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Sample records for ten case studies

  1. Building Dynamic Learning Communities: Ten Regional Case Studies.

    Tasmania Univ., Launceston (Australia). Centre for Research and Learning in Regional Australia.

    This report presents the second phase of a 4-year study commissioned by the Australian National Training Authority (ANTA) to examine the dynamics of Vocational Education and Training (VET). Ten case studies, most involving rural or indigenous communities, are presented, each illustrating an aspect of VET. Twenty-six findings and implications for…

  2. Frictional amyloidosis in Oman - A study of ten cases

    Mysore Venkataram

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Macular amyloidosis is an important cause for cutaneous pigmentation, the aetiology of which is poorly understood. Friction has recently been implicated the causation of early lesions, referred to as frictional amyloidosis. Confirmation of diagnosis by the detect on of amyloid using histochemical stains is inconsistent. Ten patients with pigmentation suggestive of macular amyloidosis were studied with detailed history, clinical examination, biopsy for histochemistry and electron microscopy. Nine out of ten patients had a history of prolonged friction with various objects such as bath sponges, brushes, towels, plant sticks and leaves. Amyloid was demonstrated by histochemical staining in only six out of ten cases. In the remaining four cases, amyloid was detected by electron microscopy. These consisted of aggregates of non-branching, extracellular, intertwining fibres measuring between 200-500 nm in length and between 20-25 nm in diameter. The study confirms the role of friction in the causation of this condition. Histochemical stains are not always successful in the detection of amyloid and electron microscopy is helpful for confirming its presence. The term frictional amyloidosis aptly describes the condition.

  3. Keys to success: Ten case studies of effective weatherization programs

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Kolb, J.O.; White, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinney, L.F.; Wilson, T. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    1993-11-01

    In 1990, DOE initiated a nationwide evaluation of its Weatherization Program, with assistance from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and an advisory group of 40 weatherization professionals, program managers, and researchers. The evaluation is comprised of three impact studies covering the Program`s major market segments: Single-family homes, mobile homes, and dwellings in small (2 to 4-unit) multifamily buildings (the Single-Family Study), Single-family homes heated primarily with fuel oil (the Fuel-Oil Study), and Dwellings in buildings with five or more units (the Multifamily Study). The Single-Family Study, the subject of this report, is a critical part of this coordinated evaluation effort. Its focus on single-family dwellings, mobile homes, and dwellings in small multifamily buildings covers 83% of the income-eligible population and 96% of the dwellings weatherized during Program Year 1989. The first phase of the Single-Family Study involved the analysis of a massive data base of information collected from 368 local weatherization agencies and 543 electric and gas utilities. This analysis resulted in energy-saving and cost-effectiveness estimates for the Weatherization Program and the identification of a set of ten high-performing agencies located throughout the country. The second phase, which is the subject of this report, involves a ``process`` evaluation of these ten high performers, aimed at identifying those weatherization practices that explain their documented success.

  4. JOB REDESIGN FOR OLDER WORKERS, TEN CASE STUDIES.

    MITNICK, EDWARD; ROTHBERG, HERMAN

    AFTER IDENTIFYING FIRMS WHICH HAD USED JOB REDESIGN TO SALVAGE THE SKILL OF OLDER EMPLOYEES, RESEARCH INVESTIGATORS MADE 10 INTENSIVE CASE STUDIES IN FIRMS PRODUCING AIRCRAFT ENGINES, ALUMINUM FRAMING, BUILDING MATERIALS, CARPETS, COMPUTERS, COPPER PIPE FITTINGS, FOOTWEAR, HEAVY IRON PIPE, PRECISION INSTRUMENTS, AND PRINTED NOVELTIES. EACH STUDY…

  5. Adolescent cancer patients' perspectives on their educational experiences: Ten case studies

    Searle, Nancy Smith

    The goal of this study was to explore the educational experiences of adolescent cancer patients in treatment for cancer and enrolled in hospital, homebound, or community schools. The incidence of students who have or had cancer is becoming more prevalent in schools today because of increases in the population, the incidence rate of cancer, and the survival rate of cancer. The number of students surviving cancer has increased over 41% in the past ten years and underscores the importance of assuring an excellent education to children and adolescents with cancer so that they may enjoy a good quality of life as long-term survivors. This study explored the educational experiences of students who were adolescent cancer patients and identified educational and psychosocial issues important to their success. The goal of this research effort was to provide educators and medical staff with a deeper understanding of the unique psychoeducational needs of this population and to provide a foundation for developing ideas for improving the educational programs and support available to students who continue their middle and high school education while undergoing treatment for cancer. Participants included ten cancer patient whose mean age at onset of disease was 13.8 +/- 1.7 years, and mean age at interview was 15.2 +/- 1.8 years. The researcher conducted individual, in-depth, ethnographic interviews of students, and one parent and one teacher of each student. Case studies of the students included extensive dialogue of each of the contributing participants. An analysis of the case studies was conducted by coding emerging themes so that topics could be fully explored and compared between individuals, groups of individuals, and educational settings to identify the meaning that these students placed on the educational and psychosocial issues that they voiced as important. Advantages and disadvantages of each educational situation, homebound, hospital school, and community school, were compared. Psychosocial issues related to education were discussed. Additional findings included information about student computer use and information gathering, and the effects of cancer treatment on student interest in science and future occupational plans.

  6. The acute radiation syndrome: A study of ten cases and a review of the problem

    Hempelmann, L.H.; Lisco, H.

    1950-03-17

    In this report ten cases of acute radiation syndrome are described resulting from two accidents occurring at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory of unique nature involving fissionable material. These cases are described in considerable detail. The report comprises ten sections. This volume, part II of the report, is comprised of sections entitled: (1) the Biological Basis for the Clinical Response seen in the Acute radiation Syndrome, (2) Clinical Signs and Symptoms, (3) Discussion of Hematological Findings, (4) Chemistry of the Blood and Urine, (5) Discussion of Pathological Findings, and (6) Reconsiderations of the Calculated Radiation Doses in Terms of the Observed Biological Response of the Patients. This report was prepared primarily for the clinician who is interested in radiation injuries and therefore emphasis has been placed on the correlation of clinical and pathological changes with the type of cytogenetic change known to be produced by ionizing radiation.

  7. Making a difference: Ten case studies of DSM/IRP interactive efforts and related advocacy group activities

    English, M.; Schexnayder, S.; Altman, J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Schweitzer, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This report discusses the activities of organizations that seek to promote integrated resource planning and aggressive, cost-effective demand-side management by utilities. The activities of such groups -- here called energy efficiency advocacy groups (EEAGs) -- are examined in ten detailed am studies. Nine of the cases involve some form of interactive effort between investor-owned electric utilities and non-utility to develop policies, plans, or programs cooperatively. Many but not all of the interactive efforts examined are formal collaboratives. In addition, all ten cases include discussion of other EEAG activities, such as coalition-building, research, participation in statewide energy planning, and intervention in regulatory proceedings.

  8. PURPA Resource Development in the Pacific Northwest : Case Studies of Ten Electricity Generating Powerplants.

    Washington State Energy Office.

    1990-07-01

    The case studies in this document describe the Public Utilities, Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) development process for a variety of generating technologies. Developer interactions with regulatory agencies and power purchasers are described in some detail. Equipment, installation, and maintenance costs are identified; power marketing considerations are taken into account; and potential environmental impacts, with corresponding mitigation approaches and practices are summarized. The project development case studies were prepared by the energy agencies of the four Northwest states, under contract to the Bonneville Power Administration.

  9. Cognitive impairments associated with corpus callosum infarction: a ten cases study.

    Huang, Xiaoqin; Du, Xiangnan; Song, Haiqing; Zhang, Qian; Jia, Jianping; Xiao, Tianyi; Wu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the cognitive impairment is associated with corpus callosum infarctions. Ten corpus callosum infarction patients were enrolled in this study. Their emotions, cognitive and language abilities, memory, comprehensive perception were assessed using the Chinese version of following measures: Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), World Health Organization-University of California-Los Angeles Auditory Verbal Learning Test (WHO-UCLA AVLT), Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) Digit Span subtest and so on. The same measurements were performed on healthy control participants as contrast for analysis. Infarction most frequently occurred in the body and/or splenium of the corpus callosum. The scores of the most cognitive tests in the corpus callosum infarction patients were significantly worse than those of the control participants (PRey complex figure test (P<0.05). Corpus callosum infarction can cause cognitive dysfunction, which poses obstacles to memory in the acute phase, accompanied by different degrees of decline in visuospatial abilities, attention and calculating abilities. PMID:26885171

  10. Azo dyes and related compounds as important aquatic contaminants: a ten-year case study

    Mutagenicity has been found in several aquatic systems in the world; however, this activity usually is not associated with any of the compounds that are currently regulated. Attempting to identify these hazardous compounds, an integrated study was conducted, employing several dif...

  11. A ten year study of STD Cases in an urban clinic in Calcutta

    Ghosh Sadhana

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Total 16440 patients attended the STD clinic during the 10 years period of study from 1984 to 1993. From 1988 number of STD caes were gradually decreasing probably due to less promiscuity in fear of AIDS and different measures taken to prevent transmission of HIV infection. But it does not lessen the importance of STD control, because syphilis is still prevalent (8% with congenital syphilis. Peak in the incidence of chancroid (15% is alarming as this may lead to increased transmission of HIV infection in near future. Male unmarried constituted the bulk of STD sufferers (44% and married males (34%, while female unmarried and married patients were 1% and 20% respectively, 5.7% of antenatal mothers were strongly seroreactive for syphilis. Therefore all antenatal mothers should be screened for STD and routine serological test for syphilis should be done.

  12. Enabling frameworks for low-carbon technology transfer to small emerging economies: Analysis of ten case studies in Chile

    Technology transfer is crucial to reduce the carbon intensity of developing countries. Enabling frameworks need to be in place to allow foreign technologies to flow, to be absorbed and to bring about technological change in the recipient country. This paper contributes to identifying these enabling factors by analysing 10 case studies of low-carbon technology transfer processes based in Chile. Our findings show the importance of strong economic and institutional fundamentals, a sound knowledge base, a sizable and stable demand and a functioning local industry. Policy recommendations are derived to improve the penetration of foreign low-carbon technologies in developing countries, focusing on the particularities of small and medium emerging economies. - Highlights: ► We analyse 10 case studies of low carbon technology transfer to Chile. ► We identify enablers of technology transfer to developing countries. ► We provide policy recommendations focusing on small and medium economies.

  13. Childhood herpes zoster: A clustering of ten cases

    Prabhu Smitha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster occurs due to reactivation of the latent varicella zoster virus and is usually a disease of the elderly. Childhood herpes zoster is believed to be rare, though recent studies suggest increasing incidence in children. Here we report ten cases of childhood herpes zoster, seven of which occurred within a short span of six months, at a tertiary care level hospital in Pokhara, Nepal. Only three of the ten children reported previous history of varicella infection and none was immunized against varicella. Though childhood herpes zoster accounted for less than 1% of the total zoster cases in the past, recent reports show an increase in the number of cases in apparently healthy children. So far, no studies have been done linking childhood herpes zoster with HIV, though there are many studies linking it with other immunocompromised conditions.

  14. Lifeline electric rates and alternative approaches to the problems of low-income ratepayers. Ten case studies of implemented programs

    1980-07-01

    Program summaries, issue developments, governmental processes, and impacts are discussed for 10 case studies dealing with lifeline electric rates and alternative approaches to the problems of low-income ratepayers, namely; the Boston Edison rate freeze; the California lifeline; Florida Power and Light conservation rate; the Iowa-Illinois Gas and Electric small-use rate; the Maine demonstration lifeline program; the Massachusetts Electric Company A-65 rate; the Michigan optional senior citizen rate; the Narragansett Electric Company A-65 SSI rate; the Northern States Power Company conservation rate break; and the Potomac Electric Power Company rate freeze. (MCW)

  15. Trends in detection of new leprosy cases at two centres in Himachal Pradesh, India: a ten-year study.

    Mahajan, V K; Sharma, N L; Rana, P; Sood, N

    2003-01-01

    An impressive decline in leprosy prevalence rate (PR) in all endemic districts of India is seen in the post-MDT era. However, the new case-detection rate, an important statistical indicator in leprosy control programmes, has not shown significant decline in spite of all efforts. In Himachal Pradesh, a decline in PR from 7.8 to 0.56/10000 between 1991 to 2000 is seen, and recently the State has won national acclaim for having achieved the goal of elimination of leprosy in all the districts. The vertical leprosy programme has been integrated into general health services of the state. An analysis of data from 1991 to 2000 of two leprosy control units of Himachal Pradesh, the Urban Leprosy Clinic in Shimla (ULC-S) and the District Leprosy Control Unit in Mandi (DLCU-M), showed no significant decline in the new cases detected. 277 and 271 new cases were detected at these centres respectively; these included 2.2% and 1.5% children of less than 14 years of age. Almost 75% of these cases were males and of MB type. A steadily increasing trend in the annual detection of new cases was seen at both the centres during the decade. The cases registered at DLCU-M were mainly indigenous to the district. At ULC-S, 45 migrant cases from other endemic areas-mainly from Nepal, Bihar, and Uttar Pradesh-had also contributed to the increased number of new cases. Other possible causes discussed for this higher new case detection, e.g. overdiagnosis, detection of backlog "hidden cases" and voluntary reporting of patients, do not differ from those seen in other parts of the country or the world. PMID:15253391

  16. Amoxicillin induced toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN: a case report

    Jaimin B. Patel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Each year many patients are hospitalized due to adverse drug reactions. Adverse reactions are the recognized hazards of drug therapy and they can occur with any class of drugs and many studies revealed that the incidence is more in case of antibiotics. Amoxicillin is a broad spectrum, bactericidal, beta lactam antibiotic, commonly used to combat various infections. Penicillin group of drugs are known to cause cutaneous drug eruptions especially in pediatric population. Most of the time, these eruptions are mild in nature, however, sometimes they represent the early manifestation of rare, severe drug-induced cutaneous reactions, such as Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN is a rare, life threatening dermatological disorder that is usually induced by medications. Seventy percent of the cases of TEN are drug induced, most commonly implicated drugs being anticonvulsants, antibiotics and Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS. Here, we report a case of toxic epidermal necrolysis induced by amoxicillin in a 16 year old female patient. Rigorous treatment with systemic corticosteroids and immunoglobulins helped in recovery of the patient. The case is being reported to emphasize the need for efficient pharmacovigilance in order to motivate adverse drug reaction reporting so as to gather more and more data regarding adverse drug reactions. Through this report, we also seek the support of everyone concerned to detect and, if possible, prevent adverse reactions to drugs. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(4.000: 1011-1014

  17. Large-Scale Curriculum Change in a System of Ten Indonesian Medical Schools: A Case Study of Educational Innovation.

    Blizard, Peter J.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    A case history is given of major curriculum changes in a system of medical schools, involving 260 departments. It is proposed that this history clarifies selected aspects of the theoretical literature on educational innovation and diffusion and on staff development program planning and provides some practical guidelines. (MSE)

  18. Subtotal Hemispherectomy, Report of Ten Cases

    N. O. Ameli

    1960-01-01

    Full Text Available 10 cases submitted to subtotal hemispheretomy are discussed. In selected group of infantile hemiplegia where epilepsy and behaviour disturbances are pr~sent, and investigations prove that the other hemisphere is farly normal, thts operation is of greatt benefit. Ne,vertheless long follow-up of these cases IS necessary before a final judgement can be passed. Age should.be no barrier to selection, as those of 18 - 25 have benefited as much as young children

  19. Bridging gaps : ten crosscurrents in media studies

    Fornäs, Johan

    2008-01-01

    The final, definitive version of this paper has been published in: Media, Culture and Society, (30), 6, 895-905, 2008.Johan Fornäs, Bridging Gaps: Ten Crosscurrents in Media Studies.http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0163443708096811. by SAGE Publications Ltd, All rights reserved. http://www.sagepub.com/

  20. Breast Cancer in Transgender Veterans: A Ten-Case Series.

    Brown, George R

    2015-03-01

    All known cases of breast cancer in patients with a diagnosis consistent with transgender identification were identified in the Veterans Health Administration (1996-2013). Ten cases were confirmed: seven birth sex females and three birth sex males. Of the three birth sex males, two identified as gender dysphoric male-to-female and one identified as transgender with transvestic fetishism. The birth sex males all presented with late-stage disease that proved fatal, whereas most of the birth sex female transgender veterans presented with earlier stage disease that could be treated. These cases support the importance of screening for breast cancer using standard guidelines in birth sex males and females. Family history of breast cancer should be obtained from transgender people as part of routine care. This report expands the known cases of breast cancer in transgender persons from 5 to 12 (female-to-male) and from 10 to 13 (male-to-female). PMID:26790021

  1. Firework injuries: a ten-year study.

    Puri, Vinita; Mahendru, Sanjay; Rana, Roshani; Deshpande, Manish

    2009-09-01

    Fireworks are used worldwide to celebrate popular events (e.g. festivals, official celebrations, weddings). The festival of lights (Diwali) is celebrated with fireworks in India. During this period, many patients from all age groups present to hospital with injuries due to fireworks. Prevalence, period of occurrence, sex and age variation, adult supervision, causative fireworks, mode of lighting, age groups prone to injury, patterns of injury caused by individual fireworks, and the body parts injured were studied. One hundred and fifty-seven cases (92 retrospective, 65 prospective) with injury due to fireworks presenting to the Department of Plastic Surgery at KEM Hospital between 1997 and 2006 were studied. The prevalence of injuries has decreased steadily over the last 10 years (41 cases in 1997, 3 cases in 2006). The maximum number of injuries (35%) was seen in the age group 5-14 years; 92% of these children were unsupervised. The commonest cause of injury was firework misuse (41% of cases), followed by device failure (35%). Device failure was commonest with flares/fountains (ground firework emitting sparks upwards) and aerial devices. Flare/fountains caused most injury (39%), sparklers the least (0.6%). Flare/fountains, ground spinners, sparklers, and gunpowder (explosive material from cracker, obtained by tearing paper wrapper and obtaining chemicals) caused only soft tissue burns; stringbombs (high-intensity fire cracker made by wrapping chemicals with jute strings/coir in layers) and rockets (aerial device that zooms upwards and bursts) caused blast injuries, leading to soft tissue disruption and bony injuries. Emergency surgery was done if indicated: tendon and/or neurovascular repair, fracture fixation, flap cover or amputation. Superficial burns were treated with dressings. Certain wounds needed only thorough cleansing of the wound and primary suturing. We concluded that, over a 10-year period, the prevalence of firework injury decreased due to increased awareness in the community. Aggressive awareness campaigns by government and non-government organisations was the cause. We can minimise the number and severity of accidents by raising awareness regarding safety precautions, encouraging professional displays and motivating manufacturers to adhere to strict quality control. PMID:18603491

  2. Drug-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and SJS-TEN overlap: A multicentric retrospective study

    M Barvaliya; Sanmukhani, J.; Patel, T.; N Paliwal; Shah, H.; TRIPATHI, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background : Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are rare immune-mediated severe cutaneous adverse reactions with incidence rate of 0.05 to 2 persons per million populations per year. Drugs are the most commonly implicated in 95% of cases. Aims : To audit the causative drugs, clinical outcome, and cost of management in SJS, TEN, and SJS-TEN overlap. Setting and Design: Tertiary care hospitals-based multicentric retrospective study (case series). Materials and M...

  3. Associations between several sites of cancer and ten types of exhaust and combustion products; Results from a case-referent study in Montreal

    Siemiatycki, J.; Stewart, P.; Nadon, L.; Dewar, R.; Richardson, L. (Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine Research Center, Institute Armand-Frappier, Laval-des-Rapides, Quebec (Canada)); Gerin, M. (Univ. of Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Occupational and Environmental Health)

    1988-01-01

    A population-based case-referent study provided information on the associations between several types of cancer and 10 types of exhaust and combustion products. All site-exposure combinations were investigated. An increased lung cancer risk, in particular squamous-cell cancers, due to exposure to gasoline and diesel exhausts was found. Among the associations that have not been subject to previous attention, the most promising leads for further investigation are the possible relations between gasoline and diesel exhaust and colorectal cancers, gasoline exhaust and kidney cancer, coal combustion products and pancreatic cancer (and possibly non-adenocarcinoma lung cancer), combustion products of heating oil and prostatic cancer, and natural-gas combustion products and bladder cancer.

  4. Lessons learnt from ten performance assessment studies

    The management of radioactive wastes and, in particular, the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal systems are areas of high priority in the programme of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). In 1994, a Working Group was set up under the PAAG (Performance Assessment Advisory Group) on Integrated Performance Assessments of Deep Repositories (IPAG). The aim of the group is to provide a forum for informed discussion on performance assessment (PA), and to examine the overall status of PA and specific issues identified by the group and the PAAG. This document presents the report of a first phase of work completed in December 1996 and is expected to be of most interest to practitioners of repository PA and those with an interest in technical review of PA studies. (K.A.)

  5. A ten years follow-up of the results of surgery for Dupuytren's disease. A study of fifty-eight cases.

    Norotte, G; Apoil, A; Travers, V

    1988-01-01

    Fifty-eight patients (52 males and 6 females) operated on for Dupuytren contracture were examined by the same author with a more than ten year follow-up. At time of surgery the average was 55 years old. 69 hands (169 fingers) rated 4.33 according to the simplified Tubiana's score were treated by the same operative procedure: Mac Indoe's incision, digital Z plasty (if needed), subtotal fasciectomy and physiotherapy beginning 8 days postoperatively. At long term, recurrence appears for 49 hands (71%) one every two in the two first postoperative years, one out of five after five years. 24 of them were graded stage I. The recurrence appeared 14 times associated with an extension of the disease and the earlier, the higher was the initial stage. Some factors seem to be of a bad prognosis regarding recurrence: age (93% of recurrence under 50 years old) Ledderhose or Lapeyronie (100%) other associated diseases (Alcoholism, diabetes mellitus, epilepsy) and severe preoperative stage. Subjective results are good: 45 patients are satisfied and only 3 underwent a second operation. PMID:3233038

  6. TESTING THE HYPOTHESIS OF MARKET EFFICIENCY THROUGH ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS: A CASE STUDY WITH THE TEN MAJOR IBOVESPA SHARES IN THE FIRST QUARTER OF 2011

    Luiz Henrique Herling

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuel market is facing political, economic, social and environmental problems that are fuzzing the future of fossil energy sources and in face of these facts, countries are looking for hybrid and electric vehicles as part of solution in transportation sector due to the fact of electric vehicles use few or no fossil fuel. The objective in this article was to identify options until 2020 to introduce electric vehicle in the urban traffic of São Paulo city and to develop this study the method of literature review in secondary sources was used to present electric vehicle technologies and to identify parameters that were assessed through morphological analysis technique. In morphological analysis, sets of values were defined by the author for these parameters, possible combinations were structured, clearly impractical deployment options before 2020 were discarded and some viable solutions were analyzed in details. These analyses concluded that there are viable options for actual days in São Paulo city, but important requirements regarding technology, politic, market, infrastructure and innovation in products and services still need to be addressed and it is the main reason of electric vehicle remain unnoticed by consumers as an viable option. The challenges are great and the actors who are willing to solve them will find a promising market to explore.

  7. Stevens Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis and SJS-TEN overlap: A retrospective study of causative drugs and clinical outcome

    Sharma Vinod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Stevens Johnson syndrome (SJS, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN and SJS-TEN overlap are serious adverse cutaneous drug reactions. Drugs are often implicated in these reactions. Methods: A retrospective analysis of inpatients′ data with these dermatological diagnoses were carried out for three years, to study the causative drugs, clinical outcome, and mortality in these conditions. Results: Thirty patients (15 TEN, nine SJS-TEN overlap, and six SJS were admitted. In 21 cases, multiple drugs were implicated whereas single drugs were responsible in nine. Anticonvulsants (35.08% were the most commonly implicated drugs followed by antibiotics (33.33% and NSAIDS (24.56%. Twenty-five patients recovered whereas five died (four TEN, one SJS-TEN overlap. Conclusion: Anticonvulsants, antibiotics and NSAIDs were the most frequently implicated drugs. TEN causes higher mortality than both SJS and SJS-TEN overlap.

  8. ANEURYSMAL BONE CYSTS OF THE SACRUM: A REPORT OF TEN CASES AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    Brastianos, Priscilla; Gokaslan, Zia; McCarthy, Edward F.

    2009-01-01

    Ten cases of aneurysmal bone cysts are presented. Patients ranged in age from five years to 64 years. Treatment was resection or curettage; four patients had preoperative embolization. Treatment results were excellent. Six patients had no recurrence while recurrences in the other four patients were successfully treated by recurretage, two with adjunctive CyberKnife therapy. All ten patients are currently disease free for at least two years. Only two patients have residual neurologic deficit i...

  9. Use of interactive lecture demonstrations: A ten year study

    Sharma, Manjula D.; Johnston, Ian D.; Johnston, Helen; Varvell, Kevin; Robertson, Gordon; Hopkins, Andrew; Stewart, Chris; Cooper, Ian; Thornton, Ronald

    2010-07-01

    The widely held constructivist view of learning advocates student engagement via interactivity. Within the physics education research community, several specific interactive strategies have been developed to enhance conceptual understanding. One such strategy, the Interactive Lecture Demonstration (ILD) is designed for large lecture classes and, if measured using specific conceptual surveys, is purported to provide learning gains of up to 80%. This paper reports on learning gains for two different Projects over ten years. In Project 1, the ILDs were implemented from 1999 to 2001 with students who had successfully completed senior high school physics. The learning gains for students not exposed to the ILDs were in the range 13% to 16% while those for students exposed to the ILDs was 31% to 50%. In Project 2, the ILDs were implemented from 2007 to 2009 with students who had not studied senior high school physics. Since the use of ILDs in Project 1 had produced positive results, ethical considerations dictated that all students be exposed to ILDs. The learning gains were from 28% to 42%. On the one hand it is pleasing to note that there is an increase in learning gains, yet on the other, we note that the gains are nowhere near the claimed 80%. This paper also reports on teacher experiences of using the ILDs, in Project 2.

  10. Use of interactive lecture demonstrations: A ten year study

    Ronald Thornton

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The widely held constructivist view of learning advocates student engagement via interactivity. Within the physics education research community, several specific interactive strategies have been developed to enhance conceptual understanding. One such strategy, the Interactive Lecture Demonstration (ILD is designed for large lecture classes and, if measured using specific conceptual surveys, is purported to provide learning gains of up to 80%. This paper reports on learning gains for two different Projects over ten years. In Project 1, the ILDs were implemented from 1999 to 2001 with students who had successfully completed senior high school physics. The learning gains for students not exposed to the ILDs were in the range 13% to 16% while those for students exposed to the ILDs was 31% to 50%. In Project 2, the ILDs were implemented from 2007 to 2009 with students who had not studied senior high school physics. Since the use of ILDs in Project 1 had produced positive results, ethical considerations dictated that all students be exposed to ILDs. The learning gains were from 28% to 42%. On the one hand it is pleasing to note that there is an increase in learning gains, yet on the other, we note that the gains are nowhere near the claimed 80%. This paper also reports on teacher experiences of using the ILDs, in Project 2.

  11. [Allergy to food colouring. A prospective study in ten children].

    Zenaidi, Makram; Pauliat, Sylvie; Chaliier, Pierre; Fratta, Anne; Girardet, Jean Philippe

    2005-07-01

    In order to know more about allergy to food colouring, we conducted a prospective open study over 8 months in a group of 10 atopic children with repeated urticaria. The mean age was 6.5 years (4.2 - 13.5 years). The diagnosis was based on oral challenge tests along with hisory taking there were 3 cases of allergy to food colourings. Clinical features were mainly skin symptoms, sometimes associated with GI manifestations which were not only rare (1 case in our series) but also non specific. Colourings-free diet was recommended in consequence. It resulted in the disappearance of the symptoms in a child (Red cochineal) and their regression in the two others (Red cochineal, Red beet) with a follow up of 8 months and 3 months respectively. PMID:16220699

  12. Case Studies

    Proven options available to Sri Lanka for large scale electricity generation in the future are coal-fired thermal, oil-fired thermal and Nuclear. Four case studies for groups participated are indicated. Case study for group 1 is comparison of the three options by taking into consideration the capital and recurrent expenditure involved. Environmental effects of the three options are also given. Case study for group 2 is economic comparison of three renewable energy based power generation system. Case study for group 3 is based on energy conservation, efficiency, improvement and demand management. Assuming that a continuous saving of 20 MW of demand from 1996 onwards is effective two projects are suggested to achieve this result. Case study for group 4 is a feasibility study for hydro power development of the Kukule Ganga (river) in Sri Lanka. Participants are required to evaluate one of the three optional development concepts which are technically feasible

  13. Adoption of Educational Technology Ten Years after Setting Strategic Goals: A Canadian University Case

    Zhou, George; Xu, Judy

    2007-01-01

    Through surveys, focus groups and interviews, this study examines technology adoption at a large Canadian university ten years after setting a strategic plan, explores the interplay between instructors' concepts of teaching and use of technology, and searches for the best solutions to help them use technology more effectively. Results showed that…

  14. A study of ten quasars with redshifts greater than four

    Four quasars with redshifts greater than four were detected in a low-resolution CCD grism survey. CCD photometry and high S/N, moderate resolution spectra are presented for these quasars and the six other known quasars with redshifts above 4. The M sub B values of nine of the objects are between -27.5 and -25, with the tenth quasar having an M sub B value of -29. The emission lines and shapes of the continua of these ten quasars are similar to those of lower-redshift quasars. The results suggest that the C IV emission lines in high-redshift quasars may be weaker than those in lower-redshift quasars. The continua of all of the high-redshift quasars display strong depressions blueward of the Ly-alpha emission line. 31 refs

  15. Colorectal carcinoma in a ten-year-old girl: A case report

    Sarbani Chattopadhyay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal carcinoma is very rare in childhood. In this case report, we depict a ten-year-old girl who presented with features of intestinal obstruction which turned out to be due to poorly differentiated mucin secreting adenocarcinoma of descending colon. Only increased awareness of this malignancy in this age-group and a high index of suspicion can help when a child complains of persistent pain of abdomen, altered bowel habits or rectal bleeding, and may provide diagnosis at an earlier stage, thereby improving the prognosis.

  16. Neutron therapy of low grade 'pencil' gliomas of the spinal cord: A review of ten cases

    Between 1980 and 1986 ten patients (two males, eight females, median age: 35 years) with spongioblastomas and ependymomas grade I of the spinal cord were treated with fast neutrons from the d(14)+Be reaction after incomplete tumour surgery. Eight patients received three weekly fractions of 0.7 to 1.33 Gy and two patients four weekly fractions of 0.8 Gy to total doses of 7.4 to 10.4 Gy. Two complete and six partial remissions of ataxia and motor disturbances were observed. Bladder dysfunctions in five patients cleared up partially in three cases. In two patients the symptomatology remained unchanged. After a follow-up of eight to 88 months two initially complete and two out of six partial remission were maintained. No severe late effects of the skin have been determined. In summary it is concluded that for incompletely resected 'pencil'-gliomas fast neutrons therapy seems to be a feasible treatment modality. (orig.)

  17. Ten most notable family medicine research studies in Canada

    Levitt, Cheryl; Katz, Alan; Mang, Eric; Safarov, Artem

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify 10 noteworthy Canadian family medicine research studies that have affected practice in order to demonstrate the unique value that Canadian family medicine research offers. Composition of the committee Representatives from the Section of Researchers (SOR) and the Health Policy and Government Relations department of the College of Family Physicians of Canada developed a framework for inclusion and identified an initial list of articles. Members of the SOR Council and research directors from the 17 Canadian departments of family medicine reviewed the preliminary list and suggested additional studies. Methods The authors developed an initial list of studies carried out by Canadian family medicine researchers from those researchers who had received awards from the College of Family Physicians of Canada since 2002. Additional studies were proposed by members of the SOR Council and the university research directors. A total of 36 published articles were reviewed by the SOR authors, and an annotated short list of 16 articles was prepared. From that list, the other authors identified 7 noteworthy studies that were used to form the basis of advocacy materials. The SOR authors, along with 3 additional members of the SOR Executive, used an informal consensus process to select the final 3 articles to arrive at the top 10. Report The top 10 most noteworthy family medicine research studies are presented in this article and represent the unique contribution that Canadian family medicine research brings to health care in Canada. They have helped advance health care quality and improve care delivery, beneficially influencing health care practices, health care policy, and patient experiences. Conclusion This project has identified 10 classic Canadian family medicine research studies that continue to influence practice today. In addition to their usefulness as tools for teaching, advocating, and championing the contribution of research to modern family practice, these studies are important examples of the value of research to patient health in Canada and around the world.

  18. The Gestational Trophoblastic Diseases: A Ten Year Retrospective Study

    Razieh Mohammadjafari; Parvin Abedi; Mitra Tadayon Najafabady

    2010-01-01

    Background: Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) defines a heterogenenous group ofinterrelated lesions that arise from the trophoblastic epithelium of the placenta. There are severalhistologically distinct types of GTD: hydatiform mole (complete or partial), persistant/invasivegestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN), choriocarcinoma and placenta site trophoblastictumors. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and risk factors of GTD amongwomen admitted to Imam Khomeini Hosp...

  19. Temperament and character in eating disorders: ten years of studies.

    Fassino, S; Amianto, F; Gramaglia, C; Facchini, F; Abbate Daga, G

    2004-06-01

    In recent years a number of studies of personality have been performed in subjects with Eating Disorders (EDs) to investigate the clinical differences between controls and ED patients and among EDs subtypes, and its role in the development and course of symptoms. The Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ) and the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) have been widely used at this purpose, allowing the description of specific temperament and character profiles for EDs. High Harm Avoidance (HA) and low Self-Directedness (SD) are shared by all EDs. Slight differences on some facets have been found among ED subgroups. Nevertheless, HA is influenced by mood and both high HA and low SD are personality traits shared by many mental disorders, whose specificity is rather low. Restrictor anorectics are characterized by high Persistence (P) and a relatively higher SD, and bulimics by higher Novelty Seeking (NS) and the lowest SD, while binge/purging and purging anorectics share some traits with anorexia and some with bulimia. Though current data justify the discrimination among anorexia subtypes, they are not in contrast with the thesis of a continuum in ED personality traits. Since some personality traits display a prognostic value with regard to therapy and clinical outcome, further studies are needed on treatments and prognostic factors in EDs. Moreover, studies attempting to define the neurobiological and genetic correlates of temperament should be supported by clinical pharmacological trials. PMID:15330074

  20. The Gestational Trophoblastic Diseases: A Ten Year Retrospective Study

    Razieh Mohammadjafari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD defines a heterogenenous group ofinterrelated lesions that arise from the trophoblastic epithelium of the placenta. There are severalhistologically distinct types of GTD: hydatiform mole (complete or partial, persistant/invasivegestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN, choriocarcinoma and placenta site trophoblastictumors. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and risk factors of GTD amongwomen admitted to Imam Khomeini Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran.Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at Imam KhomeiniHospital in Ahvaz, Iran. All hospital records related to GTD (132 from 1996 until 2006 werereviewed. Demographic and histo-pathologic characteristics were extracted. Chi-square andFisher-exact tests were used to analyze all variables. P ≤ 0.05 was considered statisticallysignificant. SPSS, version 11 was used for statistical analysis.Results: The mean age of patients was 27.6 years. Most patients who presented with GTDwere of ages 18-35 years (71.3%. There was no relationship between age and hydatiformmole during the reproductive years. There were 28 (18.9% patients over the age 40, of which18 (15.90% of these had a complete hydatiform mole. Within this group, 9 (6.8% changedto a persistent mole. There was a significant relationship between age over 40 and completemole (p<0.02. The percentage of patients with blood groups A and O was the same (37.9%.There was a significant relationship between blood groups (O+ and A+ and complete mole(p<0.05.Conclusion: The most common age range for hydatiform mole was 18-35 years. Women overthe age of 40 had a more complete hydatiform mole, which is similar to the other countries.Age and blood group are two risk factors for hydatiform mole.

  1. Prognostic factors in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a ten year study

    Oloomi yazdi Z.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common cancer in the pediatric population. With modern treatments, the chance of the complete recovery is nearly 100%. The most important prognostic factors are appropriate treatment protocol and determination of patient risk factors based on clinical, morphological, immunological and cytological characteristics. In this study we reviewed frequency of these factors, like as age, gender, the primary white blood cell number, sub- group on the base of FAB classification, immunophenotype and the clinical progress. Methods: In this retrospective study, we reviewed 877 pediatric patients with the diagnosis of ALL between the years of 1994 and 2004. In these patients the age, gender, primary WBC count, sub-group based on the FAB classification, immunophenotype and the clinical progress in 177 patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at Imam Khomeini Hospital between the years of 1994 to 2004 were determined. Results: Of these patients, 1.6% was younger than one year, 24.8% more than ten years old and 73.6% were between the ages of one and ten years; 63.8% were male. WBC counts were above 50,000/ul in 28.8% of the patients. FAB classifications included L1 in 80.2%, L2 in 17.5% and L3 in 2.3% of the patients. Immunophenotypes included pre-B cell in 63.8%, early pre-B cell in 23.1%, T cell in 12.3% and mature B cell in 0.8% of the patients. Marker CD10+ was detected in 88.1% of the B cell cases. In this study group, 74% of the patients recovered, 16.3% died and 16.5% relapsed.Conclusions: The prevalence of FAB-L1 and pre-B cell cases in this study is greater than a previous study, while the prevalence of FAB-L2 and early pre-B cell cases is less than that of the previous study.

  2. A ten-year study of tick biting in Mississippi: implications for human disease transmission.

    Goddard, Jerome

    2002-01-01

    To determine exactly which tick species bit people in Mississippi, information was gathered on ticks involved in human biting cases for the ten-year period, January 1, 1990-December 31, 1999. Specimens were identified by the author and, in most cases, confirmed by personnel at the Institute of Arthropodology and Parasitology, Georgia Southern University. A total of 119 ticks were recovered from 73 humans during the study period. Seven tick species were represented; most common included the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum, the gulf coast tick, A. maculatum, the American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis, and the black-legged deer tick, Ixodes scapularis. Interestingly, no immature Ixodes scapularis were collected. there were several unusual records. Twelve larvae of Amblyomma tuberculatum, a species associated with the gopher tortoise, were removed from a patient. Two Dermacentor albipictus larvae were collected from an elderly woman with no travel history except her backyard. One Dermacentor sp. nymph, removed from a man in central MS, was not even a North American species. One adult female Dermacentor variabilis was involved in a clinical case of tick paralysis. These findings indicate that, although we know which tick species are common human biters, unusual/unreported tick-human interactions may be more common than we think. PMID:12853269

  3. High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT) versus TENS and NSAIDs in low back pain: clinical study

    Zati, Allesandro; Fortuna, Damiano; Valent, A.; Filippi, M. V.; Bilotta, Teresa W.

    2004-09-01

    Low back pain, caused by lumbar disc herniation, is prevalently treated with a conservative approach. In this study we valued the efficacy of High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT), compared with accepted therapies such as TENS and NSAIDs. Laser therapy obtained similar results in the short term, but better clinical effect over time than TENS and NSAIDs. In conclusion high intensity laser therapy appears to be a interesting new treatment, worthy of further research.

  4. Case study

    Milana, Marcella; Bernt Sørensen, Tore

    Illeriis (at that time Roskilde University Centre and Learning Lab Denmark, DK)3. The case here presented is based on results from research activity carried out over a 1 year period (spring 2006 - spring 2007). Detailed information concerning participation in the project was collected in two DHSs only: the...

  5. Childhood poisoning in Warri, Niger Delta, Nigeria: A ten year retrospective study

    Gilbert I.M. Ugwu; Blessing O. Okperi; Eunice N. Ugwu; Nekwu E. Okolugbo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Childhood poisoning is a common but avoidable problem in developing countries such as Nigeria. Objectives: To determine the pattern of childhood poisoning in the Warri Niger Delta Region of Nigeria.Method: The case notes of all the children seen at Central Hospital Warri, the reference base for the region and GN Children Clinic the pioneer children’s hospital in the region. This is a review of cases over a ten year period, from 2000 to 2009. The information obtained was analysed.R...

  6. Experience with Oesophageal Cancer: A Ten-Year Single Centre Study Reflecting Daily Practice

    R. J. L. F. Loffeld; Dekkers, P.E.P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Studied patients with oesophageal cancer do not represent normal daily presentation. Aim. A retrospective study was done in all consecutive patients in order to describe presentation, treatment, and survival. Patients. All patients in a ten-year period were included. Patients were grouped in three groups. Group 1: no metastases and potentially curable, dead, or alive at time of evaluation. Group 2: patients presenting with metastases and treated with palliative chemotherapy, and...

  7. EFFECT OF CONVENTIONAL TENS VERSUS SPINAL MOBILIZATION IN PRIMARY DYSMENORRHEA IN ADOLESCENT GIRLS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Manisha Mistry

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary dysmenorrhea is a common disabilitating factor in most of the adolescent girls. It is a major cause of inability to concentrate on their work or studies, class or school absenteeism, inability to perform in their academic activities. This study conducted to assess the effect of non-invasive treatments for pain relief during dysmenorrhea. Aim and Objectives: To study the effect of Conventional TENS and Spinal mobilization on pain in Primary Dysmenorrhea in adolescent girls. Materials and Methods: Fifty adolescent girls aged between 14-18 years were selected for the study that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Quasi experimental study was done to compare the effect of TENS and Maitland’s spinal mobilisation in Adolscent girls suffering from primary dysmenorrhea. They were randomly divided in two groups: Group A for TENS (n= 24 and Group B for spinal mobilisation (n= 26 and participant’s menstrual history was recorded. Girls with severe dysmenorrhea, pelvic pathology and spinal pathology were excluded from this study. Treatment was given on 1st and 2nd day of menstruation period. Adolescent girls marked the Short form Mc gill Pain Questionnaire (SFMPQ which includes PPI and VAS before and just after the treatment. Total scores were noted and subjected to statistical analysis. Result: Data was analyzed using Mann Whitney U test which compared data between groups; results were not statistically significant (p> 0.05 for SFMPQ, PPI and VAS. Pain relief was approximately the same for the two groups. Conclusion: The study concludes that TENS and mobilisation both are effective reducing pain among adolescent girls who suffer from primary dysmenorrhea.

  8. Purple urine bag syndrome in nursing homes: Ten elderly case reports and a literature review

    Chi-Hung Lin

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Chi-Hung Lin1, Hsien-Te Huang1, Chia-Chang Chien1, Dong-Sheng Tzeng1,2, For-Wey Lung1,3–51Department of Psychiatry, Kaohsiung Armed Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 2Graduate Institute of Occupational Safety and Health; 3Graduate Institute of Behavioral Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 4Department of Psychiatry, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Calo Psychiatric Center, Pingtung County, TaiwanAbstract: Purple urine bag syndrome (PUBS is a rare occurrence, in which the patient has a purple-colored urine bag following urinary catheterization for hours to days. Most of authors believe it is a mixture of indigo (blue and indirubin (red that becomes purple. Previous study showed that PUBS occurred predominantly in chronically catheterized, constipated women. We collected 10 elderly patients with PUBS in two nursing homes. The first two cases were identified by chart review in 1987 and 2003, and then later eight cases (42.1% were collected among 19 urinary catheterized elderly in the period between January 2007 and June 2007. In the present report, PUBS probably can occur in any patients with the right elements, namely urinary tract infection (UTI with bacteria possessing these enzymes, diet with enough tryptophan, and being catheterized. Associations with bed-bound state, Alzheimer’s, or dementia from other causes are reflections of the state of such patients who are at higher risk for UTI, and hence PUBS occurred. Although we presented PUBS as a harmless problem, prevention and control of the nosocomial catheter-associated UTIs (CAUTIs has become very important in the new patient-centered medical era. Thus, we should decrease the duration of catheterization, improve catheter care, and deploy technological advances designed for prevention, especially in the elderly cared for in nursing homes.Keyword: purple urine bag syndrome, indigo, indirubin, nursing home, bacteriuria, indoxyl sulphatase/phosphatase, nosocomial catheter-associated UTIs

  9. [Axillary Lymph Nodes Metastases from Occult Breast Cancer Recurrence at Ten Years after Resection-Case Report].

    Nagashima, Saki; Sakurai, Kenichi; Suzuki, Shuhei; Sakagami, Masashi; Adachi, Keita; Enomoto, Katsuhisa; Amano, Sadao

    2015-11-01

    We encountered a case of axillary lymph nodes metastases from occult breast cancer recurrence at 10 years after resection. Ten years previously, a 71-year-old woman had undergone surgery (dermabrasion+full thickness skin graft+axillary lymph node dissection) for axillary lymph nodes metastases from occult breast cancer. After the operation, she had received chemotherapy and hormone therapy for 5 years. Then, in the recent 5 years, she had stopped attending our hospital. Ten years after the first operation, she came back to our hospital with a lump in her axillary region. She underwent resection for the subcutaneous mass and the axillary lymph nodes. The pathological diagnosis implied metastases from breast carcinoma. We checked upa hole her body. However, we could not detect the original lesion. PMID:26805169

  10. ANALYSIS OF 138 CASES OF LUNG CANCER IN A TRAINING HOSPITAL COMPARED TO THE DATA OF LUNG CANCER CASES DIAGNOSED TEN YEARS PREVIOUSLY

    Dilaver Taş

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze data of cases with lung cancer (LC diagnosed in our clinic over one year period and compare them with data of cases with LC diagnosed before ten years. Method: The demographic data, radiological and bronchoscopic findings, diagnostic methods, and histological type and stages of the patients diagnosed with lung cancer in year 2005 were evaluated. Results: Over one year period, 138 patients were diagnosed with LC. 104 (75.4% were men and 34 (24.6% were women. Mean age was 63.78±9.53 (38-83. 118 (86.5% of the patients had 39±16.34 (5-90 pack-years smoking history. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC was diagnosed in 40.6% of patients, adenocarcinoma in 29.0%, small cell carcinoma in 21.0%, conbined type in 8.0% and carcinoma with unidentified cell type in 1.4%. Squamous cell carcinoma was more common among smoking patients. It was determined that the distribution of histological types in this study was similar to the previous studies, however the incidence of LC was found as increased in females in our study when compared to previous studies. Conclusion: We conclude that SCC is the most common histological type in patients with LC in our clinic and the male to female ratio for LC is decreasing.

  11. Stakeholders’ Views on Factors Influencing Nutrition Policy: a Qualitative Study Across Ten European Countries

    Jeruszka-Bielak Marta; Sicińska Ewa; Wit Liesbeth de; Ruprich Jiří; Řehůřková Irena; Brown Kerry A.; Timotijevic Lada; Sonne Anne-Mette; Haugaard Pernille; Guzzon Antonella; Garcia Noé Brito; Alevritou Eleni; Hermoso Maria; Sarmant Yuliya; Lähteenmäki Liisa

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to identify the main factors influencing micronutrient policies in the opinion of policy actors in ten European countries. Study was carried out during Jan-Nov 2010 in European countries: the Czech Republic, Denmark, England, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Spain. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with representatives of stakeholders involved in the vitamin D, folate and iodine policy making process. Fifty eight key informants ...

  12. Hoarseness after Spinal Anaesthesia Persisting for Ten Days after Delivery: A Case Report

    W-Q Sun; D-B Pan; A-G Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Hoarseness is common in general anaesthesia after tracheal intubation and brachial or cervial plexus block. However, there have been no reports of hoarseness associated with spinal anaesthesia in obstetric practice. We present a case of hoarseness in a parturient lasting for 10 days aftercombined spinal epidural anaesthesia with bupivacaine for Caesarean section. The hoarseness in this case may be caused by oedema of the vocal folds, which was due to high-level sympathetic blockade induced by...

  13. Hoarseness after Spinal Anaesthesia Persisting for Ten Days after Delivery: A Case Report

    W-Q Sun

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hoarseness is common in general anaesthesia after tracheal intubation and brachial or cervial plexus block. However, there have been no reports of hoarseness associated with spinal anaesthesia in obstetric practice. We present a case of hoarseness in a parturient lasting for 10 days aftercombined spinal epidural anaesthesia with bupivacaine for Caesarean section. The hoarseness in this case may be caused by oedema of the vocal folds, which was due to high-level sympathetic blockade induced by the spinal anaesthesia.

  14. In vitro antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants against clinical isolates of oral cancer cases

    Kaushal Vivek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suppression of immune system in treated cancer patients may lead to secondary infections that obviate the need of antibiotics. In the present study, an attempt was made to understand the occurrence of secondary infections in immuno-suppressed patients along with herbal control of these infections with the following objectives to: (a isolate the microbial species from the treated oral cancer patients along with the estimation of absolute neutrophile counts of patients (b assess the in vitro antimicrobial activity medicinal plants against the above clinical isolates. Methods Blood and oral swab cultures were taken from 40 oral cancer patients undergoing treatment in the radiotherapy unit of Regional Cancer Institute, Pt. B.D.S. Health University, Rohtak, Haryana. Clinical isolates were identified by following general microbiological, staining and biochemical methods. The absolute neutrophile counts were done by following the standard methods. The medicinal plants selected for antimicrobial activity analysis were Asphodelus tenuifolius Cav., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Balanites aegyptiaca L., Cestrum diurnum L., Cordia dichotoma G. Forst, Eclipta alba L., Murraya koenigii (L. Spreng. , Pedalium murex L., Ricinus communis L. and Trigonella foenum graecum L. The antimicrobial efficacy of medicinal plants was evaluated by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. MIC and MFC were investigated by serial two fold microbroth dilution method. Results Prevalent bacterial pathogens isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (23.2%, Escherichia coli (15.62%, Staphylococcus epidermidis (12.5%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9.37%, Klebsiella pneumonia (7.81%, Proteus mirabilis (3.6%, Proteus vulgaris (4.2% and the fungal pathogens were Candida albicans (14.6%, Aspergillus fumigatus (9.37%. Out of 40 cases, 35 (87.5% were observed as neutropenic. Eight medicinal plants (A. tenuifolius, A. racemosus, B. aegyptiaca, E. alba, M. koenigii, P. murex R. communis and T. foenum graecum showed significant antimicrobial activity (P P. aeruginosa was observed highest susceptible bacteria (46.6% on the basis of susceptible index. Conclusion It can be concluded that treated oral cancer patients were neutropenic and prone to secondary infection of microbes. The medicinal plant can prove as effective antimicrobial agent to check the secondary infections in treated cancer patients.

  15. Human lymphadenitis due to Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis: report of ten cases from Australia and review.

