medium is substantially mixed and diffused with the liquid. (auth)

  7. Influence of variable thrust parameters on swirl injector fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Robert J.

    Current swirl injector design methodologies do not consider elevated chamber pressure and less than design mass flow rate operation found in variable thrust liquid rocket engines. The objective of this work is to study the effects of elevated chamber pressure and off-design mass flow rate operation on swirl injector fluid mechanics. Using a high pressure chamber, water flowed through a swirl injector at various combinations of elevated chamber pressure and reduced mass flow rate. The optically-accessible swirl injector allowed for determination of the film thickness profile down the swirl injector nozzle section. High speed video and digital stills showed significant increases in the film thickness profile at high chamber pressure and low mass flow rate operation. At prescribed combinations of chamber pressure and mass flow rate, a jump was noted in the film thickness profile. This jump was assumed related to a vortex breakdown phenomenon. Measured injector discharge coefficient values showed different trends with increasing chamber pressure at low mass flow rate operation as opposed to near-design mass flow rate operation. Downstream spray angles showed classic changes in morphology as the mass flow rate was decreased below the design value. Increasing chamber pressure worked to decrease the spray angle at any injection mass flow rate. A new set of fundamental relations linking swirl injector design parameters to injector geometry and flow conditions were derived. Impacts of the research findings to the swirl injector design process were assessed.

  8. Viscid/inviscid interaction analysis of thrust augmenting ejectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, P. M.; Dejoode, A. D.

    1979-01-01

    A method was developed for calculating the static performance of thrust augmenting ejectors by matching a viscous solution for the flow through the ejector to an inviscid solution for the flow outside the ejector. A two dimensional analysis utilizing a turbulence kinetic energy model is used to calculate the rate of entrainment by the jets. Vortex panel methods are then used with the requirement that the ejector shroud must be a streamline of the flow induced by the jets to determine the strength of circulation generated around the shroud. In effect, the ejector shroud is considered to be flying in the velocity field of the jets. The solution is converged by iterating between the rate of entrainment and the strength of the circulation. This approach offers the advantage of including external influences on the flow through the ejector. Comparisons with data are presented for an ejector having a single central nozzle and Coanda jet on the walls. The accuracy of the matched solution is found to be especially sensitive to the jet flap effect of the flow just downstream of the ejector exit.

  9. SOURCE TERM TARGETED THRUST FY 2005 NEW START PROJECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While a significant amount of work has been devoted to developing thermodynamic data. describing the sorption of radionuclides to iron oxides and other geomedia, little data exist to describe the interaction of key radionuclides found in high-level radioactive waste with the uranium surfaces expected in corroded spent nuclear fuel (SNF) waste packages. Recent work indicates that actinide adsorption to the U(VI) solids expected in the engineered barrier system may play a key role in the reduction of dissolved concentrations of radionuclides such as Np(V). However, little is known about the mechanism(s) of adsorption, nor are the thermodynamic data available to represent the phenomenon in predictive modeling codes. Unfortunately, this situation makes it difficult to consider actinide adsorption to the U(VI) silicates in either geochemical or performance assessment (PA) predictions. The primary goal in the Source Term Targeted Thrust area is to ''study processes that control radionuclide release from the waste form''. Knowledge of adsorption of actinides to U(VI) silicate solids its and parameterization in geochemical models will be an important step towards this goal

  10. The COSC-1 drill core - a geological sample through a hot allochthon and the underlying thrust zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Henning; Almqvist, Bjarne; Berthet, Théo; Klonowska, Iwona

    2015-04-01

    The ICDP (International Continental Scientific Drilling Program) supported Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) scientific drilling project has the aim to study mountain building processes in a major Paleozoic orogen. COSC-1, drilled in 2014 near Åre (Sweden), was planned to sample a section from the hot allochthon of the Lower Seve Nappe through the thrust zone and into the underlying less metamorphic rocks of the Särv and/or Jämtlandian nappes. Diamond core drilling operations resulted in 2396.0 m of drill core with only about 2.5 m documented core loss (technical failure of the core catcher). Down to about 1800 m, the COSC-1 drill hole penetrated a succession that is dominated by gneisses of varying compositions (felsic, amphibole, calc-silicate gneisses, and more), often garnet and diopside bearing. Meta-gabbros and amphibolites are common and apparently correlate well with seismic reflectors between 500 and 1000 m depth. Also marbles, pegmatite dykes and minor mylonites occur. These rocks are highly strained. Small scale structures (e.g. isoclinal folding) are occasionally discernible in the narrow section provided by the drill cores. (Young) Fractures are sparse. Only a set of very steep fractures results in fluid conduction zones at several levels throughout the drill hole. At 175 m and between 1200 and 1300 m, this results in the dissolution of calcite-rich bands in the gneisses to form "micro-karst". First signs of the thrust zone below the Seve Nappe appear just below 1700 m in form of narrow deformation bands and thin mylonites. The mylonites increase in thickness and reach a thickness of around 1 m between 1900 and 2000 m. Below c. 2100 m, mylonites are dominating and garnets become common (but are not present in all mylonites). The deepest rock of mafic origin (possibly amphibolite in the Seve Nappe) was identified at 2314 m, a transition from gneiss into lower grade metasedimentary rocks occurs between 2345 and 2360 m. The lower part of the drill core to TD is dominated by quartzites and meta-arkoses (field name) of unclear tectonostratigraphic position that are mylonitised to varying degree. The drill hole does not penetrate the base of the thrust zone. The rocks sampled in the lowermost part of the drill core are the thickest mylonites encountered, tens of metres thick and (again) rich in garnet. Geological conclusions with relevance to mountain building have to wait for detailed analysis of the drill core. However, direct observations are: - The gneisses of the Lower Seve Nappe are much more homogenous than expected. - Thick (hundreds of metres) mafic bodies (Arnbom 1980, and unpublished geological maps) are absent. The maximum thickness in the drill core is about 30 m. - The thrust zone below the Seve Nappe is much thicker than expected. After more than 500 m the lower boundary was not encountered. - The drill hole seems to leave the Seve Nappe and enter lower grade metamorphic rocks. However, the mylonites at the bottom of the drill hole contain many and large garnets (up to cm size).

  11. Improvement of journal bearing operation at heavy misalignment using bearing flexibility and compliant liners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kim; Klit, Peder

    2012-01-01

    A flexure journal bearing design is proposed that will improve operational behaviour of a journal bearing at pronounced misalignment. Using a thermoelastohydrodynamic model, it is shown that the proposed flexure journal bearing has vastly increased the hydrodynamic performance compared to the stiff bearing when misaligned. The hydrodynamic performance is evaluated on lubricant film thickness, pressure and temperature. Furthermore, the influence of a compliant bearing liner is investigated and it is found that it increases the hydrodynamic performance when applied to a stiff bearing, whereas the liner has practically no influence on the flexure journal bearing's performance.

  12. The BEAR Beamline at Elettra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nannarone, S.; Borgatti, F.; DeLuisa, A.; Doyle, B. P.; Gazzadi, G. C.; Giglia, A.; Finetti, P.; Mahne, N.; Pasquali, L.; Pedio, M.; Selvaggi, G.; Naletto, G.; Pelizzo, M. G.; Tondello, G.

    2004-05-01

    The BEAR (Bending Magnet for Emission Absorption and Reflectivity) beamline is installed at the right exit of the 8.1 bending magnet at ELETTRA. The beamline — in operation since January 2003 — delivers linear and circularly polarized radiation in the 5 - 1600 eV energy range. The experimental station is composed of a UHV chamber for reflectivity, absorption, fluorescence and angle resolved photoemission measurements and a UHV chamber for in-situ sample preparation.

  13. The BEAR Beamline at Elettra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BEAR (Bending Magnet for Emission Absorption and Reflectivity) beamline is installed at the right exit of the 8.1 bending magnet at ELETTRA. The beamline - in operation since January 2003 - delivers linear and circularly polarized radiation in the 5 - 1600 eV energy range. The experimental station is composed of a UHV chamber for reflectivity, absorption, fluorescence and angle resolved photoemission measurements and a UHV chamber for in-situ sample preparation

  14. Uranium milling at Bear Creek

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bear Creek uranium project is located in the southern Powder River basin in Wyoming. The mine is an open pit; the ore occurs in poorly consolidated sandstone that is typically coarse- to fine-grained. The ore minerals are mainly uraninite and coffinite. The current mill sustains feed rates of 2400 tpd with plant availability of 98 percent and recovery rates of 97 percent. Processing includes grinding, leaching, washing (treating sands and slimes separately), clarification, solvent extraction, precipitation, and drying

  15. Computing Thermal Performances Of Shafts And Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Claudia M.

    1992-01-01

    SHABERTH computer program developed to predict steady-state and transient thermal performance of multi-bearing shaft system operating with either wet or dry friction. Calculates loads, torques, temperatures, and fatigue lives for ball and/or roller bearings on single shaft. Enables study of many causes of instabilities in bearings. Also provides for analysis of reaction of system to termination of supply of lubricant to bearings and other lubricated mechanical elements. Valuable software tool in design and analysis of shaft bearing systems. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  16. Performance characterization of a helicon double layer thruster using direct thrust measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pottinger, Sabrina; Lappas, Vaios [Surrey Space Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2011-06-15

    The performance of a helicon double layer thruster (HDLT) has been characterized using a pendulum type thrust stand and retarding field energy analyser. Data recorded for a fixed propellant flow rate of 16 sccm of krypton and fixed magnetic field topology show that the thrust generated increases linearly with increasing radio frequency input power over a range 250-650 W. Over the power range investigated thrust levels of approximately 1-2.8 mN were achieved. A maximum effective specific impulse of 280 s was determined using the thrust data. Ion energy distribution functions indicate that increasing power corresponds to improved plasma generation processes as general trends show increasing plasma and beam currents with increasing power.

  17. Low-Cost and Light-Weight Transpiration-Cooled Thrust Chambers Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort aims to evaluate the feasibility of using transpiration-cooled Titanium as the primary material in small-scale thrust chambers for in-space...

  18. rf power system for thrust measurements of a helicon plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rf power system has been developed, which allows the use of rf plasma devices in an electric propulsion test facility without excessive noise pollution in thruster diagnostics. Of particular importance are thrust stand measurements, which were previously impossible due to noise. Three major changes were made to the rf power system: first, the cable connection was changed from a balanced transmission line to an unbalanced coaxial line. Second, the rf power cabinet was placed remotely in order to reduce vibration-induced noise in the thrust stand. Finally, a relationship between transmission line length and rf was developed, which allows good transmission of rf power from the matching network to the helicon antenna. The modified system was tested on a thrust measurement stand and showed that rf power has no statistically significant contribution to the thrust stand measurement.

  19. Simulation analysis of pressure regulation of hydraulic thrust system on a shield tunneling machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhibin; Xie, Haibo; Yang, Huayong

    2011-09-01

    Hydraulic thrust system is an important system in a shield tunneling machine. Pressure regulation of thrust cylinders is the most important function for thrust system during tunnel excavation. In this paper, a hydraulic thrust system is explained, and a corresponding simulation model is carried out in order to study the system characteristics. Pressure regulation of a certain group's cylinders has little influence on regulation of the other groups' cylinders. The influence will not affect the process much during tunnel excavation. Pump displacement may have a greater effect on pressure regulation and oil supply flow rate should be adaptive to the system's demand. A exacting situation is simulated to explain how pressure regulation works during tunnel excavation.

  20. Tank 12 data dump OME integrated thrust chamber test report, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauckert, R. P.; Tobin, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The test program conducted to characterize the steady state stability, thermal, and performance characteristics of the integrated thrust chamber assembly, as well as limited tests to investigate transient characteristics are described.

  1. A torsion balance for impulse and thrust measurements of micro-Newton thrusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuan-Xia; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Yang, Shan-Qing; Luo, Jun

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the performance of a torsion-type thrust stand suitable for studies of micro-Newton thrusters, which is developed for ground testing the micro-Newton thruster in Chinese Test of the Equivalence Principle with Optical readout space mission. By virtue of specially suspending design and precise assembly of torsion balance configuration, the thrust stand with load capacity up to several kilograms is able to measure the impulse bit up to 1350 ?Ns with a resolution of 0.47 ?Ns, and the average thrust up to 264 ?N with a resolution of 0.09 ?N in both open and close loop operation. A pulsed plasma thruster, the preliminary prototype developed for Chinese TEPO space mission, is tested by the thrust stand, and the results reveal that the average impulse bit per pulse is measured to be 58.4 ?Ns with a repeatability of about 5%. PMID:22299984

  2. Nuclear genomic sequences reveal that polar bears are an old and distinct bear lineage

    OpenAIRE

    Hailer, F.; Kutschera, V. E.; Hallstro?m, B. M.; Klassert, D.; Fain, S. R.; Leonard, Jennifer A.; Arnason, U.; Janke, A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the polar bear matriline (mitochondrial DNA) evolved from a brown bear lineage since the late Pleistocene, potentially indicating rapid speciation and adaption to arctic conditions. Here, we present a high-resolution data set from multiple independent loci across the nuclear genomes of a broad sample of polar, brown, and black bears. Bayesian coalescent analyses place polar bears outside the brown bear clade and date the divergence much earlier, in the middle Pl...

  3. Bears “Count” Too: Quantity Estimation and Comparison in Black Bears (Ursus Americanus)

    OpenAIRE

    Vonk, Jennifer; Beran, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of bear cognition are notably missing from the comparative record despite bears’ large relative brain size and interesting status as generalist carnivores facing complex foraging challenges, but lacking complex social structures. We investigated the numerical abilities of three American black bears (Ursus Americanus) by presenting discrimination tasks on a touch-screen computer. One bear chose the larger of two arrays of dot stimuli, while two bears chose the smaller array of dots. ...

  4. A Control Approach for Thrust-Propelled Underactuated Vehicles and its Application to VTOL Drones

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Minh-duc; Hamel, Tarek; Morin, Pascal; Samson, Claude

    2009-01-01

    A control approach is proposed for a class of underactuated vehicles in order to stabilize reference trajectories either in thrust direction, velocity, or position. The basic modeling assumption is that the vehicle is propulsed via a thrust force along a single body-fixed direction and that it has full torque actuation for attitude control (i.e., a typical actuation structure for aircrafts, Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) vehicles, submarines, etc.). Additional assumptions on the externa...

  5. Feedback Optimal Control of Low-thrust Orbit Transfer in Central Gravity Field

    OpenAIRE

    Owis, Ashraf H.

    2013-01-01

    Low-thrust trajectories with variable radial thrust is studied in this paper. The problem is tackled by solving the Hamilton- Jacobi-Bellman equation via State Dependent Riccati Equation( STDE) technique devised for nonlinear systems. Instead of solving the two-point boundary value problem in which the classical optimal control is stated, this technique allows us to derive closed-loop solutions. The idea of the work consists in factorizing the original nonlinear dynamical system into a quasi-...

  6. Task 12 data dump (phase 2) OME integrated thrust chamber test report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, R. D.; Pauckert, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics and performance of the orbit maneuvering engine for the space shuttle are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the regeneratively cooled thrust chamber of the engine. Tests were conducted to determine engine operating parameters during the start, shutdown, and restart. Characteristics of the integrated thrust chamber and the performance and thermal conditions for blowdown operation without supplementary boundary layer cooling were investigated. The results of the test program are presented.

  7. Design, fabrication and thrust measurement of a micro liquid monopropellant thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jeongmoo; Kwon, Sejin

    2014-10-01

    A liquid monopropellant MEMS thruster was designed, fabricated and tested. For application on a nanosatellite for orbit control, a liquid propellant MEMS thruster delivers better performance than a solid thruster. Two issues must be addressed for a liquid monopropellant MEMS thruster: high energy content of the monopropellant to overcome the excessive heat loss associated with the small scale of the thruster, and repeatability of generated thrust force. The present study proposed blending 90?wt% hydrogen peroxide with ethanol at an oxidizer to fuel ratio of 30 to enhance the energy content of the propellant. The thruster structure was constructed using glass layers that were individually patterned by wet etching. The decomposition catalyst was separately prepared by wet impregnation of the active material, Pt, on the gamma alumina pellets and inserted into the thrust chamber before the UV bonding process of the glass layers. The firing test of the assembled MEMS thruster was conducted and thrust was measured both with ethanol blended hydrogen peroxide and pure hydrogen peroxide as a reference monopropellant. The measured thrusts were approximately 30?mN for both 1.7?ml?min?1 flow rate of blended hydrogen peroxide and 2.0?ml?min?1 flow rate of pure hydrogen peroxide. The measured thrust for 1.7?ml?min?1 pure hydrogen peroxide was approximately 24?mN. The measured thrust was 40% less than the design thrust for both monopropellants. The uncertainty of the thrust was less with blended monopropellant than with pure hydrogen peroxide.

  8. Optimizing low-thrust and gravity assist maneuvers to design interplanetary trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Vasile, Massimiliano; Bernelli-zazzera, Franco

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a direct method based on a transcription by finite elements in time has been used to design optimal interplanetary trajectories, exploiting a combination of gravity assist maneuvers and low-thrust propulsion. A multiphase parametric approach has been used to introduce swing-bys, treated as coast phases between two thrusted or coasting trajectory arcs. Gravity maneuvers are at first modeled with a linked-conic approximation and then introduced through a full thr...

