WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology education students

  1. Science Student Teachers and Educational Technology: Experience, Intentions, and Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efe, Rifat

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to examine science student teachers' experience with educational technology, their intentions for their own use, their intentions for their students' use, and their beliefs in the value of educational technology in science instruction. Four hundred-forty-eight science student teachers of different disciplines…

  2. Taking Part in Technology Education: Elements in Students' Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, Ossi; Hietanoro, Jenni; Ruismaki, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the elements motivating comprehensive school students to study technology education. In addition, we tried to discover how students' motivation towards technology education developed over the period leading up to their school experience and the effect this might have on their future involvement with…

  3. Factors that Influence Students to Enroll in Technology Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Michael

    Increased primary and secondary student enrollment, recent expansion of secondary technology education programs, teacher attrition, and the decreasing number of universities offering technology education degrees have led to a nationwide shortage of technology teachers. This study sought to identify effective recruitment techniques and factors that might influence students to enroll in undergraduate technology education programs. To accomplish the purposes of the study, two sample populations were surveyed: (1) Technology Education Collegiate Association (TECA) undergraduate students who attended the 2001 TECA Midwest Regional Competition in Peoria, Illinois and (2) Technology teacher education faculty members in Midwest institutions as listed in the Industrial Teacher Education Directory (Bell, 2001). Target Audience: 2-4 Year College Faculty/Administrators

  4. Changing Technology = Empowering Students through Media Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Abreu, Belinha

    2010-01-01

    Background: As the world is changing quickly due to the technological advances, educators are looking at ways in which to empower their students' learning with digital platforms. Media literacy education is key for how this can happen in the 21st century classroom which seeks to promote learning without censoring the learner. Considering how media…

  5. Physical education of students from sports-oriented technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolinnyj U.A.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In theory grounded and experimentally tested the efficiency of employments on physical education of students on the basis of sporting oriented technologies. In experiment participated 30 students of 3 courses. The improvement of growth of most physical indexes rate is marked: speed qualities (at run on 100 m, power (bending, unbending of hands in support lying, speed-power (broad jump from a place, flexibility (inclination in before from position sitting on the floor. Recommendations are resulted on education of student youth a sense of collectivism; to the persistence, decision, purposefulness; attention and speed of thought; perfections of ability to manage the emotions, to development of physical qualities. It is proved that physical education of students on the basis of sporting oriented technologies positively influences on development of physical qualities, skills and abilities that is necessary for the future specialist.

  6. Student-driven innovation in technology enhanced education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; SØrensen, Birgitte Holm

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns examines criteria for developing technology enhanced innovation education and discusses how teacher and student relations changes in these learning spaces. To educate populations for Innovation, flexibility and creativity on all levels have become major focus points for most western countries (Drucker, 1993). The primary task of educators has thus been defined as preparing learners to participate creatively in the knowledge economies of Western countries (OECD, 2000). It has however been debated how innovative processes are integrated in school education and what elements are central for supporting learning of innovation competences in various subjects (Sawyer, 2006; Magnussen, 2011). The current paper reports from a case study of a school in Denmark where teachers and students aged 6 – 14 was involved in developing and testing new forms of teaching technology enhanced innovation as part of the establishment of a so-called EduTechLab on the school. The EduTechLab was established in new facilities on the school and contained learning technologies such as NAO robots, sensor kits and 3D visualization and printing facilities. The goal of the EduTech project was to establish a creative learning environment for students and teachers that would support innovative practice with new forms of learning technology. Part of this was to involve students in innovative design processes for students to experiment with their own design solutions to case problems. The project was organized as an interaction between workshops where teachers was introduced to learning technologies and innovation process tools, and interventions where goals and learning designs were tested in classes. The first phase of the project that was followed by the authors of this paper lasted half year and involved 15 teachers (Foreign languages, mathematics, physics, chemistry and mother tongue language) and 40, children. Video observations were conducted of workshops and interventions in classes and qualitative interviews were conducted with teachers and students. The results presented in the paper shows that integrating learning technology into innovation education changes teacher roles and enhance student’s roles as co-designers of the learning environment and activities. We observed how the planned process and activities initially defined and controlled by teachers gradually was changed during the process due to collaboration between students and teachers. The student design processes thus gradually changed from teacher directed to an open experimenting for where students co-defined processes, technologies and design goals. These processes were partly caused by teachers changed experiences of student’s ability to handle complex design processes involving new technology. It was also observed how less technical savvy teachers changed roles from an instructor role to co-developer due to the collaboration with students on solving technical difficulties with the learning technology. In the paper it is discussed how these changed roles is an integrated part of working with knowledge production processes in school in and ever changing landscape of new technologies and how co-designer roles can be integrated in innovation education.

  7. Technology Management Education for Students with Educational Background of Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Atsushi; Abe, Atsushi

    Japanese industry has been encouraged to transform from a mode of ‘recovery’ to one of 'front-runner' in effective innovation and creation of new businesses and markets based in accomplishments of basic research. Graduate School of Technology Management at Ritsumeikan University strives to not only offer knowledge and skills, but also business experiences to its students so that they may acquire the abilities to discover and solve practical problems logically, analytically and systematically. To achieve these aims, it has inaugurated the Ritsumeikan University Practicum Program by enhancing existing internship programs. Under the guidance of its faculties, this program will allow its students a chance to set and solve actual problems in real world business environments.

  8. Simulation technology achievement of students in physical education classes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ??moshenko A.V.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Technology of evaluation of progress was studied during employments by physical exercises. Possibility of the use of design method was probed in an educational process during determination of progress of students. The value of mathematical models in pedagogical activity in the field of physical culture and sport is certain. Mathematical models are offered for the evaluation of success of student young people during employments swimming. Possibility of development of models of evaluation of success is rotined on sporting games, track-and-field, gymnastics.

  9. Student Disengagement in Higher Education : Two Trends in Technology

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    Eric Main

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available As internet-based technologies increasingly colonize learning environments in higher education, they allow purposes contrary to learning to have direct access to students. The internet as a governing metaphor for transparent connectivity and equal access is a red herring because the power relations across the connections are unequal. The internet also functions as a mechanism for the operant conditioning of students by commercial interests and for surveillance and control by political authorities, purposes which can, if not restrained, undermine the intentions of teachers using technology.Teachers should resist fully automating their course management, especially grading and assessment because too much mechanization can only produce reductive thinking.A related trend is the gradual replacement of liberal studies by vocational courses that feature technology as the subject. This cooperates with the aforementioned trend to effectively censor the creative and critical thinking that instructors strive to teach.

  10. Advances in health informatics education: educating students at the intersection of health care and information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushniruk, Andre; Borycki, Elizabeth; Armstrong, Brian; Kuo, Mu-Hsing

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the authors' work in the area of health informatics (HI) education involving emerging health information technologies. A range of information technologies promise to modernize health care. Foremost among these are electronic health records (EHRs), which are expected to significantly improve and streamline health care practice. Major national and international efforts are currently underway to increase EHR adoption. However, there have been numerous issues affecting the widespread use of such information technology, ranging from a complex array of technical problems to social issues. This paper describes work in the integration of information technologies directly into the education and training of HI students at both the undergraduate and graduate level. This has included work in (a) the development of Web-based computer tools and platforms to allow students to have hands-on access to the latest technologies and (b) development of interdisciplinary educational models that can be used to guide integrating information technologies into HI education. The paper describes approaches that allow for remote hands-on access by HI students to a range of EHRs and related technology. To date, this work has been applied in HI education in a variety of ways. Several approaches for integration of this essential technology into HI education and training are discussed, along with future directions for the integration of EHR technology into improving and informing the education of future health and HI professionals. PMID:22910506

  11. Understanding student participation and choice in science and technology education

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    Dillon, Justin; Ryder, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on data generated by the EU’s Interests and Recruitment in Science (IRIS) project, this volume examines the issue of young people’s participation in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. With an especial focus on female participation, the chapters offer analysis deploying varied theoretical frameworks, including sociology, social psychology and gender studies. The material also includes reviews of relevant research in science education and summaries of empirical data concerning student choices in STEM disciplines in five European countries. Featuring both quantitative and qualitative analyses, the book makes a substantial contribution to the developing theoretical agenda in STEM education. It augments available empirical data and identifies strategies in policy-making that could lead to improved participation—and gender balance—in STEM disciplines. The majority of the chapter authors are IRIS project members, with additional chapters written by specially invited contribu...

  12. Predictors of education technology's effects on it students' performance / S. van der Linde

    OpenAIRE

    Linde, Sune?

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was: • to gain a better understanding of factors that influence the performance of Information Technology (IT) students; • to gain a better understanding of how Education Technology can assist in overcoming some of the factors that negatively influence the performance of IT students; *to gain a better understanding of students’ perceptions about technology usage in classrooms; *to determine the correlation between the use of Education Technology and student perf...

  13. Student Attitudes toward Technology Enhanced History Education: Comparison between Turkish and American Students

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    Ibrahim Turan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Teacher and student attitudes towards the technology enhanced instruction plays a critical role in determining its effectiveness. The purpose of the study is to examine Turkish and American students’ attitudes and thoughts toward the use of educational technologies in history courses, and to compare the results to determine whether there are any differences between the attitudes of Turkish and American student. This study was conducted with 197 American students from Upper Saint Claire High school in Pittsburgh, PA, and 214 Turkish students from Konya High school who volutered for this study. The required data for this study were gathered by a 26-item technology questionnaire, which included 7 multiple-choice questions and 19 Likert scale questions. This questionnaire was developed to gather data on five different areas of interest: (1 demographic information, (2 participants’ computer- and Internet-usage skills, (3 the level of technology used in history classrooms, (4 participants’ attitudes toward technology-enhanced history education, and (5 participants’ attitudes toward history. Most of the Turkish and American students rated themselves as being very well experienced on the eight computer- and Internet-usage skills targeted in this study. But the comparison of the data indicated that American students have higher computer- and Internet-usage skills than Turkish students do, and this difference is statistically significant (p = 0.001. Most of the Turkish and American students showed positive attitudes on using educational technologies in history classrooms. A majority of the Turkish and American students stated that they would be able to focus and learn better if more technological materials were used in classroom activities, and this, in turn, would increase their academic achievements.

  14. Mathematics Education for Engineering Technology Students – A Bridge Too Far?

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    Noraishiyah Abdullah

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Trying to decide what is best suited for someone or something is an ever enduring task let alone trying to prepare students with the right engineering mind. So ‘how do you build an engineer?’ if that is the right word. What is the right ingredient? Mathematics has been said as the most important foundation in engineers’ life. Curriculum has been developed and reviewed over the years to meet this target. This work explores how much or lack of it has the curriculum prepares the future technologist to face the world of engineering technology as far as mathematics is concerned. Analysis of mathematics lectures, interviews of engineering technologist students and engineering technology subject lecturer is undertaken. Understand what each contributes help in understanding the picture that the current education is painting. Based on the theory of learning, APOS theory helps in explaining how students bridge their knowledge of mathematics when it comes to solving engineering technology problems. The question is, is it a bridge too far? 

  15. The Relationship between Selected Educational Technologies and Student-Centered versus Teacher-Centered Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmer, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Not all teachers and students have equal access to technology. This inequality of access creates an uneven instructional practice that may result in varied student learning. By and large, students have limited access to technology within the confines of the classroom. New educational technologies provide schools with an opportunity to broaden and…

  16. Students' Overview: The impact of technology on learning in higher education

    OpenAIRE

    O Donnell, Eileen; Sharp, Mary

    2010-01-01

    This research explores students’ views on the impact and transformations that technology has brought to the learning experience of students in higher education. The students who kindly participated in this study are from: The School of Computer Science and Statistics, Faculty of Engineering, Mathematics and Science, Trinity College Dublin and The Faculty of Business, Dublin Institute of Technology, both based in Dublin City, Ireland. The use of technologies in third level education facilita...

  17. Utilization of Information and Communication Technologies as a Predictor of Educational Stress on Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskicumali, Ahmet; Arslan, Serhat; Demirtas, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between utilization of information and communication technologies and educational stress. Participants were 411 secondary school students. Educational Stress Scale and Utilization of Information and Communication Technologies Scale were used as measures. The relationships between students'…

  18. Investigating Elementary School Students' Technology Acceptance by Applying Digital Game-Based Learning to Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuh-Ming; Lou, Shi-Jer; Kuo, Sheng-Huang; Shih, Ru-Chu

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve and promote students' environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour, integrating environmental education into the primary education curriculum has become a key issue for environmental education. For this reason, this study aimed to investigate elementary school students' acceptance of technology applying digital game-based…

  19. Educational technology for millennial dental hygiene students: a survey of U.S. dental hygiene programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Catherine R R; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Rogo, Ellen J

    2014-06-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that today's learners have changed and education must change as well since Millennial generation students expect technology to be used in their coursework. This study sought to determine what educational technology is being used in U.S. dental hygiene programs, what student and faculty perceptions are of the effectiveness of technology, and what barriers exist to implementing educational technology. A stratified random sample of 120 entry-level dental hygiene programs nationwide were invited to participate in a survey. Fourteen programs participated, yielding a pool of 415 potential individual participants; out of those, eighty-four student and thirty-eight faculty respondents were included in the analysis, a total of 122. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics and a Mann-Whitney U test (p<0.05). Faculty and student respondents agreed on the effectiveness of educational technology in all areas except clickers and wikis. The faculty members tended to rate the effectiveness of educational technology higher than did the students. The greatest perceived barrier to implementing technology was technical difficulties. This study suggests that support services should be available to faculty and students to ensure successful implementation of technology. Dental hygiene educators have adopted many types of educational technology, but more data are needed to determine best practices. PMID:24882769

  20. Student Readiness for Technology Enhanced History Education in Turkish High Schools

    OpenAIRE

    ?brahim Turan

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether the Turkish high school social sciences major students would feel adequate and fit in atechnology-enhanced educational environment, particularly in history classrooms. To this extent, this study investigated highschool students’ level of proficiency in technology-use and their attitudes toward the use of educational technologies inclassrooms. The data for this study was collected using Kolb’s Learning Style Inventory (LSI Version-3) and a 27-item TechnologyQues...

  1. Student Attitudes toward Web-Enhanced Instruction in an Educational Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghazo, Iman M.

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating students' attitudes toward Web-enhanced instruction in an educational technology course taught in the College of Education at the United Arab Emirates University. The sample of the study consisted of (66) college female students. A survey with 5 point Likert-type items and open-ended questions was used to collect…

  2. Understanding the Use of Educational Technology among Faculty, Staff, and Students at a Medical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazley, Abby Swanson; Annan, Dustin L.; Carson, Nancy E.; Freeland, Melissa; Hodge, Ashley B.; Seif, Gretchen A.; Zoller, James S.

    2013-01-01

    A college of health professions at a medical university located in the southeastern United States is striving to increase the use of educational technology among faculty, staff, and students. A strategic planning group was formed and charged with enhancing the use of educational technology within the college. In order to understand the current…

  3. The Impact of Assessing Technology Competencies of Incoming Teacher Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannatta, Rachel A.; Banister, Savilla

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to establish a baseline of technology competency among our entering education students, our College of Education began implementing the Assessment of Technology Competencies (ATC) in Fall 2003. This performance-based assessment evaluates word-processing, presentation, spreadsheet, graphic/drawing, and Internet skills. Although…

  4. Making Math Work: Educators Can Turn to Technology to Help Their Students Grasp Difficult Math Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Harry Grover

    2007-01-01

    Mathematics teachers at all levels of public school education want their students to understand and apply math concepts. When students use different technologies in the classroom, they will become engaged in meaningful learning that helps them to move from abstract ideas to hands-on applications. Students can "see" math concepts and manipulate…

  5. Turkish University Students' Technology Use Profiles and Their Thoughts about Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Bahar; Kilic, Eylem; Bakar Corez, Aysegul; Cagiltay, Kursat

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the results of a survey implemented to investigate Turkish university students' technology use profile and their thoughts about distance education. The sample of the study is 6504 students from four universities in Turkey. The results of the study are reported in five main sections: 1) demographic information of the students,…

  6. USING EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY TOOLS TO IMPROVE LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS OF ESL STUDENTS

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    P?nar KASAPO?LU-AKYOL

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this qualitative case study research project was to find out what educational technology tools international students at Eastern Michigan University use to improve their language and communication skills. More specifically, this study is based on this research question: “On their own, outside of the structure of ESL classes, to what degree do International students use technology to practice English language and communication skills?” The question let me to explore what technologies they use and how often and for what purposes. In this paper, 6 interviewee` answers and the results of their interviews are given to have better understanding of the research question. The results of this study suggest that students are using technological tools in their daily lives for many purposes, especially for their education. It is also seen that using educational technology tools will help both to the students and to the teachers to be more successful, efficient and practical people in their lives.

  7. Students’ Views on the Use of New Technologies in Art Education: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Ilias Athanasiadis; Kampouropoulou Maria; Stefos Efstathios

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to appoint the students’ views on the use of New Technologies in Art education. In this context, a research in the Primary Education Department of University of Aegean was carried out, during the winter semester of year 2010-2011. After having participated in artistic activities which combined traditional art techniques with the use of New Technologies, 82 students took part in the research and answered a questionnaire. The questionnaire was then analyzed with Mul...

  8. Technological pattern of supporting continuity in physical education of students' personality.

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    Vovk V.M.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical approaches grounds and components, on which technological pattern of supporting of continuity in physical education of senior pupil and students' personality are considered. It is proved that effective process of continuity in physical education is impossible without construction of patterns. It is ascertained that technologies pattern is a mechanism of realization in teaching process and object-subject of the transformation to personalities on base of the physical education.

  9. Teaching foreign languages to technical students by means of educational online technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivleva, Natalia V.; Fibikh, Ekaterina V.

    2015-01-01

    The article reveals new methods of effectiveness increase in teaching foreign languages to technical students using information and communication technologies and their practical implementation at the premises of the Foreign Languages Resource Center of Siberian State Aerospace University. Adoption of information and communication technologies to the educational process is based on students' independent language learning that encourages more productive development of language competences mastered by students and future specialists in a special area of technical knowledge as a whole.

  10. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Kron Frederick W; Gjerde Craig L; Sen Ananda; Fetters Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of ...

  11. Sounding Out Science: Incorporating Audio Technology to Assist Students with Learning Differences in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Clement V.

    With the current focus to have all students reach scientific literacy in the U.S, there exists a need to support marginalized students, such as those with Learning Disabilities/Differences (LD), to reach the same educational goals as their mainstream counterparts. This dissertation examines the benefits of using audio assistive technology on the iPad to support LD students to achieve comprehension of science vocabulary and semantics. This dissertation is composed of two papers, both of which include qualitative information supported by quantified data. The first paper, titled Using Technology to Overcome Fundamental Literacy Constraints for Students with Learning Differences to Achieve Scientific Literacy, provides quantified evidence from pretest and posttest analysis that audio technology can be beneficial for seventh grade LD students when learning new and unfamiliar science content. Analysis of observations and student interviews support the findings. The second paper, titled Time, Energy, and Motivation: Utilizing Technology to Ease Science Understanding for Students with Learning Differences, supports the importance of creating technology that is clear, audible, and easy for students to use so they benefit and desire to utilize the learning tool. Multiple correlation of Likert Survey analysis was used to identify four major items and was supported with analysis from observations of and interviews with students, parents, and educators. This study provides useful information to support the rising number of identified LD students and their parents and teachers by presenting the benefits of using audio assistive technology to learn science.

  12. NASA's Student Glovebox: An Inquiry-Based Technology Educator's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Carla B.; Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    2000-01-01

    A glovebox is a sealed container with built-in gloves. Astronauts perform small experiments and test hardware inside of them. Gloveboxes have flown on NASA's space shuttles and on the Russian space station Mir. The International Space Station (ISS) will have a permanent glovebox on the U.S. laboratory, Destiny. This document contains cursory technical information on gloveboxes and glovebox experiments and is intended for use by middle school educators and students. Information is provided on constructing a model glovebox as well as realistic cut-outs to be pasted on the model.

  13. Using the remote educational technologies in training students for psychology teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Aigerim Seitbattalova

    2009-01-01

    The paper discusses the model of professional training of students for teaching psychology on the basis of remote educational technologies in pedagogical high school. The model is presented by blocks of the maintenance of professional training, the information-educational environment, psychological-pedagogical support of professional training.

  14. Investigating How Digital Technologies Can Support a Triad-Approach for Student Assessment in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Norman

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to investigate if and how digital technologies could be used to support a triad-approach for student assessment in higher education. This triad-approach consisted of self-reflection, peer feedback, and instructor assessment practices in a pre-service teacher education course at a Canadian university. Through…

  15. Evaluating Web 2.0 Technologies in Higher Education Using Students' Perceptions and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvounidis, T.; Chimos, K.; Bersimis, S.; Douligeris, C.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, Web 2.0 technologies in higher education are evaluated using students' perceptions, satisfaction, performance and behaviour. The study evaluates the Web 2.0 tools as stand-alone entities as well in terms of their cross-operability and integration (confluence) to synergistic contributions towards the enhancement of student

  16. Perception on Knowledge-sharing Activities among Industrial Technology Students in a Public Higher Education Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Caipang, Christian Le Marjo A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the perception of undergraduate students in a public higher education institution on knowledge-sharing, their preferred mode of sharing knowledge and the barriers associated with it. Students enrolled in the bachelor’s degree program of Industrial Technology in a public educational institution were used as respondents and were classified according to gender, academic year level and scholastic status. Results indicated that face-to-face communicat...

  17. Student Perceptions of the Use and Educational Value of Technology at the STCC Starr County Campus: Implications for Technology Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Texas Community Coll., McAllen. Office of Institutional Research and Effectiveness.

    This is a report on the fall 2001 student survey conducted by South Texas Community College (STCC) to measure the amount of use and perceived educational value of seven types of educational technology: (1) overhead projector; (2) television/VCR; (3) ceiling mounted data projector; (4) DVD/CD-ROM; (5) document camera; (6) smart board; and (7)…

  18. Students’ Views on the Use of New Technologies in Art Education: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Higher Education

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    Ilias Athanasiadis

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to appoint the students’ views on the use of New Technologies in Art education. In this context, a research in the Primary Education Department of University of Aegean was carried out, during the winter semester of year 2010-2011. After having participated in artistic activities which combined traditional art techniques with the use of New Technologies, 82 students took part in the research and answered a questionnaire. The questionnaire was then analyzed with Multidimensional Statistic Data Analysis methods, which allowed for differentiation criteria to emerge as well as for their classification in groups, depending on the students’ common answers to the questionnaires. The analysis showed that most students are positive towards using New Technologies in Art education and believe that their introduction in Art classes is possible to be implemented in schools.

  19. Factors that Influence Student Teacher's Interest to Achieve Educational Technology Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadijevich, Dj.; Haapasalo, Lenni

    2008-01-01

    Bearing in mind the importance of a transition from teacher-centred, lecture-based teaching to student-centred, technology-based learning, this study examined teachers' interest to achieve educational technology standards ("Interest") in terms of their computer attitude ("Attitude"), computer experience ("Experience") and the professional support…

  20. When Education, Media, and Technology Converge, What Do Latino/a Students Gain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanno, Dolores Valencia

    2003-01-01

    Research suggests that Latino students' success in college is closely linked to the interpersonal relationships they experience with faculty and staff. However, the convergence of technology, media, and education promises less rather than more of these types of interactions. Relevant research is reviewed on the growth of technology-based…

  1. EFFECTS OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS ON STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT FOR DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: WHAT FORTY YEARS OF RESEARCH TELLS US

    OpenAIRE

    Alan Cheung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine the effectiveness of educational technology applications and how features of using technology programs and characteristics of these evaluations affect achievement outcomes for disadvantaged students in grades K-12. The review applies consistent inclusion standards to focus on studies that met high methodological standards. A total of 154 qualifying studies were included in the final analysis. The findings of the review suggest that educational te...

  2. An enquiry into citizenship education curriculum and pedagogy: the role of technology and student voice

    OpenAIRE

    Olla, Venus

    2013-01-01

    The research in this thesis explores Citizenship Education pedagogy at secondary school level in Ontario, Canada. Citizenship Education is a complex subject area and its teaching and learning within the classroom is contentious. The literature indicates the value of student voice and technology; however the ways in which these pedagogical tools can be incorporated into the Citizenship Education classroom have not been explored in great detail. This study uses a Practitioner Inquiry appr...

  3. Emerging Technologies Acceptance in Online Tutorials: Tutors’ and Students’ Behavior Intentions in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Adhi Susilo

    2014-01-01

    Tutors’ and students’ intentions to use emerging technologies (ETs) in e-learning systems in higher education institutions are a central concern of researchers, academicians, and practitioners. However, tutors’ and students’ intentions to use ETs in e-learning systems in distance learning are relatively low. The goal of the study, developed in Universitas Terbuka, was to investigate the factors that may affect tutors’ and students’ intentions to use ETs in online tutorials.A Web-b...

  4. Technology and Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumsden, Bruce; And Others

    The impact of the computer on education may be greater than the impact of any other technological innovation since the development of the printing press. Although distance education has relied more extensively on technological means for delivering education to its students than has traditional classroom-centered education, most distance programs…

  5. Multimedia Technologies as a Means of Boosting the Effectiveness of Student Learning in Higher Education

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    Gulzam Abilkasimova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses multimedia technologies as a means of boosting the effectiveness of student learning in higher education, wherein they reflect present-day notions in the area of education. It goes without saying that they ought to be implemented in the practice of classes at colleges. Through the joint efforts of workers in the area of education, programmer-scientists, manufacturers of multimedia learning tools, and instructors, there is being created a new information environment wherein a key role is increasingly played by the integration of educational and information approaches to the content of education.

  6. The role of self-dependence in modern health improvemental technologies of physical students' education.

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    Shumakov O.V.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A normative base is considered on the problems of physical education, physical culture and independent work of students. An analysis is conducted scientifically-methodical and special literature on issue of research. Basic features and modern going are selected near independent work in health technologies of physical education of students. A concept «Independent work» is examined as activity of man and as a teaching method. A teaching method plugs in itself independent employments by physical exercises. During correct organization they can substantially increase motive activity of students.

  7. Author's internet blog as information and communication technologies in the educational space within the physical education students

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    Ilnitskaya A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to develop a web blog to attract students to physical culture and reveal their attitudes toward physical education. Material : in the survey participated 800 students from different cities of Ukraine, Russia and Belarus. Results : Internet blog created on the server "Vkontakte" as a social group called "Sport and motivation. It's nothing personal." With the help of questionnaires using internet blog revealed that of all the attractive aspects of physical fitness and physical development of students give greater preference beautiful physique. In the second place they have is health, then - endurance, agility, strength, speed, flexibility. Girls prefer a beautiful body, flexibility, plasticity, the boys prefer strength, endurance, agility and quickness. Conclusion : the need for the development and application of information and communication technologies and non-traditional forms of physical education to improve the effectiveness of the educational process in physical education in higher education institutions.

  8. STUDENTS‘ PERCEPTIONS OF CHANGE READINESS OF A TURKISH EDUCATION FACULTY REGARDING INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz AKBULUT

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent study investigated the degree of involvement in new teaching and learning methods by the academic staff of a large privileged Turkish state university, and revealed that faculties of education and open education were better in terms of change readiness than other faculties. The current study builds on that study, and investigates the involvement of the institution and teaching staff in technology integration from observers’ perspectives through administering a personal information form and a 31-item Likert questionnaire to 475 senior students of the Faculty of Education. Findings revealed that what were reported by instructors in the previous study seem somewhat different from what is being reported by their students in the current study. More specifically, students found their instructors and the infrastructure of the faculty quite inadequate in terms of the integration of information and communication technologies (ICT within classroom settings. Implications and suggestions regarding the integration process are provided.

  9. Nurturing Students' Critical Knowledge Using Technology-enhanced Scaffolding Strategies in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ji

    2010-02-01

    Critique is central to the development of scientific knowledge. From a cognitive perspective, critique can be used to enhance understanding. From a social perspective, critique serves to maintain the standards of a professional field. In science education, it is of tremendous value to diagnose and nurture students' critical knowledge. How students develop and apply criteria for critique, however, remains unclear. What factors influence students' performance of critique, and how can educators incorporate technology-enhanced scaffolding strategies to help diagnose and nurture students' critical knowledge? In this paper, I define critical knowledge as the criteria people use to evaluate other knowledge, the ability to use these criteria across contexts, and the reflective understanding of such processes. Building on existing literature, I develop a conceptual framework that describes the components and processes involved in a critique activity. Using this framework, I discuss the application of technology-enhanced scaffolding strategies to facilitate critique activities in science classrooms.

  10. Dimensions of flexibility - Students, communication technology and distributed education

    OpenAIRE

    Ståle Angen Rye

    2008-01-01

    Flexibility is a frequent topic in any discussion of higher education in general and ”alternative” forms of education, such as distributed education, in particular. The term is usually associated with change, but there has been little attempt to analyse the concept in further detail. This is surprising, since flexibility is often seen as the distinguishing attribute of this type of education. It is therefore the aim of this article to clarify the concept of flexibility by relating it to s...

  11. THE SELF- CONF?DENCE LEVELS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT STUDENTS TOWARDS INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES(ICT

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    Zekeriya GÖKTA?

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The development and expansion of information and communication technologies (ICT is seen as a tool to be effective in solving problems. Because higher education courses are technology intensive at universities, prospective teachers will be equipped with technology skillsThe role of educational technology in university education and training is happening by prospective teachers’ having related knowledge and skills. The material selection for the course purpose affects students’ level of comprehension and persistence of knowledge.Since, teachers and students will use these technologies, it is important to determine their level of self confidence for using technologies on educational purposes.The purpose of the study is to determine physical education and sport students’ levels of self confidence on the use of CIT for educational purposes. The survey method was used for collecting the data, and Likert type scale was preferred for measuring variables.The results of the analysis indicate the students have some level of self confidence in using information and communication technologies. The levels of self-confidence differ according to gender, taking computer courses (or not and having computers at home (or not.When physical education and sport school students are evaluated according to the department,the students of physical education and sports have higher self-confidence levels fort he use computers and communications Technologies than the students of coaching education and sport management have.

  12. Collaborative writing with web 2.0 technologies:education students' perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Brodahl, Cornelia; Hadjerrouit, Said; Hansen, Nils Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary Web 2.0 technologies are becoming popular in teaching and learning environments. Among them several online collaborative writing tools, like wikis and blogs, have been integrated into educational settings. Research has been carried out on a wide range of subjects related to wikis, while other, comparable tools like Google Docs and EtherPad remain largely unexplored in the literature. This work presents a case study investigating education students' perceptions of collaborati...

  13. The Union City Story: Education Reform and Technology Students' Performance on Standardized Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Han-hua; Honey, Margaret; Light, Daniel; Moeller, Babette; Ross, Nancy

    This paper is the first in a series to investigate the impact of state-of-the-art networking technologies in a reformed educational context on student learning, teacher instruction, and parental involvement. The findings presented in this report are based on standardized test results. Although the findings indicate that the reforms are having a…

  14. Student Evaluation of Teaching Effectiveness of a Nationwide Innovative Education Program on Image Display Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Hsiu-Ping; Chen, Tzy-Ling; Chiu, Li-An; Lee, San-Liang; Wang, An-Bang

    2012-01-01

    The study presented here explored a student evaluation of the teaching effectiveness of a nationwide innovative education program on image display technology in Taiwan. Using survey data collected through an online questionnaire system, covering 165 classes across 30 colleges and universities in Taiwan, the study aimed to understand the teaching…

  15. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

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    Kron Frederick W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Methods Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1 demographic characteristics; 2 differences between the two universities; 3 how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4 characteristics of students who play most frequently. Results 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%. Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%, felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%, and believed that video games can have educational value (80%. A majority (77% would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%, and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%. However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Conclusions Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly favorable views about the use of video games and related new media technology in medical education. Significant gender differences in game play experience and attitudes may represent male video game design bias that stresses male cognitive aptitudes; medical educators hoping to create serious games that will appeal to both men and women must avoid this.

  16. Transforming Education with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Marge

    2011-01-01

    In this EL interview, Karen Cator, the director of the Office of Educational Technology at the U.S. Department of Education, talks about ways to realize the potential of technology to transform education. She discusses what students need: their own digital devices for classroom use, the ability to use the information they access, the skills to…

  17. A qualitative study of student perspectives and experiences in an information technology education program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heekyung

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to learn about students' perspectives of an undergraduate level information technology (IT) education program. The IT program is a recent effort to create a new educational opportunity for computing in college, with recognition that the recent IT developments have had a greater influence on various aspects of people's lives than ever. Students' perspectives are a necessary piece of information to develop this innovative IT education program into a sound educational opportunity. Data were gathered through qualitative in-depth interviews conducted with 28 undergraduate students, most of whom have taken one or more IT classes before. The interview data were analyzed using the grounded theory approach. The analysis found that college students perceived that they were very competent in dealing with IT primarily due to their continued exposure to computers since youth. However, this perceived competency was not very stable. Students felt that they did not have sufficient IT competency when technical skills of dealing with IT came to attention. They also felt so when comparing their IT competency with that of their peers, examining it in a class context, and confronting a transition from education to the real world. In spite of their preference for and confidence in self-guided learning, students wanted to receive a formal instruction in IT when they needed to learn something difficult, something that they were not very interested in, and something important for their future lives. They also expressed a desire to gain a comprehensive understanding of computers without needing to learn fundamental computing principles. Students' various interests in IT education were dispersed around learning practical technical skills and understanding social implications of IT. Many participants' focus was a mix of the two factors, which was often expressed as an area that dealt with "how humans and computers interact." This blended interest suggested a potential defining characteristic for IT education. Students' motivations for pursuing IT education ranged from their passion to some practical considerations. The majority of students expressed mixed motivations, often more strongly inclined to practicality. This finding implied that students' practical considerations as well as their pure interests were an important factor to consider in administering an IT program. Participants found that the primary value of the IT program was that it incorporated technological and social topics which had not been well connected previously. Yet, balancing the technical and non-technical components in the curriculum also proved to be the most controversial aspect. Students perceived that the weaknesses of the IT program were also associated with its interdisciplinary nature. Students also viewed that the topics in the IT program were more closely related to many real world problems than the curricula of typical college education programs. Finally, the analysis revealed that students determined the value of the IT minor program in relation to their majors and career interests. Students took the IT minor to supplement their majors, in terras of their interests in developing their careers beyond formal education. Overall, this investigation showed that students perceived this broad-based education program for IT as an intermediate field that filled a significant niche in college education caused by the recent technological innovations: between technical and social, between school and everyday life, and between formal education and the "real world." The results have practical implications for the development of IT programs in college and for future research directions.

  18. MODULAR TECHNOLOGY IN THE COURSE OF SPORTS EDUCATION OF SCHOOL STUDENTS

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    ?????????? ????????? ????????

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Article contains data on expediency of use of modular training of school students to physical culture as most effective remedy of quality control of assimilation by school students of special and theoretical knowledge of a subject.Purpose: determination of learning efficiency of school students to the subject "Physical culture" by means of the process organization on modular technology.Methodology: pedagogical research.Results: the approximate structure of the modular maintenance of the subject "Physical culture" and statistical calculations of a complex assessment of level of sports education of school students is given in article during training of modular technology.Practical implications: process of training of school students to the subject "Physical culture".DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-3-16

  19. A Comparative Analysis of Preferred Learning and Teaching Styles for Engineering, Industrial, and Technology Education Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros; Fantz, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    In the spring semester of 2010, a materials process course was selected as a means to perform a preferred learning style research study. This course was selected because it contained three groups of students: technology education, engineering technology, and industrial technology. The researchers believed that the differences in the students'…

  20. THE SELF- CONF?DENCE LEVELS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT STUDENTS TOWARDS INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES(ICT)

    OpenAIRE

    Go?ktas?, Zekeriya

    2011-01-01

    The development and expansion of information and communication technologies (ICT) is seen as a tool to be effective in solving problems. Because higher education courses are technology intensive at universities, prospective teachers will be equipped with technology skillsThe role of educational technology in university education and training is happening by prospective teachers’ having related knowledge and skills. The material selection for the course purpose affects students’ level of c...

  1. Evaluating the Impacts of Technology Education on Military Maintenance Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeremy D.; Curtis, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The United States Air Force (USAF) provides career and technical education (CTE) to a wide variety of specialty career fields. Training airmen to carry out the mission while honoring the USAF core values of integrity first, service before self, and excellence in all we do is the top priority of military leaders and trainers. Vehicle maintenance is…

  2. Mathematics Education for Engineering Technology Students – A Bridge Too Far?

    OpenAIRE

    Noraishiyah Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Trying to decide what is best suited for someone or something is an ever enduring task let alone trying to prepare students with the right engineering mind. So ‘how do you build an engineer?’ if that is the right word. What is the right ingredient? Mathematics has been said as the most important foundation in engineers’ life. Curriculum has been developed and reviewed over the years to meet this target. This work explores how much or lack of it has the curriculum...

  3. EFFECTS OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS ON STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT FOR DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS: WHAT FORTY YEARS OF RESEARCH TELLS US

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    Alan Cheung

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to examine the effectiveness of educational technology applications and how features of using technology programs and characteristics of these evaluations affect achievement outcomes for disadvantaged students in grades K-12. The review applies consistent inclusion standards to focus on studies that met high methodological standards. A total of 154 qualifying studies were included in the final analysis. The findings of the review suggest that educational technology applications generally produced a positive, though modest, effect (ES=+0.16 in comparison to traditional methods. A marginally significant difference was found among four types of educational technology applications. Larger effect sizes were found with comprehensive models (ES=+0.23 and innovative technology applications (ES=+0.20. Effect sizes for supplemental programs and computer-managed learning were +0.15 and +0.12, respectively. The findings provide some suggestive evidence that approaches that integrated computer and non-computer instruction in the classrooms and innovative approaches are effective in improving student achievement. Differential impacts were also found by both substantive and methodological features.