    Peel, M M; Palmer, G G; Stacpoole, A M; Kerr, T G

    1997-02-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis commonly causes caseous lymphadenitis in Australian sheep. We describe 10 cases of human lymphadenitis due to C. pseudotuberculosis; in all cases, isolates were submitted to a reference laboratory in Victoria, Australia. Most of the patients were occupationally exposed to sheep. We also review the 12 previously published cases of this infection, most of which were reported from Australia. No patient had any underlying disease or predisposing condition. Surgical excision of the affected lymph glands is the mainstay of management, and antibiotic therapy is supplementary treatment. Diagnosis was delayed for some patients, and some patients had a protracted or recurrent clinical course and/or a slow recovery. These 10 additional cases from one Australian state indicate that human lymphadenitis caused by C. pseudotuberculosis has not been as rare as the number of published reports indicates, at least in Australia. However, the increasing use of a vaccine against caseous lymphadenitis in sheep in Australia should result in the decreasing human incidence of this zoonosis. PMID:9114145

  16. Geomagnetic response to solar activity: summary for the last ten years and analysis of selected cases

    Hejda, Pavel; Bochníček, Josef; Valach, Fridrich; Revallo, Miloš

    2014-05-01

    The main sources of geomagnetic disturbances are either coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which are usually connected with eruptive flares, or high-speed streams of solar wind from coronal holes. Development of an eruptive flare and ejection of coronal mass is accompanied by magnetic reconnection. The evidence of reconnection can be found in a broad spectrum of observations. The observations of X-rays and radio bursts were used in our study. The geoeffectiveness of solar X-ray flares was initially analysed on data from the period 1996 - 2004 [1]. It was shown that the probability of geomagnetic response depends on the solar flare class and its position on the solar disc. The flares in the central region were found to be more geoeffective. The probability further increased if the flare was accompanied by Type II and/or Type IV of solar radio bursts. In the next step a neural network model was developed to determine the probability, with which flares will be followed by the geomagnetic response of a particular intensity. Enhancement of solar energetic particle flux was added to the set of input parameters. The results indicated that X-ray flares accompanied by solar radio bursts represent a good proxy of CMEs [2, 3]. This conclusion was now confirmed by the data from the period 2005 - 2012. Coronal holes are stable formations that can survive over several solar rotations. Corotating interaction regions (CIRs) between fast and slow solar wind can thus periodically pass over the Earth and cause recurrent geomagnetic storms. This periodicity makes the forecasts of the geomagnetic disturbances much easier [4] than in the case of eruptive phenomena. Our analysis confirmed that the strongest magnetic storms are caused by CMEs. Nevertheless, many geomagnetic disturbances in the active part of solar cycle are influenced by sequences of CMEs and CIRs, which increase their strength. [1] Bochníček, J., P. Hejda and F. Valach, Solar energetic events in the years 1996-2004. The analysis of their geoeffectiveness, Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica, 51, Issue 3, doi: 10.1007/s11200-007-0025-4, 439-447, 2007. [2] Valach, F., P. Hejda, and J. Bochníček, Geoeffectiveness of XRA events associated with RSP II and/or RSP IV estimated using the artificial neural network, Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica, 51, Issue 4, doi: 10.1007/s11200-007-0032-5, 551-562, 2007. [3] Valach, F., M. Revallo, J. Bochníček, and P. Hejda, Solar energetic particle flux enhancement as a predictor of geomagnetic activity in a neural network-based model, Space Weather, 7, S04004, doi:10.1029/2008SW000421, 2009. [4] Bochníček, J. and P. Hejda,. Areas of minimum intensity of soft X-rays as sources of solar wind high-speed streams. J. Atm Solar-Ter. Phys, 64, 511-515,2002.

  17. Case Study Teaching

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of case study teaching, types of cases, and experimental data supporting their effectiveness. It also describes a model for comparing the efficacy of the various case study methods. (Contains 1 figure.)

  18. Ten years of siting studies and public dialogue: the main lessons learnt at SKB

    It is more than 20 years since a co-ordinated nuclear waste management programme was set up in Sweden. Deep geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel in crystalline bedrock is the preferred option and an extensive R and D programme has been performed. A step-wise approach is being applied to development, technical demonstration and implementation of the disposal system. A key element of the programme is siting of the deep repository, which started in a focused manner almost ten years ago. Before that time a study-site drilling programme was performed 1977-85 and facilities for intermediate storage of the spent fuel (CLAB), final disposal of low and medium level waste (SFR) and underground research (Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory) were sited during the 1980's [1, 2]. Thus, siting-related experiences to date within SKB encompasses: - Deep-drilling programme at about ten study-sites (1977-85). - Siting of CLAB, 1976-79. - Siting of SFR, 1980-83. - Siting of Aespoe HRL, 1986-90. - Feasibility studies on a voluntary basis in two municipalities in northern Sweden, Storuman and Mala, including local referenda 1995 and 1997. - Feasibility studies on a voluntary basis in six municipalities, Oesthammar, Nykoeping, Oskarshamn, Tierp, Hultsfred, Aelvkarleby, 1995-2001. By the end of this year SKB will present a comprehensive plan for the continuation of the siting programme at a few sites selected from the six municipalities where feasibility studies are now being finished. (author)

  19. Karyological studies in ten different populations of desert lily aloe vera from pakistan

    To enhance theoretical basis of Aloe feeding and provide cytological basement, the karyotype and morphology of mitotic chromosomes, ten different populations of Aloe vera collected from various geographical locations of Karachi, Pakistan were studied by aceto-orcein staining technique. The results showed that chromosome number of Aloe vera is 2n=14. The karyotype is bimodal and consists of 14 chromosomes (8 large and 6 small) predominantly with submedian, median and subterminal centromere. Average chromosome lengths among populations ranged from 7.95-2.36 micro m. (author)

  20. Intrascrotal lipoblastoma in a ten year old boy: case report and review of literature

    Ghassan Nakib

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lipoblastoma is a rare benign soft tissue tumor encountered almost exclusively in infancy and early childhood. The location of tumors varies, but most occur in the extremities, trunk, head and neck. Less frequently, lipoblastomas have been reported in the mediastinum, the retroperitoneum and the inguinal region. Only 7 cases of lipoblastoma in the scrotum have been reported so far in the English literature, with none of the patients older than 8. We report an intrascrotal lipoblastoma in a 10 year-old boy. The differential diagnosis is discussed with reference to the literature.

  1. Feasibibility study - cases

    Lund, Henrik; Hvelplund, Frede Kloster; Sukkumnoed, Decharut

    The chapter presents two case studies to show the tools of feasibiliy studies within the context of technological innovation.......The chapter presents two case studies to show the tools of feasibiliy studies within the context of technological innovation....

  2. Project management case studies

    Kerzner, Harold R

    2013-01-01

    A new edition of the most popular book of project management case studies, expanded to include more than 100 cases plus a ""super case"" on the Iridium Project Case studies are an important part of project management education and training. This Fourth Edition of Harold Kerzner''s Project Management Case Studies features a number of new cases covering value measurement in project management. Also included is the well-received ""super case,"" which covers all aspects of project management and may be used as a capstone for a course. This new edition:Contains 100-plus case studies drawn from re

  3. Karyological studies in ten species of Citrus (Linnaeus, 1753 (Rutaceae of North-East India

    Marlykynti Hynniewta

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Ten Citrus (Linnaeus, 1753 species of North-East India have been karyo-morphologically analysed. All studied species had 2n=18 chromosomes without any evidence of numerical variation. All the chromosomes were found to be of metacentric and sub-metacentric in all the species; the morphology of the chromosomes showing size difference only. Symmetrical karyotype which does not have much difference in the ratio of longest to shortest chromosome in all the species was observed. Three species, C. grandis (Osbeck, 1757, C. reticulata (Blanco, 1837 and C. medica (Linnaeus, 1753 are identified as true basic species from asymmetry studies of karyotypes as they reflect on the primitive nature of their genomes. C. indica (Tanaka, 1937 occupies a special taxonomic position within the genus Citrus as a progenitor for other cultivated species

  4. Medical School Attrition-Beyond the Statistics A Ten Year Retrospective Study

    Maher Bridget M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical school attrition is important - securing a place in medical school is difficult and a high attrition rate can affect the academic reputation of a medical school and staff morale. More important, however, are the personal consequences of dropout for the student. The aims of our study were to examine factors associated with attrition over a ten-year period (2001–2011 and to study the personal effects of dropout on individual students. Methods The study included quantitative analysis of completed cohorts and qualitative analysis of ten-year data. Data were collected from individual student files, examination and admission records, exit interviews and staff interviews. Statistical analysis was carried out on five successive completed cohorts. Qualitative data from student files was transcribed and independently analysed by three authors. Data was coded and categorized and key themes were identified. Results Overall attrition rate was 5.7% (45/779 in 6 completed cohorts when students who transferred to other medical courses were excluded. Students from Kuwait and United Arab Emirates had the highest dropout rate (RR = 5.70, 95% Confidence Intervals 2.65 to 12.27;p  Absenteeism was documented in 30% of students, academic difficulty in 55.7%, social isolation in 20%, and psychological morbidity in 40% (higher than other studies. Qualitative analysis revealed recurrent themes of isolation, failure, and despair. Student Welfare services were only accessed by one-third of dropout students. Conclusions While dropout is often multifactorial, certain red flag signals may alert us to risk of dropout including non-EU origin, academic struggling, absenteeism, social isolation, depression and leave of absence. Psychological morbidity amongst dropout students is high and Student Welfare services should be actively promoted. Absenteeism should prompt early intervention. Behind every dropout statistic lies a personal story. All medical schools have a duty of care to support students who leave the medical programme.

  5. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: from the Perspective of Ten Years and 2417 Cases

    Nurettin zgr Do?an

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Carbon monoxide (CO poisoning is a common problem in various countries, especially in Winter months. CO exposure results in the formation of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb, which is responsible for toxicity symptoms. In this study, we aim to demonstrate the demographic features and seasonal variations of this particular public health problem. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated hospital police reports and medical records of 2417 ED patients diagnosed with CO poisoning between 1999 and 2009. Sources of exposure, seasonal variation and demographic characteristics were analyzed. Results: The mean age of the patients, of whom 1418 (58.7% were female, was 2918 years. While 1708 patients (70.7% were admitted to adult ED, 709 (29.3% patients were admitted to pediatric ED. January and subsequent Winter months represented the most dangerous periods for CO exposure. No intentional (suicidal attempt exposure to CO intoxication was reported and the major cause for intoxication included unsecured stoves and gas heaters. Conclusion: Emergency physicians should be familiar with symptoms and remedies of CO intoxication, which still constitutes a serious health problem.

  6. Case Study Research

    Cousin, Glynis

    2005-01-01

    Case study research aims to explore and depict a setting with a view to advancing understanding. This note explores the dimensions of case study research in higher education, with special reference to geographical fieldwork. It explores Stake's three categories of case study research: intrinsic, instrumental and collective. It provides guidelines…

  7. Study of the parental origin of sexual aneuploidy in ten families using RFLPs.

    Villamar, M; Fernandez, E; Ayuso, C; Ramos, C; Benitez, J

    1990-01-01

    We have studied 10 families with sexual aneuploidy by means of recombinant DNA techniques. The X linked probes were F814 (DXS52), FIX (FVIII gene), pert 87.15 (DXS164), L754 (DXS84) and 47Z (DXYS5). The observed banding patterns allowed us to determine the parental origin of such aneuploidy in nine of our cases. It was paternal in seven cases and maternal in two. PMID:1973343

  8. A ten-year study of depressive symptoms in Serbian medical students.

    Risti?-Ignjatovi?, Dragana; Hini?, Darko; Jakovljevi?, Mihajlo; Fountoulakis, Kostas; Siepera, Marianna; Ranci?, Nemanja

    2013-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the rate of three dimensions of depressive symptoms in medical student population in Serbia, and to find out whether this rate had changed over the period often years. This cross-sectional study included 615 medical students (F = 61% and M = 39%), mean age = 23.60 (SD = 1.541), who were tested in five non-consecutive surveys between 2002 and 2012. Depressive symptoms were measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The mean BDI score for the entire sample was 6.26 +/- 6.175. There was no significant difference in total BDI score among the values obtained during the ten years of testing. The greatest portion of the examined sample (77.24%) had no signs of depressive symptoms, and there was no difference in symptom intensity between medical students and other educational profiles. Similar to previous results, females had higher scores on all depressive dimensions except for one tested year, whereas a weak correlation was found between BDI scores and student age (r = 0.104; p = 0.010). Since there are still discrepancies among studies that do (not) report that medical students have typical depressive symptoms, potential explanations for the mentioned discrepancies may be found in individual characteristics of the members of the student population. Our suggestions for future studies are that they should include the stress factor, stress coping strategies, estimated life satisfaction, and the impact of these factors on the potential mental disorders. PMID:24053075

  9. A Ten Year Descriptive Study of Adult Leukaemia at Al-Jomhori Teaching Hospital in Sana'a, Yemen

    Jameel Al-Ghazaly

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is scarcity of data of the epidemiology of leukaemia in Arab countries including Yemen. Understanding patterns of leukaemia underpins epidemiology and can provide insight into disease etiology. The aim of this research is to determine the epidemiologic pattern of adult leukaemia in Yemen. Methods: The research is a descriptive cross-sectional study. We analyzed the data of 702 adult patients with leukaemia, who were newly diagnosed over a ten-year period between October 1999 and October 2009 at the referral haematology centre in Sana’a at Al-Jomhori Teaching Hospital, according to type of leukaemia, age, sex, geographic distribution and time of diagnosis. Results: Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML was found to be the most common (45.1% followed by Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML (26.5%, Acute Lymphoid Leukaemia (ALL (17.7% and Chronic Lymphoid Leukaemia (CLL (10.7%, respectively. There was an almost equal prevalence of AML and CML for males and females but males had significantly more cases of ALL and CLL (p =0.008. A significant variation in geographic pattern showed that the highest number of cases is seen the Central mountainous region and the least number of cases in the South-eastern region which is coastal and lowland (p<0.001. The seasonal variation showed that higher number of ALL cases was seen in the summer months (33% compared with other seasons (21% in the spring, 24.2% in autumn and 21.8% in winter. Conclusions: The pattern of adult leukaemia in Yemen is different from that seen in western countries which could be attributed to different environmental exposure. The geographic pattern indicates a possible role of certain environmental factors which warrant further investigations. The pattern of seasonal variation needs further studies for evaluating the seasonality.

  10. [A case of the Lambert-Eaton syndrome of non-neoplastic origin. Ten-year follow-up].

    Emeryk-Szajewska, Barbara; Strugalska-Cynowska, Halina; Zakrzewska-Pniewska, Beata; Szyluk, Beata; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna

    2006-01-01

    A case is presented of a 34-year-old man who developed weakness of the proximal muscles of the extremities, particularly lower, slight myalgia, and vegetative symptoms (dryness in the mouth). Those symptoms progressed within a month. On examination weakness of the muscles of the extremities was found as well as weak tendon reflexes, slight atrophy of muscles of the arms and thighs and apokamnosis. Edrophonium test was slightly positive. Electrostimulation revealed changes typical of the Lambert-Eaton syndrome: low amplitude of the compound muscle action potential on single stimulus, decreasing amplitude of the subsequent responses to 3 Hz stimulation, marked facilitation on 30 Hz stimulation. Neoplastic etiology was excluded by chest X-ray and CT, as well as by bronchoscopy, abdominal and prostatic USG, and thyroid USG and scintigraphy. Antibodies to AChR were not found in the serum. The titre of the antibodies against voltage-gated calcium channels was highly positive which was decisive in the diagnosing of the Lambert-Eaton syndrome. The patient was treated with pyridostigmine, corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide and immunoglobulins. Ten years of follow-up have fully confirmed the diagnosis of a non-neoplastic Lambert-Eaton syndrome. PMID:16794965

  11. Breath-hold two-dimensional MR angiography of coronary arteries. Comparison with conventional coronary angiography in ten cases

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic value of two-dimensional coronary magnetic resonance (MR) angiography in patients evaluated for ischemic heart disease. Materials and methods: Ten patients who underwent selective cardiac catheterization with coronary MR angiography were evaluated with two-dimensional coronary MR angiography. Coronary MR angiography was performed with breath-hold fat-suppressed ECG-gated Turbo-FLASH with K-space segmentation using a 1.5 T imager. Results: The left main coronary artery, proximal left anterior descending artery, circumflex artery and right coronary artery were demonstrated in all cases. Continuous segments (mean) of left anterior descending, circumflex and right coronary arteries visualized on MRA were 6.72 +- 3.16 cm, 3.67 +- 4.81 cm and 7.93 +- 3.12 cm respectively. The overall sensitivity for detection of hemodynamically significant coronary artery lesion (≥50%) was 62.5% respectively. Conclusion: Breath-hold two-dimensional coronary MR angiography was useful in showing relatively long segments of the main coronary arteries and also has potential in depicting hemodynamically significant coronary artery lesions

  12. The study of multi-frequency scattering of ten radio pulsars

    Lewandowski, Wojciech; Kijak, Jaroslaw; Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Roy, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of the multi-frequency scatter time measurements for ten radio pulsars that were relatively less studied in this regard. The observations were performed using the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope at the observing frequencies of 150, 235, 325, 610 and 1060~MHz. The data we collected, in conjunction with the results from other frequencies published earlier, allowed us to estimate the scatter time frequency scaling indices for eight of these sources. For PSR J1852$-$0635 it occurred that its profile undergoes a strong evolution with frequency, which makes the scatter time measurements difficult to perform, and for PSR J1835$-$1020 we were able to obtain reliable pulse broadening estimates at only two frequencies. We used the eight frequency scaling indices to estimate both: the electron density fluctuation strengths along the respective lines-of-sight, and the standardized amount of scattering at the frequency of 1 GHz. Combining the new data with the results published earlier by Lewandowsk...

  13. [Case and studies].

    Schubert, András

    2015-11-15

    Case studies and case reports form an important and ever growing part of scientific and scholarly literature. The paper deals with the share and citation rate of these publication types on different fields of research. In general, evidence seems to support the opinion that an excessive number of such publications may negatively influence the impact factor of the journal. In the literature of scientometrics, case studies (at least the presence of the term "case study" in the titles of the papers) have a moderate share, but their citation rate is practically equal to that of other publication types. PMID:26548472

  14. Stakeholders’ Views on Factors Influencing Nutrition Policy: a Qualitative Study Across Ten European Countries

    Jeruszka-Bielak Marta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to identify the main factors influencing micronutrient policies in the opinion of policy actors in ten European countries. Study was carried out during Jan-Nov 2010 in European countries: the Czech Republic, Denmark, England, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Spain. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with representatives of stakeholders involved in the vitamin D, folate and iodine policy making process. Fifty eight key informants representing mainly scientific advisory bodies (n=24 and governmental organisations (n=19 participated in the study. The remaining interviewees represented non-governmental organisations (n=6, industry (n=4 or were independent academic or health professional experts (n=5. Data were analysed by theoretical interpretative thematic analysis. Insights from interviewees on the development of micronutrient policies were grouped using the Public Health Nutrition Policy-making model. The main factors influencing the micronutrient policies were: systematic monitoring of nutrition and health, causal relationships between consumers’ diet-related behaviours and health outcomes, scientific recommendations from national bodies (Science area; scientific recommendations from international authorities and experiences of other countries, EU legislation, cultural factors (Wider context and political environment, national capacity to deal with the problem, national legislation, economics, stakeholder engagement, relationships between stakeholders (Policy and institutions area. The spectrum and weight of the factors influencing nutritional policy depends on nutrient, country and degree of its “advanced status” within nutrition policy, political environment, culture and socio-economic conditions as well as the point of view (who is expressing the opinion.

  15. Is Electroconvulsive Therapy Fading into Oblivion? - A Study of Ten Year Trends

    Aruna G

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite proven efficacy, modified ECT has been variably used in the recent past, with data on the usage trend being scarce, worldwide. Aim: We aimed to do a time – series analysis to examine annual trends in modified ECT use in our tertiary teaching hospital in the last decade. Methods: A chart review was carried out on all patients who received m-ECT in our teaching hospital in the last ten years (2002 to 2011, and percentage of total inpatients receiving M-ECT each year was deduced. Along with number of ECT sessions given per year, details of demographic data, and indications for ECT were recorded. Results: In our study ECT was undersized as a treatment option, with only 1:13% of total inpatients having received ECT. Also it was noted that use began increasing from 2002, reaching a peak in 2006 (84% increase followed by a downward trend, with a sharp decline since 2008 (61%decrease and finally reaching a nadir in 2011 (69% decrease. Mean age of patients ranged from 31.28 to 40.1 years with a slightly high female preponderance in most year groups. The most common indication for ECT use was schizophrenia (47.8% followed by, depression (38.9%. Conclusion: Although, our study finding is in line with the downward trend of ECT utilization rates reported worldwide, the nature and magnitude of decline cannot be explained nor compared globally due to variations, inaccuracies and heterogeneity of ECT data currently available. Further, factors responsible for such trends should become focus of future research.

  16. Perinatal Mortality And Pregnancy Wastage In Ten Punjab Villages During 1991-1996 - A Population Based Study

    Sachar R.K

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: What is the extent of perinatal mortality and pregnancy wastage in rural Punjab and what are risk factors for the same. Objective: To quantify the perinatal; wastage and risk factors including the prevalence of these factors to determine the loss attributable to these factors in ten Punjab villages during the period 1991-1996. Study Design: Case control. Sample Size: 2519 pregnant women with Known outcome of pregnancy. Study Variables: Cause, timing and factors affecting perinatal mortality and pregnancy wastage (viz Wt.<40kg; Ht, <152cm,BMI, <20 illiteracy, birth to conception interval <100wks, Prematurity (Gestation <37 wks. Registered in IIIrd trimester, Registered in IInd Trimester, Home delivery. Outcome variables: Contribution of these factors in perinatal loss and pregnancy wastage. Analysis; Percentages, Odds ratio, confidence interval and population attributable risk%. Results: The perinatal mortality rate was 34.57/1000 and pregnancy wastage was 7.23%. Prematurity was the leading cause of perinatal loss. 31.25% of perinatal deaths took place within 24 hours and 87.5% within 96 hours. In case of perinatal mortality the odds ration were significant (p<0.05 for the following risk factors: weight, height, body mass index, illiteracy, birth to conception interval <1000 weeks, prematurity, registration of pregnancy in IInd trimester, registration of pregnancy in IIIrd trimester, home delivery. In case of pregnancy wastage the odds ratio were significant for the following risk factors: weight, height, body mass index, illiteracy, birth to conception interval <100weeks, prematurity, past history of abortion and low socio-economic status.

  17. SETDA Case Studies 2012

    State Educational Technology Directors Association, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA) published a series of case studies from 28 states to showcase examples of how ARRA EETT ("American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Enhancing Education Through Technology") grant funds have impacted teaching and learning. SETDA collected data for the case studies through a variety…

  18. Case Study: Challenging Change.

    May, Steven K.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses a case study involving organizational change and its effect on employees. Presents three responses to the case study: "Paradox of Ordering Change: I Insist That We Work as a Team" (Paaige K. Turner); "Managing Change Is Managing Meaning" (Greg Hearn and Abraham Ninan); and "The Psychodynamics of an Organizational Change Initiative"…

  19. Study on dosimetry systems for a few tens MeV/u ion beams

    Kojima, Takuji; Sunaga, Hiromi; Takizawa, Haruki; Tachibana, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    A combined measurement system consisting of a total calorimeter, a Faraday cup and thin film dosimeters have been developed and tested using a simultaneous irradiation apparatus to measure absorbed dose for a few tens MeV/u ion beams of the TIARA AVF cyclotron. (author)

  20. The interface between formal and informal support in advanced old age: a ten-year study

    Franca Armi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the interface between the formal and informal support provided to very old people against a background of increasing need for care and a decreasing number of potential informal caregivers. We used a sample of 323 community-dwelling octogenarians participating in the Swiss Interdisciplinary Longitudinal Study on the Oldest Old (SWILSOO (n=1441 interviews. Descriptive analyses and a multilevel model were used to test whether formal and informal services complemented or substituted one another. The study revealed that the amount of informal services increased significantly as the frequency of formal aid increased, indicating that the two networks were complementary in the majority of the cases. In 21.2% of the cases, the formal network partly substituted the informal network (as an adjustment and only in 6.4% of the cases did the informal support end after the formal support had increased (radical substitution. The concern that the introduction of formal services may curb the readiness of relatives and friends to provide care is thus unfounded.

  1. Tetanus in a Rural Setting of South-Western Nigeria: A Ten-Year Retrospective Study

    O Adekanle

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the records of 79 tetanus patients in two hospitals (one tertiary and one secondary level inOwo, Ondo state, Nigeria from 1997 to 2006. The male: female ratio was 3:1. Ages were 14-70 years(mean 33.25 years, SD ±16.76. The overall case fatality rate (CFR, 32.91%, did was not significantlydifferent in the two hospitals. CFR for men was 32.10% and for women 35.29%. The main factorindicative of bad prognosis was a short hospitalization period. It was observed that 30.38% of ourpatients were discharged against medical advice (DAMA, that financial constraint was the underlyingproblem in 50% of cases, and that the trend of DAMA occurred at the two study sites. This DAMAphenomenon could pose a great danger to the eradication of this vaccine preventable disease in ruralareas.

  2. Carcinoma de seio maxilar: análise de dez casos Maxillary sinus carcinoma: an analysis of ten cases

    Ricardo Pires de Souza

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o papel, principalmente da tomografia computadorizada, no estadiamento dos carcinomas dos seios maxilares. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram analisados dez casos de carcinoma diagnosticados e tratados pelos Departamentos de Diagnóstico por Imagem e Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço do Hospital Heliópolis, São Paulo, SP, entre 1988 e 2002. RESULTADOS: Nove pacientes tiveram extensão tumoral para a bochecha, oito para o espaço mastigador, sete para o assoalho da boca e palato duro, cinco para a fossa pterigóide, cinco para a órbita, três para o etmóide e um para a base do crânio. Três pacientes foram classificados como T3 e sete, como T4. Dois tinham metástases linfonodais no momento da apresentação inicial, os quais pertenciam ao estágio T4. Todos os casos foram confirmados com exame histopatológico. CONCLUSÃO: A análise precisa da extensão local e disseminação tumoral fornecida pela tomografia computadorizada e ressonância magnética desempenha papel importante no planejamento cirúrgico, influenciando, também, na conduta terapêutica e prognóstico.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the role, especially of computed tomography, in the staging of maxillary sinus carcinomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten cases of carcinoma treated in Hospital Heliópolis Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Head and Neck Surgery, São Paulo, SP, Brazil, in the period between 1988 and 2002, were evaluated. RESULTS: Nine patients presented with tumor extension to the cheek, eight to the masticator space, seven to the mouth floor and hard palate, five to the pterygoid fossa, five to the orbit, three to the ethmoid bone, and one to the skull base. Three of the patients were staged T3, and seven T4. Two patients had lymph nodes metastases at their initial presentation, and were staged T4. All of the cases were histopathologically confirmed. CONCLUSION: The accurate analysis of the tumor local extent and dissemination by means of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging plays a relevant role in the surgical planning, besides influencing the therapeutic conduct and prognosis.

  3. Ten-year study on varieties of parotid tumors in pediatrics

    Parotid tumors are uncommon because they account for 0.5 % of all types of cancer in pediatrics. They generally occur as increased local asymptomatic volume, occasionally accompanied by pain and inflammatory signs. A retrospective, longitudinal and descriptive study was carried out to determine the frequency and forms of presentation of parotid tumors diagnosed in 0-18 years-old patients, who had been admitted to the oncological surgery service of 'William Soler' pediatric hospital from February 2001 to December 2010. The variables taken into account were sex, forms of presentation, response to treatment as well as the histological variants presented, with the objective of giving information about these variants of parotid tumors in pediatrics, which, despite their rareness, represent a high risk group when occur. Seven patients were diagnosed, of whom 3 were pleomorphic adenomas, one adenocarcinoma, one mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the gland, one parotid Hodgkin lymphoma and one mixed tumor with atypical cells of the gland. The onset of all the tumors was the presence of a parotid mass in 6 asymptomatic cases and in one case suffering local pain. They were all performed gland ultrasound and aspiration fine needle biopsy. Males prevailed over the females (ratio of 5:2) and the average age of presentation was 12.3 years. Surgery is the main therapeutic weapon in most of cases. It was recommended to closely follow the patients because of their high rate of local recurrence

  4. Malaria in pregnancy; facts from the parasitology laboratory: a ten-year study in Abuja, North Central Nigeria

    Ibecheozor, N.K.O

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Malaria, which is transmitted by female Anopheles mosquitoes, is the major cause of mortality among the pregnant women in the sub-Saharan Africa. A ten year study of malaria in pregnancy was carried out in Abuja, North Central Nigeria. Thick and thin blood films were stained with the Giemsa methodology. Of the 16760 pregnant women blood samples, 4571 (27.3% were positive for malaria parasites caused by Plasmodium falciparum. Of the 4571 positive cases, 75 (1.7% had parasite density of >5000 parasites/µl of blood; 148 (3.2% had between 500-5000 parasites/µl of blood; 520 (11.4% had between 50 - 500 parasites/µl of blood; while 3828 (83.7% had between 5-50 parasites/µl of blood. With the current estimate of over 4500 deaths of pregnant women in Nigeria due to malaria annually, we must make deliberate efforts to stop these unacceptable and painful losses. The continued use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (M-RDTs methodologies should be discontinued because of its negative implications. Therefore, the microscopic laboratory diagnostic component should be included in ANC at all level of health care facility.

  5. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  6. Equity in HIV testing: evidence from a cross-sectional study in ten Southern African countries

    Mitchell Steven

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV testing with counseling is an integral component of most national HIV and AIDS prevention strategies in southern Africa. Equity in testing implies that people at higher risk for HIV such as women; those who do not use condoms consistently; those with multiple partners; those who have suffered gender based violence; and those who are unable to implement prevention choices (the choice-disabled are tested and can have access to treatment. Methods We conducted a household survey of 24,069 people in nationally stratified random samples of communities in Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. We asked about testing for HIV in the last 12 months, intention to test, and about HIV risk behaviour, socioeconomic indicators, access to information, and attitudes related to stigma. Results Across the ten countries, seven out of every ten people said they planned to have an HIV test but the actual proportion tested in the last 12 months varied from 24% in Mozambique to 64% in Botswana. Generally, people at higher risk of HIV were not more likely to have been tested in the last year than those at lower risk, although women were more likely than men to have been tested in six of the ten countries. In Swaziland, those who experienced partner violence were more likely to test, but in Botswana those who were choice-disabled for condom use were less likely to be tested. The two most consistent factors associated with HIV testing across the countries were having heard about HIV/AIDS from a clinic or health centre, and having talked to someone about HIV and AIDS. Conclusions HIV testing programmes need to encourage people at higher risk of HIV to get tested, particularly those who do not interact regularly with the health system. Service providers need to recognise that some people are not able to implement HIV preventive actions and may not feel empowered to get themselves tested.

  7. Ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica as a rare cause for chronic leg ulcers: case report series of ten patients.

    Franklin, Cindy; Stoffels-Weindorf, Maren; Hillen, Uwe; Dissemond, Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Necrobiosis lipoidica is a rare granulomatous disorder of the skin. In up to 30% of the affected patients it can lead to ulcerations, which can impair the quality of life and are also very difficult to treat. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. Only few studies focussing on necrobiosis lipoidica can be found, but none of them focus on ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica. Therefore, we collected demographic data and comorbidities and assessed treatment options for patients with ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica. Data of patients who were treated in the wound care centre of the University Hospital of Essen for ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica over the past 10 years were retrospectively analysed. Hence, data of altogether ten patients (nine women and one man) with ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica were collected. Of these, 70% of the patients had diabetes mellitus of which 30% had type I diabetes and 40% had type II diabetes; 60% of the patients suffered from arterial hypertension, obesity and hypercholesterolaemia; 40% of the patients suffered from psychiatric disorders such as depression and borderline disorder. Our clinical data demonstrate an association of ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica and aspects of metabolic syndrome. This leads to a conclusion that ulcerating necrobiosis lipoidica can be seen as part of a generalised inflammatory reaction similar to the inflammatory reaction already known in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid diseases or psoriasis. In patients with clinical atypical painful ulcerations, necrobiosis lipoidica should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis. Therapists should be aware of associated aspects in patients with ulcerated necrobiosis lipoidica who besides diabetes often suffer from other aspects of a metabolic syndrome with increased cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, these related comorbidities should also be diagnosed and treated. PMID:24119190

  8. Paisagens rurbanas ou a tensão entre práticas rurais e valores urbanos na morfogênese dos espaços públicos de sedes de municípios rurais. Um estudo de caso. / Rurban landscapes: tension between rural practices and urban values in the morphogenesis of public spaces of seats of rural municipalities. A case study

    Gisela Barcellos de Souza

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is interested in the deterioration of limits between rural and urban spaces in seats ofsmall rural municipalities. Based in a case study – a city of less than 3 thousand inhabitants – thisarticle postulates that the inadequate nomination of the seat of smaller rural municipalities as a“city” could to generate profound changes in townscape and in theirs representations, which bythe inscription of urban values and rural practices in its territory allows the configuration of arurban landscape.

  9. Regulatory reform - case studies

    This report focuses on issues associated with the President's regulatory reform program. The objectives of reform are related to the reduction of overall schedules and to the lowering of costs by reducing construction and engineering manpower, equipment costs and commodities. Consistent with these objectives is the goal to provide a more practical approach to engineering design and construction consistent with realistic safety goals. In order to assist DOE in its responsibility to recommend improvements to the nuclear regulatory process, specific examples of regulatory requirements and their industrial interpretation were sought on a case study basis. The case studies program is aimed at exploring the commodity and labor productivity aspects of piping, electrical systems, and concrete. Five nuclear power plant projects and a fossil project were visited for the case studies to determine design and construction procedures and relative productivity. The paper summarizes the findings

  10. Prediction of Parkinson's disease subsequent to severe depression: a ten-year follow-up study.

    Walter, Uwe; Heilmann, Robert; Kaulitz, Lara; Just, Tino; Krause, Bernd Joachim; Benecke, Reiner; Höppner, Jacqueline

    2015-06-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been associated with an increased risk of subsequent Parkinson's disease (PD) in case-control and cohort studies. However, depression alone is unlikely to be a useful marker of prodromal PD due to its low specificity. In this longitudinal observational study, we assessed whether the presence of other potential markers of prodromal PD predicts the subsequent development of PD in MDD patients. Of 57 patients with severe MDD but no diagnosis of PD who underwent a structured interview, olfactory and motor investigation and transcranial sonography at baseline, 46 (36 women; mean age 54.9 ± 11.7 years) could be followed for up to 11 (median, 10) years. Three patients (2 women; age 64, 65 and 70 years) developed definite PD after 1, 7, and 9 years, respectively. The combined finding of mild asymmetric motor slowing, idiopathic hyposmia, and substantia nigra hyperechogenicity predicted subsequent PD in all patients who could be followed for longer than 1 year. Out of the whole study cohort, only the subjects with subsequent PD presented with the triad of asymmetric motor slowing, idiopathic hyposmia, and substantia nigra hyperechogenicity in combination with at least two out of four reportable risk factors (family history of PD, current non-smoker, non-coffee drinker, constipation) at baseline investigation. Post-hoc analysis revealed that additional rating of eye and eye-lid motor abnormalities might further improve the prediction of PD in larger cohorts. Findings of this pilot-study suggest that MDD patients at risk of subsequent PD can be identified using an inexpensive non-invasive diagnostic battery. PMID:25217967

  11. Nesidioblastosis: a case study.

    Starbuck, A L

    1997-09-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common problem among neonates. Transient in nature, it usually resolves with an increase in glucose intake. However, as clinicians, we must recognize that prolonged hypoglycemia may be caused by increased insulin production. Nesidioblastosis is one cause of persistent hyperinsulinism of the newborn. This case study reviews fetal physiology, neonatal presentation, and treatment. PMID:9325879

  12. Prague Case Study Report

    Kostelecký, Tomáš; Patočková, Věra; Illner, Michal; Vobecká, Jana; Čermák, Daniel

    Aarau : Centre for Democracy Studies Aarau (ZDA), 2014 - (Widmer, C.; Kübler, D.), s. 131-177 ISBN 978-3-9524228-2-3 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA700280802 Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : urban neighbourhods * regeneration * Prague Subject RIV: AD - Politology ; Political Sciences http://www.zdaarau.ch/dokumente/en/ZDA_Working-Papers/No3_RUN_case-studies_2014.pdf

  13. Do Karst Rivers “deserve” their own biotic index? A ten years study on macrozoobenthos in Croatia

    Rađa Biljana; Puljas Sanja

    2010-01-01

    In this study we present the results of a ten year survey of the aquatic macroinvertebrate fauna along four karst rivers: Jadro, Žrnovnica, Grab and Ruda, all of them situated in the Middle Dalmatia region of Croatia, in an attempt to construct the Iliric Biotic Index, which will be more applicable for the water quality analysis than the most frequently applied biotic index in Croatia, the Italian Modification of Extended Biotic Index. The rivers geologically belong to the Dinaric karst, uniq...

  14. Compliance with dietary recommendations in the population of Geneva, Switzerland: a ten-year trend study (1999-2009)

    Marques-Vidal P.M.; De Abreu D.; Gaspoz J.M.; Guessous I

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: There is little information regarding compliance with dietary recommendations in Switzerland. Objectives: To assess the trends in compliance with dietary recommendations in the Geneva population for period 1999 - 2009. Methods: Ten cross-sectional, population-based surveys (Bus Sant study). Dietary intake was assessed using a self-administered, validated semi quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire. Compliance with the Swiss Society for Nutrition recommendations for nutrient ...

  15. MIDAS case studies

    Brusger, E.C.; Farber, M.A.; Sharpe Hayes, M.M.

    1989-07-01

    This series of three case studies illustrates the validity and usefulness of MIDAS, a microcomputer-based tool for integrated resource planning under uncertainty. The first, at Union Electric, serves to test and validate the model and to illustrate its use for demand/supply option evaluation. Focusing on nuclear plant life extension, the Virginia Power case demonstrates the model's extensive detail, particularly in the production cost and financial areas, as well as its flexibility in addressing approximately 70 uncertainty scenarios. Puget Sound Power Light, the third case, used MIDAS for the preparation of its integrated resource plan. A 108-endpoint decision tree illustrates the full power of the decision analysis capability.

  16. Study of the stellar population properties in the discs of ten spiral galaxies

    Morelli, L; Pizzella, A; Bontà, E Dalla; Coccato, L; Méndez-Abreu, J

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the properties of the stellar populations in the discs of a sample of ten spiral galaxies. Our analysis focused on the galaxy region where the disc contributes more than 95 per cent of total surface brightness in order to minimise the contamination of the bulge and bar. The luminosity-weighted age and metallicity were obtained by fitting the galaxy spectra with a linear combination of stellar population synthesis models, while the total overabundance of {\\alpha}-elements over iron was derived by measuring the line-strength indices. Most of the sample discs display a bimodal age distribution and they are characterised by a total [{\\alpha}/Fe] enhancement ranging from solar and supersolar. We interpreted the age bimodality as due to the simultaneous presence of both a young (Age$\\,\\leq\\,4$ Gyr) and an old (Age$\\,>\\,$4 Gyr) stellar population. The old stellar component usually dominates the disc surface brightness and its light contribution is almost constant within the observed radial range. For...

  17. Triacylglycerols in some underutilised tropical seed oils 1. Systematic studies of ten oils

    Triacylglycerols composition of ten lesser known and underutilised tropical seed oils have been determined. The seed oils include Monodora tenuifolia, Monodora myristica, Colocynthis citrullus, Cyperus esculentus, Cucumeropsis edulis, Andenopus breviflorus, Telfairia occidentalis, Blighia sapida, Antiaris africana and Sesame indicum. In the Moreaceae family (M. tenuifolia, M. myristica) the dominant triacylglycerol are OPO/POO, LLO, OOL, and OOO. They accounted for over 60% of the total triacylglycerol content in the oils. In the Cyperaceae family (C. esculentus), OPP/POO, POL and OOO accounted for over 80% of the total triacylglycerol content. In the Cucurbitaceae family, SSP was the dominant triacylglycerol specie in A. breviflorus, while OPO/POO and OOO were the dominant species in C. citrullus and C. edulis. Blighia sapida recorded a different distribution of triacylglycerols composition. PLL occurred at the highest concentration, while other high molecular weight triacylglycerols were also identified in the oil. They include, SSA, OSA, LSA, OAA and LLA. Analysis of A. antiaris oil showed a different pattern in the distribution of the triacylglycerols. LaLaM, MMLa and LaLaLa accounted for about 80% of the total triacylglycerols. This result reflected the fatty acid composition of the oil. Lauric acid (C12:0) and Myristic acid (C14:0) accounted for 71.5% of the total fatty acid. The possible use of the oils as cocoa butter equivalents CBEs and cocoa butter substitutes CBSs are discussed. (author)

  18. Effect of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS on hormones profile in subjects with primary dysmenorrhoea - a preliminary study

    S. R. A. Akinbo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Primary dysmenorrhoea (PD is definedas the occurrence of painful menstrual cramps of uterine origin which occurs in the absence of any underlying disease. The pathogenesis is unclear, but uterine hyperactivity, elevated prostaglandin and leukotrienes levels, and hormonal level fluctuations have all been implicated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of TENS on the hormones cortisol and prolactin in individuals with PD.Methods: Plasma levels of cortisol and prolactin were studied in twenty-one (21 subjects with PD by obtaining blood samples from each subject pre-and post-TENS therapy on the first day of menstruation. The mean age of subjects was 23 (+ 2 years.  The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS was used to assess the pre-and post-treatment pain intensity.  The TENS unit was applied for a duration of 30 minutes.Results: A paired t-test showed that there was an overall reduction in the mean cortisol and prolactin from  pre treatment values of 28.45µg/dl ((5.27 and 56.81ng/ml ((31.86 to post treatment values of 27.33µg/dl ((5.13 and 53.23ng/ml ((37.63 respectively. However, these differences were not statistically significant (P>0.05.  Pain intensity was significantly reduced comparing pre and post treatment VAS scores (P = 0.001.Conclusion: The probable mechanism by which TENS effected alterations in cortisol and prolactin levels and pain reduction in subjects with PD might be through the opioid-modulating analgesia system, which releases B-endorphins and other endogenous opiates in response to pain.  This is because there is a close relationship between B-endorphin, cortisol and neurons, which secrete dopamine into the hypothalamic-pituitary-portal system.

  19. Computational study of the structural and vibrational properties of ten and twelve vertex closo-carboranes

    Salam, A.; Deleuze, M.S.; Francois, J.-P

    2003-01-01

    Calculations using ab initio Hartree-Fock and Density Functional theories, the latter employing the B3LYP functional, in combination with a number of large standard basis sets ranging from 6-31G** to cc-pVDZ, have been performed on a series of ten and twelve vertex closo-carborane isomer species. Results obtained for optimized structural parameters and molecular properties are presented for 1,2-, 1,6- and 1,10-C{sub 2}B{sub 8}H{sub 10} and 1,2-, 1,7- and 1,12-C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12} and compared, where possible, with both earlier theoretical data and experiment. Irrespective of the model chemistry chosen, the para-isomer in each class of carborane cluster is found to be the most stable species, corresponding to a structure in which the cage carbon atoms are positioned at diametrically opposed ends of the respective polyhedron. Boron-hydrogen and carbon-hydrogen bond lengths are found to change little on going from isomers of one particular cage size to another, supporting analogous conclusions previously established for small closo-carborane cages possessing five, six and seven vertices. The calculated vibrational spectra of the isomers of both decacarborane and dodecacarborane are seen to be similar to each other and reflect a high degree of rigidity within each cluster. Key polyhedral skeletal breathing modes along with characteristic boron-hydrogen and carbon-hydrogen stretching frequencies are identified in the spectra and compared with experiment. Thermochemical data relating to each species are also analyzed.

  20. Computational study of the structural and vibrational properties of ten and twelve vertex closo-carboranes

    Calculations using ab initio Hartree-Fock and Density Functional theories, the latter employing the B3LYP functional, in combination with a number of large standard basis sets ranging from 6-31G** to cc-pVDZ, have been performed on a series of ten and twelve vertex closo-carborane isomer species. Results obtained for optimized structural parameters and molecular properties are presented for 1,2-, 1,6- and 1,10-C2B8H10 and 1,2-, 1,7- and 1,12-C2B10H12 and compared, where possible, with both earlier theoretical data and experiment. Irrespective of the model chemistry chosen, the para-isomer in each class of carborane cluster is found to be the most stable species, corresponding to a structure in which the cage carbon atoms are positioned at diametrically opposed ends of the respective polyhedron. Boron-hydrogen and carbon-hydrogen bond lengths are found to change little on going from isomers of one particular cage size to another, supporting analogous conclusions previously established for small closo-carborane cages possessing five, six and seven vertices. The calculated vibrational spectra of the isomers of both decacarborane and dodecacarborane are seen to be similar to each other and reflect a high degree of rigidity within each cluster. Key polyhedral skeletal breathing modes along with characteristic boron-hydrogen and carbon-hydrogen stretching frequencies are identified in the spectra and compared with experiment. Thermochemical data relating to each species are also analyzed

  1. Corporate Governance. Case Studies

    Manuel, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    This paper pretends to do a theoretical approach of Corporate Governance, having as support some case studies about companies like Coca-Cola, Nokia, Microsoft, and Amazon.com. The methodology adopted for this work is based in information from these companies available in their websites and annual reports. I concluded that both companies show the corporate governance components according to their core business and their environmental business.

  2. Case Studies - Cervical Cancer

    2010-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about several case studies for cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2010 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  3. Case study - Czechoslovakia

    In the lecture Case Study - Czechoslovakia with the sub-title 'Unified System of Personnel Preparation for Nuclear Programme in Czechoslovakia' the actual status and the current experience of NPP personnel training and preparation in Czechoslovakia are introduced. The above mentioned training system is presented and demonstrated by the story of a proxy person who is going to become shift engineer in a nuclear power plant in Czechoslovakia. (orig./HP)

  4. Proton-nuclear magnetic resonance study of peracetylated derivatives of ten oligosaccharides isolated from human milk

    Dabrowski, U.; Egge, H.; Dabrowski, J.

    1983-07-01

    Proton-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of peracetylated derivatives of ten structurally related oligosaccharides isolated from human milk were measured for solutions in CDCl3 at 360 MHz. The following oligosaccharides were investigated: Gal beta 1 leads to 4Glc-ol (1), GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 4Glc-ol (2), Gal beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 4Glc-ol (3), Gal beta 1 leads to 3GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 4Glc-ol (4), Gal beta 1 leads to 3GlcNAc(4 comes from 1Fuc alpha) beta 1 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 4Glc-ol (5), Fuc alpha 1 leads to 2Gal beta 1 leads to 3GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 4Glc-ol (6), Fuc alpha 1 leads to 2Gal beta 1 leads to 3GlcNAc(4 comes from 1Fuc alpha)beta 1 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 4Glc-ol (7), Fuc alpha 1 leads to 2Gal beta 1 leads to 4Glc-ol(3 comes from 1Fuc alpha) (8), and a 1:3 mixture of Fuc alpha 1 leads to 2Gal beta 1 leads to 4Glc-ol (9) and Gal beta 1 leads to 4Glc-ol(3 comes from 1Fuc alpha) (10). Owing to the strong downfield shifts of the resonances of protons linked to acetoxylated carbons, the problems of signal overlap are less severe and the spin systems of all constituent sugar residues can be assigned fully. The sites of glycosidic linkage can be recognized by the high-field position of the signals of protons linked to those sites; for example, type 1 (Gal beta 1 leads to 3GlcNAc) and type 2(Gal beta 1 leads to 4GlcNAc) saccharide chains can be distinguished. The sequence can be established by observing a nuclear Overhauser effect involving the anomomeric and the aglyconic proton.

  5. Osteitis - A case study

    A. Foxon

    1982-09-01

    Full Text Available At first it was thought to start this case study by saying: this is a case of osteitis found in a caucasion boy aged 9 years, admitted to the Children's Ward in January 1981, etcetera. This caucasian was however a rather precocious little boy, herein called Jack, whose plaintive cry of Sister bring me a bottle, Sister scratch my back, Sister can I have some drops for pain must have been heard by the night and day staff at intervals over a period of five months. So I am going to commence in a far more informal manner by telling you about him and how he came to us with an original diagnosis of septicaemia.

  6. Tetanus in a Rural Setting of South-Western Nigeria: A Ten-Year Retrospective Study

    Adekanle, O; O. Ayodeji; L Olatunde

    2009-01-01

    We review the records of 79 tetanus patients in two hospitals (one tertiary and one secondary level) in Owo, Ondo state, Nigeria from 1997 to 2006. The male: female ratio was 3:1. Ages were 1470 years (mean 33.25 years, SD 16.76). The overall case fatality rate (CFR), 32.91%, did was not significantly different in the two hospitals. CFR for men was 32.10% and for women 35.29%. The main factor indicative of bad prognosis was a short hospitalization period. It was observed that 30.38% of our ...

  7. Study on trace elements of ten kinds of fish species at Beijing market by INAA

    Background: As the improvement of the living standard, the safety of food becomes more and more concerned currently. The fish is healthy food with more protein but less fat. Purpose: We bought ten species of fish from the market, which are often eaten by Chinese, and analyzed the trace elements of them by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). So some detecting methods should be applied to give some suggestions for human. Methods: First of all, we choose six species of fresh water fish, including grass carp, weever, Wuchang Fish, tilapia, crucian, carp, and four species of frozen sea fish, including hairtail, yellow croaker, salmon, ling. All of them were collected from a supermarket in Beijing. Secondly, we remove the squama by Teflon coated scissor, wash the fish with de-ionized water and use ashless filter paper to absorb the water on the fish. Then we cut the squama-less part with titanium knife for about 10 g, put them into plastic bags separately and sealed, balance the net weight, use a tablet machine to press them into slice and freeze at -18℃ for 12 h. And then we put them into a vacuum desiccator to pump for 72 h, balance dry fish, calculate the ratio of moisture and triturate the sample into about 40 meshes in agate. Finally, we prepare three sub-samples about 300 mg with each packed by plastic bag for analysis. We put the samples, NIST-1632a and chemical standard material together, irradiate in micro neutron source reactor (MNSR) for 16 h, measure the radioactivity by Ge detector after cooling 5 d or 10 d, and calculate the contents of 16 elements by the ko-NAA and the relative method. Results: The contents of trace elements are different between fresh water fish and sea fish. The contents of As, Hg, Br: Na, Se in sea fish are apparently higher than fresh water fish, but the contents of Rb and Zn are contrary. Considering most fresh water fishes are feed, Zn was probably added in fodder. The content of As in weever is 2.4 μg·g-1, the others are 0.3 μg·g-1 in average. We don't know why it's so high. Maybe it comes from the fodder. The contents of Br and Na in ling are very high. Maybe they came from sea water for frozen fish. The content of Ca in Wuchang Fish and cap is very high, because of the fine fish bone in meat. Other elements, such as Co, Cs, Fe, K, aren't much different from the various of fish species. Conclusions: According to the national food hygiene standard GB2762-2012 (maximum levels of contaminants in foods), the level of fish is Hg (Methyl)<0.5 mg·kg-1, As (Inorganic)<0.1 mg·kg-1, Se<1.0 mg·kg-1. Apparently, the contents of As in all the fishes are higher in the level except crucian. The content of As in ling is 40 times of the level. The contents of Hg, Se in ling and Se in weever are higher in the level. We must care about the nocuous elements of fodder if these fishes are feed artificially. (authors)

  8. NOx trade. Case studies

    Some of the questions with respect to the trade of nitrogen oxides that businesses in the Netherlands have to deal with are dealt with: should a business buy or sell rights for NOx emission; which measures must be taken to reduce NOx emission; how much must be invested; and how to deal with uncertainties with regard to prices. Simulations were carried out with the MOSES model to find the answers to those questions. Results of some case studies are presented, focusing on the chemical sector in the Netherlands. Finally, the financial (dis)advantages of NOx trade and the related uncertainties for a single enterprise are discussed

  9. Western Perceptions of Hong Kong Ten Years on: A Corpus-Driven Critical Discourse Study

    Cheng, Winnie; Lam, Phoenix W. Y.