  9. Foil bearing research at Penn State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpino, Marc

    1993-11-01

    Foil journal bearings consist of a compliant metal shell or foil which supports a rigid journal by means of a fluid film. Foil bearings are considered to be a potential alternative to rolling element or traditional rigid surface bearings in cryogenic turbomachinery applications. The prediction of foil bearing performance requires the coupled solution of the foil deflection and the fluid flow in the bearing clearance between the rotor and the foil. The investigations being conducted in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Penn State are focused in three areas: theoretical prediction of steady state bearing performance, modeling of the dynamic bearing characteristics to determine performance in rotor systems, and experimental verification of analysis codes. The current status and results from these efforts will be discussed.

  10. ??????–????????????????—????????? Evolution and Later Reformation of Early-Middle Jurassic Coal-Bearing Basins in Western Mongolia—A Case Study from the Shinejinst Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ???

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available ?????????????????????????????–??????????????????????????????????????????????????????–?????????????????????????–???????????????–??????????????????????????????????(??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????–???????????????????????????????????????????????–?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????Owing to variation of the basement structures, syn-orogenic stress fields and regional tectonic evolution, the Early-Middle Jurassic coal-bearing basins in western Mongoliashow different geometric and kinematic features from the simultaneous molasse basins in easternMongolia. The west segment of the Mongolia-Okhotsk suture is a NW- striking transfer zone, which constraints two transpressional fracture belts developing in western Mongolia. The tran- spressional fracture consists of the oblique thrust with NWW- to nearly E-W-striking, and the NW-orientated oblique thrust-strike slipping fault. The front fault of the oblique thrust controls a coal-forming basin in its lower plate. The ba- sin-controlling fault thrusts north(eastwards, with the basin dynamics resulting from a northward push-compression caused by closure of Tethyan ocean in the end of Early Jurassic in western China and followed continent-continent col- lision. The evolution of the Shinejinst Basin can be divided into three stages, which experiences four episodes of refor- mation after its reversion. The coal-search direction for the Lower-Middle Jurassic large coal fields in western Mongo- lia should be a kind of the South Sub-Basin of Shinejinst Basin, which could be indicated by three characters: 1 the basin-controlling faults being NWW- to nearly E-W-striking oblique thrust as well as NE-striking sinistral shearing fault, 2 to be situated at upper side of normal fault in Early Cretaceous extension, and 3 to be located along the piedmont belt of thrust or foothill of range in the Cenozoic uplifting.

  11. Localization of duplex thrust-ramps by buckling: analog and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shumin; Dixon, John M.

    1995-06-01

    Duplex structures in natural fold-thrust belts occur over a wide range of geometric scales. Duplex thrust ramps exhibit a regular spacing linearly related to the thickness of strata involved in the duplex. We suggest that buckling instability in layered systems can produce local stress concentrations which localize thrust ramps with regular spacing. This mechanism is demonstrated through analog (centrifuge) and numerical (finite element) modelling. Centrifuge models containing finely-laminated multilayers composed of plasticine and silicone putty (simulating rocks such as limestone and shale) are compressed from one edge; folds propagate from hinterland to foreland. As shortening continues, the lowest competent unit is thrust into a blind duplex structure by breakthrusting. The duplex develops by serial nucleation of faults from hinterland to foreland; the ramp locations are inherited from the initial buckling instability. Finite-element models based on the analog models and their natural prototypes demonstrate that stress concentrations develop in fore-limbs of anticlines within competent stratigraphie units. Models containing thrust discontinuities (at sites of calculated stress concentration) display additional stress concentrations in the forelimbs of unfaulted folds closer to the foreland. The locus of stress concentration thus propagates towards the foreland, consistent with foreland thrust propagation in nature. The location and regular spacing of ramps are inherited from early (possibly even incipient) buckle folds.

  12. Design of thrust vectoring exhaust nozzles for real-time applications using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, Ravi K.; Markin, Robert E.; Whitaker, Kevin W.

    1991-01-01

    Thrust vectoring continues to be an important issue in military aircraft system designs. A recently developed concept of vectoring aircraft thrust makes use of flexible exhaust nozzles. Subtle modifications in the nozzle wall contours produce a non-uniform flow field containing a complex pattern of shock and expansion waves. The end result, due to the asymmetric velocity and pressure distributions, is vectored thrust. Specification of the nozzle contours required for a desired thrust vector angle (an inverse design problem) has been achieved with genetic algorithms. This approach is computationally intensive and prevents the nozzles from being designed in real-time, which is necessary for an operational aircraft system. An investigation was conducted into using genetic algorithms to train a neural network in an attempt to obtain, in real-time, two-dimensional nozzle contours. Results show that genetic algorithm trained neural networks provide a viable, real-time alternative for designing thrust vectoring nozzles contours. Thrust vector angles up to 20 deg were obtained within an average error of 0.0914 deg. The error surfaces encountered were highly degenerate and thus the robustness of genetic algorithms was well suited for minimizing global errors.

  13. Thrust Enhancement in Hypervelocity Nozzles by Chemical Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D. J.; Carpenter, Mark H.; Drummond, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    In the hypersonic flight regime, the air-breathing supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) has been shown to be a viable propulsion system. The current designs of scramjet engines provide performance benefits only up to a Mach number of 14. Performance losses increase rapidly as the Mach number increases. To extend the applicability of scram'jets beyond Mach 14, research is being conducted in the area of inlet and wave drag reduction, skin-friction and heat-transfer reduction, nozzle loss minimization, low-loss mixing, and combustion enhancement. For high Mach number applications, hydrogen is the obvious fuel choice because of its high energy content per unit mass in comparison with conventional fuels. These flight conditions require engines to operate at supersonic internal velocities, high combustor temperatures, and low static pressures. The high static temperature condition enhances the production of radicals such as H and OH, and the low-pressure condition slows the reaction rates, particularly the recombination reactions. High-temperature and low-pressure constraints, in combination with a small residence time, result in a radical-rich exhaust gas mixture exiting the combustor. At high Mach number conditions (due to low residence time), H and OH do not have enough time to recombine ; thus, a significant amount of energy is lost as these high-energy free radical are exhausted. The objective of the present study is to conduct a flowfield analysis for a typical nozzle geometry for NASP-type vehicle to assess for thrust enhancement in hypervelocity nozzles by substituting small amount of phosphine for hydrogen.

  14. Chromatographic (TLC) differentiation of grizzly bear and black bear scats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picton, Harold D.; Kendall, Katherine C.

    1994-01-01

    While past work concluded that thin-layer chromatography (TLC) was inadequate for the separation of grizzly (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bear (U. americanus) scats, our study found differences adequate for species separation. A key was constructed using 19 of 40 data points recorded on each(N)=356 profiles of 178) know-species scat. Accuracy was best for late summer scats (94%). Methods for specimen preparation, analysis, and reading the TLC profiles are discussed. Factors involved in scat variation were tested.

  15. Seismic isolation rubber bearings for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes results of biaxial breaking tests by compression and shear and by tension and shear for seismic isolation rubber bearings with bolted-type connections. The bearings used in the tests were low-damping rubber bearings, high-damping rubber bearings, and lead-rubber bearings. Three modes of failure of the bolted-type bearings were observed in the tests. They are the breaking failure by tension and shear; the breaking failure by compression and shear; and the buckling failure by compression and shear. The first and the second modes of failures are almost independent of the types and the sizes of the bearings. The breaking conditions of those failure modes are described in the axial-stress-shear-strain plane. This expression is useful for the evaluation of safety margins of the bearings. The paper outlines the basic design of the nuclear-grade bearings which were used for large-scale rubber bearing tests in a research project for seismic isolation of FBR plants. It also discusses the protection method against aging and the quality control which are important for implementation. (orig./HP)

  16. Interference Fit Life Factors for Roller Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of hoop stresses in reducing cylindrical roller bearing fatigue life was determined for various classes of inner ring interference fit. Calculations were performed for up to seven interference fit classes for each of ten bearing sizes. Each fit was taken at tightest, average and loosest values within the fit class for RBEC-5 tolerance, thus requiring 486 separate analyses. The hoop stresses were superimposed on the Hertzian principal stresses created by the applied radial load to calculate roller bearing fatigue life. The method was developed through a series of equations to calculate the life reduction for cylindrical roller bearings based on interference fit. All calculated lives are for zero initial bearing internal clearance. Any reduction in bearing clearance due to interference fit was compensated by increasing the initial (unmounted) clearance. Results are presented as tables and charts of life factors for bearings with light, moderate and heavy loads and interference fits ranging from extremely light to extremely heavy and for bearing accuracy class RBEC 5 (ISO class 5). Interference fits on the inner bearing ring of a cylindrical roller bearing can significantly reduce bearing fatigue life. In general, life factors are smaller (lower life) for bearings running under light load where the unfactored life is highest. The various bearing series within a particular bore size had almost identical interference fit life factors for a particular fit. The tightest fit at the high end of the RBEC-5 tolerance band defined in ANSI/ABMA shaft fit tables produces a life factor of approximately 0.40 for an inner-race maximum Hertz stress of 1200 MPa (175 ksi) and a life factor of 0.60 for an inner-race maximum Hertz stress of 2200 MPa (320 ksi). Interference fits also impact the maximum Hertz stress-life relation.

  17. Hunting Bears with a Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Case

    In this online activity, students use lichens and tardigrades (water bears) to investigate their use as bioindicators of key air pollutants. When lichens are exposed to some kinds of air pollutants, especially to sulfur dioxide, the lichens are injured and die. The lichen coverage in a specified area should be a good indicator of the level of air quality. The diversity of the tardigrade species on the lichens will be used to develop another level for bioindication of air quality. Sections of this activity include: introduction, sulfur dioxide and lichens, sampling procedure for lichen coverage, tardigrade sampling, sampling procedure for tardigrades, calculating diversity using the Simpson Diversity Index, interpretation of results, and references.

  18. Phylum: Tardigrada (water bears, tardigrades)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger Middleton

    This web page describes water bears, minute animals that can remain dormant in a dry state for over 100 years. The page addresses what they are, where they are found, their general biology, cryptobiosis, their ability to resist environmental extremes, implications and further research regarding their cryptobiosis, where they fit in with other animals, and their existence in South Africa. It also describes how someone could collect and see them. The page is part of Biodiversity Explorer, a web site hosted by Iziko Museums of Cape Town that features the diversity of life in South Africa.

  19. Lower Miocene coeval thrusting and strike-slip faulting in the Western Betics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasca, Gianluca; Gueydan, Frédéric; Brun, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the Africa-Europe convergence, the Mediterranean system presents a complex interaction between subduction rollback and upper subduction plate deformation since 30 Ma. The western end of the system shows an arcuate geometry across the Gibraltar arc, the Betico-Rifean belt, in which the relationship between slab dynamics and onshore tectonics is poorly constrained. The present study focuses on the Western Betics, which is characterized by two major thrusts: 1/ the Alboran Front limits the metamorphic domain (Alboran Domain) from the fold-and-thrust belts involving the Mesozoic cover of the Iberian margin (Subbetics Domain); 2/ the Alboran Internal Thrust allows the juxtaposition of a strongly attenuated lithosphere section, containing the large Ronda subcontinental mantle bodies, on top of crustal rocks. New structural data show that two major E-W strike-slip corridors controlled the deformation pattern of the Alboran Domain, in which E-W dextral strike-slip faults, N60° thrusts and N140° normal faults developed simultaneously during dextral strike-slip simple shear. The Alozaina piggy-back Basin, mainly formed by olistotromic deposits of Lower Miocene age, provides an age estimate for the continuous westward translation of the Alboran Domain, with reference to Iberia, that is accommodated mainly by an E-W lateral strike-slip ramp and a N60° frontal thrust ramp. In this context, a thrust sequence led to the piling up of thrust units in the Western Betics and to the crustal emplacement of the Ronda Peridotites bodies.

  20. Dutch climate policy. Main thrust, background and basic choices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1994, the Dutch government signed bilateral Sustainable Development Agreements (SDA) with the governments of Bhutan, Benin and Costa Rica. These agreements, based on reciprocity, equality and participation, have been designed with the aim of developing new forms of North-South cooperation. One of the projects being implemented under the terms of the agreements is a workshop on Dutch climate policy, to be organised by the four SDA partners. The aim of the workshop is to transfer Dutch policy background and at the same time spur critical debate. The present document is to serve as the basic discussion paper at the workshop. The aim of this paper is to describe the main thrust and background of Dutch climate policy and its implicit basic choices. It is these choices that ultimately determine the terms of such a policy and provide the most relevant starting point for a critical dialogue. The information in this paper is based on related government policy documents and the sources on which these are based. The central focus of this paper is climate policy in the Netherlands. It is obviously not Dutch society as a whole that is participating in international discussions or putting policy into place, but the Dutch government, as its representative. It may well be the case that adequate public support exists for reducing the risks of climate change, but that such support is lacking when it comes to the concrete policy measures deemed necessary by the government. Furthermored necessary by the government. Furthermore, Dutch citizens may engage in a variety of activities which are of influence on greenhouse gas emissions - e.g. buying certain consumer products - but which are difficult for the government to control, because of international trade agreements, for example. For the purposes of the workshop, though, we take it that the Dutch government, as the elected representative of the Dutch population and discussion partner of the SDA countries, can also be addressed when it comes to public support and activities of the populace on which the government can exert little or no influence. Second, opinions within Dutch society regarding appropriate climate policy are not homogeneous but diverse. There is wide range of opinions and interests - economic and ecological, among others - impacting in the public arena, and Dutch government policy is consequently the outcome of the balance existing at a particular moment in time. Alongside the perspective embodied in official Dutch policy and reviewed in this paper, then, there also exist other visions on climate policy and climate change in the Netherlands

  1. Two High-Temperature Foil Journal Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail

    2006-01-01

    An enlarged, high-temperature-compliant foil bearing has been built and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of such bearings for use in aircraft gas turbine engines. Foil bearings are attractive for use in some machines in which (1) speeds of rotation, temperatures, or both exceed maximum allowable values for rolling-element bearings; (2) conventional lubricants decompose at high operating temperatures; and/or (3) it is necessary or desirable not to rely on conventional lubrication systems. In a foil bearing, the lubricant is the working fluid (e.g., air or a mixture of combustion gases) in the space between the journal and the shaft in the machine in which the bearing is installed.

  2. Powder-Metallurgical Bearings For Turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, B. N.; Humphries, T. S.; Thom, R. L.; Moxson, V.; Friedman, G. I.; Dolan, F. J.; Shipley, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Bearings fabricated by powder metallurgy developed for use in machines subjected to extremes of temperature, rolling-contact cyclic stresses, and oxidizing or otherwise corrosive fluids. Bearings also extend operating lives of other machines in which bearings required to resist extreme thermal, mechanical, and chemical stresses. One alloy exhibiting outstanding properties was MRC-2001. Resistance to fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, and wear found superior to that of 440C stainless steel.

  3. Complex networks from space-filling bearings

    OpenAIRE

    Kranz, J. J.; Arau?jo, N. A. M.; Andrade Jr, J. S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Two dimensional space-filling bearings are dense packings of disks that can rotate without slip. We consider the entire first family of bearings for loops of size four and propose a hierarchical construction of their contact network. We provide analytic expressions for the clustering coefficient and degree distribution, revealing bipartite scale-free behavior with tunable degree exponent depending on the bearing parameters. We also analyze their average shortest path and per...

  4. Single axis controlled attraction type magnetic bearing

    OpenAIRE

    O. Horikawa; Da Silva, I.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new type of magnetic bearing with active control only in axial direction. The bearing uses two pairs of permanent magnets working in attraction mode to restrict the radial motion and a control system composed of two electromagnets, a gap sensor and a controller to keep the axis in a fixed axial position. The principle, the dynamic model for axial motion and the control system for this bearing are presented. Finally, by experiments conducted in a prototype, the effectiven...

  5. Evaluation of Journal Bearings in Manual Transmissions

    OpenAIRE

    Vidar, Joachim; Mellstedt, Jonas

    2009-01-01

    This thesis work is an evaluation of journal bearings in manual transmissions in automobiles. Today both journal- and needle bearings can be positioned into the gearboxes and in order to reduce the power loss developed by friction when a relative angular velocity arises, the right type of bearing must be chosen. In order to succeed, this work is aimed to develop a Matlab simulation model, which should be used as a tool in the design process of manual transmissions. The program development is ...

  6. Cracks in a roller-bearing

    OpenAIRE

    Celin, R.; Kmeti?, D.

    2008-01-01

    Bearings are among the most important components of electromotors, pumps, compressors and other processing equipment. After 30 years of work some non-destructive and metallographic examinations were carried out on a single-row cylindrical roller-bearing. A non-destructive liquid-penetrant testing revealed crack indications on an inner ring groove. When a sample of the roller-bearing outer ring was cut out for metallographic examination, new cracks were discovered that were not detected by the...