  4. The case for using SMS technologies to support distance education students in South Africa : conversations

    OpenAIRE

    Viljoen, Jeanne-marie; Du Preez, Carl S.; Cook, Antoinette

    2005-01-01

    The rate of adoption of mobile technologies in Africa's developing countries is amongst the highest in the world and by 2005 there may be almost 100 billion mobile users in Africa (Keegan, 2002; Brown, 2005). This is just one of the reasons why servicing distance students in this country through m-learning1 support tools should enjoy consideration. At the Unit for Distance Education at the University of Pretoria most of our students are from remote rural areas in South Africa where there is v...

  5. Research on Using Modern Educational Technology to Training Students Ability of Producing Aerobics

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    Ping Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern education for the students Aerobics Creation regard ability, scholars have conducted a series of studies, such as aerobics based on a combination of action and research on aerobics extends to extra-curricular studies, calisthenics action on creating capacity, as well as research on improving teaching mode. In recent years, with the development of aerobics in the international, it gradually started with its own unique charm and rich species in a sport, becomes the masses love sport. At the same time, it is also an important content of major colleges and universities sports in teaching process. In order to look for the related technology support of current PE teaching process, many colleges put their eyesight into current teaching technology. According teaching practice, we can know that an important ability is students’ creative ability aerobics teaching. The establishment of this ability is more complicated and it be affected by many factors, it is the result of many aspects’ interaction. In the aerobics professional teaching process, it not only needs enhancing the operation technique and movements for aerobics teaching, but also needs pay attention to students to cultivate their innovative ability, guides students to put on students’ thinking cap and active thinking, stimulates the student to carry on the independent creative enthusiasm, develop and rich aerobics’ movement and content, improve the interest of aerobics practice, guide students use learned knowledge creation to learn creatively. It can lay the foundation for the students after the independent creation of independent exercise. The main point of this study is creating aerobics capacity, teaching applications, students compose capabilities approach, as well as specific training methods and so on.

  6. Stewardship in Distance Education: A Comparative Analysis of Technologies that Support Student Learning

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    Amanda J. Rockinson-Szapkiw

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Effectively facilitating the growth of learners demonstrates prudent stewardship (Galatians 6:10; Genesis 2:15. As wise stewards of what God has entrusted to them, Christian educators are challenged to identify factors critical for supporting students’ learning in whatever environment they are teaching. When teaching in the online environment, this includes adopting technological applications to support learning. This study compared the use of two technological applications and their affect on student learning. Findings provided evidence that online graduate learners who used the combination of a content management system and e-conferencing system reported significantly higher perceptions of learning than learners who used only the content management system. Additional findings were not significant.

  7. PROMOTING SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL LITERACY AMONG POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS AT THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION UTM

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    Seth Sulaiman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available One important issue in the Science Education debate over the last century was how to prepare a more relevant science education of the 21st Century that emphasizes on promoting scientific literacy through a more meaningful science education program. In response to this call, a general science education elective course code named MPS1163 Epistemological, Social and Ethical Issues in Science and Technology was designed and implemented starting in Semester 2 Session 2009/2010. By the end of Semester 2 Session 2012/2013 the course has been running for 7 semesters and had invited 128 postgraduate students from 7 different programs, including a PhD program. A questionnaire was distributed to 26 course participants at the end of semester 2 Session 2012/2013. The objective of the questionnaire was to seek their personal assessment on their knowledge and understanding on the eleven course contents taken during the whole semester. The results indicated that there was a mean increment of between 40- 50% on their knowledge and understanding on the topics covered compared to their knowledge and understanding before taking the course. The second part of the questionnaire consisted of six items, using five point Likert Scale, seeking their suggestions for improving a more relevant science education through the elective course. The response was commendable. Implications of the study related to course contents and students opinions on the course contents and suggestions for the improvement of the course are discussed in this paper.

  8. Ground of maintenance of model of health of saving technologies of students of the special medical educational separation of physical education facilities

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    Prysjazhnuk S.I.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychological pedagogical problems of physical development of students are considered with a rejection in a state of health. Experience of physical education of students of task medical force is studied. The structural functional model of process of physical education of students is developed with the use of health of saving technologies. Over 5000 students took part in researches. It is set that morphometric indexes are most closely associate. Intercommunications of indexes of level of development of physical qualities specify on insufficient differentiation in mechanisms which determine the structure of physical preparedness of students. Recommendations of model physical possibilities of students are resulted. Models are instrumental in an estimation individual potential possibility of organism. Models allow to utillize information for planning and leadthrough of a health educational educate process on physical education. Possibilities of determination of volume of the physical loading are shown taking into account a floor, nosology of diseases and state of physical preparedness of students.

  9. Education and Educational Technology

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    This volume includes extended and revised versions of a set of selected papers from the 2011 2nd International Conference on Education and Educational Technology (EET 2011) held in Chengdu, China, October 1-2, 2011. The mission of EET 2011 Volume 1 is to provide a forum for researchers, educators, engineers, and government officials involved in the general areas of education and educational technology to disseminate their latest research results and exchange views on the future research directions of these fields. 130 related topic papers were selected into this volume. All the papers were reviewed by 2 program committee members and selected by the volume editor Prof. Yuanzhi Wang, from Intelligent Information Technology Application Research Association, Hong Kong. The conference will bring together leading researchers, engineers and scientists in the domain of interest. We hope every participant can have a good opportunity to exchange their research ideas and results and to discuss the state of the art in th...

  10. Gender differences in students’ preferences using communication technologies to support learning: the case of Portuguese Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Morais, Ni?dia Salome?; Ramos, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of the research project presented in this paper is to contribute towards a wider understanding about the use of Communication Technologies in Portuguese Public Higher Education Institutions, with a special focus on gender related issues regarding the students' perception and evaluation of the use of these technologies in supporting learning activities. Within this project this paper focuses on the results obtained about gender related differences in the activities that students ...

  11. Centre for Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-13

    Created by the University of Cape Town in South Africa, the aim of the Centre for Educational Technology is to "realise the principles expressed in the University" technology policy. In order to meet that lofty goal, the Centre for Educational Technology (CET) is hard at work in the areas of curriculum development, learning technologies, staff development, and research. Visitors are introduced to the work of talented University of Cape Town students in the "UCT Stories" on the homepage of the website, and when clicking "Read more," can view "related files," such as a film clip, screen shot, or download. Visitors will find the "Projects" tab contains informative individual downloadable reports on information and communication technologies (ICT) of the eight African countries involved in the Partnership for Higher Education in Africa (PHEA). Some of the countries involved in the partnership include Ghana, Kenya, and Egypt, and visitors can find statistics on infrastructure, higher education enrollment, internet access, and usage in the reports.

  12. Technology Education and Its Discontents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Michael C.

    1998-01-01

    Technology educators should involve students in hands-on learning about tools, materials, processes, and techniques to teach problem-solving skills and enhance self-esteem. The debate about industrial arts versus technology education loses sight of the importance of making student projects meaningful. (SK)

  13. The Impact of Educational Technology on Student Achievement: Assessment "of" and "for" Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Karen E.

    2006-01-01

    The author explores current efforts by educators and policy makers to harness the power of educational technology for both assessment "of learning" and assessment "for learning" in K-12 classrooms. (Contains 1 figure.)

  14. National Educational Technology Trends: 2011. Transforming Education to Ensure All Students Are Successful in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel; Fox, Christine; Levin, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    The State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA)--the principal association representing the technology leadership in all fifty states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs--presents its eighth annual report on select, national, educational technology activities. This…

  15. Implementing Educational Technology in Higher Education:

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Cynthia C.

    2008-01-01

    Although the move toward implementing technology in higher education is driven by an increasing number of competitors as well as student demand, there is still considerable resistance to embracing it. Adoption of technology requires more that merely installing a product. This paper outlines a framework for a strategic change process that can be utilized by educators for the purpose of the selection as well as successful implementation of educational technologies within their setting, in parti...

  16. Promoting Student Engagement by Integrating New Technology into Tertiary Education: The Role of the iPad

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    Maurizio Manuguerra

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Teachers in tertiary education need new strategies to communicate with students of the net generation and to shape enticing educational experiences for them. The use of new approaches such as video-recorded lectures to communicate directly and individually with all students has been the preserve of technology-savvy educators. However, a recent technological advance – the Apple iPad – has the potential to change this situation, offering access to effective and efficient pedagogy in an easy and intuitive way. This paper is a report on the use of the iPad in teaching activities over the past 15 months, showing how it can be used to enhance engagement with learning for tertiary students, both those studying live on campus and those studying at a distance.

  17. Technology Revolution = Education Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLafferty, Charles L., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Outlines one attempt to infuse technology into an educational psychology course, discussing commonly available tools and techniques (e.g., online syllabus, e-mail, World Wide Web, presentation packages, and use of learning teams and electronic discussion groups). The paper examines obstacles, student responses, application in the K-12 classroom,…

  18. PROVIDING INFORMATION COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT TO DISTANCE EDUCATION STUDENTS: A Case of The University of Ghana, Legon

    OpenAIRE

    Agyemang, Beatrice K.; Dadzie, Perpetua

    2010-01-01

    A study to investigate the current state of Information Communication Technology policy of the University of Ghana Distance Education (DE) programme and the extent of awareness and use of ICTs in general by the DE learners was carried out. The survey methodology was adopted using questionnaire and interview instruments. Respondents were made up of 120 DE students, the coordinator of the DE programme, and 5 workers at the DE unit. The questionnaires were distributed to all the 120 students wh...

  19. Technology and Higher Education: The Impact of E-Learning Approaches on Student Academic Achievement, Perceptions and Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, Amaury; Snyder, Blanca Plazas

    2009-01-01

    While e-learning, Web-enhanced instruction, and other forms of instructional technology have been touted as an effective way of addressing student withdrawal and academic performance, there are those (Carr, 2000) that report both program and end-of-semester course completion rates in distance education courses as merely acceptable compared to more…

  20. Verbal Immediacy and Audio/Video Technology Use in Online Course Delivery: What Do University Agricultural Education Students Think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphrey, Theresa Pesl; Arnold, Shannon; Foster, Billye; Degenhart, Shannon H.

    2012-01-01

    As demand for online course delivery increases, it is imperative that those courses be delivered in an effective and efficient manner. While technologies are offering increasingly new and innovative tools to deliver courses, it is not known which of these tools are perceived as useful and beneficial by university agricultural education students.…

  1. Ordered Effects of Technology Education Units on Higher-Order Critical Thinking Skills of Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, Kern D.

    2010-01-01

    In this quasi-experimental quantitative study, 105 eighth grade students at a suburban middle school in New York State participated in a seven month-long project involving the ordered effects of the technology education units of Lego[R] Mindstorms(TM) NXT Robotics System, Digital Storytelling with Microsoft Windows Movie Maker, and the Marble Maze…

  2. STUDY OF SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS PERSONALITY IN PRE-PROFILE TRAINING EDUCATIONAL PROCESS USING INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY ??????????? ??????????? ????? ? ???????????? ?????????? ? ???????????????? ?????????? ???????? ?? ????????????? ??????? ????????????-?????????????? ?????????? ???????? ? ?????????-????????? ???????

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    ?.?. ????????

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the study of students personality while pre-profile training educational process in secondary schools using information and communication technology. Application of psycho-pedagogical diagnosis in the final period of pre-profile training is performed, taking into account the syllogism of the individuality and specialized education in secondary schools, the definition of training motivation, creative and intellectual abilities, certain innate personality traits, motivation-emotional, practical, information compounds of pre-profile classes students individuality.? ?????? ????????????? ??????????? ??????????? ??????????? ????? ? ?????? ???????????? ?????????? ? ???????????????? ?????????? ???????? ?? ????????????? ??????? ????????????-?????????????? ?????????? ???????? ? ?????????-????????? ???????. ???????????? ? ??????????? ?????? ???????????? ?????????? ??????? ?????????-????????????? ??????????????, ????????????, ? ??????????? ????????? ???????????????? ?? ???????????? ???????? ? ?????? ????????????????? ?????, ?????????? ????????? ????????, ??????? ?? ??????????????? ??????????, ????????????? ?????? ???????????? ??????? ?? ???????????-????????-?????????, ?????????? ? ????????????? ????????? ??????????? ????? ???????????? ??????.

  3. Design Skills Education for Students of Advanced Course in College of Technology in Cooperation with the Support Program for Contemporary Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Naoyuki; Sakabe, Toshiya; Koshiba, Takashi; Ishitobi, Manabu

    Since 2004, Nara National College of Technology has been conducting “The Super Science Teacher Delivery Lecture Project”, in which the staff of our college visit elementary or junior high schools to provide special classes on science, technology or other subjects. This project was adopted as part of the Support Program for Contemporary Educational Needs by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. To provide education on design skills for students in the advanced mechanical engineering course and advanced electronic and information engineering course of the faculty of advanced engineering of our college, Problem Based Learning (PBL) has been conducted with the cooperation of the Super Science Teacher Delivery Lecture Project. In the PBL, students developed the teaching materials and experiments for science and technology lessons of elementary or junior high school students. In addition, the design skills of the students were evaluated by the reports on design skills, the demonstration of the delivery lecture and the records of the their efforts. From the results of the student questionnaire on this PBL, it is clear that most of the students understood “what are the design skills?” and acquired design skills.

  4. The educational potential of technology: Developing skills and promoting students autonomy and responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Priegue Caamaño

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal.dotm 0 0 1 166 951 Universidad de Salamanca 7 1 1167 12.0 0 false 18 pt 18 pt 0 0 false false false /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-ansi-language:ES;} The improvements carried out in the last decades in the field of Information and the Communication Technologies are significantly perceived in the educational institutions. Besides the well-known advantages from an instrumental, administrative or managerial point of view, we assist to unprecedented extension of new possibilities of social interaction as well as to the creation of new learning contexts. Thus, this work is aimed at analysing the benefits that technology can provide in the students’ learning process, making special emphasis not only on the potential of these resources to favour students’ autonomy and responsibility in the teaching-learning process, but also on their possibilities for the development of intercultural competences. Among the conclusions, we mainly stand out two issues: on the one hand, the urgency to improve teachers’ preparation, to make the most of the pedagogical potential of the digital resources and, on the other hand, the need to deepen in the knowledge of the effects that, on a long-term basis, may involve the use of digital technologies in our students’ way of behaving and of mixing with each other.

  5. Experience in applying educational technologies to the integrated system of engineering students

    OpenAIRE

    Natalya Churlyaeva, Sergey Kukushkin

    2011-01-01

    Some evolutional aspects of the institution currently known as Siberian State Aerospace University are presented as an example of degradation of the integrated system of engineering training and the entire engineering education on the way from planned to market economy. Prospects for some educational technologies expected earlier to raise university graduates’ competency are found out to be doubtful. The analysis of labor market requirements to alumnae shows that no traditional educational ...

  6. Integrating Information and Communication Technologies into Higher Education: Investigating Onsite and Online Students' Points of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillion, Gerard; Limayem, Moez; Laferriere, Therese; Mantha, Robert

    2009-01-01

    For the past two decades, information and communication technologies (ICT) have transformed the ways professors teach and students learn. The purpose of this study is to investigate the points of view of onsite students (blended or hybrid mode) and of those taking the same courses on the Internet (online mode). A moderator-type theoretical…

  7. Urban Environmental Education: Leveraging Technology and Ecology to Engage Students in Studying the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Michael; Vaughn, Meredith Houle; Strauss, Eric; Cotter, Lindsey

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the outcomes of the first year of an intensive, urban ecology focused, summer program for urban high school youth. Students in our program conduct scientific investigations of their urban ecosystems while exploring potential career options in science and technology fields. In conducting their investigations, the students

  8. Internet self-efficacy does not predict student use of Internet-mediated educational technology

    OpenAIRE

    Tom Buchanan; Sanjay Joban; Alan Porter

    2014-01-01

    Two studies tested the hypothesis that use of learning technologies among undergraduate psychology students was associated with higher Internet self-efficacy (ISE). In Study 1, the ISE scores of 86 students were found not to be associated with either attitudes towards, or measured use of, blogs and wikis as part of an IT skills course. ISE was associated with time spent online, and positive attitudes to wikis were associated with higher use. Study 2 measured 163 students’ ISE scores at the ...

  9. The value of inter-professional education: a comparative study of dental technology students' perceptions across four countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J; Henderson, A J; Sun, J; Haugen, H; Myhrer, T; Maryan, C; Ivanow, K N; Cameron, A; Johnson, N W

    2015-04-24

    The ability to function as an effective member of a dental care team is a highly desirable - frequently mandated - attribute of dental technology (DT) graduates. Currently, there is little rigorous examination of how the learning of team-working skills might best be structured in a DT curriculum. This research compares DT curricula, and students' attitudes and perceptions regarding collaboration in practice, from four countries. Students (n = 376) were invited to complete an education profile questionnaire, and the standardised measure - the shared learning scale. There were 196 (52%) responses. Students given opportunities to engage with others had better perceptions of inter-professional learning (IPL). Most believed that team-work and collaborative skills were best acquired by learning together with other dental care professionals, preferably sharing cases for real patients. Curricula should maximise opportunities for dental technology students to experience authentic IPL. Collaboration and team-work needs to be embedded through the whole undergraduate programme. PMID:25908364

  10. Achieving Educational Technology Standards: The Relationship between Student Teacher's Interest and Institutional Support Offered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadijevich, Dj.

    2006-01-01

    Having in mind the need for an increased attention to the importance of pre-service teacher development concerning technology, this study examined teachers' interest to attain educational technology standards (Interest) in terms of their computer attitude (Attitude) and the professional support they received to attain these standards (Support).…

  11. Experience of Integrating Various Technological Tools into the Study and Future Teaching of Mathematics Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorev, Dvora; Gurevich-Leibman, Irina

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents our experience of integrating technological tools into our mathematics teaching (in both disciplinary and didactic courses) for student-teachers. In the first cycle of our study, a variety of technological tools were used (e.g., dynamic software, hypertexts, video and applets) in teaching two disciplinary mathematics courses.…

  12. Investigating Students' Perceptions on Laptop Initiative in Higher Education: An Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood, Susan; Changchit, Chuleeporn; Cutshall, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine students' perceptions and their acceptance towards implementing a laptop program. Design/methodology/approach: Extensive research has been carried out on the technology acceptance model (TAM) to better understand the behavioral intention of individuals to accept and use technology. Therefore, the TAM was adopted…

  13. Information and communication technology and community-based health sciences training in Uganda: perceptions and experiences of educators and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Larry W; Mwanika, Andrew; Kaye, Dan; Muhwezi, Wilson W; Nabirye, Rose C; Mbalinda, Scovia; Okullo, Isaac; Kennedy, Caitlin E; Groves, Sara; Sisson, Stephen D; Burnham, Gilbert; Bollinger, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) has been advocated as a powerful tool for improving health education in low-resource settings. However, few evaluations have been performed of ICT perceptions and user experiences in low-resource settings. During late 2009, an internet-based survey on ICT was administered to students, tutors, and faculty members associated with a Community-Based Education and Service (COBES) program in Uganda. 255 surveys were completed. Response rates varied (students, 188/684, 27.5%; tutors, 14/27, 51.9%; faculty, 53/335, 15.8%). Most respondents owned mobile phones (98%). Students were less likely (p mobile phone coverage was almost universally present. Laptop ownership and internet and mobile phone access was not associated with high valuation of students' COBES experiences. Free text responses found that respondents valued ICT access for research, learning, and communication purposes. In summary, ICT penetration in this population is primarily manifest by extensive mobile phone ownership. Internet access in rural educational sites is still lacking, but students and educators appear eager to utilize this resource if availability improves. ICT may offer a unique opportunity to improve the quality of teaching and learning for COBES participants. PMID:21332303

  14. Educational Technology in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meifeng, Liu; Jinjiao, Lv; Cui, Kang

    2010-01-01

    This paper elaborates the two different academic views of the identity of educational technology in China at the current time--advanced-technology-oriented cognition, known as Electrifying Education, and problem-solving-oriented cognition, known as Educational Technology. It addresses five main modes of educational technology in China: as a…

  15. Experience in applying educational technologies to the integrated system of engineering students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Churlyaeva, Sergey Kukushkin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Some evolutional aspects of the institution currently known as Siberian State Aerospace University are presented as an example of degradation of the integrated system of engineering training and the entire engineering education on the way from planned to market economy. Prospects for some educational technologies expected earlier to raise university graduates’ competency are found out to be doubtful. The analysis of labor market requirements to alumnae shows that no traditional educational technology allows them reach the competence level required by the modern labor market. The existing system of university engineering education is criticized as a whole. Better prospects for preparing engineers have continuing professional training systems at enterprises that still pursue innova-tive projects. The current activity of such a system at Information Satellite Systems Joint-Stock Company as to preparing engineers along the “School-UniversityEnterprise” line is briefly outlined.

  16. Special Education Students Improve Academic Performance through Problem-Based Learning and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, S.; Kintsch, A.

    2003-12-01

    Boulder High School Special Education students work in teams on donated wireless computers to solve problems created by global climate change. Their text is Richard Somerville's The Forgiving Air. They utilize Wheeling Jesuit University's remote sensing web site and private computer bulletin board. Their central source for problem-based learning (PBL) is www.cotf.edu, NASA's Classroom of the Future Global Change web site. As a result, students not only improve their abilities to write, read, do math and research, speak, and work as team members, they also improve self-esteem, resilience, and willingness to take more challenging classes. Two special education students passed AP exams, Calculus and U.S. Government, last spring and Jay Matthews of Newsweek rates Boulder High as 201st of the nation's top 1000 high schools.

  17. Towards transfer & an integrated understanding: developing a critical skill for student teachers of technology education

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison-Love, David

    2014-01-01

    The ability of students to transfer learning between subjects and contexts when problem solving is critical for developing their capability as Technologists and teachers of Technology. However, a growing body of literature suggests this ability is often assumed or over-estimated, and rarely developed explicitly within courses or degree programs. The nature of the problems tackled within technology are such that solutions draw upon knowledge from a wide range of contexts and subjects, howeve...

  18. Leadership, Technology, and Student Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cindy; Zellner, Luana

    A Technology in Education III (TIE-3) grant was awarded to the C-SMART Consortium Project for the 1999-2000 school year by the Texas Education Agency (TEA). The consortium consisted of seven public and private schools in Texas. The goal of this grant was to accomplish four main objectives: electronic activities for development of student

  19. Students' Experiences of Blended Learning in Accounting Education at the Durban University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiralaal, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Durban University of Technology guided by the Higher Education Qualifications Framework (HEQC) identified e-learning as one of their objectives in the curriculum renewal process. To explore the impact of e-learning, blended learning, a combination of online and face-to-face interaction was implemented as a teaching approach in Accounting…

  20. Educational Leadership in an Online World: Connecting Students to Technology Responsibly, Safely, and Ethically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribble, Mike; Miller, Teresa Northern

    2013-01-01

    The current gap in technology knowledge and lack of leadership preparation related to digital literacy for school environments can cause serious problems, as school leaders, parents, and broader social communities are currently realizing. The authors describe strategies for educational leaders to prepare their stakeholder groups for a digital…

  1. Collaborative Writing with Web 2.0 Technologies: Education Students' Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodahl, Cornelia; Hadjerrouit, Said; Hansen, Nils Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies are becoming popular in teaching and learning environments. Among them several online collaborative writing tools, like wikis and blogs, have been integrated into educational settings. Research has been carried out on a wide range of subjects related to wikis, while other, comparable tools like Google Docs and EtherPad remain…

  2. COMPARISON OF STUDENT SATISFACTION BETWEEN TRADITIONAL AND BLENDED TECHNOLOGY COURSE OFFERINGS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos VERNADAKIS

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Blended learning With the concerns and dissatisfaction with e-learning, educators are searching for alternative instructional delivery solutions to relieve the above problems. The blended e-learning system has been presented as a promising alternative learning approach. While blended learning has been recognized as having a number of advantages, insufficient learning satisfaction is still an obstacle to its successful adoption. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate students’ satisfaction with blended learning course delivery compared to a traditional face-to-face class format in a general multimedia course in physical education. Forty six (n=46 undergraduate students, between the ages of 20-22 years old, were randomly assigned into two teaching method groups: Classroom Lecture Instruction (CLI and Blended Lecture Instruction (BLI. For the data collection at the end of this study, students completed an online satisfaction questionnaire.Independent sample t-test analysis was conducted to measure students’ satisfaction towards the CLI and BLI methods. Results indicated that a blended course delivery is preferred over the traditional lecture format. These finding suggest that students' satisfaction could increase when the instructor provides learning environments not only in a traditional classroom, but in an asynchronous online system as well.

  3. Evaluation of the Degree of Educational Goal Fulfillment of Theoretical Courses in Technology for Radiology Students in Hamadan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safar Shams

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Evaluation of educational programs is very important in the process of programming. Evaluation is a comparison between educational results and predetermined goals in order to make decision about programs. Via evaluation, one can judge about programs and of course can correct or change them if necessary. "nMaterials and Methods: In this study, the degree of fulfillment of educational goals for radiology students in technology has been evaluated from 1385 to 1386 by distributing questionnaires among these students. The relationship between fulfillment of educational goals and scores of students in different semesters were evaluated by statistical analysis. "nResults: About 24%, 96% and 100% of students of semester 1, 2 and 3 completely answered the ques-tions and the others were excluded from the study. About 79.3% of the first semester students of radiology assessed a medium fulfillment of educational goals, but in one case, public health lesson, most of them (64% believed in low fulfillment of goals. Second semester students of radiology, as the same ratio, assessed the fulfillment of goals as high, medium and low. Most of the third semester students (60.3% believed that the fulfillment of educational goals had been medium. Most of students believed that the degree of fulfillment of educational goals of courses taught by professors who were not members of the school was higher. There was no statistically significant relation between the fulfillment of educational goals and the score of students in related lessons. "nConclusion: The study revealed that the degree of fulfillment of educational goals for students in different semesters of Radiology was different. There were significant differences between fulfillment of educational goals in theoretical courses conducted by groups inside and outside the paramedical school. "nKeywords: Educational Planning, Vocational Education, Evaluation, Technology, Radiology Student

  4. Research on Using Modern Educational Technology to Training Students Ability of Producing Aerobics

    OpenAIRE

    Ping Zhang

    2014-01-01

    In modern education for the students Aerobics Creation regard ability, scholars have conducted a series of studies, such as aerobics based on a combination of action and research on aerobics extends to extra-curricular studies, calisthenics action on creating capacity, as well as research on improving teaching mode. In recent years, with the development of aerobics in the international, it gradually started with its own unique charm and rich species in a sport, ...

  5. Initiating Functional Vocabulary Learning for Mental Retardation Students with Educational Technology Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ai-Chiao Ku; Shu-Hsuan Chang; Li-Chih Yu

    2014-01-01

    This study developed functional vocabulary learning system for mental retardation students to assist three moderate ones enrolled in special education classes of vocational schools, and discusses the learning effect of the within and extra fading strategies. And the alternative treatment design of the single subject experiment design was adopted to evaluate the effectiveness of the learning system. The teaching strategy adopted photos of physical goods as cues combined with the fading strateg...

  6. A COMPARISON OF UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY AND MILLENNIAL STUDENTS REGARDING THE UTILIZATION OF WEBLOG AND PODCAST TECHNOLOGY IN A TEACHER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie STURDIVANT ENNIS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the study was to compare the utilization of weblog and podcast technology by undergraduate university faculty and Millennial college students. The study was conducted to test the hypothesis, formed from existing literature, that there might be a difference in the utilization of weblog and podcast technology between faculty and Millennial students in a Teacher Education Department. Analysis of the data using descriptive statistics revealed that the mean of both populations was similar in their technological utilization.A technology survey was distributed to Millennial college students and undergraduate university faculty in a Teacher Education Department. One hundred surveys were utilized based upon the number of students currently enrolled in Teacher Education classes at the time of the study. Fifty-nine students and five undergraduate faculties participated in the survey. The average age of the student population was twenty-one, with a faculty average of forty-nine. Data were collected and analyzed using descriptive statistics regarding the utilization of weblog and podcast technology by faculty and students. The study refuted the hypothesis that there is a difference in weblog and podcast utilization between faculty and Millennial students. There was no significant difference in the utilization of weblogs and podcasts in the two populations. The results indicate that the perceived technological gap between Millennial students and university faculty is not as prevalent as theorized by the existing literature.

  7. Assistive technology applied to education of students with visual impairment Uso de tecnologías de asistencia en la educación de estudiantes con deficiencia visual

    OpenAIRE

    Cássia Cristiane de Freitas Alves; Gelse Beatriz Martins Monteiro; Suzana Rabello; Maria Elisabete Rodrigues Freire Gasparetto; Keila Monteiro de Carvalho

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Verify the application of assistive technology, especially information technology in the education of blind and low-vision students from the perceptions of their teachers. METHODS: Descriptive survey study in public schools in three municipalities of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The sample comprised 134 teachers. RESULTS: According to the teachers' opinions, there are differences in the specificities and applicability of assistive technology for blind and low-vision students, ...

  8. APA Summit on Medical Student Education Task Force on Informatics and Technology: Steps to Enhance the Use of Technology in Education through Faculty Development, Funding and Change Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Donald M.; Benjamin, Sheldon; Briscoe, Gregory; Hales, Deborah J.; Boland, Robert J.; Luo, John S.; Chan, Carlyle H.; Kennedy, Robert S.; Karlinsky, Harry; Gordon, Daniel B.; Yellowlees, Peter M.; Yager, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article provides an overview of how trainees, faculty, and institutions use technology for acquiring knowledge, skills, and attitudes for practicing modern medicine. Method: The authors reviewed the literature on medical education, technology, and change, and identify the key themes and make recommendations for implementing…

  9. USE OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY IN PROMOTING DISTANCE EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Rashid, Muhammad; Uzma ELAHI

    2012-01-01

    Educational technology plays an important role in distance education system. By adapting new communication educational technologies in distance educational programmes their quality could be ensured. Instructions conducted through the use of technologies which significantly or completely eliminate the traditional face to face communication between teacher and students lead to distance education. Now a days, media such as computer, artificial satellites, digital libraries, telephones, radio and...

  10. A Cross-Cultural Examination of the Impact of Social, Organisational and Individual Factors on Educational Technology Acceptance between British and Lebanese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhini, Ali; Hone, Kate; Liu, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the social, organisational and individual factors that may affect students' acceptance of e-learning systems in higher education in a cross-cultural context. A questionnaire was developed based on an extended technology acceptance model (TAM). A total sample of 1173 university students from two private universities in Lebanon…

  11. Trends in educational technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Karnad, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Trends in Educational Technologies analyses the benefits and considerations of deploying four major technological trends set to affect higher education institutions. These include; MOOCs, BYOD, Gamification and Games-based learning and Learning analytics. The report argues that, while technology can bring benefits and should be embraced by institutions, pedagogy and learning should be at the heart of any technological adoption.

  12. Online Experiential Education for Technological Entrepreneurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolovich, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Technological Entrepreneurship is both an art and a science. As such, the education of a technological entrepreneur requires both an academic and an experiential component. One form of experiential education is creating real new ventures with student teams. When these ventures are created in an online modality, students work in virtual teams and…

  13. Implementing Educational Technology in Higher Education:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia C. Roberts

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the move toward implementing technology in higher education is driven by an increasing number of competitors as well as student demand, there is still considerable resistance to embracing it. Adoption of technology requires more that merely installing a product. This paper outlines a framework for a strategic change process that can be utilized by educators for the purpose of the selection as well as successful implementation of educational technologies within their setting, in particular, online course management systems. The four steps of this process include strategic analysis, strategy making, strategic plan design, and strategic plan implementation. The choice to embrace a new system and the extent and speed of its implementation depends upon internal factors such as resources, organizational culture, faculty readiness, anticipated degree of resistance, and the degree of variance from the status quo. A case from the author’s experience provides one example of how the use of distance learning technology was strategically implemented.

  14. Restructuring Education through Technology. Fastback 326.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Theodore W.

    This paper examines the role of technology in restructuring education by analyzing how it influences seven important relationships in the educative process: (1) teacher-student relationships; (2) student-content relationships; (3) teacher-content relationships; (4) student-context relationships; (5) teacher-context relationships; (6)…

  15. A COMPARISON OF UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY AND MILLENNIAL STUDENTS REGARDING THE UTILIZATION OF WEBLOG AND PODCAST TECHNOLOGY IN A TEACHER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Sturdivant Ennis, Leslie; Anne Gambrell, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to compare the utilization of weblog and podcast technology by undergraduate university faculty and Millennial college students. The study was conducted to test the hypothesis, formed from existing literature, that there might be a difference in the utilization of weblog and podcast technology between faculty and Millennial students in a Teacher Education Department. Analysis of the data using descriptive statistics revealed that the mean of both populati...

  16. Development of e-Learning Courses for Promoting Student's Global Competency-Basic Courses as a Guide to ESP Education in Advanced Science and Technology-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Mikako; Nakajima, Mikio; Iwai, Chiharu; Ogasawara, Fumie; Kishino, Fumio; Fukui, Kiichi

    Osaka University has been chosen for the FY2005's “Selected Efforts of the Distinctive University Education Support Program (Gendai GP/Good Practice) ”by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) . The aim of this project is to improve English proficiency of undergraduate students with scientific backgrounds. Under this strategic fund, e-Learning course contents were developed for instructing basic, yet practical English for Biotechnology during FY2005. Throughout the project, e-Learning contents will be developed for five other selected subjects of science i.e., 1) biotechnology, 2) information technology, 3) nano-technology, 4) environmental technology and 5) robotics technology, for undergraduate students as guiding courses to ESP education in graduate (higher) level.

  17. Measuring Students’ Penetration and Usage Trends of Information and Communication Technology (ICT in Polytechnic Education: Ho Polytechnic, Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Yaw Asabere

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Polytechnics in Ghana, which are ten (10 in number have amission to provide practically oriented Polytechnic Education inthe areas of science, technology, engineering and business to bothGhanaians and non Ghanaians on a global scale. In order forPolytechnics in Ghana to achieve their mission, Information andCommunication Technology (ICT has a major role to play. Theprimary focus and aim of this research paper is to analysestudents’ penetration and usage trends of ICT for learning in one(1 of the ten (10 Polytechnics, namely; Ho Polytechnic, Ghana.Through quantitative research methodology involvingadministration of questionnaires and review of relevant literature,we were able to thoroughly and critically analyse the current ICTpenetration of students in Ho Polytechnic, Ghana. Based on ourresearch findings, we further discussed how to improve ICTpenetration in Ho Polytechnic through various ICTdevelopmental objectives and guiding principles.

  18. Disruptive technologies in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Flavin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the role of “disruptive” innovative technologies in higher education. In this country and elsewhere, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs have invested significant sums in learning technologies, with Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs being more or less universal, but these technologies have not been universally adopted and used by students and staff. Instead, other technologies not owned or controlled by HEIs are widely used to support learning and teaching. According to Christensen's theory of Disruptive Innovation, these disruptive technologies are not designed explicitly to support learning and teaching in higher education, but have educational potential. This study uses Activity Theory and Expansive Learning to analyse data regarding the impact of disruptive technologies. The data were obtained through a questionnaire survey about awareness and use of technologies, and through observation and interviews, exploring participants’ actual practice. The survey answers tended to endorse Disruptive Innovation theory, with participants establishing meanings for technologies through their use of them, rather than in keeping with a designer's intentions. Observation revealed that learners use a narrow range of technologies to support learning, but with a tendency to use resources other than those supplied by their HEIs. Interviews showed that participants use simple and convenient technologies to support their learning and teaching. This study identifies a contradiction between learning technologies made available by HEIs, and technologies used in practice. There is no evidence to suggest that a wide range of technologies is being used to support learning and teaching. Instead, a small range of technologies is being used for a wide range of tasks. Students and lecturers are not dependent on their HEIs to support learning and teaching. Instead, they self-select technologies, with use weighted towards established brands. The use of technologies outside HEIs has implications for the monitoring of learning and teaching, and for the role of HEIs, which are no longer the gatekeepers to knowledge.

  19. Evaluation of the Degree of Educational Goal Fulfillment of Theoretical Courses in Technology for Radiology Students in Hamadan University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Safar Shams; Karim Ghazi-Khanlou Sani

    2010-01-01

    Background/Objective: Evaluation of educational programs is very important in the process of programming. Evaluation is a comparison between educational results and predetermined goals in order to make decision about programs. Via evaluation, one can judge about programs and of course can correct or change them if necessary. "nMaterials and Methods: In this study, the degree of fulfillment of educational goals for radiology students in technology has been evaluated from 1385 to 1386 by d...