    2013-01-01

    This article studies the Western perceptions of and relations with Hong Kong a decade after the reversion of the sovereignty from Britain to China in 1997. Previous studies have demonstrated that the West had a significantly negative view on the future of Hong Kong with respect to the handover. According to recent observations, however, the

  10. Self-Report Stability of Adolescent Cigarette Use across Ten Years of Panel Study Data

    Shillington, Audrey M.; Reed, Mark B.; Clapp, John D.

    2010-01-01

    This study is the first to examine adolescent cigarette report stability over 10 years. Six waves of data were utilized from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. This study examined internal/logical consistency and external consistency. Report stability was higher for lifetime use reports than the age of onset reports. Wave-by-wave

  11. Congenital anomalies among live births in a polluted area. A ten-year retrospective study

    Gianicolo Emilio Antonio Luca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital anomalies and their primary prevention are a crucial public health issue. This work aimed to estimate the prevalence of congenital anomalies in Brindisi, a city in southeastern Italy at high risk of environmental crisis. Methods This research concerned newborns up to 28 days of age, born between 2001 and 2010 to mothers resident in Brindisi and discharged with a diagnosis of congenital anomaly. We classified cases according to the coding system adopted by the European Network for the Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT. Prevalence rates of congenital anomalies in Brindisi were compared with those reported by EUROCAT. Logistic regression models were adapted to evaluate the association between congenital anomalies and municipality of residence of the mother during pregnancy. Results Out of 8,503 newborns we recorded 194 subjects with congenital anomalies (228.2/10,000 total births, 1.2 times higher than the one reported by the EUROCAT pool of registries. We observed 83 subjects with congenital heart diseases with an excess of 49.1%. Odds Ratios for congenital heart diseases significantly increased for newborns to mothers resident in Brindisi (OR 1.75 CI 95% 1.30-2.35. Conclusions Our findings indicated an increased prevalence of Congenital Anomalies (especially congenital heart diseases in the city of Brindisi. More research is needed in order to analyze the role of factors potentially involved in the causation of congenital anomalies.

  12. A ten year Bluebird Trail study at Necedah National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides results from a bluebird and tree swallow monitoring study conducted at Necedah National Wildlife Refuge. For the years 19851994, nest boxes...

  13. A Review of Ten Years of the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART from 2002 to 2011

    Douglas Biedenbach

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Surveillance of antimicrobial agent resistance provides important information to guide microbiologists and infectious disease specialists understanding of the control and the spread of resistance mechanisms within the local environment. Continued monitoring of antimicrobial resistance patterns in the community and in local hospital environments is essential to guide effective empiric therapy. The Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART has monitored the in vitro susceptibility patterns of clinical Gram-negative bacilli to antimicrobial agents collected worldwide from intra-abdominal infections since 2002 and urinary tract infections since 2009. Resistance trends, with a particular focus on carbapenem resistance and the rate of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs, were analyzed. Isolates from intra-abdominal infections (n = 92,086 and urinary-tract infections (n = 24,705 were collected and tested using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methods. This review presents carbapenem susceptibility and ESBL rates over ten years of SMART study analysis, including key publications during this period. The SMART study has proved to be a valuable resource in determining pathogen prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility over the last ten years and continues to provide evidence for regulatory susceptibility breakpoints and clinical decision making.

  14. Capitalism. Grade Ten. Unit One, 10.1. Comprehensive Social Studies Curriculum for the Inner City.

    Burch, Norman

    The tenth grade unit of the FICSS series (Focus on Inner City Social Studies -- see SO 008 271) deals with the political-economic systems in the United States. The first unit of the sequence focuses specifically on capitalism in a democracy. The document deals with both the theoretical and practical aspects of capitalism. The theoretical section…

  15. Ten-Year Trend Analysis of Autism Severity: A Nationwide Population-Based Register Study

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Sung, Chang-Lin; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Chien, Wu-Chien; Su, Sui-Lung; Wu, Jia-Ling

    2011-01-01

    The severity of autism spectrum disorder was strongly related to the education and service outcome. Without a clear profile of autistic population and its change, efforts to understand its nature and improve the quality of service or education will be impossible. The present study aims to describe the over time reported rate of autism severity…

  16. KAIZEN A case study

    Manjunath Shettar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate objective of manufacturing industries is to increase productivity with high quality. At present, many manufacturing companies are facing problems such as high quality rejection, high inventories, high lead time, high costs of production, and inability to cope with customer orders. By implementing and practicing the lean production system many problems can be solved without employing high-tech and high-touch approaches but by involving people on the shop floor in Kaizen activities. Kaizen is one of the powerful tools of lean manufacturing. Kaizen refers to continuous improvement in performance, cost and quality. Kaizen ensures that manufacturing processes become leaner and fitter, but eliminate waste (problem where value is added. The main objective of this paper is to provide a background on kaizen, present an overview of kaizen concepts that are used to transform a company into a high performing lean enterprise. A case study of implementation of Kaizen?s has been discussed.

  17. Reproduction and production in a buffaloes farm of the Marche region: a ten-year study

    M. Pasquini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Water buffalo milk reproductive and productive traits are fundamental to evaluate farm efficiency and dairy economy. Due to the buffalo cows long life these aspects are also important to assess the improvement of genetic animal potential and to reach optimal productive performance. Currently this knowledge is critical since the Italian cattle population is decreasing whereas the national buffalo sector is expanding; this trend is partially depending on the reconversion of some dairy cattle farms into buffalo cows farms. The present investigation was undertaken to study non-genetic factors affecting reproductive parameters and milk production traits in a farm located in a not traditional area for buffalo farming.

  18. INTRAVENOUS PULSE CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE TREATMENT OF LUPUS NEPHRITIS: A RETROSPECTIVE TEN YEARS STUDY

    R. Ganji.

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Nephritis remains an important problem in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. We conducted retrospective study to evaluate the efficiency of intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide in lupus nephritis: From 1983 to 1993, we reviewed 133 patients with biopsy proven lupus nephritis, 47 of them excluded because of short period of follow-up or defective laboratory data. Eighty six patients were treated with the following regimens: Sixty patients with intravenous pulse cyclophospham; 13 witli IV pulse methylprednisolone succinate, 8 with cyclosporine, 4 with azathioprine and one with oral prednisolone. Sixteen patients did not respond to IV cyclophosphamide. We evaluated renal biopsy, pretreatment mean arterial pressure (MAP, BUN, creatinine and proteinuria as-prognostic and risk factors of nonresponders. The results of this study showed that diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (DPGN had the poorest outcome and most of nonresponders (11/16, were of DPGN. Tliere was a correlation between initial serum creatinine level and response to IV cyclophosphamide, but there was no correlation between BUN, MAP, degree of proteinuria and response to IV cyclophosphamide. IV pulse cyclophosphamid was more effective than steroid alone in preventing renal failure in lupus nephritis.

  19. Utility of ten-second uptake periods for kinetic studies of serotonin uptake by intact platelets

    Costa, J.L.; Kirk, K.L.; Stark, H.

    1981-09-01

    When washed human platelets accumulate serotonin (5HT), it is possible with the use of formaldehyde fixative to measure uptake over periods as short as 10 seconds. To evaluate the utility of these short times for kinetic studies of 5HT uptake, we have examined the accuracy with which the 10 second uptake rate reflects changes in the extracellular 5HT concentration. The amount of 5HT taken up over a 10 second period appears to be determined by the concentration of 5HT present in the extracellular medium during that time period, and the uptake rate can change rapidly following sudden changes in the extracellular 5HT concentration. However, the extent of inhibition of 5HT uptake in the presence of imipramine of extracellular 5HT concentrations greater than 10-5M is somewhat different depending on whether the 5HT is allowed to accumulate for a 10-second or a 5- or 10-minute uptake period. A 10-second uptake period thus appears to be useful for kinetic studies of initial 5HT uptake velocities under normal conditions, but under inhibitory conditions may give results differing from those obtained with minute-long periods.

  20. Using a natural abilities battery for academic and career guidance: a ten-year study.

    Brown, Corrie C; Harvey, Stephen B; Stiles, Dori

    2011-01-01

    Over a period of 10 years, first-year students from 11 consecutive veterinary classes conducted a self-assessment using a natural abilities survey. The present study analyzes the data compiled from students' self-assessment results. As a group, veterinary students are exceptional problem solvers, either through inductive or deductive reasoning, and have strong spatial relations capacities. Veterinary students have a range of learning styles with design memory being the primary vehicle for information delivery and tonal memory being the least frequently used style overall. Information gained on each student's natural abilities can be used to guide effective career decision making and enhance prospects for long-term career satisfaction. PMID:22023979

  1. Ten-Year Retrospective Longitudinal-Study of Student Perspectives on Value of REU

    Slater, T. F.; Slater, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    For more than two decades, federal agencies have been enthusiastically supporting summer research experiences for undergraduates. These REU programs are tacitly intended to increase retention and provide "an important educational experience" for undergraduates, particularly women, minorities and underrepresented groups. Numerous authors (viz., Laursen, Lopatto, Dolan, among many others) have enthusiastically described positive impacts of summer REU programs from exit interview data. These results include enhanced persistence to pursue STEM careers and confirmed desire to attend graduate school in the field targeted by a particular REU. Perhaps surprisingly, negative student experiences are rarely described in the scholarly literature, but do appear in more informal publications (viz., Gueterma, 2007). One wonders how REU alumni, looking back over their entire collective portfolio of experiences, now perceive the educational value of their REU experience relative to their other educational experiences. To obtain a backwards-looking, reflective description from REU alumni on the value of their REU experiences, we conducted a 10-year, two-stage study was designed to explore the ways in which the REU acted as an educational experience for 51 women from a single geoscience sub-discipline. The first phase was an ex post facto longitudinal analysis of data, including multiple interviews with each participant during their REU, annual open-ended alumni surveys, faculty interviews, and extensive field notes, over a 10-year period. This analysis informed the second phase, a clinical interview. Over 10 hours of interviews with 8 participants were conducted and analyzed. These 8 participants were selected to represent a variety of career stages, and for their potential to reflect on a wide variety of educational experiences. Results from the interviews, done many years after their REU experience, indicate that the interviewees' REU did not provide a substantive educational experience related to the nature of scientific work, the scientific process, or the culture of academia when considered in a comparative context of students' other educational experiences. Results further indicated that the REU did not serve to transform participants' conceptions about themselves as situated in science, and learning gains with regard to other aspects of the self, were somewhat limited. Instead, the data suggests that these women arrived at the REU with pre-existing and remarkably strong conceptions in these areas, and that the REU did not functional to alter those states. These conceptions were frequently the result of interactions with mentors/scientists from middle school until well into the undergraduate period.

  2. Severe Allergic Reactions to Food in Norway: A Ten Year Survey of Cases Reported to the Food Allergy Register

    Eliann Egaas; Martinus Lvik; Stensby, Berit A.; Ellen Namork; Fste, Christiane K.

    2011-01-01

    The Norwegian Food Allergy Register was established at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in 2000. The purpose of the register is to gain information about severe allergic reactions to food in Norway and to survey food products in relation to allergen labelling and contamination. Cases are reported on a voluntary basis by first line doctors, and submitted together with a serum sample for specific IgE analysis. The register has received a total of 877 reports from 1 July, 2000 to 31 Dece...

  3. Effect of TENS on pain in relation to central sensitization in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Beckwée David

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central sensitization has recently been documented in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OAk. So far, the presence of central sensitization has not been considered as a confounding factor in studies assessing the pain inhibitory effect of tens on osteoarthritis of the knee. The purpose of this study is to explore the pain inhibitory effect of burst tens in OAk patients and to explore the prognostic value of central sensitization on the pain inhibitory effect of tens in OAk patients. Methods Patients with knee pain due to OAk will be recruited through advertisements in local media. Temporal summation, before and after a heterotopic noxious conditioning stimulation, will be measured. In addition, pain on a numeric rating score, WOMAC subscores for pain and function and global perceived effect will be assessed. Patients will be randomly allocated to one of two treatment groups (tens, sham tens. Follow-up measurements will be scheduled after a period of 6 and 12 weeks. Discussion Tens influences pain through the electrical stimulation of low-threshold A-beta cutaneous fibers. The responsiveness of central pain-signaling neurons of centrally sensitized OAk patients may be augmented to the input of these electrical stimuli. This would encompass an adverse therapy effect of tens. To increase treatment effectiveness it might be interesting to identify a subgroup of symptomatic OAk patients, i.e., non-sensitized patients, who are likely to benefit from burst tens. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01390285

  4. Severe Allergic Reactions to Food in Norway: A Ten Year Survey of Cases Reported to the Food Allergy Register

    Eliann Egaas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Norwegian Food Allergy Register was established at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in 2000. The purpose of the register is to gain information about severe allergic reactions to food in Norway and to survey food products in relation to allergen labelling and contamination. Cases are reported on a voluntary basis by first line doctors, and submitted together with a serum sample for specific IgE analysis. The register has received a total of 877 reports from 1 July, 2000 to 31 December, 2010. Two age groups, small children and young adults are over-represented, and the overall gender distribution is 40:60 males-females. The legumes lupine and fenugreek have been identified as two “new” allergens in processed foods and cases of contamination and faults in production of processed foods have been revealed. The highest frequency of food specific IgE is to hazelnuts and peanuts, with a marked increase in reactions to hazelnuts during the last three years. The Food Allergy Register has improved our knowledge about causes and severity of food allergic reactions in Norway. The results show the usefulness of population based national food allergy registers in providing information for health authorities and to secure safe food for individuals with food allergies.

  5. Goiania incident case study

    The reasons for wanting to document this case study and present the findings are simple. According to USDOE technical risk assessments (and our own initial work on the Hanford socioeconomic study), the likelihood of a major accident involving exposure to radioactive materials in the process of site characterization, construction, operation, and closure of a high-level waste repository is extremely remote. Most would agree, however, that there is a relatively high probability that a minor accident involving radiological contamination will occur sometime during the lifetime of the repository -- for example, during transport, at an MRS site or at the permanent site itself during repacking and deposition. Thus, one of the major concerns of the Yucca Mountain Socioeconomic Study is the potential impact of a relatively minor radiation-related accident. A large number of potential impact of a relatively minor radiation-related accident. A large number of potential accident scenarios have been under consideration (such as a transportation or other surface accident which results in a significant decline in tourism, the number of conventions, or the selection of Nevada as a retirement residence). The results of the work in Goiania make it clear, however, that such a significant shift in established social patterns and trends is not likely to occur as a direct outcome of a single nuclear-related accident (even, perhaps, a relatively major one), but rather, are likely to occur as a result of the enduring social interpretations of such an accident -- that is, as a result of the process of understanding, communicating, and socially sustaining a particular set of associations with respect to the initial incident

  6. Presentations to the Emergency Department Following Cannabis use--a Multi-Centre Case Series from Ten European Countries.

    Dines, Alison M; Wood, David M; Galicia, Miguel; Yates, Christopher M; Heyerdahl, Fridtjof; Hovda, Knut Erik; Giraudon, Isabelle; Sedefov, Roumen; Dargan, Paul I

    2015-12-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit drug in Europe, and is generally regarded as having low acute toxicity. We present the findings of the first 6 months of data collection from the Euro-DEN project on presentations related to cannabis use to further understand the acute toxicity related to the use of cannabis. Data was extracted on clinical features, treatment and outcome from the Euro-DEN minimum dataset for all cases of acute recreational drug toxicity reported 1st October 2013 to 31st March 2014 for all cannabis-related presentations. Of 2198 presentations reported by 14 of the 16 Euro-DEN centres, 356 (16.2 %) involved cannabis either alone or together with other drugs/alcohol. There were 36 that involved lone use of cannabis (1.6 % of all presentations). Of the 35 non-fatal lone cannabis presentations, the most commonly reported features were neuro-behavioural (agitation/aggression 8 (22.9 %), psychosis 7 (20.0 %), anxiety 7 (20.0 %)) and vomiting 6 (17.1 %). Most patients (25, 71.4 %) received no treatment and 30 (85.7 %) were discharged/self-discharged from the ED. There was one fatality amongst these lone-cannabis cases: an 18-year-old male collapsed with an asystolic cardiac arrest whilst smoking cannabis and suffered hypoxic brain injury related to prolonged cardiac arrest. THC was detected in a urine sample taken at ED arrival; no other drugs were detected. Lone acute cannabis toxicity was typically associated with neuro-behavioural symptoms and vomiting. Although uncommon, severe toxicity including cardiovascular toxicity and death may be under-recognised, and it is important that Emergency Physicians are aware of this. PMID:25652342

  7. FMCT verification: Case studies

    Full text: How to manage the trade-off between the need for transparency and the concern about the disclosure of sensitive information would be a key issue during the negotiations of FMCT verification provision. This paper will explore the general concerns on FMCT verification; and demonstrate what verification measures might be applied to those reprocessing and enrichment plants. A primary goal of an FMCT will be to have the five declared nuclear weapon states and the three that operate unsafeguarded nuclear facilities become parties. One focus in negotiating the FMCT will be verification. Appropriate verification measures should be applied in each case. Most importantly, FMCT verification would focus, in the first instance, on these states' fissile material production facilities. After the FMCT enters into force, all these facilities should be declared. Some would continue operating to produce civil nuclear power or to produce fissile material for non- explosive military uses. The verification measures necessary for these operating facilities would be essentially IAEA safeguards, as currently being applied to non-nuclear weapon states under the NPT. However, some production facilities would be declared and shut down. Thus, one important task of the FMCT verifications will be to confirm the status of these closed facilities. As case studies, this paper will focus on the verification of those shutdown facilities. The FMCT verification system for former military facilities would have to differ in some ways from traditional IAEA safeguards. For example, there could be concerns about the potential loss of sensitive information at these facilities or at collocated facilities. Eventually, some safeguards measures such as environmental sampling might be seen as too intrusive. Thus, effective but less intrusive verification measures may be needed. Some sensitive nuclear facilities would be subject for the first time to international inspections, which could raise concerns for states that have traditionally had 'less transparency' in their military sectors. As case studies, first we investigate how to applied verification measures including remote sensing, off-site environmental sampling and on-site inspections to monitor the shutdown status of plutonium production facilities, and what measures could be taken to prevent the disclosure of sensitive information at the site. We find the most effective verification measure to monitor the status of the reprocessing plant would be on-site environmental sampling. Some countries may worry that sample analysis could disclose sensitive information about their past plutonium production activities. However, we find that sample analysis at the reprocessing site need not reveal such information. Sampling would not reveal such information as long as inspectors are not able to measure total quantities of Cs-137 and Sr-90 from HLW produced at former military plutonium production facilities. Secondly, we consider verification measures for shutdown gaseous diffusion uranium-enrichment plants (GDPs). The GDPs could be monitored effectively by satellite imagery, as one telltale operational signature of the GDP would be the water-vapor plume coming from the cooling tower, which should be easy to detect with satellite images. Furthermore, the hot roof of the enrichment building could be detectable using satellite thermal-infrared images. Finally, some on-site verification measures should be allowed, such as visual observation, surveillance and tamper-indicating seals. Finally, FMCT verification regime would have to be designed to detect undeclared fissile material production activities and facilities. These verification measures could include something like special or challenge inspections or complementary access. There would need to be provisions to prevent the abuse of such inspections, especially at sensitive and non-proscribed military and nuclear activities. In particular, to protect sensitive information, it is essential to have an appropriate managed access mechanism, which should be able to realize the aim of FMCT without compromising the national security interests. In conclusion, under the FMCT, appropriate verification measures would be able to verify the status of shutdown reprocessing and enrichment facilities without compromising national sensitive information. (author)

  8. Termination: A Case Study.

    Friedberg, Ahron L

    2015-12-01

    In this article I posit and examine certain criteria and qualities for ending an analysis. The case study describes the end phase of a four-year psychoanalysis in which the patient's decision to move to another area forced the end of his analysis. We continued to explore and work through his core neurotic conflicts that included issues of competitive rivalry, dominance and submission, control, and anxiety about birth and death. A shift in the transference from me as a negative father to me as a supportive but competitive older brother was also examined in the context of ending treatment as well as other aspects of the transference. In addition, we analyzed the meaning of his ending treatment based on an extra-analytic circumstance. In discussing this phase of treatment, the definition and history of the term "termination" and its connotations are reviewed. Various criteria for completing an analysis are examined, and technical observations about this phase of treatment are investigated. It was found that while a significant shift in the transference occurred in this phase of the patient's analysis, conflicts related to the transference were not "resolved" in the classical sense. Terminating treatment was considered as a practical matter in which the patient's autonomy and sense of choice were respected and analyzed. PMID:26583444

  9. Final report on case studies

    Ljungberg, Daniel; McKelvey, Maureen; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2012-01-01

    Case study as a research design means investigating a single or multiple instance(s) or setting(s) (i.e. a case) and its entire context to explain a phenomenon and its processes. This is achieved through detailed understanding, usually comprised of multiple sources of information. In this way, case...... studies attempt to provide as a complete an understanding of a (complex) phenomenon as possible. Within the AEGIS project, survey and case study research are complementary. They are complementary in the sense that the former can provide more generalizable evidence on a phenomenon in terms of cross......-sectional data, while the latter can provide more in-depth (qualitative) understanding on specific issues. In systematically examining the case studies, however, this report goes beyond a typical single case study. Here we provide a synthesis of 86 case studies. Multiple case studies, following similar focus...

  10. Natural Learning Case Study Archives

    Lawler, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Natural Learning Case Study Archives (NLCSA) is a research facility for those interested in using case study analysis to deepen their understanding of common sense knowledge and natural learning (how the mind interacts with everyday experiences to develop common sense knowledge). The database comprises three case study corpora based on experiences…

  11. Natural Learning Case Study Archives

    Lawler, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Natural Learning Case Study Archives (NLCSA) is a research facility for those interested in using case study analysis to deepen their understanding of common sense knowledge and natural learning (how the mind interacts with everyday experiences to develop common sense knowledge). The database comprises three case study corpora based on experiences

  12. Theoretical study on ten ?-S states of Si2(-) anion: potential energy curves, spectroscopy and spin-orbit couplings.

    Liu, Hui; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng; Zhu, Zunlue

    2013-05-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of seventeen ? states generated from the ten ?-S states of the Si2(-) anion are studied in detail using an ab initio quantum chemical method for the first time. The PECs are calculated for internuclear separations from 0.10 to 1.20 nm by the complete active space self-consistent field method, which is followed by the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction approach with the Davidson modification. The spin-orbit coupling is accounted for by the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. Core-valence correlation and scalar relativistic corrections are considered. Core-valence correlation corrections are included using an aug-cc-pCVTZ basis set. Scalar relativistic correction calculations are made with the third-order Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian approximation at the level of a cc-pV5Z basis set. Obvious effect of core-valence correlation corrections on the PECs is observed, in particular for the two lowest (2)?u and (2)?g(+) ?-S states. All the PECs are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. The lowest (2)?u ?-S state is found to be the ground state of Si2(-) anion. The convergence observations of present calculations are made and the convergent behavior is discussed with respect to the basis set and level of theory. The effects of core-electron correlations on the energy splitting are studied by the all-electron aug-cc-pCVTZ basis set. Using these PECs, the spectroscopic parameters of ?-S and ? states involved are determined. The vibrational manifolds are evaluated for each ?-S and ? state of non-rotation Si2(-) anion. It shows that the spectroscopic parameters and molecular constants of ten ?-S and seventeen ? states reported here can be expected to be reliable predicted ones. PMID:23501942

  13. Ten Myths about Spanking Children.

    Straus, Murray A.

    One of a series of studies on corporal punishment of children, this paper argues that the reasons provided for the strong support of spanking are myths. Ten myths about spanking children are discussed by offering arguments that support the action and by quoting findings from studies that refute the arguments. The ten myths are: (1) spanking works…

  14. In vitro antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants against clinical isolates of oral cancer cases

    Kaushal Vivek; Panghal Manju; Yadav Jaya P

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Suppression of immune system in treated cancer patients may lead to secondary infections that obviate the need of antibiotics. In the present study, an attempt was made to understand the occurrence of secondary infections in immuno-suppressed patients along with herbal control of these infections with the following objectives to: (a) isolate the microbial species from the treated oral cancer patients along with the estimation of absolute neutrophile counts of patients (b) ...

  15. Developing cloud business models: A case study on cloud gaming

    Ojala, Arto; Tyrvinen, Pasi

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing offers new ways for firms to operate in the global market so that even small firms can compete in markets traditionally dominated by multinational corporations. A case study considers how, over ten years, a small firm developed a successful business model to compete in computer gaming.

  16. Stroke in the Postpartum Period: A Case Study

    SJ, Allison; A, Basit; Hussein, Omer Mohd; Ahmed RA

    2013-01-01

    A twenty six years old woman presented with visual disturbance, headache and gait disturbance ten weeks postpartum. Imaging studies identified an acute infarction in the left thalamus. This case report discusses her presentation, investigations and management and the aetiology of stroke in pregnancy and the postpartum period.

  17. Teaching Pharmacology by Case Study.

    Jordan, Sue

    1997-01-01

    Using pharmacology case studies with nursing students encourages theory-practice links and infuses real-life content. Cases provide rich qualitative data for evaluating curriculum. However, they are not a substitute for evidence-based practice. (SK)

  18. Software Maintenance: Case Studies

    Bellin, David

    1983-01-01

    The specific needs of the smaller computer user for software maintenance are discussed. Implementation problems and third party support are considered. The major areas of concern are seen to be preventative maintenance, system backup and recovery, application enhancement, and use of third party expertise. Several actual case histories are discussed, and the cost of failure is addressed.

  19. Measurement of implementation components ten years after a nationwide introduction of empirically supported programs a pilot study

    Ogden Terje

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ten years after the nationwide dissemination of two evidence-based treatment programs, the status of the implementation components was evaluated in a cross-sectional study. The aim of the study was to pilot a standardized measure of implementation components by examining the factor structure, the reliabilities of the scores, and their association with implementation outcome variables. The aim was also to compare implementation profiles of the two evidence-based programs based on multi informant assessments. Methods The 218 participants in the study were therapists, supervisors, and agency leaders working with Parent Management Training, the Oregon model (PMTO, and Multisystemic Therapy (MST in Norway. Interviewers filled in an electronic version of the Implementation Components Questionnaire during a telephone interview. Results The factor analysis of the eight one-dimensional subscales resulted in an individual clinical-level factor and an organizational system-level factor. Age, experience, and number of colleagues in the workplace were negatively correlated with positive ratings of the implementation process, but the number of colleagues working with the same program predicted positive ratings. MST and PMTO had different implementation profiles and therapists, supervisors, and managers evaluated some of the implementation drivers significantly differently. Conclusions The psychometric quality of the questionnaire was supported by measures of internal consistency, factor analyses of the implementation components, and the comparisons of implementation profiles between programs and respondent groups. A moderate, but consistent association in the expected direction was found with the implementation outcome variables.

  20. Case Study: Case Studies and the Flipped Classroom

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Schiller, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses the positive and negative aspects of the "flipped classroom." In the flipped classroom model, what is normally done in class and what is normally done as…

  1. Theory Testing Using Case Studies

    Møller, Ann-Kristina Løkke; Dissing Sørensen, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    testing using case studies, including the associated research goal, analysis, and generalisability. We argue that research designs for theory testing using case studies differ from theorybuilding case study research designs because different research projects serve different purposes and follow different......The appropriateness of case studies as a tool for theory testing is still a controversial issue, and discussions about the weaknesses of such research designs have previously taken precedence over those about its strengths. The purpose of the paper is to examine and revive the approach of theory...

  2. COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN TITANIUM ELASTIC NAILING (TENS AND DYNAMIC COMPRESSION PLATING (DCP IN THE TREATMENT OF FEMORAL DIAPHYSEAL FRACTURES IN CHILDREN

    Ramasubba Reddy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Orthopaedic surgeons have long maintained that all children who have sustained a diaphyseal fracture of femur recover with c onservative treatment, given the excellent remodeling ability of immature bone in children. Angulations, shortenings and malrotations are not always corrected by conservative treatment. Of many surgical options, titanium elastic nailing has been the newer implant which is being used regularly. Although good results have been reported with elastic intramedullary nails, plate fixation continues to be a viable alternative in surgical treatment of femoral shaft fractures. However there are not many studies comp aring the efficiency of titanium elastic nailing and plating for femoral diaphyseal fractures in pediatric age group. AIM : The present study aims to compare the surgical management of diaphyseal fractures of femur in children with Dynamic Compression Plati ng versus Titanium Elastic Nailing. DESIGN : This is a prospective study . MATERIALS AND METHODS : This prospective study was conducted in a tertiary hospital. Patients who presented to the out - patient department and casualty of the hospital with femoral diap hyseal fractures during April 2012 to June 2014 were considered for the study. Subjects fulfilling the predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in the study. STATISTICAL METHODS : Fisher Exact test, Chi - Square Test, Student t test (Two t ailed, independent . RESULTS : Patients in the age group of 6 - 14 years were considered for the study, Patients were divided into two groups and treated with DCP/TENS. The duration of surgery, hospital stay, and, amount of blood loss was minimal in TENS grou p. Callus was seen early in TENS group. Radiological union was early in TENS group by 2 - 3 weeks. Outcome was better in patients treated with TENS (Excellent - 70%; Satisfactory – 30%; Poor - 0% in comparison to DCP (Excellent - 70%; Satisfactory - 25%; Poor - 5%. CO NCLUSION : TENS is more versatile and can achieve biological fixation, with minimal complications compared to DCP hence it is concluded that TENS is better procedure for fracture shaft femur in children than DCP

  3. Responses of streamflow and sediment load to climate change and human activity in the Upper Yellow River, China: a case of the Ten Great Gullies Basin.

    Liu, Tong; Huang, He Qing; Shao, Mingan; Yao, Wenyi; Gu, Jing; Yu, Guoan

    2015-01-01

    Soil erosion and land desertification are the most serious environmental problems globally. This study investigated the changes in streamflow and sediment load from 1964 to 2012 in the Ten Great Gullies area of the Upper Yellow River. Tests for gradual trends (Mann-Kendall test) and abrupt changes (Pettitt test) identify that significant declines in streamflow and sediment load occurred in 1997-1998 in two typical gullies. A comparison of climatic variability before and after the change points shows no statistically significant trends in annual precipitation and potential evapotranspiration. Human activities have been very active in the region and during 1990-2010, 146.01 and 197.62 km2 of land were converted, respectively, to forests and grassland, with corresponding increases of 87.56 and 77.05%. In addition, a large number of check dams have been built up in the upper reaches of the ten gullies. These measures were likely responsible for the significant decline in the annual streamflow and sediment load over the last 49 years. PMID:26067511

  4. Case Studies on Sustainable Buildings

    Hui, Sam CM

    2005-01-01

    This web site is developed with the aim to promote sustainable design and planning of buildings. A knowledge base of case studies and resources has been established to illustrate the sustainable design strategies and features in realistic building projects all over the world. The database of case studies can be searched by project names, locations, design strategies and design features.

  5. Case Studies Reveal Camper Growth.

    Brannan, Steve; Fullerton, Ann

    1999-01-01

    Case studies in the National Camp Evaluation Project and National Inclusive Camp Practices project used interviews with counselors and parents about camper's growth to yield qualitative data for camp program evaluation. The importance, methods, and benefits of case studies are described. Sidebars give examples of comments on perceived camper

  6. Causative drugs and clinical outcome in Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS, Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN, and SJS-TEN overlap in children

    Gomathy Sethuraman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN are the most severe adverse drug reactions in children. Objectives : The objective was to study the causative drugs and outcome in children with SJS, SJS-TEN overlap, and TEN. Materials and Methods : Retrospective analysis of all the in-patient records of children below 18 years of age with the diagnosis of SJS, SJS-TEN overlap, and TEN was carried out. Results and Conclusions : Twenty children were identified, eight patients each were diagnosed as SJS and TEN and four as SJS-TEN overlap. Multiple drugs were implicated in 15 cases while single drug was responsible in 5 cases. Antibiotics (40.7% were implicated as the commonest cause followed by NSAIDS (25.9% and anticonvulsants (7.4%. Seventeen patients recovered completely and three patients died.

  7. Case study - Argentina

    Antecedents and experience of nuclear activities in Argentina; the Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). First development and research activities. Research reactors and radioisotopes plants. Health physics and safety regulations. - Feasibility studies for the first nuclear power plant. Awarding the first plant CNA I (Atucha I). Relevant data related to the different project stages. Plant performance. - Feasibility study for the second nuclear power plant. Awarding the second plant CNE (Central Nuclear Embalse). Relevant data related to established targets. Differences compared with the first station targets. Local participation. Plant performance. (orig./GL)

  8. Ten years of progress in the Hokkaido birth cohort study on environment and children's health: cohort profile--updated 2013.

    Kishi, Reiko; Kobayashi, Sachiko; Ikeno, Tamiko; Araki, Atsuko; Miyashita, Chihiro; Itoh, Sachiko; Sasaki, Seiko; Okada, Emiko; Kobayashi, Sumitaka; Kashino, Ikuko; Itoh, Kumiko; Nakajima, Sonomi

    2013-11-01

    The Hokkaido Study on Environment and Children's Health is an ongoing cohort study that began in 2002. The study consists of two prospective birth cohorts, the Sapporo cohort (n = 514) and the Hokkaido large-scale cohort (n = 20,940). The primary goals of this study are to first examine the potential negative effects of perinatal environmental chemical exposures on birth outcomes, including congenital malformations and growth retardation; second, to evaluate the development of allergies, infectious diseases and neurodevelopmental disorders and perform longitudinal observations of the children's physical development to clarify the causal relationship between these outcomes and environmental chemicals; third, to identify individuals genetically susceptible to environmental chemicals; finally, to identify the additive effects of various environmental factors in our daily life, such as secondhand smoke exposure or low folate intake during early pregnancy. In this paper, we introduce our recent progress in the Hokkaido study with a cohort profile updated in 2013. For the last ten years, we followed pregnant women and their offspring, measuring various environmental chemicals, i.e., PCB, OH-PCB and dioxins, PFCs (Perfluorinated Compounds), Organochlorine pesticides, Phthalates, bisphenol A and mercury. We discovered that the concentration of toxic equivalents (TEQ) of dioxin and other specific congeners of PCDF or PCDD have effects on birth weight, infants' neurodevelopment and immune function. There were significant gender differences in these effects; our results suggest that male infants have more susceptibility to those chemical exposures than female infants. Interestingly, we found maternal genetic polymorphisms in AHR, CYP1A1 or GSTs that significantly modified the dioxin concentrations in maternal blood, suggesting different dioxin accumulations in the bodies of individuals with these genotypes, which would lead to different dioxin exposure levels. These genetic susceptibility factors influenced the body size of children born from mothers that either smoked or were passively exposed to tobacco smoke. Further studies investigating the correlation between epigenetics, the effects of intrauterine exposure to environmental chemicals and developmental factors related to health and disease are warranted. PMID:23959649

  9. Geostatistical case studies

    The objective of this volume of contributed chapters is to present a series of applications of geostatistics. These range from a careful variographic analysis on uranium data, through detailed studies on geologically complex deposits, right up to the latest nonlinear methods applied to deposits with highly skewed data contributions. Applications of new techniques such as the external drift method for combining well data with seismic information have also been included. The volume emphasizes geostatistics in practice. Notation has been kept to a minimum and mathematical details have been relegated to annexes

  10. Poroelastic behaviour of the degenerating human intervertebral disc: a ten-day study in a loaded disc culture system

    KS Emanuel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The intervertebral disc (IVD allows flexibility to the vertebral column, and transfers the predominant axial loads during daily activities. Its axial biomechanical behaviour is poroelastic, due to the water-binding and releasing capacity of the nucleus pulposus. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc presumably affects both the instantaneous elastic response to the load on the IVD and the subsequent interstitial flow of fluid. This study aims to quantify the poroelastic behaviour of the IVD and its change with degeneration, as defined by the magnetic resonance imaging-based Pfirrmann Score (PS. For a period of ten days, 36 human lumbar IVDs were loaded with a simulated physiological axial loading regime, while deformation was monitored. The IVDs responded to the loads with instantaneous elastic and slow poroelastic axial deformation. Several mechanical parameters changed throughout the first five days of the experiment, until the IVDs settled into a dynamic equilibrium. In this equilibrium, degeneration was significantly related to a decrease in disc height loss during the daytime high load phase (ρ = -0.49, and to a decrease in the rate of this deformation during the final half hour of each day (ρ = -0.53. These properties were related to the nucleus glycosaminoglycan/hydroxyproline (GAG/HYP ratio, rather than GAG content alone, indicating that remodelling of the extracellular matrix reduces poroelastic properties of the IVD. This implies that the degenerated discs have a reduced capacity to bind water and/or a reduced resistance against fluid flow. The resulting loss in hydrostatic pressure may further change cell behaviour in the nucleus pulposus.

  11. Cervical neoplasia case studies

    Eduard Crauciuc

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is nowadays one of the most important health problems. In Romania cancer is the second in generalmorbidity after cardio-vascular diseases, being followed by respiratory diseases, accidents and trauma. Considering thefact that cancer has an insidious start, a slow irreversible development towards physical and psychic invalidity, and that itaffects both the person and the family and society, we can say it is very important to have a study of this illness from thesocial and medical point of view. The cytological examination offers, apart from the highlighting of the tumour cells, thepossibility of assessing the hormonal status, and also of identifying vaginal flora. Cervical cancer is a serious chroniccondition, which has great medical and social importance and has a severe evolution when detected in advanced stages.

  12. Teaching astronomy with case studies

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2015-11-01

    Breaking the students into small, collaborative learning groups to solve a meaningful task together is one of the most successful and fully evaluated teaching techniques implemented over the last century. Although there are many ways to accomplish small group learning, a long-standing and consistently successful collaborative class activity is to use the case study teaching strategy. The use of case studies is common in medical schools and law schools, but not so common in the teaching of astronomy. Case studies create meaningful conversations among students and with the professor by focusing on life-like dilemmas to be solved. Case study tasks ask audience members to synthesize several ideas or evaluate scenarios that have not been explicitly presented to them in the lecture or in available readings.

  13. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (CHICAGO, IL)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  14. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (DENVER PRESENTATION)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  15. Hydrogeologic Case Studies (Seattle, WA)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  16. A TEN YEAR STUDY OF THE MANAGEMENT OF HAEMORRHOIDS AT A SECONDARY NURSING HOME IN SOUTH WEST NIGERIA

    Omole Moses Kayode

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study evaluated the different treatment options used in the management of haemorrhoids in a state government owned secondary hospital, Jericho Nursing Home, Ibadan, Nigeria. The study was conducted for a period of two weeks covering June 5th – 17th 2007.The total of 120 case notes available for patients treated for haemorrhoids were used and thoroughly studied. The case notes consist of Thirty four (28.3% males and 86 (71.7% females who were aged between 21-40 years 57(47.5%, between 41-60 years 41(34.2% and between 61-80years 22(18.3%.Among the nursing mothers whose case notes were studied, 57(47.5% were pregnant while 63(52.5% were not pregnant.The nursing mothers’ occupations were marketing 4(3.3%, trading 36(30.0%, secretary 14(11.7%, teaching 16(13.3%, accounting 3(2.5%, student 7(5.8%, civil servant 6(5.0%, engineering 9(7.5% and retirees 8(6.7% with 17(14.2% not indicating their occupation.Treatment options reviewed showed that those treated with sitzbath were 58(20.7%, with oral liquid paraffin they were 62(22.1%, with Anusol suppositories they were 48(17.1%, with dietary advice they were 87(31.2%, with Surgery (haemorrhoidectomy they were 3(1.1% and with TCP ointment/Xylocaine gel they were 22(7.9%.Statistical analysis was done using the SPSS version 11.0 software programmer for frequency and cross tabulation.There is a need to improve on these treatment options. More innovative methods should be developed for effective treatment of haemorrhoids.

  17. Teaching Case: Enterprise Architecture Specification Case Study

    Steenkamp, Annette Lerine; Alawdah, Amal; Almasri, Osama; Gai, Keke; Khattab, Nidal; Swaby, Carval; Abaas, Ramy

    2013-01-01

    A graduate course in enterprise architecture had a team project component in which a real-world business case, provided by an industry sponsor, formed the basis of the project charter and the architecture statement of work. The paper aims to share the team project experience on developing the architecture specifications based on the business case

  18. A case study of Impetigo

    Mansouri P

    1993-01-01

    This is a report of a case study on 234 patients with impetigo who referred to Razi Dermatology Hospital from April to November, 1989. Treatment was started immediately after obtaining direct smear and performing culture and antibiotic sensitivity test. The most common organism responsible for impetigo was the coagulase-positive staphylococcus (71%). In 13.7% of the cases, the coagulase-negative staphylococcus was grown on culture media, but none of the cultures showed streptococcus as the ma...

  19. Innovation for Sustainable Tourism:International Case Studies

    Carlsen, Jack; Edwards, D; Forde, P

    2007-01-01

    Innovation is the key to responding to the future challenges that confront all sectors of society and the economy, and especially in tourism. Within tourism, there are numerous corporations and destinations around the world that are responding to the ecological, social and economic challenges and making the transformation toward sustainability through innovation. This book assembles ten case studies of large and small enterprises and destinations in developed and developing nations that are p...

  20. Theory testing using case studies

    Dissing Sørensen, Pernille; Løkke Nielsen, Ann-Kristina

    for research design. Finally, we discuss the epistemological logic, i.e., the value to larger research programmes, of such studies and, following Lakatos, conclude that the value of theory-testing case studies lies beyond naïve falsification and in their contribution to developing research programmes...

  1. Kenya Groundwater Governance Case Study

    Mumma, Albert; Lane, Michael; Kairu, Edward; Tuinhof, Albert; Hirji, Rafik

    2011-01-01

    This report presents a case study on groundwater governance in Kenya. The objectives of the study were to: (a) describe groundwater resource and socioeconomic settings for four selected aquifers; (b) describe governance arrangements for groundwater management in Kenya; and (c) identify the relevance of these arrangements for planning and implementing climate change mitigation measures. The ...

  2. Case Study on Logistics Performance

    Shahryar Sorooshian; Manimekalai Jambulingam; Javad Dodangeh

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents research carried out at a medium‐size manufacturing organization in east Asia. The study tries to highlight the importance of supply chain management; specifically, our aim for this study is to understand logistics and performance measurement in the logistics and supply chain, and we include a theoretical discussion of online data collected and a case study of the logistic performance of a real organization. The study also examines the performance of the selected company, i...

  3. Incidence of cancer in children residing in ten jurisdictions of the Mexican Republic: importance of the Cancer registry (a population-based study)

    In 1996, Mexico started to register cases of childhood cancer. Here, we describe the incidence of cancer in children, residing in ten Mexican jurisdictions, who were treated by the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). New cases of childhood cancer, which were registered prospectively in nine principal Medical Centers of IMSS during the periods 1998–2000 (five jurisdictions) and 1996–2002 (five jurisdictions), were analyzed. Personnel were specifically trained to register, capture, and encode information. For each of these jurisdictions, the frequency, average annual age-standardized incidence (AAS) and average annual incidence per period by sex and, age, were calculated (rates per 1,000,000 children/years). In total 2,615 new cases of cancer were registered, with the male/female ratio generally >1, but in some tumors there were more cases in females (retinoblastoma, germ cells tumors). The principal groups of neoplasms in seven jurisdictions were leukemias, central nervous system tumors (CNS tumors), and lymphomas, and the combined frequency for these three groups was 62.6 to 77.2%. Most frequently found (five jurisdictions) was the North American-European pattern (leukemias-CNS tumors-lymphomas). Eight jurisdictions had AAS within the range reported in the world literature. The highest incidence was found for children underless than five year of age. In eight jurisdictions, leukemia had high incidence (>50). The AAS of lymphomas was between 1.9 to 28.6. Chiapas and Guerrero had the highest AAS of CNS tumors (31.9 and 30.3, respectively). The frequency and incidence of neuroblastoma was low. Chiapas had the highest incidence of retinoblastoma (21.8). Germ-cell tumors had high incidence. The North American-European pattern of cancers was the principal one found; the overall incidence was within the range reported worldwide. In general but particularly in two jurisdictions (Yucatán and Chiapas), it will be necessary to carry out studies concerning the causes of cancer in children. Due to the little that is known about the incidence of cancer in Mexican children, it will be necessary to develop a national program to establish a cancer registry for the whole of the country

  4. eCompetence Case Studies

    Jensen, Helle Bækkelund

    In this paper we present some details of the processes undertaken in the European eCompetence Initiative. We present two illustrative and representative case studies. The research aims to identify and understand patterns of individual and organisational eCompetence approaches.......In this paper we present some details of the processes undertaken in the European eCompetence Initiative. We present two illustrative and representative case studies. The research aims to identify and understand patterns of individual and organisational eCompetence approaches....

  5. Case Study on Logistics Performance

    Shahryar Sorooshian

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents research carried out at a medium‐size manufacturing organization in east Asia. The study tries to highlight the importance of supply chain management; specifically, our aim for this study is to understand logistics and performance measurement in the logistics and supply chain, and we include a theoretical discussion of online data collected and a case study of the logistic performance of a real organization. The study also examines the performance of the selected company, identifies the problems and provides recommendations for improvements. This study can be a guide for business advisers and those interested in analysing company performance, especially from a logistics viewpoint. We also suggest the methodology of this case study for those who want to have a better understanding of a business environment before starting their own business, or for benchmarking practice during strategic planning.

  6. Teaching Case: Enterprise Architecture Specification Case Study

    Steenkamp, Annette Lerine; Alawdah, Amal; Almasri, Osama; Gai, Keke; Khattab, Nidal; Swaby, Carval; Abaas, Ramy

    2013-01-01

    A graduate course in enterprise architecture had a team project component in which a real-world business case, provided by an industry sponsor, formed the basis of the project charter and the architecture statement of work. The paper aims to share the team project experience on developing the architecture specifications based on the business case…

  7. Agile Transformation: A case study

    Pitkänen, Antti

    2015-01-01

    Agile methods have been widely adopted in the software engineering industry. In addition, agile software development has been studied extensively during the past decade. In general, studies tend to recommend having experts working in small, self-organizing and cross-functional teams. However, the environment in an enterprise can comprise of multiple, interlinked pro- grams and dozens of teams working on them, which poses many challenges to adopting agile methods. In this case study, we st...

  8. BioFleet case studies

    These six case studies examined the use of different biodiesel blends as fuel supply sources for businesses in British Columbia (BC). In the first case study, 6 municipalities participated in a pilot program designed to compare the performance of biodiesel and diesel fuels. Each municipality operated 2 base vehicles running on conventional diesel along with 2 similar vehicles which used biodiesel. Real time emissions tests and analyses of the vehicles using biodiesel were also conducted by 2 of the participating municipalities. All municipalities participating in the study agreed to purchase significant volumes of biodiesel. The second case study described a pilot study conducted by the City of Vancouver's equipment services branch in 2004. As a result of the study, the city now has over 530 types of equipment that use biodiesel. The third case study described a program designed by TSI Terminals in Vancouver to assess the emission reduction impact of using biodiesel at its port facility. Six different pieces of equipment were used to confirm that biodiesel could be used throughout the terminal. Test results confirmed that biodiesel blends could be used to reduce emissions. Overall emissions were reduced by 30 per cent. The fourth case study described a waste renderer that used a fleet of 36 trucks to deliver raw products to its plants. The company made the decision to use only biodiesel for its entire fleet of trucks. Since July 2005, the company has logged over 1.7 million km using biodiesel blends. The fifth case study described a salmon hatchery that switched from diesel to biodiesel in order to reduce emissions. The biodiesel blends are used to fuel the hatchery's 2 diesel generators. The hatchery has reduced emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) by an estimated 1800 tonnes annually. The sixth case study described how the Township of Langley has started using biodiesel for its entire fleet of of approximately 250 pieces of equipment. The township has not encountered any operational differences in their field operations since switching to biodiesel. 26 figs

  9. Os Trigonum Syndrome: A Case Study

    Yasemin Turan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Os trigonum syndrome is one of the rare causes of posterior foot pain. Ostrigonum, which is placed at the posterior of talus, is an accessory bone. Ostrigonum syndrome causes back foot pain due to compression between talusand calcaneus. In this study, we present a case of os trigonum syndrome ,which is a rare disease and is generally missed. A 65-year-old female patientwith a complaint of left foot pain for the last 2 months persented to our outpatientclinic. In the physical examination, plantar flexion of the ankle andtoe was painful. Patient’s pain was evaluated by the visual analog scale andnoted as 8 cm. There was sensitivity at the posterior of talus during palpation.Os trigonum syndrome was diagnosed based on radiological examinationsand a physical therapy program consisting of transcutaneous electrical nervestimulation (TENS, cold pack, foot and ankle range of motion and strengtheningexercises was started. After the treatment, pain VAS decreased to 2cm,and then the patient was followed clinically. As in our case, os trigonum syndromeshould also be taken into consideration in patients complaining withposterior foot pain apart from other frequently encountered causes. In suchcases, physical therapy programs are very effective in pain management andin reducing the cost of treatment. Turk J Phys Med Rehab 2013;59:161-4.

  10. Ten times eighteen

    Böcker, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    We consider the following simple game: We are given a table with ten slots indexed one to ten. In each of the ten rounds of the game, three dice are rolled and the numbers are added. We then put this number into any free slot. For each slot, we multiply the slot index with the number in this slot, and add up the products. The goal of the game is to maximize this score. In more detail, we play the game many times, and try to maximize the sum of scores or, equivalently, the expected score. We p...

  11. Overview of the Case Studies

    Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    A series of case studies are used to illustrate many of the underlying modelling principles within the book. To facilitate this, the ICAS-MoT modelling tool has been used. A wide range of application areas have been chosen to ensure that the principal concepts of effective and efficient modelling...

  12. The reflexive case study method

    Rittenhofer, Iris

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends the international business research on small to medium-sized enterprises (SME) at the nexus of globalization. Based on a conceptual synthesis across disciplines and theoretical perspectives, it offers management research a reflexive method for case study research of postnational...