  7. R+D works for the further development of high temperature reactors. (1) Captive bearing experiments for active magnetic bearings. (2) Captive bearing test for HTR blowers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When using active magnetic bearings as blower shaft bearings, blower motors and bearings must be protected against mechanical damage in case of faults (example: total electrical supply failure due to the supply cables breaking). So-called captive bearings are provided, in order to be able to shut the blowers down safely in such faults. These captive bearings are roller bearings which are additionally fitted in the area of the blower shaft bearings, to prevent mechanical contact between the blower rotor and stator. As there was little experience available for the given boundary conditions, such as - speed, - acceleration, - bearing load, - bearing dimensions, - ambient conditions, appropriate development and tests had to be carried out. It was important to determine suitable captive bearings and the necessary ambient conditions, which will make it possible to support the failures of the magnetic bearings to be expected in 40 years' operation of the reactor without damage and to meet the requirements of the captive bearings. (orig./GL)

  8. Technical Development Path for Foil Gas Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Foil gas bearings are in widespread commercial use in air cycle machines, turbocompressors and microturbine generators and are emerging in more challenging applications such as turbochargers, auxiliary power units and propulsion gas turbines. Though not well known, foil bearing technology is well over fifty years old. Recent technological developments indicate that their full potential has yet to be realized. This paper investigates the key technological developments that have characterized foil bearing advances. It is expected that a better understanding of foil gas bearing development path will aid in future development and progress towards more advanced applications.

  9. Polar Bears International: Vital Maternity Den Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes a journalist's participation in a study of polar bear denning sites in the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). It is thought that cubs born in those dens play an important role in maintaining the Beaufort Sea population of polar bears. Prior to the study, no complete map existed pinpointing the ANWR's denning areas. The study data will be available to manage human activities, thus protecting the sensitive areas in which a mother polar bear may den. The study will also provide baseline data to assess how climate change may alter the distribution of polar-bear denning habitat.

  10. Modeling and simulation of porous journal bearings in multibody systems

    OpenAIRE

    Buuren, Sietze

    2013-01-01

    A specific cost-efficient type of plain journal bearing is the porous journal bearing, which possesses a pervious bush that serves as a lubricant reservoir. The current work is concerned with modeling porous journal bearings in multibody systems, for which dynamical models are needed to investigate the bearing’s behavior. Such porous journal bearing models as well as models of elementary rotor-bearing systems including these, were developed and investigated during the course for this work.

  11. Quaternary deformation of the Mushi thrust-related fold, northeastern margin of the Pamir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T.; Chen, J.; Huang, D. M.; Thompson, J.; Xiao, P. W.; Yuan, D. Z.; Burbank, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Pamir salient defines the northwestern end of the Himalayan-Tibetan orogen and has overthrust the Tajik-Tarim basin to the north by ~300km along a late Cenozoic, south-dipping intracontinental subduction zone (Burtman and Molnar, 1993). The Quaternary deformation of the salient are concentrated on the outer margins: the sinistral Darvaz fault on the northwestern margin, the Trans-Alai thrust on the north margin and the northeast margin. The GPS-based plate tectonic model indicates the convergence rate is of 8-12mm/a in an N-S direction, nearly 1/4 of that between the Indian plate and the Eurasian plate (DeMets et al., 1990; Reigber et al., 2001; Yang et al., 2008). Previous studies focused on the northwestern margin and the north margin revel their spatial distribution, temporal evolution and kinematic patterns (Burtman and Molnar, 1993; Strecker et al., 1995; Arrowsmith and Strecker, 1999; Coutand et al., 2002). Deformed strata and GPS data indicate Quaternary deformations on the northeastern margin are concentrated on the PFT (the Pamir Front Thrust), the foreland thrust system generated by the latest advancing migration of the Pamir salient, whose kinematic patterns are still poor understood. Integrated by the Mushi thrust and the Mushi anticline, the Mushi thrust-related fold located at eastern end of the PFT. Simple structure, well outcrops and evident deformed terraces make it an excellent place to recognize deformation characters and kinematic patterns of the PFT. The Mushi thrust is north-vergent, roughly parallel with the anticline axis, and west part forming several subparallel fault scarps on the terrace surface and east part buried under the late-Quaternary deposits. The Mushi thrust is north-plunging, with a gentle south limb and a steep north limb. Combining field mapping data and neighboring seismic reflection profiles, following the cross-section balance principle, we can confine the Mushi thrust-related fold is a fault propagation fold evaluating from a detachment fold, the total shortening is ~0.7km, and the total uplift is ~1.5km. The shortening of the Mushi thrust-related fold is absorbed by strata folding and slipping along the thrust surface. According to the offset and the age of the terrace surface near the dam of the Kashi power station, the shortening rate of the Mushi thrust is ~0.7mm/a. On the basis of terraces deformation analysis, the Mushi anticline grows through limb rotation in late-Quaternary, and the minimum shortening rate is ~0.6mm/a. Then the total shortening rate is ~1.3mm/a. Although the growth strata cannot be found in the field work, the comfortable contacts between the Atushi formation and the Xiyu formation at both limbs indicate the growth inception of the Mushi thrust-related fold later than the base age of the Xiyu formation, which is ~1.6Ma (Chen et al., 2007). If the shortening rate is constant during growth of the thrust-related fold, the growth inception should be earlier than 0.5-0.6Ma.

  12. 3D geometry and evolutionary sequence of fold-thrust systems in NW Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hao-Yun; Yang, Kenn-Ming; Hsieh, Ching-Yun; Yang, Tzu-Ruei; Chuang, Hui-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ju

    2015-04-01

    During the arc-continental collision from the Pliocene to the Pleistocene, two sets of fold-and-thrust system developed in NW Taiwan, a series of NNE-SSW striking low-angle thrust faults and their related folds (set A) and the other series of NEE-SWW striking high-angle thrust faults and their related folds (set B). The latter one cuts the former one and extends forelandward. The geometry of intersection and development sequence of both sets of structures are still in debate. In this study, we utilized a grid of seismic profiles to constrain our interpretation on the subsurface structural geometry of the two structural sets, which then was tested by structural restoration. We also made some simulations on the formation of fault-related folds by trishear modeling. The influence of normal fault reactivation on and the transitional relationships among the structures were investigated to establish an evolutionary sequence for the fold-and thrust systems of NW Taiwan. The strike of set A is NNE-SSW in the northern part of the study area but becomes N-S to the south. The location of the strike change is cut by a NEE-SWW high-angle fault of set B. According to the seismic interpretation, shallower anticline is asymmetric whereas deeper anticline is symmetric. The low-angle thrust of set A extends to the south and transfers into high-angle where it is cut by the high-angle fault of set B. The trishear model suggests that the shallower anticline resulted from low-angle fault thrusting in early period, whereas the deeper one was caused by basal detachment faulting in the late stage. Seismic interpretation also reveals an asymmetric and gentle fold cut by a high-angle thrust fault of set B. The result of trishear modeling indicates that the anticline was formed by slip along a high angle thrust, which is a low-angle fault in the deep but turns into high angle along a pre-existing normal fault up to the surface. In summary, the development of the shallower anticline of set A is controlled by low-angle thrusting while the deeper one by basal detachment faulting. The anticlines of set B are not only controlled by the high-angle faulting but also influenced by the deeper low-angle thrusting. The depth of low-angle thrust fault of set B in the foreland is shallower than that of basal detachment fault of set A near the orogen. Such spatial variation in thrust shape suggests that set B was formed earlier than set A and, therefore, both sets of thrust and related structures can be viewed as an out-of-sequence development.

  13. Studies of Operating Frequency Effects On Ejector-based Thrust Augmentation in a Pulse Detonation Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, K.

    2005-01-01

    Studies were performed in order to characterize the thrust augmentation potential of an ejector in a Pulse Detonation Engine application. A 49-mm diameter tube of 0.914-m length was constructed with one open end and one closed end. Ethylene, oxygen, and nitrogen were introduced into the tube at the closed end through the implementation of a fast mixing injector. The tube was completely filled with a stoichiometric mixture containing a one to one molar ratio of nitrogen to oxygen. Ethylene was selected as the fuel due to its detonation sensitivity and the molar ratio of the oxidizer was chosen for heat transfer purposes. Detonations were initiated in the tube through the use of a spark ignition system. The PDE was operated in a multi-cycle mode at frequencies ranging from 20-Hz to 50-Hz. Baseline thrust measurements with no ejector present were performed while operating the engine at various frequencies and compared to theoretical estimates. The baseline values were observed to agree with the theoretical model at low operating frequencies and proved to be increasingly lower than the predicted values as the operating frequency was increased. The baseline thrust measurements were observed to agree within 15 percent of the model for all operating frequencies. A straight 152-mm diameter ejector was installed and thrust augmentation percentages were measured. The length of the ejector was varied while the overlap percentage (percent of the ejector length which overlapped the tube) was maintained at 25 percent for all tests. In addition, the effect of ejector inlet geometry was investigated by comparing results with a straight inlet to those of a 38-mm inlet diameter. The thrust augmentation of the straight inlet ejector proved to be independent of engine operating frequency, augmenting thrust by 40 percent for the 0.914-m length ejector. In contrast, the rounded lip ejector of the same length seemed to be highly dependent on the engine operating frequency. An optimum operating frequency observed with the rounded inlet occurred at an operating frequency of 30-Hz, resulting in thrust augmentation percentages greater than 100 percent. The effect that the engine operating frequency had on thrust augmentation levels attained with an ejector was characterized and optimum performance parameters were established. Insight into the frequency dependent nature of the ejector performance was pursued. Suggestions for future experiments which are needed to fully understand the means in which thrust augmentation is achieved in a PDE-ejector configuration were noted.

  14. Short-lived tectonic switch mechanism for long-term pulses of volcanic activity after mega-thrust earthquakes

    OpenAIRE

    Lupi, M.; Miller, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Eruptive rates in volcanic arcs increase significantly after mega-thrust earthquakes in subduction zones. Over short to intermediate time periods the link between mega-thrust earthquakes and arc response can be attributed to dynamic triggering processes or static stress changes, but a fundamental mechanism that controls long-term pulses of volcanic activity after mega-thrust earthquakes has not been proposed yet. Using geomechanical, geological, and geophysical arguments, we propose tha...

  15. Traceable Calibration of the 3 axis Thrust Vector in the mN range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, B.; Oldfield, S.

    2004-10-01

    The possibility of measuring the three force components i.e. the main axial component and the two orthogonal radial components, generated by an electric propulsion system is important for two reasons. Firstly, to assess the impact of spacecraft/propulsion system integration issues, for example to verify the alignment of the thrust vector with the spacecraft centre-of-mass for spacecraft stability. Secondly, to operate the thruster properly during flight, for example to determine the thrust vector relative to the mechanical axis of the thruster. Furthermore, a three-axis measurement capability will be useful for the experimental performance verification of the next generation of vectored electric propulsion devices, especially regarding the many unresolved issues connected with indirect thrust measurement using electrostatic probes. The capability to monitor thrust vector drift in real time and with significant bandwidth is also important. Thus enabling vector drift during thruster warm-up, to be measured, and the response of vectored thrusters to change in vector demand can be assessed. In this paper we describe the design, construction and testing of an instrument proof of concept. The instrument was designed to accommodate a dummy thruster mass of 0.5 kg and operate in the 0 to 10 mN range. The directional resolution that has been demonstrated is better than 0.05 ° in both axes when operating at full thrust.

  16. Engineering Research and Development and Technology thrust area report FY92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langland, R.T.; Minichino, C. [eds.

    1993-03-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff and the technology needed to support current and future LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) to identify key technologies and (2) to conduct high-quality work to enhance our capabilities in these key technologies. To help focus our efforts, we identify technology thrust areas and select technical leaders for each area. The thrust areas are integrated engineering activities and, rather than being based on individual disciplines, they are staffed by personnel from Electronics Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and other LLNL organizations, as appropriate. The thrust area leaders are expected to establish strong links to LLNL program leaders and to industry; to use outside and inside experts to review the quality and direction of the work; to use university contacts to supplement and complement their efforts; and to be certain that we are not duplicating the work of others. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes activities conducted within the Program for the fiscal year 1992. Its intent is to provide timely summaries of objectives, theories, methods, and results. The nine thrust areas for this fiscal year are: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Emerging Technologies; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Microwave and Pulsed Power; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Remote Sensing and Imaging, and Signal Engineering.

  17. Analytical studies of blowdown thrust force and dynamic response of pipe at pipe rupture accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The motion of a pipe due to blowdown thrust when the pipe broke is called pipe whip. In LWR power plants, by installing restraints, the motion of a pipe when it broke is suppressed, so that the damage does not spread to neighboring equipment by pipe whip. When the pipe whip of a piping system in a LWR power plant is analyzed, blowdown thrust and the dynamic response of a pipe-restraint system are calculated with a computer. The blowdown thrust can be calculated by using such physical quantities as the pressure, flow velocity, density and so on in the system at the time of blowdown, obtained by the thermal-fluid analysis code at LOCA. The dynamic response of a piping-restraint system can be determined by the stress analysis code using finite element method taking the blowdown thrust as an external force acting on the piping. In this study, the validity of the analysis techniques was verified by comparing with the experimental results of the measurement of blowdown thrust and the pipe whip of a piping-restraint system, carried out in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Also the simplified analysis method to give the maximum strain on a pipe surface is presented. (Kako, I.)

  18. Constraints on inner forearc deformation from balanced cross sections, Fila Costeña thrust belt, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitchler, Jason C.; Fisher, Donald M.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Protti, Marino

    2007-12-01

    The Fila Costeña thrust belt in the forearc of Costa Rica is accommodating a significant portion of the convergence of the Cocos plate and Panama microplate. Geologic mapping of the thrust belt depicts a duplex with three horses that incorporate Eocene limestones and Oligocene to early Miocene clastics inboard of the subducting Cocos Ridge axis. By constructing a cross section at this location along a NE-SW trending transect perpendicular to the thrust belt, we constrain a shortening rate of approximately 40 mm/a and propose that as much as 50% of the total plate convergence rate is taken up in the inner forearc. The Eocene limestones at the base of the thrust sheets pinch out in both directions away from the onland projection of the Cocos Ridge axis owing to decrease in slip on faults and a lateral ramp in the basal décollement. The thrust belt terminates near the Panama border at the onland projection of the subducting Panama Fracture Zone. These observations suggest that shortening is propagating to the east with the migration of the Panama triple junction and the onset of shallow subduction of the thickened edge of the Cocos plate. The absence of similar features in the Nicaraguan forearc, where the subducting crust is older, subducts more steeply, and lacks incoming ridges and seamounts, indicates that deformation of the forearc basin in Costa Rica reflects greater coupling between the converging plates inboard of the Cocos Ridge.

  19. Multiphysics Computational Analysis of a Solid-Core Nuclear Thermal Engine Thrust Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ten-See; Canabal, Francisco; Cheng, Gary; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate computational heat transfer methodology to predict thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine - the Small Engine. In addition, the effects of power profile and hydrogen conversion on heat transfer efficiency and thrust performance were also investigated. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based, all speeds, chemically reacting, computational fluid dynamics platform, while formulations of conjugate heat transfer were implemented to describe the heat transfer from solid to hydrogen inside the solid-core reactor. The computational domain covers the entire thrust chamber so that the afore-mentioned heat transfer effects impact the thrust performance directly. The result shows that the computed core-exit gas temperature, specific impulse, and core pressure drop agree well with those of design data for the Small Engine. Finite-rate chemistry is very important in predicting the proper energy balance as naturally occurring hydrogen decomposition is endothermic. Locally strong hydrogen conversion associated with centralized power profile gives poor heat transfer efficiency and lower thrust performance. On the other hand, uniform hydrogen conversion associated with a more uniform radial power profile achieves higher heat transfer efficiency, and higher thrust performance.

  20. Crustal earthquake triggering by pre-historic great earthquakes on subduction zone thrusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Brian; Gomberg, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Triggering of earthquakes on upper plate faults during and shortly after recent great (M>8.0) subduction thrust earthquakes raises concerns about earthquake triggering following Cascadia subduction zone earthquakes. Of particular regard to Cascadia was the previously noted, but only qualitatively identified, clustering of M>~6.5 crustal earthquakes in the Puget Sound region between about 1200–900?cal?yr?B.P. and the possibility that this was triggered by a great Cascadia thrust subduction thrust earthquake, and therefore portends future such clusters. We confirm quantitatively the extraordinary nature of the Puget Sound region crustal earthquake clustering between 1200–900?cal?yr?B.P., at least over the last 16,000. We conclude that this cluster was not triggered by the penultimate, and possibly full-margin, great Cascadia subduction thrust earthquake. However, we also show that the paleoseismic record for Cascadia is consistent with conclusions of our companion study of the global modern record outside Cascadia, that M>8.6 subduction thrust events have a high probability of triggering at least one or more M>~6.5 crustal earthquakes.

  1. High-speed engine/component performance assessment using exergy and thrust-based methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggins, D. W.

    1996-01-01

    This investigation summarizes a comparative study of two high-speed engine performance assessment techniques based on energy (available work) and thrust-potential (thrust availability). Simple flow-fields utilizing Rayleigh heat addition and one-dimensional flow with friction are used to demonstrate the fundamental inability of conventional energy techniques to predict engine component performance, aid in component design, or accurately assess flow losses. The use of the thrust-based method on these same examples demonstrates its ability to yield useful information in all these categories. Energy and thrust are related and discussed from the stand-point of their fundamental thermodynamic and fluid dynamic definitions in order to explain the differences in information obtained using the two methods. The conventional definition of energy is shown to include work which is inherently unavailable to an aerospace Brayton engine. An engine-based energy is then developed which accurately accounts for this inherently unavailable work; performance parameters based on this quantity are then shown to yield design and loss information equivalent to the thrust-based method.