  20. Nuclear Technology Education Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To reinforce the government efforts toward the restoration of nuclear education health, a new concept in post-graduate level training for the nuclear sector has been developed by a strong consortium of UK universities and HE institutions under the title Nuclear Technology Education Consortium (NTEC). The basis of this consortium were designed to meet the UK projected nuclear skills requirements in decommissioning and cleanup, reactor technology, fusion and nuclear medicine. The structure and content of the programme, which leads to qualifications up to master's level in nuclear science and technology, was established following extensive consultations with the UK nuclear sector, including industry, regulators, MoD, NDA, Government Departments and the Cogent Sector Skills Council. The programme is coordinated by the Dalton Nuclear Institute at The University of Manchester. This programme has been approved by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Following are the key features of this consortium: - It was only designed to fulfil the needs nuclear sector; - It offers subjects in broad spectrum, from reactor theory through decommissioning to waste disposal and storage, the subject matter being presented by leading specialists in their field; - Each topic is presented in short course format which is ideal for employees within the industry; - It offers part-time basis over a period of three years as well as full-time in one year post-graduate courses in nuclear science anost-graduate courses in nuclear science and technology; - This programme also covers the Post-graduate Diploma or Post-graduate Certificate opportunity for students; - Individual subjects are presented in 'short course' modular format, providing excellent access to the programme for engineers and managers in full-time employment who wish to advance their skill and knowledge base; - The core of each module is one week of direct teaching at the relevant institution, minimizing the time away from the workplace for an employee whilst maximizing its effectiveness; - A distance learning option is being developed; - The pass mark is 50% for all modules and is the same for students taking an MSc, PG Diploma, or PG Certificate. Modules are generally delivered on the campus of the providing institution. Students seeking a post-graduate qualification register with the University of their choice and visit other members of the consortium to attend their selected modules. All modules are delivered by direct teaching but some are being converted into a distance learning format as an alternative method of delivery to provide greater choice for students

  1. Educational Technology, Reimagined

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Michael

    2010-01-01

    "Educational technology" is often equated in the popular imagination with "computers in the schools." But technology is much more than merely computers, and education is much more than mere schooling. The landscape of child-accessible technologies is blossoming in all sorts of directions: tools for communication, for physical construction and…

  2. Educational Technology in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Trentin, Guglielmo

    2012-01-01

    Discussing the theme of Educational Technology (ET) in Europe is a far from simple matter, mainly because of the different approaches of the member states in promoting the use of ICTs to support educational processes. Nevertheless, through its research and development programmes on Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) themes, the European Community has played and still plays an important role in boosting the development of new educational methodologies and technologies, favoring and stimulating...

  3. Introducing Mobile Technology in Graduate Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Gopesh; Chhajed, Dilip; Hong, Seung Won; Scagnoli, Norma

    2014-01-01

    The insertion of mobile technology in educational settings is becoming more prevalent, making it important to understand the effectiveness of such technology in enhancing students' learning and engagement. This article is based on research conducted to study the effects of the use of mobile technology--specifically iPads--by students in a…

  4. Educational studies in heat and power technology : how students learn with multimedia tools and problem-based learning

    OpenAIRE

    Abbes, Yacine

    2005-01-01

    Higher education is undergoing continuous changes and new learning tools and methods are implemented. Researchers in education do not always agree upon the effectiveness of some of the methods introduced into engineering education. The present thesis consists of two case studies on educational methods introduced at the Department of Energy Technology, at Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden. The qualitative research methodology has been used in case one and a combination of qualitative...

  5. Distance Education in Technological Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R .C. SHARMA

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Distance Education in Technological AgeRomesh Verma (Editor, New Delhi: Anmol Publications, 2005, ISBN 81-261-2210-2, pp. 419 Reviewed by R C SHARMARegional DirectorIndira Gandhi National Open University-INDIA The advancements in information and communication technologies have brought significant changes in the way the open and distance learning are provided to the learners. The impact of such changes is quite visible in both developed and developing countries. Switching over to online mode, joining hands with private initiatives and making a presence in foreign waters, are some of the hallmarks of the open and distance education (ODE institutions in developing countries. The compilation of twenty six essays on themes as applicable to ODE has resulted in the book, ?Distance Education in Technological Age?. These essays follow a progressive style of narration, starting from describing conceptual framework of distance education, how the distance education was emerged on the global scene and in India, and then goes on to discuss emergence of online distance education and research aspects in ODE. The initial four chapters provide a detailed account of historical development and growth of distance education in India and State Open University and National Open University Model in India . Student support services are pivot to any distance education and much of its success depends on how well the support services are provided. These are discussed from national and international perspective. The issues of collaborative learning, learning on demand, life long learning, learning-unlearning and re-learning model and strategic alliances have also given due space by the authors. An assortment of technologies like communication technology, domestic technology, information technology, mass media and entertainment technology, media technology and educational technology give an idea of how these technologies are being adopted in the open universities. The study provides details on how the multi-media systems like radio, audio cassettes, telephone, video cassettes, video discs, education television and computer based education etc can be successfully adopted. There are factors like socio-political, economic, human and administrative, and economic, which manipulate the application of information communication technology in education in developing countries. The authors in their chapters on satellite communication and virtual university explain the advancements. The book also gives details of how the library services could be arranged for the distance learners in developing countries. Skills in distance teaching are crucial to the successful counseling and teaching as the learners have varied characteristics. These skills contribute to the effective distance teaching in traditional as well as online distance education settings. A major portion of the book has been dedicated to the e-learning and virtual university initiatives. Cases from YashwantRao Chawan Maharastra Open University, a project C-MODE which deals with offering education through virtual academy and application of non-broadcasting and broadcasting media technologies to distance education can be found in these chapters.Research in and research on distance education is very significant. Quality and Quantity of research in distance education has been a source of prime concern of educators. The readers can find here an overview of review and critiques of researches in the field of open and distance learning in the Indian context and what are various changing paradigms of research in distance education. The authors strongly suggest undertaking researches on pedagogy, educational media and management of distance education. The book contains useful information for the beginners in basic distance education and those who are interested in knowing what happened and what is happening in developing countries. Biodata and Adresses of Reviewer Ramesh Chandra Sharma holds a PhD in Education in the area of Educational Technology and has been working as Regional Director i

  6. Students Computer Skills in Faculty of Education

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Caglar; Mukaddes Sakalli Demirok

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays; the usage of technology is not a privilege but an obligation. Technological developments influence structures andfunctions of educational institutions. It is also expected from the teachers that they integrate technology in their lessons inorder to educate the individuals of information society. This research has covered 145(68 female, 78 male) students, studying inNear East University Faculty of Education. The Computer Skills Scale developed by Güçlü (2010) was used as a data co...

  7. Students for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spor, Tara M.

    This paper is the text of a speech given by the president of "Students for Education," a students' organization at Rutgers-The State University at Camden (New Jersey), describing her experiences organizing and leading the group. She describes the organization's first year when it was a grassroots organization with the goal of becoming an…

  8. Benign Educational Technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Allan; Fox, Robert; Boyd, Anna

    1999-01-01

    Uses Tenner's framework of unintended consequences of the introduction and use of technology and applies it to a case study in educational technology change at Curtin University (Western Australia). Discusses distance education, computer-mediated communication based on the World Wide Web, and revenge as a framework for identifying unintended…

  9. Information Technology and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Halimah Badioze

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the impact of information technology on learning and teacher education and outlines a scenario for the use of information technology in education in Malaysia, including online systems and an experimental computer-integrated learning system. Interactive computer systems used in the Open University (United Kingdom) are described. (Contains…

  10. Knowledge-generating activities on which technology education students draw when they design and make artefacts

    OpenAIRE

    Rauscher, Willem J.

    2010-01-01

    Technology is often perceived simplistically as applied science, and therefore regarded as inferior to science. Scholars of technology, however, reject the view that technology is applied science and insist that technology is a cognitive system consisting of a separate body of technological knowledge. Although science is acknowledged as an important source of knowledge for technology, Vincenti (1990) identified six other knowledge-generating activities that contribute to the knowledge base in...

  11. Impact of School Technology on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Larry Douglas, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an overview of the impact of school technology on elementary students in grades three through five attending public schools in Indiana. The investigation focused on the impact of various technologies on student achievement as measured on Indiana Statewide Testing for Educational Progress-Plus (ISTEP+). Various comparisons were…

  12. A Student View of Technology in the Classroom: Does It Enhance the Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Deborah Brown; Meuter, Matthew L.

    2011-01-01

    There has been an explosion of classroom technologies, yet there is a lack of research investigating the connection between classroom technology and student learning. This research project explores faculty usage of classroom-based course management software, student usage and opinions of these software tools, and an exploration of whether or not…

  13. Improving Educational Outcomes by Providing Educational Services through Mobile Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Hosam Farouk El-Sofany

    2013-01-01

    The use of Computers, Networks, and Internet has successfully enabled educational institutions to provide their students and instructors with various online educational services. With the recent developments in M-learning and mobile technology, further possibilities are emerging to provide such services through mobile devices such as mobile phones and PDAs. By providing the educational services using wireless and mobile technologies, the educational institutions can potentially bring great co...

  14. KSC Education Technology Research and Development Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, Michael R. L.

    2003-01-01

    Educational technology is facilitating new approaches to teaching and learning science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. Cognitive research is beginning to inform educators about how students learn providing a basis for design of more effective learning environments incorporating technology. At the same time, access to computers, the Internet and other technology tools are becoming common features in K-20 classrooms. Encouraged by these developments, STEM educators are transforming traditional STEM education into active learning environments that hold the promise of enhancing learning. This document illustrates the use of technology in STEM education today, identifies possible areas of development, links this development to the NASA Strategic Plan, and makes recommendations for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Education Office for consideration in the research, development, and design of new educational technologies and applications.

  15. An Investigation of Technology Avoidance Effect into Higher Education Environments: Some Empirical Evidence of Marketing Students' Background and Their Use of Personal Computers Outside the Academic Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spais, George S.; Vasileiou, Konstantinos Z.

    2008-01-01

    The major objective of this study was to test a research hypothesis in order to explain the technology avoidance effect in higher educational environments. We addressed the core research themes of our study using a survey. Our intention was to test marketing students' perceptions in order to investigate the potent influence of a climate of…

  16. A Teacher Action Research Study: Enhancing Student Critical Thinking Knowledge, Skills, Dispositions, Application and Transfer in a Higher Education Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Jack Gordon

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a critical thinking instructional intervention in a higher education technology course with the purpose of determining the extent to which the intervention enhanced student critical thinking knowledge, skills, dispositions, application and transfer abilities. Historically, critical thinking has been considered…

  17. Enhancing Physical Education and Sport Science Students' Self-Efficacy and Attitudes regarding Information and Communication Technologies through a Computer Literacy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastergiou, Marina

    2010-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have become an integral component of Physical Education (PE) and Sport Science (SS) curricula and professions. It is thus imperative that PE and SS students develop ICT skills, self-efficacy in ICT and positive attitudes towards ICT. This study was aimed at designing a computer literacy course…

  18. How to educate students without coming face to face with them or Information technologies in the teaching of translation on a distance-learning basis

    OpenAIRE

    Neunzig, Wilhelm

    2002-01-01

    The author offers a synoptic vision of the possibilities presented by the use of information and communication technologies in the teaching of translation on a distance-learning basis, with a view to improving contact between lecturers and students, suggesting practical translation classes and guaranteeing individualised online education.

  19. Technologies for Inclusive Education: Beyond Traditional Integration Approaches. Advances in Educational Technologies and Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barres, David Griol; Carrion, Zoraida Callejas; Lopez-Cozar Delgado, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    By providing students with the opportunities to receive a high quality education regardless of their social or cultural background, inclusive education is a new area that goes beyond traditional integration approaches. These approaches hope to provide the educative system with the ability to adapt to the diversity of its students. Technologies for…

  20. Relationships between Teacher Characteristics and Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Kurt Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Too often, teachers are using educational technology resources for administrative purposes instead of using these resources in a constructivist manner to enhance student learning. The study site was well behind the national average in overall educational technology use categories. The purpose of this explanatory correlational research was to…

  1. Worlds in Collision: Copyright, Technology, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    In the past, copyright and education have evolved together in response to technological advances from the book to the videocassette, and copyright law has been designed to allow educators to use a wide range of media with their students. Stephen Marshall describes how digital communication technologies threaten these accommodations, not as a…

  2. The Effects of Educational Games based on Science Stories on Students’ Academic Achievements in Science and Technology Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal CO?KUN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Today, the importance of training all individuals equipped with inquiry is accepted by the authorities. In this respect, approaching students’ classroom learning and everyday learning, both facilitate students’ better understanding and as it was aimed before, will make it possible to teach students with inquiry ability and help students to easily adapt changing scheme of the world. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the academic effect of educational games based on science stories in. the academic success of students in 7th grade elementary science class. In order to achieve that, an experimental study with pre-post tests was administered to an experiment group (N=15 and a control group (N=15 of middle school students. In conclusion, results of the study were analyzed with SPPS 17.00 version software. As a result of study, educational games with science stories revealed some significant differences between each group.

  3. Engaging Students in Modeling as an Epistemic Practice of Science: An Introduction to the Special Issue of the Journal of Science Education and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Todd; Oh, Phil Seok

    2015-04-01

    This article provides an introduction for the special issue of the Journal of Science Education and Technology focused on science teaching and learning with models. The article provides initial framing for questions that guided the special issue. Additionally, based on our careful review of each of these articles, some discussion of how selected articles within the issue informed these questions. Specifically, when considering key facets of modeling instruction or design features of modeling curriculum, the studies in the special issue provided insight into productive ways in which teachers engaged students in modeling practices. Further, modeling pedagogies—pedagogies for transforming scientific practices of modeling into students' experience—were reified so that how these pedagogies could be coordinated into classroom instruction was revealed. When characteristic features of students' engagement in modeling were considered, research offered insight into productive model-based learning sequences for K-6 modelers and how students' development of productive epistemologies can evolve differently. Finally, the special issue considered how technology facilitated cognitive processes and/or instructional practices by examining learners' interactions with technology within modeling contexts. In this, instructional sequences using agent-based modeling (ABM) as a central technology are shared. These include the role of ABM in scaling student-modeling experiences beyond individuals to classroom experiences and how ABM can support student investigations of complex phenomenon that is not directly observable, among other affordances. Other articles also investigated some aspects of learners' interactions with technology to inform how technology-enhanced science teaching and learning with models.

  4. Educational Technology for the Inclusive Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcic, Andreja Istenic

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents and evaluates the development of an educational technology curriculum aimed at pre-service, primary education and undergraduates; the focus is on the incorporation of ICT competences for inclusive education. The framework was the introduction of SEVERI e-learning environment in Slovenian schools. Students were able to monitor…

  5. A Gendered World: Students and Instructional Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Rajagopal, Indhu; Bojin, Nis

    2003-01-01

    Gender has become a significant issue in the various discussions related to the use of computers and instructional technologies (IT) in higher education. Are gender differences relevant in the students' learning process and their use of technological components in their courses? Is gender significant in determining the use of IT by students in colleges and universities? Does the study of how gender influences students' use of software and presentation formats, throw light on other general beh...

  6. Software Piracy among Technology Education Students: Investigating Property Rights in a Culture of Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teston, George

    2008-01-01

    When asked about individual perceptions of "technology," 68% of Americans primarily equate the term to the computer. Although this perception under represents the true breadth of the field, the statistic does speak to the ubiquitous role the computer plays across many technology disciplines. Software has become the building block of all major…

  7. The Educational Technology Myth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, David

    2012-01-01

    If one wants to teach youth to think, one has to restrain himself from doing all their thinking for them. One has to refrain from specifying in advance what they are going to think. Yet, this is just what educational technologists are consistently guilty of doing. Educational technology is committed to excluding the possibility of anything new or…

  8. Open educational resources : higher education students??? knowledge and use

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Paulo; Miranda, Luisa; Morais, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technologies represent one of the main innovation factors within the teaching and learning process, especially in Higher Education. In this context, the search for building useful and grounded knowledge using strategies which meet students??? needs and interests requires the use of innovative resources, among which we highlight digital educational resources, particularly open educational resources (OER). The open educational resources issue has deserved the at...

  9. Technology and Educational Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boocock, Sarane S.

    2012-01-01

    Most current debate on instructional technology is characterized either by grandiose speculation on the salvation of education through automation (without specification of "what" and "how" technological innovations will actually be introduced in specific classroom situations, and how the changes will be financed), or by jargon-filled hairsplitting…

  10. Technology in Adult Education ESOL Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Today's world is filled with technology resources such as cellphones, iPods, laptops and the internet. By using these technological resources, adult education ESOL teachers can improve instruction, boost learning and better prepare students for real world English use. This article examines advantages of technology use and offers examples of…

  11. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Leo Stanly

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of virtual education is most noticeable in the developed world where there is much greater access to educational institutions and learning technologies, especially computers, CDROMs and the Internet. ICT makes it possible for many potential learners in many parts of developing countries, including remote and rural areas, to have access to education. Another technology that is being used extensively in education is satellite broadcasting. Satellite television for educational purposes has a long history dating back to the early 1980s. India was one of the first countries to use satellite television through the INSAT project, and today the Indira Gandhi National Open University is still a major satellite user.

  12. The Impact of Assistive Technology on the Educational Performance of Students with Visual Impairments: A Synthesis of the Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Stacy M.; Smith, Derrick W.

    2011-01-01

    This synthesis examined the research literature from 1965 to 2009 on the assistive technology that is used by individuals with visual impairments. The authors located and reviewed 256 articles for evidence-based research on assistive technology that had a positive impact on educational performance. Of the 256 studies, only 2 provided promising…

  13. [Innovations in education for the digital student].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, P; Vervoorn, J M

    2012-06-01

    A significant percentage of today's teaching staff received their professional training before the revolution in information and communication technology took place. Students, by contrast, are so-called 'digital natives': they grew up surrounded by digital technology. Present day students are used to multi-tasking and expect to be facilitated in using educationalfacilities regardless of time and place. Adapting higher education to present day students' study behaviour and expectations requires reconsideration of educationalform and methods. Several types of staff can be distinguished in their attitude towards technological innovation in education. Among them are staff who are reluctant in accepting innovations. Dental schools face the challenge of finding supportfor innovations with all their teaching staff and to better adapt to the twenty-first century student. In order to introduce technological innovations successfully, students need to become involved and sufficient attention must be paid to qualifying instructors. PMID:22812266

  14. When are powerful learning environments effective? The role of learner activities and of students' conceptions of educational technology

    OpenAIRE

    Gerjets, Peter; Hesse, Friedrich

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this chapter is to outline a theoretical and empirical perspective on how learners' conceptions of educational technology might influence their learning activities and thereby determine the power of computer-based learning environments. Starting with an introduction to the concept of powerful learning environments we outline how recent developments in information and communication technologies might be used to implement these environments technologically. In the next step we refer...

  15. Mnemonics for Higher Education Using Contemporary Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Balaji, Dr. R. D.; Ramniklal, Dr. Brijesh; Balasupramanian, N.; Malathi, Er. R.

    2013-01-01

    Education pierces into the contemporary world due to the influence of the emerging technologies in the digital world. Education field is also bombarded by the modern technologies and the demands of the digital society. It is affected by cloud computing, green computing and Internet. Still the success of this depends upon the minimization of the knowledge loss, while transferring ideas from teacher to student. Teaching & Learning is always an art. Even though modern technolog...

  16. Employing Virtualization for Information Technology Education

    OpenAIRE

    Mirzoev, Timur

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript presents teaching and curriculum design for Information Technology classes. Today, students demand hands-on activities for the newest technologies. It is feasible to satisfy this appetite for exciting education by employing server virtualization technologies to teach advanced concepts with extensive hands-on assignments. Through utilization of virtualized servers, students are able to deploy, secure and manage virtual machines and networks in a contained envi...

  17. Business school techspectations Technology in the daily lives and educational experiences of business students

    OpenAIRE

    Alexopoulos, Angelos; Lynn, Theo

    2010-01-01

    Business School Techspectations is the second in a series of reports based on research by the DCU Leadership, Innovation and Knowledge Research Centre (LInK) at DCU Business School. With its roots in an Irish business school, it is no surprise that LInK’s mission is to strengthen the competitiveness, productivity, innovation and entrepreneurial capacity of the Irish economy. Ireland’s next generation transformation will be enabled by information and communication technologies (ICT) and di...

  18. South Carolina Advanced Technological Education National Resource Center (SC ATE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The South Carolina Advanced Technological Education (SC ATE) National Resource Center for Engineering Technology (ET) Education is a resource for two-year colleges and provides access to "materials for recruiting and retaining students, as well as for teaching engineering technology." The website also provides resources for ET students and for businesses and industries seeking to hire engineering technology graduates. Of interest to educators and administrators is a free PDF monograph on the recruitment and retention of engineering technology students and links to web and other resources for teaching engineering technology courses. Students may be interested in SCATE's on-line resources for finding jobs in the ET sector.

  19. A Computer Simulation of the U.S. Energy Crisis, Energy. Student Guide. Computer Technology Program Environmental Education Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This is the student guide in a set of five computer-oriented environmental/energy education units. Content of this guide: (1) introduce the unit; (2) describe the "ENERGY" simulation; (3) give instructions for running the simulation; (4) give exercises for the unit; and (5) present sources of information on the energy crisis. (MR)

  20. Integrating Educational Technologies into Teacher Education: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlins, Peter; Kehrwald, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This article is a case study of an integrated, experiential approach to improving pre-service teachers' understanding and use of educational technologies in one New Zealand teacher education programme. The study examines the context, design and implementation of a learning activity which integrated student-centred approaches, experiential…

  1. On School Educational Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Patricia M.

    2010-01-01

    This analysis of the literatures on school educational technology leadership addresses definitions of school technology leaders and leadership, their role in educational change, and why schools are now changing as a result of 21st century advancements in technology. The literatures disagree over the definition of educational technology leadership.…

  2. Distance Education Students Moving Towards Collaborative Learning - A Field Study of Australian Distance Education Students and Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Fa?hræus, Eva R.

    2004-01-01

    Distance education has been offered to young students in Australia for about 100 years. Recently, information and communication technology has been introduced as a means to improve communication, but not all remote students have access to this new technology. This has made it difficult to arrange collaborative learning for distance-education students. In this student-focused study, more than 40 students as well as teachers and other important persons have been interviewed and observed in scho...

  3. Measuring Students’ Penetration and Usage Trends of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Polytechnic Education: Ho Polytechnic, Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Nana Yaw Asabere; Mawuli Kwasi Ahegbebu

    2012-01-01

    Polytechnics in Ghana, which are ten (10) in number have amission to provide practically oriented Polytechnic Education inthe areas of science, technology, engineering and business to bothGhanaians and non Ghanaians on a global scale. In order forPolytechnics in Ghana to achieve their mission, Information andCommunication Technology (ICT) has a major role to play. Theprimary focus and aim of this research paper is to analysestudents’ penetration and usage trends of ICT for learning in one(1...

  4. A Review of Technology Education in Ireland; a Changing Technological Environment Promoting Design Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Keelin; Phelan, Pat

    2014-01-01

    In Ireland, Technology Education's structure and organisation across the levels of education is not delivered or governed in a coherent manner. Technology Education in primary level education, for students between 5 and 12 years of age, does not explicitly exist as a separate subject. In primary level education, Social, Environmental and…

  5. Advanced Information Technology in Education

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The volume includes a set of selected papers extended and revised from the 2011 International Conference on Computers and Advanced Technology in Education. With the development of computers and advanced technology, the human social activities are changing basically. Education, especially the education reforms in different countries, has been experiencing the great help from the computers and advanced technology. Generally speaking, education is a field which needs more information, while the computers, advanced technology and internet are a good information provider. Also, with the aid of the computer and advanced technology, persons can make the education an effective combination. Therefore, computers and advanced technology should be regarded as an important media in the modern education. Volume Advanced Information Technology in Education is to provide a forum for researchers, educators, engineers, and government officials involved in the general areas of computers and advanced technology in education to d...

  6. Are Special Education Students Happy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusitalo-Malmivaara, Lotta; Kankaanpaa, Paula; Makinen, Tuula; Raeluoto, Tiina; Rauttu, Karoliina; Tarhala, Veera; Lehto, Juhani E.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the subjective and school-related happiness of 75 11- to 16-year-old special education students to 77 age- and gender-matched mainstream students using two quantitative measures. Additionally, the respondents chose from a list of 12 putative happy makers what they felt increased their happiness. Ten special education students

  7. Emerging Web Technologies in Higher Education: A Case of Incorporating Blogs, Podcasts and Social Bookmarks in a Web Programming Course Based on Students' Learning Styles and Technology Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Nauman; Yang, Yun; Sinnappan, Suku

    2009-01-01

    The adoption level of emerging web technologies is on the rise in academic settings. However, a major obstacle in the practice of web-based instruction is the limited understanding of learners' characteristics and perceptions about technology use. Thus there is a need to understand the relationship between students' learning styles and their…

  8. Informatics Education in Different Disciplines at University Level: Case Study--A Survey of Students' Attitude toward Informatics Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingoy, Ozhan; Gulluoglu, Sabri Serkan

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a quantitative study on attitudes toward the usage of Information Technology related tools and applications. The study was conducted at a private university, Turkey, with 97 female and 113 male students involved as participants. They were each presented with a questionnaire to relate their attitudes toward IT and after…

  9. Analysis of knowledge in Astronomy of the students of the Course of Technology in Industrial Automation at the Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of São Paulo - Campus Cubatao

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, A. C.

    2014-02-01

    This work is part of a research of the academic Masters in Science in Education. It seeks to present the results of the survey conducted among students of the technology course in industrial automation at the Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of São Paulo at the Campus Cubatão (IFSP Campus Cubatão). In the first step, the students' lack of knowledge to the related primary concepts of Astronomy turned out. In a second step, a Basic Course in Astronomy was held outside the syllabus, including classes, lectures and films with pertinent content, which corrected initially found erros. Through a special approach, containing diverse teaching strategies, astronomical concepts were learned or relearned. Analysing the responses of this second step it was found that students had a significant improvement in learning.

  10. Successful Student Recruitment Using Direct Marketing and Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merante, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    Educational marketing--which uses marketing methods unique to education institutions, including segmentation, direct mail, and information technology--is discussed. A model for student recruitment developed by the University of Pittsburgh is described. (Author/MLW)

  11. MONOGRAPH - Recruitment & Retention of Engineering Technology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Elaine

    Identifying strategies to assist with recruitment and retention of engineering technology students particularly women and minorities was the focus of a 1998 Retention Forum, held in Columbia, SC, and sponsored by the South Carolina Advanced Technological Education (SC ATE) Center of Excellence. The Center is funded by the National Science Foundation and the South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education. Approximately 90 Retention Forum participants discussed results from research on enrollment and retention of engineering technology (ET) students in South Carolinas technical college system. The SC ATE Center of Excellence commissioned the research report, Determinants of Enrollment and Retention in South Carolina Engineering Technology Programs, by Dr. W. Douglas Evans. Forum participants also heard a report on what SC technical colleges are doing well to recruit and retain women and minorities in ET fields. During the forum, a panel of women and minority ET students from South Carolina technical colleges shared their perspectives and experiences. In conclusion, participants met in focus groups to discuss new ways of enhancing recruitment and retention of engineering technology students. These research activities reveal some significant findings, which are being used to develop new retention strategies. In addition to an in-depth examination of opinions and attitudes of first- and second-year engineering technology students and engineering technology faculty and administrators, the research takes a closer look at recruitment and retention of women and minority students. The various components of this research activity by the SC ATE Center of Excellence are presented in this monograph.

  12. Research on Technology and Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, Scott

    2010-10-01

    From Facebook to smart phones, technology is an integral part of our student's lives. For better or for worse, technology has become nearly inescapable in the classroom, enhancing instruction, distracting students, or simply complicating life. As good teachers we want to harness the power we have available to impact our students, but it is getting harder as the pace of technological change accelerates. How can we make good choices in which technologies to invest time and resources in to use effectively? Do some technologies make more of a difference in student learning? In this talk we will look at research studies looking at technology use in the physics classroom---both my work and that of others---and their impact on student learning. Examples will include computers in the laboratory, web-based homework, and different forms of electronic communication. From these examples, I will draw some general principles for effective educational technology and physics education. Technology is simply a tool; the key is how we use those tools to help our students develop their abilities and understanding.

  13. Culturelogical senses of activity in anthropic technologies of higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriev S.V.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Technology of the educational teaching motive actions is examined in a theory and practice of higher education. The role of modern educational technologies is rotined in professional preparation of students. «Humanism conversion» of educational technologies is offered. It is rotined that authentic sense of educational activity of man is finding by him itself (achievement of authenticness with itself. On the basis of it is creative realization in professional labour.

  14. Assistive technology applied to education of students with visual impairment Uso de tecnologías de asistencia en la educación de estudiantes con deficiencia visual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Cristiane de Freitas Alves

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Verify the application of assistive technology, especially information technology in the education of blind and low-vision students from the perceptions of their teachers. METHODS: Descriptive survey study in public schools in three municipalities of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The sample comprised 134 teachers. RESULTS: According to the teachers' opinions, there are differences in the specificities and applicability of assistive technology for blind and low-vision students, for whom specific computer programs are important. Information technology enhances reading and writing skills, as well as communication with the world on an equal basis, thereby improving quality of life and facilitating the learning process. The main reason for not using information technology is the lack of planning courses. The main requirements for the use of information technology in schools are enough computers for all students, advisers to help teachers, and pedagogical support. CONCLUSIONS: Assistive technology is applied to education of students with visual impairment; however, teachers indicate the need for infrastructure and pedagogical support. Information technology is an important tool in the inclusion process and can promote independence and autonomy of students with visual impairment.OBJETIVOS: Verificar el uso de tecnologías de asistencia, en particular tecnologías informáticas, en la educación de estudiantes ciegos y débiles visuales, desde la percepción de sus maestros. MÉTODOS: Estudio descriptivo mediante encuesta a 134 maestros de escuelas públicas de tres municipios del estado de São Paulo, Brasil. RESULTADOS: Según la opinión de los maestros hay diferencias en las especificidades y aplicabilidad de las tecnologías de asistencia para estudiantes ciegos y débiles visuales, para los que son importantes programas específicos de computación. Las tecnologías informáticas desarrollan las habilidades de lectura y escritura, así como la comunicación con el mundo sobre una base de igualdad, lo que mejora la calidad de vida y facilita el proceso de aprendizaje. La principal razón para no utilizar tecnologías informáticas es la falta de cursos de planificación. Los principales requisitos para usar tecnologías informáticas en las escuelas es tener suficientes computadoras para todos los estudiantes, asesores que ayuden a los maestros y apoyo pedagógico. CONCLUSIONES: Las tecnologías de asistencia se utilizan en la educación de estudiantes con deficiencia visual; no obstante, los maestros señalan la necesidad de infraestructura y apoyo pedagógico. Las tecnologías informáticas constituyen una herramienta importante para el proceso de inclusión y pueden propiciar la independencia y la autonomía de los estudiantes con deficiencia visual.

  15. Assistive technology applied to education of students with visual impairment / Uso de tecnologías de asistencia en la educación de estudiantes con deficiencia visual

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Cássia Cristiane de Freitas, Alves; Gelse Beatriz Martins, Monteiro; Suzana, Rabello; Maria Elisabete Rodrigues Freire, Gasparetto; Keila Monteiro de, Carvalho.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Verificar el uso de tecnologías de asistencia, en particular tecnologías informáticas, en la educación de estudiantes ciegos y débiles visuales, desde la percepción de sus maestros. MÉTODOS: Estudio descriptivo mediante encuesta a 134 maestros de escuelas públicas de tres municipios del e [...] stado de São Paulo, Brasil. RESULTADOS: Según la opinión de los maestros hay diferencias en las especificidades y aplicabilidad de las tecnologías de asistencia para estudiantes ciegos y débiles visuales, para los que son importantes programas específicos de computación. Las tecnologías informáticas desarrollan las habilidades de lectura y escritura, así como la comunicación con el mundo sobre una base de igualdad, lo que mejora la calidad de vida y facilita el proceso de aprendizaje. La principal razón para no utilizar tecnologías informáticas es la falta de cursos de planificación. Los principales requisitos para usar tecnologías informáticas en las escuelas es tener suficientes computadoras para todos los estudiantes, asesores que ayuden a los maestros y apoyo pedagógico. CONCLUSIONES: Las tecnologías de asistencia se utilizan en la educación de estudiantes con deficiencia visual; no obstante, los maestros señalan la necesidad de infraestructura y apoyo pedagógico. Las tecnologías informáticas constituyen una herramienta importante para el proceso de inclusión y pueden propiciar la independencia y la autonomía de los estudiantes con deficiencia visual. Abstract in english OBJECTIVES: Verify the application of assistive technology, especially information technology in the education of blind and low-vision students from the perceptions of their teachers. METHODS: Descriptive survey study in public schools in three municipalities of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The s [...] ample comprised 134 teachers. RESULTS: According to the teachers' opinions, there are differences in the specificities and applicability of assistive technology for blind and low-vision students, for whom specific computer programs are important. Information technology enhances reading and writing skills, as well as communication with the world on an equal basis, thereby improving quality of life and facilitating the learning process. The main reason for not using information technology is the lack of planning courses. The main requirements for the use of information technology in schools are enough computers for all students, advisers to help teachers, and pedagogical support. CONCLUSIONS: Assistive technology is applied to education of students with visual impairment; however, teachers indicate the need for infrastructure and pedagogical support. Information technology is an important tool in the inclusion process and can promote independence and autonomy of students with visual impairment.

  16. Effect of Distance Education on Student Learning Methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlamert, Jill A.

    1998-01-01

    Discussion of distance education outlines general strategies for effective distance learners, methodologies students have adopted to learn online, and their preparation techniques. Topics include student personality characteristics, reasons for pursuing education online, technology increasing student motivation, collaborative learning, and use of…

  17. Development of health inter-professional telemedicine practice through simulation scenario training with students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology-, and nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nortvig, Anne-Mette; Vestergaard, Kitt

    Background: Welfare technology is considered to be cost effective and to promote consistent quality in health care (1, 2). Due to the pervasive deployment of telemedicine and the political focus thereon, it is very important that health professional students gain an understanding of its benefits and limitations and that they develop competences related to telemedicine practices. Because close interprofessional and intersectoral cooperation is required in the care and treatment of patients by the use of telemedicine, development of telemedicine competences must take place in an inter-professional context. Aims: The purpose of the project was • to develop practice oriented competences related to telemedicine in an inter-professional and a cross-sectoral context among health professional students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology-, and nursing education. • to motivate and retain male students by the use of simulation training that involves technology. Methodology:The project was settled as a cross-professional telemedicine course on health educations. Nursing students (N=20) and physiotherapy students (N=34) participated actively and the scenarios were filmed and enacted via Adobe Connect. Students were divided into groups, and some students acted health professionals, while others acted patients. Excerpts of the recordings were analyzed and discussed with a focus on successful telemedical care and treatments well as challenges and they were followed by evaluation and qualitative interviews. Recordings, field notes, memos and observations of students and lecturers were used as empirical material for follow-up research. Data were analyzed in order to categorize the theoretical perspectives relating to learning and motivation. Results: Evaluations and follow-up research showed that students developed competences equivalent to novice level through simulation training (3). The project gave rise to wide project on Occupational Therapy education and medical laboratory technology education too. Follow-up research concludes that the boys who participated in the project responded positively to simulation training, as many of the girls did. Further results and perspectives will be presented at the conference. References: 1. Accelerating innovation: the power of the crowd. Global lessons in e-Health implementation d Documents/e-health-implementation Case study: UK Department of Health: Whole System Demonstrator program 2. Danske Regioner, Kommunernes Landsforening, Ministeriet for Sundhed og Forebyggelse, Social- og Integrationsministeriet, Erhvervs- og Vækstministeriet, Økonomi- og Indenrigsministeriet & Finansministeriet (2012): National handlingsplan for udbredelse af telemedicin, Fonden for Velfærdsteknologi 3. Nortvig, Anne-Mette et. Eriksen, Kathrine Krageskov. Teknologistøttet simulationsundervisning som translokation for teoretisk viden og praktisk handlen. Læring & Medier (LOM) – nr. 11 – 2013. ISSN: 1903-248X 4. Murray C, Grant MJ, Howarth ML, Leigh J.The use of simulation as a teaching and learning approach to support practice learning. Nurse Education in Practice 2008;8[1]:5-8. 5. Watson K, Wright A, Morris N, McMeeken J, Rivett D, Blackstock F, et al. Can simulation replace part of clinical time? Two parallel randomised controlled trials. Med Educ 2012;46[7]:657-667 6. Dieckmann P, Friis SM, Lippert A, Østergaard D. Goals, Success Factors, and Barriers for Simulation-Based Learning A Qualitative Interview Study in Health Care. Simulation & Gaming 2012;43[5]:627-647. 7. Dreyfus, Stuart E.; Dreyfus, Hubert L. (February 1980). A Five-Stage Model of the Mental Activities Involved in Directed Skill Acquisition. Washington, DC: Storming Media. Retrieved June 13, 2010.