  13. Case Studies in Sports Nutrition.

    Clark, Nancy

    1988-01-01

    This article presents case studies of two athletes who wanted to affect a change in their body weight in order to enhance athletic performance. Each athlete's problem and the nutrition approach used to solve it are discussed. Caloric values of fast foods are listed. (JL)

  14. Probabilistic consequence study of residual radiological effects from a hypothetical ten-ton inadvertent nuclear yield. Weapons Safety Program

    In this paper we study the potential radiological consequences of a strategic bomber accident, in which one of the assumed on-board nuclear weapons explodes with an arbitrarily chosen 10-ton nuclear yield. The frequency of such an occurrence is infinitesimal. The safety design features in today s nuclear weapons' systems essentially forbid its occurrence. We have a chosen a military base which has the feature of being a representative combination of urban and rural populations. The assumed ''crash site'' is near the northwest comer of the military base, close to civilian housing located just across the street from the base. A worst case wind would be from the ESE (east south east). This would cause fission debris to be dispersed toward the largest population centers and, thus, would lead to the largest Pu ''collective'' doses (i.e., a dose integrated over time and summed over individuals). Also, if an ESE wind were blowing at accident time, some people in nearby housing could receive lethal gamma-ray doses from fallout before evacuation could occur. It is assumed only one weapon undergoes nuclear yield; the other on-board weapons would HE detonate and the Pu would be aerosolized and lofted. We assume an activity-size distribution and lofting similar to those used to predict fallout measured at NTS. The main thrust of our study is to provide estimates of probabilistic radiological risks to the population local to a strategic bomber crash site. The studied radiological consequences are: cloud-passage doses from Pu inhalation; doses from groundshine due to gamma-producing radionuclides; and areal contamination from Pu and the long-lived fission products Cs-137 and Sr-90

  15. Ten Problems in Experimental Mathematics

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Kapoor, Vishaal; Weisstein, Eric

    2004-09-30

    This article was stimulated by the recent SIAM ''100 DigitChallenge'' of Nick Trefethen, beautifully described in a recent book. Indeed, these ten numeric challenge problems are also listed in a recent book by two of present authors, where they are followed by the ten symbolic/numeric challenge problems that are discussed in this article. Our intent was to present ten problems that are characteristic of the sorts of problems that commonly arise in ''experimental mathematics''. The challenge in each case is to obtain a high precision numeric evaluation of the quantity, and then, if possible, to obtain a symbolic answer, ideally one with proof. Our goal in this article is to provide solutions to these ten problems, and in the process present a concise account of how one combines symbolic and numeric computation, which may be termed ''hybrid computation'', in the process of mathematical discovery.

  16. Endometriosis-associated ovarian cancer: A ten-year cohort study of women living in the Estrie Region of Quebec, Canada

    Aris Aziz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Endometriosis has been believed to increase the risk of developing ovarian cancer, but recent data supporting this hypothesis are lacking. The aim of this study was to verify whether the incidence of endometriosis, ovarian cancer and the both increased during the last 10 years among women living in the Estrie region of Quebec. Methods We collected data of women diagnosed with endometriosis, ovarian cancer or both, between 1997 and 2006, from a population living in the Estrie region of Quebec. We performed this retrospective cross-sectional study from the CIRESSS (Centre Informatisé de Recherche Évaluative en Services et Soins de Santé system, the database of the CHUS (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada. Results Among the 2854 identified patients, 2521 had endometriosis, 292 patients had ovarian cancer and 41 patients had both ovarian cancer and endometriosis. We showed a constant increase in the number of ovarian cancer (OC between 1997 and 2006 (r2 = 0.557, P = 0.013, which is not the case for endometriosis (ENDO or endometriosis-associated ovarian cancer (EAOC. The mean age ± SD was 40.0 ± 9.9 and 53.9 ± 11.4 for patients having ENDO and OC, respectively. Mean age of women with EAOC was 48.3 ± 10.8, suggesting an early onset of ovarian cancer in women having endometriosis of about 5.5 years average, P = 0.003. Women with ENDO were at increased risk for developing OC (Rate Ratio [RR] = 1.6; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] = 1.12-2.09. Pathological analyses showed the predominance of endometrioid type (24.4% and clear-cell type (21.9% types in EAOC compared to OC, P = 0.0070 and 0.0029, respectively. However, the serous type is the most widespread in OC (44.5% in comparison to EAOC (19.51%, P = 0.0023. Conclusion Our findings highlight that the number of cases of ovarian cancer is constantly increasing in the last ten years and that endometriosis represents a serious risk factor which accelerates its apparition by about 5.5 years.

  17. Frequency and antimicrobial resistance patterns of bacteria implicated in community urinary tract infections: a ten-year surveillance study (20002009)

    Linhares Ins; Raposo Teresa; Rodrigues Antnio; Almeida Adelaide de

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infectious diseases at the community level. In order to assess the adequacy of the empirical therapy, the prevalence and the resistance pattern of the main bacteria responsible for UTI in the community (in Aveiro, Portugal) was evaluated throughout a ten-year period. Methods In this retrospective study, all urine samples from patients of the District of Aveiro, in ambulatory regime, collected at the Clinical Analysis ...

  18. Structure is three to ten times more conserved than sequence--a study of structural response in protein cores.

    Illergård, Kristoffer; Ardell, David H; Elofsson, Arne

    2009-11-15

    Protein structures change during evolution in response to mutations. Here, we analyze the mapping between sequence and structure in a set of structurally aligned protein domains. To avoid artifacts, we restricted our attention only to the core components of these structures. We found that on average, using different measures of structural change, protein cores evolve linearly with evolutionary distance (amino acid substitutions per site). This is true irrespective of which measure of structural change we used, whether RMSD or discrete structural descriptors for secondary structure, accessibility, or contacts. This linear response allows us to quantify the claim that structure is more conserved than sequence. Using structural alphabets of similar cardinality to the sequence alphabet, structural cores evolve three to ten times slower than sequences. Although we observed an average linear response, we found a wide variance. Different domain families varied fivefold in structural response to evolution. An attempt to categorically analyze this variance among subgroups by structural and functional category revealed only one statistically significant trend. This trend can be explained by the fact that beta-sheets change faster than alpha-helices, most likely due to that they are shorter and that change occurs at the ends of the secondary structure elements. PMID:19507241

  19. Stochastic efficiency: five case studies

    Proesmans, Karel; Van den Broeck, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic efficiency is evaluated in five case studies: driven Brownian motion, effusion with a thermo-chemical and thermo-velocity gradient, a quantum dot and a model for information to work conversion. The salient features of stochastic efficiency, including the maximum of the large deviation function at the reversible efficiency, are reproduced. The approach to and extrapolation into the asymptotic time regime are documented.

  20. Continuing education case study quiz.

    2013-03-01

    Goal- The goal of this program is to educate pharmacists about the use of teriflunomide for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Objectives- At the completion of this program, the reader will be able to:Describe the pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of teriflunomide.Discuss the risks associated with the use of teriflunomide.Discuss the potential benefit of teriflunomide for an individual patient.Apply the information on the use of teriflunomide to a case study. PMID:24421468

  1. Case Study Research in Therapeutic Recreation.

    McCormick, Bryan P.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the rationale for and implications of case study research in therapeutic recreation, examining: what can be learned from studying a single case; issues of validity and reliability; ethical conduct of research; and the practice of case study research (case protocol, case selection, collecting data, analyzing and interpreting data, and…

  2. A case study of Impetigo

    Mansouri P

    1993-05-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of a case study on 234 patients with impetigo who referred to Razi Dermatology Hospital from April to November, 1989. Treatment was started immediately after obtaining direct smear and performing culture and antibiotic sensitivity test. The most common organism responsible for impetigo was the coagulase-positive staphylococcus (71%. In 13.7% of the cases, the coagulase-negative staphylococcus was grown on culture media, but none of the cultures showed streptococcus as the main organism. Treatment was started with oral penicillin V, oral erythromycin, benzathine penicillin G injection, oral cephalexin, and topical fuccidin. Clinical and bacteriological evaluation after 3-7 days showed that it is preferable to use oral cephalexin instead of other protocols such as oral erythromycin, which has previously been the drug of choice for impetigo. In addition, topical fuccidin with a 75% curative rate was the first drug for treatment, with the same effect as the oral cephalexin

  3. The 'fine structure' of nutrient dynamics in rivers: ten years of study using high-frequency monitoring

    Jordan, Phil; Melland, Alice; Shore, Mairead; Mellander, Per-Erik; Shortle, Ger; Ryan, David; Crockford, Lucy; Macintosh, Katrina; Campbell, Julie; Arnscheidt, Joerg; Cassidy, Rachel

    2014-05-01

    A complete appraisal of material fluxes in flowing waters is really only possibly with high time resolution data synchronous with measurements of discharge. Defined by Kirchner et al. (2004; Hydrological Processes, 18/7) as the high-frequency wave of the future and with regard to disentangling signal noise from process pattern, this challenge has been met in terms of nutrient flux monitoring by automated bankside analysis. In Ireland over a ten-year period, time-series nutrient data collected on a sub-hourly basis in rivers have been used to distinguish fluxes from different catchment sources and pathways and to provide more certain temporal pictures of flux for the comparative definition of catchment nutrient dynamics. In catchments where nutrient fluxes are particularly high and exhibit a mix of extreme diffuse and point source influences, high time resolution data analysis indicates that there are no satisfactory statistical proxies for seasonal or annual flux predictions that use coarse datasets. Or at least exposes the limits of statistical approaches to catchment scale and hydrological response. This has profound implications for catchment monitoring programmes that rely on modelled relationships. However, using high resolution monitoring for long term assessments of catchment mitigation measures comes with further challenges. Sustaining continuous wet chemistry analysis at river stations is resource intensive in terms of capital, maintenance and quality assurance. Furthermore, big data capture requires investment in data management systems and analysis. These two institutional challenges are magnified when considering the extended time period required to identify the influences of land-based nutrient control measures on water based systems. Separating the 'climate signal' from the 'source signal' in river nutrient flux data is a major analysis challenge; more so when tackled with anything but higher resolution data. Nevertheless, there is scope to lower costs in bankside analysis through technology development, and the scientific advantages of these data are clear and exciting. When integrating its use with policy appraisal, it must be made clear that the advances in river process understanding from high resolution monitoring data capture come as a package with the ability to make more informed decisions through an investment in better information.

  4. The Case: Generalisation, Theory and Phronesis in Case Study

    Thomas, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Arguments for the value of case study are vitiated by assumptions about the need for generalisation in the warrant of social scientific inquiry--and little generalisation is legitimate from case study, although an argument exists for the role of the case in the establishment of a form of generalisation in a certain kind of theory, a line of…

  5. Powers of ten

    Pyramid FILMS

    1977-01-01

    Powers of Ten is a 1977 short documentary film written and directed by Charles Eames and his wife, Ray. The film depicts the relative scale of the Universe in factors of ten (see also logarithmic scale and order of magnitude). The film begins with an aerial image of a man reclining on a blanket; the view is that of one meter across. The viewpoint, accompanied by expository voiceover, then slowly zooms out to a view ten meters across ( or 101 m in standard form), revealing that the man is picnicking in a park with a female companion. The zoom-out continues, to a view of 100 meters (102 m), then 1 kilometer (103 m), and so on, increasing the perspective—the picnic is revealed to be taking place near Soldier Field on Chicago's waterfront—and continuing to zoom out to a field of view of 1024 meters, or the size of the observable universe. The camera then zooms back in to the picnic, and then to views of negative powers of ten—10-1 m (10 centimeters), and so forth, until we are viewing a carbon nucl...

  6. Ten Top Tech Trends

    McLester, Susan

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the major technical issues, products, and practices of the day. The top ten tech trends are listed and discussed. These include: (1) data mining; (2) cyberbullying; (3) 21st century skills; (4) digital content; (5) learning at leisure; (6) personal responders; (7) mobile tools; (8) bandwidth; (9) open-source…

  7. Puma : a sponsorship case study

    Vasconcelos, Toms Garcia Pestana de

    2014-01-01

    This case study provides an overview of the sporting goods retail industry and the main players in the market and presents a decision-making moment from the Head of Sports Marketing Teamsport in PUMA regarding the companys strategy for the year 2013, revolving around the pursuing one of the worlds leading football teams in order to get a sponsorship deal, or on the other hand it is better for the brand to make smaller deals with more teams with a smaller dimension. In the foo...

  8. Case studies in canonical stewardship.

    Cafardi, N P; Hite, J

    1985-11-01

    In facing the challenges that confront Catholic health care today, it is important to know which civil law forms will assist in preserving the Church's ministry. The proper meshing of civil law and canon law thus provides a vehicle to strengthen the apostolate's work. The case studies presented here suggest several means of applying the principles in the new Code of Canon Law to three potentially problematic situations: the merger of a Catholic and non-Catholic hospital, the leasing of a Catholic hospital to an operating company, and the use of the multicorporate format. PMID:10274590

  9. A parathyroid scintigraphy case study

    Background: There has been much debate concerning the most suitable protocol for parathyroid scintigraphy; the merits of various radiopharmaceuticals versus the correct imaging protocol to visualise both ectopic and anatomically placed adenomas against the various equipment choices have been debated. Aim: To demonstrate, through the use of a case study, the necessity of changing imaging protocols for parathyroid scintigraphy where a definitive imaging diagnosis is absent in the face of strong clinical suspicion. Method: Use is made of Tc99mMIBI, full field chest scintigraphy, a clearly defined imaging protocol and SPECT imaging to locate ectopic parathyroid tissue in a female patient with significant symptoms of parathyroid hyperfunction. Results: A single hyperfunctioning adenoma is located in the pre-carinal area of the mediastinum. Using a radioguided surgical technique the hyperfunctioning tissue is excised and confirmed by histopathology. Conclusion: Whilst a dramatic reduction in patient symptoms was not seen immediately in this patient, the symptoms of the illness have been subsiding since January 2003. This case study demonstrates the necessity of changing imaging protocols for parathyroid scintigraphy where a definitive imaging diagnosis is absent in the face of strong clinical suspicion

  10. The immune system status under the effect of low-level radiation: studies within the ten-kilometer zone of Chernobyl disaster

    A study was made of the influence of high radiation contamination within the ten-kilometer zone of Chernobyl disaster on the structure and function of the immune system of mice. The cumulative radiation doses with respect to ?-radiation, were 0.024, 0.168 and 0.336 Gy. T-lymphocyte proliferation was shown to be activated with all radiation doses mentioned above but with doses of 0.024 and 0.168 Gy, helper T lymphocytes, and with 0.336 Gy, suppressor N-lymphocytes were primarilly activated. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Ten steps to heaven

    Chell, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Ten Steps to Heaven formed part of Fourteen Artists' Interventions, an exhibition held to mark the Swedenborg Societys bicentennial celebration a series of events including publications, lectures and presentations by writers including Simon Armitage, Iain Sinclair and A.S. Byatt. My contribution was a stair rail designed to have specific resonance to the site. Created for the bicentenary year, during which visitors encountered it as they moved through the building, my installation is now p...

  12. Ten?Year Blood Pressure Trajectories, Cardiovascular Mortality, and Life Years Lost in 2 Extinction Cohorts: the Minnesota Business and Professional Men Study and the Zutphen Study

    Tielemans, Susanne M. A. J.; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Menotti, Alessandro; Boshuizen, Hendriek C.; Soedamah?Muthu, Sabita S.; Jacobs, David R.; Blackburn, Henry; Kromhout, Daan

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood pressure (BP) trajectories derived from measurements repeated over years have low measurement error and may improve cardiovascular disease prediction compared to single, average, and usual BP (single BP adjusted for regression dilution). We characterized 10?year BP trajectories and examined their association with cardiovascular mortality, all?cause mortality, and life years lost. Methods and Results Data from 2 prospective and nearly extinct cohorts of middle?aged menthe Minnesota Business and Professional Men Study (n=261) and the Zutphen Study (n=632)were used. BP was measured annually during 19471957 in Minnesota and 19601970 in Zutphen. BP trajectories were identified by latent mixture modeling. Cox proportional hazards and linear regression models examined BP trajectories with cardiovascular mortality, all?cause mortality, and life years lost. Associations were adjusted for age, serum cholesterol, smoking, and diabetes mellitus. Mean initial age was about 50 years in both cohorts. After 10 years of BP measurements, men were followed until death on average 20 years later. All Minnesota men and 98% of Zutphen men died. Four BP trajectories were identified, in which mean systolic BP increased by 5 to 49 mm Hg in Minnesota and 5 to 20 mm Hg in Zutphen between age 50 and 60. The third systolic BP trajectories were associated with 2 to 4 times higher cardiovascular mortality risk, 2 times higher all?cause mortality risk, and 4 to 8 life years lost, compared to the first trajectory. Conclusions Ten?year BP trajectories were the strongest predictors, among different BP measures, of cardiovascular mortality, all?cause mortality, and life years lost in Minnesota. However, average BP was the strongest predictor in Zutphen. PMID:25753924

  13. Powers of ten

    Innocenti, Pier Giorgio

    1979-01-01

    Powers of Ten is a 1977 short documentary film written and directed by Charles Eames and his wife, Ray. The film depicts the relative scale of the Universe in factors of ten (see also logarithmic scale and order of magnitude). The idea for the film appears to have come from the 1957 book Cosmic View by Kees Boeke. The film begins with an aerial image of a man reclining on a blanket; the view is that of one meter across. The viewpoint, accompanied by expository voiceover, then slowly zooms out to a view ten meters across ( or 101 m in standard form), revealing that the man is picnicking in a park with a female companion. The zoom-out continues, to a view of 100 meters (102 m), then 1 kilometer (103 m), and so on, increasing the perspective—the picnic is revealed to be taking place near Soldier Field on Chicago's waterfront—and continuing to zoom out to a field of view of 1024 meters, or the size of the observable universe. The camera then zooms back in to the picnic, and then to views of negative pow...

  14. STS Case Study Development Support

    Rosa de Jesus, Dan A.; Johnson, Grace K.

    2013-01-01

    The Shuttle Case Study Collection (SCSC) has been developed using lessons learned documented by NASA engineers, analysts, and contractors. The SCSC provides educators with a new tool to teach real-world engineering processes with the goal of providing unique educational materials that enhance critical thinking, decision-making and problem-solving skills. During this third phase of the project, responsibilities included: the revision of the Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) source code to ensure all pages follow World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) standards, and the addition and edition of website content, including text, documents, and images. Basic HTML knowledge was required, as was basic knowledge of photo editing software, and training to learn how to use NASA's Content Management System for website design. The outcome of this project was its release to the public.

  15. Case Study: A Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Making a Case for Video Case Studies

    Pai, Aditi

    2014-01-01

    A picture, they say, is worth a thousand words. If a mere picture is worth a thousand words, how much more are "moving pictures" or videos worth? The author poses this not merely as a rhetorical question, but because she wishes to make a case for using videos in the traditional case study method. She recommends four main approaches of…

  16. Disaster exposure as a risk factor for mental health problems, eighteen months, four and ten years post-disaster a longitudinal study

    van den Berg Bellis

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disaster experiences have been associated with higher prevalence rates of (mental health problems. The objective of this study was to examine the independent relation between a series of single disaster experiences versus the independent predictive value of a accumulation of disaster experiences, i.e. a sum score of experiences and symptoms of distress and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Methods Survivors of a fireworks disaster participated in a longitudinal study and completed a questionnaire three weeks (wave 1, eighteen months (wave 2 and four years post-disaster (wave 3. Ten years post-disaster (wave 4 the respondents consisted of native Dutch survivors only. Main outcome measures were general distress and symptoms of PTSD. Results Degree of disaster exposure (sum score and some disaster-related experiences (such as house destroyed, injured, confusion were related to distress at waves 2 and 3. This relation was mediated by distress at an earlier point in time. None of the individual disaster-related experiences was independently related to symptoms of distress. The association between the degree of disaster exposure and symptoms of PTSD at waves 2 and 3 was still statistically significant after controlling for symptoms of distress and PTSD at earlier point in time. The variable house destroyed was the only factor that was independently related to symptoms of PTSD at wave 2. Ten years after the disaster, disaster exposure was mediated by symptoms of PTSD at waves 2 and 3. Disaster exposure was not independently related to symptoms of PTSD ten years post-disaster. Conclusions Until 4 years after the disaster, degree of exposure (a sum score was a risk factor for PTSD symptoms while none of the individual disaster experiences could be identified as an independent risk factor. Ten years post-disaster, disaster exposure was no longer an independent risk factor for symptoms of PTSD. Since symptoms of PTSD and distress at earlier waves perpetuate the symptoms at later waves, health care workers should aim their resources at those who still have symptoms after one and a half year post-disaster, to prevent health problems at medium and long-term.

  17. Disaster exposure as a risk factor for mental health problems, eighteen months, four and ten years post-disaster a longitudinal study

    2012-01-01

    Background Disaster experiences have been associated with higher prevalence rates of (mental) health problems. The objective of this study was to examine the independent relation between a series of single disaster experiences versus the independent predictive value of a accumulation of disaster experiences, i.e. a sum score of experiences and symptoms of distress and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Methods Survivors of a fireworks disaster participated in a longitudinal study and completed a questionnaire three weeks (wave 1), eighteen months (wave 2) and four years post-disaster (wave 3). Ten years post-disaster (wave 4) the respondents consisted of native Dutch survivors only. Main outcome measures were general distress and symptoms of PTSD. Results Degree of disaster exposure (sum score) and some disaster-related experiences (such as house destroyed, injured, confusion) were related to distress at waves 2 and 3. This relation was mediated by distress at an earlier point in time. None of the individual disaster-related experiences was independently related to symptoms of distress. The association between the degree of disaster exposure and symptoms of PTSD at waves 2 and 3 was still statistically significant after controlling for symptoms of distress and PTSD at earlier point in time. The variable house destroyed was the only factor that was independently related to symptoms of PTSD at wave 2. Ten years after the disaster, disaster exposure was mediated by symptoms of PTSD at waves 2 and 3. Disaster exposure was not independently related to symptoms of PTSD ten years post-disaster. Conclusions Until 4 years after the disaster, degree of exposure (a sum score) was a risk factor for PTSD symptoms while none of the individual disaster experiences could be identified as an independent risk factor. Ten years post-disaster, disaster exposure was no longer an independent risk factor for symptoms of PTSD. Since symptoms of PTSD and distress at earlier waves perpetuate the symptoms at later waves, health care workers should aim their resources at those who still have symptoms after one and a half year post-disaster, to prevent health problems at medium and long-term. PMID:22989093

  18. The effect of manganese on the central nervous system. On the basis of ten cases with hyperintensities in the globus pallidus and a part of the brainstem on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Katsuragi, Toshio [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-03-01

    We examined the effect of manganese (Mn) on the central nervous system, on the basis of ten cases with hyperintensities in the globus pallidus and a part of the brainstem on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These cases were divided into three groups; four cases with liver dysfunction, three cases with intravenous infusion containing Mn and three cases without any specific factor. Mn levels were measured in serum, whole blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). As a result, their serum and CSF Mn levels were significantly higher (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively) than those of the control subjects, while their whole blood Mn levels were not significantly different. Single photon emission computed tomography demonstrated a decrease of the cerebral blood flow in the frontal lobe in four cases with the hyperintensities and in one of them the decrease improved after the disappearance of the hyperintensity. Oculogyric crisis in one case with intravenous infusion containing Mn and dystonia in one case without any specific factor also improved, when the hyperintensities disappeared. In the cases with T1-weighted MRI hyperintensities, it is important to measure serum and CSF Mn levels as well as to observe psychiatric and neurological symptoms. (author)

  19. The effect of manganese on the central nervous system. On the basis of ten cases with hyperintensities in the globus pallidus and a part of the brainstem on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    We examined the effect of manganese (Mn) on the central nervous system, on the basis of ten cases with hyperintensities in the globus pallidus and a part of the brainstem on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These cases were divided into three groups; four cases with liver dysfunction, three cases with intravenous infusion containing Mn and three cases without any specific factor. Mn levels were measured in serum, whole blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). As a result, their serum and CSF Mn levels were significantly higher (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively) than those of the control subjects, while their whole blood Mn levels were not significantly different. Single photon emission computed tomography demonstrated a decrease of the cerebral blood flow in the frontal lobe in four cases with the hyperintensities and in one of them the decrease improved after the disappearance of the hyperintensity. Oculogyric crisis in one case with intravenous infusion containing Mn and dystonia in one case without any specific factor also improved, when the hyperintensities disappeared. In the cases with T1-weighted MRI hyperintensities, it is important to measure serum and CSF Mn levels as well as to observe psychiatric and neurological symptoms. (author)

  20. NWCC Transmission Case Study III

    Terry Allison, Steve Wiese

    2000-03-01

    OAK-B135 Transmission System Improvements for Wind Energy Development in the Upper Midwest and Great Plains: Opportunities and Obstacles. This case study set out to ascertain the validity of three assumptions from the perspectives of stakeholders involved in wind energy and transmission issues in the Upper Midwest and Great Plains. The assumptions, and the stakeholders' reactions to each, are summarized below: Assumption 1--Transmission system improvements would provide significant benefits to the electricity network and its customers. Respondents acknowledge the potential for overall system benefits in the form of reduced line losses, improved grid stability and reliability, and enhanced ability to conduct spot market transactions. They also agree that these benefits relate to specific regional needs. However, there is disagreement over the extent of other benefits such as efficiency gains and cost savings from reduced line losses. Further, environmental and community interest groups point out that none of these benefits are realized without significant financial, environmental and social costs. Assumption 2--The benefits of transmission improvements would be helpful, but not confined, to wind power. All respondents agree that wind energy could benefit from transmission system improvements. But they also acknowledge, reluctantly, in the case of environmental stakeholders, that the benefits of an improved transmission system cannot be limited to environmentally preferable forms of generation. Some environmental and community advocate respondents also feel that transmission system improvement projects can be avoided altogether through energy conservation and efficiency measures, and by substituting wind energy for fossil generation. Assumption 3--Transmission alliances among stakeholders within and external to the wind community can provide benefits in the public interest. The fractured, multi-jurisdictional governance of the regional transmission system, and the distrust and diversity of perspectives among affected stakeholders, may make the formation of multi-stakeholder alliances necessary to accomplishing transmission goals. If the wind industry and utilities want to partner with environmental and community advocate groups in supporting a transmission project, they may have to convince these groups that the project would result in a net environmental benefit. The project proponents would have to make the case that the benefits of the additional wind energy will at least offset the emissions of any additional fossil generation made possible by the transmission project, as well as offset the environmental impact of the transmission project itself.

  1. Recovery Potential of a Western Lowland Gorilla Population following a Major Ebola Outbreak: Results from a Ten Year Study

    Genton, Céline; Cristescu, Romane; Gatti, Sylvain; Levréro, Florence; Bigot, Elodie; Caillaud, Damien; Pierre, Jean-Sébastien; Ménard, Nelly

    2012-01-01

    Investigating the recovery capacity of wildlife populations following demographic crashes is of great interest to ecologists and conservationists. Opportunities to study these aspects are rare due to the difficulty of monitoring populations both before and after a demographic crash. Ebola outbreaks in central Africa have killed up to 95% of the individuals in affected western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) populations. Assessing whether and how fast affected populations recover is ...

  2. Development of ten microsatellite markers from the keystone mistletoe Tristerix corymbosus (Loranthaceae) using 454 next generation sequencing and their applicability to population genetic structure studies.

    Fontúrbel, Francisco E; Murúa, Maureen M; Vega-Retter, Caren

    2016-05-01

    Tristerix corymbosus (Loranthaceae) is a keystone mistletoe from the South American temperate rainforests. As most mistletoes, T. corymbosus relies on biotic pollination and seed dispersal, which may cause population structure. For a better understanding of its ecology, we isolated and characterized ten polymorphic microsatellite loci for this species. We used 454 Next Generation Sequencing to build a microsatellite library from a high quality DNA sample. We tested 90 sequences from which we obtained ten polymorphic markers. In order to assess their variability, the novel markers were tested in 48 individuals from three locations of the Valdivian Coastal Reserve in Chile. We also estimated genetic differences between pairs of populations using the FST statistic. The mean number of alleles per locus in the 48 individuals studied was 7.1 (2-17 alleles per locus). The observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.298 to 0.634 and from 0.310 to 0.881, respectively. There were genetic differences among the three populations assessed, according to the FST values (ranging from 0.048 to 0.100, all significant) and, the number of alleles per locus ranged from 3.9 to 5.1. These are the first microsatellite markers developed for T. corymbosus, and they arise as a powerful tool for studying population structure, genetic diversity and gene flow at the landscape scale, along its distribution. PMID:26944282

  3. Case Study #3: Negative Intergroup Influence

    Erbe, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    This is the third case study in the series Holding These Truths: Empowerment and Recognition in Action. This series presents case studies for a future conflict resolution textbook. It has been successfully piloted with several international classes. Those, who benefit most, stress the importance of carefully studying the introduction. (See Introduction to Conflict Case Studies, Nancy D. Erbe). Because the case study format is intentionally unique, written in an interactive and non-linear work...

  4. Cement Allergy: A Case Study.

    Gamez, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to educate nurses about the possibility of patients having an allergic reaction to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). Although rare, an allergic reaction to PMMA or the bone cement used to adhere the metal components of a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to the bone can cause aseptic loosening of a TKA ( S. A. Edwards & J. Gardiner, 2007). The prevalence of PMMA allergies in the population has not been reported in the literature; therefore, no high-level research studies on the subject are available ( K. Kaplan, C. Della Valle, K. Haines, & J. D. Zuckerman, 2002). A case study and literature review was used to construct this article. The patient, L.W., a 61-year-old, white woman, is a nail technician with a history of right knee pain, stiffness, soreness, and a decreased range of motion for one and a half years following a TKA. The complications from a PMMA allergy could be avoided by adding one or two questions to the patient's history and physical form. A complete history could also do away with the need for additional testing and increased medical expenses for the patient and the healthcare system as a whole. PMID:26213878

  5. Using Time-on-Task Measurements to Understand Student Performance in a Physics Class: A Ten-Year Study

    Stewart, John

    2015-04-01

    The amount of time spent on out-of-class activities such as working homework, reading, and studying for examinations is presented for 10 years of an introductory, calculus-based physics class at a large public university. While the class underwent significant change in the 10 years studied, the amount of time invested by students in weeks not containing an in-semester examination was constant and did not vary with the length of the reading or homework assignments. The amount of time spent preparing for examinations did change as the course was modified. The time spent on class assignments, both reading and homework, did not scale linearly with the length of the assignment. The time invested in both reading and homework per length of the assignment decreased as the assignments became longer. The class average time invested in examination preparation did change with the average performance on previous examinations in the same class, with more time spent in preparation for lower previous examination scores (R2 = 0 . 70).

  6. Catalog of NASA-Related Case Studies

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The OCKO has developed over 50 case studies to enhance learning at workshops, training, retreats and conferences. Case studies make mission knowledge attractive and...

  7. Ten-year viability study on natural populations of Drosophila sibling species from Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mxico.

    Pimentel, E; Cruces, M P; Salceda, V M; de la Rosa, M E; Levine, L; Castillo, J A

    2004-02-01

    The generation of electricity in nuclear power plants produces an increase in background radiation that could possibly have some impact on the organisms that live in that area. In order to identify and quantify any such possible effect, the natural populations of two sibling species, D. melanogaster and D. simulans, that live in the immediate vicinity of the first Mexican Nuclear Power Plant were analyzed for a period of 10 years. Collections of flies were made at two sites, one close to and one farther from the power plant, during the pre and operational stages of the reactor, and their egg-to-adult viability was analyzed. The data obtained indicate that in both sites, the egg-to-adult viability was generally higher in D. melanogaster than in D. simulans. Further, a relationship was found between egg-to-adult viability and the season of the year (warm-wet or cool-dry season). Some differences were found between the two sites. It may be concluded that there is no negative impact on the Drosophila populations studied. PMID:15106671

  8. The association of microalbuminuria with mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. A ten-year follow-up study

    Jan Skov Jensen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Our study evaluates the long-term effect of microalbuminuria on mortality among patients with acute myocardial infarction. We followed 151 patients from 1996 to 2007 to investigate if microalbuminuria is a risk factor in coronary heart disease. All patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction in 1996 were included. At baseline, we recorded urinary albumin/creatinine concentration ratio, body mass index, blood pressure, left ventricle ejection fraction by echocardiography, smoking status, medication, diabetes, age, and gender. Deaths were traced in 2007 by means of the Danish Personal Identification Register. Microalbuminuria, defined as a urinary albumin/creatinine concentration ratio above 0.65 mg/mmoL, occurred in 50% of the patients and was associated with increased all-cause mortality. Thus, 68% of the patients with microalbuminuria versus 48% of the patients without microalbuminuria had died during the 10 years of follow-up (P=0.04. The crude hazard ratio for death associated with microalbuminuria was 1.78 (CI: 1.18-2.68 (P=0.006, whereas the gender- and age-adjusted hazard ratio was 1.71 (CI: 1.03-2.83 (P=0.04. We concluded that microalbuminuria in hospitalized patients with acute myocardial infarction is prognostic for increased long-term mortality. We recommend measurement of microalbuminuria to be included as a baseline risk factor in patients with acute myocardial infarction and in future trials in patients with cor-onary heart disease.

  9. What passes as a rigorous case study?

    Gibbert, Michael; Ruigrok, Winfried; Wicki, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the methodological sophistication of case studies as a tool for generating and testing theory by analyzing case studies published during the period 1995-2000 in 10 influential management journals. We find that case studies emphasized external validity at the expense of the two more fundamental quality measures, internal and construct validity. Comparing case studies published in the three highest-ranking journals with the other seven, we reveal strategies that may be...

  10. Recovery potential of a western lowland gorilla population following a major Ebola outbreak: results from a ten year study.

    Genton, Céline; Cristescu, Romane; Gatti, Sylvain; Levréro, Florence; Bigot, Elodie; Caillaud, Damien; Pierre, Jean-Sébastien; Ménard, Nelly

    2012-01-01

    Investigating the recovery capacity of wildlife populations following demographic crashes is of great interest to ecologists and conservationists. Opportunities to study these aspects are rare due to the difficulty of monitoring populations both before and after a demographic crash. Ebola outbreaks in central Africa have killed up to 95% of the individuals in affected western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) populations. Assessing whether and how fast affected populations recover is essential for the conservation of this critically endangered taxon. The gorilla population visiting Lokoué forest clearing, Odzala-Kokoua National Park, Republic of the Congo, has been monitored before, two years after and six years after Ebola affected it in 2004. This allowed us to describe Ebola's short-term and long-term impacts on the structure of the population. The size of the population, which included around 380 gorillas before the Ebola outbreak, dropped to less than 40 individuals after the outbreak. It then remained stable for six years after the outbreak. However, the demographic structure of this small population has significantly changed. Although several solitary males have disappeared, the immigration of adult females, the formation of new breeding groups, and several birth events suggest that the population is showing potential to recover. During the outbreak, surviving adult and subadult females joined old solitary silverbacks. Those females were subsequently observed joining young silverbacks, forming new breeding groups where they later gave birth. Interestingly, some females were observed joining silverbacks that were unlikely to have sired their infant, but no infanticide was observed. The consequences of the Ebola outbreak on the population structure were different two years and six years after the outbreak. Therefore, our results could be used as demographic indicators to detect and date outbreaks that have happened in other, non-monitored gorilla populations. PMID:22649511

  11. Chernobyl - ten years after

    This folder contains ten brief factsheets which aim to give a balanced presentation of the facts relating to the reactor accident at the Chernobyl power station ten years after the event. Details of the incident are given and its aftermath, in particular as it has affected the lives and health of people living in the immediate vicinity, is considered. Since records of the health of people in the region before the accident were very poor, it is extremely difficult to make definitive statements about the health effects of the accident. It is clear, however, that there has been a marked increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer especially among children in Belarus. Although curable this has given rise to deaths owing to poor health care. It is likely that deaths due to other cancers will occur in the longer term. Though estimates vary, they are in the region of 10-25,000 world wide over the next 70 years. Comparisons with the numbers of deaths from other large-scale non-nuclear industrial disasters are provided which put the Chernobyl incident in context and experts who refute the wilder claims made in the media are quoted. The status of the plant today and the international effort to improve the safety of the 15 original RMBK commercial reactors still operating in the former USSR are described. (Author)

  12. Concentrated photovoltaics, a case study

    Antonini Piergiorgio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Concentrated Photovoltaics (CPV, once a niche technology, has now reached the maturity and reliability for large scale power generation. Especially in regions where temperatures are very high, the use of high efficiency triple junction solar cells with concentrating optics allows stable energy yield. Thus CPV can be seen as complementary and not in concurrence with silicon photovoltaics. The state of the art, the advantages and limitations of this technology will be shown. Among the main advantages of CPV is the possibility of a much higher energy supply, when compared to silicon photovoltaics, both comparing CPV and silicon with same area or the same installed power. The use of recycled and recyclable materials allows a more environmentally friendly production. The possibility to couple CPV with desalination facilities, energy storage will be analysed. As an example a case study of a CPV installation in Northern Italy is discussed. Here the use of mature technologies, derived from automotive and lighting sectors resulted in a simple and efficient module.

  13. Case Study: The Chemistry of Cocaine

    Dewprashad, Brahmadeo

    2011-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's case study focuses on the chemistry of cocaine to teach a number of core concepts in organic chemistry. It also requires that students read and analyze an original research paper on…

  14. Summary of case studies for cooperation mechanisms

    Longa, Francesco Dalla; Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik; Hansen, Lise-Lotte Pade; Tantareanu, Cristian; Caldes-Gomez, Natalia; Santamaria-Belda, Marta

    2012-01-01

    This document is a summary report highlighting the main aspect analyzed in the RES4LESS case studies. The document starts with an introductory chapter where the background that led to the selection of the case studies is outlined. In the following three chapters the case studies are presented, hi...

  15. The case for case studies: Optimising the use of communication cases

    Tony Jaques

    2009-01-01

    Case studies are widely used by communication and public relations practitioners and educators. Yet, despite their extensive use, the question should be asked whether public relations case studies are applied in the best possible way. Many tertiary education institutions are moving away from case study analysis as a discrete subject and instead adopting a ‘case study approach’ across the communication curriculum. This paper explores the merits of different styles of the case method and the re...

  16. Case Study Methodology and Homelessness Research

    Jill Pable

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the potential suitability of case study methodology for inquiry with the homeless population. It references a research study that uses case study research method to build theory. This study's topic is the lived experience of destitute individuals who reside in homeless shelters, and explores the homeless shelter built environment's potential influence on resident satisfaction and recovery. Case study methodology may be appropriate because it explores real-life contextual ...

  17. A study on heparin in complex with L1 protein of ten high risk Human Papillomavirus: new structural insights based on in silico analysis

    Jorge Félix Beltrán Lissabet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is one of the most common causes of sexually transmitted diseases in both men and women around the world. It has been suggested that the heparan sulfate constitute the main receptor recognized by HPV, however its role during the interactions with other HPV is not very clear. BC, DE, EF, FG, and HI are the five loops displayed on the surface of the pentamer which can interact with heparin as an analogue for heparan sulfate. In this study, the L1 late protein of ten high risks HPV (HR HPV L1 corresponding to the types 31/33/35/39/45/51/52/56/58/59 were analyzed using in silico methods by looking for insights related to HR HPV L1-loops and heparin interactions. The five loop regions (BC, DE, EF, FG and HI of the ten HR HPV L1 interact with heparin, where the interaction established between the BC-loop and heparin was found to be present in all the HR HPV L1 analyzed in this study as well as those reported in the scientist literature. Moreover it was found that lysine residues are involves in most of interactions and that the chargecharge and polar interactions are stabilizing the HR HPV L1-heparin interaction. The results obtained in this work with all the in silico methods; suggest that the heparin-binding site in the loops for all the HR HPV plays an important role during HR HPV infections, where BC-loop constitute the most required structure during the HR HPV L1-heparin interactions. The charge-charge and polar interactions are the main forces stabilizing the HR HPV L1-heparin.

  18. Using Narrative Case Studies in an Online World Religions Course to Stimulate Deep Learning about Islam

    Elliott, Sherman Lee

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this action research was to examine how a narrative case study in an online asynchronous world religions course affected learners' understandings, appreciation, and respect for the beliefs and values of others. The world religions course examined a variety of religions including Islam. Ten participants received information about the…

  19. How Do Faculty Make Formative Use of Student Evaluation Feedback? A Multiple Case Study

    Yao, Yuankun; Grady, Marilyn L.

    2005-01-01

    This multiple case study explored faculty formative use of student evaluation feedback. Results were based on interviews of ten education faculty members at a midwestern research university and reviews of relevant documents. It was found that end of semester student evaluation, originally used for summative evaluation, was also used by faculty for…

  20. A Qualitative Case Study Illustrating the Benefits of Discussion Roles in Online Asynchronous Discussion

    Hancock, Cheryl J.

    2012-01-01

    This research describes a qualitative, naturalistic case study of a situation-specific, in-depth exploration of the use of ten student discussion roles in and adult education, online asynchronous discussions. Discussion roles were designed in order to enable students to respond better and create deeper and more meaning-filled threaded discussions,…

  1. Diabetes in Asian Indians-How much is preventable? Ten-year follow-up of the Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study (CURES-142).

    Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Sudha, Vasudevan; Nair, Divya H; Lakshmipriya, Nagarajan; Deepa, Mohan; Pradeepa, Rajendra; Shanthirani, Coimbatore S; Subhashini, Sivasankaran; Malik, Vasanti; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Binu, Valsalakumari S; Patel, Shivani A; Hu, Frank B; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2015-08-01

    We sought to evaluate the contribution of various modifiable risk factors to the partial population attributable risk (PARp) for diabetes in an Asian Indian population. Of a cohort of 3589 individuals, representative of Chennai, India, followed up after a period of ten years, we analyzed data from 1376 individuals who were free of diabetes at baseline. A diet risk score was computed incorporating intake of refined cereals, fruits and vegetables, dairy products, and monounsaturated fatty acid. Abdominal obesity was found to contribute the most to incident diabetes [Relative Risk (RR) 1.63(95%CI 1.21-2.20)]; (PARp 41.1% (95%CI 28.1-52.6)]. The risk for diabetes increased with increasing quartiles of the diet risk score [highest quartile RR 2.14(95% CI 1.26-3.63)] and time spent viewing television [(RR 1.84(95%CI 1.36-2.49] and sitting [(RR 2.09(95%CI 1.42-3.05)]. The combination of five risk factors (obesity, physical inactivity, unfavorable diet risk score, hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL cholesterol) could explain 80.7% of all incident diabetes (95%CI 53.8-92.7). Modifying these easily identifiable risk factors could therefore prevent the majority of cases of incident diabetes in the Asian Indian population. Translation of these findings into public health practice will go a long way in arresting the progress of the diabetes epidemic in this region. PMID:26044609

  2. Five misunderstandings about Case-study Research

    Flyvbjerg, Bent

    This article examines five common misunderstandings about case-study research: (1) Theoretical knowledge is more valuable than practical knowledge; (2) One cannot generalize from a single case, therefore the single case study cannot contribute to scientific development; (3) The case study is most...... useful for generating hypotheses, while other methods aremore suitable for hypotheses testing and theory building; (4) The case study contains a bias toward verification; and (5) It is often difficult to summarize specific case studies. The article explains and corrects these misunderstandings one by one...... and concludes with the Kuhnian insight that a scientific discipline without a large number of thoroughly executed case studies is a discipline without systematic production of exemplars, and that a discipline without  exemplars is an ineffective one. Social science may be strengthened by the execution...

  3. Five misunderstandings about case study research

    Flyvbjerg, Bent

    This article examines five common misunderstandings about case-study research: (1) Theoretical knowledge is more valuable than practical knowledge; (2) One cannot generalize from a single case, therefore the single case study cannot contribute to scientific development; (3) The case study is most...... useful for generating hypotheses, while other methods aremore suitable for hypotheses testing and theory building; (4) The case study contains a bias toward verification; and (5) It is often difficult to summarize specific case studies. The article explains and corrects these misunderstandings one by one...... and concludes with the Kuhnian insight that a scientific discipline without a large number of thoroughly executed case studies is a discipline without systematic production of exemplars, and that a discipline without exemplars is an ineffective one. Social science may be strengthened by the execution...

  4. Five Misunderstandings About Case-Study Research

    Flyvbjerg, Bent

    2006-01-01

    This article examines five common misunderstandings about case-study research: (a) theoretical knowledge is more valuable than practical knowledge; (b) one cannot generalize from a single case, therefore, the single-case study cannot contribute to scientific development; (c) the case study is most...... useful for generating hypotheses, whereas other methods are more suitable for hypotheses testing and theory building; (d) the case study contains a bias toward verification; and (e) it is often difficult to summarize specific case studies. This article explains and corrects these misunderstandings one by...... one and concludes with the Kuhnian insight that a scientific discipline without a large number of thoroughly executed case studies is a discipline without systematic production of exemplars, and a discipline without exemplars is an ineffective one. Social science may be strengthened by the execution...

  5. Enhancing Tourism Competitiveness of Hong Kong via Tourism Planning: A Comparative Case Study between Hong Kong and Singapore

    Kaewta Muangasame; Siyathorn Khunon

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to recommend tourism planning in Hong Kong (HK). A comparison case study of tourism planning between Singapore and Hong Kong is discussed. Secondary data from web sites, observations and in-depth interviews of ten residents and ten tourists was conducted to investigate tourism planning in the two countries. The study discloses that the HK government should consider adopting a long term oriented plan and implement an integrated approach with their tourism planning. Sustainabi...

  6. Hemofiltracin continua en pacientes con complicaciones abdominales del sndrome hemoltico urmico: Report of ten cases Continuous hemofiltration in children with abdominal complications of hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Felipe Cavagnaro SM

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Close to one half of patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS will require a dialytic therapy, mainly peritoneal dialysis (PD. In some cases, PD may have relative or absolute contraindications, usually when HUS is associated to severe intra-abdominal complications. Aim: To report the results of continuous hemofiltration use, in children with abdominal complications of HUS. Material and methods: Retrospective review of the files of 40 patients that were admitted to our pediatric unit with HUS, since 1995. Six children had relevant intra-abdominal complications and were treated with continuous hemofiltration (CHF. Four additional children, with similar HUS related complications and treated with CHF before 1995, were included in the analysis. Results: The age of the patients ranged from 5 to 66 months old. An arterio-venous CHF was performed in four and veno-venous CHF in six children. The duration of CHF was 93.2 hours in average. Adequate control of volemia was achieved in every patient; diafiltration with peritoneal dialysis solution was added in five patients, to improve azotemia. Four patients had complications related to the vascular access or the anticoagulation procedure. The procedure was terminated due to improvement of diuresis in five cases, transfer to PD in four and a cardiorespiratory arrest in one. Only one patient developed a chronic renal failure during the follow up. Conclusions: CHF is an effective and safe alternative of acute renal replacement therapy in the management of renal failure in pediatric cases with HUS, aggravated with abdominal complications (Rev Md Chile 2002; 130: 768-72.

  7. Bioremediation case studies: Abstracts. Final report

    The report contains abstracts of 132 case studies of bioremediation technology applied to hazardous waste clean-up. It was prepared to compile bioremediation studies in a variety of locations and treating diverse contaminants, most of which were previously undocumented. All data are based on vendor-supplied information and there was no opportunity to independently confirm its accuracy. These 132 case studies, from 10 different biotechnology companies, provide users with reference information about on-going and/or completed field applications and studies. About two-thirds of the cases were at full-scale clean-up level with the remainder at pilot or laboratory scale. In 74 percent of the cases, soil was at least one of the media treated. Soil alone accounts for 46 percent of the cases. Petroleum-related wastes account for the largest contaminant with 82 cases. Thirty-one states are represented in the case studies

  8. The case for case studies: Optimising the use of communication cases

    Tony Jaques

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Case studies are widely used by communication and public relations practitioners and educators. Yet, despite their extensive use, the question should be asked whether public relations case studies are applied in the best possible way. Many tertiary education institutions are moving away from case study analysis as a discrete subject and instead adopting a ‘case study approach’ across the communication curriculum. This paper explores the merits of different styles of the case method and the reference materials available, and concludes that formalised analysis of case studies is essential to fully optimise their application.

  9. L’utilisation du TENS en physiothérapie : la situation particulière des soins palliatifs oncologiques

    Laliberté, Maude; Dyer, Joseph-Omer

    2012-01-01

    Trans-cutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a treatment against pain that uses the application of an electric current. Some studies suggest that TENS would reduce the pain associated with certain types of cancer and this treatment is regularly used in therapy in contexts of interdisciplinary practice specializing in palliative oncology. However, the use of TENS in cancer cases is a matter of controversy, and its application is contraindicated by Canadian standards governing the pra...

  10. Case study as a research method

    Zaidah Zainal

    2007-01-01

    Although case study methods remain a controversial approach to data collection, they are widely recognised in many social science studies especially when in-depth explanations of a social behaviour are sought after. This article, therefore, discusses several aspects of casestudies as a research method. These include the design and categories of case studies and how their robustness can be achieved. It also explores on the advantages and disadvantages of case study as a research method.

  11. Theoretical pluralism in psychoanalytic case studies

    Willemsen, Jochem; Cornelis, Shana; Geerardyn, Filip M.; Desmet, Mattias; Meganck, Reitske; Inslegers, Ruth; Cauwe, Joachim M. B. D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the scientific activity of different psychoanalytic schools of thought in terms of the content and production of case studies published on ISI Web of Knowledge. Between March 2013 and November 2013, we contacted all case study authors included in the online archive of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic case studies (www.singlecasearchive.com) to inquire about their psychoanalytic orientation during their work with the patient. The response rate...

  12. Congenital Kyphoscoliosis in Monozygotic Twins: Ten-Year Follow-up Treated by Posterior Vertebral Column Resection (PVCR): A Case Report.

    Chang, Dong-Gune; Yang, Jae Hyuk; Lee, Jung-Hee; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Hyok; Suh, Seung-Woo; Ha, Kee-Yong; Suk, Se-Il

    2016-04-01

    The etiology of congenital scoliosis and its development remains unclear and has not yet been fully identified, even there are theories that congenital scoliosis could be derived from the failure of formation or failure of segmentation, which are etiologically heterogeneous with genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors contributing to their occurrence. We reported a case of long-term follow-up after posterior vertebral column resection (PVCR) in both identical twins with similar congenital kyphoscoliosis at thoracolumbar levels. Twin I had been noticed by his parents to have asymmetry of his back at age 5 years, but no treatment was given. Twin II was first noticed to have a spinal problem at 11 years of age by his parents. Overtime, spine of both twins became further deviated to the left with kyphosis and was referred to our hospital. Both monozygotic twins were treated by PVCR and satisfactory results were demonstrated at 10-year follow-up.This case is the first report on the surgical treatment with PVCR, almost simultaneously, in both identical twins who had similar congenital vertebral anomalies causing kyphoscoliosis. Both identical twins with congenital kyphoscoliosis had undergone surgical correction by PVCR, anterior support with a mesh cage and posterior fusion using pedicle screws at the age of 14 years and achieved a satisfactory correction and a stable spine without curve progression with 10-year follow-up. PMID:27124052

  13. The ten thousand Kims

    In Korean culture, the names of family members are recorded in special family books. This makes it possible to follow the distribution of Korean family names far back in history. It is shown here that these name distributions are well described by a simple null model, the random group formation (RGF) model. This model makes it possible to predict how the name distributions change and these predictions are shown to be borne out. In particular, the RGF model predicts that for married women entering a collection of family books in a certain year, the occurrence of the most common family name 'Kim' should be directly proportional to the total number of married women with the same proportionality constant for all the years. This prediction is also borne out to a high degree. We speculate that it reflects some inherent social stability in the Korean culture. In addition, we obtain an estimate of the total population of the Korean culture down to the year 500 AD, based on the RGF model, and find about ten thousand Kims.