  2. Blowdown thrust force and pipe whip analyses of large diameter pipes under LWR LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An instantaneous pipe rupture is postulated as a hypothetical accident in the design of the nuclear power plants. The ruptured pipe at double ended guillotine break would move rapidly and impact surrounding structures. This dynamic motion is called a pipe whip. Pipe whip restraints and other protective structures are installed to limit the pipe whip motion in the nuclear power plants. In order to design such protective structures, it is necessary to evaluate the blowdown thrust force for a ruptured large diameter pipe under the loss of coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. The present paper shows (1) the verification of the thermal-hydraulic analysis code RELAP4/MOD6 and its post-processor BLOWDOWN for the blowdown thrust force analysis under both BWR and PWR LOCA conditions by comparison between analytical and experimental results. (2) pipe whip analysis of an 8 inch diameter pipe using the general purpose finite element code ADINA with analytical blowdown thrust force under PWR LOCA conditions, and (3) blowdown thrust force analyses for various diameters of pipes under both BWR and PWR LOCA conditions. The jet discharge and the pipe whip tests were carried out using 4, 6 and 8 inch pipes at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). BLOWDOWN was developed to calculate blowdown thrust force at JAERI in 1981

  3. Analogue modelling of different angle thrust-wrench fault interference in a brittle medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, F. M.; Duarte, J. C.; Schellart, W. P.; Tomás, R.; Grigorova, V.; Terrinha, P.

    2015-05-01

    Analogue modelling experiments of thrust-wrench fault interference in a brittle medium are presented and discussed. Simultaneous reactivation of confining strike-slip and thrust faults bounding a (corner) zone of interference defined by the angle between the two fault systems is simulated, instead of previously reported discrete (time and space) superposition of alternating thrust and strike-slip events. The influence of different considered interference angles of 60°, 90° and 120° is investigated through comparison between the obtained structural configurations in each case. It is shown that under these conditions a characteristic morpho-structural pattern with a deltoid shape resembling a tie-knot consistently forms in the (corner) zone between the two fault systems. The specific structural configuration of a such tie-knot structure (TKS) varies significantly as a function of the prescribed fault interference angle, which determines the orientation of the displacement vector shear component (ds ?) along the main frontal thrust system, and critically controls the geometry and kinematics of the TKS. Comparison with three natural examples shows remarkable geometric and kinematic similarity, confirming model predictions and suggesting the existence of common underlying dynamic processes governing the specific (TKS) structural configuration of different thrust-wrench fault interference corner-zones in nature.

  4. Parametric Investigation of Thrust Augmentation by Ejectors on a Pulsed Detonation Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jack; Sgondea, Alexandru; Paxson, Daniel E.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.

    2006-01-01

    A parametric investigation has been made of thrust augmentation of a 1 in. diameter pulsed detonation tube by ejectors. A set of ejectors was used which permitted variation of the ejector length, diameter, and nose radius, according to a statistical design of experiment scheme. The maximum augmentation ratios for each ejector were fitted using a polynomial response surface, from which the optimum ratios of ejector diameter to detonation tube diameter, and ejector length and nose radius to ejector diameter, were found. Thrust augmentation ratios above a factor of 2 were measured. In these tests, the pulsed detonation device was run on approximately stoichiometric air-hydrogen mixtures, at a frequency of 20 Hz. Later measurements at a frequency of 40 Hz gave lower values of thrust augmentation. Measurements of thrust augmentation as a function of ejector entrance to detonation tube exit distance showed two maxima, one with the ejector entrance upstream, and one downstream, of the detonation tube exit. A thrust augmentation of 2.5 was observed using a tapered ejector.

  5. Engineering Research and Development and Technology thrust area report FY92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff and the technology needed to support current and future LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) to identify key technologies and (2) to conduct high-quality work to enhance our capabilities in these key technologies. To help focus our efforts, we identify technology thrust areas and select technical leaders for each area. The thrust areas are integrated engineering activities and, rather than being based on individual disciplines, they are staffed by personnel from Electronics Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and other LLNL organizations, as appropriate. The thrust area leaders are expected to establish strong links to LLNL program leaders and to industry; to use outside and inside experts to review the quality and direction of the work; to use university contacts to supplement and complement their efforts; and to be certain that we are not duplicating the work of others. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes activities conducted within the Program for the fiscal year 1992. Its intent is to provide timely summaries of objectives, theories, methods, and results. The nine thrust areas for this fiscal year are: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Emerging Technologies; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Microwave and Pulsed Power; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Remote Sensing and Imaging, and Signal Engineering

  6. Relationships between basin architecture, basin closure, and occurrence of sulphide-bearing schists: an example from Tampere Schist Belt, Finland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliomäki, Henrik; Torvela, Taija

    The Tampere Schist Belt (TSB) in southern Finland is a c. 1.92-1.88 Ga volcano-sedimentary basin that underwent inversion and closure between c. 1.89-1.88 Ga. We present field observations from the Tampere palaeobasin, where the primary structures have been exceptionally well preserved. The TSB, therefore, offers an excellent opportunity to examine the volcano-sedimentary evolution of an ancient marginal basin, and the mechanics of and strain distribution during its subsequent closure. The aim of this study is to investigate the structural development and the architecture of a part of the TSB in more detail, including the relationships between the volcano-sedimentary sequences, the tectonic structures, and the sulphide-bearing schist horizons. Important insights are gained into understanding the mechanisms of the basin closure and the localisation of the sulphide mineralisation within the basin. We use the observations to construct a new conceptual tectonic model for the closure of the southeastern margin of the Tampere basin. The observed volcano-sedimentary and structural features suggest a change in the local structural style from thick-skinned inversion to thin-skinned thrusting, in order to accommodate the crustal shortening during basin closure. Furthermore, it is suggested that there is a genetic relationship between the interpreted palaeothrusts and the sulphide-bearing schist horizons in the study area: early, gently dipping thrusts acted as both channels and traps for the mineralising fluids that possibly sourced either locally or from relatively shallow depths from the base of the basin infill. The continued compression caused a subsequent rotation of the thrusts into their present subvertical position.

  7. Local Attitudes towards Bear Management after Illegal Feeding and Problem Bear Activity

    OpenAIRE

    David Fraser; Sara Dubois

    2013-01-01

    The “pot bears” received international media attention in 2010 after police discovered the intentional feeding of over 20 black bears during the investigation of an alleged marijuana-growing operation in Christina Lake, British Columbia, Canada. A two-phase random digit dialing survey of the community was conducted in 2011 to understand local perspectives on bear policy and management, before and after a summer of problem bear activity and government interventions. Of the 159 households s...

  8. Bifurcation Onset Delay in Magnetic Bearing Systems with Auxiliary Bearing and Time Varying Stiffness

    OpenAIRE

    Ghazavi, M. R.; Sun, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Auxiliary bearings are used in magnetic bearing systemsto protect bearings from damage. These bearings are in contact with rotor temporarily. This contact associated with intermittent contact forces which change the system dynamic behavior. These include vibration instability and thermal stresses. The system is simulated to clarify the role of two different control methods in synchronous and asynchronous responses.This is carried out using linear PD controller and time varying stiffness. Roto...

  9. Unbalance Response Prediction for Rotors on Ball Bearings Using Speed and Load Dependent Nonlinear Bearing Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, David P.; Poplawski, J. V.

    2003-01-01

    Rolling-element bearing forces vary nonlinearly with bearing deflection. Thus an accurate rotordynamic analysis requires that bearing forces corresponding to the actual bearing deflection be utilized. For this work bearing forces were calculated by COBRA-AHS, a recently developed rolling-element bearing analysis code. Bearing stiffness was found to be a strong function of bearing deflection, with higher deflection producing markedly higher stiffness. Curves fitted to the bearing data for a range of speeds and loads were supplied to a flexible rotor unbalance response analysis. The rotordynamic analysis showed that vibration response varied nonlinearly with the amount of rotor imbalance. Moreover, the increase in stiffness as critical speeds were approached caused a large increase in rotor and bearing vibration amplitude over part of the speed range compared to the case of constant bearing stiffness. Regions of bistable operation were possible, in which the amplitude at a given speed was much larger during rotor acceleration than during deceleration. A moderate amount of damping will eliminate the bistable region, but this damping is not inherent in ball bearings.

  10. Active hydrostatic bearing with magnetorheological fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselbach, J.; Abel-Keilhack, C.

    2003-05-01

    Special bearings based on magnetic fluids are well known in literature. These bearings use the magnetic pressure inside a ferrofluid that is exposed to a magnetic field. The biggest disadvantage of this principle is the small load that can be supported. In one reference [B. M. Berkovsky, V. F. Medvedev, and M. S. Krakov, Magnetic Fluids, Engineering Applications (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1993)], the specific load is specified as 1 N cm-2. To support heavy loads very large support areas are needed. We will present a completely different concept for bearings with magnetorheological fluids. Hydrostatic bearings get their load bearing capacity from the hydrostatic pressure produced by an external pump and should not be confused with hydrodynamic bearings presented in another reference [R. Patzwald, M. S. thesis, Institute für Werkzeugmaschinen und Fabrikbetrieb, Technische Universität, Berlin (2001)]. The main disadvantage of hydrostatic bearings is that the bearing gap varies with the payload. Conventional systems compensate for these variations with a change of the oil flow rate, that is done, for example, by external valves. Our contribution will present a hydrostatic bearing that uses magnetorheological fluids. Due to the fact that magnetorheological fluids change their rheological properties with the change of an external magnetic field, it is possible to achieve a constant bearing gap even if the payload changes. The great advantage of this system compared to valve based systems is the short response time to payload changes, because the active element (i.e., the fluid) acts directly inside the bearing gap, and not outside like in the case of valves.

  11. Journal bearing performance and metrology issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this paper, a radial clearance of a journal bearings and the metrology of the radial clearance measurement is described.Design/methodology/approach: In this experimental study out-of-roundness and radial clearance of journal bearings were measured with high precision and the impact of their metrology was examined on the specific oil film thickness of the bearing. Some metrological issues were emerged and these should be taken into account when bearings are designed.Findings: An investigation showed that the radial clearance measurements can vary from one measuring device to another and the specified clearance may not necessarily meet the design criteria of specific oil film thickness. The study indicates that the radial clearance measurement can differ from one measuring device to another depending upon the precision that can be achieved by the device. The radius of the bearing or the shaft also varies along the circumference, mainly due to out-of-roundness. The out-of-roundness contributes to the error in radial clearance measurement and hence similar to the cut off length specified with the surface roughness, the out-of-roundness needs to be specified with the radial clearance.Practical implications: The radial clearance of a journal bearing is a key design parameter and bearing performance mainly depends upon this parameter. In this paper was showed that the metrology of the radial clearance measurement plays a significant role and not only that the bearing manufacturer or the user of the bearing is aware of this fact but the bearing designer must also take this fact into account while designing bearingsOriginality/value: This paper showed that The radial clearance is a sensitive micro-geometry parameter and hence metrology plays a vital role in making decisions

  12. Bringing energy savings to bear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Harry

    2011-05-01

    Harry Waugh, the Scottish branch member of IHEEM's Council, and a former Health Facilities Scotland energy manager, who now runs his own energy/carbon consultancy, "Call Harry", argues that growing reliance on technology will continue to strengthen the need for effective energy management in the healthcare sphere. In an article that first appeared in the 2010 IFHE Digest, he looks back at previous Government and NHS energy-saving initiatives, and describes a recent Scottish carbon reduction campaign, aimed at health service staff, which used the plight of an imaginary character, Floe Bear, cut off from his natural habitat by melting ice floes, to bring humour to a serious subject and encourage buy-in in from staff. PMID:21936242

  13. Experimental and theoretical comparison of the Probe Thrust Vector Control concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalleri, Robert; Tiarn, Weihnurng; Lewis, Lynn

    1991-01-01

    A concept that offers an alternate method for thrust vector control of liquid or solid propellant rockets is the use of a solid body or probe that is inserted on demand through the wall of the rocket nozzle. This Probe Thrust Vector Control (PTVC) concept is an alternative to that of a gimbaled nozzle or a Liquid Injection Thrust Vector control system. The viability of the PTVC concept can be assessed either experimentally and/or with the use of CFD. A purely experimental assessment is time consuming and expensive, whereas a CFD assessment is time- and cost-effective. Two key requirements of the concept are PTVC vectoring performance and active cooling requirements for the probe to maintain its thermal and structural integrity. The objective of the work reported here is presentation of experimental subscale cold flow tests and comparison of these tests with CFD predictions and the response time of the PTVC system.

  14. Development and qualification of a STAR 48 rocket motor with thrust vector control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamke, R.; Rade, J.; Weldin, R.

    1992-07-01

    A thrust vector control (TVC) nozzle for use on the STAR 48 rocket motor (STAR 48V) has been developed for use on the COMET program aboard the Conestoga launch vehicle. The first stages of qualification testing have been completed. The first STAR 48V has been successfully static-tested. The flexseal TVC nozzle design is based upon the qualified and flight-proven fixed nozzle design used on spin-stabilized spacecraft. The flexseal design and fabrication approach benefit from flight-proven and man-rated Thiokol Corporation flexseal designs. The thrust vector control system provides vectoring capability to 4 deg for use on nonspinning spacecraft. Electromechanical actuators coupled with a closed-loop controller provide thrust vector positioning and spacecraft attitude control.

  15. A computational study of thrust vectoring control using dual throat nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Choon Sik; Kim, Heuy Dong; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Matsuo, Shigeru

    2010-12-01

    Dual throat nozzle (DTN) is fast becoming a popular technique for thrust vectoring. The DTN is designed with two throats, an upstream minimum and a downstream minimum at the nozzle exit, with a cavity in between the upstream throat and exit. In the present study, a computational work has been carried out to analyze the performance of a dual throat nozzle at various mass flow rates of secondary flow and nozzle pressure ratios (NPR). Two-dimensional, steady, compressible Navier-Stokes equations were solved using a fully implicit finite volume scheme. The present computational results were validated with available experimental data. Based on the present results, the control effectiveness of thrust-vectoring is discussed in terms of the thrust coefficient and the coefficient of discharge.

  16. Thrust Vectoring of a Continuous Rotating Detonation Engine by Changing the Local Injection Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shi-Jie; Lin, Zhi-Yong; Sun, Ming-Bo; Liu, Wei-Dong

    2011-09-01

    The thrust vectoring ability of a continuous rotating detonation engine is numerically investigated, which is realized via increasing local injection stagnation pressure of half of the simulation domain compared to the other half. Under the homogeneous injection condition, both the flow-field structure and the detonation wave propagation process are analyzed. Due to the same injection condition along the inlet boundary, the outlines of fresh gas zones at different moments are similar to each other. The main flow-field features under thrust vectoring cases are similar to that under the baseline condition. However, due to the heterogeneous injection system, both the height of the fresh gas zone and the pressure value of the fresh gas in the high injection pressure zone are larger than that in the low injection pressure zone. Thus the average pressure in half of the engine is larger than that in the other half and the thrust vectoring adjustment is realized.

  17. Multiphysics Analysis of a Solid-Core Nuclear Thermal Engine Thrust Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ten-See; Canabal, Francisco; Cheng, Gary; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics methodology. Formulations for heat transfer in solids and porous media were implemented and anchored. A two-pronged approach was employed in this effort: A detailed thermo-fluid analysis on a multi-channel flow element for mid-section corrosion investigation; and a global modeling of the thrust chamber to understand the effect of hydrogen dissociation and recombination on heat transfer and thrust performance. The formulations and preliminary results on both aspects are presented.

  18. Effect of Operating Frequency and Fill Time on PDE-Ejector Thrust Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, K.; Santoro, Robert J.; Pal, Sibtosh; Shehadeh, R.; Bouvet, N.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Thrust measurements for a pulse detonation engine (PDE)-ejector system were determined for a range of operating frequencies. Various length tubular ejectors were utilized. The results were compared to the measurements of the thrust output of the PDE alone to determine the enhancement provided by each ejector configuration at the specified frequencies. Ethylene was chosen as the fuel, with an equi-molar mixture of nitrogen and oxygen acting as the oxidizer. The propellant was kept at an equivalence ratio of one during all the experiments. The system was operated for frequencies between 20 and 50 Hz. The parameter space of the study included PDE operation frequency, ejector length, overlap percentage, the radius of curvature for the ejector inlets, and duration of the time allowed between cycles. The results of the experiments showed a maximum thrust augmentation of 120% for a PDE-ejector configuration at a frequency of 40Hz with a fill time of 10 ms.

  19. Feedback Optimal Control of Low-thrust Orbit Transfer in Central Gravity Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf H. Owis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Low-thrust trajectories with variable radial thrust is studied in this paper. The problem is tackled by solving the Hamilton- Jacobi-Bellman equation via State Dependent Riccati Equation( STDE technique devised for nonlinear systems. Instead of solving the two-point boundary value problem in which the classical optimal control is stated, this technique allows us to derive closed-loop solutions. The idea of the work consists in factorizing the original nonlinear dynamical system into a quasi-linear state dependent system of ordinary differential equations. The generating function technique is then applied to this new dynamical system, the feedback optimal control is solved. We circumvent in this way the problem of expanding the vector field and truncating higher-order terms because no remainders are lost in the undertaken approach. This technique can be applied to any planet-to-planet transfer; it has been applied here to the Earth-Mars low-thrust transfer

  20. Optimal trajectories for spacecraft with low electric-jet thrust in mission to asteroid Apophis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashkin, V. V.; Krylov, I. V.