  18. Development of health inter-professional telemedicine practice through simulation scenario training with students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology, and nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nortvig, Anne-Mette; Vestergaard, Kitt

    Background: Welfare technology is considered to be cost effective and to promote consistent quality in health care (1, 2). Due to the pervasive deployment of telemedicine and the political focus thereon, it is very important that health professional students gain an understanding of its benefits and limitations and that they develop competences related to telemedicine practices. Because close interprofessional and intersectoral cooperation is required in the care and treatment of patients by the use of telemedicine, development of telemedicine competences must take place in an inter-professional context. Aims: The purpose of the project was • to develop practice oriented competences related to telemedicine in an inter-professional and a cross-sectoral context among health professional students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology-, and nursing education. • to motivate and retain male students by the use of simulation training that involves technology. Methodology:The project was settled as a cross-professional telemedicine course on health educations. Nursing students (N=20) and physiotherapy students (N=34) participated actively and the scenarios were filmed and enacted via Adobe Connect. Students were divided into groups, and some students acted health professionals, while others acted patients. Excerpts of the recordings were analyzed and discussed with a focus on successful telemedical care and treatments well as challenges and they were followed by evaluation and qualitative interviews. Recordings, field notes, memos and observations of students and lecturers were used as empirical material for follow-up research. Data were analyzed in order to categorize the theoretical perspectives relating to learning and motivation. Results: Evaluations and follow-up research showed that students developed competences equivalent to novice level through simulation training (3). The project gave rise to wide project on Occupational Therapy education and medical laboratory technology education too. Follow-up research concludes that the boys who participated in the project responded positively to simulation training, as many of the girls did. Further results and perspectives will be presented at the conference. References: 1. Accelerating innovation: the power of the crowd. Global lessons in e-Health implementation d Documents/e-health-implementation Case study: UK Department of Health: Whole System Demonstrator program 2. Danske Regioner, Kommunernes Landsforening, Ministeriet for Sundhed og Forebyggelse, Social- og Integrationsministeriet, Erhvervs- og Vækstministeriet, Økonomi- og Indenrigsministeriet & Finansministeriet (2012): National handlingsplan for udbredelse af telemedicin, Fonden for Velfærdsteknologi 3. Nortvig, Anne-Mette et. Eriksen, Kathrine Krageskov. Teknologistøttet simulationsundervisning som translokation for teoretisk viden og praktisk handlen. Læring & Medier (LOM) – nr. 11 – 2013. ISSN: 1903-248X 4. Murray C, Grant MJ, Howarth ML, Leigh J.The use of simulation as a teaching and learning approach to support practice learning. Nurse Education in Practice 2008;8[1]:5-8. 5. Watson K, Wright A, Morris N, McMeeken J, Rivett D, Blackstock F, et al. Can simulation replace part of clinical time? Two parallel randomised controlled trials. Med Educ 2012;46[7]:657-667 6. Dieckmann P, Friis SM, Lippert A, Østergaard D. Goals, Success Factors, and Barriers for Simulation-Based Learning A Qualitative Interview Study in Health Care. Simulation & Gaming 2012;43[5]:627-647. 7. Dreyfus, Stuart E.; Dreyfus, Hubert L. (February 1980). A Five-Stage Model of the Mental Activities Involved in Directed Skill Acquisition. Washington, DC: Storming Media. Retrieved June 13, 2010.

  19. A needs assessment for mobile technology use in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Vafa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study investigated how medical students perceived mobile technology as a component of their learning experience and identified barriers to the use of mobile technology in education. Methods: An anonymous survey developed by EDUCAUSE was distributed to 1000 first year medical students (M1s at two separate medical schools during three consecutive academic years, 2010 to 2013. The 25-item questionnaire assessed student use of mobile devices, student interest in mobile technologies as they apply to education, and technology issues related to implementing mobile application in education. Results: The majority of participating M1s (n=520 indicated that they own a smartphone or a similar mobile device. More than half of M1s reported using their devices for education, primarily to download educational course materials, listen to podcasts/lectures, and access medical resource applications. Two student-identified technology issues concerning the use of mobile technology in education were ensuring better implementation of technology and faster data transmission (60. Review of qualitative data from written responses to open-ended questions highlighted three common themes: (1 the current use of mobile technology in the clinics and other institutions, (2 common technology ownership and comfort of use, and (3 efficiency and accessibility to learning materials. Conclusions: While the needs assessment revealed student acceptance of mobile technology in education, student responses highlighted the need for a supportive academic and technological infrastructure.

  20. Experiencing technology integration in education: children's perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Baytak, Ahmet; Tarman, Bu?lent; Ayas, Cemalettin

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the experiences of six children using technologies in their education. Data were collected via in-depth interviews, classroom observations, and home observations. The results showed that students have commonperceptions toward their experience with technology integration. Furthermore, the following four themes emerged; the value of technology, authority over learning, misuses and misconceptions, and the border of integration.

  1. Educational designs supporting student engagement through networked project studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche Nielsen, JØrgen; Andreasen, Lars Birch

    2013-01-01

    The chapter discusses how student engagement can be facilitated through educational designs that make conscious use of various online communication technologies. The chapter discusses the involvement of students as co-designers of how courses and learning environments unfold, and deals with the development of students’ information literacy and the application of new technological possibilities inspired by problem- and project-based learning.

  2. Physics Education Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Funded by grants from The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and the National Science Foundation, the Physics Education Technology (PhET) site features many well-designed and engaging physics and chemistry simulations for use in the classroom. Currently, the site offers a number of simulations, which cover projectile motion, salts & solubility, wave interference, and other related areas. Visitors can run the simulations from their computer, or they can also elect to download them individually. The simulations are all interactive, full of color, and very engaging. Of course, they have also provided a "Teachers" area. Here visitors can browse through activities created by educators across the country which are based on these simulations. Visitor can look over the activities by type or grade level, and they can also submit their own activities for inclusion. The site is rounded out by a list of FAQ's and a troubleshooting section.

  3. The technological trigger: Fostering educational revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Howard

    1995-09-01

    While we live in an Information Society, information technology has barely penetrated the classroom. Not only does it make no sense for every aspect of our lives save education to be enriched by appropriate technologies (e.g., computers, video discs, interactive systems), this technology has the potential to trigger an educational revolution much in the way that the Gutenberg press triggered a revolution 500 years ago. Technology alone cannot fix our ailing educational system. Yet it can be the thin edge of the wedge in giving us the capacity to provide an educational experience that stimulates the student (and the teacher), opens myriad worlds of information, and conforms to what we believe to be best teaching and learning practices.

  4. A needs assessment for mobile technology use in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Shahrzad Vafa; Chico, Diane E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated how medical students perceived mobile technology as a component of their learning experience and identified barriers to the use of mobile technology in education. Methods: An anonymous survey developed by EDUCAUSE was distributed to 1000 first year medical students (M1s) at two separate medical schools during three consecutive academic years, 2010 to 2013. The 25-item questionnaire assessed student use of mobile devices, student interest in mobile technolog...

  5. Students as Learning Designers in Innovation Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; SØrensen, Birgitte Holm

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns examines criteria for developing technology enhanced innovation education and discusses how teacher and student relations changes in these learning spaces. To educate populations for Innovation, flexibility and creativity on all levels have become major focus points for most western countries (Drucker, 1993). The primary task of educators has thus been defined as preparing learners to participate creatively in the knowledge economies of Western countries (OECD, 2000). It has however been debated how innovative processes are integrated in school education and what elements are central for supporting learning of innovation competences in various subjects (Sawyer, 2006; Magnussen, 2011). The current paper reports from a case study of a school in Denmark where teachers and students aged 6 – 14 was involved in developing and testing new forms of teaching technology enhanced innovation as part of the establishment of a so-called EduTechLab on the school. The EduTechLab was established in new facilities on the school and contained learning technologies such as NAO robots, sensor kits and 3D visualization and printing facilities. The goal of the EduTech project was to establish a creative learning environment for students and teachers that would support innovative practice with new forms of learning technology. Part of this was to involve students in innovative design processes for students to experiment with their own design solutions to case problems. The project was organized as an interaction between workshops where teachers was introduced to learning technologies and innovation process tools, and interventions where goals and learning designs were tested in classes. The first phase of the project that was followed by the authors of this paper lasted half year and involved 15 teachers (Foreign languages, mathematics, physics, chemistry and mother tongue language) and 40, children. Video observations were conducted of workshops and interventions in classes and qualitative interviews were conducted with teachers and students. The results presented in the paper shows that integrating learning technology into innovation education changes teacher roles and enhance student’s roles as co-designers of the learning environment and activities. We observed how the planned process and activities initially defined and controlled by teachers gradually was changed during the process due to collaboration between students and teachers. The student design processes thus gradually changed from teacher directed to an open experimenting for where students co-defined processes, technologies and design goals. These processes were partly caused by teachers changed experiences of student’s ability to handle complex design processes involving new technology. It was also observed how less technical savvy teachers changed roles from an instructor role to co-developer due to the collaboration with students on solving technical difficulties with the learning technology. In the paper it is discussed how these changed roles is an integrated part of working with knowledge production processes in school in and ever changing landscape of new technologies and how co-designer roles can be integrated in innovation education.

  6. Bioprocess-Engineering Education with Web Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Sessink, O.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis covers choices that have been made, and material that has been designed during the application and evaluation of web technology in education in food and biotechnology in general, and in bioprocess engineering in particular. Special attention has been paid to the design of learning material and the designed material itself. This thesis comprises six chapters.In Chapter 1 is explained that bioprocess engineering education teaches students what is needed to apply biotechnology in lar...

  7. Education Quality Enhancement via Multimedia Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Zin, M. Z.; Mohd Syahiran Abdul Latif; Azri Bhari; Rohaya Sulaiman; Azhar Abdul Rahman; Ahmad Faisal Mahdi; Mohd Sapawi Jamain

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: The objective of this research was to evaluate the relationship between the multimedia usage in the understanding level and students interest. While the emphasis on the effectiveness of using multimedia teaching system as an aid in the exploration of ideas in learning instruments need to be addressed. Approach: A rapidly growing technology, comprehensive and interest in education at Malaysia has provided space and opportunities for educators to contribute their ideas and ex...

  8. SOCIAL NETWORKING IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION: Undergraduate Students’ Views on Ning

    OpenAIRE

    Sezen Balcikanli, Gu?lfem

    2012-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to investigate physical education undergraduate students’ views on the use of social networking, one of the most typical representations of Web 2.0 technologies. In order to do so, the researcher, who was the instructor of the class, entitled “Fair Play Education in Sport”, introduced Ning and its educational aspects to her students with a 50-minute presentation prior to the study. Following this, the students were encouraged to use this networking for 15 we...

  9. Promoting Innovative Methods in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nasra, Moayyad M.

    2012-01-01

    The engineering profession is very sensitive to the new changes in the engineering job market demand. The engineering job market is changing in a much faster rate than the engineering/engineering technology education. A 13-year study will be presented. The study focuses on the factors affecting the survival rate, student academic performance,…

  10. Culture and Cognition in Information Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holvikivi, Jaana

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims at explaining the outcomes of information technology education for international students using anthropological theories of cultural schemas. Even though computer science and engineering are usually assumed to be culture-independent, the practice in classrooms seems to indicate that learning patterns depend on culture. The…

  11. 3D Laser Scanning in Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Jim

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional laser scanner can be used as a tool for design and problem solving in technology education. A hands-on experience can enhance learning by captivating students' interest and empowering them with creative tools. (Author/JOW)

  12. Paper Towers : Building students' understandings of technological design

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Minogue

    2006-01-01

    ?What do you think the National Science Education Standards are referring to when they talk about science and technology?" The authors posed this question to a group of undergraduate education majors during a science teaching methods course. The students? somewhat myopic notions of technology provided the perfect segue to introduce the activity, Paper Towers, which can be used in the middle school science classroom to help students develop their understandings of technological design.

  13. Technology-Enhanced Learning: The Effects of 1:1 Technology on Student Performance and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Susan Annette

    2012-01-01

    Accessibility of computers in the classroom is a major concern facing American students. To help meet U.S. technology education requirements, initiatives are in place throughout many school districts to increase the accessibility of computers for students to a ratio of 1:1. Although the number of technological devices placed in students'…

  14. Trends of Students of the College of Basic Science towards Teaching the Course of Athletics and Health by Using Computer Technology in the World Islamic Sciences and Education University (WISE)

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim Abdul Ghani Salameh; Mohammad Falah Ali Khawaldeh

    2014-01-01

    The Study aimed at identifying the trends of the students of basic sciences College in the World Islamic Sciences and Education University towards teaching health and sport course by using computer technology as a teaching method, and to identify also the impact of the variables of academic level and the gender on the students’ trends. The study sample was selected among 140 male and female students (65 males and 75 females) from Basic Science College in The World Islamic Sciences and Educa...

  15. Educational Technology Media Method in Teaching and Learning Progress

    OpenAIRE

    Ahamad A. Sakat; Mohamad Z.M. Zin; Rusli Muhamad; Anzaruddin Ahmad; Nurfahiratul A. Ahmad; Mohd A. Kasmo

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: The objective of this research was to evaluate the level of understanding and students interest in Jawi education, after educational technology media was used in teaching and learning at primary schools. This study emphasizes with more detail on the aspects of usage and effectiveness media-aided teaching system. Exploring the notion of instrument, recognized positive attitude and students associated with the use of educational technology media in teaching and learning proce...

  16. Technology Transfer Center | Technology Transfer Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    SKIP ALL NAVIGATION SKIP TO SUB MENU Search Site Standard Forms & Agreements Co-Development & Resources Careers & Training Intellectual Property & Inventions About TTC Overview NCI TTC Fellowship Program NIH Online Training Technology Transfer Education Other

  17. Automotive Technology Student Learning Styles and Their Implications for Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threeton, Mark D.; Walter, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to provide Career and Technical Education (CTE) professionals with additional insight on how to better meet the educational needs of the learner, this study sought to identify the preference for learning of postsecondary automotive technology students. While it might appear logical to naturally classify auto-tech students as primarily…

  18. Potential of Social Networking Sites for Distance Education Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Jaime; Perini, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This chapter explores the potential of social networking sites for increasing student engagement for distance education learners. The authors present a modified student engagement model with a focus on the integration of technology, specifically social networking sites for community college distance education learners. The chapter concludes with…

  19. Graduate nursing student self-assessment: Fundamental technology skills

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas James Virgona

    2012-01-01

    A gap exists in technology demands in the nursing field as well as appropriate educational strategies to assist students in developing skills to meet these demands. This study assesses graduate nursing students’ perceived skills regarding specific technology related to health care. The results of a brief researcher-developed survey indicated that students’ perceived that technology skills were not critical to entering the nursing field, however, they were critical for their present positi...

  20. Distance Education Technology: Higher Education Barriers during the First Decade of the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Ansah, Angela; Neill, Patti; Haralson, Michele K.

    2011-01-01

    In the twenty-first century, despite the expanded opportunities technology affords in student-access to higher education, most institutions of higher education are hesitant to offer technology-based distance education (TBDE). The prohibiting factors include cost, accessibility, faculty concerns, state mandates, academic administrative actions, and…

  1. Health Educational Potentials of Technologies.

    OpenAIRE

    Magnussen, Rikke; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The field of health promotion technology has been in an exponential growth in recent years and smart phone applications, exer-games and self-monitoring devices has become part of fitness activities and health education. In this work-in-progress-paper theoretical perspectives for categorising and analysing health educational potentials of technologies are presented.

  2. Globalization, Internationalization, and the Recruitment of International Students in Higher Education, and in the Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudmore, Geoffrey

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores general issues relating to globalization and higher education; the internationalization of higher education, and particularly the recruitment of international students. This subject is examined through a range of topics around the global development of the market approach to the recruitment of international students and a focus…

  3. A Roadmap for Education Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Woolf, Beverly Park

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the initial findings of several workshops convened in 2009 to consider the future of education and in particular the role of technology and computer science in education. Through a series of facilitated collaborative workshops, leaders in several disciplines engaged in conversations that cast computers in the role of facilitating education in the future and recommended a research agenda for federal funding.

  4. Technology for Education and Learning

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    This volume contains 108 selected papers presented at the 2012 international conference on Technology for Education and Learning (ICTEL 2012), Macau, China, March 1-2, 2012. The conference brought together researchers working in various different areas of Technology for Education and Learning with a main emphasis on technology for business and economy in order to foster international collaborations and exchange of new ideas. This proceedings book has its focus on Technology for Economy, Finance and Education representing some of the major subareas presented at the conference.

  5. Distance Education Students Moving Towards Collaborative Learning - A Field Study of Australian Distance Education Students and Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva R Fåhræus

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Distance education has been offered to young students in Australia for about 100 years. Recently, information and communication technology has been introduced as a means to improve communication, but not all remote students have access to this new technology. This has made it difficult to arrange collaborative learning for distance-education students. In this student-focused study, more than 40 students as well as teachers and other important persons have been interviewed and observed in schools and on remote farms. Using Activity Theory for the analysis, different contradictions were identified. Lack of technology and access were not the only obstacles. The education was built on a tradition of individual learning, and the technology at hand was not supporting collaboration. However, contradictions may result in ?expansive learning? among students and teachers, leading to more of a development towards collaborative learning.

  6. Students' Technology Use and the Impacts on Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotten, Shelia R.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter reviews technology use patterns and the social impacts of technology on well-being among college students. It provides empirical evidence delineating the processes through which Internet use affects well-being among college students, and provides suggestions for ways to advance future studies in this area and for higher education

  7. Technology for social work education

    OpenAIRE

    Tom Hopkins; David Colombi

    1996-01-01

    The development of technology in social-work education is set not only in the broader context of the use of technology in higher education generally, but also in the parallel context of the use of technology in social work practice. The latter is important for a subject area with two primary characteristics: the need to acquire not just academic knowledge but also professional expertise and understanding of the aims, methods and values of social work; a strong emphasis on practical preparatio...

  8. Study on the infusion of foundation technology in science education

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hai-bin; Liu, Ting-ting; Li, Xiu-ying

    2009-01-01

    Traditional science education in China weakened the teaching of practical knowledge and basic skills, and neglected the scientific educational objective which are suitable for the daily-life of students and the demands of society. So it led to a lower level of the pupils’ technological literacy. Amid the basic education curriculum reform, it is necessary and feasible to implement foundation technology education. At present, measures should be taken as follows: enriching the contents of scie...

  9. Social Networking in Physical Education: Undergraduate Students' Views on Ning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezen Balcikanli, Gulfem

    2012-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to investigate physical education undergraduate students' views on the use of social networking, one of the most typical representations of Web 2.0 technologies. In order to do so, the researcher, who was the instructor of the class, entitled "Fair Play Education in Sport", introduced Ning and its educational aspects…

  10. Motivation of engineering students in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Savage

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines motivational factors affecting Higher Education (HE students in the Faculty of Technology at the University of Portsmouth. A reliable identification of motivational factors would usefully inform pedagogical interventions. Students who are more intrinsically motivated may benefit from less prescriptive assignments which offer more freedom to choose from ‘formative’ assessment topics in which they have a greater personal interest. For those who are more extrinsically motivated, where the final, ‘summative’ grade is thought of as the most important, pedagogical styles may less influence students’ motivation. In the current study, the investigatory approaches employed to assess motivation discover different results. While questionnaire responses indicated that students operate both intrinsically and extrinsically, semi-structured interviews found little evidence of the former, with most students indicating that they operate extrinsically.

  11. Information Technology for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Cathrine E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Eight papers address technological, behavioral, and philosophical aspects of the application of information technology to training. Topics include instructional technology centers, intelligent training systems, distance learning, automated task analysis, training system selection, the importance of instructional methods, formative evaluation and…

  12. Research Perspectives and Best Practices in Educational Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared

    2013-01-01

    With advancements in technology continuing to influence all areas of society, students in current classrooms have a different understanding and perspective of learning than the educational system has been designed to teach. Research Perspectives and Best Practices in Educational Technology Integration highlights the emerging digital age, its…

  13. Curriculum Consonance and Dissonance in Technology Education Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan A.

    2009-01-01

    In a time of increased accountability, a tightened curriculum, and fewer curricular choices for students, technology education in the United States is in the position of defending itself by "carving a niche" in the school curriculum. Justifying the place of technology education is becoming increasingly difficult, as there has been little agreement…

  14. Formation of information and communication environment of technological education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novikova Natalya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The author examines theoretical and practical aspects of development of information and communication environment of technological education. The author presents structure, characteristics and key features of the information and communication environment of technological education, as well as organizational forms of network cooperation between students.

  15. The Impact of Technology on Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1995-08-01

    Near the top of the list of critical issues in education is the appropriate use of technology in the educational process. It is clear that some type of investment in educational technology, specifically interactive computing, is essential for nearly all institutions, and indeed, many have made some purchases already. Despite that fact, the leadership of educational institutions face a complex set of problems in this regard. What portion of a (probably) shrinking budget should be allocated to this expanding area? Which options from a growing array of technological choices are the most appropriate for a particular environment? Which of these options are essentials, and which are luxuries? What sorts of technology will benefit students the most? What is needed now in order to keep from falling (even further) behind a few years hence? The pressure to do something is great, and it is often exacerbated by arguments of efficiency that have little foundation in fact. For example, suggestions are often made that an investment in educational technology will help handle more students. This point of view may ultimately prevail, but little evidence on this point is currently available. Indeed, it appears that more faculty/staff effort is required to bring interactive technology into students' hands in a meaningful way. Often ignored is the amount of training necessary for a spectrum of novice users. Another argument often made is that empowering students with interactive technology will somehow lessen pressure on the current (classical) library operation. Presumably, this effect will come about through access to the Internet resources. As currently constituted, the Internet carries information of widely varying quality, ranging from the systematic holdings of many of the fine libraries of the world to outright garbage (from an intellectual point of view). Information on the Internet (other than that from libraries) is often unedited or unorganized to the extent that potential users must employ reasonably sophisticated skills and insights to extract useful information from the abundance of dross. These, of course, are the kinds of skills academe is expected to instill in undergraduates; they are not easily acquired by the "sink or swim" technique, which is often the way students learn to use electronic information systems. Clearly, if this is the only method of instruction we have to offer, students and their parents might be forgiven for questioning the value added by academe to this process. Content-oriented instructors who attempt to use interactive technology to help students learn currently have to spend a considerable amount of time and effort to address these kinds of issues, and, of course, such efforts are usually add-ons in most institutions, where little recognition or encouragement is afforded to the design and development of new courses. Augmenting a course with interactive technology takes considerably more effort than preparing a few new lecture for a standard course, a fact well understood by those who have tried. Finally, there are the lurking problems associated with success. History tells us that very successful computation center operations ultimately attract more clients than they can handle with their existing equipment, often with the result that the quality of their services begins to degrade. Information technology does not necessarily save time or money, at least in the early phases, and it's not at all obvious that it ever will. Information technology may enable us to do some things we cannot do well in the current environment (e.g., providing students feedback on their work via electronic mail) as well as to do some things much easier or better than is now possible (e.g., accessing information and conducting research). However, such benefits do not automatically translate into economies. For example, with regard to feedback to students, it is not obvious that a teacher in a class, of say, a hundred or more students can actually provide continuous feedback for a full term without assistance of some

  16. The State of Manufacturing Engineering Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Scott

    In response to a need identified by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers' Education and Research Technical Community, a survey was conducted to assess the health of ABET accredited manufacturing engineering technology programs in the spring of 2005 and 2007. In 2005, thirty-eight programs received the survey via email and twenty-two programs provided a response. Survey questions focused on enrollment issues, laboratories, regional manufacturing industrial base, graduate success, and student recruiting resources. Now, the survey has been updated and all programs currently listed on the ABET website have been contacted in early 2007. This paper will present the original results of the survey as well as results from the spring 2007 survey. Thus the paper helps establish overall national trends for, and, when possible, within manufacturing engineering technology programs. These results provide information regarding manufacturing engineering technology program health. Thus, inferences are drawn regarding the state of manufacturing engineering technology education across the nation.

  17. #Nomoretextbooks? The impact of rapid communications technologies on medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Farooq, Ameer; White, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This paper was selected as the 2013 student essay winner by the Canadian Undergraduate Surgical Education Committee. The essay was in response to the question “How does rapid communications technology affect learning?”.

  18. Technology-Mediated Supervision of Undergraduate Students' Dissertations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaldemark, Jimmy; Lindberg, J. Ola

    2013-01-01

    In Sweden, technology-mediated participation has increased in tertiary education, which has led to changing conditions for its delivery. However, one part has proven more resistant to change, technology-mediated or not: the supervision of students' undergraduate dissertation work. This article presents a study that analyses technological

  19. Intervención educativa sobre VIH/SIDA en estudiantes de Tecnología en Atención Estomatológica Educational intervention about HIV/AIDS with students of Technology in Dentistry Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Díaz Valdés

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio analítico, longitudinal y prospectivo con intervención grupal a estudiantes de segundo y tercer año de Tecnología de la Salud en Atención Estomatológica de la Filial "Simón Bolívar" en Pinar del Río, en el período comprendido de septiembre 2009 a julio de 2010 con el objetivo de identificar los conocimientos que tenían los estudiantes sobre VIH/Sida y así poder aplicar un programa educativo que contribuyera a elevar sus conocimientos para la prevención y diagnóstico precoz de la enfermedad. La muestra estuvo formada por todos los estudiantes de segundo y tercer año, 28 y 37 respectivamente, que fueron encuestados antes y después de la aplicación del programa educativo cumpliendo así con las tres etapas de ejecución planificadas: diagnóstico, intervención y evaluación. Para la comparación del efecto de la encuesta antes y después de aplicar el programa educativo se realizaron las pruebas de Wilcoxon y Mann-Whitney obteniendo diferencia altamente significativa en cuanto al nivel de conocimiento adquirido por los estudiantes, que se incrementó en un 92.3% luego de la intervención lo que demostró el resultado positivo de su aplicación, además de lograr la creación de promotores de salud y comunicadores para desarrollar la capacitación al resto de los estudiantes de la carrera.An analytical, longitudinal and prospective study with a group intervention among students of the second and third academic courses in Technology in Dentistry Care was conducted at "Simon Bolivar" Affiliated Health Institute in Pinar del Rio from September 2009 to July 2010 with the purpose of identifying knowledge of the students about HIV/AIDS to apply and educational program which could contribute to increase awareness of prevention and early diagnosis of the disease. The sample included all the students from the second (28 and third (37 academic years respectively, a survey was put into effect before and after the application of the educational program, following the three stages planned: diagnosis, intervention and assessment. To compare the effects of the survey before and after its application the tests of Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney were made, achieving a very significant difference regarding the level of knowledge acquired by the students, which increased in 92.3% after the intervention, demonstrating the positive results of its application; reaching the creation of health promoters and communicators to develop the training of the rest of the students of the specialty as well.

  20. Intervención educativa sobre VIH/SIDA en estudiantes de Tecnología en Atención Estomatológica / Educational intervention about HIV/AIDS with students of Technology in Dentistry Care

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Katia, Díaz Valdés; Maite, Reinoso Díaz; María Isabel, Miló Puentes; Modesto Antonio, Iglesias Iglesias.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio analítico, longitudinal y prospectivo con intervención grupal a estudiantes de segundo y tercer año de Tecnología de la Salud en Atención Estomatológica de la Filial "Simón Bolívar" en Pinar del Río, en el período comprendido de septiembre 2009 a julio de 2010 con el objetivo d [...] e identificar los conocimientos que tenían los estudiantes sobre VIH/Sida y así poder aplicar un programa educativo que contribuyera a elevar sus conocimientos para la prevención y diagnóstico precoz de la enfermedad. La muestra estuvo formada por todos los estudiantes de segundo y tercer año, 28 y 37 respectivamente, que fueron encuestados antes y después de la aplicación del programa educativo cumpliendo así con las tres etapas de ejecución planificadas: diagnóstico, intervención y evaluación. Para la comparación del efecto de la encuesta antes y después de aplicar el programa educativo se realizaron las pruebas de Wilcoxon y Mann-Whitney obteniendo diferencia altamente significativa en cuanto al nivel de conocimiento adquirido por los estudiantes, que se incrementó en un 92.3% luego de la intervención lo que demostró el resultado positivo de su aplicación, además de lograr la creación de promotores de salud y comunicadores para desarrollar la capacitación al resto de los estudiantes de la carrera. Abstract in english An analytical, longitudinal and prospective study with a group intervention among students of the second and third academic courses in Technology in Dentistry Care was conducted at "Simon Bolivar" Affiliated Health Institute in Pinar del Rio from September 2009 to July 2010 with the purpose of ident [...] ifying knowledge of the students about HIV/AIDS to apply and educational program which could contribute to increase awareness of prevention and early diagnosis of the disease. The sample included all the students from the second (28) and third (37) academic years respectively, a survey was put into effect before and after the application of the educational program, following the three stages planned: diagnosis, intervention and assessment. To compare the effects of the survey before and after its application the tests of Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney were made, achieving a very significant difference regarding the level of knowledge acquired by the students, which increased in 92.3% after the intervention, demonstrating the positive results of its application; reaching the creation of health promoters and communicators to develop the training of the rest of the students of the specialty as well.

  1. Technology Education in East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, George

    1996-01-01

    Reports from the first international technology education conference in Asia provide insight into the state of the field in Asia. Looks at difficulties, teacher education, and change in Japan, South Korea, the Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, and the People's Republic of China. (JOW)

  2. Adapting to Student Learning Styles: Engaging Students with Cell Phone Technology in Organic Chemistry Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursell, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Students of organic chemistry traditionally make 3 x 5 in. flash cards to assist learning nomenclature, structures, and reactions. Advances in educational technology have enabled flash cards to be viewed on computers, offering an endless array of drilling and feedback for students. The current generation of students is less inclined to use…

  3. Interactive Technology in the FL Classroom : Using Polling and Chat to Promote Student Participation in Campus Education

    OpenAIRE

    Wulff Sahle?n, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a project where polling and chat were used in the foreign language classroom to promote student participation and, at the same time, provide a record of student contributions. The setting is a Swedish university course in grammar and translation for advanced learners of English. The majority of seminars are devoted to discussing translation assignments that students have prepared at home. During the project, Adobe Connect Pro, a web conferencing solution for online meeting...

  4. Manufacturing Technology Series. Educational Resources for the Machine Tool Industry. Course Syllabi, Instructor's Handbook, [and] Student Laboratory Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Technical Coll. System, Waco.

    This package consists of course syllabi, an instructor's handbook, and a student laboratory manual for a 2-year vocational training program to prepare students for entry-level employment as manufacturing technicians. The program was developed through a modification of the DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) technique. The course syllabi volume begins…

  5. Students' vulnerability in educational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, L M; Dullabh, H

    2012-06-01

    Dental teaching institutions in South Africa recently implemented "learner-centred" curricula and expected educators to alter their teaching styles accordingly, but perhaps without providing adequate training in this paedagogical philosophy. At the same time, the lecturers were required to conduct evidence-based research to evaluate the outcomes. Thus, clinicians/lecturers also became researchers, using their own students or student material for assessment purposes. Previously, this form of educational research, which was carried out in normal academic settings, was not subject to review by Institutional Review Boards (IRB). However, concerns have risen that learners may be a vulnerable population due to their position in the academic institution, and the power and knowledge differentials that exist between them and the lecturer/researcher. This raises ethical concerns regarding their autonomy and ability to provide free, voluntary, informed consent to be research participants. This paper questions whether educational research may lead to student vulnerability, and proposes some recommendations for educators and institutions involved in educational research. PMID:23185948

  6. Sociological Support for the Job Placement of Students and Graduates of Higher Educational Institutions: The Experience of the Moscow Institute of Aviation and Technology (MATI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotin, I. S.; Basalai, S. I.; Pugach, V. F.; Mikhailov, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    The weak connection between Russia's system of higher education and the labor market in Russia requires that greater attention be paid to preparing students for successful, employment. This will require more careful research into best practices, and the development of more effective links between employers and educational institutions.

  7. Study on the infusion of foundation technology in science education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-bin SUN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional science education in China weakened the teaching of practical knowledge and basic skills, and neglected the scientific educational objective which are suitable for the daily-life of students and the demands of society. So it led to a lower level of the pupils’ technological literacy. Amid the basic education curriculum reform, it is necessary and feasible to implement foundation technology education. At present, measures should be taken as follows: enriching the contents of science curriculum, expanding the space of science teaching, developing students' ability for conducting science experiments and science inquiry.

  8. Problem Solving in Technology Education: A Taoist Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Jim

    1998-01-01

    Offers a new approach to teaching problem solving in technology education that encourages students to apply problem-solving skills to improving the human condition. Suggests that technology teachers incorporate elements of a Taoist approach in teaching by viewing technology as a tool with a goal of living a harmonious life. (JOW)

  9. Technologies and distance education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal LEROUX

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available n this paper, our aims is to clarify the university contexts and underlying instructional approaches in which on-line education works are engaged and the influence of these contexts on this same works. This positioning should facilitate the reading, interpretation and understanding of the articles of this special issue, as well as ensure the intelligibility of the current trends on the distance education. We want to make sure that the contributions to this issue are within the reach of both French-speaking academic cultures, France and Quebec. We have the feeling that there are significant differences between French and Quebecer experiences concerning the distance education and the use of ICT in education.

  10. Life Imitates Pokemon: The Virtues and Necessities of Technology-Based Peer Education in Today's Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, David

    1999-01-01

    As the Pokemon game craze illustrates, the combination of peer education and technology makes for powerful educational experiences. Educators need to accept technology-based peer education as a help rather than a hindrance to improve educational outcomes for students. (SLD)

  11. Teaching Science in the early years of primary education from the perspective STS: a work proposal facing the technological artifacts that guide the daily lives of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Fabri

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a study with sixteen students of 2nd year 2nd cycle of the early years of the School Municipal Network of the city of Ponta Grossa in relation to the technological artifacts of everyday life. The study objective was to provide students with a scientific and technological literacy, an approach STS (Science, Technology and Society, starting from the main theme proposed by Resources Technology proposed by the National Curriculum in Sciences. The methodological approach was qualitative interpretative with participant observation. Among the organized activities can be mentioned: a visit to a recycling cooperative, interview with a scientist, presentations, mini-lessons for students, making folders, written productions, as well as a Technology Fair where students made presentations to the community school and parents. At the end of the study, it was noticed that students already could make reflections on social issues of scientific and technological development, but we emphasize the need to continue these discussions taking place during their school life, since it is believed that only this way the reflective stance on Science and Technology will be internalized. Please note that these are data of a dissertation in the Graduate Program in Teaching Science and Technology of the Technological Federal University of Paraná, Campus Ponta Grossa (UTFPR, Brazil.

  12. Frameworks of Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Donald

    2008-01-01

    This paper, written from a 20th-century perspective, traces the development of, and influences on, the field of instructional technology and attempts to describe a framework within which we can better understand the field. [This article is based on "Instructional Technology: Contemporary Frameworks" originally written by the author for the…

  13. The Learning Edge: What Technology Can Do to Educate All Children. Technology, Education--Connections (TEC) Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Alan; Weston, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    After billions of dollars, thousands of studies, and immeasurable effort by educators at all levels, why is the performance of students and teachers so unaffected by technology? Moreover, what should be done to extract genuine benefit from the information and communication technology (ICT) revolution? In this groundbreaking book, technology and…

  14. Glenn Learning Technologies Project: Aeronautic Educational Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    These educational technology applications developed by the NASA Glenn Learning Technologies Project (LTP) include simulations of aeronautics-related concepts, an introduction to aeronautics, and lesson plans and activities to discover basic physics and aeronautics principles. Simulations and problem sets are based on aerodynamics, propulsion, airfoils, jet engines, model rockets, aircraft performance, and the atmosphere. There is a presentation on wind tunnel experiments and a project to build a wind tunnel; an aeronautics internet activity in which students learn to forecast the weather, fly a plane, explore the solar system, and build a space colony; and information on video conferences with the United Kingdom.

  15. Cooperative learning in higher education using weblogs : a study with undergraduate students of education in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Coutinho, Clara Pereira

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an experience of internet integration in an Education Program of the University of Minho, Braga, Portugal. The project was developed in the first semester of 2006/2007 and integrated 23 undergraduate students who attended Educational and Communication Technology (ECT) class. Students, in small groups, were encouraged to set up and maintain a weblog as a portfolio of the team work. Cooperative learning was the central object of study: students worked together to maximize th...

  16. Harnessing the Complexity of Education with Information Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Education at all levels is facing several challenges in most countries, such as low quality, high costs, lack of educators, and unsatisfied student demand. Traditional approaches are becoming unable to deliver the required education. Several causes for this inefficiency can be identified. I argue that beyond specific causes, the lack of effective education is related to complexity. However, information technology is helping us overcome this complexity.

  17. SOCIAL NETWORKING IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION: Undergraduate Students’ Views on Ning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülfem SEZEN BALCIKANLI

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available It was the aim of this study to investigate physical education undergraduate students’ views on the use of social networking, one of the most typical representations of Web 2.0 technologies. In order to do so, the researcher, who was the instructor of the class, entitled “Fair Play Education in Sport”, introduced Ning and its educational aspects to her students with a 50-minute presentation prior to the study. Following this, the students were encouraged to use this networking for 15 weeks in parallel with their class. During this application, the researcher helped the students to make the best use of Ning in educational settings. Upon the implementation, the researcher interviewed the students (n=19 in five groups on the basis of the questions prepared and piloted earlier. The interviews demonstrated that the students enjoyed using social networking in educational settings. The findings of the study were the following: Increasing student-student and teacher-student interaction, enhancing student motivation and classroom climate, sharing materials with the instructor and students, making use of students’ interests and needs, and making learning process more interesting and permanent. The research concluded that social networking could be used in PE classes effectively.

  18. From learning to e-learning: mining educational data. A novel, data-driven approach to evaluate individual differences in students’ interaction with learning technology

    OpenAIRE

    Vigentini, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, learning technology has become a very important addition to the toolkit of instructors at any level of education and training. Not only offered as a substitute in distance education, but often complementing traditional delivery methods, e-learning is considered an important component of modern pedagogy. Particularly in the last decade, learning technology has seen a very rapid growth following the large-scale development and deployment of e-learning financed by...