  14. The ten thousand Kims

    Baek, Seung Ki; Minnhagen, Petter [Integrated Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, Umeaa University, 901 87 Umeaa (Sweden); Kim, Beom Jun, E-mail: Petter.Minnhagen@physics.umu.se [BK21 Physics Research Division and Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    In Korean culture, the names of family members are recorded in special family books. This makes it possible to follow the distribution of Korean family names far back in history. It is shown here that these name distributions are well described by a simple null model, the random group formation (RGF) model. This model makes it possible to predict how the name distributions change and these predictions are shown to be borne out. In particular, the RGF model predicts that for married women entering a collection of family books in a certain year, the occurrence of the most common family name 'Kim' should be directly proportional to the total number of married women with the same proportionality constant for all the years. This prediction is also borne out to a high degree. We speculate that it reflects some inherent social stability in the Korean culture. In addition, we obtain an estimate of the total population of the Korean culture down to the year 500 AD, based on the RGF model, and find about ten thousand Kims.

  15. Roadmaster Roading Contractors Case Study

    Hazel Taylor

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Systems analysis students seldom experience the practical difficulties of the initial investigation into a client’s requirements. They get little chance to practice the skills they need to investigate complex and confused problem situations, or to appreciate the wider organizational issues that can impact on a situation. This teaching case is designed to give students the opportunity to practice and apply investigation skills and to challenge them to consider the wider work environment when considering possible solutions to a problem situation. The case is conducted as a role-play, with students acting as systems analysts and teaching staff role-playing the clients. The students develop a report analyzing the client’s situation based on the issues that arise during the interviews. Feed-back sessions focus on discussing how well the students applied various interviewing strategies previously covered in lectures, and on the wider organizational problems that could impact proposed information system solutions.

  16. Liverpool Telecare Pilot: case studies

    Nigel Barnes; Steve Webster; Tom Mizutani; Jason Ng; Mark Buckland; Andrew Reeves

    2006-01-01

    Telecare services use information and communications technology (ICT) to support the provision of care to people in their own homes. This paper describes a pilot telecare service employed by Liverpool (UK) City Council to support a sample of their frail and elderly social services users. The pilot has been running for over two years and has been deployed for 21 individuals in Liverpool. In this paper we present the pilot system and provide real example cases which help to illustrate the benef...

  17. Study on Case Teaching of Financial Management

    Che, Zhenghong; Che, Zhengmei

    2011-01-01

    Case teaching is an efficient teaching method of management. It plays an important role to enhance the students' ability to practice the theory. However, case teaching of financial management has not achieved the expected results. The paper aims to study the importance, characteristics and corresponding methods of case teaching method of financial…

  18. Study on Case Teaching of Financial Management

    Zhenghong Che; Zhengmei Che

    2011-01-01

    Case teaching is an efficient teaching method of management. It plays an important role to enhance the students’ ability to practice the theory. However, case teaching of financial management has not achieved the expected results. The paper aims to study the importance, characteristics and corresponding methods of case teaching method of financial management.

  19. Case Study: A Strategic Research Methodology

    Khairul B.M. Noor

    2008-01-01

    This research reviews the literature on case study as a strategic qualitative research methodology. Although case studies have been criticised by some authors as lacking scientific rigour and do not address generalizability, this research, however, reiterated its appropriateness when dealing with a process or a complex real-life activities in great-depth. Case study has been commonly used in social science fields like sociology, industrial relations and anthropology eventhough generally was c...

  20. Liverpool Telecare Pilot: case studies

    Nigel Barnes

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Telecare services use information and communications technology (ICT to support the provision of care to people in their own homes. This paper describes a pilot telecare service employed by Liverpool (UK City Council to support a sample of their frail and elderly social services users. The pilot has been running for over two years and has been deployed for 21 individuals in Liverpool. In this paper we present the pilot system and provide real example cases which help to illustrate the benefits of such a system.

  1. Giant adrenal cyst: case study

    Poiana, C; Carsote, M; Chirita, P.; Terzea, D; Paun, S.; M. Beuran

    2010-01-01

    One of the rarest situations regarding an adrenal incidentaloma is an adrenal cyst. We present the case of a 61Z–year old male patient diagnosed with peritonitis. During surgery, a right adrenal tumor of 2 cm is discovered. The patient was referred to endocrinology. 6 months later the diameter of the tumor is 7 times bigger than the initial stage. It has no secretory phenotype, except for the small increase of serum aldosterone and the 24–h 17–ketosteroids. Open right adrenalectomy is perform...

  2. Geothermal Exploration Case Studies on OpenEI (Presentation)

    Young, K.; Bennett, M.; Atkins, D.

    2014-03-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessment (Williams et al., 2008) outlined a mean 30 GWe of undiscovered hydrothermal resource in the western United States. One goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technology Office (GTO) is to accelerate the development of this undiscovered resource. DOE has focused efforts on helping industry identify hidden geothermal resources to increase geothermal capacity in the near term. Increased exploration activity will produce more prospects, more discoveries, and more readily developable resources. Detailed exploration case studies akin to those found in oil and gas (e.g. Beaumont and Foster, 1990-1992) will give developers central location for information gives models for identifying new geothermal areas, and guide efficient exploration and development of these areas. To support this effort, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been working with GTO to develop a template for geothermal case studies on the Geothermal Gateway on OpenEI. In 2012, the template was developed and tested with two case studies: Raft River Geothermal Area (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Raft_River_Geothermal_Area) and Coso Geothermal Area (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Coso_Geothermal_Area). In 2013, ten additional case studies were completed, and Semantic MediaWiki features were developed to allow for more data and the direct citations of these data. These case studies are now in the process of external peer review. In 2014, NREL is working with universities and industry partners to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough data set to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models.

  3. The Danish National Case Study Report

    Brodersen, Søsser; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    Three case studies from Danish science shops within the environmental field are analysed with respect to societal background, interaction between the involved actors and the societal impact of the co-operation. The report is one of the seven national case study reports from the EU-financed INTERA......Three case studies from Danish science shops within the environmental field are analysed with respect to societal background, interaction between the involved actors and the societal impact of the co-operation. The report is one of the seven national case study reports from the EU......-financed INTERACTS project....

  4. Freak Waves: A case study

    Lechuga, A.

    2009-04-01

    Evidences tell us freak waves are difficult to deal with from a scientific point of view. Though it is generally accepted that in deep water the mechanism involved in the generation is modulation instability there are some doubts about the way such giant waves can appear on a relatively calm sea. Partly the problem could be, it has been pointed out, that the so called evolution equations, as for instance Schrödinger nonlinear equation and further enhancements of this equation are valid for little wave steepness, that we know is not the case with freak waves. On the other hand, statistical description gives us another tool to cop with the problem, not without some shortcomings also. However, as the matter of fact, freak or extreme waves are present in our seas causing accidents, casualties and damages. For that reason the main aim of this research is to collect data from past records in order to see how near or how far we are of the expected conditions to formation of freak waves, once we know some accident has taken place .The purposely practical approach is going to be carried out on a specific case where the above conditions presented themselves, using wave records both, previous and simultaneous, to the location from a nearby station( a deployed buoy). For that end, we are going to use some parameters, as BFI, steepness, shape of the wave, asymmetry, etc., combining, to a certain extent, the deterministic and statistical line of thought.

  5. Giant adrenal cyst: case study.

    Poiana, Catalina; Carsote, Mara; Chirita, Corina; Terzea, Dana; Paun, S; Beuran, M

    2010-01-01

    One of the rarest situations regarding an adrenal incidentaloma is an adrenal cyst. We present the case of a 61-year-old male patient diagnosed with peritonitis. During surgery, a right adrenal tumor of 2 cm is discovered. The patient was referred to endocrinology. 6 months later the diameter of the tumor is 7 times bigger than the initial stage. It has no secretory phenotype, except for the small increase of serum aldosterone and the 24-h 17-ketosteroids. Open right adrenalectomy is performed and a cyst of 15 cm is removed. The evolution after surgery is good. The pathological exam reveals an adrenal cyst with calcifications and osteoid metaplasia. The immunohistochemistry showed a positive reaction for CD34 and ACT in the vessels and VIM in the stroma. The adrenal cysts are not frequent and represent a challenge regarding the preoperative diagnostic and surgical procedure of resection. The pathological exam highlights the major aspects. PMID:20945822

  6. Case studies in conservation science

    Bisulca, Christina

    The research presented in this dissertation covers three separate topics of conservation as defined by the National Science Foundation: 1) Materials Stabilization, Strengthening, Monitoring, and Repair; 2. Understanding Material Degradation and Aging; and 3) Materials and Structural Characterization of Cultural Heritage Objects (the 'technical study'). The first topic is addressed through a study to assess the consolidant tetraethoxysilane for the stabilization of alum treated wood. Falling under materials degradation studies is a study published in American Museum Novitates to understand how environmental conditions affect the aging of fossil resins from five different deposits. Two separate studies are included in technical study of cultural heritage objects which comprises the third research area of materials characterization. The first is a survey of red dyes used in Chinese paintings from the Ming Dynasty to the Early Republic (1364-1911). The second is a study of the pigments, dyes and binders used in Hawaiian barkcloth (kapa) from the 19th century.

  7. Use of 3D-computed tomography angiography for planning the surgical removal of pineal region meningiomas using Poppen's approach: a report of ten cases and a literature review

    Li Ye

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several treatment approaches for pineal region meningiomas, such as Poppen's approach, Krause's approach and combinations of the two approaches. We present our experience with the use of 3D-computed tomography angiography for planning the surgical removal of pineal region meningiomas using a suboccipital transtentorial approach (Poppen's approach and evaluate the role of Poppen's approach. Methods During the period from January 2005 to June 2010, ten patients presented to us with pineal region meningioma. MRI was routinely used to define the tumor size, position, and its relevant complications while 3D-CTA was applied to define the blood supply of the tumor and the venous complex (VC shift before operations. Most of the meningiomas had developed at both sides of the tentorial plane and extended laterally with typical characteristics of a pineal region tumor. Results All tumors were completely removed surgically without any injury to the VC. Postoperative intracranial infection occurred in one case who recovered after antibiotics were given. Postoperative intraventricular hemorrhage and pneumocephalus were found in one case, but fully recovered after conservative treatment. In the nine cases of concurrent hydrocephalus, this was gradually relieved in eight patients and the single case that became aggravated was successfully treated with ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Moreover, the follow-up MRI examinations did not indicate any recurrence of the meningiomas. Conclusion We found that the use of Poppen's approach is strongly supported for the successful removal of pineal region meningiomas without serious complications.

  8. Ten steps or climbing a mountain: A study of Australian health professionals' perceptions of implementing the baby friendly health initiative to protect, promote and support breastfeeding

    Sheehan Athena

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Baby Friendly Hospital (Health Initiative (BFHI is a global initiative aimed at protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding and is based on the ten steps to successful breastfeeding. Worldwide, over 20,000 health facilities have attained BFHI accreditation but only 77 Australian hospitals (approximately 23% have received accreditation. Few studies have investigated the factors that facilitate or hinder implementation of BFHI but it is acknowledged this is a major undertaking requiring strategic planning and change management throughout an institution. This paper examines the perceptions of BFHI held by midwives and nurses working in one Area Health Service in NSW, Australia. Methods The study used an interpretive, qualitative approach. A total of 132 health professionals, working across four maternity units, two neonatal intensive care units and related community services, participated in 10 focus groups. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Three main themes were identified: 'Belief and Commitment'; 'Interpreting BFHI' and 'Climbing a Mountain'. Participants considered the BFHI implementation a high priority; an essential set of practices that would have positive benefits for babies and mothers both locally and globally as well as for health professionals. It was considered achievable but would take commitment and hard work to overcome the numerous challenges including a number of organisational constraints. There were, however, differing interpretations of what was required to attain BFHI accreditation with the potential that misinterpretation could hinder implementation. A model described by Greenhalgh and colleagues on adoption of innovation is drawn on to interpret the findings. Conclusion Despite strong support for BFHI, the principles of this global strategy are interpreted differently by health professionals and further education and accurate information is required. It may be that the current processes used to disseminate and implement BFHI need to be reviewed. The findings suggest that there is a contradiction between the broad philosophical stance and best practice approach of this global strategy and the tendency for health professionals to focus on the ten steps as a set of tasks or a checklist to be accomplished. The perceived procedural approach to implementation may be contributing to lower rates of breastfeeding continuation.

  9. A Case Study of "Empathetic Teaching Artistry"

    Risner, Doug

    2014-01-01

    This case study is one of twenty cases derived from Anderson and Risner's international study of teaching artists in dance, and theatre, which investigated participants' (n=172) artistic and academic preparation in dance, and theatre, initial entry into the teaching artist field, rewards, challenges, and obstacles in participants'…

  10. A Comparative Comment on the Case Studies

    Kjeldsen, Christian Christrup; Ley, Thomas; Jensen, Niels Rosendal; Otto, Hans-Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Denne konklusion sammenfatter hovedtrækkene af de gennemførte case studies i WorkAble-projektet. Vigtige pointer er, at unge på tværs af de forskellige case studies har vanskeligt ved at blive hørt og taget alvorligt. I stedet spises de af med "realistisk vejledning" eller dårlige uddannelses- og...

  11. Case Studies in Middle Management Supervision

    White, Lori S.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter presents a series of supervision-related case studies of situations that midlevel managers might face. Individuals enrolled in a midlevel management professional development course recommended the topics selected for this chapter. Drawing upon her experience teaching the course, the author selected four case studies that individuals…

  12. Case-Control Study of Writer's Cramp

    Roze, E.; Soumare, A.; Pironneau, I.; Sangla, S.; de Cock, V. Cochen; Teixeira, A.; Astorquiza, A.; Bonnet, C.; Bleton, J. P.; Vidailhet, M.; Elbaz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonias are thought to be due to a combination of individual vulnerability and environmental factors. There are no case-control studies of risk factors for writer's cramp. We undertook a case-control study of 104 consecutive patients and matched controls to identify risk factors for the condition. We collected detailed data…

  13. Using Case Studies: An International Approach

    McClam, Tricia; Woodside, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    Case studies as an instructional strategy have been used in many disciplines, including law, teacher education, science, medicine, and business. Among the benefits of this method of instruction are involving students in learning, developing their critical thinking skills, promoting communication, and engaging in critical analysis. Case studies are

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Case Studies in Knowledge Management

    Reviewed by Dr. Adnan BOYACI

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available 161Case Studies in Knowledge ManagementEdited by Murray JennexHersley: PA: Idea Group, 2005, pp. 372, ISBN 1-59140-352-9Reviewed by Dr. Adnan BOYACIAnadolu UniversityEskişehir-TurkeyKnowledge management (KM as a structured system and the way to the effectiveness isrelatively new field for the contemporary organizations functioning in different andcompetitive domain of public and private sectors in terms of getting optimal effectivenessunderlined by the concepts such as quality, productivity…etc. Because of the growingimportance and the popularity of the KM either as a research topic or specialized coursesubject, a crucial need for understanding, conceptualization and implementation of KM asa system has emerged since the mid 1990’s. In this sense, the book contributes criticallyto fill the gap between theory and implementation as a teaching material.This edited book is published by Idea Group Publishing. The book has twenty chaptersdivided into seven sections. In addition to a section of authors’ biography contributing thebook and an index, there is a preface that the basic terms and key concepts underliningthe cases discussed following chapters, which is explained in a schematized way.Besides the editor, total of 47 authors have contributed to the book. These authors arefrom different countries, academic backgrounds, and institutions. Although approximatelyone third of the authors are from USA, the rest of the authors are from Canada, England,Austria, Germany, Australia, New Zealand, Egypt, Bahrain and China. The authorsrepresent a variety of universities, private companies, and military institutions. Most ofthem have strong professional backgrounds, which help them address the issues bothfrom theoretical and practical perspectives. Contributions of authors having differentbackgrounds and institutions enable the book to have very comprehensive spectrum andthis makes the book attractive practically for those working different sectors.The book presents case studies explaining actual applications of KM in a different oforganizational and global settings. Different subjects and issues associated withconstruction of KM system in different kinds of organizations are explored within eachsection. Organizational learning (OL, knowledge, culture and productivity are some ofthe issues tackled with construction of KM system in a variety of organizational andglobal settings.The book is organized into seven sections; KM in support of organizational learning,knowledge management in support of retaining organizational knowledge, knowledgemanagement strategy, issues in knowledge management, KM is support of knowledgetransfer, KM in support of projects, KM outcomes. Each section is related with an area KMresearch.In section I, there are two cases discussing KM in support of OL. The first case is fromLynne P. Cooper, Rebecca L. Nash, Tu-Anh T. Phan, and Teresa R. Bailey and describesdevelopment and operation of knowledge system in order to support learning oforganizational knowledge at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in USA. It presents in detailimplementation and rollout of the system and argues the results from performance andusage data collected over 19 weeks. The second case is from Brigette McGregor-MacDonald and describes the work of global organizations in its KM efforts to sustain andtransfer learning from global leadership curriculum. It mainly focuses on KM solution162developed to support employees to sustain their learning, to enable them to share theirinsights and experiences with others, and thus increase organizational capability.Section 2 explores using KM to support the retention of organizational knowledge inorganizations where the work forces are in transition. In third chapter in this section HaniAbdel-Aziz, and Khaled Wahba discuss the building of organizational memory informationsystem (OMIS in an Egyptian Professional Services company suffering from knowledgeloss due to high rate of employee turnover In the fourth chapter, Gail Corbitt discussesdefinition identification and the transfer of the core competencies associated with thesplit to all employees who need to have them when HP splits into HP and AgilentSection three explores the importance of a KM strategy in the implementation of a KMinitiative. In chapter five, Afsoun Hatami and Robert D. Galliers discuss long term impactsof knowledge (re use and organizational memory on effectiveness of strategic decisions.Suzanne Zyngier, Frada Burstein, and Judy McKay, in chapter six discusses governancestrategies to manage organizational knowledge in Australia’s Science and TechnologyDevelopment Organization. In chapter seven, Summer E. Bartczak and Ellen C. Englanddiscuss the issues and challenges in developing KM strategy for the United States’ AirForce Material Command’s.In section four, the use of KM in the support of projects and project management arediscussed. Elayne Coakes, Anton Bradburn, and Cathy Blake, in chapter eight discuss thetopic ‘KM in a projects-t climate’. Under this topic, they mainly focus on using of KM tominimize mischance by promoting best practices in the British construction firm TaylorWoodrow In chapter nine, Jill Owen and Frada Burstein look at where knowledge residesin an Australian consulting firm and how the firm uses this knowledge to improve projectperformance. This case study highlights the importance of understanding the drivers ofknowledge transfer and reuse in the projects.In section five KM in support of knowledge transfer is explored and discussed. Zhang Li,Tian Yezhuang, and Li Ping, in chapter ten, focus on the effect of knowledge sharing inthe process of enterprise resource planning (ERP system implementation in a Chinesemanufacturing firm. Thomas Hahn, Bernhard Schmiedinger, and Elisabeth Stephan, inchapter eleven, discuss the use of communities of practice and other techniques toimprove the transfer of knowledge in and between Austrian small and medium sizedmanufacturing firms. In chapter twelve, Florian Bayer, Rafael Enparantza, Ronald Maier,Franz Obermair, and Bernhard Schmiedinger discuss the use of Know Com to facilitate thedecentralized control of the flow of knowledge between small and medium sized Germandie and mould makers.In section six, different issues and problems associated with the implementation of KMand a knowledge management system (KMS are discussed. In chapter thirteen, YogeshAnand, David J. Pauleen, and Sally Dexter look at adoption and implementation of KM inthe New Zealand Reserve Bank. Colin White and David Crosdell, in chapter fourteen, lookat the assessment methods for organizing data and data resources in organizations byfocusing on four cases and provide examples for organizations based on ability to activelycollect and distribute knowledge.In chapter fifteen, Minwir Al-Shammari, discussesdeveloping an understanding of the various aspects and issues related with theimplementation of a knowledge enabled customer relationship management (KCRMstrategy at a telecommunication company in a developing country. Ivy Chan and PatrickY.K. Chau, in chapter sixteen, explore why a KM failed in a Hong Kong manufacturing andexport firm. In chapter seventeen, Nikhil Mehta and Anju Mehta look at theimplementation efforts of one such firm-India’s Infosys Technologies, Limited and discusshow KM emerged as a strategic requirement of the firm, and various capabilities the firmhad to develop to fulfill this requirement. Eliot Rich and Peter Duchessi, at the lastchapter–chapter eighteen – of this section, explores how to manage KM initiative going163after it has been successful for a couple of years at the United States’ SystemManagement Solutions International.Section 7 discusses the determination of KM outcomes. A.N. Dwivedi, Rajeev K. Bali, andR.N.G. Naguib, in chapter nineteen, explore a general KM framework for the Britishhealthcare industry and how to manage KM successfully. In chapter twenty, Murray E.Jennex looks at how the use of knowledge can impact individual and organizationalproductivity.

  15. Five case studies of multifamily weatherization programs

    Kinney, L; Wilson, T.; Lewis, G. [Synertech Systems Corp. (United States); MacDonald, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The multifamily case studies that are the subject of this report were conducted to provide a better understanding of the approach taken by program operators in weatherizing large buildings. Because of significant variations in building construction and energy systems across the country, five states were selected based on their high level of multifamily weatherization. This report summarizes findings from case studies conducted by multifamily weatherization operations in five cities. The case studies were conducted between January and November 1994. Each of the case studies involved extensive interviews with the staff of weatherization subgrantees conducting multifamily weatherization, the inspection of 4 to 12 buildings weatherized between 1991 and 1993, and the analysis of savings and costs. The case studies focused on innovative techniques which appear to work well.

  16. Theoretical pluralism in psychoanalytic case studies.

    Willemsen, Jochem; Cornelis, Shana; Geerardyn, Filip M; Desmet, Mattias; Meganck, Reitske; Inslegers, Ruth; Cauwe, Joachim M B D

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the scientific activity of different psychoanalytic schools of thought in terms of the content and production of case studies published on ISI Web of Knowledge. Between March 2013 and November 2013, we contacted all case study authors included in the online archive of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic case studies (www.singlecasearchive.com) to inquire about their psychoanalytic orientation during their work with the patient. The response rate for this study was 45%. It appears that the two oldest psychoanalytic schools, Object-relations psychoanalysis and Ego psychology or "Classical psychoanalysis" dominate the literature of published case studies. However, most authors stated that they feel attached to two or more psychoanalytic schools of thought. This confirms that the theoretical pluralism in psychoanalysis stretches to the field of single case studies. The single case studies of each psychoanalytic school are described separately in terms of methodology, patient, therapist, or treatment features. We conclude that published case studies features are fairly similar across different psychoanalytic schools. The results of this study are not representative of all psychoanalytic schools, as some do not publish their work in ISI ranked journals. PMID:26483725

  17. Theoretical pluralism in psychoanalytic case studies

    Willemsen, Jochem; Cornelis, Shana; Geerardyn, Filip M.; Desmet, Mattias; Meganck, Reitske; Inslegers, Ruth; Cauwe, Joachim M. B. D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the scientific activity of different psychoanalytic schools of thought in terms of the content and production of case studies published on ISI Web of Knowledge. Between March 2013 and November 2013, we contacted all case study authors included in the online archive of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic case studies (www.singlecasearchive.com) to inquire about their psychoanalytic orientation during their work with the patient. The response rate for this study was 45%. It appears that the two oldest psychoanalytic schools, Object-relations psychoanalysis and Ego psychology or “Classical psychoanalysis” dominate the literature of published case studies. However, most authors stated that they feel attached to two or more psychoanalytic schools of thought. This confirms that the theoretical pluralism in psychoanalysis stretches to the field of single case studies. The single case studies of each psychoanalytic school are described separately in terms of methodology, patient, therapist, or treatment features. We conclude that published case studies features are fairly similar across different psychoanalytic schools. The results of this study are not representative of all psychoanalytic schools, as some do not publish their work in ISI ranked journals. PMID:26483725

  18. Outage management: A case study

    Outage management issues identified from a field study conducted at a two-unit commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR), when one unit was in a refueling outage and the other unit was at full power operation, are the focus of this paper. The study was conduced as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) organizational factors research program, and therefore the issues to be addressed are from an organizational perspective. Topics discussed refer to areas identified by the NRC as critical for safety during shutdown operations, including outage planning and control, personnel stress, and improvements in training and procedures. Specifically, issues in communication, management attention, involvement and oversight, administrative processes, organizational culture, and human resources relevant to each of the areas are highlighted by example from field data collection. Insights regarding future guidance in these areas are presented based upon additional data collection subsequent to the original study

  19. Case Study Methodology and Homelessness Research

    Jill Pable

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the potential suitability of case study methodology for inquiry with the homeless population. It references a research study that uses case study research method to build theory. This study's topic is the lived experience of destitute individuals who reside in homeless shelters, and explores the homeless shelter built environment's potential influence on resident satisfaction and recovery. Case study methodology may be appropriate because it explores real-life contextual issues that characterize homelessness and can also accommodate the wide range of homeless person demographics that make this group difficult to study in a generalized fashion. Further, case study method accommodates the need within research in this area to understand individualized treatments as a potential solution for homelessness.

  20. [Hand-foot syndrome induced by chemotherapy: a case study].

    Simão, Delma Aurélia da Silva; Lima, Elenice Dias Ribeiro de Paula; Souza, Raíssa Silva de; Faria, Tiago Vitervo; Azevedo, Geraldo Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    The study was aimed at reporting a case of a patient who developed Hand-Foot Syndrome (HFS) grade 3 due the use of capecitabine and for which massage was used with aqueous-based moisturizer, aloe vera. The patient's functional capacity was assessed using the ECOG Performance Scale and the lesions were photographed during nursing appointment that occurred at intervals of ten days, totaling forty days of monitoring. There was significant improvement in tissue integrity, with total regression of symptoms, an important gain in quality of life, and immediate return to chemotherapy. It is believed that aloe vera can be an important component in nursing care in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy. PMID:22911424

  1. Case Study: A Strategic Research Methodology

    Khairul B.M. Noor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This research reviews the literature on case study as a strategic qualitative research methodology. Although case studies have been criticised by some authors as lacking scientific rigour and do not address generalizability, this research, however, reiterated its appropriateness when dealing with a process or a complex real-life activities in great-depth. Case study has been commonly used in social science fields like sociology, industrial relations and anthropology eventhough generally was considered an underutilized strategy. Hence, this research explained the general concept of a case study, strengths and weaknesses of using this method knowing that theoretically case is exciting and data rich. Based on a study of four organizations and the researcher’s own experience, this article described matters on how case study was undertaken, gaining excess to those organizations and the systematic process of data collection and triangulation (multiple techniques. It was noted that combining multiple techniques for elicitng data in case study research actually strengthens and confirmed results.

  2. Case study on printed matter

    global warming, acidification and nutrification. The studies focus on energy consumption including the emissions and impact categories related to energy. The chemical-related impact categories comprising ecotoxicity and human toxicity are not included at all or only to a limited degree. In this paper we...... distribution of potential environmental impacts and consumption of resources along the life cycle of a generic printed matter produced on a model sheet feed offset printing industry in Europe. Main activities at all stages in the life cycle are covered. However special focus is on the production stage but...... upstream emissions assessed to be of possible significant importance are included (e.g. estimated emissions from pigment production) or handled in the sensitivity analysis. The functional unit is 1 ton of sheet feed offset produced printed matter, i.e. printed communication covering books, pamphlets etc...

  3. A network security case study

    This paper reports on a study to validate the Graphical Network Representation (GRPHREP) model which is being conducted on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Integrated Computer Network (ICN). The GRPHREP model is a software system application based on graph theory and object-oriented programming methodologies. It codified the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5637.1, which is concerned with classified computer secret policy, restrictions, and requirements. The Los Alamos ICN is required to control access to and support large-scale scientific and administrative computing. Thus, large-scale scientific and administrative computing. Thus we felt that this large, complex, and dynamic network would provide a good test for the graphical and functional capabilities of the model. Furthermore, the ICN is composed of multiple partitions that reflect the sensitivity and classification of the computation (data) and designate the required clearance level for the user

  4. Does present use of cardiovascular medication reflect elevated cardiovascular risk scores estimated ten years ago? A population based longitudinal observational study

    Straand Jørund

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is desirable that those at highest risk of cardiovascular disease should have priority for preventive measures, eg. treatment with prescription drugs to modify their risk. We wanted to investigate to what extent present use of cardiovascular medication (CVM correlates with cardiovascular risk estimated by three different risk scores (Framingham, SCORE and NORRISK ten years ago. Methods Prospective logitudinal observational study of 20 252 participants in The Hordaland Health Study born 1950-57, not using CVM in 1997-99. Prescription data obtained from The Norwegian Prescription Database in 2008. Results 26% of men and 22% of women aged 51-58 years had started to use some CVM during the previous decade. As a group, persons using CVM scored significantly higher on the risk algorithms Framingham, SCORE and NORRISK compared to those not treated. 16-20% of men and 20-22% of women with risk scores below the high-risk thresholds for the three risk scores were treated with CVM, while 60-65% of men and 25-45% of women with scores above the high-risk thresholds received no treatment. Among women using CVM, only 2.2% (NORRISK, 4.4% (SCORE and 14.5% (Framingham had risk scores above the high-risk values. Low education, poor self-reported general health, muscular pains, mental distress (in females only and a family history of premature cardiovascular disease correlated with use of CVM. Elevated blood pressure was the single factor most strongly predictive of CVM treatment. Conclusion Prescription of CVM to middle-aged individuals by large seems to occur independently of estimated total cardiovascular risk, and this applies especially to females.

  5. Why is seed production so variable among individuals? A ten-year study with oaks reveals the importance of soil environment.

    Prez-Ramos, Ignacio M; Aponte, Cristina; Garca, Luis V; Padilla-Daz, Carmen M; Maran, Teodoro

    2014-01-01

    Mast-seeding species exhibit not only a large inter-annual variability in seed production but also considerable variability among individuals within the same year. However, very little is known about the causes and consequences for population dynamics of this potentially large between-individual variability. Here, we quantified seed production over ten consecutive years in two Mediterranean oak species - the deciduous Quercus canariensis and the evergreen Q. suber - that coexist in forests of southern Spain. First, we calibrated likelihood models to identify which abiotic and biotic variables best explain the magnitude (hereafter seed productivity) and temporal variation of seed production at the individual level (hereafter CVi), and infer whether reproductive effort results from the available soil resources for the plant or is primarily determined by selectively favoured strategies. Second, we explored the contribution of between-individual variability in seed production as a potential mechanism of satiation for predispersal seed predators. We found that Q. canariensis trees inhabiting moister and more fertile soils were more productive than those growing in more resource-limited sites. Regarding temporal variation, individuals of the two studied oak species inhabiting these resource-rich environments also exhibited larger values of CVi. Interestingly, we detected a satiating effect on granivorous insects at the tree level in Q. suber, which was evident in those years where between-individual variability in acorn production was higher. These findings suggest that individual seed production (both in terms of seed productivity and inter-annual variability) is strongly dependent on soil resource heterogeneity (at least for one of the two studied oak species) with potential repercussions for recruitment and population dynamics. However, other external factors (such as soil heterogeneity in pathogen abundance) or certain inherent characteristics of the tree might be also involved in this process. PMID:25532130

  6. Ten cases of Actinobaculum schaalii infection

    Reinhard, Mark; Prag, Jrgen; Kemp, Michael; Andresen, Keld; Klemmensen, Belinda; Hjlyng, Niels; Srensen, Susan Hildebrand; Christensen, Jens Jrgen

    2005-01-01

    Nine of 10 strains of Actinobaculum schaalii caused urinary tract infections in predisposed individuals. Identification included 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and use of the API Coryne and Rapid ID 32 A test systems. A. schaalii is easily overlooked due to its slow growth in ambient air and its...... resemblance to the normal bacterial flora on skin and mucosa....

  7. Over ten thousand cases and counting

    Elbers, Paul W G; Van Regenmortel, Niels; Gatz, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Acidbase.org has been serving the critical care community for over a decade. The backbone of this online resource consists of Peter Stewart's original text "How to understand Acid-Base" which is freely available to everyone. In addition, Stewart's Textbook of Acid Base, which puts the theory in t...

  8. Antiphospholipid syndrome: A case study

    Full text: A forty-two-year-old male presented to the Royal Adelaide Hospital with symptoms of increasing shortness of breath, swelling in both ankles, petechial rash and blood in his sputum. Initial investigations showed cardiomegaly, right ventricular hypertrophy, patchy lung infiltrates, a platelet count of 1500 and a clotting time of 60 seconds. A V/Q scan indicated a high probability of pulmonary embolism. Further investigations showed that the patient was positive for lupus anticoagulant and cardiolipin antibodies. A diagnosis of primary antiphospholipid syndrome was made. The patient''s high risk of strokes and hemorrhaging prompted investigation by a 99mTc-HMPAO brain scan. Further V/Q scans were performed to follow up the initial finding of multiple pulmonary embolism and a R-L shunt study was performed to investigate a left subclavian murmur. The patient was admitted for four weeks and began treatment which included cyclaphosphamide, corticosteroids and plasmaphoresis and was discharged when stable. Over the next six months he was re admitted three times for relapse of antiphospholipid syndrome. On his fourth admission he collapsed and died five hours after admission. Cause of death was due to cardiac arrhythmia secondary to severe right ventricular hypertrophy and dilation. The effects of antiphospholipid syndrome was believed to be responsible for this outcome

  9. Antiphospholipid syndrome: A case study

    Davies, T. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-03-01

    Full text: A forty-two-year-old male presented to the Royal Adelaide Hospital with symptoms of increasing shortness of breath, swelling in both ankles, petechial rash and blood in his sputum. Initial investigations showed cardiomegaly, right ventricular hypertrophy, patchy lung infiltrates, a platelet count of 1500 and a clotting time of 60 seconds. A V/Q scan indicated a high probability of pulmonary embolism. Further investigations showed that the patient was positive for lupus anticoagulant and cardiolipin antibodies. A diagnosis of primary antiphospholipid syndrome was made. The patient``s high risk of strokes and hemorrhaging prompted investigation by a {sup 99}mTc-HMPAO brain scan. Further V/Q scans were performed to follow up the initial finding of multiple pulmonary embolism and a R-L shunt study was performed to investigate a left subclavian murmur. The patient was admitted for four weeks and began treatment which included cyclaphosphamide, corticosteroids and plasmaphoresis and was discharged when stable. Over the next six months he was re admitted three times for relapse of antiphospholipid syndrome. On his fourth admission he collapsed and died five hours after admission. Cause of death was due to cardiac arrhythmia secondary to severe right ventricular hypertrophy and dilation. The effects of antiphospholipid syndrome was believed to be responsible for this outcome.

  10. Case Study Report about Gender Impact Assessment

    Faber, Stine Thidemann; Agustin, Lise Rolandsen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this national case study report is to take a closer look at the use of Gender Impact Assessments in Denmark in order to describe the Danish implementation of this specific Gender Mainstreaming method. By way of analyzing two selected cases (two law proposals put forward by The Danish...

  11. Case studies of steel structure failures

    P. Bernasovský

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with some case studies of steel structure failures, which happened in Slovakia a few years ago. Features of cracking are illustrated on real cases of breakdowns in the transmission gas pipelines, at the cement works and in the petrochemical indus-try. All failures were caused by an incorrect technical approach. Possible remedial measures are proposed.

  12. Abbreviated Case Studies in Organizational Communication

    Wanguri, Deloris McGee

    2005-01-01

    The cases contained within organizational communication texts are generally two to three pages, often followed by questions. These case studies are certainly useful. They generally describe events in the present, provide some type of organizational context, include first-hand data, include a record of what people say and think, develop a…

  13. Qualitative Case Study Research in Business Education.

    O'Connor, Bridget N.

    2002-01-01

    This guide to using qualitative case study research in business education explains methodological steps and decisions, illustrated with examples from business research. It addresses data analysis and interpretation, including discussion of software tools. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  14. Towards More Case Study Research in Entrepreneurship

    Tom Duxbury

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship as an emerging discipline has made good strides, but according to some, has fallen short of bringing its theory and literature up to the standards of others in the management sciences. Rich with the descriptive detail needed for insightful theory building in entrepreneurship, scholars have called for more case study research, particularly those incorporating non-retrospective and longitudinal observations. At the same time however, it has become rare to find such research published in A-level journals dedicated to entrepreneurship. A survey presented here of major entrepreneurship journals over the past six years revealed a publication rate of only 3% using the case study method. This presents a major impediment for developing fresh research in this field based upon the study of real cases. The author explores how the case study method has been applied to entrepreneurship research and provides recommendations for improved publication rates.

  15. BTS Case Study: The Galloway Family Home

    Case study of an energy-efficient Habitat for Humanity house that uses 30% less energy than conventional residential construction. The project was part of the Jimmy Carter Work Project in rural Appalachia in 1997

  16. [Burnout : ten years later.].

    Bibeau, G

    1985-01-01

    The important literature on burn-out or professionnal exhaustion is examined here from three aspects: socio-cultural anthropology, biological anthropology and ethnopsychiatry. On the socio-cultural level, the emergence of burn-out is seen as an epiphenomenon arising conjointly from a new work ethic and a new concept of the person; on the biological level, the burnout is presented in relation to two main areas of study: as an adaptative strategy used by individuals to face particularly demanding situations in their working environment and as a particular modality of the interrelations between physical, psychological and behavioral dimensions in a person; on the ethnopsychiatric level, the burn-out is not interpreted as a new category in the description of illnessess but rather as a model of behavior more socially accepted and as an integrative concept that allows one to give meaning to a diversified group of symptoms. Studies on burn-out indicators, their causes, its neuro-physiology and its definition are explicitly discussed according to three perspectives: socio-cultural, biological and ethnopsychiatric. PMID:17093512

  17. Eccrine Angiomatous Hamartoma: A Retrospective Study of 15 Cases

    Yi-Ting Lin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eccrine angiomatous hamartoma (EAH comprises a rare nevoid proliferation of normal eccrine glands and small blood vessels and occasionally otherelements in the middle and deep dermis with variable clinical manifestations.Case series have rarely been published except for case reports and literaturereviews. The aims of this article were to investigate the clinical and pathologic features of patients with EAH in Taiwan and to compare our resultswith the results of previous studies.Methods: A retrospective review of medical records and histopathological findings wasperformed on patients diagnosed with EAH in a medical center in Taiwanbetween 1994 and 2010.Results: Fifteen patients with pathologically diagnosed EAH were collected. Themean age at the time of diagnosis was 38.6 years (range, birth to 67 years.The male to female ratio was 3 to 2. In most cases, EAH arose as a singlelesion on a lower extremity. The symptoms and signs most commonly associated with EAH were pain (60%, hypertrichosis (13.3%, itching (13.3%and hyperhidrosis (6.7%. Additional pathological findings included hemangioma (13.3%, verrucous hemangioma (6.7%, arteriovenous malformation(6.7%, and angiokeratoma (6.7%. None of the patients experienced spontaneous regression of the lesions before excision. Excisions were done in onepatient under general anesthesia, and ten patients with local anesthesia. Fourpatients were kept under observation. Tumor recurrences were noted in twoout of the eleven patients whose lesions were excised.Conclusion: Compared with cases in the literature, we found additional histopathologicalfindings and an increased tumor recurrence risk in our cohort. EAH remainsa benign and uncommon hamartomatous condition. Further multi-center, retrospective studies with larger case numbers are needed to better characterizethe disease presentation in Asian populations.

  18. Frequency and antimicrobial resistance patterns of bacteria implicated in community urinary tract infections: a ten-year surveillance study (20002009)

    2013-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infectious diseases at the community level. In order to assess the adequacy of the empirical therapy, the prevalence and the resistance pattern of the main bacteria responsible for UTI in the community (in Aveiro, Portugal) was evaluated throughout a ten-year period. Methods In this retrospective study, all urine samples from patients of the District of Aveiro, in ambulatory regime, collected at the Clinical Analysis Laboratory Avelab during the period 20002009 were analysed. Samples with more than 105 CFU/mL bacteria were considered positive and, for these samples, the bacteria were identified and the profile of antibiotic susceptibility was characterized. Results From the 155597 samples analysed, 18797 (12.1%) were positive for bacterial infection. UTI was more frequent in women (78.5%) and its incidence varied with age, affecting more the elderly patients (38.6%). Although E. coli was, as usual, the most common pathogen implicated in UTI, it were observed differences related to the other bacteria more implicated in UTI relatively to previous studies. The bacteria implicated in the UTI varied with the sex of the patient, being P. aeruginosa a more important cause of infection in men than in women. The incidence of the main bacteria changed over the study period (P. aeruginosa, Klebsiella spp and Providencia spp increased and Enterobacter spp decreased). Although E. coli was responsible for more than an half of UTI, its resistance to antibiotics was low when compared with other pathogens implicated in UTI, showing also the lowest percentage of multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates (17%). Bacteria isolated from females were less resistant than those isolated from males and this difference increased with the patient age. Conclusions The differences in sex and age must be taken into account at the moment of empirical prescription of antimicrobials. From the recommended antimicrobials by the European Association of Urology guidelines, the first line drugs (pivmecillinam and nitrofurantoin) and the alternative antibiotic amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMX-CLA) are appropriate to treat community-acquired UTI, but the fluoroquinolones should not be suitable to treat male infections and the trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) shall not be used in the treatment of UTI at this level. PMID:23327474

  19. Frequency and antimicrobial resistance patterns of bacteria implicated in community urinary tract infections: a ten-year surveillance study (20002009

    Linhares Ins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most common infectious diseases at the community level. In order to assess the adequacy of the empirical therapy, the prevalence and the resistance pattern of the main bacteria responsible for UTI in the community (in Aveiro, Portugal was evaluated throughout a ten-year period. Methods In this retrospective study, all urine samples from patients of the District of Aveiro, in ambulatory regime, collected at the Clinical Analysis Laboratory Avelab during the period 20002009 were analysed. Samples with more than 105 CFU/mL bacteria were considered positive and, for these samples, the bacteria were identified and the profile of antibiotic susceptibility was characterized. Results From the 155597 samples analysed, 18797 (12.1% were positive for bacterial infection. UTI was more frequent in women (78.5% and its incidence varied with age, affecting more the elderly patients (38.6%. Although E. coli was, as usual, the most common pathogen implicated in UTI, it were observed differences related to the other bacteria more implicated in UTI relatively to previous studies. The bacteria implicated in the UTI varied with the sex of the patient, being P. aeruginosa a more important cause of infection in men than in women. The incidence of the main bacteria changed over the study period (P. aeruginosa, Klebsiella spp and Providencia spp increased and Enterobacter spp decreased. Although E. coli was responsible for more than an half of UTI, its resistance to antibiotics was low when compared with other pathogens implicated in UTI, showing also the lowest percentage of multidrug resistant (MDR isolates (17%. Bacteria isolated from females were less resistant than those isolated from males and this difference increased with the patient age. Conclusions The differences in sex and age must be taken into account at the moment of empirical prescription of antimicrobials. From the recommended antimicrobials by the European Association of Urology guidelines, the first line drugs (pivmecillinam and nitrofurantoin and the alternative antibiotic amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMX-CLA are appropriate to treat community-acquired UTI, but the fluoroquinolones should not be suitable to treat male infections and the trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT shall not be used in the treatment of UTI at this level.

  20. Ten shades of black

    Hod, Shahar

    2015-01-01

    The holographic principle has taught us that, as far as their entropy content is concerned, black holes in $(3+1)$-dimensional curved spacetimes behave as ordinary thermodynamic systems in flat $(2+1)$-dimensional spacetimes. In this essay we point out that the opposite behavior can also be observed in black-hole physics. To show this we study the quantum Hawking evaporation of near-extremal Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black holes. We first point out that the black-hole radiation spectrum departs from the familiar radiation spectrum of genuine $(3+1)$-dimensional perfect black-body emitters. In particular, the would be black-body thermal spectrum is distorted by the curvature potential which surrounds the black hole and effectively blocks the emission of low-energy quanta. Taking into account the energy-dependent gray-body factors which quantify the imprint of passage of the emitted radiation quanta through the black-hole curvature potential, we reveal that the $(3+1)$-dimensional black holes effectively behave as p...

  1. Evaluating SMIL: Three User Case Studies

    Rutledge, L; Hardman, Hazel Lynda; Ossenbruggen, van, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents three user case studies of the multimedia standard SMIL. Each conveys a different kind of typical multimedia. The studies illustrate how SMIL can be used for these forms of multimedia. Analysis of these studies also show potential areas for extension of the language to better suit the needs of Web-based multimedia.

  2. Predicting Students Drop Out: A Case Study

    Dekker, Gerben W.; Pechenizkiy, Mykola; Vleeshouwers, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    The monitoring and support of university freshmen is considered very important at many educational institutions. In this paper we describe the results of the educational data mining case study aimed at predicting the Electrical Engineering (EE) students drop out after the first semester of their studies or even before they enter the study program…

  3. Ground-source heat pump case studies and utility programs

    Lienau, P.J.; Boyd, T.L.; Rogers, R.L.

    1995-04-01

    Ground-source heat pump systems are one of the promising new energy technologies that has shown rapid increase in usage over the past ten years in the United States. These systems offer substantial benefits to consumers and utilities in energy (kWh) and demand (kW) savings. The purpose of this study was to determine what existing monitored data was available mainly from electric utilities on heat pump performance, energy savings and demand reduction for residential, school and commercial building applications. In order to verify the performance, information was collected for 253 case studies from mainly utilities throughout the United States. The case studies were compiled into a database. The database was organized into general information, system information, ground system information, system performance, and additional information. Information was developed on the status of demand-side management of ground-source heat pump programs for about 60 electric utility and rural electric cooperatives on marketing, incentive programs, barriers to market penetration, number units installed in service area, and benefits.

  4. NWCC Transmission Case Study Conclusions Summary

    Steve Wiese, Terry Allison

    2000-09-01

    OAK-B135 The NWCC Transmission Case Studies Conclusions Summary In the spring of 1999, the Utility Wind Interest Group (UWIG), with the cooperation of the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC), conducted a forum on transmission issues associated with the production of energy from wind. As a result of this forum, a number of issues were identified which, if successfully resolved, could help reduce barriers to the future expansion of wind power. The NWCC, being a multi-stakeholder group, was in an ideal position to conduct follow-up activities among a cross-section of the interested parties. The follow-up activities took the form of three case studies in the areas of interest identified by forum participants: (1) Transmission policy and pricing; (2) ''Virtual wheeling'' arrangements; and, (3) Transmission system improvements. The case studies provide an interesting snapshot in time dealing with a range of issues associated with scheduled or planned regulatory and restructuring proceedings related to energy transmission. The NWCC Transmission Subcommittee and the UWIG reviewed early drafts of the case studies in November 1999. The case studies were conducted through a questionnaire and interview process with interested parties. In writing each case study, NWCC staff attempted to identify all stakeholder groups with an interest in each topic and solicit their input. While all parties do not agree on every issue presented, a serious effort has been made to present all views in an unbiased fashion. At the end of each case study, relevant conclusions are drawn and recommendations for next steps are provided where appropriate.

  5. Top Ten Bed Bug Tips

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Bed Bugs Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us ... Bugs Top Ten Tips to Prevent or Control Bed Bugs Related Information Bed bugs tips (to print) ...

  6. Top Ten Bed Bug Tips

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Bed Bugs Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us You ... Bugs Top Ten Tips to Prevent or Control Bed Bugs Related Information Bed bugs tips (to print) 10 ...

  7. ABACC ten years applying safeguards

    The Argentinian-Brazilian Agency for Accounting and Control of nuclear special materials has been in operations for ten years. The rational behind the creation and the work performed by the Agency during the last decade is described. (author)

  8. Epidemiological Study of RRT-Treated ESRD in Nanjing - A Ten-Year Experience in Nearly Three Million Insurance Covered Population

    Han, Yu-chen; Huang, Han-Ming; Sun, Ling; Tan, Chao-Ming; Gao, Min; Liu, Hong; Tang, Ri-ning; Wang, Yan-Li; WANG, BEI; Ma, Kun-Ling; Liu, Bi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background The growing burden of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has been a great challenge to the health care system of China. However, the exact epidemiological data for ESRD in China remain unclear. We aimed to investigate the epidemiology of ESRD treated by renal replacement therapy (RRT) in Nanjing based on analysing ten-year data of Nanjing three million insurance covered population. Methods Using the electronic registry system of Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI), we includ...

  9. Study of enzyme replacement therapy for Gaucher Disease: comparative analysis of clinical and laboratory parameters at diagnosis and after two, five and ten years of treatment

    Ana Maria Almeida Souza; Thiago Pimentel Muniz; Rafael Maciel Brito

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of enzyme replacement therapy for Gaucher Disease on clinical and laboratory parameters after two, five and ten years of treatment. Methods: Data were collected from patient records and analyzed using BioEstat software (version 5.0). Student's t-test, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), Wilcoxon test and Kruskal–Wallis test were used for statistical analysis. Hepatomegaly and splenomegaly were analyzed using the Kappa test. Results: There was a significant incr...

  10. Trends in the theoretical and research methodological approaches applied in doctoral studies in information and knowledge management: an exploration of ten years of research in South Africa

    M.A. Mearns

    2008-01-01

    The past ten years have seen the field of information and knowledge management develop and implement new and improved technologies. Because of the ease with which information is exchanged the contribution to information overload has increased exponentially and the need for information and knowledge management is more real than ever before. Research in itself is a science of knowledge creation that continuously evolves in line with newly developed theories and research methodologies. An invest...

  11. Experiences from Industrial WCET Analysis Case Studies

    Ermedahl, Andreas; Gustafsson, Jan; Lisper, Björn

    2007-01-01

    Static Worst-Case Execution Time (WCET) analysis is currently taking a step from research to industrial use. We present a summary of three case studies where static WCET analysis has been used to analyse production code for embedded real-time systems. The primary purpose has not been to test the accuracy of the obtained WCET estimates, but rather to investigate the practical and methodological difficulties that arise when applying current WCET analysis methods to th...

  12. USING STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT STUDY CASES IN ROMANIA

    Bacanu Bogdan

    2008-01-01

    The paper discuss the use of study case in the teaching of strategic management and the translation of the method from United States to Romania. Some technical aspects of American experience in strategic management case researching are underlined, with a focalised approach on financial analysis and their informational context. The basic weaknesses of the method are also analysed in order to understand the practical problems in Romanian educational environment. The general value as a tool in a...

  13. Management by Values: A Case Study

    Liu, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to conclude the management approach by the case study of Chinese enterprise. There are a lot of management approaches in practice, one of the most influential and famous one is management by objective which is invented by the father of modern management discipline Peter F Drucker, he observed the case of American most successful enterprise such as GM and then concluded and created the relevant meaningful management tools, in effect, such valuable manage...