    2012-07-01

    There is considered the problem of space flights to the asteroid Apophis. We analyze the flight scheme, which includes the geocentric stage, when a spacecraft with a high-thrust engine is accelerated; the heliocentric stage, in which the spacecraft moves using a low-thrust engine; and, finally, the deceleration stage, when the spacecraft becomes an artificial satellite orbiting the asteroid. We solve the problem of optimal control for the ideal and piecewise-constant low thrust, as well as determine the optimal value and direction of the hyperbolic velocity at "infinity" achieved by the spacecraft when it leaves the Earth sphere of influence. There is defined the set of space trajectories for a wide range of start dates and various flight durations using a complex method of optimization. We estimate the final mass of the spacecraft and the mass of the payload that can be delivered to the asteroid using the Soyuz-Fregat launcher.

  1. Resistive thrust production can be as crucial as added mass mechanisms for inertial undulatory swimmers

    CERN Document Server

    Piñeirua, Miguel; Thiria, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we address a crucial point regarding the description of moderate to high Reynolds numbers aquatic swimmers. For decades, swimming animals have been classified in two different families of propulsive mechanisms based on the Reynolds number: the "resistive" swimmers, using local friction to produce the necessary thrust force for locomotion at low Reynolds number and the "reactive" swimmers, lying in the high Reynolds range, and using added mass acceleration (described by perfect fluid theory). However, inertial swimmers are also systems that dissipate energy, due to their finite size, therefore involving strong resistive contributions, even for high Reynolds numbers. Using a complete model for the hydrodynamic forces, involving both reactive and resistive contributions, we revisit here the physical mechanisms responsible for the thrust production of such swimmers. We show, for instance, that the resistive part of the force balance is as crucial as added mass effects in the modeling of the thrust ...

  2. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES THRUST AREA, OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY AND INTERNATIONAL: ANNUAL REPORT 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Advanced Technologies Thrust (ATT) is to: (1) identify/develop technologies and processes; (2) reduce the cost of proposed repository development, construction, and operation with the application of these new technologies and processes; and (3) provide the data necessary to demonstrate feasibility of new technologies and processes. Fiscal Year 2005 was the inaugural year for this thrust. Several of the projects were already under way when this thrust team was formed; however, it was not until this year that a focused approach to managing these projects was established. The nine projects supporting the initiatives listed below are described: (1) The Evaluation of Improved Waste Package Materials and Fabrication Processes; (2) Advanced Approaches for Improved Waste Package Closure Welds; (3) Advanced Tunneling Technology; and (4) Improved Understanding of Extreme Ground Motions Predicted Using Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

  3. Optimal design of thrust force in vertical-type HTS bulk LRM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We proposed the vertical-type linear reluctance motor (LRM) with HTS bulks cooled in zero-field. The double-sided HTS bulk LRM is propelled contactlessly only by electromagnetic repulsive force from both sides of a double-sided armature guideway. This paper presents optimal thrust force design based on the dependence of thrust on the size of HTS bulk attached to the cage in vertical-type HTS bulk LRM. The thrust force is calculated by Finite Element Method (FEM), taking into account the E-J characteristic. Improved HTS bulk LRM which is 1.5 times heavier than the previous cage can be propelled contactlessly in propulsion and guidance simulation

  4. Stabilizing gas bearing in free piston machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Manmohan (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    In a free piston engine, to reduce dynamic loads on the reciprocating elements caused by a time varying pressure gradient across the gas bearing and close clearance seals provided therein, drain galleries are incorporated at the ends of the gas bearings to isolate the same, and circumferentially spaced grooves are incorporated in the close clearance seal region.

  5. Methods and systems for micro bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stalford, Harold L

    2015-01-27

    A micro drive assembly may comprise a substrate, a micro shaft oriented in-plane with the substrate and at least one micro bearing to support rotation of the micro shaft. The micro shaft and micro bearing may be in or less than the micrometer domain.

  6. Precision instrumentation for rolling element bearing characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes an instrument to measure the error motion of rolling element bearings. This challenge is met by simultaneously satisfying four requirements. First, an axial preload must be applied to seat the rolling elements in the bearing races. Second, one of the races must spin under the influence of an applied torque. Third, rotation of the remaining race must be prevented in a way that leaves the radial, axial/face, and tilt displacements free to move. Finally, the bearing must be fixtured and measured without introducing off-axis loading or other distorting influences. In the design presented here, an air bearing reference spindle with error motion of less than 10 nm rotates the inner race of the bearing under test. Noninfluencing couplings are used to prevent rotation of the bearing outer race and apply an axial preload without distorting the bearing or influencing the measurement. Capacitive displacement sensors with 2 nm resolution target the nonrotating outer race. The error motion measurement repeatability is shown to be less than 25 nm. The article closes with a discussion of how the instrument may be used to gather data with sufficient resolution to accurately estimate the contact angle of deep groove ball bearings

  7. Can polar bear hairs absorb environmental energy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ji-Huan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A polar bear (Ursus maritimus has superior ability to survive in harsh Arctic regions, why does the animal have such an excellent thermal protection? The present paper finds that the unique labyrinth cavity structure of the polar bear hair plays an important role. The hair can not only prevent body temperature loss but can also absorb energy from the environment.

  8. Alex the Bear Goes to Child Care

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Goes to Child Care, click here . For more information on how you can use the Alex the Bear Goes to Child Care video, select one of the PDFs below : ... Aware Public Service Announcements Meet Alex the Bear Child Care Aware ...

  9. Changes in illite crystallinity within an ancient tectonic boundary thrust caused by thermal, mechanical, and hydrothermal effects: an example from the Nobeoka Thrust, southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Rina; Fujimoto, Koichiro; Kameda, Jun; Hamahashi, Mari; Yamaguchi, Asuka; Kimura, Gaku; Hamada, Yohei; Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Kitamura, Yujin; Saito, Saneatsu

    2014-12-01

    Illite crystallinity (IC), the full width at half maximum of the illite (001) peak in clay-fraction X-ray diffraction (XRD), is a common geothermometer widely applied to various tectonic settings. Paleotemperature estimation using IC presents methodological ambiguity because IC is not only affected by background temperature but also by mechanical, hydrothermal, and surface weathering effects. To clarify the influences of these effects on IC in the fault zone, we analyzed the IC and the illite 001 peak intensity of continuous borehole core samples from the Nobeoka Thrust, a fossilized tectonic boundary thrust in the Shimanto Belt, the Cretaceous-Paleogene Shimanto accretionary complex in southwest Japan. We also carried out grinding experiments on borehole core samples and sericite standard samples as starting materials and investigated the effect of mechanical comminution on the IC and illite peak intensity of the experimental products. We observed the following: (1) the paleotemperatures of the hanging wall and footwall of the Nobeoka Thrust are estimated to be 288°C to 299°C and 198°C to 249°C, respectively, which are approximately 20°C to 30°C lower than their previously reported temperatures estimated by vitrinite reflectance; (2) the fault core of the Nobeoka Thrust does not exhibit IC decrease; (3) the correlation of IC and illite peak intensity in the hanging wall damage zone were well reproduced by the grinding experiment, suggesting that the effect of mechanical comminution increases toward the fault core and; (4) the abrupt increase in IC value accompanied by high illite peak intensity is explained by hydrothermal alterations including plagioclase breakdown and the formation of white micas. Our results indicate that IC has potential for quantifying the effects of mechanical comminution and hydrothermal alteration within a fault zone.

  10. Rotor and bearing system for a turbomachine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubell, Daniel; Weissert, Dennis

    2006-09-26

    A rotor and bearing system for a turbomachine. The turbomachine includes a drive shaft, an impeller positioned on the drive shaft, and a turbine positioned on the drive shaft proximate to the impeller. The bearing system comprises one gas journal bearing supporting the drive shaft between the impeller and the turbine. The area between the impeller and the turbine is an area of increased heat along the drive shaft in comparison to other locations along the drive shaft. The section of the drive shaft positioned between impeller and the turbine is also a section of the drive shaft that experiences increased stressed and load in the turbomachine. The inventive bearing machine system positions only one radial bearing in this area of increased stress and load.

  11. Nonlinear Dynamic Response of Compliant Journal Bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glavatskih S.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the dynamic response of the compliant tilting pad journal bearings subjected to synchronous excitation. Bearing compliance is affected by the properties of pad liner and pad support geometry. Different unbalance eccentricities are considered. It is shown that bearing dynamic response is non-linear. Journal orbit complexity increases with pad compliance though the orbit amplitudes are marginally affected at low loads. At high loads, the journal is forced to operate outside the bearing clearance. The polymer liner reduces the maximum oil film pressure by a factor of 2 when compared to the white metal liner. The nonlinear dynamic response of compliant tilting pad journal bearings is thoroughly discussed.

  12. Ball bearing tests to evaluate Duroid replacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M. J.

    2001-09-01

    ESTL has completed a programme to identify and qualify a self-lubricating material to replace RT/duroid 5813 ("Duroid"), for ball bearing cage applications in space mechanisms. Following literature reviews, material evaluations, friction and wear testing and a ball bearing screening test programme, PGM-HT (a PTFE/MoS2/glass fibre composite) was selected for evaluation in ball bearings. PGM-HT cages were tested extensively in conditions representative of that experienced by a selection of current mechanism applications. Different types (and sizes) of ball bearings and cages were tested over a range of operating speeds, loads (contact stresses) and under different environments. From these tests, it was concluded that the torque behaviour of PGM-HT lubricated bearings was identical to that of Duroid. A design guide was then prepared to summarise the findings and assist designers with torque and lifetime predictions.

  13. Rotating anode X-ray tube with axial magnetic bearing and radial sliding bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a bearing system for a rotating anode X-ray tube that consists of an axial magnetic bearing and at least one radial sliding bearing. The bearing surfaces are coated with a molecular lubricating layer of either liquid gallium or a liquid gallium alloy, which does not substantially impair the mutually cooperating metallic bearing surfaces. This gives minimal wear and noise generation and ensures cheap production. The X-ray tube construction described is particularly suitable for applications as a radiation source in medical X-ray diagnostics. (T.P.)

  14. Estimating off-nominal performance of a solid rocket motor for thrust vector control guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Garfield C.

    1992-08-01

    There are two main parameters relating the off-nominal performance of a solid rocket motor to its nominal performance. One parameter is associated with specific impulse and the other with burn rate. The way in which these parameters can be used to predict off-nominal acceleration from the nominal is reviewed, and a filter for estimating these parameters using accelerometer output and stored tables of nominal performance is derived. A closed-form solution is then derived for the thrust angle required of a thrust-vector-controlled rocket in order to intercept a constant velocity target.

  15. Developmental Testing of Electric Thrust Vector Control Systems for Manned Launch Vehicle Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Lisa B.; Young, David T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes recent developmental testing to verify the integration of a developmental electromechanical actuator (EMA) with high rate lithium ion batteries and a cross platform extensible controller. Testing was performed at the Thrust Vector Control Research, Development and Qualification Laboratory at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center. Electric Thrust Vector Control (ETVC) systems like the EMA may significantly reduce recurring launch costs and complexity compared to heritage systems. Electric actuator mechanisms and control requirements across dissimilar platforms are also discussed with a focus on the similarities leveraged and differences overcome by the cross platform extensible common controller architecture.

  16. Earth-Mars transfers with ballistic escape and low-thrust capture

    OpenAIRE

    Mingotti, G.; Topputo, F.; Bernelli-zazzera, F.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In this paper novel Earth–Mars transfers are presented. These transfers exploit the natural dynamics of n-body models as well as the high specific impulse typical of low-thrust systems. The Moon-perturbed version of the Sun–Earth problem is introduced to design ballistic escape orbits performing lunar gravity assists. The ballistic capture is designed in the Sun–Mars system where special attainable sets are defined and used to handle the low-thrust control. The compl...

  17. 3D evolution of fold and thrust belts formed by oblique convergence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClay, K.R.; Whitehouse, P.S.; Dooley, T.; Richards, M. [University of London, Egham (United Kingdom). Fault Dynamics Research Group

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of scaled analogue models designed to simulate thrust belt development formed by orthogonal and oblique convergence. The models were constructed to produce doubly-vergent orogenic wedges with a pro-wedge and a retro-wedge separated by an uplifted orogenic core. Models were constructed from homogeneous layered sandpacks in a 3 m x 1.3 m deformation rig. The progressive evolution of the models was recorded using digital photography, and the photographs were animated for analysis. The experiments investigated convergence obliquities from orthogonal (90{sup o}) to as low as 15{sup o} obliquity. Orthogonal models produced long, linear, critically tapered pro-wedge fold and thrust belts parallel to the convergence margin together with a narrow, uplifted core and a steep retro-wedge thrust system. The taper angle of the pro-wedge was typically 11-12{sup o} whereas the retro-wedge maintained a steeper taper of 38-42{sup o}. Models where the convergence vector was oblique at angles of 60 and 45{sup o} to the margin produced doubly-vergent thrust wedges with thrust faults trending parallel to the margin. There was little evidence of linked, penetrative strike-slip faulting but en-echelon Riedel like shear systems developed in the 45{sup o} oblique model. Subordinate oblique-slip motion was observed on some thrust faults. In contrast, for 30 and 15{sup o} oblique convergence models, strong deformation partitioning developed with steeply sloping pro-wedges that did not have critical tapers. Through-going linked strike-slip faulting was developed that cut the uplifted axial zones of these models. Analysis of the models by animation of the digital photographs shows how the thrust systems initiated and propagated. In particular it is clear that at any one time several thrusts were moving simultaneously. Serial cross sections through the moderately oblique convergence models (60-45{sup o}) are almost indistinguishable from the orthogonal model cross-sections. The results of orthogonal convergence experiments compare well to the map patterns of faults and folds in the Salt Range, Pakistan. 60 and 45{sup o} oblique convergence models compare well to the Zagros where some strain partitioning on strike-slip faults occurs. The highly oblique models show very strong strain partitioning with penetrative margin-parallel strike-slip faulting similar to that found in NE Venezuela. (author)

  18. Axial-thrust responses due to a gas turbine's rotor blade distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebele-Alawa, B. T.

    2010-11-01

    The axial thrust imposed on the shaft of a gas turbine depends upon its rotor blade inlet inclination to the turbine's axial direction: this inclination can change due to the distortions resulting from fouling, aging, tip rubbing, erosion, thermal-fatigue cracks, and corrosion. Relevant influential parameters for an operational gas turbine were measured. Theoretical predictions for the behavior of the same turbine were obtained from computer simulations. The results of both measurements and theoretical predictions were compared and showed qualitative correspondence. The rotor blade profile distortions result in significant increases in the axial thrust on the compressor, which adversely affects the gas turbine's thermodynamic performance, reliability, and operational life.

  19. Detachments in Shale: Controlling Characteristics on Fold-Thrust Belt Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansberry, Rowan; King, Ros; Collins, Alan; Morley, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Fold-thrust belts occur across multiple tectonic settings where thin-skinned deformation is accommodated by one or more detachment zones, both basal and within the fold-thrust belt. These fold-thrust belts exhibit considerable variation in structural style and vergence depending on the characteristics (e.g. strength, thickness, and lithology) and number of detachment zones. Shale as a detachment lithology is intrinsically weaker than more competent silts and sands; however, it can be further weakened by high pore pressures, reducing resistance to sliding and; high temperatures, altering the rheology of the detachment. Despite the implications for petroleum exploration and natural hazard assessment the precise nature by which detachments in shale control and are involved in deformation in fold-thrust belts is poorly understood. Present-day active basal detachment zones are usually located in inaccessible submarine regions. Therefore, this project employs field observations and sample analysis of ancient, exhumed analogues to document the nature of shale detachments (e.g. thickness, lithology, dip and dip direction, deformational temperature and thrust propagation rates) at field sites in Thailand, Norway and New Zealand. X-ray diffraction analysis of illite crystallinity and oxygen stable isotopes analysis are used as a proxy for deformational temperature whilst electron-backscatter diffraction analysis is used to constrain microstructural deformational patterns. K-Ar dating of synkinematic clay fault gouges is being applied to date the final stages of activity on individual faults with a view to constraining thrust activation sequences. It is not possible to directly measure palaeo-data for some key detachment parameters, such as pore pressure and coefficients of friction. However, the use of critical taper wedge theory has been used to successfully infer internal and basal coefficients of friction and depth-normalized pore pressure within a wedge and at its base (e.g. Platt, 1986; Bilotti and Shaw, 2005; Morley, 2007). Therefore, through a mixture of field observations, sample analysis and theoretical analysis it will be possible to determine a full range of shale detachment parameters and their impact on the structural style of fold-thrust belts across a variety of settings. Recent work in Muak Lek, central Thailand has focused on a structural investigation of fold-thrust belt deformation of a passive margin sequence as a result of continent-continent collision during the Triassic Indosinian Orogeny. Exceptional outcropping of the detachment lithology is accessible in the Siam City Cement quarry allowing construction of sections detailing the deformational style across the detachment itself. The detachment forms complex, 3-dimensional duplex-like structures creating egg-carton geometries enveloping foliation surfaces in the zones of most intense strain. Up section strain decreases to discrete thrust imbricates of decametre scale. Samples of limestone and secondary calcite were collected through the sections for oxygen stable isotopes analysis which show a distinct pattern of isotopic fractionation across the main thrust and into the detachment. Results from this study give insights into the nature of shale detachments and the control on fold-thrust belt development.