  19. Trends of Students of the College of Basic Science towards Teaching the Course of Athletics and Health by Using Computer Technology in the World Islamic Sciences and Education University (WISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Abdul Ghani Salameh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Study aimed at identifying the trends of the students of basic sciences College in the World Islamic Sciences and Education University towards teaching health and sport course by using computer technology as a teaching method, and to identify also the impact of the variables of academic level and the gender on the students’ trends. The study sample was selected among 140 male and female students (65 males and 75 females from Basic Science College in The World Islamic Sciences and Education University in order to test the hypotheses of the study, a questionnaire was made to suite the nature of study objectives to identify the students’ attitudes towards using computer in teaching health and sport course. Wherein statistical processors were used: (SMA, standard deviation, (T-Test and results of the analysis were as follows: There are positive attitudes towards teaching health and sport course by using computer technology as a teaching method, as well as the computing experience has a statistically significant impact on the students’ attitudes towards using computer. Also the lack of statistically significant differences in the male and female students’ trends towards using computer technology attributed to the academic level as a teaching method.

  20. Intervención educativa sobre enfermedades transmitidas por alimentos en estudiantes de Tecnología de la Salud Educational intervention on the subject of food-borne diseases with health technology students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Dair García de la Rosa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: las enfermedades trasmitidas por los alimentos (ETA constituyen el problema de salud pública más extendido en el mundo, por lo que es necesario mantener una vigilancia epidemiológica de estas para aplicar medidas oportunas que permitan su control y prevención. Objetivo: elevar el nivel de conocimiento sobre las enfermedades transmitidas por alimentos, en estudiantes de la Facultad de Tecnología de la Salud en la provincia de Camagüey. Métodos: se realizó un estudio experimental de intervención educativa en la Facultad de Tecnología de la Salud en la Provincia de Camagüey desde el 31 de diciembre de 2008 al 30 de abril de 2009. Para la ejecución del estudio en una primera etapa se estableció la comunicación con los estudiantes, lo que quedó validado a través del consentimiento informado. El universo fue de 421 jóvenes de los cuales se seleccionó una muestra (n = 110 estudiantes, a través de un muestreo aleatorio simple, a los que se les aplicó un cuestionario. Toda la información se conservó bajo los principios de máxima confiabilidad. Se empleó la técnica de McNemar para la validación estadística de las tablas sobre el nivel de conocimiento, con el fin de mostrar los cambios ocurridos antes y después, con un nivel de significación de p Introduction: Food-borne diseases (FBD are the most widely spread public health problem worldwide. Therefore, it is necessary to keep them under epidemiological surveillance in order to apply timely measures allowing their control and prevention. Objective: Expand the knowledge of food-borne diseases among students from the School of Health Technology in the province of Camagüey. Methods: An educational intervention experimental study was conducted at the School of Health Technology in the province of Camagüey from 31 December 2008 to 30 April 2009. In the first stage of the study, communication was established with the students, who gave their informed consent. The study universe was composed of 421 young adults, from whom a sample was selected (n = 110 students by simple random sampling. A questionnaire was applied to all subjects in the sample. The information collected was kept under strict confidentiality. McNemar's analysis was used for the statistical validation of knowledge tables, with the purpose of showing the changes occurred before and after, with a statistical significance of p < 0,05. Results: There was a predominance of female sex and the 17-21 age range (53,5 %. Before the intervention, students had scant information about FBDs (47,2 %, their causal agents, and the measures to reduce or eradicate them. Conclusions: The educational intervention performed proved effective. Therefore, we recommend to extend the experience to health schools where food-borne diseases constitute a health risk for students and workers.

  1. Student Affairs and Information Technology: Collaborating in the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbatis, Peter Reyes

    2014-01-01

    Student affairs and information technology have opportunities to partner in order to increase student satisfaction and retention rates and to assist institutions to comply with federal educational regulations. This chapter contains four examples of emerging best practices and future initiatives including: (a) the admissions pipeline, (b)…

  2. Use of Educational Technology in Promoting Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Muhammad; Elahi, Uzma

    2012-01-01

    Educational technology plays an important role in distance education system. By adapting new communication educational technologies in distance educational programmes their quality could be ensured. Instructions conducted through the use of technologies which significantly or completely eliminate the traditional face to face communication between…

  3. Differences in Intention to Use Educational RSS Feeds between Lebanese and British Students: A Multi-Group Analysis Based on the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhini, Ali; Scott, Michael James; Sharma, Sujeet Kumar; Abbasi, Muhammad Sharif

    2015-01-01

    Really Simple Syndication (RSS) offers a means for university students to receive timely updates from virtual learning environments. However, despite its utility, only 21% of home students surveyed at a university in Lebanon claim to have ever used the technology. To investigate whether national culture could be an influence on intention to use…

  4. Technology for social work education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Hopkins

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of technology in social-work education is set not only in the broader context of the use of technology in higher education generally, but also in the parallel context of the use of technology in social work practice. The latter is important for a subject area with two primary characteristics: the need to acquire not just academic knowledge but also professional expertise and understanding of the aims, methods and values of social work; a strong emphasis on practical preparation for work in social work agencies, which is expressed through the universal use of practice placements within agencies as a major component of social-work professional education and training.

  5. Incorporating Student Activities into Climate Change Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, H.; Kelly, K.; Klein, D.; Cadavid, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Under a NASA grant, Mathematical and Geospatial Pathways to Climate Change Education, students at California State University, Northridge integrated Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, satellite data technologies, and climate modelling into the study of global climate change under a Pathway for studying the Mathematics of Climate Change (PMCC). The PMCC, which is an interdisciplinary option within the BS in Applied Mathematical Sciences, consists of courses offered by the departments of Mathematics, Physics, and Geography and is designed to prepare students for careers and Ph.D. programs in technical fields relevant to global climate change. Under this option students are exposed to the science, mathematics, and applications of climate change science through a variety of methods including hands-on experience with computer modeling and image processing software. In the Geography component of the program, ESRI's ArcGIS and ERDAS Imagine mapping, spatial analysis and image processing software were used to explore NASA satellite data to examine the earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere in areas that are affected by climate change or affect climate. These technology tools were incorporated into climate change and remote sensing courses to enhance students' knowledge and understanding of climate change through hands-on application of image processing techniques to NASA data. Several sets of exercises were developed with specific learning objectives in mind. These were (1) to increase student understanding of climate change and climate change processes; (2) to develop student skills in understanding, downloading and processing satellite data; (3) to teach remote sensing technology and GIS through applications to climate change; (4) to expose students to climate data and methods they can apply to solve real world problems and incorporate in future research projects. In the Math and Physics components of the course, students learned about atmospheric circulation with applications of the Lorenz model, explored the land-sea breeze problem with the Dynamics and Thermodynamics Circulation Model (DTDM), and developed simple radiative transfer models. Class projects explored the effects of varying the content of CO2 and CH4 in the atmosphere, as well as the properties of paleoclimates in atmospheric simulations using EdGCM. Initial assessment of student knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors associated with these activities, particularly about climate change, was measured. Pre- and post-course surveys provided student perspectives about the courses and their learning about remote sensing and climate change concepts. Student performance on the tutorials and course projects evaluated students' ability to learn and apply their knowledge about climate change and skills with remote sensing to assigned problems or proposed projects of their choice. Survey and performance data illustrated that the exercises were successful in meeting their intended learning objectives as well as opportunities for further refinement and expansion.

  6. Intervención educativa sobre enfermedades transmitidas por alimentos en estudiantes de Tecnología de la Salud / Educational intervention on the subject of food-borne diseases with health technology students

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Roberto Dair, García de la Rosa; Odalys, Rodríguez Heredia; Cristina, Casado Rodríguez; Adolfo, Pérez Arruti; Irismary, Sosa Cabrera.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: las enfermedades trasmitidas por los alimentos (ETA) constituyen el problema de salud pública más extendido en el mundo, por lo que es necesario mantener una vigilancia epidemiológica de estas para aplicar medidas oportunas que permitan su control y prevención. Objetivo: elevar el nive [...] l de conocimiento sobre las enfermedades transmitidas por alimentos, en estudiantes de la Facultad de Tecnología de la Salud en la provincia de Camagüey. Métodos: se realizó un estudio experimental de intervención educativa en la Facultad de Tecnología de la Salud en la Provincia de Camagüey desde el 31 de diciembre de 2008 al 30 de abril de 2009. Para la ejecución del estudio en una primera etapa se estableció la comunicación con los estudiantes, lo que quedó validado a través del consentimiento informado. El universo fue de 421 jóvenes de los cuales se seleccionó una muestra (n = 110 estudiantes), a través de un muestreo aleatorio simple, a los que se les aplicó un cuestionario. Toda la información se conservó bajo los principios de máxima confiabilidad. Se empleó la técnica de McNemar para la validación estadística de las tablas sobre el nivel de conocimiento, con el fin de mostrar los cambios ocurridos antes y después, con un nivel de significación de p Abstract in english Introduction: Food-borne diseases (FBD) are the most widely spread public health problem worldwide. Therefore, it is necessary to keep them under epidemiological surveillance in order to apply timely measures allowing their control and prevention. Objective: Expand the knowledge of food-borne diseas [...] es among students from the School of Health Technology in the province of Camagüey. Methods: An educational intervention experimental study was conducted at the School of Health Technology in the province of Camagüey from 31 December 2008 to 30 April 2009. In the first stage of the study, communication was established with the students, who gave their informed consent. The study universe was composed of 421 young adults, from whom a sample was selected (n = 110 students) by simple random sampling. A questionnaire was applied to all subjects in the sample. The information collected was kept under strict confidentiality. McNemar's analysis was used for the statistical validation of knowledge tables, with the purpose of showing the changes occurred before and after, with a statistical significance of p

  7. Wilberforce Power Technology in Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Edward M.; Buffinger, D. R.; Hehemann, D. G.; Breen, M. L.; Raffaelle, R. P.

    1999-01-01

    The Wilberforce Power Technology in Education Program is a multipart program. Three key parts of this program will be described. They are: (1) WISE-The Wilberforce Summer Intensive Experience. This annual offering is an educational program which is designed to provide both background reinforcement and a focus on study skills to give the participants a boost in their academic performance throughout their academic careers. It is offered to entering Wilberforce students. Those students who take advantage of WISE learn to improve important skills which enable them to work at higher levels in mathematics, science and engineering courses throughout their college careers, but most notably in the first year of college study. (2) Apply technology to reaming. This is being done in several ways including creating an electronic chemistry text with hypertext links to a glossary to help the students deal with the large new vocabulary required to describe and understand chemistry. It is also being done by converting lecture materials for the Biochemistry class to PowerPoint format. Technology is also being applied to learning by exploring simulation software of scientific instrumentation. (3) Wilberforce participation in collaborative research with NASA's John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. This research has focused on two areas in the past year. The first of these is the deposition of solar cell materials. A second area involves the development of polymeric materials for incorporation into thin film batteries.

  8. INTELLIGENCE MOBILE AND DIGITAL BROADCASTING TECHNOLOGY TO SUPPORT LEARNING FOR DISABILITIES STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Settachai Chaisanit; Chiraphorn Chomyim; Samphan Chandee

    2013-01-01

    Usage of mobile digital broadcasting technologies in education is the most important of required technologies to provide main goals in distance education. It offers learning and data accession opportunities to learners notwithstanding time and place. In academic education, it was found that one of the critical problem is the appreciate education tool for disabilities students. Students with special education have difficulties to develop cognitive abilities and acquire new knowledge. They coul...

  9. Linking Critical Pedagogy and Education Technology (2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathon Henderson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the importance of linking critical pedagogy and educational technology. It begins by discussing the growth of critical pedagogy and the increasing importance placed on educational technology. Next it introduces concepts of critical pedagogy, such as the banking system of education. This paper concludes with a discussion of the reasons why a critical perspective on educational technology is needed and the use of community to link critical pedagogy and educational technology.

  10. Linking Critical Pedagogy and Education Technology (2013)

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathon Henderson

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of linking critical pedagogy and educational technology. It begins by discussing the growth of critical pedagogy and the increasing importance placed on educational technology. Next it introduces concepts of critical pedagogy, such as the banking system of education. This paper concludes with a discussion of the reasons why a critical perspective on educational technology is needed and the use of community to link critical pedagogy and educational technology.

  11. Distance Education in Technological Age

    OpenAIRE

    R.C. Sharma

    2005-01-01

    Distance Education in Technological AgeRomesh Verma (Editor), New Delhi: Anmol Publications, 2005, ISBN 81-261-2210-2, pp. 419 Reviewed by R C SHARMARegional DirectorIndira Gandhi National Open University-INDIA The advancements in information and communication technologies have brought significant changes in the way the open and distance learning are provided to the learners. The impact of such changes is quite visible in both developed and developing countries. Switching over to online mode...

  12. Elementary Physical Education Student Teachers' Interactions with Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, David

    2005-01-01

    The student teaching experience can be a time of application and learning for the student. The purpose of this study was to investigate the types of interactions student teachers had during their elementary physical education teaching experience. The subjects were three senior physical education majors that had completed all of their class work…

  13. Building Innovation: Learning with Technologies. Australian Education Review Number 56

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Australian Education Review (AER) 56 explores national and international policy priorities for building students' innovation capabilities through information and communication technologies (ICT) in Australian schools. Section 1 sets out the Australian policy context for digital education and highlights some of the emerging challenges. It provides…

  14. An Evaluation of Educational Technology Integration in Middle School Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redditt, Lorry Miller

    2007-01-01

    To meet the challenge of addressing the educational needs of students enrolled in the 21st century classroom and to meet the vitally important national goal of raising the level of digital inclusion, it is imperative for educators to develop methods of integrating technology into the everyday activities of the classroom. This applied dissertation…

  15. Mobile Technology and Liberal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author offers reflections on the impact of mobile technology for liberal education. These reflections are based on his own experience of incorporating iPads in his communication courses during the 2010-2011 academic year. As a member of an interdisciplinary faculty learning community on the use of mobile tablets, he explored…

  16. Potential of information technology in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheos, N; Stefanovic, N; Apse, P; Attstrom, R; Buchanan, J; Brown, P; Camilleri, A; Care, R; Fabrikant, E; Gundersen, S; Honkala, S; Johnson, L; Jonas, I; Kavadella, A; Moreira, J; Peroz, I; Perryer, D G; Seemann, R; Tansy, M; Thomas, H F; Tsuruta, J; Uribe, S; Urtane, I; Walsh, T F; Zimmerman, J; Walmsley, A D

    2008-02-01

    The use of information technology (IT) in dentistry is far ranging. In order to produce a working document for the dental educator, this paper focuses on those methods where IT can assist in the education and competence development of dental students and dentists (e.g. e-learning, distance learning, simulations and computer-based assessment). Web pages and other information-gathering devices have become an essential part of our daily life, as they provide extensive information on all aspects of our society. This is mirrored in dental education where there are many different tools available, as listed in this report. IT offers added value to traditional teaching methods and examples are provided. In spite of the continuing debate on the learning effectiveness of e-learning applications, students request such approaches as an adjunct to the traditional delivery of learning materials. Faculty require support to enable them to effectively use the technology to the benefit of their students. This support should be provided by the institution and it is suggested that, where possible, institutions should appoint an e-learning champion with good interpersonal skills to support and encourage faculty change. From a global prospective, all students and faculty should have access to e-learning tools. This report encourages open access to e-learning material, platforms and programs. The quality of such learning materials must have well defined learning objectives and involve peer review to ensure content validity, accuracy, currency, the use of evidence-based data and the use of best practices. To ensure that the developers' intellectual rights are protected, the original content needs to be secure from unauthorized changes. Strategies and recommendations on how to improve the quality of e-learning are outlined. In the area of assessment, traditional examination schemes can be enriched by IT, whilst the Internet can provide many innovative approaches. Future trends in IT will evolve around improved uptake and access facilitated by the technology (hardware and software). The use of Web 2.0 shows considerable promise and this may have implications on a global level. For example, the one-laptop-per-child project is the best example of what Web 2.0 can do: minimal use of hardware to maximize use of the Internet structure. In essence, simple technology can overcome many of the barriers to learning. IT will always remain exciting, as it is always changing and the users, whether dental students, educators or patients are like chameleons adapting to the ever-changing landscape. PMID:18289271

  17. STUDENT OPINIONS ON MANAGEMENT OF DISTANCE EDUCATION APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celal GULSEN

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditional education systems can sometimes become inadequate in the face of technological developments. Individuals, whose educational needs cannot be met by traditional education systems, can tend to search for alternatives and can have different demands in order to meet with these needs. These demands of the individuals can be reciprocated by managements and internet-based education methods, which remove limitations of time and space, provide facilities and equal opportunities, comply with student-centered educational approach and use computer and internet technologies, can be put into practice. Appearing before us sometimes as an alternative to the traditional education and sometimes as a support, these applications began to occupy an important place in the education systems of our era. This study, which was conducted by general survey method in view of this importance, aims to learn opinions of “masters’ students on the efficiency of distance education applications.” Survey of “Distant Education and Technologies Assessment,” developed by Aktas (2008 and adapted to Istanbul sampling by the researcher, was used in order to determine opinions. University students, who are doing masters without thesis at Social Sciences Institute Educational Administration Supervision Planning and Economics Department of Fatih University in 2013-2014 academic years, constitute the study group of the research. All of the students in the study group were reached. As a result of the study, masters’ students believe that “distance education applications” fills a very important void for individuals that experience difficulties especially in time management despite some of its inconveniencies. By looking at the results of the study, it is suggested that measures, which provide further dissemination of distance education application by will improve their technical competencies, should be taken.

  18. Innovations in multidisciplinary education in healthcare and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoof, Joost; Zwerts-Verhelst, Elisabeth L M; Nieboer, Marianne E; Wouters, Eveline J M

    2015-06-01

    The growing importance of technology in health care calls for interdisciplinary study programmes in which students with various backgrounds work together in exploring and designing new solutions for real-life problems. The Centre of Healthcare and Technology of Fontys University of Applied Sciences (Fontys EGT), the Netherlands, is presented as an example of how new initiatives in the field of education at the crossroads of health care and technology can be shaped and implemented in practice. A case study illustrating one of the student projects is provided as an example of the approach to educational innovation and interdisciplinary collaboration. PMID:26021475

  19. How Social Science and Geography Teachers Perceive Educational Technologies that have Been Integrated in Educational Program

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Ozel

    2007-01-01

    One of the major universal aims of educational systems is to raise human power suitable for the requirements of information society, one of the main steps of which is to configure the educational programs in accordance with universal interaction. The prerequisite of this step is to use the technology in the educational environment urgently and efficiently because the student-centered learning approach that goes along with educational programs relies on the individual’s establishing a relati...

  20. The Use of Mobile-Wireless Technology for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altalib, Hasan

    This paper focuses on the use of mobile-wireless technology for education. The first section is an introduction which provides a definition of the terms. The second section discusses implementation of mobile-wireless technology in schools, providing examples from Latrobe Junior High School, where wireless laptops were issued to students and River…

  1. Science Fiction in Social Education: Exploring Consequences of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lance E.

    2013-01-01

    An NCSS Technology Position Statement and Guidelines, published in 2006 (an updated version is published in this issue of "Social Education"), affirms that social studies students should critically examine relations between technology and society. This article describes how teachers can use science fiction to introduce critical questions…

  2. Experiencing Technology Integration in Education: Children's Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baytak, Ahmet; Tarman, Bülent; Ayas, Cemalettin

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the experiences of six children using technologies in their education. Data were collected via in-depth interviews, classroom observations, and home observations. The results showed that students have common perceptions toward their experience with technology integration. Furthermore, the…

  3. Elementary Principals' Strategies for Managing the Educational Technology Refresh Process: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Increased uses of educational technology by students and teachers in recent years have compelled elementary principals to expand educational technology resources and replace educational technology resources at the end of it's service life. The purpose of this study was to investigate strategies and practices employed by elementary principals…

  4. ROLES OF PROFESSIONAL SCIENTISTS AND RESEARCH ORGANIZATIONS IN THE EDUCATION OF STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES PREPARING TO ENTER THE SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS WORKFORCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at the Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology, Gainesville, FL have developed considerable experience in organizing and carrying out science education outreach activities for minority and disabled students. The author was invited to participate in a symposium on the ...

  5. A Study Of Student’s Attitude Towards Virtual Education In Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad HUSSAIN

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Virtual education paradigm has been developing as a form of distance education to provide education across the boundaries of a nation and/or country. It imparts education through information and communication technologies. In Pakistan the Virtual University of Pakiastan imparts it. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the students’ attitudes towards virtual education in Pakistan. The data were collected from BCS final semester students of the virtual university through questionnaire. The study revealed that virtual education is an alternate to the formal system of education. It can cater large students’ body at all academic levels. It is flexible and convenient to the learners providing them exposure with emerging technologies. It integrates the nation extending the opportunities of higher education, uniform curricula, technology based instructional methodology and equal opportunities of higher education. However, students do face some problems as well. These include problems of password, computer vision syndrome (CVS, fingers’ joint pain, backache, dizziness & headache and electricity failure. From the findings of the study it can be projected that in future formal universities may be adopting the virtual mode in some way.

  6. Library Experience for Applied Engineering Technology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Jay

    The full-time Applied Engineering Technology Program at Goodwin College of Drexel University was launched two years ago. This program clearly distinguishes itself from traditional engineering programs. The curriculum places emphasis on the application of theory rather than on derivations and proofs. The majority of courses are fully integrated with training and laboratory experience, extensive use of software and industrial case studies. The information literacy of students plays an important role in the education process. The primary goal of an academic library is to support the curriculum and provide a more successful library experience for students. The communication between the librarian with liaison responsibilities and the academic program is described in this work. During the class-session of the Introduction to Applied Engineering Technology Course, the librarian introduces students to library resources including databases and electronic products, services, programs and policies, as well as to proper communication links between the library and the various colleges and schools. The information skills learned during the process contribute to life-long learning among the students in this program. Several activities such as research skills workshops, informal consultations, electronic reference and virtual chat, and informal mentoring are used to provide informative library experiences to the students. The role of the communication and collaboration among the faculty and the librarian to develop the content for the library skills workshops and assignments to assess the information skills learned are considered crucial for providing enriching library experience. The core information skills that will enhance the knowledge fundamentals form the central theme of this collaboration between the faculty, students, and librarians.

  7. TUBSAT-1, satellite technology for educational purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginati, A.

    1988-01-01

    TUBSAT-1 (Technical University of Berlin Satellite) is an experimental low-cost satellite within the NASA Get Away Special (GAS) program. This project is being financed by the German BMFT (Federal Ministry for Research and Technology), mainly for student education. The dimensions and weight are determined by GAS requirements and the satellite will be ejected from the space shuttle into an approximately 300-km circular orbit. It is a sun/star oriented satellite with an additional spin stabilization mode. The first planned payload is to be used for observing flight paths of migratory birds from northern Europe to southern Africa and back.

  8. Social Media Use in Academia : Campus Students Perceptions of How Using Social Media Supports Educational Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Aghaee, Naghmeh

    2010-01-01

    Traditional education system on campus has been using as a legacy over decades to support educational learning. The major change over time has been made by the use of technology supporting students in the academic community. As the majority of students in higher education today belong to the digital-age-student generation, they frequently use online technology to interact with instructors, other learners, and to access online materials. In this study, the result is primarily presented from ca...

  9. Promoting Business Education through Student Organization Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelverton, Sandra

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the promotion of business education through the activities of student organizations. Describes specific programs, projects, and leadership development activities and their effectiveness in publicizing business education programs. (JOW)

  10. Educating Students for Practice: Educational Outcomes and Community Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Nemire, Ruth E.; Meyer, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    The education of pharmacists in the United States integrates classroom and experiential learning. Two organizations played a key role in determining the current education of pharmacy students. They are the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education and the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. The curriculum offered today provides opportunities for students to learn and achieve ability-based outcomes in both didactic and experiential courses. This review of pharmacy education focuse...

  11. Are Students Customers in Finnish Higher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuori, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    This study examines Finnish higher education students' perceptions of whether students are customers, based on qualitative interview data. The article contributes to the discussion on students as customers by giving attention to students' own voices from a country where tuition fees are not generally collected. The data are presented and analysed…

  12. Inclusive Education for Students with Intellectual Disability

    OpenAIRE

    Janaki Balakrishnan; Djk, Cornelius

    2012-01-01

    This paper traces briefly the evolution of Inclusive Education for students with special education needs (SEN) and discusses some significant challenges in its implementation. While the aim of Inclusive Education is to include all children with SEN in mainstream schools, there are many challenges that have to be overcome for their education to be meaningful. This paper focuses primarily on the inclusion of students with intellectual disability, since they are likely to be the largest number w...

  13. Students' Awareness and Requirements of Mobile Learning Services in the Higher Education Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Naji S. Alzaza; Abdul R. Yaakub

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: M-learning is considered as the next generation of e-learning using mobile technologies. Students? awareness of such technology is one of the most focuses for success adoption. This study aims to investigate students? awareness and requirements of mobile learning services among Malaysian students in the higher education environment. Approach: The study found that the higher education environment now has the necessary mobile technology infrastructure to utilize m-learning....

  14. Students education and training for Slovak NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Preparation of operating staff for nuclear industry is and also has to be one of the most serious education processes mainly in the Central-European countries where about 40-50% of electricity is produced in nuclear power plants. In the central-European Region exists a very extensive and also effective international collaboration in nuclear industry and education. Similarly good situation is also on the level of universities and technical high schools in this area. Slovak university of technology Bratislava established contacts with many universities in abroad in utilization of research and training reactors. Slovak University of Technology is the largest and also oldest technological university in Slovakia. Surely more than 50% of high-educated technicians who work nowadays in nuclear industry graduated from this university. Its importance increased in the last few years because after political changes there is a small interest in study at Russian and Czech universities, where traditionally a lot of technicians graduated in the past. In every specialisation there are fixed number of compulsory subjects. Also each of 17 Departments offers a group of optional subjects, from which every student can choose a subgroup of courses that interest them most and relate to their future specialisation. Some optional subjects can be studied at another university or university abroad. Excellent students from all specializations can surely find jobs in nuclear industry, ban surely find jobs in nuclear industry, but for the operating staff it is recommended to study Power Plant Engineering and Power electronics. There is a possibility (beside the obligatory subjects) to choose a batch of 12 optional subjects focused on peaceful use of nuclear energy. Individual works of students (annual projects, diploma theses) in which they consult the independently earned knowledge with supervisors and experts from practice is very important. An extension of total study-length to 5,5 years created space for more precise elaboration of diploma thesis. In addition to regular academic education we perform post-gradual courses: 'Safety aspects of NPP operation'. The main goal is to increase safety culture of NPP operation and target groups are operation staff of NPP, NRA officers, nuclear safety specialists - all graduated from technical universities with at least two years practice in nuclear industry. On international level we organised the 4 weeks 'IAEA Regional Training Course on Safety, Management and Utilization of Research Reactors' which was held in Bratislava (Slovakia) and Vienna (Austria) during March 05-30th 2001. IAEA in co-operation with the Department of Nuclear Physics and Technology of the Slovak University of Technology and the Atominstitut of Austrian Universities Vienna prepared and realized this training course with the aim to train junior staff from research reactors in various aspects of safety, management and utilization of research reactors. All participants had to have at least 4 years experiences in operation, management, utilization or regulation of research reactors. Lectures covered the topics in nuclear design and operation, neutron physics, reactor physics, health physics, dosimetry, reactor instrumentation, fuel management decontamination procedures, preparation of experiments at research reactors and others. Beside theoretical part of the course, the practical exercises at TRIGA II reactor in Vienna constituted an important part of training. The course was held in English for participants from 6 countries (Slovakia, Russia, Romania, Hungary, Ukraine, Turkey) and thank support of IAEA was fully provided with textbooks and laboratory guides. This year we take part via students and 2 professors the second run of the Eugene Wiegner course establishing in frame of ENEN project. According to international experiences obtained during the last 3 years, we created The Slovak Nuclear Education Network (SNEN) which is supervised at our Department. Coordination of nuclear education is essentially important on the regional

  15. Identification of risk factors of computer information technologies in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrebniak M.P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The basic direction of development of secondary school and vocational training is computer training of schoolchildren and students, including distance forms of education and widespread usage of world information systems. The purpose of the work is to determine risk factors for schoolchildren and students, when using modern information and computer technologies. Results of researches allowed to establish dynamics of formation of skills using computer information technologies in education and characteristics of mental ability among schoolchildren and students during training in high school. Common risk factors, while operating CIT, are: intensification and formalization of intellectual activity, adverse ergonomic parameters, unfavorable working posture, excess of hygiene standards by chemical and physical characteristics. The priority preventive directions in applying computer information technology in education are: improvement of optimal visual parameters of activity, rationalization of ergonomic parameters, minimizing of adverse effects of chemical and physical conditions, rationalization of work and rest activity.

  16. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) is a highly effective web-based educational system to complement conventional knowledge transfer methods by networking teachers, students, and their institutions that are engaged or interested in the peaceful uses of nuclear technology and other applications. ANENT is primarily aimed at Asia and the Pacific region, where huge economic growth is now under way and expected to continue, accompanied by rapidly increasing demand for energy. The demand cannot, and should not, be met only by fossil fuels. Fossil fuels are limited and increasingly expensive, and are thought to be the largest cause of global warming. Nuclear energy is expected to play an important role to close the widening gap between energy supply and demand. While some countries in Asia have been operating nuclear power plants (NPP) for decades, there are some potential newcomer countries to nuclear power programmes. Other countries are to maintain and expand the use of radiation and radioisotopes. Demand in human resources is increasing in the field of energy and nuclear technology in the region. At the same time, however, many countries are facing urgent issues of nuclear knowledge management such as 'brain drain', shortage of educational opportunities, resources and facilities. Thus, the Asian region needs to develop a wide spectrum of nuclear education and training programmes for capacity and infrastructure building. The basic concept of ANENT ware building. The basic concept of ANENT was discussed and agreed upon at a consultancy meeting held in Daejeon, the Republic of Korea(2003), in cooperation with Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). On the basis of the basic agreement, ANENT was established at the first coordination committee meeting held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (2004), with the cooperation of the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (Malaysian Nuclear Agency). The participants agreed upon the initial Terms of Reference and an action plan for launching ANENT. Implementation of five group activities was also agreed upon. ANENT is a new regional partnership for knowledge management and capacity building in the peaceful applications of nuclear technology. It aims at aiding networking of nuclear research institutes, universities, and other educational facilities as well as developing a web-based education and training system to complement existing mechanisms. This regional partnership is intended to disseminate knowledge and information on nuclear technology in a reliable and economic manner to a broader audience

  17. Building technology services that address student needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ber, Jeanne M; Lombardo, Nancy T; Wimmer, Erin

    2015-01-01

    A 16-question technology use survey was conducted to assess incoming health sciences students' knowledge of and interest in current technologies, and to identify student device and tool preferences. Survey questions were developed by colleagues at a peer institution and then edited to match this library's student population. Two years of student responses have been compiled, compared, and reviewed as a means for informing library decisions related to technology and resource purchases. Instruction and event programming have been revised to meet student preferences. Based on the number of students using Apple products, librarians are addressing the need to become more proficient with this platform. PMID:25611437

  18. Mining Educational Data to Analyze Students' Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Baradwaj, Brijesh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of higher education institutions is to provide quality education to its students. One way to achieve highest level of quality in higher education system is by discovering knowledge for prediction regarding enrolment of students in a particular course, alienation of traditional classroom teaching model, detection of unfair means used in online examination, detection of abnormal values in the result sheets of the students, prediction about students' performance and so on. The knowledge is hidden among the educational data set and it is extractable through data mining techniques. Present paper is designed to justify the capabilities of data mining techniques in context of higher education by offering a data mining model for higher education system in the university. In this research, the classification task is used to evaluate student's performance and as there are many approaches that are used for data classification, the decision tree method is used here. By this task we extract knowledge th...

  19. Navigating the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Pipeline: How Social Capital Impacts the Educational Attainment of College-Bound Female Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rebecca Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Despite the proliferation of women in higher education and the workforce, they have yet to achieve parity with men in many of the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) majors and careers. The gap is even greater in the representation of women from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. This study examined pre-college intervention strategies…

  20. Teaching Note--Ask the Audience: Using Student Response Systems in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedline, Terri; Mann, Aaron R.; Lieberman, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Social work educators are uniquely tasked with balancing content while helping students evaluate personal biases and develop ethical conduct necessary for social work professionalism. Social work education may benefit from technology like Student Response Systems (SRS) that allow educators to pose questions on sensitive topics in real time while…

  1. Evaluations of Students on Facebook as an Educational Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Naci Çoklar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Taking cognizance of the transformation experienced in education technologies, the concept that comes into prominence in integration of ICTs to education process at present is web 2.0. The main philosophy of web 2.0 technologies is its contribution to content formation of users and high-level interaction between users. One of web 2.0 technologies used widely is social networking sites. In this study, educational use of Facebook, which is a social networking site, was assessed in terms of student views. To that end, 27 students were inserted to an interaction in Facebook environment as a part of a formal lesson for 2 months. The students appraised Facebook positively in aspects of dissemination of information, arousing interest, motivation, presenting interaction opportunity, whereas negatively in terms of being nested with entertainment, problem of control mechanism, excessive informational convergence. The students made suggestions about Facebook in terms of educational usage, providing teacher supervisions, introducing education in Facebook environment and including student performance in this environment into academic assessment process.

  2. Evaluating Technology Resistance and Technology Satisfaction on Students' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norzaidi, Mohd Daud; Salwani, Mohamed Intan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Using the extended task-technology fit (TTF) model, this paper aims to examine technology resistance, technology satisfaction and internet usage on students' performance. Design/methodology/approach: The study was conducted at Universiti Teknologi MARA, Johor, Malaysia and questionnaires were distributed to 354 undergraduate students.…

  3. Satellite education: The national technological university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Technological University (NTU) was founded to address the wide-ranging educational needs of the employed technical professional. A state-of-the-art satellite delivery system allows nationwide coverage by participating engineering colleges. Established in 1984, NTU is now a nonprofit effort of 24 engineering colleges. The NTU network grew rapidly to its present configuration, and enrollment patterns clearly demonstrate the need and acceptance of the concept. Each member school teaches its own courses (with on-campus students enrolled) over the network and awards its own grades. Receiving sites at NTU are operated by a sponsoring organization (i.e., the employer) in accordance with NTU guidelines. Masters degrees are offered in electrical engineering, computer engineering, computer science, engineering management, and manufacturing engineering. Several certificate programs are also available. Typically, NTU telecasts 80 credit courses each term. Over 50,000 attend continuing education courses, tutorials, and research teleconferences each year. Newly acquired channels will enable further expansion

  4. Integrating technology education concepts into China's educational system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Faxian

    The problem of this study was to develop a strategy for integrating technology education concepts within the Chinese mathematics and science curricula. The researcher used a case study as the basic methodology. It included three methods for collecting data: literature review, field study in junior and senior secondary schools in America and China, and interviews with experienced educators who were familiar with the status of technology education programs in the selected countries. The data came from the following areas: Japan, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, China, and five states in the United States: Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, and New York. The researcher summarized each state and country's educational data, identified the advantages and disadvantages of their current technology education program, and identified the major concepts within each program. The process determined that identified concepts would be readily acceptable into the current Chinese educational system. Modernization of, industry, agriculture, science and technology, and defense have been recent objectives of the Chinese government. Therefore, Chinese understanding of technology, or technology education, became important for the country. However, traditional thought and culture curb the implementation of technology education within China's current education system. The proposed solution was to integrate technology education concepts into China's mathematics and science curricula. The purpose of the integration was to put new thoughts and methods into the current educational structure. It was concluded that the proposed model and interventions would allow Chinese educators to carry out the integration into China's education system.

  5. Student Projects: Hands-on Experience with Mechanical Engineering Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ian D.

    For several years, the Engineering Technology Department (ETD) at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) has sponsored a variety of student led competition vehicle programs. These programs have enjoyed considerable success in competitions around the country, and have spawned a thriving research community at MTSU, culminating with the foundation of the Experimental Vehicles Program (EVP) at MTSU during the summer of 2004. The vehicle projects sponsored by EVP, including a Solar Vehicle, Solar Boat, Formula car, Mini Baja, and a human powered Moon Buggy, give engineering technology students invaluable experience solving real world engineering problems. The vehicle teams themselves provide a support network that introduces younger students to more experienced older students who are glad to share the hard won knowledge they have gained, and are often willing to help with homework. This paper illustrates the effectiveness of extra-curricular student led projects in educating students for the challenges they will face on the job. EVP, along with other ETD sponsored projects, supplement the standard Mechanical Engineering Technology curriculum at MTSU by: " Attracting new and undeclared students to the Engineering Technology Department and the Mechanical Engineering Technology (MET) concentration " Increasing retention rates among first year MET students " Challenging those students to apply their classroom skills in designing and building vehicles for national and international competitions " Encouraging independent research into specific problems associated with vehicle design and construction " Fostering effective communication, leadership, and project management skills.

  6. A Delphi forecast of technology in education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, B. E.

    1973-01-01

    The results are reported of a Delphi forecast of the utilization and social impacts of large-scale educational telecommunications technology. The focus is on both forecasting methodology and educational technology. The various methods of forecasting used by futurists are analyzed from the perspective of the most appropriate method for a prognosticator of educational technology, and review and critical analysis are presented of previous forecasts and studies. Graphic responses, summarized comments, and a scenario of education in 1990 are presented.