  14. Journalists and Olympic athletes:a Norwegian case study of ambivalent relationship

    Kristiansen, Elsa; Hanstad, Dag Vidar

    2012-01-01

    This case study explores the relationship between media and sport. More specifically, it examines the association (i.e., the contact and communication) between Norwegian journalists and athletes during the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver, Canada. Ten athletes and three journalists were interviewed about their relationship. To regulate and improve the journalist–athlete relationship during special events like the Olympics, media rules have been formulated. In regard to the on-site inter...

  15. Clean Cities Case Study: Barwood Cab Fleet Study Summary

    Barwood Cab Fleet Study Summary is the second in a new series called''Alternative Fuel Information Case Studies,'' designed to present real-world experiences with alternative fuels to fleet managers and other industry stakeholders

  16. Collaborative Assessment: Middle School Case Study

    Parkison, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing a participant observer research model, a case study of the efficacy of a collaborative assessment methodology within a middle school social studies class was conducted. A review of existing research revealed that students' perceptions of assessment, evaluation, and accountability influence their intrinsic motivation to learn. A…

  17. Designing data governance model - case study

    Vnsk, Ari

    2013-01-01

    Objectives of the study The purpose of this study was to find suitable and effective method for designing data governance model. The objective is to develop data governance model by utilizing general frameworks and theories from the literature that could be applied to the empirical part of the study. Thus the goal is to build design method with frameworks and theories combined with empirical research and test this method in case context. The main motivator for the study was an o...

  18. Measuring marketing performance - A case study

    Laakso, Vesa-Pekka

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The purpose of this study is to develop a marketing dashboard for a Finnish company that operates in the financial industry. The identification of suitable metrics for assessing marketing performance is considered central. This study proposes a new construct (a dashboard) that aims to providing management relevant information on marketing performance from decision-making perspective. METHODOLOGY AND DATA The methodology is a constructive case study. In the...

  19. The comparison of grey-scale ultrasonic and clinical features of hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma in children: a retrospective study for ten years

    Luo Yan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatoblastoma (HBL and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC are respectively the first and the second most common pediatric malignant liver tumors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the combined use of the ultrasound examination and the assessment of the patients' clinical features for differentiating HBL from HCC in children. Methods Thirty cases of the confirmed HBL and 12 cases of the confirmed HCC in children under the age of 15 years were enrolled into our study. They were divided into the HBL group and the HCC group according to the histological types of the tumors. The ultrasonic features and the clinical manifestations of the two groups were retrospectively analyzed, with an emphasis on the following parameters: onset age, gender (male/female ratio, positive epatitis-B-surface-antigen (HBV, alpha-fetoprotein increase, and echo features including septa, calcification and liquefaction within the tumors. Results Compared with the children with HCC, the children with HBL had a significantly younger onset age (8.2 years vs. 3.9 years, P Conclusion Ultrasonic features combined with clinical manifestations are valuable for differentiating HBL from HCC in children.

  20. The Ten-Year History of the Asklepios Study: An Interview with Professor Ernst R. Rietzschel, Primary Investigator and Leader of the Asklepios Study.

    Park, Jeong Bae

    2015-05-01

    The Asklepios study started 10 years ago when 2,500 subjects were screened between 2002 and 2004. And all of the 90+ publications we have for the moment are from those cross-sectional data. This is called round 1. Since 2011, in round 2, all of those patients have started to come back for a 10-year follow-up. At this moment, approximately 1,750 of those patients have been seen. The patients were followed by general practitioners (GP), and the GP again provided the information about what has happened with the medical status in the past 10 years including drug therapy: not only the drugs that they are taking at the moment were evaluated, but, because patients often use many drugs, the chronicles of drugs for major risk factors, for hypertension, lipids, contraceptives and more. Then, patients come to the study center where the same cluster of examinations are undertaken by one single doctor, Prof. Ernst R. Rietzschel and one study nurse, just like 10 years ago. Again, using a single observer at the two time frames has kept the methodology very strict. PMID:26587452

  1. Cryostat design case studies, principles and engineering

    Weisend II, J G

    2016-01-01

    This book enables the reader to learn the fundamental and applied aspects of practical cryostat design by examining previous design choices and resulting cryostat performance. Through a series of extended case studies the book presents an overview of existing cryostat design covering a wide range of cryostat types and applications, including the magnet cryostats that comprise the majority of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, space-borne cryostats containing sensors operating below 1 K, and large cryogenic liquid storage vessels. It starts with an introductory section on the principles of cryostat design including practical data and equations. This section is followed by a series of case studies on existing cryostats, describing the specific requirements of the cryostat, the challenges involved and the design choices made along with the resulting performance of the cryostat. The cryostat examples used in the studies are chosen to cover a broad range of cryostat applications and the authors of each case are ...

  2. Shuttle Case Study Collection Website Development

    Ransom, Khadijah S.; Johnson, Grace K.

    2012-01-01

    As a continuation from summer 2012, the Shuttle Case Study Collection has been developed using lessons learned documented by NASA engineers, analysts, and contractors. Decades of information related to processing and launching the Space Shuttle is gathered into a single database to provide educators with an alternative means to teach real-world engineering processes. The goal is to provide additional engineering materials that enhance critical thinking, decision making, and problem solving skills. During this second phase of the project, the Shuttle Case Study Collection website was developed. Extensive HTML coding to link downloadable documents, videos, and images was required, as was training to learn NASA's Content Management System (CMS) for website design. As the final stage of the collection development, the website is designed to allow for distribution of information to the public as well as for case study report submissions from other educators online.

  3. The Danish National Case Study Report

    Brodersen, Søsser; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    science through co-operation with Science Shops as a mediator between universities and civil society. The Danish national case study report analyses three projects carried out through the Science Shops at DTU and RUC. One case is a co-operation between two DTU students and an NGO, whom is working towards...... promoting the use of bicycles. The project addresses how different actors perceive and understand the bicycles as technology, and how this is incorporated in traffic strategies and planning. A second case is a co-operation between two DTU students and a day-care centre, aiming at investigating storage...... facilities for organic food and the possibilities of local supply of organic food to the day-care centre. The third case is a co-operation between four RUC students and a local branch of a larger NGO working with nature and environment. This co-operation aims at investigating the pollution level in a village...

  4. Repurposing legacy data innovative case studies

    Berman, Jules J

    2015-01-01

    Repurposing Legacy Data: Innovative Case Studies takes a look at how data scientists have re-purposed legacy data, whether their own, or legacy data that has been donated to the public domain. Most of the data stored worldwide is legacy data-data created some time in the past, for a particular purpose, and left in obsolete formats. As with keepsakes in an attic, we retain this information thinking it may have value in the future, though we have no current use for it. The case studies in this book, from such diverse fields as cosmology, quantum physics, high-energy physics, microbiology,

  5. Case study in time series analysis

    Zhongjie, Xie

    1993-01-01

    This book is a monograph on case studies using time series analysis, which includes the main research works applied to practical projects by the author in the past 15 years. The works cover different problems in broad fields, such as: engineering, labour protection, astronomy, physiology, endocrinology, oil development, etc. The first part of this book introduces some basic knowledge of time series analysis which is necessary for the reader to understand the methods and the theory used in the procedure for solving problems. The second part is the main part of this book - case studies in differ

  6. Case studies in atomic collision physics

    McDaniel, E W

    1974-01-01

    Case Studies in Atomic Physics III focuses on case studies on atomic and molecular physics, including atomic collisions, transport properties of electrons, ions, molecules, and photons, interaction potentials, spectroscopy, and surface phenomena. The selection first discusses detailed balancing in the time-dependent impact parameter method, as well as time-reversal in the impact parameter method and coupled state approximation. The text also examines the mechanisms of electron production in ion. Topics include measurement of doubly differential cross sections and electron spectra, direct Coul

  7. Corporate Social Responsibility : A Case Study

    Björkqvist, Kira

    2012-01-01

    The importance of taking responsibility for the common environmental and social welfare has become of essence in the business world of the 21st century. This thesis provides the reader with knowledge on corporate social responsibility (CSR) and shows the reader a comparative study on how CSR is reported on in three case study companies chosen for this thesis. This thesis is a descriptive study that uses the research method of content analysis to determine the commonalities and differences...

  8. A study on effects of organizational learning on organizational innovation: A case study of insurance industry

    Maryam Marvasti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the relationship between organization learning and organization innovation in one of Iranian insurance firm. The proposed study selects a sample of 300 employees who work for different positions for the case study of this paper and using Pearson correlation as well as Freedman tests determines the relationship and ranks different components of the survey. The results of this implementation have indicated that organization innovation influences on organizational learning, data distribution, interpretation and memory significantly but the effect of organizational innovation on data collection cannot be confirmed when the level of significance is five or even ten percent. The implementation of Freedman test has also indicated that Information interpretation is number priority followed by information learning, organizational distribution and organizational memory.

  9. Top Ten Workplace Skills for Future Organizations

    Kelly Y. Senter

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers have indicated that there are skills that are going to be essential for the future workforce. This review helps identify these skills and the applicability of these skills to job performance of the future organization competing in a globalized environment. The review provides insight into each of the ten listed skills and also information on how the skills will be useful for future organizations. The review will extend previous literature regarding the identified ten skills essential for future organizations. Providing this analysis of the literature and potential applicability of these identified essential skills will help guide and focus additional studies relating to future job performance requirements.

  10. Case studies in organic contaminant hydrogeology

    Baker, John A.

    1989-07-01

    The effective management of domestic solid waste and hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste is a major problem in the area of environmental geology and water sciences over the world. This series of case studies of organic contaminants from both solid and hazardous waste disposal facilities provides examples of these problems. The facilities were investigated to determine risks and liabilities before acquisition, to determine the site hydrogeologic conditions for design of appropriate groundwater monitoring plans, and/or to determine the potential for groundwater contamination. The results of these studies and investigations by Waste Management Inc. (WMI) and its consultants have shown certain relationships in the distribution of organic pollutants to the different geologic and hydrogeologic charac teristics of each facility. In each of the case studies, all 129 priority pollutants were analyzed in private wells and/or monitoring wells at the request of regulatory agencies. The 31 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of the priority pollutant list were the majority of the organic compounds detected and these data are evaluated in each case study. The case studies are on disposal facilities located in glacial tills, carbonaceous weathered clay soils, weathered shale, limestone bedrock, dolomite bedrock, and alluvial and sedimentary deposits. A brief discussion of groundwater quality impacts and remedial measures also is included.

  11. A Case Study on Collective Cognition and Operation in Team-Based Computer Game Design by Middle-School Children

    Ke, Fengfeng; Im, Tami

    2014-01-01

    This case study examined team-based computer-game design efforts by children with diverse abilities to explore the nature of their collective design actions and cognitive processes. Ten teams of middle-school children, with a high percentage of minority students, participated in a 6-weeks, computer-assisted math-game-design program. Essential

  12. A Case Study on Collective Cognition and Operation in Team-Based Computer Game Design by Middle-School Children

    Ke, Fengfeng; Im, Tami

    2014-01-01

    This case study examined team-based computer-game design efforts by children with diverse abilities to explore the nature of their collective design actions and cognitive processes. Ten teams of middle-school children, with a high percentage of minority students, participated in a 6-weeks, computer-assisted math-game-design program. Essential…

  13. Study of enzyme replacement therapy for Gaucher Disease: comparative analysis of clinical and laboratory parameters at diagnosis and after two, five and ten years of treatment

    Ana Maria Almeida Souza

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the impact of enzyme replacement therapy for Gaucher Disease on clinical and laboratory parameters after two, five and ten years of treatment. Methods: Data were collected from patient records and analyzed using BioEstat software (version 5.0. Student's t-test, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA, Wilcoxon test and Kruskal–Wallis test were used for statistical analysis. Hepatomegaly and splenomegaly were analyzed using the Kappa test. Results: There was a significant increase in hemoglobin levels (p-value <0.01 and platelet counts (p-value = 0.01 within two years of therapy. At the same time, the frequencies of splenomegaly (p-value <0.01 and hepatomegaly (p-value <0.05 reduced. These results were similar at five and ten years of enzyme replacement therapy. Conclusions: There are substantial and quick (within two years laboratory and clinical responses to enzyme replacement therapy. These improvements continue as long as enzyme replacement therapy is administered every two weeks, as recommended by the literature.

  14. Teaching the Holocaust through Case Study

    Misco, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    This article responds to the curricular challenges teachers face with Holocaust education, including cursory treatments and a lack of focus on individual experiences. First, the author argues for a case-study approach to help students reengage concrete and complex features of the Holocaust as a point of departure for subsequent inquiry. In…

  15. Performance Support Case Studies from IBM.

    Duke-Moran, Celia; Swope, Ginger; Morariu, Janis; deKam, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Presents two case studies that show how IBM addressed performance support solutions and electronic learning. The first developed a performance support and expert coaching solution; the second applied performance support to reducing implementation time and total cost of ownership of enterprise resource planning systems. (Author/LRW)

  16. Physics Courses--Some Suggested Case Studies

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    To communicate the relevance and excitement of science activity to students, the use of more imaginative, and even openly speculative, case studies in physics courses is suggested. Some useful examples are Magnetic Monopoles, Constants, Black Holes, Antimatter, Zero Mass Particles, Tachyons, and the Bootstrap Hypothesis. (DF)

  17. A Case Study from South Africa.

    Casazza, Martha

    2000-01-01

    Presents the case study success story of a University of Port Elizabeth Advancement Program student named Elroy Africander. Underscores two significant components of student transition programs: the need for support for students' personal and emotional growth, and that practitioners should regularly assess the strengths and weaknesses of programs…

  18. Three Case Studies in Green Cleaning

    State Education Standard, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents case studies from three districts implementing green cleaning. In 2008, Missouri passed legislation requiring state education officials to convene a committee of stakeholders with the purpose of developing green cleaning guidelines and specifications for schools. The guide, published by the Department of Elementary and…

  19. Library Virtual Tours: A Case Study

    Ashmore, Beth; Grogg, Jill E.

    2004-01-01

    Virtual tours delivered via the Web have become a common tool for both instruction and outreach. This article is a case study of the creation of a virtual tour for a university library and is intended to provide others interested in creating a virtual tour of their library the opportunity to learn from the mistakes and successes of fellow…

  20. It's Not Funny: A Case Study

    Méndez-Morse, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    This case study may be used with personnel supervision, school law, and other school leadership courses. It describes the behavior and actions of one teacher toward another. Student discussions can focus on supervision, workplace mobbing, workplace bullying, as well as sexual harassment. Students should focus on a school leader's role in such…

  1. Understanding Parkinson disease: an evolving case study.

    Vernon, Gwyn M; Carty, Anne E S; Salemno, Christin M; Siskind, Michele M; Thomas, Cathi A

    2014-10-15

    Thirty years ago, Parkinson disease was described as a shortage of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Today, understanding of this disorder includes possible genetic influences, premorbid and nonmotor issues, and a variety of neurologic, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms. Using a case study, this article presents the current science of Parkinson disease. PMID:25225972

  2. ESL and Digital Video Integration: Case Studies

    Li, J., Ed.; Gromik, N., Ed.; Edwards, N., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    It should come as no surprise that digital video technology is of particular interest to English language learners; students are drawn to its visual appeal and vibrant creative potential. The seven original case studies in this book demonstrate how video can be an effective and powerful tool to create fluid, fun, interactive, and collaborative

  3. Firefighter Workplace Learning: An Exploratory Case Study

    Tracey, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite there being a significant amount of research investigating workplace learning, research exploring firefighter workplace learning is almost nonexistent. The purpose of this qualitative multi-case study was to explore how firefighters conceptualize, report, and practice workplace learning. The researcher also investigated how firefighters…

  4. The Campus Diversity Initiative: A Case Study

    Nayak, Sharada

    2005-01-01

    This Case Study presents the Campus Diversity Initiative (CDI), a three-phase project lead by the Educational Resources Project Centre Trust, in New Delhi, India. In a historic and cultural context different from that of India, the American Diversity Initiative was launched by the Ford Foundation in 1990 and addressed their diversity issues by…

  5. Firefighter Workplace Learning: An Exploratory Case Study

    Tracey, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite there being a significant amount of research investigating workplace learning, research exploring firefighter workplace learning is almost nonexistent. The purpose of this qualitative multi-case study was to explore how firefighters conceptualize, report, and practice workplace learning. The researcher also investigated how firefighters

  6. Teaching the Holocaust through Case Study

    Misco, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    This article responds to the curricular challenges teachers face with Holocaust education, including cursory treatments and a lack of focus on individual experiences. First, the author argues for a case-study approach to help students reengage concrete and complex features of the Holocaust as a point of departure for subsequent inquiry. In

  7. Learning Machine Learning: A Case Study

    Lavesson, N.

    2010-01-01

    This correspondence reports on a case study conducted in the Master's-level Machine Learning (ML) course at Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden. The students participated in a self-assessment test and a diagnostic test of prerequisite subjects, and their results on these tests are correlated with their achievement of the course's learning

  8. Case Studies on Globalization and Money Laundering

    Eckhard Freyer

    2008-01-01

    Financial globalization has greatly improved the efficiency of capital transfers around the world, with the cost of facilitating criminal money laundering activities. Based on case studies on conditions for money laundering in the process of globalization and transformation in Europe, are discussed the challenges that a “global financial village” must confront.

  9. Climate wise case study compendium: Report 1

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    This case study compendium is one of several Climate Wise tools available to help interested companies identify cost-effective options. Climate Wise, a private-public partnership program, is a key Federal initiative to return greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2000.

  10. Case Studies of Altruistic Persons: AERA Roundtable.

    Stephens, William N.

    This document presents information from a body of research called Lives of Service, a collection of case studies of 32 altruistic adults. It begins with a review of the research on altruism, service orientation, giving, helpfulness, social responsibility, and voluntarism. Research on altruism in psychology and in other disciplines is included,…

  11. Learning Machine Learning: A Case Study

    Lavesson, N.

    2010-01-01

    This correspondence reports on a case study conducted in the Master's-level Machine Learning (ML) course at Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden. The students participated in a self-assessment test and a diagnostic test of prerequisite subjects, and their results on these tests are correlated with their achievement of the course's learning…

  12. A Codesign Case Study in Computer Graphics

    Brage, Jens P.; Madsen, Jan

    The paper describes a codesign case study where a computer graphics application is examined with the intention to speed up its execution. The application is specified as a C program, and is characterized by the lack of a simple compute-intensive kernel. The hardware/software partitioning is based...

  13. Tachycardia During Resistance Exercise: A Case Study.

    Fry, Andrew C.; Parks, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    This case study examined a weight-trained (WT) male who had an unusually high heart rate response to heavy resistance exercise and self-administered anabolic androgenic steroids as an ergogenic aid to training. The subject was compared to 18 other WT people. His tachycardia response occurred only in the presence of a pressure load and not with a…

  14. Spicy Stonehenge: Proposing a SOA Case Study

    Espinha, T.A.; Chen, C.; Zaidman, A.E.; Gross, H.G.

    2012-01-01

    Prepint of paper published in: ICSE Workshop on Principles of Engineering Service Oriented Systems (PESOS), 4 June 2012; doi:10.1109/PESOS.2012.6225940 Maintenance research in the context of Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) is currently lacking a suitable standard case study that can be used by scientists in order to (1) develop and assess their research ideas and (2) compare and benchmark their solution(s). It is also well established in different fields that having such a standard case s...

  15. Avio case study: the MRO process

    Corallo, Angelo; Dimartino, Angelo; Errico, Fabrizio; Giangreco, Enza

    This chapter presents the case study of the Avio Brindisi plant where a profound process of change has been in progress for a number of years. We use the TEKNE Project methodology of change to analyze the different aspects of the case, highlighting the firm's strategic, organizational and technological characteristics and the environment it operates in. In particular, we envisage a change in the plant's business model in response to the expansion of its client segments and a potential new approach to MRO operations based on advanced fleet management practices that would radically change the firm's organization and value network with respect to its MRO service offering, thereby yielding extensive global market opportunities.

  16. A case study of imported pulmonary coccidioidomycosis

    Wang, Zheng-yang; Wen, Sheng-lan; Ying, Ke-jing

    2011-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is an endemic disease of the Western hemisphere. The cases in non-endemic areas are mostly imported. Determining a history of exposure is critical for performing the diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis, especially for cases occurring in a non-endemic area. In this study, a 71-year-old Chinese male presented to our hospital with chronic cough and malaise, and was found to have a mass in the middle lobe of right lung. He had been visiting Arizona, USA for four months before admis...

  17. Cook Off Study of Combustible Cartridge Cases

    R.K. Syal

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available Combustible cartridge case (CCC offers specific advantages over the conventional metallic (brass case. The CCCs are made of cellulose fibres with suitable explosives to ensure debris-free combustion inside the gun barrel. The presence of explosives in CCC, however, causes increased vulnerability to cook-off. An experimental study of cook-off of CCC was carried out by hot plate technique. Cook-off data for CCC of different compositions and with various cook-off delay coatings was measured. It was found that out of four types of coatings, two gave better results.

  18. Music in context : Four case studies

    Randwijck, R.J.C. van

    2008-01-01

    In his thesis entitled “Music in Context. Four Case Studies”, R.J.C. van Randwijck investigates the context in which music has been created. It is a search in Four Case Studies, approaching four pieces of music from the context in which they were written in order to understand their meaning. The investigation of Johann Sebastian Bach’s Chaconne in D minor for solo violin BWV 1004 can justify the conclusion that everything seems to indicate that it was a part of the musica sub communione and t...

  19. Parental influence on tennis players : case studies

    Catherine Delforge; Christine Le Scanff

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to better understand the failure of young gifted athletes and the influence the parents / child relationships has on it. Three case studies are developed in order to put them back in their context. Interviews were carried out with players / parents / coaches. The players were specifically chosen as they had not reached elite level, despite very promising results in the junior leagues. The content analysis points out some favorable roles played by parents and other rat...

  20. Case studies on selected natural food antioxidants

    Herrero, Miguel; Mendiola, J. A.; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Ibáñez, Elena

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, a broad description of several case studies related to common antioxidants found in food-related products is presented. In this regard, special attention is put on the novel advanced environmentally-friendly extraction methods nowadays employed to extract and purify those potent antioxidants from natural matrices. A brief description of these extraction processes is provided together with some of the instrumentation needed. Besides, the studies carried out so f...

  1. Empathy Development Through Case Study and Simulation.

    Mennenga, Heidi A; Bassett, Susan; Pasquariello, Libby

    2016-01-01

    Because empathy is integral to the nurse-patient relationship, nurse educators are challenged to explore teaching strategies that may aid in the development of empathy among students. The purpose of this study was to determine whether consistent exposure to a single patient through case study and simulation had an impact on empathy levels in senior-level baccalaureate nursing students. Results provide interesting conclusions for faculty members and offer a basis for ongoing discussion. PMID:26448156

  2. Chloride Channel Myotonia: Study of Five Cases

    M Ghofrani

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Chloride channel Myotonia is a form of channelopathy, and Myotonia is its manifestation. Myotonia may be defined as delayed relaxation of skeletal muscle after its contraction. Decreased chloride conductance across the transverse tubular system, renders the muscle membrane hyper-excitable and leads to repetitive firing, creating Myotonia. Myotonia congenital is another name for chloride channel Myotonia. Myotonia congenital appears in autosomal dominant type called Thomson disease, autosomal recessive type called Becker disease, and a type with sporadic occurrence. Symptoms appear in the first or second decade of life. Repeated muscle contraction, the so called warm up, result in resolution of the Myotonia stiffness. Muscle stiffness and hypertrophy is another finding at physical examination. In this study we report on 5 patients, which had clinical and electrical signs of Myotonia. Muscle hypertrophy and warm up phenomena were present in all cases. CPK measurement of all cases were normal. 2 patients underwent muscle biopsy that showed only atrophy and increased central nuclei. In three cases autosomal recessive inheritance (Becker, in one case autosomal dominant inheritance (Thomsen and in one case sporadic occurrence was suggested. With respect to successful results of carbamazepine therapy in 4 patients, and being excellent in one of them, we suggest carbamazepine for the first choice of Myotonia treatment.

  3. Chelonid herpesvirus 5 in secretions and tumor tissues from green turtles (Chelonia mydas) from Southeastern Brazil: A ten-year study.

    Monezi, Telma A; Mehnert, Dolores U; de Moura, Elisabeth M M; Müller, Natascha M G; Garrafa, Patrícia; Matushima, Eliana R; Werneck, Max R; Borella, Maria I

    2016-04-15

    Fibropapillomatosis (FP), a neoplastic disease characterized by the formation of multiple tumors affecting different species of sea turtles and, most often, the green turtle (Chelonia mydas), is considered one of the major threats to the survival of this species. Recent studies indicate that Chelonid herpesvirus (ChHV5) is the etiological agent of this disease, though its association with anthropogenically altered environments and the immune status of these animals also appears to contribute to disease expression and tumor formation. In this study, tumor biopsy and secretions from green turtles captured off the coast of São Paulo State, Brazil, were used in histological and molecular analyses to detect and characterize circulating ChHV5. In 40.9% of cases, the tumor histopathological findings revealed focal ballooning degeneration with intranuclear inclusion bodies, results which are suggestive of viral infection. ChHV5 was detected using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on the animals' skin, ocular tumor biopsies, and ocular and oral secretions. The analysis of the detected ChHV5 sequences revealed two distinct genetic sequences together. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Brazilian samples were similar to ChHV5 samples described for the Atlantic phylogeographic group and are therefore part of the same clade as the Gulf of Guinea and Puerto Rico samples. This similarity suggests a possible flow of the virus between these three regions. PMID:27016769

  4. A case-control study of lung cancer relative to domestic radon exposure

    Public concern was expressed regarding the possibility of adverse health effects with the disposal of radioactive waste in Port Hope, Ontario. A case-control study was carried out to estimate the relative importance of domestic radon gas exposure in the causation of lung cancer in the town over a ten-year period. Twenty-seven cases met the entry criteria. Statistical analyses of results did not provide conclusive results that linked an increased risk of lung cancer and elevated domestic alpha radiation levels, when all factors were considered. However, a very strong association was demonstrated between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. (author)

  5. Compactified vacuum in ten dimensions

    Since the 1920's, theories which unify gravity with the other fundamental forces have called for more than the four observed dimensions of space-time. According to such a theory, the vacuum consists of flat four-dimensional space-time described by the Minkowski metric M4 and a compactified space B. The dimensions of B are small, and the space can only be observed at distance scales smaller than the present experimental limit. These theories have had serious difficulties. The equations of gravity severely restrict the possible choices for the space B. The allowed spaces are complicated and difficult to study. The vacuum is furthermore unstable in the sense that a small perturbation causes the compactified dimensions to expand indefinitely. There is an addition a semi-classical argument which implies that the compactified vacuum by annihilated by virtual black holes. It follows that a universe with compactified extra dimensions could not have survived to the present. These results were derived by applying the equations of general relativity to spaces of more than four dimensions. The form of these equations was assumed to be unchanged by an increase in the number of dimensions. The authors illustrate the effect of such terms by considering the example B = S6 where S6 is the six-dimensional sphere. Only when the extra terms are included is this choice of the compactified space allowed. He explore the effect of a small perturbation on such a vacuum. The ten-dimensional spherically symmetric potential is examined, and I determine conditions under which the formation of virtual black holes is forbidden. The examples M4 x S6 is still plagued by the semi-classical instability, but this result does not hold in general. The requirement that virtual black holes be forbidden provides a test for any theory which predicts a compactified vacuum

  6. An Industrial Case Study for Scrum Adoption

    Hassan Hajjdiab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Agile software development methods and techniqueshave been demonstrated to improve employee morale, enhanceend-product quality, and achieve customer satisfaction. Agileadoption always comes with special challenges and thus fundamental organizational changes are necessary for successful outcome. In this paper we present an in-depth case study for adopting Scrum in a multi-team and multi-project situation to a government entity in the United Arab Emirates (U.A.E. While there are many successful stories for adopting Scrum in large and small organizations, there is little known about adoption stories in a multi-project/multi-team environments. In this paper we present a case study for an unsuccessful adoption of Scrum in a government entity in the U.A.E. The government entity under study have used the traditional waterfall approach for many years and decided to move to Agile software development method.This study highlights the challenges faced during the adoptionof Scrum method with recommendations to address them. Eachorganization has its unique properties and one case study is not enough to draw conclusions for the U.A.E environment. However, the results obtained from this paper help software engineers to better understand the development environment and context factors for software projects in the U.A.E and many lessons may be learned for future Agile adoption.

  7. Ten Years of NOPP Accomplishments

    James J. Kendall Jr.; Eric J. Lindstrom; Benjamin Chicoski

    2009-01-01

    Agencies participating in the National Oceanographic Partnership Program (NOPP) collectively invested over $295 million during the last ten years on significant collaborative activities that might not have been accomplished without the NOPP framework. The partnerships formed added efficiency to research and development, reduced duplication of effort, focused education programs, and strengthened communication of ocean issues.

  8. Vitiligo: A study of 120 cases

    Kar P

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is a common pignientary disorder and of major social and cosmetic concern in India. Purpose of the study was to find out age at onset and sex incidence in vitiligo, role of hereditary factors and associations with other diseases. 120 self reporting vitiligo patients attending out patient department of a service hospital were selected for the study and this data was analysed. In the present series out of 120 cases 62 (51.6% were males and 58(48.35%were females. There was practically no difference in sex incidence. The lowest age of onset was two years and the oldest was 65 years. In the majority of patients,52(43.2%, disease started before twenty years of age.8 (6.6% cases gave definite family history of vitiligo. Exposed areas of the body were commonly affected in majority (66.6% of cases. The legs were commonest site of involvement in 60(50% cases. Circunicript type of vitiligo (46.6% was heading the list. Majority of patients (56.6% had multiple lesions. Diabetes mellitus was found in 2 (2.6% patients. Cause of vitiligo is still idiopathic. Hereditary factors hardly play any role in manifestation of vitiligo

  9. Enhancing Tourism Competitiveness of Hong Kong via Tourism Planning: A Comparative Case Study between Hong Kong and Singapore

    Kaewta Muangasame

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to recommend tourism planning in Hong Kong (HK. A comparison case study of tourism planning between Singapore and Hong Kong is discussed. Secondary data from web sites, observations and in-depth interviews of ten residents and ten tourists was conducted to investigate tourism planning in the two countries. The study discloses that the HK government should consider adopting a long term oriented plan and implement an integrated approach with their tourism planning. Sustainability issues, land management and carrying capacity should be addressed by HK tourism planners. Lastly, re-structuring of the Tourism board should be considered to improve the efficacy of tourism planning of HK.

  10. Electronic Document Management: A Human Resource Management Case Study

    Thomas Groenewald

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This case study serve as exemplar regarding what can go wrong with the implementation of an electronic document management system. Knowledge agility and knowledge as capital, is outlined against the backdrop of the information society and knowledge economy. The importance of electronic document management and control is sketched thereafter. The literature review is concluded with the impact of human resource management on knowledge agility, which includes references to the learning organisation and complexity theory. The intervention methodology, comprising three phases, follows next. The results of the three phases are presented thereafter. Partial success has been achieved with improving the human efficacy of electronic document management, however the client opted to discontinue the system in use. Opsomming Die gevalle studie dien as voorbeeld van wat kan verkeerd loop met die implementering van n elektroniese dokumentbestuur sisteem. Teen die agtergrond van die inligtingsgemeenskap en kennishuishouding word kennissoepelheid en kennis as kapitaal bespreek. Die literatuurstudie word afgesluit met die inpak van menslikehulpbronbestuur op kennissoepelheid, wat ook die verwysings na die leerorganisasie en kompleksietydsteorie insluit. Die metodologie van die intervensie, wat uit drie fases bestaan, volg daarna. Die resultate van die drie fases word vervolgens aangebied. Slegs gedeelte welslae is behaal met die verbetering van die menslike doeltreffendheid ten opsigte van elektroniese dokumentbestuur. Die klient besluit egter om nie voort te gaan om die huidige sisteem te gebruik nie.

  11. Waiting Lists for Radiation Therapy: A Case Study

    Singer Peter A

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Why waiting lists arise and how to address them remains unclear, and an improved understanding of these waiting list "dynamics" could lead to better management. The purpose of this study is to understand how the current shortage in radiation therapy in Ontario developed; the implications of prolonged waits; who is held accountable for managing such delays; and short, intermediate, and long-term solutions. Methods A case study of the radiation therapy shortage in 1998-99 at Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Relevant documents were collected; semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with ten administrators, health care workers, and patients were conducted, audio-taped and transcribed; and relevant meetings were observed. Results The radiation therapy shortage arose from a complex interplay of factors including: rising cancer incidence rates; broadening indications for radiation therapy; human resources management issues; government funding decisions; and responsiveness to previous planning recommendations. Implications of delays include poorer cancer control rates; patient suffering; and strained doctor-patient relationships. An incompatible relationship exists between moral responsibility, borne by government, and legal liability, borne by physicians. Short-term solutions include re-referral to centers with available resources; long-term solutions include training and recruiting health care workers, improving workload standards, increasing compensation, and making changes to the funding formula. Conclusion Human resource planning plays a critical role in the causes and solutions of waiting lists. Waiting lists have harsh implications for patients. Accountability relationships require realignment.

  12. Electronic Document Management: A Human Resource Management Case Study

    Thomas Groenewald

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available This case study serve as exemplar regarding what can go wrong with the implementation of an electronic document management system. Knowledge agility and knowledge as capital, is outlined against the backdrop of the information society and knowledge economy. The importance of electronic document management and control is sketched thereafter. The literature review is concluded with the impact of human resource management on knowledge agility, which includes references to the learning organisation and complexity theory. The intervention methodology, comprising three phases, follows next. The results of the three phases are presented thereafter. Partial success has been achieved with improving the human efficacy of electronic document management, however the client opted to discontinue the system in use. Opsomming Die gevalle studie dien as voorbeeld van wat kan verkeerd loop met die implementering van ’n elektroniese dokumentbestuur sisteem. Teen die agtergrond van die inligtingsgemeenskap en kennishuishouding word kennissoepelheid en kennis as kapitaal bespreek. Die literatuurstudie word afgesluit met die inpak van menslikehulpbronbestuur op kennissoepelheid, wat ook die verwysings na die leerorganisasie en kompleksietydsteorie insluit. Die metodologie van die intervensie, wat uit drie fases bestaan, volg daarna. Die resultate van die drie fases word vervolgens aangebied. Slegs gedeelte welslae is behaal met die verbetering van die menslike doeltreffendheid ten opsigte van elektroniese dokumentbestuur. Die klient besluit egter om nie voort te gaan om die huidige sisteem te gebruik nie.

  13. The Pendulum A Case Study in Physics

    Baker, Gregory L

    2005-01-01

    The pendulum: a case study in physics is a unique book in several ways. Firstly, it is a comprehensive quantitative study of one physical system, the pendulum, from the viewpoint of elementary and more advanced classical physics, modern chaotic dynamics, and quantum mechanics. In addition, coupled pendulums and pendulum analogs of superconducting devices are also discussed. Secondly, this book treats the physics of the pendulum within a historical and cultural context,showing, for example, that the pendulum has been intimately connected with studies of the earth's density, the earth's motion,

  14. Case studies of nurseries in Malawi

    Namoto, M.; Likoswe, M.G.

    This study of 42 case studies of nurseries was made as part of a major sample survey of 360 nurseries in 6 districts in Malawi. The purpose of the study was to let the small nurseries in the country explain in their own words how they source seed, how and for whom they produce seedlings, and to...... explain about their problems and opportunities in the nursery business. The assessment was made within the framework of Improved Seed Supply for Agroforestry in African Countries (ISSAAC), a Danida supported programme implemented in cooperation between Forest & Landscape Denmark and World Agroforestry...

  15. Ten past and ten future GAS/MAUS-payloads

    Staniek, S.; Otto, G.; Doepkess, J.

    1988-01-01

    MAUS (materials science autonomous experiments) is one out of a series of flight opportunities which the Space Program of West Germany offers to scientists from the disciplines of materials research and processing for performing materials science investigations under microgravity conditions. Up to now, ten MAUS experiments were flown which were dealing with the following scientific topics: decomposition of binary alloys with miscibility gap in the liquid state, interaction of a solidification front with dispersed particles, critical Marangoni number, investigation of the magnetic compound MnBi, shrinkage of gas bubbles in glass melts and slip casting. The ten future experiments are partly reflights with modification of the scientific objectives as well as new experiments in the fields of chemical reactions, heat transfer, glass technology and Ostwald ripening. Looking to ten flown payloads, the peculiarities of instrument technology in GAS-cans and its evolution is discussed with emphasis on structure, electronics and thermal design. A typical modern payload using 100 percent of the resource is presented.

  16. Management & Communication: Project Management Case Study

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2004-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the recent launch of a new workshop on Project Management. This is designed for People with budgetary, scheduling and/or organizational responsibilities in a project or a sub-project. The objectives through a management case study specially suited to CERN are: to become familiar with modern management techniques in use for structuring, planning, scheduling, costing and progress monitoring of a project or a sub-project. to understand in-depth issues associated with Deliverable-oriented Project Management, Earned Value Management, Advanced Project Cost Engineering and Project Risk Management. The full description of this workshop can be found here. The next session will be held on 8 October 2004. If you are interested in this workshop, please contact Nathalie Dumeaux, email or 78144. Programme of Seminars October to December 2004 Situation : 21.09.2004 Séminaires bilingues Dates Jours Places disponibles Project Management Case study 8 October 1 oui Intr...

  17. Czech Experience with Broader Case Studies Implementation

    Martina Fischerov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Czech education system is influenced by various conditions that have impact also on the further development of higher education in the Czech Republic. Within the educational process, the shift from passive learning methods (teaching to active teaching methods (learning is still obvious. The shift itself places higher requirements on both pedagogical staff skills and their networking ability Important factor for the teachers is getting real data from Czech companies in order to prepare tailor made case studies from the Czech environment. The main aim of this paper is to highlight and analyze the complexity of experience with case studies implementation into the Czech higher education system from various perspectives of selected stakeholders (university, students, companies.

  18. Case study: Wireless Sensor Networks Technology

    Naveen Jain; Pawan Shakdwipee; Sunil Sharma

    2013-01-01

    This paper present the history of research in sensor networks over the past decades, including two important programs of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), and the Distributed Sensor Networks (DSN) and the Sensor Information Technology (SensIT) programs. Technology trends that impact the development of sensor networks are reviewed, and new applications such as infrastructure security, habitat monitoring. The paper concludes by presenting some recent case studies results in...

  19. An Industrial Case Study for Scrum Adoption

    Hassan Hajjdiab; Al Shaima Taleb; Jauhar Ali

    2012-01-01

    Agile software development methods and techniqueshave been demonstrated to improve employee morale, enhanceend-product quality, and achieve customer satisfaction. Agileadoption always comes with special challenges and thus fundamental organizational changes are necessary for successful outcome. In this paper we present an in-depth case study for adopting Scrum in a multi-team and multi-project situation to a government entity in the United Arab Emirates (U.A.E). While there are many successfu...

  20. A Case Study: action based Entrepreneurship Education

    Jacobsen, Petter Jacob

    2011-01-01

    This paper contributes by providing suggestions on how to analyze business ideas forexploitation in an entrepreneurial education context, and how the institution can provide support activities to enhance the chance of successful exploitation. Active learning has become the preferred choice of teaching entrepreneurship and external ideas are used to provide the students with business opportunities to exploit. An instrumentaø case study on the Norwegian University of Science and Technology...

  1. Mobile phone surveys: the Slovenian case study:

    Batagelj, Zenel; Belak, Eva; ?iki?, Sanja; VEHOVAR Vasja

    2004-01-01

    In 2004, the number of mobile phone subscriptions in Slovenia reached the total number of inhabitants. Consequently, the fixed telephone coverage has started to decline; almost 10% of households are now available only over the mobile phone. With this, Slovenia positions itself as a typical EU country and can serve as a case study for issues related to mobile phone interview surveys. The paper addresses the general context of mobile phone usage and the calculations of mobile phone coverage rat...

  2. Lean Software Management: BBC Worldwide Case Study

    Middleton, Peter; Joyce, David

    2012-01-01

    This case study examines how the lean ideas behind the Toyota production system can be applied to software project management. It is a detailed investigation of the performance of a nine-person software development team employed by BBC Worldwide based in London. The data collected in 2009 involved direct observations of the development team, the kanban boards, the daily stand-up meetings, semistructured interviews with a wide variety of staff, and statistical analysis. The evidence shows that...

  3. Private power financing: a case study

    The Public Utility Regulatory Power Act (PURPA) in the USA and the UK's Electricity Act passed in 1989 are discussed and the first UK private power project is considered. A case study is presented, and covers the questions of when to approach the bank; banker versus investment bank; project fundamentals; the sponsor and the management team; the strength of the key project agreements; syndication of the project debt; and bank support during construction and operation. (author)

  4. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia - A Case Study

    Pradeesh Sathyan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary Ectodermal Dysplasia is an inherited disorder involving skin, teeth, hair and nails.Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia or Anhydrotic ectodermal dysplasia is the most common syndromeamong this large group of heriditory disorders. Hypohidrosis, hypotrichosis and hypodontia constitutethe main symptoms of the syndrome. The case study of a 17 year old boy, a vibrant youngster with nopositive family history is presented. The pattern of genetic inheritance is also discussed.

  5. A warehouse design decision model: case study

    Geraldes, Carla A. S.; Carvalho, Maria do Sameiro; Pereira, Guilherme

    2008-01-01

    Today’s competitive and volatile market requires flexibility, quality and efficiency from the logistics operations. In this context, warehouses are an important link of the logistic chain and warehouse management plays an important role over customer's service. Throughout this work we analyze a mathematical model aiming to support warehouse management decisions. A case study is used for that purpose and the model jointly identifies product allocation to the functional areas in the warehouse, ...

  6. BOOK REVIEW: Case Studies in Knowledge Management

    Reviewed by Dr. Adnan BOYACI

    2005-01-01

    161Case Studies in Knowledge ManagementEdited by Murray JennexHersley: PA: Idea Group, 2005, pp. 372, ISBN 1-59140-352-9Reviewed by Dr. Adnan BOYACIAnadolu UniversityEskişehir-TurkeyKnowledge management (KM) as a structured system and the way to the effectiveness isrelatively new field for the contemporary organizations functioning in different andcompetitive domain of public and private sectors in terms of getting optimal effectivenessunderlined by the concepts such as quality, productivity…...

  7. Concentrated Photo Voltaics (CPV): a case study

    Centro, S.

    2015-08-01

    Concentrated PhotoVoltaic (CPV), among green energy solutions, nowadays has the ambition to reach grid-parity without subside. CPV substitutes large areas of expensive semiconductor solar cells, with concentrating optics made of cheap materials. Moreover the cells that are suitable for CPV exhibits an unprecedented efficiency and their technology is progressing every year. A case study project, TwinFocus, will be presented in detail.

  8. Power and organisational change: a case study

    João Pedro Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    This thesis reports the results of a case study conducted in a Portuguese manufacturing organization, a part of a large group, which endured profound organizational changes. The initial objective of the research was to explore, in a processual way, the long-term interactions between an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system, the consultants that implemented it and management accounting and control, in this organization. However, during the fieldwork, the researcher was confronted with an a...

  9. Mobile phone surveys: the Slovenian case study

    Vehovar, Vasja; Belak, Eva; Batagelj, Zenel; Čikić, Sanja

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, the number of mobile phone subscriptions in Slovenia reached the total number of inhabitants. Consequently, the fixed telephone coverage has started to decline; almost 10% of households are now available only over the mobile phone. With this, Slovenia positions itself as a typical EU country and can serve as a case study for issues related to mobile phone interview surveys. The paper addresses the general context of mobile phone usage and the calculations of mobile phone coverage rat...

  10. Case studies of soil in art

    Feller, C.; Landa, E. R.; Toland, A.; Wessolek, G.

    2015-08-01

    The material and symbolic appropriations of soil in artworks are numerous and diverse, spanning many centuries and artistic traditions, from prehistoric painting and ceramics to early Renaissance works in Western literature, poetry, paintings, and sculpture, to recent developments in film, architecture, and contemporary art. Case studies focused on painting, installation, and film are presented with the view of encouraging further exploration of art about, in, and with soil as a contribution to raising soil awareness.

  11. Gamification in teaching music : case study

    Gomes, Cristina; Figueiredo, Mauro; Bidarra, José

    2014-01-01

    The study presented here aims to assess the quality of learning that occurred by the introduction of an educational application in the teaching/learning process of music education – 2nd cycle of basic education. The investigation focused on the use of a set of multimedia materials designed to provide support for instrumental practice (recorder and guitar) and backing vocals, according to the technique of the sing along. The students had access to the materials in two ways: in the first case, ...

  12. Marketing and clinical trials: a case study

    Entwistle Vikki A; Snowdon Claire; Garcia Jo; Knight Rosemary C; Shakur Haleema; Elbourne Diana R; Roberts Ian; Francis David; McDonald Alison M; Grant Adrian M; Campbell Marion K

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Publicly funded clinical trials require a substantial commitment of time and money. To ensure that sufficient numbers of patients are recruited it is essential that they address important questions in a rigorous manner and are managed well, adopting effective marketing strategies. Methods Using methods of analysis drawn from management studies, this paper presents a structured assessment framework or reference model, derived from a case analysis of the MRC's CRASH trial, o...

  13. Case Study on Inventory Management Improvement

    Plinere Darya; Borisov Arkady

    2015-01-01

    Inventory management is a challenging problem area in supply chain management. Companies need to have inventories in warehouses in order to fulfil customer demand, meanwhile these inventories have holding costs and this is frozen fund that can be lost. Therefore, the task of inventory management is to find the quantity of inventories that will fulfil the demand, avoiding overstocks. This paper presents a case study for the assembling company on inventory management. It is proposed to use inve...

  14. Customer Buying Behavior : Case Study: Algol Technics

    Weckman, Nina

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to research the customer buying behavior in a specific market. This thesis is made for a subgroup of Algol Technics which specializes in the marketing of driver seats. The research areas included brand recognition, price and quality, as well as the communications channels. The theoretical framework presented consists of the marketing strategies, marketing mix, Porter’s five forces analysis, customer relationship marketing, and market analysis. The case compan...

  15. Case Study for Holylight(HK)

    Ha, Kong Ho

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the case company Holylight (HK) was thoroughly studied. The company structure, business strategic management and Marketing mix (4ps) were analyzed using SWOT analysis. It was found that Holylight (HK) had huge poten-tial in the business its stable supplies from the United States of America, Europe and Australia; Alliance partnership company ensure the steady sales channel in potential market China that further development and expansion are highly feasible. However th...

  16. Estudio de diez aos sobre variedades de tumores de partida en pediatra Ten-year study on varieties of parotid tumors in pediatrics

    Caridad Verdecia Caizares

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Los tumores de partida en pediatra son infrecuentes, pues constituyen aproximadamente el 0,5 % de todos los cnceres. Se presentan, generalmente, como un aumento de volumen local y asintomtico, otras veces se acompaan de dolor y signos inflamatorios. Se realiz un estudio retrospectivo, longitudinal y descriptivo, para determinar la frecuencia y formas de presentacin de los tumores de partida diagnosticados en pacientes con edades comprendidas de 0 a 18 aos, que han sido ingresados en el servicio de oncociruga del Hospital "William Soler", entre febrero del ao 2001 y diciembre de 2010, teniendo en cuenta: sexo, las formas de presentacin, respuesta al tratamiento, as como las variantes histolgicas presentadas, con el objetivo de dar a conocer estas variantes de tumores de partida en pediatra, que, a pesar de ser infrecuentes, cuando se presentan constituyen un grupo de alto riesgo. Se diagnosticaron 7 pacientes, de los cuales 3 fueron adenomas pleomorfos, un adenocarcinoma, un carcinoma mucoepidermoide de la glndula, un linfoma de Hodgkin parotdeo y un tumor mixto con clulas atpicas de la glndula. El inicio de todos fue la presencia de una masa parotdea, en 6 de los casos asintomticos, y en un caso con dolor local. Se le realiz ultrasonido de la glndula y biopsia aspirativa con aguja fina a todos los pacientes. El sexo masculino predomin sobre el femenino en una proporcin 5 a 2, la edad media de presentacin fue 12,3 aos. La ciruga es el arma teraputica principal en la mayora de los casos. Se recomienda el seguimiento estrecho de los pacientes por el alto ndice de recurrencia local.Parotid tumors are uncommon because they account for 0.5 % of all types of cancer in pediatrics. They generally occur as increased local asymptomatic volume, occasionally accompanied by pain and inflammatory signs. A retrospective, longitudinal and descriptive study was carried out to determine the frequency and forms of presentation of parotid tumors diagnosed in 0-18 years-old patients, who had been admitted to the oncological surgery service of "William Soler" pediatric hospital from February 2001 to December 2010. The variables taken into account were sex, forms of presentation, response to treatment as well as the histological variants presented, with the objective of giving information about these variants of parotid tumors in pediatrics, which, despite their rareness, represent a high risk group when occur. Seven patients were diagnosed, of whom 3 were pleomorphic adenomas, one adenocarcinoma, one mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the gland, one parotid Hodgkin lymphoma and one mixed tumor with atypical cells of the gland. The onset of all the tumors was the presence of a parotid mass in 6 asymptomatic cases and in one case suffering local pain. They were all performed gland ultrasound and aspiration fine needle biopsy. Males prevailed over the females (ratio of 5:2 and the average age of presentation was 12.3 years. Surgery is the main therapeutic weapon in most of cases. It was recommended to closely follow the patients because of their high rate of local recurrence.

  17. The feasibility of daily, weekly and ten-day water-level forecasting in Colombia

    Efraín Antonio Domínguez Calle

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the feasibility of forecasting daily, weekly and ten-day water-levels at 20 hydrological stations forming part of the monitoring network supporting the Institute of Hydrology, Meteorology and Environmental Studies’ (IDEAM Alert Service in Colombia (www.ideam.gov.co. Such viability was determined by a set of orthogonal performance criteria and implementing optimally adaptive linear combinations (OALC was recommended for this study as a viable operator for configuring a real-time hydrological forecast system. It is shown that the forecast for daily, weekly and ten-day levels had satisfactory viability for 70% of the cases studied.

  18. Systemic Design: Two Canadian Case Studies

    Alex Ryan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces two novel applications of systemic design to facilitate a comparison of alternative methodologies that integrate systems thinking and design. In the first case study, systemic design helped the Procurement Department at the University of Toronto re-envision how public policy is implemented and how value is created in the broader university purchasing ecosystem. This resulted in an estimated $1.5 million in savings in the first year, and a rise in user retention rates from 40% to 99%. In the second case study, systemic design helped the clean energy and natural resources group within the Government of Alberta to design a more efficient and effective resource management system and shift the way that natural resource departments work together. This resulted in the formation of a standing systemic design team and contributed to the creation of an integrated resource management system. A comparative analysis of the two projects identifies a shared set of core principles for systemic design as well as areas of differentiation that reveal potential for learning across methodologies. Together, these case studies demonstrate the complementarity of systems thinking and design thinking, and show how they may be integrated to guide positive change within complex sociotechnical systems.