  20. 49 CFR 230.102 - Tender plain bearing journal boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tender plain bearing journal boxes. 230.102 Section 230.102...Tenders Running Gear § 230.102 Tender plain bearing journal boxes. Plain bearing journal boxes with the following defects...

  1. 49 CFR 230.103 - Tender roller bearing journal boxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tender roller bearing journal boxes. 230.103 Section 230... Running Gear § 230.103 Tender roller bearing journal boxes. Tender roller bearing journal boxes shall be maintained in a safe...

  2. 46 CFR 61.20-23 - Tailshaft clearance; bearing weardown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Tailshaft clearance; bearing weardown. 61.20-23 Section 61.20-23...Equipment § 61.20-23 Tailshaft clearance; bearing weardown. (a) Water lubricated bearings, other than rubber, must be rebushed as...

  3. 24 CFR 3285.202 - Soil classifications and bearing capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Soil classifications and bearing capacity. 3285.202 Section 3285.202... § 3285.202 Soil classifications and bearing capacity. The soil classification and bearing capacity of the soil must be determined...

  4. 77 FR 77070 - Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 2727-086] Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC; Notice of Intent To File...Filed: October 24, 2012. d. Submitted By: Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC (Black Bear Hydro). e. Name of Project: Ellsworth...

  5. Computer program for analysis of high speed, single row, angular contact, spherical roller bearing, SASHBEAN. Volume 1: User's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1993-01-01

    The computer program SASHBEAN (Sikorsky Aircraft Spherical Roller High Speed Bearing Analysis) analyzes and predicts the operating characteristics of a Single Row, Angular Contact, Spherical Roller Bearing (SRACSRB). The program runs on an IBM or IBM compatible personal computer, and for a given set of input data analyzes the bearing design for it's ring deflections (axial and radial), roller deflections, contact areas and stresses, induced axial thrust, rolling element and cage rotation speeds, lubrication parameters, fatigue lives, and amount of heat generated in the bearing. The dynamic loading of rollers due to centrifugal forces and gyroscopic moments, which becomes quite significant at high speeds, is fully considered in this analysis. For a known application and it's parameters, the program is also capable of performing steady-state and time-transient thermal analyses of the bearing system. The steady-state analysis capability allows the user to estimate the expected steady-state temperature map in and around the bearing under normal operating conditions. On the other hand, the transient analysis feature provides the user a means to simulate the 'lost lubricant' condition and predict a time-temperature history of various critical points in the system. The bearing's 'time-to-failure' estimate may also be made from this (transient) analysis by considering the bearing as failed when a certain temperature limit is reached in the bearing components. The program is fully interactive and allows the user to get started and access most of its features with a minimal of training. For the most part, the program is menu driven, and adequate help messages were provided to guide a new user through various menu options and data input screens. All input data, both for mechanical and thermal analyses, are read through graphical input screens, thereby eliminating any need of a separate text editor/word processor to edit/create data files. Provision is also available to select and view the contents of output files on the monitor screen if no paper printouts are required. A separate volume (Volume-2) of this documentation describes, in detail, the underlying mathematical formulations, assumptions, and solution algorithms of this program.

  6. Bear bile: dilemma of traditional medicinal use and animal protection

    OpenAIRE

    Nagamatsu Tadashi; Tsao Sai-Wah; Ng Kwan-Ming; Wang Ning; Siu Kayu; Feng Yibin; Tong Yao

    2009-01-01

    Bear bile has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for thousands of years. Modern investigations showed that it has a wide range of pharmacological actions with little toxicological side effect and the pure compounds have been used for curing hepatic and biliary disorders for decades. However, extensive consumption of bear bile made bears endangered species. In the 1980's, bear farming was established in China to extract bear bile from living bears with "Free-dripping Fistula Techn...

  7. Cryogenic, high speed, turbopump bearing cooling requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Fred J.; Gibson, Howard G.; Cannon, James L.; Cody, Joe C.

    1988-01-01

    Although the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has repeatedly demonstrated the capability to perform during launch, the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) main shaft bearings have not met their 7.5 hour life requirement. A tester is being employed to provide the capability of subjecting full scale bearings and seals to speeds, loads, propellants, temperatures, and pressures which simulate engine operating conditions. The tester design permits much more elaborate instrumentation and diagnostics than could be accommodated in an SSME turbopump. Tests were made to demonstrate the facilities; and the devices' capabilities, to verify the instruments in its operating environment and to establish a performance baseline for the flight type SSME HPOTP Turbine Bearing design. Bearing performance data from tests are being utilized to generate: (1) a high speed, cryogenic turbopump bearing computer mechanical model, and (2) a much improved, very detailed thermal model to better understand bearing internal operating conditions. Parametric tests were also made to determine the effects of speed, axial loads, coolant flow rate, and surface finish degradation on bearing performance.

  8. Genomic sequencing of Pleistocene cave bears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonan, James P.; Hofreiter, Michael; Smith, Doug; Priest, JamesR.; Rohland, Nadin; Rabeder, Gernot; Krause, Johannes; Detter, J. Chris; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, Edward M.

    2005-04-01

    Despite the information content of genomic DNA, ancient DNA studies to date have largely been limited to amplification of mitochondrial DNA due to technical hurdles such as contamination and degradation of ancient DNAs. In this study, we describe two metagenomic libraries constructed using unamplified DNA extracted from the bones of two 40,000-year-old extinct cave bears. Analysis of {approx}1 Mb of sequence from each library showed that, despite significant microbial contamination, 5.8 percent and 1.1 percent of clones in the libraries contain cave bear inserts, yielding 26,861 bp of cave bear genome sequence. Alignment of this sequence to the dog genome, the closest sequenced genome to cave bear in terms of evolutionary distance, revealed roughly the expected ratio of cave bear exons, repeats and conserved noncoding sequences. Only 0.04 percent of all clones sequenced were derived from contamination with modern human DNA. Comparison of cave bear with orthologous sequences from several modern bear species revealed the evolutionary relationship of these lineages. Using the metagenomic approach described here, we have recovered substantial quantities of mammalian genomic sequence more than twice as old as any previously reported, establishing the feasibility of ancient DNA genomic sequencing programs.

  9. Radiation tolerance in water bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, D. D.; Sakashita, T.; Katagiri, C.; Watanabe, M.; Nakahara, Y.; Okuda, T.; Hamada, N.; Wada, S.; Funayama, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    Tardigrades water bears are tiny invertebrates forming a phylum and inhabit various environments on the earth Terrestrial tardigrades enter a form called as anhydrobiosis when the surrounding water disappears Anhyydrobiosis is defined as an ametabolic dry state and followed by recovering their activity when rehydrated Anhydrobiotic tardigrades show incredible tolerance to a variety of extreme environmental conditions such as temperatures -273 r C to 151 r C vacuum high pressure 600 MPa and chemicals that include alcohols and methyl bromide In these views there have been some discussions about their potential for surviving outer space In the present study we demonstrated the survival limit not merely against gamma-rays but against heavy ions in the tardigrade Milnesium tardigradum in order to evaluate the effects of radiations on them The animals were exposure to 500 to 7000 Gy of gamma-rays or 500 to 8000 Gy of heavy ions 4 He in their hydrated or anhydrobiotic state The results showed that both of hydrated and anhydrobiotic animals have high radio-tolerance median lethal dose LD50 48 h of gamma-rays or heavy ions in M tardigradum was more than 4000 Gy indicating that this species is categorized into the most radio-tolerant animals We suggest that tardigrades will be suitable model animals for extremophilic multicellular organisms and may provide a survival strategy in extraterrestrial environments

  10. Future bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jun-Dong

    2014-03-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements have been made with regard to fixation technique and implant quality. PMID:24605198

  11. Transient unbalance response of four multilobe journal bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire, P. E.; Li, D. F.; Choy, K. C.

    1979-01-01

    This work carries out an analysis of the transient response of four multilobe journal bearings (elliptical, offset, three-lobe, and four-lobe) subject to unbalance both below and above the linearized stability thresholds for the bearings. It extends the work of a previous paper on a balanced rotor in the same four bearing types. Transient orbits, bearing forces, and a numerical fast Fourier transform analysis of the orbits are presented. A comparison of bearing forces above the stability threshold for each bearing indicates that the elliptical bearing has the most violent whirl vibration amplitudes, while the offset bearing exhibits the least amount of subsynchronous vibration.

  12. Simultaneous thrust vector control and vibration isolation of satellites using steerable smart platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.; Ma, Kougen

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents an innovative concept, control strategies and experimental verification of simultaneous thrust vector control and vibration isolation of satellites. First, the innovative concept is introduced by employing a smart platform as an active structural interface between the main thruster of a satellite and the satellite structure. Second, the inverse kinematics and singularity analysis of the smart platform are performed. Third, thrust vector control model of satellites with smart platforms is deduced. Fourth, a multiple loop control strategy is proposed. It includes three cascaded feedback loops for nonlinear compensation of actuators, smart platform control and trust vector control, respectively, and a combined feedback-feedforward control scheme for vibration isolation. Finally, experiments are carried out and experimental results are illustrated and discussed. The cascaded multiple feedback loops compensate the hysteresis (for piezoelectric stacks inside the three linear actuators that individually have simultaneous precision positioning and vibration suppression), dead-zone, back-lash, and friction nonlinearities very well, and provide precision and quick smart platform control and satisfactory thrust vector control capability. The experimental results demonstrate that the simultaneous thrust vector control and vibration suppression is achieved with satisfactory performance.

  13. Two-dimensional confined jet thrust vector control: Operating mechanisms and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caton, Jeffrey L.

    1989-03-01

    An experimental investigation of two-dimensional confined jet thrust vector control nozzles was performed. Thrust vector control was accomplished by using secondary flow injection in the diverging section of the nozzle. Schlieren photographs and video tapes were used to study flow separation and internal shock structures. Nozzle performance parameters were determined for nozzle flow with and without secondary flows. These parameters included nozzles forces, vector angles, thrust efficiencies, and flow switching response times. Vector angles as great as 18 degrees with thrust efficiencies of 0.79 were measured. Several confined jet nozzles with variations in secondary flow port design were tested and results were compared to each other. Converging-diverging nozzles of similar design to the confined jet nozzles were also tested and results were compared to the confined jet nozzle results. Existing prediction models for nozzle side to axial force ratio were evaluated. A model for nozzle total forces based on shock losses that predicted values very close to actual results was developed.

  14. Study on development of ejector of Bubble Jet Engine (BJE) - measurement of thrust -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, B; Nakashima, K; Shigematsu, T; Morishita, K, E-mail: ono@post.cc.sasebo.ac.j [Sasebo National College of Technology1-1, Okishin-cho, Sasebo City, Nagasaki Pref., 857-1193 (Japan)

    2009-02-01

    The AUV (Autonomous Under-water Vehicle), which is used for the present seabed investigations, has obtained the thrust with the screw driven by the battery. However, it has a disadvantage because of its size and cost. Therefore, this research is carried out to propose the Bubble Jet Engine (BJE) as an alternative propulsion device. It can directly transform combustion energy into kinetic energy, so it is expected that BJE can also rise the level of propulsion efficiency. This research aims at measuring exhaled mass flow rate and thrust to design ejectors, which become the core of BJE, and exploring practical possibility of BJE. Vertical type gas-water ejector experimental apparatus for measuring water entrainment was employed in order to understand the characteristics of operation conditions, such as inlet distance, air pressure of nozzle, diameter of nozzle, and so on. In addition, experiments for measuring the thrust in the condition of ejector were executed with horizontal type apparatus in water. However, the influence of the ejector to improve thrust can't have been recognized with high-pressure air at room temperature yet.

  15. Towards a High Fidelity Direct Transcription Method for Optimisation of Low-Thrust Trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Yam, Chit Hong; Izzo, Dario; Biscani, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    We build upon some new ideas in direct transcription methods developed within the Advanced Concepts Team to introduce two improvements to the Sims-Flanagan transcription for low-thrust trajectories. The obtained new algorithm is able to produce an operational trajectory accounting for the real spacecraft dynamics and adapting the segment duration on-line improving the final trajectory optimality.

  16. Characteristics of vortex formation and thrust performance in drag-based paddling propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daegyoum; Gharib, Morteza

    2011-07-01

    Several characteristics of drag-based paddling propulsion are studied with a simple mechanical model and a measurement technique for mapping three-dimensional flow fields. In drag-based propulsion, the temporal change of the vortex strength is an important parameter in the relationship between vortex formation and thrust generation. Our results indicate that spanwise flow behind the paddling propulsor significantly affects tip vortex development and thrust generation. The distribution of spanwise flow is dependent on the propulsor shape and the Reynolds number. A delta-shaped propulsor generates strong spanwise flow compared with a rectangular propulsor. For the low Reynolds number case, spanwise flow is not as strong as that for the high Reynolds number case. Without sacrificing total impulse, the flexible propulsor can smooth out thrust peaks during sudden stroke motions, which is favorable for avoiding structural failures and stabilizing body motion. We also explored the role of stopping vortex shedding in efficient thrust generation by determining the relationship between stroke angles and total impulses generated by paddling propulsors. PMID:21653822

  17. An experimental investigation of active control of thrust vectoring nozzle flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strykowski, P. J.; Krothapalli, A.

    1994-01-01

    Fluidic thrust vector control is examined in a supersonic rectangular jet having a 4:1 aspect ratio. Experiments conducted at a Mach number of 2 reveal that the thrust vector angle of the jet can be continuously varied by up to at least 16 deg by applying a counterflowing stream to one of the primary jet shear layers. A technique using counterflow eliminates the bistable response known to plague fluidic elements and is shown to be effective in both hot and cold supersonic jets. Results are presented for jet stagnation temperatures between 300 K and 670 K. Measurements indicate that the thrust vector control is both efficient as well as a linear function of the static pressure developed in the counterflowing stream. The typical power required to vector the jet at 16 degrees was estimated to be less than 1 percent of the power developed in the primary jet. Thrust vector control employing counterflow has several advantages over current technologies, the most important of which is the elimination of movable control surfaces which add considerable weight to the aircraft.

  18. Fuel-optimal, low-thrust transfers between libration point orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Jeffrey R.

    Mission design requires the efficient management of spacecraft fuel to reduce mission cost, increase payload mass, and extend mission life. High efficiency, low-thrust propulsion devices potentially offer significant propellant reductions. Periodic orbits that exist in a multi-body regime and low-thrust transfers between these orbits can be applied in many potential mission scenarios, including scientific observation and communications missions as well as cargo transport. In light of the recent discovery of water ice in lunar craters, libration point orbits that support human missions within the Earth-Moon region are of particular interest. This investigation considers orbit transfer trajectories generated by a variable specific impulse, low-thrust engine with a primer-vector-based, fuel-optimizing transfer strategy. A multiple shooting procedure with analytical gradients yields rapid solutions and serves as the basis for an investigation into the trade space between flight time and consumption of fuel mass. Path and performance constraints can be included at node points along any thrust arc. Integration of invariant manifolds into the design strategy may also yield improved performance and greater fuel savings. The resultant transfers offer insight into the performance of the variable specific impulse engine and suggest novel implementations of conventional impulsive thrusters. Transfers incorporating invariant manifolds demonstrate the fuel savings and expand the mission design capabilities that are gained by exploiting system symmetry. A number of design applications are generated.

  19. The Application of Perturbation Method in Low-thrust Orbit Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S. C.; Zhao, Y. H.; Ji, J. H.; Hou, X. Y.

    2015-03-01

    In the multiple-purpose and multiple-mission exploration of near-Earth asteroids in solar system, developing effective methods to select the transferable targets from a large amount of asteroids is an on-going problem. Here we consider the orbit motion of a low-thrust probe in the interplanetary space. The idea of drawing lessons from the analytical method in classical celestial mechanics is proposed, and the low-thrust is considered as a perturbation. We derive the necessary condition to satisfy the two transferable Kepler orbits using the low-thrust propulsion in the sense of the fist-order approximation. This condition is the norm of the difference of several orbit elements, and has a high computational efficiency. It may be used to quickly reject the non-transferable asteroids under the condition of a given flight time and low-thrust propulsion. The numerical results are used to testify the validity of this condition in near-Earth asteroids exploration.

  20. Low-thrust chemical propulsion system propellant expulsion and thermal conditioning study. Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, F.; Wakabayashi, I.; Pleasant, R. L.; Hill, M.

    1982-01-01

    Preferred techniques for providing abort pressurization and engine feed system net positive suction pressure (NPSP) for low thrust chemical propulsion systems (LTPS) were determined. A representative LTPS vehicle configuration is presented. Analysis tasks include: propellant heating analysis; pressurant requirements for abort propellant dump; and comparative analysis of pressurization techniques and thermal subcoolers.