  7. Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Committee on Minority Representation in Special Education

    2002-01-01

    Special education and gifted and talented programs were designed for children whose educational needs are not well met in regular classrooms. From their inceptions, these programs have had disproportionate representation of racial and ethnic minority students. What causes this disproportion? Is it a problem? Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education considers possible contributors to that disparity, including early biological and environmental influences and inequities in opportunities for preschool and K-12 education, as well as the possibilities of bias in the referral and assessment system that leads to placement in special programs. It examines the data on early childhood experience, on differences in educational opportunity, and on referral and placement. The book also considers whether disproportionate representation should be considered a problem. Do special education programs provide valuable educational services, or do they set students off on a path of lower educational expectations? Would students not now placed in gifted and talented programs benefit from raised expectations, more rigorous classes, and the gifted label, or would they suffer failure in classes for which they are unprepared? By examining this important problem in U.S. education and making recommendations for early intervention and general education, as well as for changes in referral and assessment processes, Minority Students in Special and Gifted Education will be an indispensable resource to educators throughout the nation, as well as to policy makers at all levels, from schools and school districts to the state and federal governments.

  8. Using Technology To Educate Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children in Rural Alaskan General Education Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 79 teachers of Alaskan students with deafness found those who use instructional technology tended to be older, hold an advanced degree and secondary education certification, benefit from in-service training onsite, are connected to the Internet, and actively use the technology available at their schools. (Contains references.)…

  9. Education Faculty Students' Views About Use of E-Books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat YALMAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parallel to technological developments, numerous new tools are now available for people’s use. Societies adapt these tools to their professional lives by learning how to use them. In this way, they try to establish more comfortable working environments. Universities giving vocational education are supposed to teach these new technologies to their students to help them become successful in their future profession. Books that serve as the basic sources of information for education faculty students are increasingly being transformed into e-books parallel to these new technologies. In line with these developments, identifying students’ approaches and preferences regarding e-book could help determine the needs regarding this type of new technologies. In line with this purpose, the present study aimed at determining the views and preferences of preservice teachers regarding e-book as well as their levels of general knowledge about this technology. The participants of the study were 1179 students attending an education faculty (660 female, 519 male. In the study, qualitative and quantitative methods were used together. The results revealed that the students did not have sufficient knowledge about e-book and that they regarded any digital source on the Internet as e-book. Of all the participating preservice teachers, only 6% of them had sufficient knowledge about e-book.

  10. Education of Gifted Students in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekowski, Andrzej E.; Lubianka, Beata

    2015-01-01

    The present article contains a review of the literature devoted to gifted education in Europe. Forms of supporting the development of gifted students provided in European schools are presented with reference to the problems of diagnosing exceptional abilities, the existence and forms of educational measures for gifted students and forms of…

  11. New Technological Trend in Educational Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Postolache

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The authors aim to highlight, after using the LMS based Sakai from implementation, the perceptionof both sides (professors and students over the use of the implementation of information and communicationtechnology (ITC in the education process. In the academic year 2007 – 2008, the leadership of DanubiusUniversity from Galati adopted the strategic decision to develop an integrated information system, which toincorporate the Student Information System (UMS, an e-learning platform, management system, researchand administrative management. In the months April – May 2010, at Danubius University from Galati it wasmade a survey organized by MISI 2010, at which 28 universities attended from around the world who useSakai, of the professors and students regarding the use in their activity of the ITC and in general of theplatform Danubius Online. At the university Danubius from Galati answered to the survey 24 professors and177 students. The participants responded to questions about both their views concerning the use of theinformation technology in the superior education in general, and at specific questions concerning theDanubius Online portal. After the experience gained in the pilot phase, developed in the academic year 2009-2010 and taking into account by the results of the survey, it was decided that starting with 1 October 2010 toproceed to the stage production. To this end, it was installed the Sakai version 2.7.1 and significantlyincreased the number of course sites that are operating on the Danubius Online portal, the tendency being togeneralize at all the university courses, taking into account by the trends of the both sides. There have beenintroduced more extensive indications of use, both for students and for professors. The article aims tohighlight the reactions of both sides: professors and students, on the implementation of the Danubius onlineplatform, through a survey that took place during May – June 2010. This is a clear example of response to thetechnological change management within the university. By participating in the survey organized by MISI2010 we found both strengths and weaknesses in the Romanian educational management, but also of all theparticipant universities within the survey. Being the only university from Romania, which has implementedthe learning platform developed in the Sakai project, we can state that the results are unique, so therefore webelieve that this paper brings a new contribution to the higher education by highlighting the current level ofdevelopment.

  12. Examining the Role of Technology to Create a Safe Haven for Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierros, Edward Garcia; Foley, Jean Ann

    2006-01-01

    This research examines the use of technology to create a relationship between student teachers and preservice teachers as they navigate the union of practice and theory within the two contexts of a teacher education course and student teaching practicum. Technology was used to create a safe haven where students could explore their respective…

  13. Satisfaction Clustering Analysis of Distance Education Computer Programming Students: A Sample of Karadeniz Technical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurt, Hacer

    2014-01-01

    In line with recently developing technology, distant education systems based on information technologies are started to be commonly used within higher education. Students' satisfaction is one of the vital aspects in order to maintain distant education efficiently and achieving its goal. As a matter of the fact, previous studies proved that…

  14. Educational Technology: Effective Leadership and Current Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courville, Keith

    2011-01-01

    (Purpose) This article describes the basis for effective educational technology leadership and a few of the current initiatives and impacts that are a result of the aforementioned effective leadership. (Findings) Topics addressed in this paper include: (1) the role of the educational technology leader in an educational setting; (2) an examination…

  15. The Changing Nature of Educational Technology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    The many changes in educational technologies have been well documented in both the professional and popular literature. What is less well documented is the changing nature of programs that prepare individuals for careers in the broad multi-disciplinary field of educational technology. This article is a first attempt to look at how educational

  16. Editorial Caution: changing education, changing technology

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Jacobs

    1996-01-01

    The theme of ourvery successful ALT-C 95 was Changing Education, Changing Technology. The papers which made up the conference (a small selection of which are published in this special issue of ALT-f) would have reflected this theme even if it had not been chosen by the conference committee, since both educational thinking and educational technology are so patently in flux.

  17. Student Teachers’ Attitude towards Twitter for Educational Aims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria I. Marín

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an educational experience with 100 student teachers from different courses of the University of the Balearic Islands (Spain in which Twitter is used for various different activities. The aim of this experiment was to explore student teachers’ perceptions in order to value their attitude towards Twitter for educational aims. Afterwards, students were asked to write down their reflections on an eportfolio. Data was collected from their eportfolio evidence, which was analysed to review their attitude towards the use of Twitter for educational purposes and for their future teaching and professional development. The conclusions indicate the need to conduct different educational activities in which Twitter is used in various ways. In addition, conclusions reflect on the real impact of Twitter on students’ learning enhancement, in order to improve student teachers’ attitudes towards social media in education. Therefore, this article contributes to the body of existing research on the use of technology in education, specifically to the possibilities of the use of social media and microblogging in Teacher Education.

  18. Science Teacher Learning of MBL-Supported Student-Centered Science Education in the Context of Secondary Education in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogt, Joke; Tilya, Frank; van den Akker, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Science teachers from secondary schools in Tanzania were offered an in-service arrangement to prepare them for the integration of technology in a student-centered approach to science teaching. The in-service arrangement consisted of workshops in which educative curriculum materials were used to prepare teachers for student-centered education and…

  19. Finding the Education in Educational Technology with Early Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManis, Lilla Dale; Gunnewig, Susan B.

    2012-01-01

    As many educators and parents have observed, today's children are exposed to advanced technology at an early age, with tablets, e-readers, and smartphones being some prevalent choices. Experiences with technology can pave the way for unprecedented learning opportunities. However, without an education component, technology cannot reach its full…

  20. Student Aid Policy of Chinese Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Jiao, Junhui

    2008-01-01

    Student aid policy of Chinese higher education was made in the form of free higher education before 1989. It changed into the form of direct assisting and rewarding students afterwards with the cost sharing policy into operation in China. This paper analyses four main questions of Chinese student aid policy. Firstly, it explores the background in which the policy is formulated and identifies the policy development stages. Secondly, human capital theory and modernization theory are applied to...

  1. A Technology for Designing a Vocational Module in Vocational Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Y. Zakirova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is aimed at improving the vocational training of students of technical vocational educational institutions in the field of organization and management of production processes. In the article the features of modern economic training of technical specialists are defined in the management and organization of production activity on the basis of modular competence-based approach. The article presents a technology for designing a vocational module that provides the organizational-management training of technicians in vocational education. The results of the research have a wide range of application for designing and implementing vocational modules for training vocational education students of not only technical, but also other specializations in corporate and post-professional education, and can be in demand by educators, researchers, customers of educational services.

  2. Science and students: Yucca Mountain project's education outreach program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is very concerned about the lack of understanding of basic science. Increasingly, critical decisions regarding the use of energy, technology, and the environment are being made. A well-educated and science-literate public is vital to the success of these decisions. Science education and school instruction are integral parts of the DOE's public outreach program on the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). Project staff and scientists speak to elementary, junior high, high school, and university students, accepting all speaking invitations. The objectives of this outreach program include the following: (1) educating Nevada students about the concept of a high-level nuclear waste repository; (2) increasing awareness of energy and environmental issues; (3) helping students understand basic concepts of earth science and geology in relation to siting a potential repository; and (4) giving students information about careers in science and engineering

  3. Rural Students? Skills and Attitudes Towards Information and Communication Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Judi, Hairulliza M.; Amin, Hazilah M.; Zin, Nor A. M.; Rodziah Latih

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: Despite various initiatives and programmes by the government to incorporate ICT in education, not much research has been done to evaluate the achievement of these initiatives and programmes, including ICT proficiency among students. This study fills in the gap of lack of current information pertaining to the Malaysian secondary school students? ICT competencies, knowledge on internet and attitudes toward computer technology. Approach: Data for this study has been gathered ...

  4. Students' Epistemological Awareness Concerning the Distinction Between Science and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinou, Costas; Hadjilouca, Rodothea; Papadouris, Nicos

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We have developed an approach for assessing students’ understanding about the distinction between science and technology. The assessment approach focuses on a specific aspect of this distinction, namely the different goal pursued by each of the two domains. Based on this approach, we collected data from two sources; two written tests administered to 183 elementary, 132 middle school and 78 elementary education students and follow-up interviews with a sub-sample of the pa...

  5. USING OF INFORMATIVE AND COMMUNICATIVE TECHNOLOGIES IN MUSIC EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O?GA PAPPOVÁ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Contribution processing and analyzing possibilities of using informative andcommunicative technologies in teaching music. It also indicates the importance ofimplementing informative and communicative technologies (ICT to the process ofteaching in light of current tendencies and trends in teaching music and educationalsubjects. It provides answers to the question if ICT really motivates students to bemore active in music lessons. We notice if there is a bigger difference in student'smotivation to musical activities for students teached with classic educationalapproaches than in new approaches with using means of ICT in education.

  6. Explaining the Intention to Use Technology among University Students: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Timothy; Zhou, Mingming

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the factors that an influence higher education students' intention to use technology. Using an extended technology acceptance model as a research framework, a sample of 314 university students were surveyed on their responses to seven constructs hypothesized to explain their intention to use technology.…

  7. Diesel Technology: Introduction. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joerschke, John D.; Eichhorn, Lane

    This complete teacher edition of a diesel technology course consists of introductory pages, teacher pages, and the student edition. The introductory pages provide these tools: training and competency profile; National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation Crosswalk; instructional/task analysis; basic skills icons and classifications; basic…

  8. Diesel Technology: Engines. Second Edition. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Dave; Miller, Roger; Kellum, Mary

    This diesel technology series offers secondary and postsecondary students an opportunity for learning required skills in the diesel industry. It aligns with the medium/heavy duty truck task list developed by the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation and used by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence in…

  9. Assessing Kinesiology Students' Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weimo

    2007-01-01

    Student learning in higher education is traditionally assessed and compared using institution statistics (e.g., graduation rate, students' entrance examinations scores and percent of students with jobs or plans to enter graduate or professional schools after graduation). This practice is no longer adequate to meet the needs of workforce…

  10. Engage and Excite Students with Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsche, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Using educational games to learn or reinforce lessons engages students and turns a potentially boring subject into something exciting and desirable to know! Games offer teachers and parents a new way to grab students' attention so that they will retain information. Games have become a teaching tool, an invaluable resource for reaching students in…

  11. PRAISE: Christians Educators and the Difficult Student

    OpenAIRE

    Beth E. Ackerman

    2008-01-01

    This article defends the role of the Christian educator in reaching the difficult student. It further offers tips for handling the challenging student from a Christian perspective, coupled with tried-and-true research using the acronym PRAISE: being proactive, using reinforcements, assessing and analyzing the intent of misbehavior, being sincere, and empowering students and the Holy Spirit in them.

  12. Educational Debt and Professional School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Sandy

    2000-01-01

    Discussion and analysis of effects of educational debt for professional school students includes four tables based on the National Student Loan Survey showing: (1) income and debt levels by graduate field of study; (2) graduate students in law and medicine (debts and income); (3) fields of graduate study with high payment-to-income ratios; and (4)…

  13. The Student Group in Formal Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Glen H., Jr.

    This paper discusses the use of student groups in formal education. A model is proposed which involves the development of student interdependence on common tasks, the use of group incentives which may be earned through competition with a standard or with other groups, and the exchange of student resources in teaching and learning. In contrast to…

  14. PRAISE: Christians Educators and the Difficult Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth E. Ackerman

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This article defends the role of the Christian educator in reaching the difficult student. It further offers tips for handling the challenging student from a Christian perspective, coupled with tried-and-true research using the acronym PRAISE: being proactive, using reinforcements, assessing and analyzing the intent of misbehavior, being sincere, and empowering students and the Holy Spirit in them.

  15. Developing Educational designs supporting student engagement through networked project studies

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche; Birch Andreasen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The chapter discusses how learner engagement can be facilitated through educational designs that make conscious use of various online communication technologies. The discussions will be based on cases from the Danish Master’s programme in ICT and Learning (MIL), where students from all over Denmark within a networked learning structure are studying in groups combining on-site seminars with independent and challenging virtually organized project periods, implementing new educational technolo...

  16. Nursing students’ use of technology enhanced learning: A longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Wilkinson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses are expected to be information and communication technology (ICT literate at registration but, despite the growth of social uses of technology, little is known of the views of students on the use of technology enhanced learning. The purpose of this study was to explore the experience and confidence of first year pre-registration nursing students with information and communication technologies and technology enhanced learning. Methods: A prospective longitudinal survey design with multiple data collection strategies was employed. Cross- sectional surveys using a new ICT and Education Scale at three time-points were used to collect data. The target population were first year UK nursing students (n=458; of those 287 (41.7% participated in the initial baseline survey. Results: There were three main findings. First, more than half of the respondents (67% reported that they were not confident with aspects of information literacy and were not prepared for technology enhanced learning (60% as they entered university and these aspects showed least change through time. Second, from varied starting points at baseline, respondents’ experience and confidence with ICT skills showed different trajectories over time. Third, there was some evidence that demographic profile was related to use and acceptance of ICT in the educational context. Conclusions: There is some evidence that nursing students find it difficult to negotiate the boundaries between their pre-university experience with technologies and that of education and practice. In a rapidly changing technology environment this has implications for curriculum planning in the first six months of a programme of study as well as student/staff preparation for technology enhanced learning.

  17. Cheating Behaviours, the Internet and Education Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushell, J.; Byrne, K.; Simpson, R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an illuminative small-scale study that piloted an initial survey instrument intended to investigate correspondences between 47 undergraduate Education final year students' use of information and communications technology (ICT), including the Internet, and--within the context of their adoption of tactics intended to impress…

  18. Internet Shopping Behavior of College of Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyici, Mubin

    2012-01-01

    Internet is an important facilitator for human and humans use this medium almost every phase. As a shopping medium, internet attract human so attract researcher. Younger people can adapt newer technologies so they can adapt internet as shopping tool. In this research it is tried to define college of education students' online shopping behavior and…

  19. Students' Ethical Decision-Making in an Information Technology Context: A Theory of Planned Behavior Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemenschneider, Cynthia K.; Leonard, Lori N. K.; Manly, Tracy S.

    2011-01-01

    Business educators have increased the focus on ethics in the classroom. In order for students to become ethical professionals, they must first be held to an ethical standard as students. As information technology continues to permeate every aspect of students' lives, it becomes increasingly important to understand student decision-making in this…

  20. Developing Educational designs supporting student engagement through networked project studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, JØrgen Lerche; Birch Andreasen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The chapter discusses how learner engagement can be facilitated through educational designs that make conscious use of various online communication technologies. The discussions will be based on cases from the Danish Master’s programme in ICT and Learning (MIL), where students from all over Denmark within a networked learning structure are studying in groups combining on-site seminars with independent and challenging virtually organized project periods, implementing new educational technology, which require teachers who are flexible and aware of the different challenges in the networked environment. The aim of the chapter is to discuss the application of new technological possibilities in educational settings inspired by problem-based learning. In our understanding, an educational design is constituted through the interplay of the pedagogical perspective, the chosen technologies, and the specific activities that unfold. This interplay is important in order to make a difference, as the experience is that new technologies do not in themselves guarantee increasing learning quality. The chapter will discuss examples of how learners as well as teachers have developed imaginative ways of implementing new technological possibilities in educational settings. The examples will include how sometimes seemingly simple technologies can be used in innovative pedagogical ways to increase learners’ involvement. Another example to be discussed in the chapter derives from an online seminar on ICT and Learning in Organizations, where the traditional practice of using online discussions were challenged, by expecting the students not only individually to take part in online discussions, but also on a group basis to discuss what kind of theme or opening question they would pose in order to invite co-students to take part in the online dialogues. Thus in contrast to the traditional understanding of the teacher as the sole designer of the learning environment, here the students were involved as active co-designers. Our understanding of problem-based learning is characterized by collaborative project work in groups, where students actively are constructing their own knowledge. The development of students’ information literacy is an important aspect of applying problem-based learning. In our contribution we will reflect on the many varied dimensions of the teacher role, the challenges for the students as both independent and interconnected learners, and discuss cases of developing student engagement through educational designs that facilitates group organized project work and learners’ participation in dialogically organized online seminars. Here we will focus on how the dimensions of participation and reification are played out.

  1. INTERACTIVE MEDIA PATH IN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Mammani, Basavaraj S.

    2014-01-01

    The age of information technology has presented to education a wide range of instructional media and materials. These media and materials are, in fact, tools of educational technology, which aims at solving problems of teaching and learning Hardware and software are two structural components of this technology and INTERACTIVE MEDIA is an important aspect related to them. Education as a system has some objective planned for the process and for the realization of which a variety...

  2. Application of Holographic Technology in Education

    OpenAIRE

    Aina, Oladapo

    2010-01-01

    Aina, Oladapo. 2010. Application of Holographic Technology in Education. Bachelor’s thesis. Kemi - Tornio University of Applied Sciences. Department of Information Processing. Pages 67. This research deals with holographic technology and its application as a tool to enhance learning and address perceived educational challenges. This research covers series of obscure strengths of holographic technology and discusses its applicability in education. Driven by the need to address some educa...

  3. Technology and education: Between chaos and order

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid Hamza, Mohammad; Alhalabi, Bassem

    1999-01-01

    More than any period in recorded history, today's heterogeneity of emergent technology has transformed daily life, particularly the lives of the many fascinated by it. The American educational system and its sense of direction have not been spared from the chaos and distress that accompanies this unprecedented era. Many educators await the promise of technology's power to improve the educational system. The purpose of this paper is not to validate the pros or cons of technology, but to explor...

  4. Methodology for Evaluating a Novel Education Technology: A Case Study of Handheld Video Games in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Jesse L.; Nussbaum, Miguel; Rodriguez, Patricio; Rosas, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    Many school systems, in both the developed and developing world, are implementing educational technology to assist in student learning. However, there is no clear consensus on how to evaluate these new technologies. This paper proposes a comprehensive methodology for estimating the value of a new educational technology in three steps: benefit…

  5. Role of Information Communication Technology in Higher Education: Learners Perspective in Rural Medical Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava, Tripti K.; Waghmare, Lalitbhushan S.; Jagzape, Arunita T.; Rawekar, Alka T.; Quazi, Nazli Z.; Mishra, Ved Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Background: Higher education has undergone profound transformation due to recent technological advancements. Resultantly health profession students have a strong base to utilize information technology for their professional development. Studies over recent past reflect a striking change in pattern of technology usage amongst medical students expanding prospects exponentially by e-books, science apps, readymade power-point presentations, evidence based medicine, Wikipedia, etc.

  6. Students' Attitudes Toward Gene Technology: Deconstructing a Construct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Grant E.; Troelstrup, Angelique

    2015-01-01

    Emergent technologies are commonly characterized as involving cutting-edge developments while lacking wide-scale public implementation. Although currently prevalent in many applications, gene technology is often considered emergent in that the science changes so rapidly. Science educators at all levels of formal education are faced with a unique challenge of facilitating student understanding of gene technology (in comparison with more established content) as well as integrating some of the more controversial socioscientific aspects of such content into the curricula. Much of the literature regarding student understanding of biotechnology has focused on development of student attitudes toward the field and the impact of this on their learning. However, there has, of yet, been no unifying framework in the literature regarding what is meant by attitudes toward gene technology. This article reviews the current scholarship (38 empirical studies published between 1990 and 2011) on the measurement of student attitudes toward biotechnology in order to highlight major themes present within the literature. Items from all reviewed studies were collected, coded, and sorted for construction of a comprehensive instrument representing the conceptualizations of attitudes toward gene technology in all 38 studies. Factor analytic techniques were used as a tool to reduce and categorize measurement items. Results provided a framework of five factors that help describe student attitudes toward biotechnology across all the studies. This emergent framework of factors is proposed as a useful means to standardize the discourse in future research.

  7. Introduction to the Special Issue on Using Technology in Mathematics and Science Education

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Ann Donnelly; Michael Mikusa

    2010-01-01

    The articles in this special issue of the RCETJ on mathematics and science investigate the role of educational technology in promoting student learning in mathematics and science. Manuscripts selected for this special issue include studies in which K-12 students are being studied in the context of technology-rich environments, that look at the impact of the use of various technologies on student learning, and illustrate how combined efforts at technology-rich professional development affect t...

  8. New Technology "Clouds" Student Data Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Keith R.; Moore, Bob

    2015-01-01

    As technology has leaped forward to provide valuable learning tools, parents and policy makers have begun raising concerns about the privacy of student data that schools and systems have. Federal laws are intended to protect students and their families but they have not and will never be able to keep up with rapidly evolving technology. School…

  9. Educational Technologies in Health Science Libraries: Teaching Technology Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Hurst, Emily J.

    2014-01-01

    As technology rapidly changes, libraries remain go-to points for education and technology skill development. In academic health sciences libraries, trends suggest librarians provide more training on technology topics than ever before. While education and training have always been roles for librarians, providing technology training on new mobile devices and emerging systems requires class creation and training capabilities that are new to many. To appeal to their users, many health sciences li...

  10. Pursuit of nuclear science and technology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While it is quite encouraging to note that there is a nuclear renaissance underway around the world, there is a growing concern that the knowledge-base of nuclear technologies will be lost. Several international organizations are making concerted efforts to avert this situation by establishing collaborative workshops etc. In Western Canada, our challenges and opportunities are many-fold. As a uranium mining region, we can engage our economy in the full life-cycle of the nuclear energy industry. It is also important that we maintain and augment nuclear technologies. We need to develop the infrastructure to jump-start the education and training of the youth. We are taking a multi-prong approach to this end. We are initiating specializations in undergraduate programs which emphasize nuclear radiation physics and technology. We are collaborating with Canadian organizations such as University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE) and University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT). We are organizing collaborations with our colleagues at foreign institutions in Europe and Asia to provide an international component. We are also working with local industry and health organizations to provide a wide-range of learning opportunities to students by engaging them in research projects of immediate interest to professionals. My presentation will focus on these developments and we will also seek thoughts and suggestions for future collaborations.r future collaborations.

  11. Two on Advances in Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advances in technology can help children play and compose music. The first site describes a project of the Centre for Research in IT in Education, which draws from the field of cognitive development, learning styles theory and educational best practice to develop DrumSteps. This tool, available for downloading, enables children to create, manipulate, edit and save original pieces of percussion music. A user-tracking feature allows the teacher or researcher to follow along with student files click-by-click, giving valuable insights into the students' thinking. The Centre is also examining pedagogical issues surrounding a parallel project, which is described on the second site. Toy Symphony is a project of the MIT Media Lab and Media Lab Europe and offers software, which enables children to compose-by-drawing. The bulk of the project, however, develops specially designed Music Toys, which enable children to engage in sophisticated listening, performing and composing activities normally accessible only after years of study. Videos of the workshops, as well as live concerts in which children play alongside some of the world's most accomplished musicians, are also available to download. [VF

  12. Whatever became of educational technology? the implications for teacher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Latchem

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the reasons for educational technology principles and practices not being more widely accepted and successfully applied in everyday teaching and learning. It argues that these are: an over-emphasis on new technology; a failure to learn from the lessons of the past; and a lack of meta-analysis and collaborative research to evidence the benefits. The paper also brings out the point that the literature fails to acknowledge the important role of educational technology in informal learning and non-formal education. It concludes with recommendations for future research into the broader aspects of educational technology and the employment of more longitudinal and collaborative action research and the nature of pre- service, in-service and postgraduate teacher education in educational technology.

  13. Using Cluster Analysis for Data Mining in Educational Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, Pavlo D.; Toy, Serkan; Niederhauser, Dale S.

    2012-01-01

    Cluster analysis is a group of statistical methods that has great potential for analyzing the vast amounts of web server-log data to understand student learning from hyperlinked information resources. In this methodological paper we provide an introduction to cluster analysis for educational technology researchers and illustrate its use through…

  14. PRODUCTIVE EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES IN TEACHING FOREGN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Vladimirovna Sannikova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to looking for productive educational technologies in learning a foreign language and culture with the use of ICT-based on the student-centered strategy that implements the method of projects.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-47

  15. Botswana medical students education in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Svendsen, Lone

    2014-01-01

    35 students have been participating in the program of educating Botswana medical students in Norway from 1995 until resent date. The purpose of this study has been to clarify the goal of the program and to find to what degree the program has been a success focusing on numbers of students having graduated, how many having returned home working as doctors, and the student’s experiences during their time of study. 11 of the Botswana medical students were participating in the study. It was done...

  16. Information Communication Technology (ICT) Shaping Student Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Elizabeth

    This paper opens with the following questions: "How prepared are you as a student affairs professional for information communication technology (ICT)? Do you understand such concepts as portals, e-business, Napster, computer use policies, and wireless communication? Will student affairs be shaped by ICT or will student affairs help shape ICT on…

  17. Students' Approaches to Learning when Entering Higher Education: Differences between Students with Senior General Secondary and Senior Secondary Educational Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bragt, Cyrille A. C.; Bakx, Anouke W. E. A.; Van der Sanden, Johan M. M.; Croon, Marcel A.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, more students have entered Dutch higher education. This is a consequence of the possibility to offer students to enter higher education, with a certificate from senior secondary education (SSVE). In earlier days most students in higher education had passed senior general secondary education (SGSE), or even pre-university education. It is…

  18. Redesigning Engineering Technology Education. The New Jersey Center for Advanced Technological Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waintraub, Jack L.

    1997-01-01

    The holistic approach to restructuring engineering technology education at the New Jersey Center for Advanced Technological Education includes partnerships for articulated programs, recruitment and retention of underrepresented groups, involvement of industrial personal, and faculty development in innovative instructional methods. (SK)

  19. Technology-Enhanced Learning Analytics System Design for Engineering Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushal Abhyankar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The field of technologically enhanced learning (TEL allows for the visualization of different patterns of user behaviors. These trends represent the usages of the technology based educational content. The visualization of this information leads to the formation of a comprehensive analytics system to process the metadata. The efforts to the formation of this learning analytics system were initiated with a comprehensive ethnographic research conducted over the engineering students of Wright State University to understand the pain points in studying engineering subjects. The focus of this research is primarily over the development, testing and evaluation of the educational content over small form factors devices in order to provide an interactive form of learning support to the engineering students. The usage data will be collected from the students with the help of the questionnaire designed to understand the affinity towards the technology. The data will be collected to understand the user attitude, ease of use, behavioral and social effects on the user as well as the user affinity towards the technology. The metadata presentation forms the learning analytics system, which will serve as the performance benchmark for the educators, technology developers, education administrators and stakeholders.

  20. An Appraisal of Educational Technology Usage in Secondary Schools in Ondo State (Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufemi Victor ADEOLUWA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined and appraised the use of Educational Technology in secondary schools in Ondo State South West, Nigeria. The study investigated the level of availability of Educational Technology facilities in schools, attitude of teachers toward educational technology, the perceived benefits of using Educational Technology, the problems facing the use of Educational Technology in secondary schools and Application of Educational Technology in schools by teachers. The descriptive survey design was used for the study. The population consisted of all the teachers and principals of the secondary schools in Ondo State. The sample consists of 400 teachers and 40 principals randomly selected from the secondary schools in Ondo State. A self designed questionnaire tagged Educational Technology and Secondary Schools (ETSS was used to collect the data for the study. Data collected for the study were analyzed using frequency count, percentage scores, mean and charts. The study revealed that Educational Technology facilities were lacking in schools and teachers and students were to a little extent exposed to the use of Educational Technology. Moreover, the study revealed the perceived benefits of using Educational Technology in schools which include making teaching-learning interesting; helping the distance learning program; Educational technology provide for individual differences; Educational technology makes teaching efficient and effective. However, despite these perceived benefits, the study also revealed some of the challenges facing Educational technology in secondary schools as: Epileptic supply of electricity: misconception of right concept of educational technology; Shortage of specialist in educational technology; inadequate facilities to support full application of educational technology and lack of fund. It was therefore recommended that government should increase the funding of the education sector. There should also be periodic training for teachers on educational technology skills acquisition.

  1. Brief Introduction to Technology Education in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng; Wang, Shin Ting; Wang, Buddy; Ko, Jerome; Wang, Ching Hsiang; He, Chi Chun; Wu, Hsiao Liang; Lu, Nancy; Shen, Yuoh Ching; Lin, Ran long; Ling, Yung Shun; Chang, Ming Chieh; Chen, Te Jen; Fong, Sha Zon; Huang, Chiung

    2004-01-01

    Technology Education at both elementary and secondary schools levels has become an important means to develop technological literacy for all. In Taiwan, Living Technology (LT) is offered at both elementary and secondary school levels in order to improve technological literacy of the public. This brief introduction presents the national status of…

  2. The Influence of the Educational Reform in Slovakia on Educational Contents and Technology in Pre-College Economic Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaromír Novák

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – the Slovak educational reform caused many changes in the Slovak school system. In the article, the author analyzes the impact it had on the educational contents and technology in pre-college economic education as part of general education.Design/methodology/approach – curriculum documents analysis, literature review, opinion survey (questionnaire, qualitative research (interview.Findings – he reform resulted in more teaching time as well as more practical orientation of economic education in general education in primary and secondary schools. However, what is still missing in the contents of this branch of economic education is more space for entrepreneurship education that would help to develop entrepreneurial skills necessary for the students to become more economically independent after they leave school. Although the reform gave schools more freedom in creating their school educational programs, it did not provide them with extra funds to finance the necessary modernization of the educational technologies they use. The differences in the use of modern ICT between different schools are thus attributable to other factors, unrelated to the educational reform process.Research limitations/implications – in the analysis of the contents of pre-college economic education, the author focused on the educational standards set by the state educational program, which must be respected by all schools in Slovakia. Although the reality of economic education in general education differs among schools (some schools created even several separated economic courses compulsory for all their students, others offer only a minimum required by the state educational program infused in a compulsory social studies course, it might also be interesting to analyze a sample of school educational programs for comparison and a more in-depth analysis.Originality/value – the article presents the findings of the genuine research.Research type: research paper.

  3. Student Support Services and Student Satisfaction in Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdil, Kutlay M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between quality of support services in online education and the level of satisfaction of e-learners with these services. Case study was employed to measure University of Surrey's virtual MBA students' satisfaction with course facilitator, personal tutor and help desk functions designed for online education.…

  4. Effect of Educational Computer Games on Student Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Habibian Naeini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available At present age, students to cope with the amazing developments of third millennium, should improve their critical thinking and creative skills to make good decisions and solve society complex problems present era is the era of computers and technology which are result of human creativity. Video games are sample of human innovations that are full of new samples with day by day increasing popularity. Because of its great appeal for many people, many social sciences, education, psychology and other researchers are attracted. Also this study goal is investigation of the impact of educational computer games on students' creativity to measure their creativity. The research has 4 hypothesises. In order to test hypothesis, paired comparison test and SPSS 16 software were used. Data analysis results using educational computer games lead to increase in dimension of originality, fluidity and flexibility of students’ creativity but not in extension dimension.

  5. Educational technologies in health sciences libraries: teaching technology skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Emily J

    2014-01-01

    As technology rapidly changes, libraries remain go-to points for education and technology skill development. In academic health sciences libraries, trends suggest librarians provide more training on technology topics than ever before. While education and training have always been roles for librarians, providing technology training on new mobile devices and emerging systems requires class creation and training capabilities that are new to many librarians. To appeal to their users, many health sciences librarians are interested in developing technology-based classes. This column explores the question: what skills are necessary for developing and teaching technology in an academic health sciences library setting? PMID:24528269

  6. Educational Technologies in Health Science Libraries: Teaching Technology Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Emily J.

    2014-01-01

    As technology rapidly changes, libraries remain go-to points for education and technology skill development. In academic health sciences libraries, trends suggest librarians provide more training on technology topics than ever before. While education and training have always been roles for librarians, providing technology training on new mobile devices and emerging systems requires class creation and training capabilities that are new to many. To appeal to their users, many health sciences librarians are interested in developing technology-based classes. This column explores the question: what skills are necessary for developing and teaching technology in an academic health sciences library setting? PMID:24528269

  7. Women Technology Leaders: Gender Issues in Higher Education Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    Women working in higher education information technology (IT) organizations and those seeking leadership positions in these organizations face a double challenge in overcoming the traditionally male-dominated environments of higher education and IT. Three women higher education chief information officers (CIOs) provided their perspectives,…

  8. Global Educational Goals, Technology, and Information Literacy in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snavely, Loanne

    2008-01-01

    Three interconnected aspects of higher education and information literacy are essential. The first is global educational goals and the place of information literacy within those goals. The second is new research on higher education effectiveness and the role of information literacy for successful learning. The third is the role technology plays in…

  9. ON QUALITY OF EDUCATION REALIZED THROUGH TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgerová Jana

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Quality is a concept which resonates in all areas of our life including the education system. Putting the emphasis on education and implementation of quality standards in a field of education is the way which would lead to success of our educational institutions. It is up to all participants in education to set the processes and system so that they fulfil the standard quality criteria which could also be applicable to education. Innovations in education as well as the innovations in a form of new technologies application undoubtedly contribute to the quality. Alternative or more precisely supporting education through technologies (internet in particular, known as e-learning, must be as well as the traditional education, if not more, subjected to quality criteria. This article deals with an application of standard quality criteria and their application to e-learning.

  10. Borderless STEM education: A study of both American students and foreign students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Kiriko

    This study explores the current status of borderless education in STEM through surveys of two populations of STEM students: American students who studied abroad and foreign students who were studying in the U.S. It was undertaken in response to the U.S. government's desires to strengthen STEM education and to develop American students' global competencies. The purpose was to understand how international experiences can be enhanced in order to increase American STEM students' interest in study abroad programs and in earning advanced STEM degrees and to understand how to attract more foreign STEM students to study in the United States. Issues of particular focus were: the impacts of gender, race/ethnicity, and nationality on STEM students' motivation to participate in, and responses to study abroad programs, and the value of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in borderless STEM education. Several different forms of multivariate analyses were performed on data from surveys at seven public and private colleges and universities in the Southern California area. The results indicated that among American students, greater value was placed on social and cultural experiences gained through studying abroad. In contrast, among foreign students greater value was placed on enhancement of their academic and professional development opportunities. American students whose study abroad included research experiences had a greater interest in international research and teaching in the future. Foreign graduate students majoring in computer science, engineering and biology are the most likely to seek opportunities to study and work in the US. Finally, ICTs were valued by American students as platforms for social interactions and by foreign students for facilitating professional networks. The analyses lead to several recommendations, including: STEM faculty should be made aware of the critical importance of their advising and mentoring in motivating students to choose to study abroad and, minority students gain more confidence about working in STEM fields and seeking advanced STEM degrees as a result of studying abroad.

  11. What Is Technology Education? A Review of the "Official Curriculum"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan A.; Brown, Joshua W.

    2010-01-01

    Technology education, not to be confused with educational technology, has an "official curriculum." This article explores this "official curriculum" and answers the following questions; what are the goals of technology education, what should technology education look like in classrooms, and why technology education is important. This article…

  12. Advances in Technology, Education and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouwenhoven, Wim, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    From 3rd to 5th March 2008 the International Association of Technology, Education and Development organised its International Technology, Education and Development Conference in Valencia, Spain. Over a hundred papers were presented by participants from a great variety of countries. Summarising, this book provides a kaleidoscopic view of work that…

  13. Education, Population Trends and Technological Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Mary Jean

    1985-01-01

    Focuses on three sets of generalized interrelationships among population growth, technological change, and education: human resources and technological change; parental education, child services, and demographic transition; and relationships affecting household health and contraception. Outlines current demographic trends and predicts effects of…

  14. Artifactual Reality: Household, Technology, and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, Beverly; Fleming, Reginald

    1998-01-01

    The views of rural Canadian students on the role of technology in their own lives were examined using a sociotechnology and a human ecology model. Students identified several different roles for technology, believed in more equal gender roles in its use, and preferred direct instruction over distance learning. (Author/JOW)

  15. Center for Innovation in Technological Education (CITE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for Information Technology Education is dedicated to providingpractical Information Technology education, which prepares people withskills to match industry needs. Their site contains resources on problem based learning, and the incorporation of "real-world, real-time" situations and case studies into the education process. This is a great resource for anyone studying Information Technology and those currently in the field, as it gives information on maximizing IT education to provide the skills necessary to the profession for the 21st century.