  19. Shuttle Transportation System Case-Study Development

    Ransom, Khadijah

    2012-01-01

    A case-study collection was developed for NASA's Space Shuttle Program. Using lessons learned and documented by NASA KSC engineers, analysts, and contractors, decades of information related to processing and launching the Space Shuttle was gathered into a single database. The goal was to provide educators with an alternative means to teach real-world engineering processes and to enhance critical thinking, decision making, and problem solving skills. Suggested formats were created to assist both external educators and internal NASA employees to develop and contribute their own case-study reports to share with other educators and students. Via group project, class discussion, or open-ended research format, students will be introduced to the unique decision making process related to Shuttle missions and development. Teaching notes, images, and related documents will be made accessible to the public for presentation of Space Shuttle reports. Lessons investigated included the engine cutoff (ECO) sensor anomaly which occurred during mission STS-114. Students will be presented with general mission infom1ation as well as an explanation of ECO sensors. The project will conclude with the design of a website that allows for distribution of information to the public as well as case-study report submissions from other educators online.

  20. Case study research designs: their place in chiropractic

    Waalen, Judith Kelly

    1992-01-01

    Case studies involve utilizing a distinct research approach. They are often confused with case reports, case series, cases used in rounds, and cases without control groups or baseline measures. The case study approach can provide a way to investigate broad chiropractic issues, policies, or practices in their real settings. Case study research designs are appropriate in both clinical and nonclinical settings. They require good conceptual skills not elaborate equipment; extensive “thinking” tim...

  1. Case studies in atomic collision physics

    McDaniel, E W

    2013-01-01

    Case Studies in Atomic Collision Physics II focuses on studies on the role of atomic collision processes in astrophysical plasmas, including ionic recombination, electron transport, and position scattering. The book first discusses three-body recombination of positive and negative ions, as well as introduction to ionic recombination, calculation of the recombination coefficient, ions recombining in their parent gas, and three-body recombination at moderate and high gas-densities. The manuscript also takes a look at precision measurements of electron transport coefficients and differential cr

  2. Corporate Valuation : A case study of Unibet

    Davidsson, Marcus; Bertilsson, Jonas

    2005-01-01

    Problem: The online betting industry has erased the importance of national borders and opened up the world, which has lead to a more diversified perspective of the company. In this master thesis we wanted to broaden and develop the topic of corporate valuation with regard to the on-line gambling industry. In order to do that, a case study of the on-line betting firm Unibet and its core betting activities has been carried out. Purpose: The study aims to identify factors in the strategic, SWOT ...

  3. Connecting Reading and Writing: A Case Study

    Zhanfang Li

    2015-01-01

    Connecting reading and writing, proposed by many scholars, is realized in this case study. The 30 participants in this study are the English majors of the third year in one School of Foreign Languages in Beijing. They are encouraged to write journals every week, based on the source text materials in their Intensive Reading class, with the final piece as a reflective journal of their mind work in writing. All their journals written during the first 12 weeks of the whole semester are analyzed q...

  4. Mycetoma in Iran: Study of 62 Cases

    S.J. Hashemi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This research presents a retrospective study of 62 cases of mycetoma in Iran that were diagnosed clinically and microbiologically from 1972 to 2005. In 1972 mycetoma has been first report in Iran by medical mycology department of Tehran University. We retrospectively compared the overall prevalence of mycetoma and the prevalence of infective agent in Iran during 33 years. In this study age, sex, job, infective agent and anatomical site of infection have been considered. Retrospective analysis of the records revealed that the ratio of actinomycetoma and eumycetoma was 42:20 that differed significantly (p < 0.01. Actinomadura madurae (n = 11 in actiomycetoma and Psudallescheria boydii (n = 9 in eumycetoma were predominant agents. The male to female ratio was 41:21 and the peak age for infection was between 40-50 years old but there is no a significant differences between age groups (p > 0.05 and the earliest age of onset was 18 and the latest 65.The single most common site of infection is foot but generally hand and other limbs can infected and 54.4% of infected area was in palm and disease can infected other area with less frequency. A total of 49 cases were pedal mycetoma and 13 cases were in extra pedal areas. The results show that farmers with 45.2% are at greater occupation risk of mycetoma (p < 0.01.

  5. The Ten Plagues of Egypt

    Roger S. Wotton

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The ten Plagues of Egypt described in the Bible were central to the liberation of the Jewish people from the oppression of the Egyptians. The succession of disasters demoralised the Egyptians and were seen as a victory for Jewish monotheistic beliefs. In this essay, natural explanations for most of the Plagues are proposed and a chronology of events is provided. Could the mythological explanation of these arguably natural phenomena still have a profound influence on the modern world?

  6. The Ten Plagues of Egypt

    Roger S. Wotton

    2007-01-01

    The ten Plagues of Egypt described in the Bible were central to the liberation of the Jewish people from the oppression of the Egyptians. The succession of disasters demoralised the Egyptians and were seen as a victory for Jewish monotheistic beliefs. In this essay, natural explanations for most of the Plagues are proposed and a chronology of events is provided. Could the mythological explanation of these arguably natural phenomena still have a profound influence on the modern world?

  7. The case study of biomaterials and biominerals

    Del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    The teaching of biomaterials as case study by on-line platform , susceptible to develop both individually and in groups, got different objectives proposed by the European Higher Education System, among which include: participate actively in the teaching-learning process by students, interpreting situations, adapt processes and solutions. It also improves oral and written communication, analytical skills and synthesis and also the ability to think critically. Biomaterials have their origin in biominerals. These are solid inorganic compounds of defined structure, consisting of molecular control mechanisms that operate in biological systems. Its main functions are: structural support, a reservoir of essential elements, sensors, mechanical protection and storage of toxic elements. Following the demand of materials compatible with certain functional systems of our body, developed biomaterials. Always meet the condition of biocompatibility. Should be tolerated by the body and do not provoke rejection. This involves a comprehensive study of physiological conditions and the anatomy of the body where a biomaterial has to be implemented. The possibility of generating new materials from biominerals has a major impact in medicine and other fields could reach as geology, construction, crystallography, etc. While the study of these issues is in its infancy today, can be viewed as an impact on the art and future technology. Planning case study that students would prepare its report for discussion in subgroups. Occurs then the pooling of individual analysis, joint case discussion and adoption by the subgroup of a consensual solution to the problem. The teacher as facilitator and coordinator of the final case analysis, sharing leads to group-wide class and said the unanimous decision reached by the students and gives his opinion on the resolution of the case. REFERENCES D.P. Ausubel. Psicología Educativa. Un punto de vista cognoscitivo. Trillas. Ed. 1983. E.W. Eisner. Procesos cognitivos y currículum. Una base para decidir lo que hay que enseñar. Martínez Roca Ed. 1987. C.O. Oriakhi. Polymer Nanocomposition Approach to Advanced Materials, Journal of Chemical Education. Vol. 77. 2000. 9-16. G. Lagaly & T. J. Pinnavaia.Clay Mineral-Polymer Nanocomposites, Applied Clay Science. Vol. 5. 1999. G. Gibbs. Changing lecturer's conceptions of teaching and learning through action research,. SRHE Press, 1995.

  8. Terahertz applications in cultural heritage: case studies

    Giovannacci, D.; Martos-Levif, D.; Walker, G. C.; Menu, M.; Detalle, V.

    2013-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy and imaging is a non-destructive, non-contact, non-invasive technology emerging as a tool for the analysis of cultural heritage. THz Time Domain Spectroscopy (TDS) techniques have the ability to retrieve information from different layers within a stratified sample, that enable the identification of hidden sub-layers in the case of paints and mural paintings. In this paper, we present the THz TDS2 system developed in the European Commission's 7th Framework Program project CHARISMA [grant agreement no. 228330]. Bespoke single processing algorithms; including a deconvolution algorithm can be deployed to increase the resolution and the global performance of the system. The potential and impact of this work is demonstrated through two case studies of mural paintings, where the capability to reveal the stratigraphy of the artworks is demonstrated.

  9. Case studies in using alternative sampling technologies

    Traditionally, site assessments for delineating petroleum hydrocarbon releases have been conducted in several phases. One way to improve the traditional assessment and remedial investigation methodology is to utilize alternative sampling techniques such as drive point sampling, combined with on-site field analytical methods. There are several drive point sampling technologies which have been used successfully in the past several years to collect both soil and groundwater samples. These drive point techniques include the Geoprobe trademark, Hydropunch trademark, Cone Penetrometer Testing (CPT) and KV trademark Sampling System. Utilized in combination with an on-site mobile laboratory equipped to conduct headspace analysis by EPA method 3810, these drive point sampling methods provide immediate, real-time data at a lower cost per data point. This paper presents three case studies in utilizing the Geoprobe trademark as an alternative sampling technology to gather both soil and groundwater data to delineate site contamination and provide for more informed, remedial solutions. In two of the cases (retail service stations), remediation by groundwater pump and treat had been on-going for several years with little remedial progress. The use of the alternative sampling technologies provided the needed information to expedite site clean-up. The remaining site is a petroleum refining facility where an active recovery system was planned. In this case, the data provided through the expedited assessment provided imperative design information

  10. Case Study of the California Cement Industry

    Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; WORRELL Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    California is the largest cement producing state in the U.S., accounting for between 10 percent and 15 percent of U.S. cement production and cement industry employment. The cement industry in California consists of 31 sites that consume large amounts of energy, annually: 1,600 GWh of electricity, 22 million therms of natural gas, 2.3 million tons of coal, 0.25 tons of coke, and smaller amounts of waste materials, including tires. The case study summarized in this paper focused on providi...

  11. Case study: Bioremediation in the Aleutian Islands

    This case study describes the design, construction, and operation of a bioremediation pile on Adak Island, which is located in the Aleutian Island chain. Approximately 1,900 m3 of petroleum-contaminated soil were placed in the bioremediation pile. The natural bioremediation process was enhanced by an oxygen and nutrient addition system to stimulate microbial activity. Despite the harsh weather on the island, after the first 6 months of operation, laboratory analyses of soil samples indicated a significant (80%) reduction in diesel concentrations

  12. Privacy Aware Engineering: A Case Study

    Xiaojun Ye

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Privacy is a complex social process that will persist in one form or another as a fundamental feature of software engineering. For successful privacy aware engineering, it is critical to guarantee the alignment and compliance among privacy artifacts emerging during software development process. In this paper, we propose a privacy compliance engineering flow in which we investigate the involved necessary privacy artifacts and discuss their alignment, refinement, and compliance verification. Within an exemplary case study, we identify the privacy artifacts introduced in the refinement process and analyze their compliance verification.

  13. Case study: Wireless Sensor Networks Technology

    Naveen Jain

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper present the history of research in sensor networks over the past decades, including two important programs of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA, and the Distributed Sensor Networks (DSN and the Sensor Information Technology (SensIT programs. Technology trends that impact the development of sensor networks are reviewed, and new applications such as infrastructure security, habitat monitoring. The paper concludes by presenting some recent case studies results in sensor network algorithms, including localized algorithms and directed diffusion, distributed tracking in wireless ad hoc networks, and distributed classification using local agents.

  14. Russian Media Educators: Case Studies Portraits

    Alexander Fedorov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to case studies of the media education works of some well knowns Russian media educators. The analysis of media educational work of the famous Russian media educators leads us to the conclusion that media education in Russia is developing, building on the synthesis of the aesthetic, socio-cultural, and practical concepts, with a focus on the development of media competence of the audience, mainly school and youth. The enthusiasts of media education, even devoid of substantial public support for its innovative projects, achieve significant and meaningful results.

  15. Case studies in Bayesian microbial risk assessments

    Turner Joanne

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quantification of uncertainty and variability is a key component of quantitative risk analysis. Recent advances in Bayesian statistics make it ideal for integrating multiple sources of information, of different types and quality, and providing a realistic estimate of the combined uncertainty in the final risk estimates. Methods We present two case studies related to foodborne microbial risks. In the first, we combine models to describe the sequence of events resulting in illness from consumption of milk contaminated with VTEC O157. We used Monte Carlo simulation to propagate uncertainty in some of the inputs to computer models describing the farm and pasteurisation process. Resulting simulated contamination levels were then assigned to consumption events from a dietary survey. Finally we accounted for uncertainty in the dose-response relationship and uncertainty due to limited incidence data to derive uncertainty about yearly incidences of illness in young children. Options for altering the risk were considered by running the model with different hypothetical policy-driven exposure scenarios. In the second case study we illustrate an efficient Bayesian sensitivity analysis for identifying the most important parameters of a complex computer code that simulated VTEC O157 prevalence within a managed dairy herd. This was carried out in 2 stages, first to screen out the unimportant inputs, then to perform a more detailed analysis on the remaining inputs. The method works by building a Bayesian statistical approximation to the computer code using a number of known code input/output pairs (training runs. Results We estimated that the expected total number of children aged 1.5-4.5 who become ill due to VTEC O157 in milk is 8.6 per year, with 95% uncertainty interval (0,11.5. The most extreme policy we considered was banning on-farm pasteurisation of milk, which reduced the estimate to 6.4 with 95% interval (0,11. In the second case study the effective number of inputs was reduced from 30 to 7 in the screening stage, and just 2 inputs were found to explain 82.8% of the output variance. A combined total of 500 runs of the computer code were used. Conclusion These case studies illustrate the use of Bayesian statistics to perform detailed uncertainty and sensitivity analyses, integrating multiple information sources in a way that is both rigorous and efficient.

  16. Recycling Proof Patterns in Coq: Case Studies

    Heras, Jónathan; Komendantskaya, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Development of Interactive Theorem Provers has led to the creation of big libraries and varied infrastructures for formal proofs. However, despite (or perhaps due to) their sophistication, the re-use of libraries by non-experts or across domains is a challenge. In this paper, we provide detailed case studies and evaluate the machine-learning tool ML4PG built to interactively data-mine the electronic libraries of proofs, and to provide user guidance on the basis of proof patterns found in the ...

  17. Wind to Hydrogen in California: Case Study

    Antonia, O.; Saur, G.

    2012-08-01

    This analysis presents a case study in California for a large scale, standalone wind electrolysis site. This is a techno-economic analysis of the 40,000 kg/day renewable production of hydrogen and subsequent delivery by truck to a fueling station in the Los Angeles area. This quantity of hydrogen represents about 1% vehicle market penetration for a city such as Los Angeles (assuming 0.62 kg/day/vehicle and 0.69 vehicles/person) [8]. A wind site near the Mojave Desert was selected for proximity to the LA area where hydrogen refueling stations are already built.

  18. GRØD: A marketing case study

    Nørager, Signe Lærke; Frimand-Meier, Benjamin; Laursen, Stine Vesterskov

    2013-01-01

    This project is a single in-depth case study of GRØD. Through interviews and theory it suggests how the branding strategy of GRØD must be to align with the vision of the company. Based hereon, a strategy of branding GRØD’s baby porridge is also sought to be found. The project concludes that the main point in GRØD’s vision is to generate a reinterpretation of porridge. However, this is not achieved to the intended extent, which is found to be caused by a missing definition of porridge from ...

  19. Environmental qualification - facilities and case studies

    The term environmental qualification is used for assurance or guarantee for satisfactory performance of hardware under specified environmental conditions including normal, abnormal and accident conditions. To generate confidence about satisfactory performance in reasonable time, hardware must be tested under accelerated conditions. For testing and measuring performance parameters, it is essential to have adequate facilities and experienced and inquisitive staff so that qualified and reliable hardware can be manufactured by active participation of manufacturers, users and researchers. Top priority is given to the determination of characteristics, capabilities and limitations of hardware before really starting accelerated testing so that maximum information can be extracted before failure of hardware. This paper describes test and measurement facilities set up at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre for environmental qualification and some case studies where it has been possible to make significant contributions towards reliability assessment, upgrading and indigenisation. Apart from climatic test facilities (thermal and humidity chambers), a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) environment simulator and synergistic simulator (combined environment test facility comprising temperature, humidity, gamma radiation and electrical stresses for studying interaction effects) have been set up. Notable case studies are :(1) Assessment of residual life-spans of cables and elastomeric components, (2) Reliability upgradation of indicating alarm meters and solenoid valves, (3) Assessment of survival capability of process instruments under LOCA environment, (4)Assessment of reusability of relays exposed to smoke and water spray in fire incident in a nuclear power station. (author)

  20. LEADERSHIP STYLE-A CASE STUDY

    Nitin B. Bhagwat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The leadership is an art of getting things done through others to achieve the target. It is a style to put efforts of all people towards organizational goals. All these can be possible to a foresighted leader who will be regarded as the leader in the present LPG era. We find an ideal case of Asha Jain, the Director of Gnat Foundry Pvt. Ltd. She is leading 300 employees with her unique leadership style. She brought her unit out of worldwide recession (2008-2011, when some foundry units were in loss and few units were closed. Further, she established another unit named Yashaswi Foods and Products Pvt. Ltd. in such a critical situation in 2009 and also succeeded in it. The exclusive feature of this unit is 40 imprisoned women laboures out of 160. She started this unit with purely social responsibility under which she has tried to empower the effluent womens. She started as a founder, a Rotary Club of Gargi, - a branch of Rotary Club in 2007. She is also a founder president of Jain International Women Organisation (2010. Aim of all this organization is to empower women socially, economically as well as educationally. Considering the uniqueness of her working at industrial and social level, the researchers have decided to study the leadership style of Asha Jain as a case study. This study will bring out the unique features of successful leader which will be regarded as roadmap to others.

  1. Enhancing the quality of case studies in health services research.

    Yin, R K

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide guidance on improving the quality of case studies in health services research. DATA SOURCES: Secondary data, drawing from previous case study research. RESEARCH DESIGN: Guidance is provided to two audiences: potential case study investigators (eight items) and reviewers of case study proposals (four additional items). PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The guidance demonstrates that many operational steps can be undertaken to improve the quality of case studies. These steps have been a...

  2. Ten questions on nuclear wastes

    The authors give explanations and answers to ten issues related to nuclear wastes: when a radioactive material becomes a waste, how radioactive wastes are classified and particularly nuclear wastes in France, what are the risks associated with radioactive wastes, whether the present management of radioactive wastes is well controlled in France, which wastes are raising actual problems and what are the solutions, whether amounts and radio-toxicity of wastes can be reduced, whether all long life radionuclides or part of them can be transmuted, whether geologic storage of final wastes is inescapable, whether radioactive material can be warehoused over long durations, and how the information on radioactive waste management is organised

  3. Radiochemical purity of ten radiopharmaceuticals

    Ten radiopharmaceuticals in frequent clinical use were examined for their radiochemical purity. Thin-layer chromatography, paper chromatography and electrophoresis were used. The activity of the separated components was measured in a gamma sample changer. The assumed chemical identity of the radiochemical impurities was evaluated by comparing the results with data described in the literature. For all radiopharmaceuticals tested, the radiochemical purity was found to be not lower than the value claimed by the manufacturer and to be in accordance with the requirements of the European Pharmacopoeia as far as those pharmaceuticals are listed therein. (orig.)

  4. Ten questions about systems biology

    Joyner, Michael J; Pedersen, Bente K

    In this paper we raise 'ten questions' broadly related to 'omics', the term systems biology, and why the new biology has failed to deliver major therapeutic advances for many common diseases, especially diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We argue that a fundamentally narrow and reductionist...... common diseases. Finally, we attempt to integrate our critique of reductionism into a broader social framework about so-called translational research in specific and the root causes of common diseases in general. Throughout we offer ideas and suggestions that might be incorporated into the current...

  5. Ten Thousand Years of Solitude?

    This report documents the authors work as an expert team advising the US Department of Energy on modes of inadvertent intrusion over the next 10,000 years into the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) nuclear waste repository. Credible types of potential future accidental intrusion into the WIPP are estimated as a basis for creating warning markers to prevent inadvertent intrusion. A six-step process is used to structure possible scenarios for such intrusion, and it is concluded that the probability of inadvertent intrusion into the WIPP repository over the next ten thousand years lies between one and twenty-five percent. 3 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Ten Thousand Years of Solitude

    Benford, G. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) California Univ., Irvine, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics); Kirkwood, C.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA). Coll. of Business Administration); Harry, O. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Pasqualetti, M.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (USA))

    1991-03-01

    This report documents the authors work as an expert team advising the US Department of Energy on modes of inadvertent intrusion over the next 10,000 years into the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) nuclear waste repository. Credible types of potential future accidental intrusion into the WIPP are estimated as a basis for creating warning markers to prevent inadvertent intrusion. A six-step process is used to structure possible scenarios for such intrusion, and it is concluded that the probability of inadvertent intrusion into the WIPP repository over the next ten thousand years lies between one and twenty-five percent. 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. A postural 'stressed' cerebral HMPAO case study

    Full text: This case study represents an example of the utility of postural hypoperfusion stressed HMPAO SPECT. An elderly woman of 78 with a long history of giddiness was referred to our laboratory for examination of possible cerebral ischaemia. She had recurrent dizzy episodes, sometimes posture related, over the past few years and had suffered several falls. Cerebral DSA revealed minimal disease. CT scans were reported as normal. Carotid duplex Doppler studies revealed bilateral plaque disease in the carotid bulbs extending to the origins of the ICAs which were not significant stenoses. Postural symptoms were induced by standing the patient up rapidly and HMPAO was administered at the same time. A SPECT scan of the brain was performed. Quantitative analysis showed a left to right decrease of 10.8% in the temporo-occipital area, 5.6% in the temporo-parietal area and 2.5% in the cerebellar and parietal areas. Images revealed moderately reduced tracer concentration in the left half of the cerebellum and the left occipital region extending as far forward as the temporo-parietal region A repeat HMPAO SPECT scan without stress was normal. This would appear to indicate reversible ischaemia in the left posterior region, and is consistent with the reported symptoms. This case illustrates the usefulness of HMPAO in the diagnosis of reversible cerebral ischaemia

  8. Combining genetic association study designs: a GWAS case study

    Estus, Janice L.; ,; Fardo, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) explore the relationship between genome variability and disease susceptibility with either population- or family-based data. Here, we have evaluated the utility of combining population- and family-based statistical association tests and have proposed a method for reducing the burden of multiple testing. Unrelated singleton and parent-offspring trio cases and controls from the Genetics of Kidneys in Diabetes (GoKinD) study were analyzed for genetic associ...

  9. Commercializing Emerging Renewable Energy: A Case Study

    Matti Lehtovaara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A broad scientific consensus exists that the global climate is changing. The Earths surface temperature could rise significantly over the next few decades, leading to us witnessing an entirely new and unknown planet. Improved energy efficiency, decreasing use of fossil fuels and wide diffusion of various renewable energy sources are among the focal measures to limit global warming to a sustainable level. The objective of this study is to analyse how renewable energy, such as wind power and bioenergy, could be efficiently commercialized. The evaluation is based on a case study and expert analyses exploiting lateral and parallel thinking methods, and group decision support systems tools. The results reveal that some of the generated ideas are ready for implementation to commercialize renewable energy, whereas others still require technical and commercial development and improvements before maturity.

  10. Social Architecture: An Emergency Management Case Study

    Asif Qumer Gill

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Emergency management agencies are progressively using social media for the sourcing and distribution of disaster information. Emergency management agencies are often unsure as to how to best identify and assess social media concerns (e.g. information security, trust which must be addressed to develop a social media-enabled disaster information management environment. This paper adopts the Social Architecture Viewpoint Assessment (SAVA framework for identifying and assessing social media concerns from four different viewpoints: IT, Value, Resource and Management. This paper demonstrates the use of the SAVA framework in the context of an in-depth empirical case study of an Australian emergency management agency. The results of this study indicate that the SAVA framework is useful for emergency information management managers in identifying and assessing social media concerns.

  11. The Effect of Using Case Studies in Business Statistics

    Pariseau, Susan E.; Kezim, Boualem

    2007-01-01

    The authors evaluated the effect on learning of using case studies in business statistics courses. The authors divided students into 3 groups: a control group, a group that completed 1 case study, and a group that completed 3 case studies. Results evidenced that, on average, students whom the authors required to complete a case analysis received…

  12. Observational studies: cohort and case-control studies.

    Song, Jae W; Chung, Kevin C

    2010-12-01

    Observational studies constitute an important category of study designs. To address some investigative questions in plastic surgery, randomized controlled trials are not always indicated or ethical to conduct. Instead, observational studies may be the next best method of addressing these types of questions. Well-designed observational studies have been shown to provide results similar to those of randomized controlled trials, challenging the belief that observational studies are second rate. Cohort studies and case-control studies are two primary types of observational studies that aid in evaluating associations between diseases and exposures. In this review article, the authors describe these study designs and methodologic issues, and provide examples from the plastic surgery literature. PMID:20697313

  13. Ten years of nuclear power

    Ten years have elapsed since the world's first nuclear power station began to supply electricity in Russia, and this in turn marked the end of a twelve year stage following the first controlled nuclear chain reaction at Chicago. These periods mark major stages in the development of atomic energy from the realm of abstract ideas to that of everyday industrial application. They followed a period of fundamental research and laboratory work, culminating in Enrico Fermi's demonstration of a system whereby the forces of the atom could be brought under control. Then it was necessary to find ways and means of using the chain reaction for practical purposes and on an industrial scale. And after this had been shown in 1954 to be technically possible, it had still to be developed into an economic process. The nuclear power station has proved itself from the technical and engineering standpoint. The third phase of development has been to bring it to the stage of being economically competitive with alternative sources of energy, and it would appear that we are now reaching that goal - though more slowly than had been envisaged ten years ago

  14. U-opportunities: why is ten equal to ten?

    Julia, B. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, ENS, 75 - Paris (France)

    2002-07-01

    It seems to me at this time that two recent developments may permit fast progress on our way to understand the symmetry structure of toroidally (compactified and) reduced M-theory. The first indication of a (possibly) thin spot in the wall that prevents us from deriving a priori the U-duality symmetries of these models is to be found in the analysis of the hyperbolic billiards that control the chaotic tune evolution of (quasi)homogeneous anisotropic String. Supergravity or Einstein cosmologies near a spacelike singularity. What happens is that U--duality symmetry controls chaos via negative constant curvature. On the other hand it was noticed in 1982 that (symmetrizable) 'hyperbolic' Kac-Moody algebras have maximal rank ten, exactly like superstring models and that two of these four rank ten algebras matched physical theories. My second reason for optimism actually predates also the previous breakthrough, it was the discovery in 1998 of surprising superalgebras extending U-dualities to all (p + 1)-forms (associated to p-branes). They have a super-nonlinear sigma model structure similar to the symmetric space structure associated to 0-forms and they obey a universal self-duality field equation. As the set of forms is doubled to implement electric-magnetic duality, they obey a set of first order equations. More remains to be discovered but the beauty and subtlety of the structure cannot be a random emergence from chaos. In fact we shall explain how a third maximal rank hyperbolic algebra BE{sub 10} controls heterotic cosmological chaos and how as predicted Einstein's General Relativity fits into the general picture. (authors)

  15. STAKEHOLDERS AND APART HOTELS: MULTIPLE CASE STUDY

    Patrícia Freire Ferreira Oliveira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Means of accommodation involve a wide range of social actors and agents, as well as different business models. Management strategies in this sector have been increasingly important for long-term sustainability and competitiveness of business organizations. This study aims to analyze the interactions between apart-hotels and their stakeholders to foster an improvement of services provided, aligning the interface of strategic management from the point of view of managers and their key stakeholders. It is an exploratory study, with qualitative chacter, along with multiple case studies of the following establishments: Travel Inn, Hotels Slaviero and Etoile george v. Brazilian enterprises, which manage lodging facilities with apart-hotel concepts, combining features that enable comparative analysis of the study. For conceptual understanding, this study was based on literature about stakeholders, taking the work of Freeman (1984 and Freeman et al (2010 as main references. The research was conducted through semi-structured interviews with managers of lodging facilities and their key stakeholders and through direct observation and documentation. We found that not all groups of influence are considered in the planning of service flats. However, the organizations surveyed indicated that the market has realized the importance of the groups that exert influence and are influenced by their goals, and are therefore increasingly alert for integration of such groups in their strategic planning.

  16. Building Energy Information Systems: User Case Studies

    Granderson, Jessica; Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish

    2010-03-22

    Measured energy performance data are essential to national efforts to improve building efficiency, as evidenced in recent benchmarking mandates, and in a growing body of work that indicates the value of permanent monitoring and energy information feedback. This paper presents case studies of energy information systems (EIS) at four enterprises and university campuses, focusing on the attained energy savings, and successes and challenges in technology use and integration. EIS are broadly defined as performance monitoring software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems to store, analyze and display building energy information. Case investigations showed that the most common energy savings and instances of waste concerned scheduling errors, measurement and verification, and inefficient operations. Data quality is critical to effective EIS use, and is most challenging at the subsystem or component level, and with non-electric energy sources. Sophisticated prediction algorithms may not be well understood but can be applied quite effectively, and sites with custom benchmark models or metrics are more likely to perform analyses external to the EIS. Finally, resources and staffing were identified as a universal challenge, indicating a need to identify additional models of EIS use that extend beyond exclusive in-house use, to analysis services.

  17. Building energy information systems. User case studies

    Granderson, J.; Piette, M.A.; Ghatikar, G. [Lawrence Berkeley, National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Measured energy performance data are essential to national efforts to improve building efficiency, as evidenced in recent benchmarking mandates, and in a growing body of work that indicates the value of permanent monitoring and energy information feedback. This paper presents case studies of energy information systems (EIS) at four enterprises and university campuses, focusing on the attained energy savings, and successes and challenges in technology use and integration. EIS are broadly defined as performance monitoring software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems to store, analyze, and display building energy information. Case investigations showed that the most common energy savings and instances of waste concerned scheduling errors, measurement and verification, and inefficient operations. Data quality is critical to effective EIS use, and is most challenging at the subsystem or component level, and with non-electric energy sources. Sophisticated prediction algorithms may not be well understood but can be applied quite effectively, and sites with custom benchmark models or metrics are more likely to perform analyses external to the EIS. Finally, resources and staffing were identified as a universal challenge, indicating a need to identify additional models of EIS use that extend beyond exclusive in-house use, to analysis services.

  18. Oral lichen planus: study of 21 cases

    Juliana Tristo, Werneck; Taiara de Oliveira, Costa; Christian Abreu, Stibich; Cristhiane Almeida, Leite; Eliane Pedra, Dias; Arley, Silva Junior.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract BACKGROUND: Lichen planus is considered to be the most common dermatological disease involving the oral mucosa. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the profile, clinical features, and the presence of dysplasia and candidiasis in patients with oral lichen planus. METHODS: A total of 21 patients were s [...] elected from 258 patients at risk for oral cancer development. RESULTS: Most of the patients were white (76,2%), female (66,6%), with mean age of 58.8 years. Eight were smokers and seven were alcohol consumers. The buccal mucosa was the most affected site, followed by the tongue and the gingiva. The reticular pattern was the most common appearance. Histopathology depicted dysplasia in nine cases and cytopathology was positive for Candida in eight cases in the first appointment. CONCLUSION: Our data are similar to the literature. Cytopathology was important for the diagnosis of candidiasis. Although the presence of dysplasia was verified, further studies are necessary to clarify the importance of this finding.

  19. Logistics opportunity costs: A mining case study

    Leani van Jaarsveld

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study highlighted the importance of determining the impact that an ineffective mode of transport has on a firm’s transportation model and costs. The main focus of this study was to determine the logistics opportunity costs of using road transport within a mining firm. A case study approach was followed, as the investigation aimed to analyse a complex problem experienced by one company and present it in an easily understandable format. From the results of this study, it was apparent that the logistics opportunity costs associated with the mode of transport was substantial. This highlighted the need for firms to revise their choice of transport mode on a regular basis, as it has a major impact not only on their transportation costs, but also on their inventory holding and carbon emissions. The results also have implications for South Africa’s only freight railway, Transnet Freight Rail, which should not only focus on expanding its existing capacity, but also on improving its customer service delivery whilst containing tariff increases.

  20. Case studies of attacks on communication networks

    Kang, Sin Bok; Han, Eon Suk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-15

    Recently, as the computer hardware and communications are developed, the data exchange through inter-networking has been highlighted and the data is being recognized as a great asset. Most of the organizations, businesses and enterprises are open to the external world-computer communication networks, attention must be focused on the securities of the information infrastructure. A government organization has been developing 'Circuits Analyzers', and 'Hacker-Tracking Program' and is struggling to track down sneakers. In this report, we analyze the contents of the cases where the communication network has been invaded, from the past up until now in Korea. This report also contains the result of a study on E-mail security, for the protection of KAERI Integrated Management Information System under which utilizes the CALS concepts and web services. (Author)

  1. Case study on industrial hazmat response teams.

    Stephens, Shelly J

    2009-11-01

    In 1991, Amway formed an industrial hazardous materials (hazmat) team in order to respond quickly and efficiently to potential chemical spills. The company's goals were, and still are today, to protect employees, the environment and the local community, and to reduce the amount of resulting downtime. In 1991, the hazmat team was very well funded, enabling it to become a discrete department with its own management staff and nearly 100 hazmat volunteers. Due to changes in the business climate, Amway reorganised in 2000/01, and the hazmat team became part of a company that incorporated contract work into its scope. When this reorganisation occurred, the hazmat team was thoroughly re-evaluated. Its response function was maintained, but was systematically reinvented in the most lean way practicable while still meeting corporate goals. This case study represents Amway's hazmat team's journey through the evaluation process and subsequent reorganisation. PMID:20378491

  2. Unraveling phonological conspiracies: A case study.

    Dinnsen, Daniel A; Gierut, Judith A; Morrisette, Michele L; Rose, Darcy E

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on three seemingly unrelated error patterns in the sound system of a child with a phonological delay, Child 218 (male, age 4 years 6 months) and ascribes those error patterns to a larger conspiracy to eliminate fricatives from the phonetic inventory. Employing Optimality Theory for its advantages in characterizing conspiracies, our analysis offers a unified account of the observed repairs. The contextual restrictions on those repairs are, moreover, attributed to early developmental prominence effects, which are independently manifested in another error pattern involving rhotic consonants. Comparisons are made with a published case study involving a different implementation of the same conspiracy, the intent being to disambiguate the force behind certain error patterns. The clinical implications of the account are also considered. PMID:25000372

  3. Robust control systems theory and case studies

    Mackenroth, Uwe

    2004-01-01

    "Robust Control Systems" gives a self-contained introduction to modern Control Theory. It thus adds a textbook to the existing research-oriented literature on Robust Control. The author lays emphasis on the modern aspects of the design of controllers with prescribed performance and robustness properties. Different to the classical engineering approach, a rigorous mathematical treatment is essential for the full understanding and applicability of the modern methods such as H2 or H8 control or methods based on the structured singular value µ. Nevertheless, no prior knowledge of Control Theory is required as the classical fundamentals are introduced within the first few chapters. Subsequently a large part of the text provides elementary examples and industrial case studies, which are developed in full detail to show how modern methods can be applied to advanced problems. They make intensive use of MATLAB, especially the Control Systems Toolbox and the µ-Analysis and Synthesis Toolbox.

  4. Case studies of attacks on communication networks

    Recently, as the computer hardware and communications are developed, the data exchange through inter-networking has been highlighted and the data is being recognized as a great asset. Most of the organizations, businesses and enterprises are open to the external world-computer communication networks, attention must be focused on the securities of the information infrastructure. A government organization has been developing 'Circuits Analyzers', and 'Hacker-Tracking Program' and is struggling to track down sneakers. In this report, we analyze the contents of the cases where the communication network has been invaded, from the past up until now in Korea. This report also contains the result of a study on E-mail security, for the protection of KAERI Integrated Management Information System under which utilizes the CALS concepts and web services. (Author)

  5. Telepractice for pediatric Dysphagia: a case study.

    Malandraki, Georgia A; Roth, Melissa; Sheppard, Justine Joan

    2014-01-01

    A closed-ended intensive pediatric swallowing telepractice program was developed and piloted in one pediatric patient with Opitz BBB/G and Asperger's Syndromes, oropharyngeal dysphagia and aerophagia. The present study is a case report. Outcome variables included behavioral, swallowing and quality of life variables, and were assessed at baseline and at the end of the four-week program. Selective variables were also assessed at a follow-up family interview four weeks post program completion. Over the four-week intervention period, the patient demonstrated substantial improvements in: oral acceptance of eating-related objects and a variety of foods (behavioral variable), timing of voluntary saliva swallows and aerophagia levels (swallowing variables) and quality of life. Follow-up interview analysis showed that most skills were retained or improved one-month post intervention. This intensive telepractice program proved to be feasible and effective for this pediatric patient with dysphagia. PMID:25945217

  6. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding: a case study.

    Woods, Christopher W; Woods, Amanda G; Cederholm, Carmen K

    2013-12-01

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB), formerly known as hemorrhagic disease of the newborn (HDN), is a bleeding disorder in neonates that is caused by inadequate serum levels of vitamin K. Vitamin K is a nutrient essential for adequate function of the coagulation cascade. Certain internal and external factors place newborn infants at higher risk for VKDB. Therefore, vitamin K prophylaxis has become the standard of care for newborns. Although the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the administration of vitamin K to newborns, some parents are choosing to withhold vitamin K administration at birth. This case study describes an infant who developed VKDB in the absence of vitamin K prophylaxis. Although parents ultimately have the right to choose whether or not to administer vitamin K, as healthcare professionals, it is important to provide education regarding the potential complications of withholding vitamin K and the signs of VKDB if vitamin K prophylaxis at birth is withheld. PMID:24300958

  7. Automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a case study.

    Spiro, Jon; Theodosiou, Maria; Doshi, Sagar

    2014-02-01

    Rates of survival after cardiac arrest are low and correlate with the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Devices that deliver automated CPR (A-CPR) can provide sustained and effective chest compressions, which are especially useful during patient transfer and while simultaneous invasive procedures are being performed. The use of such devices can also release members of resuscitation teams for other work. This article presents a case study involving a man with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock and pulmonary oedema. It describes how ED nursing and medical teams worked together to deliver A-CPR, discusses the use of A-CPR devices in a tertiary cardiac centre, and highlights the advantages of using such devices. PMID:24494769

  8. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in modulation of pain of tender points in syndrome fibromyalgia: case study

    Isabel Mara Magalhes Roriz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fibromyalgia is a syndrome of pain and chronic diffuse, characterized by the presence of at least 11 of 18 points called anatomically specific tender points, painful on palpation. As the pain diffuse the main symptom of fibromyalgia. The current treatment is focused mainly to the reduction of symptoms. Physiotherapy has an important role in improving the control of pain. This study aimed to verify the effectiveness of the main TENS of low frequency and high intensity in modulating pain of tender points of patients with fibromyalgia. For this was a case study of patient R. S. S., 38-year-old female carrier of the syndrome of fibromyalgia attended school in the clinic of the Faculty of Integrated Cear (FISIOFIC. The patient was treated with the TENS-pain Acupuncture points in a total of twelve care and pain assessed before starting treatment and after three attendants. There was a significant reduction in pain intensity at 77.7% of the tender points in the second evaluation and 88.8% of the points in the other assessments. It was concluded that there was a reduction in the pain of tender points of the patient showing the analgesia promoted by TENS, so it should be used as a complementary treatment programs associated with other treatments and also served as a good technique to locate the tender points

  9. CASE STUDY THE DIABET PROGRAME IN GIURGIU COUNTY

    MARIANA BÎRSA

    2011-01-01

    In the develop country of the world tuck place, before few tens years ago, the ephidemiological transition from the contagious deseases to the cronical deseases. Through this, the diabet is a huge challenge for the population direct affectedly and for theyr families, and also for the medical system, with all the social-economiques results. Type 2 is the most common form of diabetes, affecting 26.5 million adults — that is more than 95 percent of all diagnosed adult cases of diabetes. A furthe...

  10. L’utilisation du TENS en physiothérapie : la situation particulière des soins palliatifs oncologiques

    Laliberté, Maude

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Trans-cutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS is a treatment against pain that uses the application of an electric current. Some studies suggest that TENS would reduce the pain associated with certain types of cancer and this treatment is regularly used in therapy in contexts of interdisciplinary practice specializing in palliative oncology. However, the use of TENS in cancer cases is a matter of controversy, and its application is contraindicated by Canadian standards governing the practice of physiotherapy. This article aims to present, through a case study, some principles to guide decision making regarding the choice of this therapy in cases of cancer. Scientific evidence, standards of practice and ethical principles that should guide the choice of therapy are discussed. The use of TENS therapy in palliative care is a paradigmatic example of a common situation: the weighing by health care professionals of the benefits and potential costs, such as potential adverse effects of treatment. In the case of TENS, the benefits are associated with the reduction of pain, while a potential adverse effect would increase tumour proliferation. This difficult calculation has implications for the various stakeholders such as patients and health professionals.

  11. Ten questions about systems biology

    Joyner, Michael J; Pedersen, Bente K

    In this paper we raise 'ten questions' broadly related to 'omics', the term systems biology, and why the new biology has failed to deliver major therapeutic advances for many common diseases, especially diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We argue that a fundamentally narrow and reductionist...... understand how whole animals adapt to the real world. We argue that a lack of fluency in these concepts is a major stumbling block for what has been narrowly defined as 'systems biology' by some of its leading advocates. We also point out that it is a failure of regulation at multiple levels that causes many...... perspective about the contribution of genes and genetic variants to disease is a key reason 'omics' has failed to deliver the anticipated breakthroughs. We then point out the critical utility of key concepts from physiology like homeostasis, regulated systems and redundancy as major intellectual tools to...

  12. Ten years of progress in the Hokkaido birth cohort study on environment and children’s health: cohort profile—updated 2013

    Kishi, Reiko; Kobayashi, Sachiko; Ikeno, Tamiko; Araki, Atsuko; Miyashita, Chihiro; Itoh, Sachiko; Sasaki, Seiko; Okada, Emiko; Kobayashi, Sumitaka; Kashino, Ikuko; Itoh, Kumiko; Nakajima, Sonomi

    2013-01-01

    The Hokkaido Study on Environment and Children’s Health is an ongoing cohort study that began in 2002. The study consists of two prospective birth cohorts, the Sapporo cohort (n = 514) and the Hokkaido large-scale cohort (n = 20,940). The primary goals of this study are to first examine the potential negative effects of perinatal environmental chemical exposures on birth outcomes, including congenital malformations and growth retardation; second, to evaluate the development of allergies, infe...

  13. Landslide Economics: Concepts and Case Studies

    Klose, Martin; Damm, Bodo

    2015-04-01

    Landslide economics is vital for fundamental understanding of landslide risk as dealing with two important topics: (i) impact assessment, either as damage statistics or cost modeling, and (ii) vulnerability assessment, i.e., the study of exposure, sensitivity, and resilience to landslide damage, ideally from both sociotechnical and financial perspective (e.g., Crovelli and Coe, 2009; Wills et al., 2014). Many aspects addressed in landslide economics have direct influence on landslide risk, including: (i) human activity is often a major causative factor of landslides, not only by predisposing or triggering them, but also as a result of inadequate (low-cost) landslide mitigation; (ii) the level of tolerable or acceptable risk, a measure driving a large part of landslide costs in industrialized countries, is highly variable, differing between individuals, public or private organizations, and societies, with its nature being to change over time; and (iii) decision makers are faced with finding the right balance in landslide mitigation, thus need to weight diverse geological and socioeconomic factors that control its effectiveness in both technical and financial terms (e.g., Klose et al., 2014a). A large part of the complexity in assessing landslide risk as measured by economic costs is due to unique problems in understanding of (i) what types of landslide damage affect human activity and infrastructure in which way, (ii) how society contributes and responds to various kinds of damage, and (iii) how landslide damage is valued in monetary terms. Landslide economics shows the potential to take account of these sociocultural factors to the benefit of risk analysis (e.g., Klose et al., 2014b). The present contribution introduces local and regional case studies in which different economic issues of landslide risk are highlighted using the example of public infrastructures in NW Germany. A special focus is on the following topics: (i) risk culture and created risk, (ii) disaster financing and budgetary burdens, and (iii) economic risk balancing in urban planning. The results of the conducted case studies are discussed with regard to method development for integrated assessment of landslide risk. References Crovelli, R.A., Coe, J.A., 2009. Probabilistic estimation of numbers and costs of future landslides in the San Francisco Bay region. Georisk 3, 206-223. Klose, M., Highland, L., Damm, B., Terhorst, B., 2014a. Estimation of direct landslide costs in industrialized countries: challenges, concepts, and case study. In: Sassa, K., Canuti, P., Yin, Y. (Eds.), Landslide Science for a Safer Geoenvironment. Volume 2: Methods of Landslide Studies. Springer, Berlin, pp. 661-667. Klose, M., Damm, B., Terhorst, B., 2014b. Landslide cost modeling for transportation infrastructures: a methodological approach. Landslides, DOI 10.1007/s10346-014-0481-1. Wills, C., Perez, F., Branum, D., 2014. New Method for Estimating Landslide Losses from Major Winter Storms in California and Application to the ARkStorm Scenario. Natural Hazards Review, DOI 10.1061/(ASCE)NH.1527-6996.0000142.

  14. Anxiety and IBS revisited: ten years later

    Stefan-Lucian Popa; Dan Lucian Dumitrascu

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM:   Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been associated with high prevalence of psychological and psychiatric disorders. However, the association between IBS and each of its subtypes ( diarrhea IBS-D, constipation IBS-C, mixed IBS-M) with anxiety, still remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to perform a comparative analysis, of the association between anxiety and IBS on a period of ten years.METHODS: PubMed was searched for studies analyzing IBS and anxiety, publishe...

  15. Problem-based case study to enhance critical thinking in student nurses

    NM Mogale

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of traditional teaching methods, for example the lecture method, does not stimulate critical thinking in student nurses. This problem can be solved by the utilisation of problem-based case study in the classroom/clinical setting. The purpose of this study is to describe guidelines for the implementation of problem-based case study in a clinical setting among first year, comprehensive course students at the Northern Province College of Nursing: Sovenga campus. The research design of this study was qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual and was conducted in the following phases: Phase 1: The development and implementation of a program for problem-based case study in the clinical setting; Phase II: The experiences of student nurses who were exposed to problem-based case study in the clinical setting; Phase III: The perceptions of tutors regarding the implementation of problem-based case study in the clinical setting (focus group, and; ase IV: Guidelines for the implementation of problem-based case study. The data from Phases I, II and III were used to formulate guidelines for the implementation of problem-based case study. The sample group consisted of all 69 first year student nurses at the Northern Province College of Nursing: Sovenga campus and ten tutors teaching clinical courses at the same campus. The Tesch (1990 approach is used for data analysis. Nine guidelines for the implementation of a problem-based case study approach were formulated and recommendations for development of an instrument to measure critical thinking in nursing were recommended.

  16. Goal Attainment, Goal Striving, and Well-Being during the Transition to Adulthood: A Ten-Year U.S. National Longitudinal Study

    Messersmith, Emily E.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the relation between young adults' goal achievement, continued goal striving over time, and subsequent well-being. Analysis of a longitudinal subsample of a nationally representative U.S. study of 5,693 adolescents as they transition to adulthood revealed that individuals who met their goals had higher well-being, but that the…

  17. Case Study: Revising a Formal Case Study Presentation as an Independent Research Project

    Field, Patrick R.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the process of researching and revising a case study presentation on an individual who experienced anesthetic awareness during an abdominal surgery and eventually committed suicide. Topics addressed include the author's selection of an undergraduate student with a science and teaching background to work on the case…

  18. Case Study: The Mystery of the Seven Deaths--A Case Study in Cellular Respiration

    Gazdik, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    Cellular respiration, the central component of cellular metabolism, can be a difficult concept for many students to fully understand. In this interrupted, problem-based case study, students explore the purpose of cellular respiration as they play the role of medical examiner, analyzing autopsy evidence to determine the mysterious cause of death…

  19. Ten out of ten for LHC decapole magnets

    2001-01-01

    CERN's Albert Ijspeert (left) and Avinash Puntambekar of the Indian CAT laboratory with the ten Indian decapole magnets on the test bench. Tests will be carried out by the LHC-MTA group. A batch of 10 superconducting decapole magnets for the LHC has just arrived at CERN from India. These will be used to correct for slight imperfections in the dipole magnets that will steer proton beams around CERN's new accelerator. All magnets have slight imperfections in the fields they produce, and in the LHC dipoles these will be corrected for using sextupoles and decapoles. The sextupoles were the first LHC magnets to be given the production green-light following successful tests of pre-series magnets last year (Bulletin 21/2000, 22 May 2000). Now it is the turn of pre-series decapoles to go on trial at CERN. Of the LHC's 1232 dipole magnets, half will use sextupole correctors only and the other half will use both sextupoles and decapoles. That means that a total of 616 pairs of decapoles are needed. Like the sextupole...

  20. Case Study #2: Intrapersonal Approaches to Conflict: Cognitive & Perceptual Biases

    Erbe, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    This is the second case study in the series Holding These Truths: Empowerment and Recognition in Action. This series presents case studies for a future conflict resolution textbook. It has been successfully piloted with several international classes. Those, who benefit most, stress the importance of carefully studying the introduction. (See Introduction to Conflict Case Studies, Nancy D. Erbe). Because the case study format is intentionally unique, written in an interactive and non-linear wor...

  1. Case Study #4: Empathy: Effective Response with Escalating Aggression

    Erbe, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    This is the fourth case study in the series Holding These Truths: Empowerment and Recognition in Action. This series presents case studies for a future conflict resolution textbook. It has been successfully piloted with several international classes. Those, who benefit most, stress the importance of carefully studying the introduction. (See Introduction to Conflict Case Studies, Nancy D. Erbe). Because the case study format is intentionally unique, written in an interactive and non-linear wor...

  2. Case Study #5: Assessing Covert Bad Faith & Power Abuse

    Erbe, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    This is the fifth case study in the series Holding These Truths: Empowerment and Recognition in Action. This series presents case studies for a future conflict resolution textbook. It has been successfully piloted with several international classes. Those, who benefit most, stress the importance of carefully studying the introduction. (See Introduction to Conflict Case Studies, Nancy D. Erbe). Because the case study format is intentionally unique, written in an interactive and non-linear work...

  3. Groundwater study by using radioisotope tracer - some case studies

    This study is to investigate the groundwater behaviour by using radioisotope tracer. The main objectives of the study are to determine the groundwater flowrate and its direction. The equipment that we used in this study are rheometer and direction monitoring system - MINT water spy. In this study, the single well method is used to determine the groundwater velocity and direction. The method involved the injection of radioisotope tracer into the borehole and monitor its concentration over a certain period of time. Radioactive isotopes artificially injected at a well-define point of the system under investigation. Groundwater movement studies have been performed for example in Paya Terubong (Penang), Klian Intan (Perak), and Taman Makmur (Negeri Sembilan). The application of these techniques have shown that in many cases they not only confirm the results obtained by classical hydrological methods but as an alternative they provide more information and immediate answers to some hydrological problems. (Author)

  4. Go with the flow: A case study

    Moran, J.A. [Alfred Hospital, Prahran, VIC (Australia)

    1998-03-01

    Full text: A 55-year-old female presented to the Alfred Emergency Department semi-conscious with frank rectal bleeding requiring blood volume replacement. Labelled red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy was requested in order to locate the site of bleeding. In vitro labelling of 3 mL of patient``s blood was performed (PYP as a diluted tinning agent and 1 GBq of freshly eluted {sup 99}mTc) and suspended red cells were injected. Using a GE Starcam system with high resolution collimation, images were acquired for 30 seconds (2 s per frame) and thereafter continuously for 1. 5 hours (30 s per frame). During imaging, patient history became available revealing portal hypertension, oesophageal and anal varices due to myelofibrosis and previous cholecystectomy. Initial flow images showed bizarre abdominal collateral vessels. Accumulation of labelled RBC over 1.5 hours in the right upper quadrant indicated the hepatic flexure as the site of bleeding. The initial flow study showing major porto-systemic collateral vessels indicated that therapeutic embolisation via angiography would be life threatening. The patient underwent emergency hemicolectomy and has been bleed-free to date. In this case, delayed RBC scintigraphy accurately located the haemorrhage site. However, the initial flow study demonstrating major vessel collateral flow was crucial in contraindicating angiographic embolisation. Surgery was then the only therapeutic option.