  1. Study on development of ejector of Bubble Jet Engine (BJE) - measurement of thrust -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AUV (Autonomous Under-water Vehicle), which is used for the present seabed investigations, has obtained the thrust with the screw driven by the battery. However, it has a disadvantage because of its size and cost. Therefore, this research is carried out to propose the Bubble Jet Engine (BJE) as an alternative propulsion device. It can directly transform combustion energy into kinetic energy, so it is expected that BJE can also rise the level of propulsion efficiency. This research aims at measuring exhaled mass flow rate and thrust to design ejectors, which become the core of BJE, and exploring practical possibility of BJE. Vertical type gas-water ejector experimental apparatus for measuring water entrainment was employed in order to understand the characteristics of operation conditions, such as inlet distance, air pressure of nozzle, diameter of nozzle, and so on. In addition, experiments for measuring the thrust in the condition of ejector were executed with horizontal type apparatus in water. However, the influence of the ejector to improve thrust can't have been recognized with high-pressure air at room temperature yet.

  2. Hydrostatic, aerostatic and hybrid bearing design

    CERN Document Server

    Rowe, W Brian

    2012-01-01

    Solve your bearing design problems with step-by-step procedures and hard-won performance data from a leading expert and consultant Compiled for ease of use in practical design scenarios, Hydrostatic, Aerostatic and Hybrid Bearing Design provides the basic principles, design procedures and data you need to create the right bearing solution for your requirements. In this valuable reference and design companion, author and expert W. Brian Rowe shares the hard-won lessons and figures from a lifetime's research and consultancy experience. Coverage includes: Clear e

  3. Single axis controlled attraction type magnetic bearing

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    O., Horikawa; I. da, Silva.

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new type of magnetic bearing with active control only in axial direction. The bearing uses two pairs of permanent magnets working in attraction mode to restrict the radial motion and a control system composed of two electromagnets, a gap sensor and a controller to keep the axis [...] in a fixed axial position. The principle, the dynamic model for axial motion and the control system for this bearing are presented. Finally, by experiments conducted in a prototype, the effectiveness of the presented concept is shown.

  4. Compressor ported shroud for foil bearing cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elpern, David G. (Los Angeles, CA); McCabe, Niall (Torrance, CA); Gee, Mark (South Pasadena, CA)

    2011-08-02

    A compressor ported shroud takes compressed air from the shroud of the compressor before it is completely compressed and delivers it to foil bearings. The compressed air has a lower pressure and temperature than compressed outlet air. The lower temperature of the air means that less air needs to be bled off from the compressor to cool the foil bearings. This increases the overall system efficiency due to the reduced mass flow requirements of the lower temperature air. By taking the air at a lower pressure, less work is lost compressing the bearing cooling air.

  5. Morphotectonics of the central Muertos thrust belt and Muertos Trough (northeastern Caribbean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Bruna J. L.; ten Brink, U.S.; Carbó-Gorosabel, Andrés; Munoz-Martin, A.; Gomez, Ballesteros M.

    2009-01-01

    Multibeam bathymetry data acquired during the 2005 Spanish R/V Hesp??rides cruise and reprocessed multichannel seismic profiles provide the basis for the analysis of the morphology and deformation in the central Muertos Trough and Muertos thrust belt. The Muertos Trough is an elongated basin developed where the Venezuelan Basin crust is thrusted under the Muertos fold-and-thrust belt. Structural variations along the Muertos Trough are suggested to be a consequence of the overburden of the asymmetrical thrust belt and by the variable nature of the Venezuelan Basin crust along the margin. The insular slope can be divided into three east-west trending slope provinces with high lateral variability which correspond to different accretion stages: 1) The lower slope is composed of an active sequence of imbricate thrust slices and closed fold axes, which form short and narrow accretionary ridges and elongated slope basins; 2) The middle slope shows a less active imbricate structure resulting in lower superficial deformation and bigger slope basins; 3) The upper slope comprises the talus region and extended terraces burying an island arc basement and an inactive imbricate structure. The talus region is characterized by a dense drainage network that transports turbidite flows from the islands and their surrounding carbonate platform areas to the slope basins and sometimes to the trough. In the survey area the accommodation of the ongoing east-west differential motion between the Hispaniola and the Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands blocks takes place by means of diffuse deformation. The asymmetrical development of the thrust belt is not related to the geological conditions in the foreland, but rather may be caused by variations in the geometry and movement of the backstop. The map-view curves of the thrust belt and the symmetry of the recesses suggest a main north-south convergence along the Muertos margin. The western end of the Investigator Fault Zone comprises a broad band of active normal faults which result in high instability of the upper insular slope. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Deformation characterization of a regional thrust zone in the northern Rif (Chefchaouen, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Stefano; Zaghloul, Mohamed Najib; Tramparulo, Francesco D.'Assisi; El Ouaragli, Bilal

    2014-07-01

    This paper provides the structural analysis of the Chefchaouen area in the northern Rif. Here the Dorsale Calcaire superposes, by means of an excellently exposed thrust fault, onto the Predorsalian succession in turn tectonically covering the Massylian Unit. Hanging wall carbonates of the Dorsale Calcaire Unit form a WSW-verging regional fold with several parasitic structures, deformed by late reverse faults in places indicating an ENE vergence. A 200 m thick shear zone characterizes the upper part of the Predorsalian succession, located at footwall of the Dorsale Calcaire Unit. Here the dominantly pelitic levels are highly deformed by (i) C? type shear bands indicating a mean WSW tectonic transport and (ii) conjugate extensional shear planes marking an extension both orthogonal and parallel to the shear direction. The Massylian Unit is characterized by a strain gradient increasing toward the tectonic contact with the overlying Predorsalian succession, where the dominantly pelitic levels are so highly deformed so as appearing as a broken formation. Such as the previous succession, conjugate extensional shear bands and normal faults indicate a horizontal extension parallel to the thrust front synchronous with the mainly WSW-directed overthrusting. The whole thrust sheet pile recorded a further shortening, characterized by a NW-SE direction, expressed by several reverse and thrust faults and related folds. Finally strike-slip and normal faults were the last deformation structures recorded in the analyzed rocks. A possible tectonic evolution for these successions is provided. In the late Burdigalian, the Dorsale Calcaire Unit tectonically covered the Predorsalian succession and together the Massylian Unit. The latter two successions were completely detached from their basement and accreted in the orogenic wedge within a general NE-SW shortening for the analyzed sector of the northern Rif. At lithosphere scale the thrust front migration was driven by roll back and slab tear mechanisms producing a synchronous arching and related counterclockwise rotation of the tectonic prism along the African margin. Radial displacement involved extension parallel to the thrust front well-recorded in the analyzed rocks. The NE-SW shortening, probably acting in the Tortonian-Pliocene interval, was related to the final compression of the Rif Chain resulting in out-of-sequence thrusts affecting the whole orogenic belt.

  7. Computer program for analysis of high speed, single row, angular contact, spherical roller bearing, SASHBEAN. Volume 2: Mathematical formulation and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1993-01-01

    Spherical roller bearings have typically been used in applications with speeds limited to about 5000 rpm and loads limited for operation at less than about 0.25 million DN. However, spherical roller bearings are now being designed for high load and high speed applications including aerospace applications. A computer program, SASHBEAN, was developed to provide an analytical tool to design, analyze, and predict the performance of high speed, single row, angular contact (including zero contact angle), spherical roller bearings. The material presented is the mathematical formulation and analytical methods used to develop computer program SASHBEAN. For a given set of operating conditions, the program calculates the bearings ring deflections (axial and radial), roller deflections, contact areas stresses, depth and magnitude of maximum shear stresses, axial thrust, rolling element and cage rotational speeds, lubrication parameters, fatigue lives, and rates of heat generation. Centrifugal forces and gyroscopic moments are fully considered. The program is also capable of performing steady-state and time-transient thermal analyses of the bearing system.

  8. Molecular phylogeny and SNP variation of polar bears (Ursus maritimus), brown bears (U. arctos), and black bears (U. americanus) derived from genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Matthew A; Rincon, Gonzalo; Meredith, Robert W; MacNeil, Michael D; Islas-Trejo, Alma; Cánovas, Angela; Medrano, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the relationships of polar bears (Ursus maritimus), brown bears (U. arctos), and black bears (U. americanus) with high throughput genomic sequencing data with an average coverage of 25× for each species. A total of 1.4 billion 100-bp paired-end reads were assembled using the polar bear and annotated giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) genome sequences as references. We identified 13.8 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the 3 species aligned to the polar bear genome. These data indicate that polar bears and brown bears share more SNP with each other than either does with black bears. Concatenation and coalescence-based analysis of consensus sequences of approximately 1 million base pairs of ultraconserved elements in the nuclear genome resulted in a phylogeny with black bears as the sister group to brown and polar bears, and all brown bears are in a separate clade from polar bears. Genotypes for 162 SNP loci of 336 bears from Alaska and Montana showed that the species are genetically differentiated and there is geographic population structure of brown and black bears but not polar bears. PMID:24477675

  9. One-equation modeling and validation of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator thrust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators with an asymmetric electrode configuration can generate a wall-bounded jet without mechanical moving parts, which require considerable modifications of existing aeronautical objects and which incur high maintenance costs. Despite this potential, one factor preventing the wider application of such actuators is the lack of a reliable actuator model. It is difficult to develop such a model because calculating the ion-electric field and fluid interaction consume a high amount calculation effort during the numerical analysis. Thus, the authors proposed a semi-empirical model which predicted the thrust of plasma actuators with a simple equation. It gave a numeric thrust value, and we implemented the value on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver to describe the two-dimensional flow field induced by the actuator. However, the model had a narrow validation range, depending on the empirical formula, and it did not fully consider environment variables. This study presents an improved model by replacing the empirical formulae in the previous model with physical equations that take into account physical phenomena and environmental variables. During this process, additional operation parameters, such as pressure, temperature and ac waveforms, are newly taken to predict the thrust performance of the actuators with a wider range of existing parameters, the thickness of the dielectric barrier, the exposed electrode, the dielectric constant, the ac frequency and the voltage amplitude. Thrust prediction curves from the model are compared to those of earlier experimental results, showing that the average error is less than 5% for more than one hundred instances of data. As in the earlier work, the predicted thrust value is implemented on a CFD solver, and two-dimensional wall-jet velocity profiles induced by the actuator are compared to the previous experimental results. (paper)

  10. Frontal compression along the Apennines thrust system: The Emilia 2012 example from seismicity to crustal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarabba, Claudio; De Gori, Pasquale; Improta, Luigi; Lucente, Francesco Pio; Moretti, Milena; Govoni, Aladino; Di Bona, Massimo; Margheriti, Lucia; Marchetti, Alessandro; Nardi, Anna

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of the Apennines thrust-and-fold belt is related to heterogeneous process of subduction and continental delamination that generates extension within the mountain range and compression on the outer front of the Adria lithosphere. While normal faulting earthquakes diffusely occur along the mountain chain, the sparse and poor seismicity in the compressional front does not permit to resolve the ambiguity that still exists about which structure accommodates the few mm/yr of convergence observed by geodetic data. In this study, we illustrate the 2012 Emilia seismic sequence that is the most significant series of moderate-to-large earthquakes developed during the past decades on the compressional front of the Apennines. Accurately located aftershocks, along with P-wave and Vp/Vs tomographic models, clearly reveal the geometry of the thrust system, buried beneath the Quaternary sediments of the Po Valley. The seismic sequence ruptured two distinct adjacent thrust faults, whose different dip, steep or flat, accounts for the development of the arc-like shape of the compressional front. The first shock of May 20 (Mw 6.0) developed on the middle Ferrara thrust that has a southward dip of about 30°. The second shock of May 29 (Mw 5.8) ruptured the Mirandola thrust that we define as a steep dipping (50-60°) pre-existing (Permo-Triassic) basement normal fault inverted during compression. The overall geometry of the fault system is controlled by heterogeneity of the basement inherited from the older extension. We also observe that the rupture directivity during the two main-shocks and the aftershocks concentration correlate with low Poisson ratio volumes, probably indicating that portions of the fault have experienced intense micro-damage.

  11. Alex the Bear Goes to Child Care

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Public Service Announcements Meet Alex the Bear Resources Resources for ... and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. 1515 North Courthouse Road, 11th Floor, Arlington, ...

  12. Telemetry techniques used on Kodiak brown bear

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the results of a study on the techniques used to monitor the movements of Kodiak brown bears instrumented with radio transmitters. Methods...

  13. Thermal performance of shaft bearing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crecelius, W.

    1978-01-01

    Computer program calculates loads, torques, temperature, and fatigue life of multibearing shaft system operating with either wet or dry friction. Program is also capable of predicting system reactive to termination of lubricant supply to bearings and other lubricated mechanical elements.

  14. Alex the Bear Goes to Child Care

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Subscribe to our RSS Feed Child Care Aware® - America's most trusted child care resource. Parents and Families ... Meet Alex the Bear Child Care Aware of America Child Care Aware Parent Network Provider Appreciation Day ...

  15. IMPROVED OF BEARING EQUIPMENT IN FOREST PROCESSING ????????????????? ??????????? ?????????? ??????????????????? ????????????

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posharnikov F. V.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, application of perspective polymeric metal anti-frictional material in the knots of a friction in that case when the plug rotates with shaft to the motionless base of the bearing is considered

  16. Ceramic Rail-Race Ball Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzer, Mark A.; Mungas, Greg S.; Peters, Gregory H.

    2010-01-01

    Non-lubricated ball bearings featuring rail races have been proposed for use in mechanisms that are required to function in the presence of mineral dust particles in very low-pressure, dry environments with extended life. Like a conventional ball bearing, the proposed bearing would include an inner and an outer ring separated by balls in rolling contact with the races. However, unlike a conventional ball bearing, the balls would not roll in semi-circular or gothic arch race grooves in the rings: instead, the races would be shaped to form two or more rails (see figure). During operation, the motion of the balls would push dust particles into the spaces between the rails where the particles could not generate rolling resistance for the balls

  17. Cavitation Peening of Aerospace Bearings Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High-value bearings are a critical part of the safety, reliability, cost and performance of modern aircraft. A typical passenger jet will have 100 to 175 high-valve...

  18. LIGHT-WEIGHT LOAD-BEARING STRUCTURE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl Technical University of Denmark,

    The invention relates to a light-weight load-bearing structure (1) with optimized compression zone (2), where along one or more compression zones (2) in the structure (1) to be cast a core (3) of strong concrete is provided, which core (3) is surrounded by concrete of less strength (4) compared to the core (3) of strong concrete. The invention also relates to a method of casting of light-weight load-bearing structures (1) with optimized compression zone (2) where one or more channels, grooves, ducts, pipes and/or hoses (5) formed in the load-bearing structure (1) serves as moulds for moulding one or more cores (3) of strong concrete in the light-weight load-bearing structure (1).

  19. Driving stability of superconducting magnetic bearing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansiz, Ahmet; Oral, Emin Argun; Gundogdu, Omer

    2012-06-01

    A superconducting bearing system including a 7.5 kg disc shaped rotor is stabilized by using superconducting and magnetic levitation combination. The rotor is stabilized with the Evershed type bearing where the majority of the rotor mass is lifted via attractive permanent magnets configuration, and the stability of the rotor is provided by superconductors. The stability tests are performed via obtaining levitation force characteristic. Preliminary levitation force results show that the system is stable and robust; indicating rotor mass can be increased more without losing the efficiency. Dynamic tests are performed during spin of the designed bearing system. The resonance behavior of the system indicates that the bearing is not vulnerable to higher speeds.

  20. Surface layer characterisation of bearing rings

    OpenAIRE

    Skrzypek, S. J.; Go?y, M.

    2007-01-01

    austenite. Theoretical calculation of residual macro-stresses due to volume fraction of transformed austenite in bearing rings and following measurements of residual stresses were carried out as well. The bearing elements were made of 100Cr6 steel and they were smoothed and grinded.Design/methodology/approach: Particular features of diffraction patterns like angle position; shape and intensity are used to characterize phase composition, residual micro and macro-stresses, crystallographic tex...

  1. Design of bearing structures of dwelling - house

    OpenAIRE

    Sodja, Urška

    2007-01-01

    Graduation thesis represents design of bearing structures of dwelling-house including materials and materials´ properties of bearing structures. Self weight, imposed load, snow, and wind are determinated regarding EC1. Static calculation of building is divided to design of timber, reinforced concrete elements and control of resistance of walls. Summary contains earthquake rules for simple masonry buildings. Enclosure contains plans for positions of slaps and reinforces.

  2. Bridge Bearings : Merits, Demerits, Practical Issues, Maintenance and Extensive Surveys on Bridge Bearing

    OpenAIRE

    Oladimeji Fasheyi, Adebowale

    2012-01-01

    A technical solution to the problem of unavoidable movements in bridge structures is the use of bridge bearings. Bridge bearings are small integral parts of the entire bridge structure serving several purposes, such as connection, transfer of forces, allowing movements, force damping etc. However, bridge bearings could create more problems for the bridge structure than it solves if not properly understood, especially when it receives less attention than it deserves. Technical and practical is...

  3. Vibration Analysis of Rolling Element Bearings Defects

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    H., Saruhan; S., Saridemir; A., Qicek; I., Uygur.