  16. Continuing Education in Engineering Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Robert

    1977-01-01

    Examines continuing education with respect to its importance, relationship to degree programs, financing, teaching opportunities, and compensation possibilities. The surveyed institutions recognize continuing education as an important and significant faculty activity and also suggest the need to further explore the financial and compensatory…

  17. Manufacturing & Engineering Technologies Education Clearinghouse (METEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Manufacturing & Engineering Technologies Education Clearinghouse (METEC), run by the National Center for Manufacturing Education (NCME), is a searchable database of materials submitted by educators from around the world. Topics covered include classroom content and pedagogy. New materials are added continually, so be sure to check back often. Access to most materials requires a quick and free registration with METEC.

  18. Nursing Education and the Technology Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    At one time, it was believed that Information Technology (IT) was a specialty in nursing that should be offered at the graduate education level. Programs were offered at some of the more progressive colleges and universities. Graduates of these programs became highly-prized in industry and education. Now, educators and industry recognize that…

  19. Theological Educators and Their Concerns about Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamarter, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Based on results from interviews with theological educators at forty-five seminaries in North America, the author begins by listing twenty-six concerns expressed about technology in theological education, particularly the concerns about electronically mediated distance education. These concerns are categorized loosely under three headings:…

  20. Student Professionalism Competencies in Optometric Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register, Shilpa J.

    2012-01-01

    Society has high expectations of health care practitioners leaving the burden of proof on healthcare educational institutions. As educators, it is our responsibility to ensure that students acquire the cognitive and affective domains associated with professionalism through the acquisition of appropriate skills and knowledge leading to the…

  1. Discrimination against Students in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieronek, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    Surveys courts cases in 2000 that addressed discrimination against students, including gender discrimination under Title IX and racial discrimination under Title VI. The cases return to familiar themes, exploring when, if ever, an educational institution may consider gender or race in making decisions that affect the educational opportunities…

  2. Are Students "Customers" of Collegiate Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliff, John V.

    The emerging economic paradigm of higher education will make enhancing national productivity the primary goal; emphasize the mastery of learning skills over rote learning; and operate around the principle of customer service, viewing students as customers. Total Quality Management (TQM), as applied to education, shares this focus on customer…

  3. Medical Students' Affirmation of Ethics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrmann, Jon A.; Hoop, Jinger; Hammond, Katherine Green; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Despite the acknowledged importance of ethics education in medical school, little empirical work has been done to assess the needs and preferences of medical students regarding ethics curricula. Methods: Eighty-three medical students at the University of New Mexico participated in a self-administered written survey including 41 scaled…

  4. Teaching Disabled Students in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konur, Ozcan

    2006-01-01

    As the number of disabled students in higher education has increased in recent years, teaching them in compliance with public policy while maintaining academic standards has become a crucial issue. The access of disabled students to programs and to the curriculum are two separate but inter-linked features of such policies. This paper reviews the…

  5. The nuclear technology education consortium: an innovative approach to nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report on the Nuclear Technology Education Consortium (NTEC) that includes 12 UK universities and Higher Education Institutes. It was established in 2005 to provide nuclear education and training at the Masters, Diploma, Certificate and Continuing Professional Development (CPD) levels. Module and providers of the NTEC are described (all modules are available in industry-friendly short formats). Students are allowed to select from 22 different modules, taught by experts, covering all aspects of nuclear education and training. It is the acknowledgement by each partner that they cannot deliver the range of modules individually but by cooperating. The NTEC program structure is given

  6. Overcoming Subcultural Barriers in Educational Technology Support

    OpenAIRE

    Franziska Zellweger

    2005-01-01

    Various higher education institutions in German speaking Europe are in the process of establishing educational technology support structures. Educational technology support brings together a variety of academics as well as administrative units such as IT services, multimedia shops, faculty development, or the libraries. The following contribution describes academic and support subcultures, unfolds areas of conflict and suggests strategies to overcome cultural barriers in edtech support. Th...

  7. Student Self-Assessment in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Lew, D.N.M.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis addresses the theme of student self-assessment in higher education. Self-assessment is defined as the process by which students make judgments about their learning, particularly their learning outcomes (Boud & Falchikov, 1989; Eva et al., 2004). It functions to train students to make a better appraisal of aspects of their learning thus enabling them to take further steps to improve on their deficiencies (Thomas, 1999). Self-assessment is not only expected to encourage self-reflect...

  8. 34 CFR 403.1 - What is the State Vocational and Applied Technology Education Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...Vocational and Applied Technology Education Program...Vocational and Applied Technology Education Program...assist them, local educational agencies, postsecondary educational institutions...Vocational and Applied Technology Education...

  9. What is technology? A study of fifth and eighth grade student ideas about the Nature of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digironimo, Nicole

    Most, if not all, standards for science and technology education and curriculum indicate that knowledge of the Nature of Technology is an educational goal, yet the literature lacks an established definition for the Nature of Technology. Additionally, the research on student ideas about the Nature of Technology is insufficient. After reviewing the literature on science and technology education, the philosophy of technology, and the history of technology, this study presents an internally consistent definition for the Nature of Technology. This definition illustrates how the Nature of Technology includes five dimensions: Technology as Artifacts; Technology as a Creation Process; Technology as a Human Practice; The History of Technology; and The Current Role of Technology. Using an interview protocol developed for this study, a small group of 5th and 8th grade students were interviewed to ascertain their ideas about the Nature of Technology. The results indicate that there are a variety of ideas present in the thinking of young people. All of the participants expressed one of two ideas about technological artifacts: technological artifacts are electronic or technological artifacts are invented. All of the participants identified particular skills needed to invent technological artifacts; some of the participants included mobility and concluded that disabled people cannot be inventors. Despite their experiences with technological artifacts (including educational technology tools), a few of the participants were uncertain whether they would identify themselves as technological. More than half of the participants did not believe older artifacts can still be considered technology. Most of the participants were apprehensive about our technological future; the main issue expressed by the participants was the environment. Other than environmental concerns, most of the participants were unable to identify global issues regarding technological use and development. Overall, these findings increase our knowledge of the ideas young people have about the Nature of Technology, which can inform future research on teaching and learning about science and technology.

  10. Technological Developments in Networking, Education and Automation

    CERN Document Server

    Elleithy, Khaled; Iskander, Magued; Kapila, Vikram; Karim, Mohammad A; Mahmood, Ausif

    2010-01-01

    "Technological Developments in Networking, Education and Automation" includes a set of rigorously reviewed world-class manuscripts addressing and detailing state-of-the-art research projects in the following areas: Computer Networks: Access Technologies, Medium Access Control, Network architectures and Equipment, Optical Networks and Switching, Telecommunication Technology, and Ultra Wideband Communications. Engineering Education and Online Learning: including development of courses and systems for engineering, technical and liberal studies programs; online laboratories; intelligent

  11. Strategy for Nuclear Technology Education at Uppsala University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the TMI accident 1979, and later the Tjernobyl accident, the future of nuclear power was vividly debated in Sweden. The negative public opinion governed a number of political decisions that marked an ambition to out-phase nuclear power prior to 2010. Due to this, the student's interest in nuclear technology ceased and together with the fact that public funding to nuclear technology was withdrawn, academic research and education within the field were effectively dismounted. In the beginning of 1990 it became clear to the society that nuclear power could not easily be closed down and the issue of the future competence supply to the nuclear industry was initiated. In the mid-nineties the situation became acute due to the fact that personnel in the nuclear industry started to retire in an increasing pace necessitating measures to be taken in order to secure the future operation of the nuclear power plants. In the year 2000, the Swedish nuclear power plants, Westinghouse Electric Sweden and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority embarked a project together with the three major universities in the field, Uppsala University, The Royal Institute of Technology and Chalmers University of Technology. The aim of this project was to define a financial platform for reconstructing the Swedish research and education in nuclear technology. The project, named the Swedish Centre for Nuclear Technology (SKC), has during a decade been the major financier to nuclear technology research and education. Using funding from SKC, Uppsala University formulated a strategy along two tracks: 1) Instead of creating ambitious master programs in nuclear technology, the already existing engineering programs in a wide range of fields were utilized to expose as many students as possible to nuclear technology. 2) A program was initiated together with the nuclear industry aiming at educating newly employed personnel. The result is encouraging; starting from essentially zero, typically 100 undergraduate students follows at least one nuclear technology course each year and about 25 students conduct their Diploma work within nuclear technology annually. Meanwhile about 150 persons from the nuclear industry follow the 'industrial' courses and an increasing amount of undergraduate students chose to follow also these courses. The volume goal has now been reached and the next step is to launch a Bachelor program in nuclear technology during second part of 2010. (author)

  12. Technology-Enhanced Mathematics Education for Creative Engineering Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafyllou, Eva; Timcenko, Olga

    2014-01-01

    This project explores the opportunities and challenges of integrating digital technologies in mathematics education in creative engineering studies. Students in such studies lack motivation and do not perceive the mathematics the same way as mathematics students do. Digital technologies offer new possibilities for mathematics representation, for interacting with mathematical concepts, and for positioning mathematics in the context of their studies. First, we are going to investigate how mathematics is used in their professional and academic work, and how important mathematical concepts are conceptualized. Then, we are going to apply this field data in designing learning technologies, which will be introduced in university classrooms. The effect of this introduction will be evaluated through educational design experiments.

  13. The Technological Dimension of Educational Technology in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Yannis

    2012-01-01

    This article describes some of the main technological trends and issues of the European landscape of research and innovation in educational technology. Although several innovative technologies (tools, architectures, platforms, or approaches) emerge, such as intelligent support to personalization, collaboration or adaptation in mobile, game-based,…

  14. It's TIME for Technology: The Technology in Mathematics Education Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the impact that the Technology in Mathematics Education (TIME) Project had on participating middle level and secondary mathematics teachers' preparedness to teach through technology. Results indicate that the TIME Project positively impacted participants' perceptions of their knowledge of technological resources and methods…

  15. Optimization of physical education and sports of students with disabilities throughout the entire period of study at the university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adyrkhaev S.G.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Considered personal and proactive approach to physical education students with different nosologies and ensure close connection processes of personal training and physical development. In the experiment involved 644 students, with 2 and 3 of disability. The level of physical performance determined using the indexes. Identified organizational and methodological priorities of physical education and sports of students. Using the model of physical education allows full integration into the student environment. Students feel more comfortable. Students changing attitude toward themselves, manifested in the appropriate perception, finding camouflage disabilities struggle with her self-presentation. The effectiveness of didactic technology of physical education of students with disabilities in the pedagogical process.

  16. Community Colleges in the Information Age: Gains Associated with Students' Use of Computer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bodi; Horn, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Computer literacy is increasingly important in higher education, and many educational technology experts propose a more prominent integration of technology into pedagogy. Empirical evidence is needed to support these theories. This study examined community college students planning to transfer to 4-year universities and estimated the relationship…

  17. The Effects of Technology Innovativeness and System Exposure on Student Acceptance of E-Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngafeeson, Madison N.; Sun, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The efforts of educators in the last three decades have, among other things, focused on the use of information technology (IT) in education. It has become commonplace to view information systems both as an effective carrier of course content as well as a cost-effective tool to improve student learning outcomes. One of such technologies is the…

  18. Assessment and Student Learning: A Fundamental Relationship and the Role of Information and Communication Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Adrian; Price, Linda

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of assessment in student learning and its relationship with the use of information and communication technologies (ICT). There is ample evidence of technology-led innovations failing to achieve the transformations expected by educators. We draw upon existing research to illustrate the links between aspects of student

  19. Developing Musical Creativity: Student and Teacher Perceptions of a High School Music Technology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lance D.

    2013-01-01

    Music technology classes designed to use the latest in music software to develop music compositional skills within high school students are becoming more prominent in K-12 education. The purpose of this case study was to describe the development of creativity in high school students through their participation in a music technology course at one…

  20. The Impact of Integration of Instructional Systems Technology into Research and Educational Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Bahador Makki; Baharak Makki

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims at presenting a review about instructional system technology integration in educational literature. Transitional periods of educational technology are discussed and principles of integration of instructional technology in educational technology are reviewed.

  1. Beginning with a Baseline: Insuring Productive Technology Integration in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banister, Savilla; Vannatta, Rachel

    2006-01-01

    If colleges of education are going to successfully prepare teacher candidates to meet NETS-T standards (Kelly, 2002), then teacher education programs must begin developing strategies to assess technology competencies of beginning college students. Colleges must then move beyond these assessments to providing student support for achieving…

  2. Federated Technologies for Distance Education - SINED (Mexico)

    OpenAIRE

    Cebria?n La Serna, Manuel; Galeana, Lourdes; Murrillo, Georgette

    2013-01-01

    The Association for the Development of the National Distance Education (SINED, https://www.sined.mx/sined/) is an organization which manages and develops distance education in Mexico. Its public and institutional actions are carried out through networking. Knowledge management is promoted through educational social networking supported by the strategic use of technology. SINED has contributed in various ways to the development of distance education in Mexico, e.g. through a) insta...

  3. Online College Education for Computer-Savvy Students: A Study of Perceptions and Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaifi, Belal A.; Mujtaba, Bahaudin G.; Williams, Albert A.

    2009-01-01

    With new technologies and cyberspace-literate students, distance education has been in high demand and more schools are getting into online education. As such, understanding the needs of current and prospective learners has become especially important for success in the new millennium. Based on the learners' needs and current technology status,…

  4. erception of Technical Education Students on the Role of ICT in General Studies Programme (GSP) In University Education

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy Umunadi, E.

    2011-01-01

    The role of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in teaching and learning is rapidly becoming one of the most important widely discussed issues in contemporary general studies programme in university education. The paper examined the perception of technical education students on the role of information and communication technology in general studies programme in Nigeria. The paper discussed National Policy for Information and Communication Technology, the role of ICT in general stud...

  5. A survey of medical information education in radiological technology schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to clarify actual conditions and problems in medical information education and to propose the educational concept to be adopted in medical information. A questionnaire survey was carried out by the anonymous method in June 2008. The survey was intended for 40 radiological technology schools. The questionnaire items were as follows: educational environment in medical information education, content of a lecture in medical information, problems in medical information education. The response rate was 55.0% (22 schools). Half of the responding schools had a laboratory on medical information. Seventeen schools had a medical information education facility, and out of them, approximately 50% had an educational medical information system. The main problems of the medical information education were as follows: motivation of the students is low, the educational coverage and level for medical information are uncertain, there are not an appropriate textbook and educational guidance. In conclusion, these findings suggest that it is necessary to have a vision of medical information education in the education of radiological technologists. (author)

  6. Engaging Students with the Nature of Science and the Nature of Technology by Modeling the Work of Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Jerrid W.; Wilcox, Jesse L.

    2013-01-01

    Just as science education is too often limited to the acquisition of facts, technology education is too often limited to proficient use of technology. Neither of these goals fully realize a robust definition of science and technology literacy. To achieve greater science and technology literacy, students must understand the natures of both science…

  7. Sustainable E-Education Through Mobile Enabled Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrs. Swarnangini Sinha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains the dynamics of Mobile learning and its academic implications within the education system of India. The emergence of learning technologies is progressively adopted for rapid delivery and cost-effective purposes. The focus is given on the ways in which to integrate new teaching tools into e-education to encourage mobile based education, to conquer main hurdles of money, access and isolation. In other words, technology is able to surpass the relative deprivation in the multicultural groups. Mobile learning appropriates the self-motivation and play impulse of the young learners in providing sustainable e-education to the students. This paper seeks to benefit various stakeholders in the education, telecommunication, industries in rural area and policy making sectors by providing meaningful insight into the large-scale and small challenges and proposing novel application, service and structured solutions to address the same. The main objective of this paper is to sum up the ways in which mobile-supported learning can contribute for the cause of universal education by providing quality education for children, youth and adults. The scope of this paper is restricted to the importance of mobile learning, suggestions and recommendations made for the sustainability of e-education through mobile enabled technology.

  8. Students education and training for Slovak NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovak University of Technology is the largest and also the oldest university of technology in Slovakia. It is certain that more than 50% of the highly-educated technicians who are currently working in the nuclear industry have graduated from this university. The Department of Nuclear Physics and Technology of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology as one of the seven faculties of this University feels the responsibility to impart proper engineering education and training for Slovak NPP operating staff. The education process is realised via undergraduate (BSc), graduate (MSc) and postgraduate (PhD) study as well as via specialised training courses within the framework of a continuous education system. (author)

  9. Inclusion of Special Education Students: Regular Education and Special Education Teachers Perceptions in a Northside School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ernest E.

    2008-01-01

    In 1990 the Congress of the United States passed Public Law 101-476, The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This law mandated that students with disabilities be educated in, what this act calls, the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE). Educating students with disabilities in the LRE is also known as inclusion and the terms may be…

  10. Inclusive Education for Students with Intellectual Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaki Balakrishnan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces briefly the evolution of Inclusive Education for students with special education needs (SEN and discusses some significant challenges in its implementation. While the aim of Inclusive Education is to include all children with SEN in mainstream schools, there are many challenges that have to be overcome for their education to be meaningful. This paper focuses primarily on the inclusion of students with intellectual disability, since they are likely to be the largest number with special education needs in ‘inclusive’ schools. It offers the outline of a curriculum that may be derived from the mainstream one in use, and suggests a model that emphasises the replacement of age / grade placement, as is the present practice, with experience and maturity underpinning learning in persons with intellectual disability. The proposed model needs, of course, to be field-tested.doi 10.5463/DCID.v23i2.111

  11. Online cultural competency education for millennial dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lorraine; Hanes, Philip J

    2014-06-01

    Teaching cultural competence is now an educational requirement for U.S. dental curricula to meet 2013 accreditation standards. The question now is, given time restrictions, limited resources, and budget constraints faced by the majority of dental schools, how can they provide effective cultural competency education to prepare future dental professionals? An additional concern regarding instruction is the recent focus on techniques to engage Millennial learners since this generation is characterized as technologically savvy with a preference for multimedia and general dislike of traditional lectures. With these issues in mind, Georgia Regents University developed Healthy Perspectives, an online, interactive course in cultural competence designed to engage Millennial students. Both before and after the course, the students were asked to complete a modified version of the Clinical Cultural Competency Questionnaire. Of the eighty-eight students in the course (eighty-one first-year dental students and seven entering radiology students), seventy-one completed the questionnaire both before and after the course, for an 81 percent response rate. Seventy-five students also completed the course evaluation. The pre and post questionnaires showed statistically significant gains for students across the four primary areas of self-awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and skills. Student evaluations of the course were generally positive, particularly regarding content, but somewhat surprisingly their assessment of the interactive components (which were designed to meet generational expectations) was ambivalent. PMID:24882772

  12. Technology Use among College Students: Implications for Student Affairs Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmill, Erin; Peterson, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to explore the extent to which technology disrupts and occupies the time of a college student and to determine the degree to which these disruptions contribute to perceived stress. A 71-item survey to assess perceived stress, technology use and disruptions, and social support was administered to 299 undergraduate …

  13. Technology Education to Engineering: A Good Move?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. John

    2010-01-01

    Recent curriculum changes in the educational system of Australia have resulted in allowing optional Engineering course work to count for university entrance for students choosing to apply to a university. In other educational systems, Engineering is playing an increasingly important role, either as a stand-alone subject or as part of an integrated…

  14. The influence of interactive technology on student performance in an Oklahoma secondary Biology I program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltman, Vallery

    Over the last decade growth in technologies available to teach students and enhance curriculum has become an important consideration in the educational system. The profile of today's secondary students have also been found to be quite different than those of the past. Their learning styles and preferences are issues that should be addressed by educators. With the growth and availability of new technologies students are increasingly expecting to use these as learning tools in their classrooms. This study investigates how interactive technology may impact student performance. This study specifically focuses on the use of the Apple Ipad in 4 Biology I classrooms. This study used an experimental mixed method design to examine how using Ipads for learning impacted student achievement, motivation to learn, and learning strategies. Qualitatively the study examined observed student behaviors and student perceptions regarding the use of interactive technologies. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests, 2-way ANOVAs, and qualitative analysis. Quantitatively the results revealed no significant difference between students who used the interactive technology to learn and those who did not. Qualitative data revealed behaviors indicative of being highly engaged with the subject matter and the development of critical thinking skills which may improve student performance. Student perceptions also revealed overall positive experiences with using interactive technology in the classroom. It is recommended that further studies be done to look at using interactive technologies for a longer period of time using multiple subjects areas. This would provide a more in-depth exploration of interactive technologies on student achievement.

  15. Technology Education Tackles Energy Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutshall, Sandy

    2002-01-01

    Describes the solar-hydrogen technologies at the East Valley Institute of Technology, the only technology center in the nations that offers this class. Describes its focus on solving the energy crisis. (JOW)

  16. Faculty Use of Established and Emerging Technologies in Higher Education: A Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Carmen C.; Fretwell, Cherie E.; Jim Ryan; Parham, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Our effectiveness as instructors lies ultimately in how well our students can understand and apply the concepts we teach. In response to the growing importance of accountability in the educational process and the abundance of social networking technology and communication tools available for possible classroom use, this paper will use The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) to examine the adoption of established and emerging information technology in higher education cl...

  17. Application of Technology in Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaee, Shahnam

    This paper focuses on introducing the faculty to a collection of powerful software tools and technologies that can be used effectively in a teaching and learning environment. This presentation additionally illustrates some of the techniques that can be employed in conjunction with using these tools and technologies to further enhance the teaching effectiveness of the faculty and promote student learning. Sample tools utilized in this study include WebCT, Adobe Acrobat, Microsoft EXCEL, Macromedia FLASH, MATLAB, LabVIEW as well as a series of other utility tools such as image capturing and screen recording software. The discussed tools and techniques enable the faculty to achieve goals that are unattainable through utilizing traditional teaching approaches. Included in this presentation will be several examples of course related material produced for teaching engineering topics and concepts. These examples clearly establish the great power, valuable utilities, and important advantages of these tools in teaching. Among presented examples are a few sample course modules selected from recent publications and presentations of the author in several national educational conferences as well as in an international colloquium. This paper does a comparison study between the tools and procedures utilized in these papers and discusses some of the advantages and disadvantages that these tools offer.

  18. Current Trends in Education and Technology as Signs to the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary-Alice

    1989-01-01

    Identifies 12 major trends in the field of education and technology. Topics discussed include school choice; integrating new technologies and the traditional curriculum; visual vs. logocentric curriculum; distance learning; problems with evaluation; increasing business pressure on public education; the impact of minority students; commercial…

  19. Science and Technology Education in China: Skills for Modernization in the Absence of Criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafy, Randy

    1997-01-01

    Argues that Chinese students are being increasingly exposed to education for modernization while largely missing out on an education in the social criticism of technology that would allow them to make empowered decisions about the role of technology and progress in Chinese culture. (DDR)

  20. Shifting Views: Exploring the Potential for Technology Integration in Early Childhood Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Beverlie; Kashin, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Using technology with children in play-based early learning programs creates questions for some within the Early Childhood Education (ECE) community. This paper presents how two faculty who teach in ECE-related degree programs integrated educational technology into their teaching pedagogy as a way to model to their students how it can be used to…

  1. Educational Technology as a Teaching and Learning Tool in Environmental Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandratos George

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the following research paper, we discuss an educational action research that was carried out in order to investigate students' knowledge, attitudes and views in relation to understanding, managing and solving environmental problems in connection with recycling, before and after implementing an environmental education programme that utilised the “Recycle-Land” educational software. The objective of using this software application was to make students view waste management problems as genuine problems of the environment to which they themselves are related. Exploiting Information and Communication Technology (ICT in education based on social constructionism, it becomes possible to approach environmental education in a holistic manner whilst avoiding to isolate students outside the general framework within which it take place. Student activities lead to concept formation, theory and practice come together, teaching, learning and evaluation become integrated and active problem solving is encouraged. This educational software application –through a user-friendly and familiar interface – makes it possible for students to realize the environmental and financial benefits of recycling and hence, as modern citizens, act to promote the viability and sustainability of the planet.

  2. Information technology and its role in anaesthesia training and continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Larry F; Erlendson, Matthew J; Sun, John S; Clemenson, Anna M; Martin, Paul; Eng, Reuben L

    2012-03-01

    Today's educators are faced with substantial challenges in the use of information technology for anaesthesia training and continuing medical education. Millennial learners have uniquely different learning styles than previous generations of students. These preferences distinctly incorporate the use of digital information technologies and social technologies to support learning. To be effective teachers, modern educators must be familiar with these new information technologies and understand how to use them for medical education. Examples of new information technologies include learning management systems, lecture capture, social media (YouTube, Flickr), social networking (Facebook), Web 2.0, multimedia (video learning triggers and point-of-view video) and mobile computing applications. The information technology challenges for educators in the twenty-first century include: (a) understanding how technology shapes the learning preferences of today's anaesthesia residents, (b) distinguishing between the function and properties of new learning technologies and (c) properly using these learning technologies to enhance the anaesthesia curriculum. PMID:22559955

  3. Student-Centered Educational Reform: The Impact of Parental and Educator Support of Student Diligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Hinsdale; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Diligence is a significant, meaningful predictor of student competence. This study examines the level of diligence displayed by students from two selected northeastern Ohio school districts and relates student diligence to the level of support provided by parents and educators. There was no distinction in support levels provided by mothers and…

  4. The Rise of Student-to-Student Learning: Youth-led Programs Impacting Engineering Education Globally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian O'Shea

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Around the globe, students and young engineers are playing an increasing role in the coordination and delivery of engineering education programs. Many youth-led initiatives are now conducted with students involved in all aspects of their creation, organisation and delivery. This trend presents an exciting opportunity for the education of engineering students, both those involved in delivery of the courses and for participants. This paper profiles four leading youth-led engineering education programs and analyses their structure and growth in recent years. Profiled are initiatives coordinated by Engineers Without Borders – Australia (EWB-A; the Board of European Students of Technology (BEST; the Electrical Engineering Students’ European Association (EESTEC; and the Student Platform for Engineering Education Development (SPEED. Each case study includes a brief history of the organisation, program overview, growth analysis and future projections. The common features amongst these programs were analysed, as were the aspects which made them distinct from traditional university offerings. Key findings about the initiatives include: an international focus; the mixture of formal learning and social aspects; an integral role of volunteers within the organisation; the use of residential programs; and the role of internal professional development of committee members and volunteers. Additionally, this paper outlines the benefits for universities and provides a guide for how engineering faculties can support and nurture these initiatives and effectively create partnerships.

  5. Technology in education, necessary but not sufficient : understanding learning with virtual patients

    OpenAIRE

    Edelbring, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid technological development and the broadening access to computers over recent decades, several technological innovations have emerged in medical education, including virtual patients. Students’ use of virtual patients is proposed to fill gaps in clinical exposure, and train clinical reasoning. However, higher education faculties have been slow to adopt new technology as a regular part of curricula. Virtual patients and similar technologies have either been ...

  6. Technology Talk With a Grade Two Student

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Bradshaw-Truesdale

    2013-01-01

    In this interview, elementary grade level student Samuel Bradshaw-Truesdale discusses how he uses technology--ranging from Smart tables and Smart boards to computers and the Internet--both at home and in the classroom. He talks about how technology helps him solve word and mathematic problems as well as build LEGO robots.

  7. Technology Talk With a Grade Two Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Bradshaw-Truesdale

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this interview, elementary grade level student Samuel Bradshaw-Truesdale discusses how he uses technology--ranging from Smart tables and Smart boards to computers and the Internet--both at home and in the classroom. He talks about how technology helps him solve word and mathematic problems as well as build LEGO robots.

  8. Technology in the Classroom: Burning the Bridges to the Gaps in Gender-Biased Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumm, Karyn M.

    2008-01-01

    This review introduces the concepts of gender bias and technology in education. It discusses the interaction between the two in the educational setting and the effects this interaction may have on teachers, students and materials used in the classroom. It is argued that areas in the educational setting that have been focused on as materials and…

  9. Effect of Educational Computer Games on Student Creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Habibian Naeini; Mona Masood

    2012-01-01

    At present age, students to cope with the amazing developments of third millennium, should improve their critical thinking and creative skills to make good decisions and solve society complex problems present era is the era of computers and technology which are result of human creativity. Video games are sample of human innovations that are full of new samples with day by day increasing popularity. Because of its great appeal for many people, many social sciences, education, psychology and ot...

  10. Education of International Students in Soft Cultural Power Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuhua WANG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Soft culture power promotion has deeply affected the education of international students. Soft cultural Power can utilize the advantages of education of international students studying in China to promote rapidly, to develop vigorously and to spread internationally. The education of international students in soft culture power promotion has made Chinese brilliant culture benefit all human beings and world peace.Key words: Soft cultural power; International students; Higher-education; Internationalization; International students studying in China

  11. CONFERENCE REVIEW:V. International Educational Technology Symposium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Mubin KIYICI

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available 167V. International Educational Technology SymposiumWas held in Sakarya UniversityBetween 21 – 23 September 2005Reviewed by Mubin KIYICISakarya Universitymkiyici@anadolu.edu.trV. International Educational Technology Symposium was held in Sakarya University heldbetween 21 – 23 September 2005 by cooperation with Eastern Mediterranean University,Louisiana State University, Governors State University and Ohio University, and TOJET(The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology journal, at Sakarya UniversityCampus. Assoc. Prof. Dr. Aytekin ISMAN who was conference coordinator and Editor inchief of TOJET spoke at the opening ceremony of symposium. His speech was related todiffusion of distance education and diffusion of usage educational technology. And thenProf. Dr. Mehmet DURMAN who is Rector of Sakarya University, talked about aapplications of Distance Education which is applied by Sakarya University and educationaltechnology applications in Tukey. His Speech is here:168Dear GuestsWelcome to the “5th International Educational Technology ConferenceIETC/EG?TEK 2005. It is an international educational activity for academics,teachers and educators. This conference is now a well known educationaltechnology event and the number of paper submissions and attendeesincrease every year.This year, IETC-2005 received 268 applications. The conference academicadvisory board accepted 209 applications.IETC-2005 promotes the development and dissemination of theoreticalknowledge, conceptual research, and professional knowledge throughconference activities, the conference proceeding book, and the TurkishOnline Journal of Educational Technology (TOJET. Its focus is to create anddisseminate knowledge about the use instructional technology for learningand teaching in education.The main theme of IETC-2005 is distance education. Distance education is adelivery system of teaching and learning, when the teacher and the studentare separated by physical distance and time, using alternative mediaresources when students and instructors have difficulties of establishingface-to-face communication. In distance education, instruction deliverybetween tutors and student is done by using different delivery systems suchas computer mediated communication systems, video tapes, printedmaterial, cassettes, and instructional television. With the developments inthe Internet and global network system, the universities immediately tookthe advantage of using World Wide Web to deliver the instruction to almostany node in the world, regardless of the physical distance and time.The main aims which should sought by almost all institutions offeringdistance education are how affective the given program is and whether it isa sufficient replacement to the traditional face-to-face education. Duringthe IETC-2005 will be discussed these aims by presenters, panels andkeynote speakers.The first, second and fourth of “The International Educational TechnologyConference (IETC'' were held by Sakarya University in Turkey, the third onein the Eastern Mediterranean University in the Turkish Republic of NorthernCyprus, and the fifth one again in Sakarya University in Turkey.Without the authors and receivers, IETC 2005 would, of course, have beenimpossible. We would like to sincerely thank all of you for coming,presenting, and joining in the academic activities. We would also like tothank all of those who contributed to the reviewing process of the “IETC2005'' conference papers, which will be also published in TOJET. And finally,we would like to thank Sakarya University (Turkey, Eastern MediterraneanUniversity (TRNC, Louisiana State University (USA, Ohio University (USA,Governors State University (USA and The Turkish Online Journal ofEducational Technology (TOJET for successfully organizing and hosting“IETC 2005'' in Sakarya, Turkey.Finally, I would like to wish you all a pleasant stay in Sakarya-Turkey andsafe return back home. I hope that IETC 2005 will be a meeting you willpleasantly remember.Assis. Prof. Dr. Hüseyin YARATAN who is the head of Educat

  12. BRIDGING THE KNOWLEDGE DIVIDE Educational Technology for Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Ozlem OZAN,

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available BRIDGING THE KNOWLEDGE DIVIDEEducational Technology for DevelopmentMarshall,S., Kinuthia, W. & Wallace Taylor., Ed.D.; Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC, SBN: 978-1-60752-109-9, p.433, 2009Reviewed by Ozlem OZANFaculty of EducationEski?ehir Osmangazi UniversityEskisehir, TURKEYThe concept of a knowledge divide is used to describe the gap in living conditions between those who can find, manage and process information or knowledge, and those who are impaired in this, for one reason or another. In the 21st century, the emergence of the knowledge society becomes pervasive hence the information and ICT systems that support knowledge are very important.This book discusses how educational technology can be used to transform education and assist developing communities to close the knowledge divide. Its broader audience is anyone who is interested in educational technology for development. In the book you can find best practices and case studies especially from countries in Africa.The book is edited by Stewart Marshall, Wanjira Kinuthia, Wallace Taylor. Professor Stewart Marshall, PhD, is the director of the Academic Division of the University of the West Indies Open Campus (UWIOC and holds the UNESCO Chair in Educational Technologies.Dr. Wanjira Kinuthia is assistant professor of Learning Technologies at Georgia State University. She works as an instructional designer in higher education and business and industry for several years. Professor Wallace Taylor, PhD, is a founding director of The Information Society Institute (TISI, a non-profit academic, research, and policy development organization based in South Africa.The book is consisted of 433 pages (+xxxv covering 24 articles divided into four sections and provides information about flexible learning for empowerment, managing and communicating knowledge, flexible delivery in higher education and preparing teacher using flexible approaches.Topics covered in the book are as follows:Flexible Education and Community Development, Flexible Learning for Community Economic Development, Contribution of the IDE in Promoting Gender Equality and in Empowering Women in Swaziland, A Virtual Wheel of Fortune?: Enablers and Constraints of ICTs in Higher Education in South Africa, Delivering Distance Education for the Civil Service in the UK: The University of Chester’s Foundation for Government Program, Knowledge Management Strategies for Distance Education, The Effectiveness of Mobile Short Messaging Service (SMS Technologies in the Support of Selected Distance Education Students of Makerere University, Uganda, The Impact of Video Conferencing on Distance Education Courses: A University of Namibia Case Study, Open Resources for Open Learning in Developing Countries: Deciphering Trends for Policies, Quality, and Standards Considerations, Freedom, Innovation, and Equity with Open Source Software, Copyright Issues and their Impact on Flexible Education in Africa, University Education for National Development: Makerere University’s Dual Mode Experience, Considerations for Higher Education Distance Education Policy for Development: A Case of the University of Botswana,Blended Online and Face-to-Face Learning: A Pilot Project in the Faculty of Education, Eduardo Mondlane University, Evaluating the Impact of CABLE: A Cognitive Apprenticeship-Based Learning Environment, From Distance Learning to E-learning in Central and Northern Mozambique, A Framework for the Delivery of Cross-Regional Distance Education to Professionals in Developing Countries, Distance Learning—Challenges and Opportunities for Postgraduate Medical Education: A Case Study of Postgraduate Training in Family Medicine Using Distance Learning at the University of the West Indies (2001–2006, Pre-service Teacher Preparation and Effective eLearning, Distance Teacher Training in Rwanda: Comparing the Costs, Beckoning E-Learners through Exploration of Computer Technology, Educational Technology and Flexible Education in Nigeria: Meeting the Need for Effective Teacher Education, Fostering Digital Liter

  13. Fifty years experiences in nuclear engineering education at Tokyo Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear engineering education has been initiated in 1957 at the graduate school of Tokyo Institute of Technology. Educational activities have been conducted for fifty years under the support of the Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors. In the past fifty years, about 1000 Master students and 200 Doctoral students and 200 Doctoral students graduated from our Nuclear Engineering Department at Tokyo Institute of Technology. Many of them found their jobs in nuclear industries and institutes. International course of nuclear engineering was initiated in 1994, and so far about 90 students from 15 overseas countries have graduated from our Master and Doctoral Programs. In 2003, our proposal of 'Innovative Nuclear Energy System for the Sustainable World' was adopted as the Center of Excellent Program sponsored by Ministry of Education, Science and Technology. Recently a collaborative education network has been developed among Kanazawa University, Fukui University, Ibaraki University, Okayama University, Tokyo Institute of Technology and Japan Atomic Energy Agency. (author)

  14. Research Framework and Dimensions for Evaluating the Effectiveness of Educational Technology Systems in Learning Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolucci, Rocco; Jones, Trevor H.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a general framework for evaluating the effectiveness of educational technology in enhancing student learning and achievement. Describes the following components and their relationships: instructional objectives, learning domain, learner profile, task characteristics, grouping, delivery system, control, presence, media, connectivity, and…

  15. Developing Goals and Objectives for a Process-Based Technology Education Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklein, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    An 11-member DACUM team identified necessary instructional elements and student outcomes for process-based secondary technology education. A panel of 43 exemplary teachers then validated goals and objectives, resulting in a curriculum framework. (SK)

  16. Technology leadership : enhancing positive educational change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert Valdez

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the characteristics of quality leadership and discusses critical educational leadership issues. A brief history traces the evolution of school leadership from a managerial business-type approach to a style that includes a vital instructional leadership component. The need for teacher leadership and the effects of the decentralization of schools are noted. Also explored are the qualities of transformational education leaders, the complexity of schools, and the usefulness of a systems thinking approach. The authors conclude with a discussion of how educational technology leadership can promote needed school change and increase educational productivity. In addition, the article provides suggested improvement goals and action options for administrators, teachers, and school board members to consider when encouraging the use of technology. Differing view points are offered, as well as a discussion of potential implementation pitfalls. Supplementing the article are links to illustrative case studies and contact information for both school administration and educational technology organizations.