  5. Antineutrino reactor safeguards - a case study

    Christensen, Eric; Jaffke, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Antineutrinos have been proposed as a means of reactor safeguards for more than 30 years and there has been impressive experimental progress in neutrino detection. In this paper we conduct, for the first time, a case study of the application of antineutrino safeguards to a real-world scenario - the North Korean nuclear crisis in 1994. We derive detection limits to a partial or full core discharge in 1989 based on actual IAEA safeguards access and find that two independent methods would have yielded positive evidence for a second core with very high confidence. To generalize our results, we provide detailed estimates for the sensitivity to the plutonium content of various types of reactors, including most types of plutonium production reactors, based on detailed reactor simulations. A key finding of this study is that a wide class of reactors with a thermal power of less than 0.1-1 GWth can be safeguarded achieving IAEA goals for quantitative sensitivity and timeliness with detectors right outside the reactor ...

  6. Odontoma: a retrospective study of 73 cases

    An, Seo Young; An, Chang Hyeon; Choi, Karp Shik [School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical findings and treatment results for impacted permanent teeth associated with odontomas. We retrospectively investigated 73 odontomas in 72 patients who visited Kyungpook National University Dental Hospital from April 2004 through November 2011. The study was performed using medical records, panoramic radiographs, and pathological reports. Data gathered included age, gender, location, chief complaints, effects on dentition, and treatment of odontoma and the impacted tooth associated with odontoma. Most compound odontomas (46.7%) were found in the second decade and complex odontomas were not related to age. Odontomas showed no gender predilection. Fifty-five cases (75.3%) of odontomas were detected on routine dental radiographs. Sixty percent of compound odontomas occurred in the canine area and 57.1% of complex odontomas in the molar areas. Impaction of permanent teeth (61.6%) was the most common complication on the adjacent teeth. Most odontomas (84.9%) were removed surgically and impacted permanent teeth were managed by surgical removal (53.2%), orthodontic treatment (25.5%), or surgical repositioning (6.4%). There was a statistically significant relation between age and preservation of the impacted permanent teeth associated with odontomas (p<0.01). Early detection and treatment of odontomas increase the possibility of preservation of the impacted tooth. Therefore, it would be suggested that periodic panoramic examination during the first and second decade of life might be beneficial for the early detection and better prognosis of odontomas.

  7. Odontoma: a retrospective study of 73 cases

    The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical findings and treatment results for impacted permanent teeth associated with odontomas. We retrospectively investigated 73 odontomas in 72 patients who visited Kyungpook National University Dental Hospital from April 2004 through November 2011. The study was performed using medical records, panoramic radiographs, and pathological reports. Data gathered included age, gender, location, chief complaints, effects on dentition, and treatment of odontoma and the impacted tooth associated with odontoma. Most compound odontomas (46.7%) were found in the second decade and complex odontomas were not related to age. Odontomas showed no gender predilection. Fifty-five cases (75.3%) of odontomas were detected on routine dental radiographs. Sixty percent of compound odontomas occurred in the canine area and 57.1% of complex odontomas in the molar areas. Impaction of permanent teeth (61.6%) was the most common complication on the adjacent teeth. Most odontomas (84.9%) were removed surgically and impacted permanent teeth were managed by surgical removal (53.2%), orthodontic treatment (25.5%), or surgical repositioning (6.4%). There was a statistically significant relation between age and preservation of the impacted permanent teeth associated with odontomas (p<0.01). Early detection and treatment of odontomas increase the possibility of preservation of the impacted tooth. Therefore, it would be suggested that periodic panoramic examination during the first and second decade of life might be beneficial for the early detection and better prognosis of odontomas.

  8. Environmental noise exposure, early biological risk and mental health in nine to ten year old children: a cross-sectional field study

    Stansfeld Stephen A; Clark Charlotte; Crombie Rosanna

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous research suggests that children born prematurely or with a low birth weight are more vulnerable to the mental health effects of ambient neighbourhood noise; predominantly road and rail noise, at home. This study used data from the Road Traffic and Aircraft Noise Exposure and Children's Cognition and Health (RANCH) study to see if this finding extends to aircraft and road traffic noise at school. Methods Children and their parents from schools around three European...

  9. Suicide attempts and related factors in patients admitted to a general hospital: a ten-year cross-sectional study (1997-2007)

    Lantes-Louzao Sara; Martnez-Sande Gonzalo; Garca-Fernndez Jorge; Iglesias-Gil-de-Bernab Fernando; Gmez-Pardias Sonia M; Pita-Fernndez Salvador; Alberdi-Sudupe Jess; Prtega-Daz Sonia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Suicide and suicide attempts represent a severe problem for public health services. The aim of this study is to determine the socio-demographic and psychopathological variables associated with suicide attempts in the population admitted to a General Hospital. Methods An observational-descriptive study of patients admitted to the A Corua University Hospital (Spain) during the period 1997-2007, assessed by the Consultation and Liaison Psychiatric Unit. We include n = 5,234 ...

  10. An Elementary Leadership Challenge: A Case Study

    Thomas G. RYAN; Christine Duncan

    2011-01-01

    This case involves an incident of physical aggression that occurred between two students at an elementary level. It typifies the complexity, multidimensionality, and tension involved in school based leadership. A principal in this case made a unilateral decision, instead of considering viable alternatives, thereby deciding on a course of action that would adequately address the tensions between many inherent competing values. The clear bias of this case combined with a deliberate provoca...

  11. Deficiencies of effectiveness of intervention studies in veterinary medicine: a cross-sectional survey of ten leading veterinary and medical journals

    Meursinge Reynders, Reint

    2016-01-01

    The validity of studies that assess the effectiveness of an intervention (EoI) depends on variables such as the type of study design, the quality of their methodology, and the participants enrolled. Five leading veterinary journals and 5 leading human medical journals were hand-searched for EoI studies for the year 2013. We assessed (1) the prevalence of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) among EoI studies, (2) the type of participants enrolled, and (3) the methodological quality of the selected studies. Of 1707 eligible articles, 590 were EoI articles and 435 RCTs. Random allocation to the intervention was performed in 52% (114/219; 95%CI:45.258.8%) of veterinary EoI articles, against 87% (321/371; 82.589.7%) of human EoI articles (adjusted OR:9.2; 3.424.8). Veterinary RCTs were smaller (median: 26 animals versus 465 humans) and less likely to enroll real patients, compared with human RCTs (OR:331; 452441). Only 2% of the veterinary RCTs, versus 77% of the human RCTs, reported power calculations, primary outcomes, random sequence generation, allocation concealment and estimation methods. Currently, internal and external validity of veterinary EoI studies is limited compared to human medical ones. To address these issues, veterinary interventional research needs to improve its methodology, increase the number of published RCTs and enroll real clinical patients.

  12. Goal Attainment, Goal Striving, and Well-Being During the Transition to Adulthood: A Ten-Year U.S. National Longitudinal Study

    Messersmith, Emily E.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the relation between young adults’ goal achievement, continued goal striving over time, and subsequent well-being. Analysis of a longitudinal subsample of a nationally representative U.S. study of 5,693 adolescents as they transition to adulthood revealed that individuals who met their goals had higher well-being, but that the relation between goal completion and well-being varied by goal content. Continued goal striving was related to well-being and maintained domain-spec...

  13. Ten-year prediction of osteoporosis from baseline bone mineral density: development of prognostic thresholds in healthy postmenopausal women. The Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Rejnmark, Lars; Nielsen, Stig Pors; Rud, Bo; Nissen, Nis; Mosekilde, Leif; Bärenholdt, Olaf; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck

    2006-01-01

    . We analyzed dual energy X-ray absorptometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN) from 872 women, who participated in the non-HRT arms of the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study and had remained on no HRT, bisphosphonates or raloxifene since inclusion 10 years ago. We defined...

  14. DFT studies of the hydrated carbohydrate, glucose: optimization and DFTMD simulations of ten explicit waters superimposed with an implicit solvation method, COSMO

    One of the most important and least understood properties of carbohydrates is their conformational profile in solution. The study of carbohydrates in solution is a most difficult computational problem, a result of the many soft conformational variables (hydroxyl groups) inherent in the structures of...

  15. Neurofibromatosis in pregnancy: study of 2 cases

    Khushboo Jain

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The report presents two cases of neurofibromatosis (NF and illustrates how women with NF have increased complications associated with pregnancy. With these case reports, we wanted to describe the diagnostic possibilities, management of pregnancies and dilemmas in everyday clinical practice of a gynaecologist. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(2.000: 483-485

  16. Case Study: Camptocormia, a Rare Conversion Disorder.

    Rajmohan, Velayudhan; Thomas, Biju; Sreekumar, Kumaran

    2004-01-01

    Camptocormia is a condition characterized by severe frontal flexion of the spinal cord and knees, with passive drooping of both arms. It occurs as a form of conversion disorder. Some cases are associated with behavioral problems. A case of camptocormia of 2-year duration in a south Indian adolescent girl with oppositional defiant disorder and…

  17. Guidelines for Conducting Positivist Case Study Research in Information Systems

    Graeme Shanks

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The case study research approach is widely used in a number of different ways within the information systems community. This paper focuses on positivist, deductive case study research in information systems. It provides clear definitions of important concepts in positivist case study research and illustrates these with an example research study. A critical analysis of the conduct and outcomes of two recently published positivist case studies is reported. One is a multiple case study that validated concepts in a framework for viewpoint development in requirements definition. The other is a single case study that examined the role of social enablers in enterprise resource planning systems implementation. A number of guidelines for successfully undertaking positivist case study research are identified including developing a clear understanding of key concepts and assumptions within the positivist paradigm; providing clear and unambiguous definitions of the units and interactions when using any theory; carefully defining the boundary of the theory used in the case study; using hypotheses rather than propositions in the empirical testing of theory; using fuzzy or probabilistic propositions in recognising that reality can never be perfectly known; selecting case studies carefully, particularly single case studies; and recognising that generalisation from positivist, single case studies is inherently different from generalisation from single experiments. When properly undertaken, positivist, deductive case study research is a valuable research approach for information systems researchers, particularly when used within pluralist research programs that use a number of different research approaches from different paradigms.

  18. New case study guidelines: a call to arms for practitioners.

    McDowall, A.; Short, E.

    2012-01-01

    This article outlines our new journal guidelines for case studies to encourage practice-based submissions. We first outline how case studies have similarities with and may differ from case studies in psychology and Human Resource Management research. This leads us to propose 10 succinct guidelines for writing up case study submissions, covering formatting in terms of length and referencing, the need to cover both process and outcome(s) and as well as ethical ramifications and declarations of ...

  19. Effect of rearing media on the susceptibility of Tribolium casteneum (Herbst) to gamma radiation : Studies with insects reared on the same medium for ten generations

    Studies on the radiation susceptibility of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) reared on the medium upto 10th generation revealed that the order of relative susceptibility of T. castaneum for different food media was Bengal gram >barley>maize>wheat>jowar. However, LD50 values to radiation for insects bred on Bengal gram, barley and maize for 10 generations were found to be considerably higher than those obtained with insects reared on the same medium for one generation only. (author)

  20. A Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray: X-ray Sources in Ten Star Forming Regions

    Kuhn, Michael A.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Broos, Patrick S.; Townsley, Leisa K; Feigelson, Eric D.

    2013-01-01

    The Massive Young star-forming complex Study in Infrared and X-ray (MYStIX) uses data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory to identify and characterize the young stellar populations in twenty Galactic (d 10,000 X-ray sources is presented. In comparison to other published Chandra source lists for the same regions, the number of MYStIX detected...

  1. Environmental noise exposure, early biological risk and mental health in nine to ten year old children: a cross-sectional field study

    Stansfeld Stephen A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research suggests that children born prematurely or with a low birth weight are more vulnerable to the mental health effects of ambient neighbourhood noise; predominantly road and rail noise, at home. This study used data from the Road Traffic and Aircraft Noise Exposure and Children's Cognition and Health (RANCH study to see if this finding extends to aircraft and road traffic noise at school. Methods Children and their parents from schools around three European airports were selected to represent a range of aircraft and road traffic noise exposure levels. Birth weight and gestation period were merged to create a dichotomous variable assessing 'early biological risk'. Mental health was assessed using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ. Complete data were available for 1900 primary school children. Results Children who were 'at risk' (i.e. low birth weight or premature birth were rated as having more conduct problems and emotional symptoms and poorer overall mental health than children not at risk. However, there was no interaction between aircraft or road traffic noise exposure at school and early biological risk. Conclusions Data from the RANCH study suggests that children with early biological risk are not more vulnerable to the effects of aircraft or road traffic noise at school on mental health than children without this risk; however they are more likely to have mental ill-health.

  2. Pipeline corridors through wetlands - summary of seventeen plant-community studies at ten wetland crossings. Topical report, February 1990--August 1994

    Van Dyke, G.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Trinity Christian College, Palos Heights, IL (United States); Shem, L.M.; Wilkey, P.L.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Alsum, S.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-12-01

    As part of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program, Argonne National Laboratory conducted field studies on 10 wetland crossings located in six states to document impacts of natural gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROWS) on 15 wetland plant communities. This study is unique in the number, range, ages, and variety of wetland crossings surveyed and compared. Vegetation data and recorded observations were analyzed to reveal patterns associated with age, installation technology, maintenance practices, and wetland type. This report summarizes the findings of this study. Results revealed that ROWs of pipelines installed according to recent wetland regulations rapidly revegetated with dense and diverse plant communities. The ROW plant communities were similar to those in the adjacent natural areas in species richness, wetland indicator values, and percentages of native species. The ROW plant communities developed from naturally available propagules without fertilization, liming, or artificial seeding. ROWs contributed to increased habitat and plant species diversity in the wetland. There was little evidence that they degrade the wetland by providing avenues for the spread of invasive and normative plant species. Most impacts are temporal in nature, decreasing rapidly during the first several years and more slowly thereafter to the extent permitted by maintenance and other ROW activities.

  3. Environmental injustice: case studies from the South

    Cifuentes, Enrique; Frumkin, Howard

    2007-10-01

    We selected three case studies to illustrate environmental injustice issues in the South. These examples relate to migrant agricultural workers, the maquiladora industry and artisanal mining, while reviewing some of the major mechanisms involved, e.g. multinational corporations, the development of free trade zones, multilateral free trade agreements and the export of hazards. A series of strategies are discussed in order to address environmental injustice and health disparities that exist on a global scale. Some of the recommendations involve policy initiatives; others, such as research and mentorship, fall within the traditional domain of public health practice. In this paper, special attention is given to concerned environmental and occupational health professionals using evidence-based data for advocacy. For lasting changes to be made, however, stronger institutions and legislation are required. Those who have the 'right to know' about environmental injustice issues include communities of concern, workers' representatives and lawyers. Government officials and company officials may eventually work on the basis of conflict resolution, compensation and remediation, to quote some examples. Systematic approaches to protect both the environment and public health must be updated.

  4. Jazz improvisers’ shared understanding: A case study

    MichaelF.Schober

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To what extent and in what arenas do collaborating musicians need to understand what they are doing in the same way? Two experienced jazz musicians who had never previously played together played three improvisations on a jazz standard (“It Could Happen to You” on either side of a visual barrier. They were then immediately interviewed separately about the performances, their musical intentions, and their judgments of their partner’s musical intentions, both from memory and prompted with the audiorecordings of the performances. Statements from both (audiorecorded interviews as well as statements from an expert listener were extracted and anonymized. Two months later, the performers listened to the recordings and rated the extent to which they endorsed each statement. Performers endorsed statements they themselves had generated more often than statements by their performing partner and the expert listener; their overall level of agreement with each other was greater than chance but moderate to low, with disagreements about the quality of one of the performances and about who was responsible for it. The quality of the performances combined with the disparities in agreement suggest that, at least in this case study, fully shared understanding of what happened is not essential for successful improvisation. The fact that the performers endorsed an expert listener’s statements more than their partner’s argues against a simple notion that performers’ interpretations are always privileged relative to an outsider’s.

  5. DEINDUSTRIALIZATION AND UNDERDEVELOPMENT. CASE STUDY: VALEA JIULUI

    Mihnea PREOTESI

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is based on the preliminary results of the research project "Deindustrialization and under-development in the Romanian Transition. Individual/Collective Strategies and Reply Policies. Case study: Valea Jiului", that will be done within the POSDRU project "Plural and interdisciplinary in doctoral and post-doctoral programs". This paper intends to analyze the complex relation between economic development, social development and modernization. The basic hypothesis of the proposed analysis is that the economic development is not an irreversible process not even when it leads to social development as part of a modernizing program. Valea Jiului represents an example of how the economic and social development built on weak basis, become unsustainable. The collapse of this weak basis initiated after 1989 when the economy and the society changed and after a transition period produced a major negative social impact started with the restructuring of the mining. In less than 10 months, the number of the miners was reduced to half and the reduction continued. Today in Valea Jiului is only 15 % of the number of employees in 1989. The social effects of the mining restructuring were at communitarian level the underdevelopment, return to pre-modern occupations like the subsistence agriculture. A good example that will be deeply analyzed in this paper is the town Aninoasa, the first Romanian town in insolvency since 2013.

  6. High Penetration Photovoltaic Case Study Report

    Bank, J.; Mather, B.; Keller, J.; Coddington, M.

    2013-01-01

    Technical concerns with integrating higher penetrations of photovoltaic (PV) systems include grid stability, voltage regulation, power quality (voltage rise, sags, flicker, and frequency fluctuations), and protection and coordination. The current utility grid was designed to accommodate power flows from the central generation source to the transmission system and eventually to the distribution feeders. At the distribution level, the system was designed to carry power from the substation toward the load. Renewable distributed generation, particularly solar PV, provides power at the distribution level challenging this classical paradigm. As these resources become more commonplace the nature of the distribution network and its operation is changing to handle power flow in both directions. This report is focused on large PV installations in which penetration is significantly greater than 15% of maximum daytime feeder load. These case studies are intended to demonstrate success stories with integration of large PV plants at the distribution level as well as some of the solutions used by the utility to ensure safe, reliable operation of both the PV system and the distribution network.

  7. Hybrid Risk Management Methodology: A Case Study

    Jacky Siu-Lun Ting

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Risk management is a decision-making process involving considerations of political, social, economic and engineering factors with relevant risk assessments relating to a potential hazard. In the last decade, a number of risk management tools are introduced and employed to manage and minimize the uncertainty and threats realization to the organizations. However, the focus of these methodologies are different; in which companies need to adopt various risk management principles to visualize a full picture of the organizational risk level. Regarding to this, this paper presents a new approach of risk management that integrates Hierarchical Holographic Modeling (HHM, Enterprise Risk Management (ERM and Business Recovery Planning (BCP for identifying and assessing risks as well as managing the consequences of realized residual risks. To illustrate the procedures of the proposed methodology, a logistic company ABC Limited is chosen to serve as a case study Through applying HHM and ERM to investigate and assess the risk, ABC Limited can be better evaluated the potential risks and then took the responsive actions (e.g. BCP to handle the risks and crisis in near future.

  8. Refugee Problem in Europe – Case Studies

    Esztella Varga

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The European refugee problem has grown dramatically in the last few months, putting a considerable amount of pressure on the European countries. Not only are they facing migrants from North Africa, but from the Middle East as well.In March 2011 the Arab Spring has reached Syria, causing a huge number of Syrians to flee their country and seek asylum in Turkey, and possibly going further to the EU. The refugees who fled Syria as well as those who are leaving North Africa (mostly the failed state of Libya are aiming to reach European soil, but Italy, Greece or Turkey is not ready to handle the amount of refugees. The cooperation of the Mediterranean countries and Europe has not been able to slow down the flow of refugees, and the Mediterranean and Aegean seas have become dangerous routes for the desperate migrants who attempt the sea-crossing. In my analysis I would like to highlight the role of the so-called elements of ‘soft power’ in the way of dealing with the refugee problem. According to my hypothesis, the issue can’t be successfully addressed using only the means of the ‘soft power’. No real solution for the crisis has been offered yet, and I would like to give case studies of the different ways of dealing with the problem – inside (Greece, Italy and outside (Turkey of the European Union.

  9. Environmental injustice: case studies from the South

    We selected three case studies to illustrate environmental injustice issues in the South. These examples relate to migrant agricultural workers, the maquiladora industry and artisanal mining, while reviewing some of the major mechanisms involved, e.g. multinational corporations, the development of free trade zones, multilateral free trade agreements and the export of hazards. A series of strategies are discussed in order to address environmental injustice and health disparities that exist on a global scale. Some of the recommendations involve policy initiatives; others, such as research and mentorship, fall within the traditional domain of public health practice. In this paper, special attention is given to concerned environmental and occupational health professionals using evidence-based data for advocacy. For lasting changes to be made, however, stronger institutions and legislation are required. Those who have the 'right to know' about environmental injustice issues include communities of concern, workers' representatives and lawyers. Government officials and company officials may eventually work on the basis of conflict resolution, compensation and remediation, to quote some examples. Systematic approaches to protect both the environment and public health must be updated

  10. VINCRISTINE INDUCED NEUROTOXICITY: STUDY OF 75 CASES

    M.T. Arzanian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveConcern for side-effects of therapy related to treatment of childhood malignancies is becoming an increasingly important topic. In this study, we evaluated extent of vincristine (VCR induced neurotoxicity in a group of children who underwent chemotherapy, with VCR being part of the regimen.Materials & MethodsIn this investigation, for 75 children (54% boys, 46% girls, aged between 1 to 14 (mean 6.5±4.3 years, serial weekly neurological examinations were performed; of the 75, 70 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 5 Wilm's tumor. All patients were on a chemotherapy protocol of at least 4 consecutive VCR (1.5mg/m2 injections.ResultsDecreased deep tendons reflexes were seen in the Achilles reflex in 78%, and the patellar reflex in 53% of patients. Muscle weakness was found in 70% of patients, being mild in 76% of them. Four  percent of patients showed severe weakness. Petosis, jaw pain, hoarseness, abdominal pain and constipation were seen in 15%, 6%, 12%, 12% and 12% respectively. Paresthesia was observed in 32 of 52 patients, over 4 years old. No cases of foot drop, urinary retention or facial nerve palsy were seen in this patient group.ConclusionChildren on usual doses of vincristine regimen may have neuropathic side effects but most of these side effects are mild and not troublesome.Key words: Vincristine, neuropathy, neurotoxicity, side effect

  11. Case studies: Redevelopment of former industrial sites

    This paper presents the case studies of the redevelopment of two sites: Herr's Island, located in the Allegheny River in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and the Union Pacific Resources Company's site located near the Port of Long Beach in Wilmington, California. The common goal in cleaning up both sites is the transformation of environmentally unsound property into flourishing residential and commercial use. Herr's Island site has included a petroleum refinery, an asphalt plant, pipe mills, a meat packing plant, and a transformer dismantling facility. A small portion of the island was investigated as part of a Phase 2 audit. The investigation identified contamination in the southern portion of the island with maximum polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in soils at 40 and 200 parts per million (ppm), respectively. The Union Pacific Resources Company (UPRC) site, located in Wilmington, California, is situated within a 600-acre oil field production area. A phased remedial investigation (RI) of the site was initiated in 1991 pursuant to a consent agreement between UPRC and the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC). The RI identified the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds, chlorinated pesticides, PAHs, PCBs and metals at various concentrations throughout the soils. VOCs and metals were also detected in the groundwater. In particular, arsenic, benzene, vinyl chloride, and mercury were encountered at concentration levels at, or slightly above, drinking water standards in a few samples

  12. Jazz improvisers' shared understanding: a case study.

    Schober, Michael F; Spiro, Neta

    2014-01-01

    To what extent and in what arenas do collaborating musicians need to understand what they are doing in the same way? Two experienced jazz musicians who had never previously played together played three improvisations on a jazz standard ("It Could Happen to You") on either side of a visual barrier. They were then immediately interviewed separately about the performances, their musical intentions, and their judgments of their partner's musical intentions, both from memory and prompted with the audiorecordings of the performances. Statements from both (audiorecorded) interviews as well as statements from an expert listener were extracted and anonymized. Two months later, the performers listened to the recordings and rated the extent to which they endorsed each statement. Performers endorsed statements they themselves had generated more often than statements by their performing partner and the expert listener; their overall level of agreement with each other was greater than chance but moderate to low, with disagreements about the quality of one of the performances and about who was responsible for it. The quality of the performances combined with the disparities in agreement suggest that, at least in this case study, fully shared understanding of what happened is not essential for successful improvisation. The fact that the performers endorsed an expert listener's statements more than their partner's argues against a simple notion that performers' interpretations are always privileged relative to an outsider's. PMID:25152740

  13. Comparative economic analysis: Anaerobic digester case study

    An economic guide is developed to assess the value of anaerobic digesters used on dairy farms. Two varieties of anaerobic digesters, a conventional mixed-tank mesophilic and an innovative earthen psychrophilic, are comparatively evaluated using a cost-effectiveness index. The two case study examples are also evaluated using three other investment merit statistics: simple payback period, net present value, and internal rate of return. Life-cycle savings are estimated for both varieties, with sensitivities considered for investment risk. The conclusion is that an earthen psychrophilic digester can have a significant economic advantage over a mixed-tank mesophilic digester because of lower capital cost and reduced operation and maintenance expenses. Because of this economic advantage, additional projects are being conducted in North Carolina to increase the rate of biogas utilization. The initial step includes using biogas for milk cooling at the dairy farm where the existing psychrophilic digester is located. Further, a new project is being initiated for electricity production with thermal reclaim at a swine operation

  14. Bayesian inference in physics: case studies

    This report describes the Bayesian approach to probability theory with emphasis on the application to the evaluation of experimental data. A brief summary of Bayesian principles is given, with a discussion of concepts, terminology and pitfalls. The step from Bayesian principles to data processing involves major numerical efforts. We address the presently employed procedures of numerical integration, which are mainly based on the Monte Carlo method. The case studies include examples from electron spectroscopies, plasma physics, ion beam analysis and mass spectrometry. Bayesian solutions to the ubiquitous problem of spectrum restoration are presented and advantages and limitations are discussed. Parameter estimation within the Bayesian framework is shown to allow for the incorporation of expert knowledge which in turn allows the treatment of under-determined problems which are inaccessible by the traditional maximum likelihood method. A unique and extremely valuable feature of Bayesian theory is the model comparison option. Bayesian model comparison rests on Ockham's razor which limits the complexity of a model to the amount necessary to explain the data without fitting noise. Finally we deal with the treatment of inconsistent data. They arise frequently in experimental work either from incorrect estimation of the errors associated with a measurement or alternatively from distortions of the measurement signal by some unrecognized spurious source. Bayesian data analysis sometimes meets with spectacular success. However, the approach cannot do wonders, but it does result in optimal robust inferences on the basis of all available and explicitly declared information

  15. Engaged Learning and Change through Undergraduate Research: A Case Study of the Heart of Gold Community Empowerment Project

    David William Robinson; J. Laureen Styles; Nichola Evernden; Kassandra Kirkham

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to describe a best-practice undergraduate research-involved case study of the Heart of Gold Rural Community Empowerment Project (HG) that has demonstrated significant gains in social and economic capital over the last ten years. The HG is an international community-university research alliance between the Farm and Agro-tourism Association of Los Santos (FAALS) cooperative in Costa Rica and Vancouver Island University (VIU) in Canada that uses cooperative inquiry met...

  16. The usability of green building rating systems in hot arid climates: A case study in Siwa, Egypt

    Attia, Shady; Dabaieh, Marwa

    2013-01-01

    In the last ten years there has been a proliferation of regional building rating systems across the Middle East (ME). Most those emerging rating systems and labels emulate the British and American rating systems BREEAM and LEED that emerged in industrial countries context with an impact reduction paradigm. Thus they are neglecting the local historic, climatic, economic, technological, cultural and social context of the ME. This paper presents a case study of a recently constructed eco-lodge,...

  17. The student experience of Foundation Degrees: a case study of a cohort in a Foundation Degree in Educational Administration

    Thelwell, Helen Wendy

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is the result of a qualitative case study of a group of ten part-time, mature, non-traditional learners enrolled on a Foundation Degree. The thesis identifies how students think, communicate with one another and manage the learning processes. It explores the attitudes of students who are a new type of cohort entering Higher Education. The thesis commences by identifying entry barriers to Higher Education and how these were overcome. Despite earlier failures, stud...

  18. Ten challenges to transform Taxonomy

    Wheeler, Q. D.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomy is at a crossroads. Although taxonomy has an impressive past, having documented and organized knowledge of nearly two million species, most of the basic work required to describe Earth’s biodiversity remains undone. Factors that guide the choices of research topics in science are considered. Ten challenges are presented to the taxonomic community that we believe will accelerate its revitalization.

    La Taxonomía se encuentra en una encrucijada. Con un admirable pasado que ha permitido documentar y organizar un inmenso conocimiento sobre casi dos millones de especies, sin embargo, la tarea básica de describir la Biodiversidad sobre la Tierra está por hacer. Se examinan los factores que guían la elección de líneas de investigación en la ciencia y se propone a la comunidad taxonómica, diez retos que consideramos acelerarán su revitalización.

  19. Business and Legal Case Genre Networks: Two Case Studies

    Uhrig, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The framework of genre systems (Bazerman, 1994; Bhatia, 2004; Swales, 2004) offers an opportunity to illuminate the ways in which students enculturate into their disciplinary cultures (Berkenkotter & Huckin, 1995). To explore the ways in which genre chains are constructed through engagement in specific tasks, this study investigates two

  20. Case Study Research in Software Engineering Guidelines and Examples

    Runeson, Per; Rainer, Austen; Regnell, Bjorn

    2012-01-01

    Based on their own experiences of in-depth case studies of software projects in international corporations, in this book the authors present detailed practical guidelines on the preparation, conduct, design and reporting of case studies of software engineering.  This is the first software engineering specific book on the case study research method.

  1. A ten-year follow-up of a study of memory for the attack of September 11, 2001: Flashbulb memories and memories for flashbulb events.

    Hirst, William; Phelps, Elizabeth A; Meksin, Robert; Vaidya, Chandan J; Johnson, Marcia K; Mitchell, Karen J; Buckner, Randy L; Budson, Andrew E; Gabrieli, John D E; Lustig, Cindy; Mather, Mara; Ochsner, Kevin N; Schacter, Daniel; Simons, Jon S; Lyle, Keith B; Cuc, Alexandru F; Olsson, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Within a week of the attack of September 11, 2001, a consortium of researchers from across the United States distributed a survey asking about the circumstances in which respondents learned of the attack (their flashbulb memories) and the facts about the attack itself (their event memories). Follow-up surveys were distributed 11, 25, and 119 months after the attack. The study, therefore, examines retention of flashbulb memories and event memories at a substantially longer retention interval than any previous study using a test-retest methodology, allowing for the study of such memories over the long term. There was rapid forgetting of both flashbulb and event memories within the first year, but the forgetting curves leveled off after that, not significantly changing even after a 10-year delay. Despite the initial rapid forgetting, confidence remained high throughout the 10-year period. Five putative factors affecting flashbulb memory consistency and event memory accuracy were examined: (a) attention to media, (b) the amount of discussion, (c) residency, (d) personal loss and/or inconvenience, and (e) emotional intensity. After 10 years, none of these factors predicted flashbulb memory consistency; media attention and ensuing conversation predicted event memory accuracy. Inconsistent flashbulb memories were more likely to be repeated rather than corrected over the 10-year period; inaccurate event memories, however, were more likely to be corrected. The findings suggest that even traumatic memories and those implicated in a community's collective identity may be inconsistent over time and these inconsistencies can persist without the corrective force of external influences. PMID:25751741

  2. Urban street networks: a comparative analysis of ten European cities

    Strano, Emanuele; Cardillo, Alessio; Costa, Luciano Da Fontoura; Porta, Sergio; Latora, Vito

    2012-01-01

    We compare the structural properties of the street networks of ten different European cities using their primal representation. We investigate the properties of the geometry of the networks and a set of centrality measures highlighting differences and similarities among cases. In particular, we found that cities share structural similarities due to their quasi planarity but that there are also several distinctive geometrical proprieties. A Principal Component Analysis is also performed on the distributions of centralities and their respective moments, which is used to find distinctive characteristics by which we can classify cities into families. We believe that, beyond the improvement of the empirical knowledge on streets network proprieties, our findings can open new perspectives in the scientific relation between city planning and complex networks, stimulating the debate on the effectiveness of the set of knowledge that statistical physics can contribute for city planning and urban morphology studies.

  3. Mobile and Social: Ten Best Practices for Designing Mobile Applications

    Liviu LICA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives ten best practices for designing mobile applications that have social-networking functions. The need for such an approach is given by the rapid growth in impor-tance of both social networks and mobile applications. In order to make it easy to follow where the best practices come from, the paper starts with a look at why social networks are more than just a buzz word and at how the field of mobile applications is evolving. It also shows how and why the two fields go together so well. To further make the point, there is a case study of four interesting mobile applications that are textbooks examples of successful applications. The best practices are based on research done for this article and on the extensive knowledge of the author.

  4. Bilingual education in Slovakia: A Case Study

    Silvia Pokrivčáková

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bilingual education is one of the areas in contemporary education that brings out some important controversies (philosophical, conceptual, sociological, political, economical, etc. and thus calls for extensive and intensive debate. Bilingual education in Europe (and here the European Union countries are meant has gained a very different status, due to the general European policy of developing language diversity and promoting “European plurilingualism and multilingualism”. In Slovakia, one of the younger members of the EU, bilingual education became an extraordinarily popular instrument for the fulfilment of this task.  Since the specifically defined topic of bilingual education and its current status in Slovakia has not been studied and systematically reviewed yet, the research presented in this paper was designed as a single-phenomenon revelatory case study investigating seven research areas: reflection of bilingual education in school legislation and state pedagogical documents, purposes of bilingual education in Slovakia, its organization (levels and types of schools, foreign languages incorporated, teachers, structure of bilingual schools curricula, types of bilingual education applied at Slovak bilingual schools, and how bilingual education is both reflected in and saturated by the latest research findings. The conclusions presented in the paper were collected from multiple sources: state curriculum, statistical data published by the Slovak Ministry of Education or its partner institutions, international treaties on establishing and supporting bilingual sections of schools, bilingual schools curricula, interviews with school directors, teachers, and learners, direct observations at bilingual schools, research studies and research reports, etc. In the conclusion, bilingual education in Slovakia is identified as a unique, dynamically developing system which is both significantly shaped by the foreign language education policy promoted by the European Council (1995 as well as bears some specific characteristics, determined by its unique historical, political, and socio-cultural contexts. The paper includes partial results of the research project KEGA 036UKF-4/2013 Creating university textbooks and multimedia courses for a new study program funded by the Ministry of Education of the Slovak Republic.

  5. What Superintendents Should Do to Position Their Districts to be Prepared for the Changing Nature of Technology in the Next Ten Years: A Delphi Study

    Ainsworth, Ean

    Over the past twenty years, schools and districts have been faced with the challenge of integrating technology into their classroom instruction. The rapid rate of evolution that technology changes has placed new burdens on school and district leaders to plan meaningful professional development, create and develop effective policy, and focus on school and district culture. In the coming years, the changing nature of technology is not expected to slow down and most certainly will accelerate. The purpose of this Delphi study was to identify what K-12 superintendents should do to position their districts to be prepared for the changing nature of technology in the next 10 years. The expert panel for this study was comprised of K-12 superintendents from eight Northern California counties. This Delphi study consisted of three rounds. In Round 1, the expert panel identified 74 strategies that superintendents should do to position their districts to be prepared for the changing nature of technology in the next 10 years. Those items were thematically categorized and where then narrowed down into a list of 30 strategies in preparation for Round 2. During Round 2, the expert panel rated the 30 strategies on the level of influence it would have on preparing districts for the changing nature of technology in the next 10 years using a 6-point Likert scale. In Round 3, each panel member was given the mean rating for each item as well as their own ratings for each item. Each panel member was then given the opportunity to change their ratings to the Round 2 survey. The expert panel identified four strategies which had the highest combined mean and median scores as well as an interquartile range of less than two. Each of the strategies from Round 2 and 3 had a mean score of four or higher. However, consensus was reached on four strategies which were rated with the highest combined mean and median scores. The four highest rated strategies were represented by three categories: culture, professional development, and investment in infrastructure.

  6. Does involvement in food preparation track from adolescence to young adulthood and is it associated with better dietary quality? Findings from a ten-year longitudinal study

    Larson, Nicole I.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Story, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether involvement in food preparation tracks over time, between adolescence (15–18 years), emerging adulthood (19–23 years), and the mid-to-late twenties (24–28 years), as well as examine 10-year longitudinal associations between home food preparation, dietary quality and meal patterning. Design Population-based, longitudinal cohort study. Setting Participants were originally sampled from Minnesota public secondary schools (USA). Subjects Participants enrolled in Project EAT (Eating Among Teens)-I, EAT-II, and EAT-III (n=1,321). Results Most participants in their mid-to-late twenties reported an enjoyment of cooking (73% of males, 80% of females); however, few prepared meals including vegetables most days of the week (24% males, 41% females). Participants in their mid-to-late twenties who enjoyed cooking were more likely to have engaged in food preparation as adolescents and emerging adults (p<0.01); those who frequently prepared meals including vegetables were more likely to have engaged in food preparation as emerging adults (p<0.001), but not adolescents. Emerging adult food preparation predicted better dietary quality five years later in the mid-to-late twenties, including higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, dark green/orange vegetables, and less sugar sweetened beverage and fast food consumption. Associations between adolescent food preparation and later dietary quality yielded few significant results. Conclusions Food preparation behaviors appeared to track over time, and engagement in food preparation during emerging adulthood, but not adolescence, was associated with healthier dietary intake during the mid-to-late twenties. Intervention studies are needed to understand whether promoting healthy food preparation results in improvements in eating patterns during the transition to adulthood. PMID:22124458

  7. Suicide attempts and related factors in patients admitted to a general hospital: a ten-year cross-sectional study (1997-2007

    Lantes-Louzao Sara

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide and suicide attempts represent a severe problem for public health services. The aim of this study is to determine the socio-demographic and psychopathological variables associated with suicide attempts in the population admitted to a General Hospital. Methods An observational-descriptive study of patients admitted to the A Corua University Hospital (Spain during the period 1997-2007, assessed by the Consultation and Liaison Psychiatric Unit. We include n = 5,234 admissions from 4,509 patients. Among these admissions, n = 361 (6.9% were subsequent to a suicide attempt. Admissions arising from a suicide attempt were compared with admissions occurring due to other reasons. Multivariate generalised estimating equation logistic regression models were used to examine factors associated with suicide attempts. Results Adjusting by age, gender, educational level, cohabitation status, being employed or unemployed, the psychiatric diagnosis at the time of the interview and the information on previous suicide attempts, we found that the variables associated with the risk of a suicide attempt were: age, psychiatric diagnosis and previous suicide attempts. The risk of suicide attempts decreases with age (OR = 0.969. Psychiatric diagnosis was associated with a higher risk of suicide attempts, with the highest risk being found for Mood or Affective Disorders (OR = 7.49, followed by Personality Disorders (OR = 7.31, and Schizophrenia and Other Psychotic Disorders (OR = 5.03. The strongest single predictive factor for suicide attempts was a prior history of attempts (OR = 23.63. Conclusions Age, psychopathological diagnosis and previous suicide attempts are determinants of suicide attempts.

  8. Jane: A Case Study in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Willingham, Barbara

    1988-01-01

    The article reports the case history of a 15-year-old Australian girl with anorexia nervosa. Information is also given on prevalence, causes, definitions, and treatments including hospitalization, co-therapy, psychotherapy, behavior modification, family therapy, and counseling. (DB)

  9. Structured Controversy: A Case Study Strategy.

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    1996-01-01

    Introduces a dynamic form of the case instruction method that involves debate and compromise. Discusses two versions of structured controversy and presents an example of structured controversy that involves the use of DNA fingerprinting in forensic medicine. (JRH)

  10. Herb-Induced Liver Injury in the Berlin Case-Control Surveillance Study.

    Douros, Antonios; Bronder, Elisabeth; Andersohn, Frank; Klimpel, Andreas; Kreutz, Reinhold; Garbe, Edeltraut; Bolbrinker, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    Herb-induced liver injury (HILI) has recently attracted attention due to increasing reports of hepatotoxicity associated with use of phytotherapeutics. Here, we present data on HILI from the Berlin Case-Control Surveillance Study. The study was initiated in 2000 to investigate the serious toxicity of drugs including herbal medicines. Potential cases of liver injury were ascertained in more than 180 Departments of all 51 Berlin hospitals from October 2002 to December 2011. Drug or herb intake was assessed through a standardized face-to-face interview. Drug or herbal aetiology was assessed based on the updated Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences scale. In ten of all 198 cases of hepatotoxicity included in the study, herbal aetiology was assessed as probable (once ayurvedic herb) or possible (Valeriana five times, Mentha piperita once, Pelargonium sidoides once, Hypericum perforatum once, Eucalyptus globulus once). Mean age was 56.4 ± 9.7 years, and the predominant pattern of liver injury was hepatocellular. No cases of acute liver failure or death were observed. This case series corroborates known risks for ayurvedic herbs, supports the suspected association between Valeriana use and liver injury, and indicates a hepatotoxic potential for herbs such as Pelargonium sidoides, Hypericum perforatum or Mentha piperita that were rarely associated with liver injury before. However, given that possible causality does not prove clinical significance, further studies in this field are needed. PMID:26784183

  11. Phytochemical analysis, biological evaluation and micromorphological study of Stachys alopecuros (L.) Benth. subsp. divulsa (Ten.) Grande endemic to central Apennines, Italy.

    Venditti, Alessandro; Bianco, Armandodoriano; Nicoletti, Marcello; Quassinti, Luana; Bramucci, Massimo; Lupidi, Giulio; Vitali, Luca Agostino; Petrelli, Dezemona; Papa, Fabrizio; Vittori, Sauro; Lucarini, Domenico; Maleci Bini, Laura; Giuliani, Claudia; Maggi, Filippo

    2013-10-01

    Stachys alopecuros subsp. divulsa (Lamiaceae), a perennial herb endemic to central Italy growing on mountain pastures, was investigated for the first time for the content of secondary metabolites, for the micromorphology and histochemistry of glandular trichomes, and for the biological activity of the volatile oil, namely cytotoxic, antioxidant and antimicrobial. The plant showed the molecular pattern of iridoids, among which a new iridoid diglycoside (4'-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-teuhircoside) was detected, together with a sterol glucoside and a phenylethanoid glycoside. The essential oil from the flowering aerial parts was characterized by a high proportion of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (65.1%), with (E)-caryophyllene (33.2%) as the most abundant, while other main components were germacrene D (7.6%), α-humulene (6.4%) and the oxygenated cis-sesquisabinene hydrate (10.2%). Taken together, polar and apolar chemical profiles support the classification of the species within the section Betonica of the genus Stachys. Micromorphological study revealed three types of glandular hairs secreting different classes of compounds, with type A peltate hairs producing the bulk of the essential oil. MTT assay revealed the potential of the volatile oil in inhibiting A375, HCT116 and MDA-MB 231 tumor cells (IC₅₀ values below 20 μg/ml). PMID:23827382

  12. Lung Involvement in Multiple Myeloma - Case Study

    NIŢU, MIMI; CRIȘAN, EMILIA; Olteanu, M.; CĂLĂRAŞU, CRISTINA; Olteanu, Mădălina; POPESCU, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Mutiple mieloma (MM) cells are rarely found in extramedullary sites. The sites of extramedullary dissemination reported in the literature are spleen, liver, lymph nodes, kidneys, thyroid gland, adrenal gland, ovary, tests, lung, pleura, pericardium, intestinal tract and skin. We report a case in which the myeloma was diagnosed after we discovered the presence of monoclonal plasma cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL). Matherial and method: a case in which diagnosis was...

  13. Delusional parasitosis--study of 3 cases.

    Hanumantha K; Pradhan P; Suvarna B

    1994-01-01

    Delusional disorder-somatic (parasitosis) type is a rare psychiatric disorder which poses a challenge to diagnostic and therapeutic skills. Pimozide, a highly specific dopamine blocker has shown promising results in the 3 cases illustrated here. These cases were seen over a period of 3 years. All the three patients believed that an insect has entered through the ear and is burrowing tracts/laying multiple eggs. They approached the ENT surgeons or neurosurgeon with a fear that their brain will...

  14. TIMWE : Born Global Firm : case study

    Marques, Frederico José Castro Reis

    2013-01-01

    TIMWE is the Portuguese based company chosen to illustrate and serve as background to support the creation of a teaching case in Strategy, exploring the internationalization of a real company and the challenges undertaken by the process of being a born global firm, followed by a Teaching Note that can be used as a tool to help solving the case. TIMWE is a Portuguese owned company, founded in 2002, that offers mobile monetization solutions and services (entertainment, marketing and money) t...

  15. Case study spontaneous otoliquorrhea in adult

    Rossi, Amanda Costa; Bertoncello, Juliana Martins de Araujo Cardoso; Scachetti, Luiz Carlos; Schäffer, Carolina; Catanoce, Aguinaldo Pereira; Marone, Silvio Antonio Monteiro

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The spontaneous otological CSF leaks are rare entities. Usually they manifest themselves in children with meningitis and deep sensorineural hearing loss and in adults with middle otitis and effusion clinical picture. Objective: To describe the clinical picture, diagnosis and surgical treatment of a patient with CSF otological. Case Report: A female sex patient, 57 years old, with hearing loss, aural fullness and right ear tinnitus case history 10 years ago. After insertion of ty...

  16. Cases for the Net Generation: An Empirical Examination of Students' Attitude toward Multimedia Case Studies

    Sheppard, Michael; Vibert, Conor

    2016-01-01

    Case studies have been an important tool in business, legal, and medical education for generations of students. Traditional text-based cases tend to be self-contained and structured in such a way as to teach a particular concept. The multimedia cases introduced in this study feature unscripted web-hosted video interviews with business owners and…

  17. Real or Illusory? Case Studies on the Public Perception of Environmental Health Risks in the North West of England

    Richard Jarvis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Applied research in a public health setting seeks to provide professionals with insights and knowledge into complex environmental issues to guide actions that reduce inequalities and improve health. We describe ten environmental case studies that explore the public perception of health risk. We employed logical analysis of components of each case study and comparative information to generate new evidence. The findings highlight how concerns about environmental issues measurably affect peoples wellbeing and led to the development of new understanding about the benefits of taking an earlier and more inclusive approach to risk communication that can now be tested further.

  18. Case Study on social software in distributed working environments

    Kieslinger, Barbara; Hofer, Margit; Cao, Yiwei; Ehms, Karsten; Fiedler, Sebastian; Kairamo, Anna-Kaarina; Klamma, Ralf; Krause, Beate; Kravcik, Milos; Ryypp, Tommi; Spaniol, Marc; Stumme, Gerd; Wild, Fridolin

    2007-01-01

    This document outlines four different case studies on the use of Social Software in distributed working environments. While two case studies focus on the corporate world, two other case studies look at the use of Social Software in academic workplaces. The concluding remarks identify some common benefits as well as issues with the use of Social Software and to derive some further research challenges from the different cases. The findings for future research need to be directed towards strateg...

  19. Exeresis and Brachytherapy as Salvage Treatment for Local Recurrence After Conservative Treatment for Breast Cancer: Results of a Ten-Year Pilot Study

    Purpose: To analyze the long-term results of a pilot study assessing excision and brachytherapy as salvage treatment for local recurrence after conservative treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between December 1990 and March 2001, 36 patients with breast-only recurrence less than 3 cm in diameter after conservative treatment for Stage I or II breast carcinoma were treated with local excision followed by high-dose rate brachytherapy implants (30 Gy in 12 fractions over a period of 5 days). No patient was lost to follow-up. Special attention was paid to local, regional, or distant recurrences; survival; cosmesis; and early and late side effects. Results: All patients completed treatment. During follow-up (range, 1-13 years), 8 patients presented metastases (2 regional and 6 distant) as their first site of failure, 1 had a differed local recurrence, and 1 died of the disease. Actuarial results at 10 years were as follows: local control, 89.4%; disease-free survival, 64.4%; and survival, 96.7%. Cosmetic results were satisfactory in 90.4%. No patient had Grade 3 or 4 early or late complications. Of the 11 patients followed up for at least 10 years, all but 1 still had their breast in place at the 10-year stage. Conclusions: High-dose rate brachytherapy is a safe, effective treatment for small-size, low-risk local recurrence after local excision in conservatively treated patients. The dose of 30 Gy of high-dose rate brachytherapy (12 fractions over a period of 5 days twice daily) was well tolerated. The excellent results support the use of breast preservation as salvage treatment in selected patients with local recurrence after conservative treatment for breast cancer.

  20. Reading and writing difficulties in adolescence and later risk of welfare dependence. A ten year follow-up, the HUNT Study, Norway

    Holmen Turid L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Welfare dependence and low work participation among young people have raised concern in many European countries. Reading and writing difficulties (RWD might make young people vulnerable to work integration problems and welfare dependence through negative influences on education and health. Our main objective of this study was to examine if RWD in adolescence affected the risk of welfare dependence in young adulthood. Methods Baseline information on self-reported RWD, health and family was obtained for 8950 school-attending adolescents in Nord-Trøndelag County, Norway, participating in the Young-HUNT1 survey, 1995-97. All individuals were linked to biological parents to identify siblings and parental education from national registers. Welfare dependence was assessed by the reception of social benefits (medical and economic from the national social insurance database (1998-2007. Only long-term benefits (> 180 days were included. Results The adolescents who reported RWD at baseline were more likely to receive medical or social benefits during follow-up compared with those who did not report RWD. In girls with RWD, the adjusted 5-year risk (at age 24 to 28 for receiving medical benefits was 0.20 (95% confidence interval 0.14-0.26, compared with 0.11 (0.09-0.12 in girls without RWD. In boys the corresponding risks were 0.13 (0.09-0.17 and 0.08 (0.07-0.09. Conclusions The associations between RWD in adolescence and welfare dependence later in life suggest that increased attention should be paid to these problems when discussing the public health aspects of work integration, since there might be a potential for prevention.