    Full Text Available In this work, vibration analysis of rolling element bearings (REBs) defects is studied. The REBs are the most widely used mechanical parts in rotating machinery under high load and high rotational speeds. When the defect in a rolling element comes into contact with another element surface, an impact [...] force is generated which is resulting in an impulsive response of the bearing. A defect at any element of the REB transmits to all other elements such as outer race, inner race, ball and, train cage of the bearing. The defect in rolling elements may lead to serious catastrophic consequences resulting in costly downtime. For this purpose, the vibration analysis technique which is a reliable and accurately detecting defect in the bearing elements is used. The vibration data captured and used for determination and validation is composed from four different defects states of the REB -outer raceway defect, inner raceway defect, ball defect, and combination of the bearing elements defect- and one representing normal state of the bearing for four different running speeds with two load levels. The results obtained from the experiments have illustrated and explained.

  4. Rotordynamics and bearing design of turbochargers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen Jeng

    2012-05-01

    Turbochargers have gained significant attention in recent years. They are already widely used in automotive, locomotive, and marine applications with diesel engines. They are also applied in the aerospace application to increase the engine performance now. The turbochargers used in automotive and aerospace industry are very light-weight with operating speeds above 100,000 rpm. The turbochargers used in locomotive and marine applications are relatively heavy in size and power compared to the automotive and aerospace applications, and the maximum continuous operating speeds are around 30,000 rpm depending on the diesel engine power rating. Floating ring bushings, semi-floating dampers, ball bearings, and ball bearings with dampers are commonly used in automotive applications for small turbochargers. However, these bearings may not be appropriate for large turbochargers in locomotive and marine applications. Instead, multi-lobed bearings with and without squeeze film dampers are commonly used in these heavy-duty turbochargers. This paper deals with the rotordynamic characteristics of larger turbochargers in locomotive and marine applications. Various bearing designs are discussed. Bearing design parameters are studied and optimal values are suggested. Test results are also presented to support the analytical simulation.

  5. Bifurcation Onset Delay in Magnetic Bearing Systems with Auxiliary Bearing and Time Varying Stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Ghazavi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Auxiliary bearings are used in magnetic bearing systemsto protect bearings from damage. These bearings are in contact with rotor temporarily. This contact associated with intermittent contact forces which change the system dynamic behavior. These include vibration instability and thermal stresses. The system is simulated to clarify the role of two different control methods in synchronous and asynchronous responses.This is carried out using linear PD controller and time varying stiffness. Rotor whirl orbit and power spectrum in magneticbearing with time varying stiffness reveals better behavior in some cases. Rotational speed range with synchronous response increases. A delay in the onset of bifurcation depicts an improved rotor dynamic performance.

  6. Comparison between mobile-bearing and fixed-bearing knees in bilateral total knee replacements

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, T.; Tomita, T; Fujii, M.; Hashimoto, J.; Sugamoto, K.; YOSHIKAWA, H.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare mid-term results of mobile-bearing and fixed-bearing in bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Twenty-two patients underwent bilateral TKA with a mobile-bearing prosthesis (Rotaglide, Corin, UK) on one side and a fixed-bearing prosthesis (NexGen-CR, Zimmer, USA) on the other. There were 21 female patients, and in 18 patients, the diagnosis was rheumatoid arthritis. The average age was 59.6 (35–78) years. In all procedures, the posterior cruciate liga...

  7. Comparison between mobile-bearing and fixed-bearing knees in bilateral total knee replacements

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, T.; Tomita, T.; Fujii, M.; Hashimoto, J.; Sugamoto, K.; Yoshikawa, H.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare mid-term results of mobile-bearing and fixed-bearing in bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Twenty-two patients underwent bilateral TKA with a mobile-bearing prosthesis (Rotaglide, Corin, UK) on one side and a fixed-bearing prosthesis (NexGen-CR, Zimmer, USA) on the other. There were 21 female patients, and in 18 patients, the diagnosis was rheumatoid arthritis. The average age was 59.6 (35–78) years. In all procedures, the posterior cruciate li...

  8. Optimization of thrust algorithm calibration for Computing System (TCS) for Thrust the NASA Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology (HiMAT) vehicle's propulsion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, M. J.; Alexander, R. I.

    1981-01-01

    A simplified gross thrust computing technique for the HiMAT J85-GE-21 engine using altitude facility data was evaluated. The results over the full engine envelope for both the standard engine mode and the open nozzle engine mode are presented. Results using afterburner casing static pressure taps are compared to those using liner static pressure taps. It is found that the technique is very accurate for both the standard and open nozzle engine modes. The difference in the algorithm accuracy for a calibration based on data from one test condition was small compared to a calibration based on data from all of the test conditions.

  9. Static investigation of two fluidic thrust-vectoring concepts on a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, David J.

    1994-01-01

    A static investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel of two thrust-vectoring concepts which utilize fluidic mechanisms for deflecting the jet of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. One concept involved using the Coanda effect to turn a sheet of injected secondary air along a curved sidewall flap and, through entrainment, draw the primary jet in the same direction to produce yaw thrust vectoring. The other concept involved deflecting the primary jet to produce pitch thrust vectoring by injecting secondary air through a transverse slot in the divergent flap, creating an oblique shock in the divergent channel. Utilizing the Coanda effect to produce yaw thrust vectoring was largely unsuccessful. Small vector angles were produced at low primary nozzle pressure ratios, probably because the momentum of the primary jet was low. Significant pitch thrust vector angles were produced by injecting secondary flow through a slot in the divergent flap. Thrust vector angle decreased with increasing nozzle pressure ratio but moderate levels were maintained at the highest nozzle pressure ratio tested. Thrust performance generally increased at low nozzle pressure ratios and decreased near the design pressure ratio with the addition of secondary flow.

  10. Sensitivity Analysis and Mitigation with Applications to Ballistic and Low-thrust Trajectory Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Iman

    The ever increasing desire to expand space mission capabilities within the limited budgets of space industries requires new approaches to the old problem of spacecraft trajectory design. For example, recent initiatives for space exploration involve developing new tools to design low-cost, fail-safe trajectories to visit several potential destinations beyond our celestial neighborhood such as Jupiter's moons, asteroids, etc. Designing and navigating spacecraft trajectories to reach these destinations safely are complex and challenging. In particular, fundamental questions of orbital stability imposed by planetary protection requirements are not easily taken into account by standard optimal control schemes. The event of temporary engine loss or an unexpected missed thrust can indeed quickly lead to impact with planetary bodies or other unrecoverable trajectories. While electric propulsion technology provides superior efficiency compared to chemical engines, the very low-control authority and engine performance degradation can impose higher risk to the mission in strongly perturbed orbital environments. The risk is due to the complex gravitational field and its associated chaotic dynamics which causes large navigation dispersions in a short time if left un-controlled. Moreover, in these situations it can be outside the low-thrust propulsion system capability to correct the spacecraft trajectory in a reasonable time frame. These concerns can lead to complete or partial mission failure or even an infeasible mission concept at the early design stage. The goal of this research is to assess and increase orbital stability of ballistic and low-thrust transfer trajectories in multi-body systems. In particular, novel techniques are presented to characterize sensitivity and improve recovery characteristics of ballistic and low-thrust trajectories in unstable orbital environments. The techniques developed are based on perturbation analysis around ballistic trajectories to determine analytically the maximum divergence directions and also optimal control theory with nonstandard cost functions along with inverse dynamics applied to low-thrust trajectories. Several mission scenarios are shown to demonstrate the applicability of the techniques in the Earth-Moon and the Jupiter-Europa system. In addition, the results provide fundamental insight into design, stability analysis and guidance, navigation and control of low-thrust trajectories to meet challenging mission requirements in support of NASA's vision for space exploration.

  11. Investigation of Pneumatic Inlet and Diffuser Blowing on a Ducted Fan Propulsor in Static Thrust Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondor, Shayne; Englar, Robert J.; Lee, Warren J.

    2003-01-01

    Tilting ducted fans present a solution for the lifting and forward flight propulsion requirements of VTOL aircraft. However, the geometry of the duct enshrouding the propeller has great a effect on the efficiency of the fan in various flight modes. Shroud geometry controls the velocity and pressure at the face of the fan, while maintaining a finite loading out at the tips of the fan blades. A duct tailored for most efficient generation of static lifting thrust will generally suffer from performance deficiencies in forward flight. The converse is true as well, leaving the designer with a difficult trade affecting the overall performance and sizing of the aircraft. Ideally, the shroud of a vertical lifting fan features a generous bell mouth inlet promoting acceleration of flow into the face of the fan, and terminating in a converging nozzle at the exit. Flow entering the inlet is accelerated into the fan by the circulation about the shroud, resulting in an overall increase in thrust compared to an open propeller operating under the same conditions . The accelerating shroud design is often employed in lifting ducted fans to benefit from the thrust augmentation; however, such shroud designs produce significant drag penalties in axial flight, thus are unsuitable for efficient forward flight applications. Decelerating, or diffusing, duct designs are employed for higher speed forward flight configurations. The lower circulation on the shroud tends to decelerate the flow into the face of the fan, which is detrimental to static thrust development; however, net thrust is developed on the shroud while the benefits of finite blade loading are retained. With judicious shroud design for intended flight speeds, a net increase in efficiency can be obtained over an open propeller. In this experiment, conducted under contract to NASA LaRC (contract NAG-1-02093) circulation control is being applied to a mildly diffusing shroud design, intended for improved forward flight performance, to generate circulation in the sense of an accelerating duct design. The intent is to improve static thrust performance of a ducted fan tailored for high speed axial flight, while at the same time significantly reduce the pressure signature on the ground plane. Circulation control on the fan shroud is achieved by the Coanda effect.

  12. Polar bears: the fate of an icon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T

    2013-11-01

    Polar bears are one of the most iconic animals on our planet. Worldwide, even people who would never see one are drawn to these charismatic arctic ice hunters. They are the world's largest terrestrial carnivore, and despite being born on land, they spend most of their lives out on the sea ice and are considered a marine mammal. Current global studies estimate there are around 20,000 animals in some 19 discrete circumpolar populations. Aside from pregnant females denning in the winter months to give birth, the white bears do not hibernate. They spend their winters on the sea ice hunting seals, an activity they are spectacularly adapted for. Research on these animals is incredibly difficult because of the inhospitable surroundings they inhabit and how inaccessible they make the bears. For many years, the sum of our understanding of the natural history of polar bears came from tracks, scats, the remains of their kills, abandoned dens, and anecdotal observations of native hunters, explorers, and early biologists. Nonetheless, the last 40 years have seen a much better picture of their biology emerge thanks to, first, dedicated Canadian researchers and, later, truly international efforts of workers from many countries. Veterinarians have contributed to our knowledge of the bears by delivering and monitoring anesthesia, obtaining blood samples, performing necropsies, investigating their reproduction, conducting radiotelemetry studies, and examining their behavior. Recently, new technologies have been developed that revolutionize the study of the lives and natural history of undisturbed polar bears. These advances include better satellite radiotelemetry equipment and the development of remote-controlled miniature devices equipped with high-definition cameras. Such new modalities provide dramatic new insights into the life of polar bears. The remarkable degree of specialized adaptation to life on the sea ice that allowed the bears to be successful is the very reason that the bears are so vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Polar bears have few alternatives if their habitat (the sea ice) and their access to their ringed seal prey rapidly disappear. Predictions that polar bears may be able to adjust and sustain themselves on alternative food sources are not based on reality. Spring breakup of the sea ice is happening much earlier as well as fall freezeup is getting later, thereby prolonging the open water period that the bears are shore bound. If trends continue and the ice continues to disappear, the effect on polar bears would be devastating. Veterinarians must stay involved in polar bear studies and in multidisciplinary conservation studies dealing with threatened and endangered species worldwide. On account of their training, veterinarians can offer a unique skill set that can provide access to a number of technologies critical to conservation efforts. The oath veterinarians take on graduation from veterinary school charges them to be sworn to the "conservation of animal resources" and in the education of the public. We are only as good as the oaths we keep. PMID:24331553

  13. Rolling Bearing Life Prediction, Theory, and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2013-01-01

    A tutorial is presented outlining the evolution, theory, and application of rolling-element bearing life prediction from that of A. Palmgren, 1924; W. Weibull, 1939; G. Lundberg and A. Palmgren, 1947 and 1952; E. Ioannides and T. Harris, 1985; and E. Zaretsky, 1987. Comparisons are made between these life models. The Ioannides-Harris model without a fatigue limit is identical to the Lundberg-Palmgren model. The Weibull model is similar to that of Zaretsky if the exponents are chosen to be identical. Both the load-life and Hertz stress-life relations of Weibull, Lundberg and Palmgren, and Ioannides and Harris reflect a strong dependence on the Weibull slope. The Zaretsky model decouples the dependence of the critical shear stress-life relation from the Weibull slope. This results in a nominal variation of the Hertz stress-life exponent. For 9th- and 8th-power Hertz stress-life exponents for ball and roller bearings, respectively, the Lundberg- Palmgren model best predicts life. However, for 12th- and 10th-power relations reflected by modern bearing steels, the Zaretsky model based on the Weibull equation is superior. Under the range of stresses examined, the use of a fatigue limit would suggest that (for most operating conditions under which a rolling-element bearing will operate) the bearing will not fail from classical rolling-element fatigue. Realistically, this is not the case. The use of a fatigue limit will significantly overpredict life over a range of normal operating Hertz stresses. Since the predicted lives of rolling-element bearings are high, the problem can become one of undersizing a bearing for a particular application.

  14. Late Holocene activity and historical earthquakes of the Qiongxi thrust fault system in the southern Longmen Shan fold-and-thrust belt, eastern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Maomao; Jia, Dong; Lin, Aiming; Shen, Li; Rao, Gang; Li, Yiquan

    2013-01-01

    The 12 May 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Mw 7.9) generated a 285-km-long surface rupture zone along the Longmen Shan fold-and-thrust belt (LSFTB) on the eastern margin of Tibetan Plateau. The Wenchuan earthquake did not rupture into the southwestern Longmen Shan, along which there is no evidence for large paleo- or historical earthquakes. Seismic reflection profiles and field investigations reveal that the 50-km-long Qiongxi thrust fault (QTF) of the southern LSFTB is currently active. The QTF consists of three west-dipping ramp segments overlain by fault-bend folds rooted in a regional detachment that transfers shortening from the mountain belt into the Sichuan basin. Trench investigations, coupled with interpretations of seismic reflection profiles and radiocarbon results, show that a recent surface-rupturing earthquake occurred on the QTF during the Late Ming to Qing Dynasty, between AD 1600 and 1800. In addition, seismic reflection profile and topographic analysis indicate the presence of a subtle topographic, produced by kink-band migration folding above a fault bend at about 5 km depth. These findings confirm that the QTF is a significant seismic hazard, and that it should be incorporated into current regional seismic hazard models for the densely populated Sichuan basin.

  15. Development and Demonstration of a Device to Determine Thrust by Measuring the Force on a Target Plate in the Exhaust of a Plasma Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin

    2004-01-01

    A device has been developed to measure the force on a target plate by an impacting beam of charged and neutral particles. This device, an impact thrust stand, was developed to allow thrusters at low TRL, levels to be easily tested without the expense of developing a flight prototype of the thruster to be placed on a conventional thrust stand. The impact thrust stand was developed for the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) but has been tested and calibrated using several devices including Hall thrusters. The calibration and comparison of the impact thrust stand against conventional thrust stands will be discussed in this paper.

  16. CONSIDERATION REGARDING THE DIAGNOSIS AND REPAIR OF BEARINGS

    OpenAIRE

    Popp, Ilie

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents some aspects of diagnosis bearings in preventive maintenance andthe importance of bearing repair as an alternative to replacing them. Bearing repair is not a newconcept, nor has it changed a great deal over the years. Repairing damaged bearings is a precisescience that has been fine-tuned over time through careful and gradual enhancements to providesuperior results. Knowing and understanding the value of bearing repair means knowing whatrepair can do, when to use it, and w...

  17. Nuclear fuel handling grapple carriage with self-lubricating bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a nuclear fuel handling grapple carriage having a bearing with a lubricant reservoir that is capable of being refilled when the bearing and reservoir are submerged in a lubricant pool. The lubricant reservoir supplies lubricant to the bearing while the bearing allows a small amount of lubricant to leak passed appropriately placed seals creating a positive out flow of lubricant thereby preventing foreign material from entering the bearing

  18. Method for changing removable bearing for a wind turbine generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Scotia, NY); Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY)

    2008-04-22

    A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

  19. Removable bearing arrangement for a wind turbine generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya

    2010-06-15

    A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

  20. Local Attitudes towards Bear Management after Illegal Feeding and Problem Bear Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fraser

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The “pot bears” received international media attention in 2010 after police discovered the intentional feeding of over 20 black bears during the investigation of an alleged marijuana-growing operation in Christina Lake, British Columbia, Canada. A two-phase random digit dialing survey of the community was conducted in 2011 to understand local perspectives on bear policy and management, before and after a summer of problem bear activity and government interventions. Of the 159 households surveyed in February 2011, most had neutral or positive attitudes towards bears in general, and supported the initial decision to feed the food-conditioned bears until the autumn hibernation. In contrast to wildlife experts however, most participants supported relocating the problem bears, or allowing them to remain in the area, ahead of killing; in part this arose from notions of fairness despite the acknowledged problems of relocation. Most locals were aware of the years of feeding but did not report it, evidently failing to see it as a serious form of harm, even after many bears had been killed. This underscores the importance of preventive action on wildlife feeding and the need to narrow the gap between public and expert opinion on the likely effects of relocation versus killing.