  17. Using Handheld Technologies for Student Support: A Model

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Lunsford

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes my EdD research, which used an action research approach at The Open University to discover the potential role of mobile technologies as a means of student support in distance education. Tutors produced their own mobile-accessible materials to suit and support their students (including the use of SMS texting), for course-specific knowledge and more general study issues. Increasingly the OU is developing mobile access options and the use of web 2.0 tools is growing within ...

  18. Students’ Views of Distance Education Provision at One University

    OpenAIRE

    Nalan YILMAZ; AKSU, Mualla BiLGiN; Binnur Genç ILTER

    2005-01-01

    Students’ Views of Distance Education Provision at One University Assist. Prof. Dr. Binnur Genç ILTERAkdeniz University, Faculty of Education Prof. Dr. Mualla Bilgin AKSUInönü University, Faculty of Education Lecturer. Nalan YILMAZAkdeniz University, Faculty of Education ABSTRACT Providing university students with distance education is of great importance in the global world. Distance education provides advantages and benefits especially for students who don’t have the chanc...

  19. AIAA Educator Academy: Enriching STEM Education for K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagle, E.; Bering, E. A.; Longmier, B. W.; Henriquez, E.; Milnes, T.; Wiedorn, P.; Bacon, L.

    2012-12-01

    Educator Academy is a K-12 STEM curriculum developed by the STEM K-12 Outreach Committee of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). Consisting of three independent curriculum modules, K-12 students participate in inquiry-based engineering challenges to improve critical thinking skills and enhance problem solving skills. The Mars Rover Celebration Curriculum Module is designed for students in grades 3-8. Throughout this module, students learn about Mars and the solar system. Working with given design criteria, students work in teams to do basic research about Mars that will determine the operational objectives and structural features of their rover. Then, students participate in the design and construction of a model of a mock-up Mars Rover to carry out a specific science mission on the surface of Mars. At the end of this project, students have the opportunity to participate in a regional capstone event where students share their rover designs and what they have learned. The Electric Cargo Plan Curriculum Module is designed for students in grades 6-12. Throughout this module, students learn about aerodynamics and the four forces of flight. Working individually or in teams, students design and construct an electrically-powered model aircraft to fly a tethered flight of at least one lap without cargo, followed by a second tethered flight of one lap carrying as much cargo as possible. At the end of this project, students have the opportunity to participate in a regional capstone event where students share what they have learned and compete with their different cargo plane designs. The Space Weather Balloon Curriculum Module is designed for students in grades 9-12. Throughout this module, students learn and refine physics concepts as well as experimental research skills. Students participate in project-based learning that is experimental in nature. Students are engaged with the world around them as they collaborate to launch a high altitude balloon equipped with HD cameras. To better assist teachers in implementing one or more of these Curriculum Modules, teacher workshops are held to give teachers a hands-on look at how this curriculum is used in the classroom. And, to provide further support, teachers are each provided with an AIAA professional member as a mentor for themselves and/or their students. These curriculum modules, provided by AIAA are available to any K-12 teachers as well as EPO officers for use in formal or informal education settings.

  20. Partnership for electrical generation technology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Engineering Technician education effort adapts an existing two-year Instrumentation and Control (I and C) education program into a model that is focused on electrical-generation technologies. It will also locally implement a program developed elsewhere with National Science Foundation funding, aimed at public schools, and adapt it to stimulate pre-college interest in pursuing energy careers in general. (authors)

  1. Technology Explosion and Its Impact on Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozoglu, Dogan; Varank, Ilhan

    Despite the fact that computers, as opposed to other technologies such as television and radio, have significantly impacted education from several perspectives, a consensus about the effectiveness of computer use in education has not been reached among the researchers. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of…

  2. Education of indoor enviromental engineering technology.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kic, P.; Zají?ek, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Ro?. 9, Spec. 1 (2011), s. 83-90. ISSN 1406-894X. [Biosystems Engineering 2011. Tartu, 12.05.2011-13.05.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Biosystems engineering * indoor environment * study * programs Subject RIV: AM - Education http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/VS/zajicek-education of indoor enviromental engineering technology.pdf

  3. Information Technology, Intellectual Property, and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Steven W.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses issues affecting the fields of information technology, intellectual property, and education. Four main needs are addressed: (1) new economic mechanisms beyond copyright and patent; (2) new codes of ethics for education; (3) effective representation for creator/producers and users of information; and (4) a forum for the voice of…

  4. A project for transitional education of doctoral applicants in educational technology

    OpenAIRE

    Class, Barbara; Schneider, Daniel; Canal, Richard; Laroussi, Mona

    2014-01-01

    This article concerns a new project among French speaking countries in the EMEA region. Its goal is to set up transitional education for doctoral applicants in the domain of educational technology, to help them write a robust PhD proposal and to enable them to apply as doctoral student in one of the partner universities. We shall discuss the first stage of an Educational Design Research (EDR) project to design a new distance teaching programme and to create a study book on research methodolog...

  5. The disconnect in the appropriation of new technologies into students’ everyday lives. A three country comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André H. Caron

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There is little doubt that students eagerly appropriate new technologies into their lives.  However, the authors wanted to explore what steps would be needed to ensure a proper appropriation of new technologies when applied to academic settings.  This paper presents a 3-country comparison of students reporting on their academic activities and technology use in everyday life. Though the numbers vary slightly within each country, the final results show an overall disconnect between the amount of time students allot to technology use and academic activities. Overall, the findings shed some much needed statistical light on the current reality of studentstechnological and academic habits. The authors propose possible next steps to take in order to better understand this phenomenon. Ultimately, this study urges educators and students alike to gather more information about the role social media plays in students’ lives. A better understanding of the situation could eventually lead to the successful integration of new technologies in academia.

  6. Differential Equations in Engineering Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Jerry D.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses reasons for including differential equations in the required course of study for engineering technology (ET) students. Briefly describes mathematics requirements of the ET Division of the School of Engineering at the University of Dayton. Provides an outline of their differential equations course for ET students. (CS)

  7. General Course and Specialist Physical Education Student Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, L. B.; Whiting, H. T.A.

    1972-01-01

    Physical Education students tended to be mesomorphic, stable extroverts, with driving, aggressive social responses and authoritarian attitudes as compared with general course college students. (Authors/MB)

  8. Using Handheld Technologies for Student Support: A Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Lunsford

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes my EdD research, which used an action research approach at The Open University to discover the potential role of mobile technologies as a means of student support in distance education. Tutors produced their own mobile-accessible materials to suit and support their students (including the use of SMS texting, for course-specific knowledge and more general study issues. Increasingly the OU is developing mobile access options and the use of web 2.0 tools is growing within specific courses.SMS texting and the rich media available for mobile learning have proved to be useful and engaging to students. Interestingly, students gave importance to the affective aspects that were bound up with the practical uses of these technologies. Distance institutions work hard to overcome any feelings of isolation inherent in the distance learning process, by providing personal and online communication options: my research showed that students felt that they became more involved with the tutor, tutor group, or general student community, and for some students perhaps mobile access could lead to an increase in motivation and self-confidence and thus improve the likelihood of course completion.I describe a composite model of mobile student support: practical options to support students with their scheduling, in communicating with the institution and each other, in accessing services and resources, in their skills development, and to enhance their perceived connection with the institution. Web 2.0 options can extend the reach to our distance students and encourage students to share advice and ideas.

  9. Progression of technology education for atomic energy engineering in Tsuyama National College of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the achievements of a program in which technology education is provided to cultivate practical core engineers for low-level radiation. It was made possible by means of (1) an introductory education program starting at an early age and a continuous agenda throughout college days and (2) regional collaboration. First, with regard to the early-age introductory education program and the continuous education agenda, the subjects of study related to atomic energy or nuclear engineering were reorganized as 'Subjects related to Atomic Power Education' for all grades in all departments. These subjects were included in the syllabus and the student guide book, emphasizing a continuous and consistent policy throughout seven-year college study, including the five-year system and additional two-year advanced course. Second, to promote practical education, the contents of lectures, experiments, and internships were enriched and realigned in collaboration with the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Okayama University and The Cyugoku Electric Power Co., Inc. In addition to the expansion and rearrangement of atomic power education, research on atomic power conducted for graduation thesis projects were undertaken to enhance the educational and research activities. In consequence, it has been estimated that there is now a total of fourteen subject areas in atomic energy technology, more than eight-hundred registered students in the department, and thirteen members of the tedepartment, and thirteen members of the teaching staff related to atomic energy technology. Furthermore, the 'Tsuyama model' is still being developed. This program was funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. (author)

  10. Chinese EFL Students’ Perspectives on the Integration of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the centrality of the technology integration to Chinese EFL students' experiences in College English instruction. Students involved in this qualitative and quantitative study described the effectiveness of Web-based instructional environments (WBIEs facilitated by the WebNing course management systems. Sources that were used for data analysis include online survey and oral interviews. The study demonstrates that students perceive the advantages of using Web-based instruction (WBI. They feel that the WBI greatly enhances their experiences by (1 developing their writing skills through online essay, (2 improving their communication skills through online discussion and (3 providing greater learner autonomy. Besides, Web-based learning empowers students to be actively involved in the learning process and to be responsible for their own learning. The findings of this study provide a useful reference point for those educators contemplating the implementation of a web-based instruction.

  11. The potential impact of microgravity science and technology on education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargo, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of educational support materials by NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications Division is discussed in the light of two programs. Descriptions of the inception and application possibilities are given for the Microgravity-Science Teacher's Guide and the program of Undergraduate Research Opportunities in Microgravity Science and Technology. The guide is intended to introduce students to the principles and research efforts related to microgravity, and the undergraduate program is intended to reinforce interest in the space program. The use of computers and electronic communications is shown to be an important catalyst for the educational efforts. It is suggested that student and teacher access to these programs be enhanced so that they can have a broader impact on the educational development of space-related knowledge.

  12. Redefining psychiatry: implications for educators and medical student education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickstein, L J

    1994-01-01

    Psychiatric education must be reevaluated and changed in response to increasing knowledge in the field, ongoing health care reform, decreased inpatient stays, changing reimbursement and other faculty fiscal pressures, the generalist physician priority, and fewer students entering the field. The author offers recommendations for preclinical patient interviewing, supervision, and follow-up; revision of the behavioral sciences course; new lectures in clinical clerkship rotations; attention to faculty attitudes toward students; faculty teaching competence; the importance of role modeling and mentoring; and the need for electives to encourage students to select psychiatry. An improved relationship with other physician colleagues is a priority to decrease stigma toward psychiatry. PMID:7812261

  13. Developing the Environment of Information Technology Education using Cloud Computing Infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Chen-Feng Wu; Liang-Pang Huang

    2011-01-01

    The education of Information Technology (IT) in Taiwan has been promoted since 1997. However, there were still problems with the current environment of IT education. Problem statement: The major problem was that students were unable to practice after school with the same environment and there was no appropriate space to save their files for students, so it was not convenient for students achievement of learning. Approach: The service of private cloud computing was adopted in this study to est...

  14. Educational Data Visualization via WebGIS Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niki Yuqing Guo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a research that applies educational data-visualization techniques in a government employee training platform. A novel visualization system Web-based Statistics and Geographic Information System (Stat-Geo developed by web service and WebGIS technology is employed. It is able to visualize student learning traces data and present the information simply and clearly to designers and instructors, thus gain insights of members behavior and learning status.

  15. Motivating students in engineering & ICT education

    OpenAIRE

    Kollenburg, Peter; Schenk Brill, Dick

    2009-01-01

    We found out that 25 % of our students came to study at the Electrical & Electronic Engineering department (E&E) because they were active (as a hobby) in music. Because of this the E&E department offers their students to work in video and audio themes in all projects of their education. From our inquiries we found out what students interests are and we use these interests for new project themes. The study has been changed in such a way that it is possible to have these project themes twice in...

  16. Student Attitudes towards and Use of ICT in Course Study, Work and Social Activity: A Technology Acceptance Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Rob; Thorpe, Mary; Conole, Grainne

    2012-01-01

    The increasing use of information and communication technology (ICT) in higher education has been explored largely in relation to student experience of coursework and university life. Students' lives and experience beyond the university have been largely unexplored. Research into student experience of ICT used a validated model--the technology

  17. Student perceptions of secondary science: A performance technology application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Belinda Rusnak

    The primary purpose of this study was to identify influences blocking or promoting science performance from the lived K-12 classroom experience. Human Performance Technology protocols were used to understand factors promoting or hindering science performance. The goal was to gain information from the individual students' perspective to enhance opportunities for stakeholders to improve the current state of performance in science education. Individual perspectives of 10 secondary science students were examined using grounded theory protocols. Findings include students' science learning behaviors are influenced by two major themes, environmental supports and individual learning behaviors. The three environmental support factors identified include the methods students receive instruction, students' opportunities to access informal help apart from formal instruction, and students' feelings of teacher likability. Additionally, findings include three major factors causing individual learners to generate knowledge in science. Factors reported include personalizing information to transform data into knowledge, customizing learning opportunities to maximize peak performance, and tapping motivational opportunities to persevere through complex concepts. The emergent theory postulated is that if a performance problem exists in an educational setting, then integrating student perspectives into the cause analysis opens opportunity to align interventions for influencing student performance outcomes. An adapted version of Gilbert's Behavioral Engineering Model is presented as an organizational tool to display the findings. The boundaries of this Performance Technology application do not extend to the identification, selection, design, or implementation of solutions to improved science performance. However, as stakeholders begin to understand learner perspectives then aligned decisions may be created to support learners of science in a direct, cost effective manner.

  18. THE ENVIRONMENTAL ATTITUDES IN STUDENTS OF THE TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION. A SOCIAL PROBLEM OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY / LAS ACTITUDES MEDIOAMBIENTALES EN ESTUDIANTES DE LA EDUCACIÓN TÉCNICA Y PROFESIONAL. UN PROBLEMA SOCIAL DE LA CIENCIA Y LA TECNOLOGÍA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Gutiérrez Hidalgo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Our Earth Planet confronts the global crisis including the environmental area and its common cause, the unconscious acting of the human being and the convergent effect to the extermination of the world and the human sort. At present environmental insufficiencies are persisted related to the environmental knowledge of the Construction technician in Oscar Alberto Ortega Lara Polytechnic Institute as well as in the development of a favourable environmental attitudes establishing a contradiction in the social practice between a model wanted in the Technical and Professional Education (TPE - to graduate technicians of the Construction Family with good environmental behaviour. That’s why in this paper it is argued that the environmental attitudes of the TPE students constitute a social problem of the Science and the Technology, getting as a result that the application of the epistemology bases given, emits positive changes in their cognitive, affective and participative attitudes to the environmental situations.

  19. Student’s perspectives on Education for Sustainable Development in a problem based learning environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Aida; Holgaard, Jette Egelund

    2013-01-01

    In a society characterized by fast technological advances and increasing pressure on economic, ecological as well as social systems, it is important to educate engineers with a broader, reflective and sustainable perspective in alignment with their professional practice. This poses challenges to most engineering programmes, and scholars argue that a paradigm shift is needed to developing engineering education (EE) to embrace education for sustainable development (ESD). However, some of the more innovative pedagogies as for example problem based and project organised learning (PBL) already seem to bring EE on the right trajectory to ESD. For example, the pedagogical recommendations for ESD include active and student-centred learning, which are two of the basic principles of PBL. Some engineering educational systems have already implemented PBL and the question is whether engineering students at these PBL institutions experience the strength of this pedagogy when being educated for sustainability. This paper aims to investigate how students perceive and integrate ESD in a PBL environment. Results exemplify how PBL moves beyond awareness about sustainability as the problem based learning model encourage students to contextualise engineering problems and solutions and apply knowledge about sustainability in real life contexts.

  20. Overcoming Students' Misconceptions in Earth Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, K. C.; Finley, F. N.; Morin, P. J.; Chen, A. P.

    2006-12-01

    The University of Minnesota's Introductory Geology Program recently began to develop and use geologic concept surveys. Designed to measure changes in student knowledge and confidence through the semester, these surveys clearly demonstrate the remarkable tenacity of students' prior knowledge and misconceptions in surviving or resisting course instruction, unless instruction is specifically designed to counteract those misconceptions. Students do not simply absorb new information and knowledge, but interpret it in light of their previous understanding of how things work. They use this previous understanding to interpret, revise and often dismiss new information presented in class. This filtering process is one of the most important, if often overlooked, barriers to effective instruction. The present study demonstrates that classroom `interventions', targeted to specific misconceptions can overcome this barrier. Once students believe that their previous understanding is incorrect or incomplete and inadequately explains phenomena, they are more likely to understand, accept and use a new interpretation in subsequent explanations. These ideas are well known in education departments, but are less well established in the earth science field. Compared to physics and mathematics, earth science education also suffers from a relative lack of research on students' prior knowledge and misconceptions, the basis on which successful `interventions' rely. The present study presents a suite of common earth science misconceptions and demonstrates the effectiveness of targeted `interventions' in overcoming them, compared to traditional instruction methods. The results clearly demonstrate the importance of instructors knowing what knowledge or concepts students bring to their courses, as well as the remarkable effort still needed to identify and document students' perceptions of how the Earth works. This work is sponsored in part by the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE), U.S. Department of Education.

  1. Dental education of left-handed students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grga ?urica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Asymmetrical activity of brain hemispheres is projected through laterality e.g. the dominance of one of the paired organs. A very important way of laterality manifestation is left-handedness. The lef-handed must solve various conflicts with their environment, so mild left-handedness usually shifts into dominant right-handedness in the early childhood, fortunately with no difficulties. Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine the number and distribution of left-handed dental students, check the possibilities and propose measures for solving the problem in their education. Material and methods: The study was conducted at Belgrade University School of Dentistry, dept. of restorative dentistry and endodontics. During two academic years, six generations of senior dental students (III, IV and V year students completed a questionnaire, i.e. 1385 individuals were included in the survey. Results: The questionnaire revealed that out of the total number or students involved in the study 62 (4.48% students were left-handed. The distribution of left-handed students is relatively uniform and concentrated between 4-6% of the sample. Conclusion: Even though the number of left-handed students is small, it is necessary to change conditions for their education and enable their proper development.

  2. Fraud Education for Accounting Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Bonita K.

    2003-01-01

    Reports that limited fraud education takes place in accounting due to a crowded curriculum and misunderstanding of the extent of fraud. Suggests ways to develop content on the topic and provides a list of teaching materials (textbooks, workbooks, trade books, case materials, videos, and reference materials). (Contains 16 references.) (SK)

  3. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND ROMANIAN HIGHER EDUCATION - EVIDENCE ON LINKED DYNAMIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Nichifor

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The link between education, in general, and information technologies is one that does not necessarily have to be demonstrated. But it is interesting to see the specific link that is established between these two components of modern society. In recent years, part-time education forms tend to occupy an increasingly important position in the Romanian higher education from the perspective of the total number of students opting for distance learning or traditional part-time learning. This development occurred amid expansion of information technology - more and more households have Internet access and frequency of its use is increasing from year to year – in the context in which forms of part – time learning require the use of this means of information and communication. On this background more and more people over 25 years become interested in further developing their studies, including employed persons opting for further studies, increasing the share of students over 25 years in total students and the share of employed population over 25 years with higher education in total in respective age group.

  4. Introducing Educational Technologies to Teachers: Experience Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, Neena; Negreiros, Joao G. M.

    2015-01-01

    The dramatic rise in use of digital media has changed the way learning is taking place and has led to new ways to teach with digital technologies. In this article, we describe the experiences of teaching a course that introduces educational technologies to teachers in Macau. The course design is based on connectivism, a learning theory for the…

  5. Emerging Education Technologies and Research Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Two recent publications report the emerging technologies that are likely to have a significant impact on learning and instruction: (a) New Media Consortium's "2011 Horizon Report" (Johnson, Smith, Willis, Levine & Haywood, 2011), and (b) "A Roadmap for Education Technology" funded by the National Science Foundation in…

  6. The Impact of Society on Educational Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Gary

    1988-01-01

    Presents a theoretical perspective on the impact of society on new technologies, and gives examples of the impact of cultural factors on the development of computer/video-mediated educational technology in the United States, Japan, and the United Kingdom. Highlights include the use of television, computer languages, and videotex. (14 references)…

  7. A DISTANCE EDUCATION MODEL FOR JORDANIAN STUDENTS BASED ON AN EMPIRICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad SHAHER MASHHOUR

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Distance education is expanding worldwide. Numbers of students enrolled in distance education are increasing at very high rates. Distance education is said to be the future of education because it addresses educational needs of the new millennium. This paper represents the findings of an empirical study on a sample of Jordanian distance education students into a requirement model that addresses the need of such education at the national level. The responses of the sample show that distance education is offering a viable and satisfactory alternative to those who cannot enroll in regular residential education. The study also shows that the shortcomings of the regular and the current form of distance education in Jordan can be overcome by the use of modern information technology.

  8. Influencing Technology Education Teachers to Accept Teaching Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Luke Joseph; Putnam, Alvin Robert

    2008-01-01

    Technology education is facing a significant teacher shortage. The purpose of this study was to address the technology education teacher shortage by examining the factors that influence technology education teachers to accept teaching positions. The population for the study consisted of technology education teachers and administrators. A survey…

  9. Attitudes Toward Computer Technology Between Nursing and Medical Educators

    OpenAIRE

    Harsanyi, Bennie E.; Kelsey, Clyde E.

    1989-01-01

    The results of this descriptive study indicated no significant difference between nursing and medical educators' attitudes toward computer technology. Demographic variables and usages of computer technology in educational and clinical practice environments were not significant. Previous experience with computer technology was significant but negatively correlated; whereas, education regarding computer technology was not. Word processing and record keeping in the education environment, however...

  10. Examining Educators' Knowledge, Beliefs, and Practices about Using Technology with Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenty, Nicole S.; Anderson, Elizabeth McKendry

    2014-01-01

    Technology has been shown to foster children's motivation and interest in instructional materials. In addition, researchers have found that technology results in higher levels of student engagement and greater levels of comprehension. Researchers have also found that educators must have the knowledge and skills in technology necessary to…

  11. Motivational Profiles of Adult Basic Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beder, Hal W.; Valentine, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Structured interviews with a random sample of adult basic education students in Iowa (N=323) and an academic ability test administered to a 50 percent subsample identified reasons for participation. Factor analysis revealed 10 motivational dimensions, and cluster analysis categorized 6 subgroups: mainstream women, the urged, young adults, the…

  12. How Can Science Education Foster Students' Rooting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Edvin

    2015-01-01

    The question of how to foster rooting in science education points towards a double challenge; efforts to "prevent" (further) uprooting and efforts to "promote" rooting/re-rooting. Wolff-Michael Roth's paper discusses the uprooting/rooting pair of concepts, students' feeling of alienation and loss of fundamental sense of the…

  13. Educating the Next Generation of Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wailoo, B.; John, S.

    2013-01-01

    Business students take courses in Financial Accounting where they learn the basic financial statements and how to present and analyze them. Accounting majors immediately experience a frustrating situation as they continue their studies with the Intermediate Accounting I course. Practicing accountants realize when they attend continuing education

  14. Engaging Millennial Students in Leadership Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arensdorf, Jill R.; Andenoro, Anthony C.

    2009-01-01

    Leadership, regardless of definition, cannot be taught by a textbook alone, and if educators are to embrace the idea of highly engaged, holistic classrooms for Millennials, they must teach students to participate in real changes as both leaders and followers through practice and experiences. As new generations of young people mature and enter…

  15. Daily Stressors in Primary Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Baena, F. Javier; Trianes, María V.; Escobar, Milagros; Blanca, María J.; Muñoz, Ángela M.

    2015-01-01

    Daily stress can have a bearing on children's emotional and academic development. This study aimed to assess daily stressors and to determine their prevalence among primary education students, taking into account their gender, academic year, social adaptation, and the school location. A sample of 7,354 Spanish schoolchildren aged between 6…

  16. Incorporating learning technologies into undergraduate radiography education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study investigated the impact of integrating podcasts/audio file downloads and use of an electronic voting system (EVS) on a previously traditionally taught module. Both student (direct entry and mature) and staff satisfaction with the modified structure were evaluated. Method: An interim student evaluation was undertaken during the module, to provide formative data to the module leader about student opinion of the teaching methods and learning technologies. An end of module questionnaire was given to students and staff on the teaching team. Results: From the interim evaluation, given the option of returning to the traditional delivery method, 77.5% of students agreed that the module should continue to run in its blended format. The final evaluation discovered no differences in the behaviour of direct entry students compared to mature students. Both groups accessed the podcasts easily, generally at home, and spent longer studying than if blended learning technologies had not been used. It was discovered that 16% of the mature and 24% of the direct entry students would have preferred lectures to podcasts, although the students were positive about the flexibility offered. Both groups of students were virtually unanimous on the benefits of the EVS to support learning. Conclusion: The researchers concluded that the learning technologies did not create barriers for either student group, and that students' engagement with their learning and level of classroom ith their learning and level of classroom interactivity were both increased when compared with the previous traditional delivery. The researchers are confident that the described combination of teaching delivery methods is a successful way of allowing small group work to continue with large cohorts.

  17. Beyond “appropriate” technology. Mobilizing education for development

    OpenAIRE

    Hewling, Anne; Sesnan, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Having established that technology mediated instruction of some kind has potential and a valuable role to play in education for on the move and remote area learners the paper looks at practice as documented and suggests that social and cultural barriers are a greater challenge than technological ones. It concludes by suggesting that successful implementation may depend both on use of familiar technology i.e. phones rather than internet, and establishing for users a social and ...

  18. Validation of an Instrument to Measure Students' Motivation and Self-Regulation towards Technology Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Pey-Yan; Kuo, Pei-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Background: Few studies have examined students' attitudinal perceptions of technology. There is no appropriate instrument to measure senior high school students' motivation and self-regulation toward technology learning among the current existing instruments in the field of technology education. Purpose: The present study is to validate…

  19. Information Literacy Education on College of Technology at Kyushu Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozono, Kazutake; Ikeda, Naomitsu; Irie, Hiroki; Fujimoto, Yoichi; Oshima, Shunsuke; Murayama, Koichi; Taguchi, Hirotsugu

    Recently, the importance of an engineering education increases by the development of the information technology (IT) . Development of the information literacy education is important to deal with new IT in the education on college of technology. Our group investigated the current state of information literacy education on college of technology at Kyushu area and the secondary education. In addition, we investigated about the talent whom the industrial world requested. From these investigation results, this paper proposed cooperation with the elementary and secondary education, enhancement of intellectual property education, introduction of information ethics education, introduction of career education and enhancement of PBL to information literacy education on college of technology.

  20. COMPETENCIAS GENÉRICAS EN LA EDUCACIÓN SUPERIOR TECNOLÓGICA MEXICANA: DESDE LAS PERCEPCIONES DE DOCENTES Y ESTUDIANTES (GENERIC COMPETENCES IN MEXICAN HIGHER TECHNOLOGICAL EDUCATION: FROM THE PERCEPTIONS OF TEACHERS AND STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Medina Palomera

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:Los modelos educativos, a nivel mundial, están sufriendo modificaciones hacia la implementación del enfoque en competencias. Tal es el caso del Sistema Nacional de Educación Superior Tecnológica en México. Dada la relevancia, se llevó a cabo un estudio para conocer la perspectiva que tienen los docentes y estudiantes sobre las competencias genéricas (CG. El trabajo se desarrolló mediante encuestas aplicadas en Institutos Tecnológicos a nivel nacional. En este artículo se presentan los resultados obtenidos sobre los siguientes tópicos: la importancia de las CG, la identificación de las esenciales, y la relación que tienen entre las diferentes categorías de carreras de los Institutos Tecnológicos. Se encontró que los docentes otorgan mayor importancia a las CG que los estudiantes; además, se advierte una concordancia de los resultados entre las CG esenciales tanto por los docentes como por los estudiantes; asimismo, se observan varias diferencias entre categorías de carreras. Se concluye que tanto académicos y estudiantes perciben positivamente la incorporación de las CG en los programas de estudio, dejando entrever un ambiente propicio para su implementación. Se propone, además, un estudio complementario. El análisis reveló que a cada carrera le corresponden diferentes CG esenciales.Abstract: The educational models around the world are undergoing modifications to the implementation of the competences approach. Such is the case of the National Higher Technological Education System in Mexico. Given the importance of this, conducted a study to determine the perspective which teachers and students on generic competences (CG. The work was developed through surveys completed in Institutes of Technology nationwide. This article presents the results obtained on the following topics: the importance of the CG, the identification of essential and the relationship they have between different categories of careers in research centers. We found that the teachers give greater importance to the CG than students, in addition, we see a concordance of results between the essential CG both teachers and the students, on the other side there were several key differences between categories careers. We conclude that both faculty and students perceived positively by the inclusion of CG in the curriculum, suggesting an environment conducive to its implementation. It also proposes an additional study. The analysis revealed that each career will show different CG essential.

  1. Perceptions of uncivil student behavior in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Richard W; Hagan, Joseph L; Townsend, Janice A; Ballard, Mary B; Armbruster, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    Students and faculty members in the health professions classroom are expected to exhibit professional behaviors that are conducive to maintaining a positive learning environment, but there is little published research concerning incivility in the area of dental education. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in perceptions of incivility between dental faculty and students, between students in different courses of study, and between students in different years of dental study. The study utilized an anonymous electronic survey of all dental faculty and administrators and all dental, dental hygiene, and dental laboratory technology students at a single institution. The survey instrument contained questions concerning perceived uncivil behavior in the classroom and clinical settings. Response rates were 54% for faculty and administrators and ranged from 60% to 97% for students in various years and programs. The results were analyzed based on gender, course of study, year of study, and ethnicity. Significant differences were found regarding perceptions of civil behaviour between faculty and students, male and female students, the year of study, and the course of study. These differences point to the need for further research as well as administrative leadership and faculty development to define guidelines in this area in order to ensure a positive learning environment. PMID:25576551

  2. Experiences of Students with Visual Impairments in Canadian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Maureen; Curtis, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This article presents a study of the higher education experiences of students with visual impairments in Canada. Methods: Students with visual impairments and the staff members of disability programs were surveyed and interviewed regarding the students' experiences in entering higher education and completing their higher education

  3. Home Education Transitions with Formal Schooling: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Glenda

    2007-01-01

    Home education is a well established phenomenon in Australia but little is known about the movement of students between home schooling and formal education and how students view and handle the transitions. A sociocultural theoretical framework has been used to explore student perceptions of their transition experiences between formal education and…

  4. Virtually Forgotten: Special Education Students in Cyber Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnahan, Chris; Fulton, Lacey

    2013-01-01

    The area of online K-12 education is experiencing rapid growth, yet practice has greatly surpassed the research. This article looks to add to the field by examining special education students enrolled in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. There were over 2600 students in the state that were identified as special education students and enrolled in…

  5. Project-based learning as a facilitator to promote studentstechnology competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Bagheri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the close relationship between educational technology as a field of study on the one hand and technological progress as a fact on the other, the very nature of this field has undergone tremendous shift which has resulted in a transmogrification, changes which are evinced by the roles of educational technologist. Therefore, not only should educational technology training centers aim at transferring concepts related to this major to learners, but they should also focus on developing basic skills that students need, such as technological competencies.This article sought to examine the effects of project-based learning strategy (PoBL on studentstechnology competency in a system-based education course offered in the educational technology department of Arak University in Iran. In order to achieve this end, a sample of 78 students majoring in the field of educational technology who enrolled in the system-based education course was selected. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the experimental group (PoBL strategy and the control group (conventional teaching strategy. The educational course involved 12 sessions over the course of one semester of the 2011-2012 academic year, with each session lasting approximately 90 minutes. The technology competency questionnaire was administrated three times (i.e. pretest, post-test one, and post-test two, while the experimental group received the PoBL strategy and the control group was exposed to conventional teaching (CT methods. The results of two way repeated measure ANOVA revealed that students who were taught using Poll strategy performed better in terms of technology competency compared to students who were taught using CT strategy.

  6. Philosophy of Technology Assumptions in Educational Technology Leadership: Questioning Technological Determinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Mark David

    2013-01-01

    Scholars have emphasized that decisions about technology can be influenced by philosophy of technology assumptions, and have argued for research that critically questions technological determinist assumptions. Empirical studies of technology management in fields other than K-12 education provided evidence that philosophy of technology assumptions,…

  7. An Educational Panopticon? New Technology, Nurse Education and Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epling, Michael; Timmons, Stephen; Wharrad, Heather

    2003-01-01

    Web-based learning can be liberating and enhance autonomy and reflection. However, new forms of computer-based learning also have the potential for panoptic surveillance and control of students, practices that are inimical to the values and philosophy of nursing education. (Contains 37 references.) (SK)

  8. Climate Change Education: Student Media Production to Educate and Engage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney-Varga, J. N.; Brisk, A. A.; Ledley, T. S.; Shuldman, M.

    2011-12-01

    Climate change education offers many challenges, including the complexity of the natural and human systems involved, a need for a multi-disciplinary perspective, and the psychological barriers to learning that result from a problem that frequently elicits a sense of being overwhelmed and powerless. The implications of climate change impacts and/or solutions can be especially overwhelming for today's students, who are likely to be confronted with many projected changes within their lifetimes. We are developing approaches to incorporate video production by students at both the high school and university levels in order to overcome many of the challenges unique to climate change education. Through media production, students are asked to convey complex topics using clear, simple language and metaphor, so their content knowledge must be deep enough to educate others. Video production is a team effort (director, camera person, editor, etc.) and inherently creates an opportunity for learning in a social context, which has been shown to lead to better learning outcomes in climate change education. Video production also promotes the basic tenets of engagement theory, in which a small group of students is in constant contact with the content and, ideally, creates a product that can be disseminated broadly. Lastly, putting students behind the camera can give them a voice and a sense of empowerment, fostering active participation in the learning process. While video is a medium that is readily disseminated to a broad audience, our focus is on the process (i.e., learning outcomes of students directly involved in media production), not the product. However, we have found that providing students with a means to add their voices to the broader public's discussion of climate change has a positive impact on student engagement with climate change science and on public awareness this problem beyond the classroom. While student-produced media pieces are not intended to provide in-depth scientific information to the broader public, we have found that they can be successful in conveying some of the key, basic concepts needed to understand anthropogenic climate change. Some of these concepts include the causal relationships between fossil fuel-based energy systems, atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, and climate change; the distinction between natural and anthropogenic processes in the carbon cycle; impacts of climate change on ecosystem services; and transitioning to renewable energy systems that do not emit carbon dioxide is necessary to avert 'dangerous' climate change.

  9. Role of Educational Technology at Primary School Level In District Karak (Khyber Pukhtunkhwa) Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Qaiser Suleman

    2011-01-01

    The study was conducted to explore the role of educational technology at primary school level in District Karak (Khyber Pukhtunkhwa). The main objectives of the study were; to investigate the availability, usability and importance of educational technology; and to investigate whether primary school teachers are for the effective use of technologies for teaching learning process. The study was descriptive in nature. All the teachers and students at primary level in District Karak constituted t...

  10. Law of Large Numbers: the Theory, Applications and Technology-based Education

    OpenAIRE

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Christou, Nicolas; Gould, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Modern approaches for technology-based blended education utilize a variety of recently developed novel pedagogical, computational and network resources. Such attempts employ technology to deliver integrated, dynamically-linked, interactive-content and heterogeneous learning environments, which may improve student comprehension and information retention. In this paper, we describe one such innovative effort of using technological tools to expose students in probability and statistics courses t...

  11. Improving Higher Education Student Learning through a Table of Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Lai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Web-based or “online” learning commonly known as e-Learning which makes use of internet technologies has been widely used by many education institutions around the globe. Higher education institutions have been using Learning Management system (LMS as a part of their campus-based and distance teaching. To date, very little research has been carried out to investigate whether the uses of LMS actually contribute to student learning. In this paper, we present a higher education blended teaching method for improving student learning. By blended teaching, we mean the combination of face-to-face teaching and the uses of a LMS for learning, teaching and assessment activities. Student’s learning progress is guided and gauged by Shulman’s (2002 table of learning. The LMS that we use at La Trobe University is Moodle. To demonstrate the usefulness of our method, we also present in this paper the results of applying it to teaching a third year software engineering subject, CSE3MQR (Metrics, Quality and Reliability.

  12. INTELLIGENCE MOBILE AND DIGITAL BROADCASTING TECHNOLOGY TO SUPPORT LEARNING FOR DISABILITIES STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Settachai Chaisanit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Usage of mobile digital broadcasting technologies in education is the most important of required technologies to provide main goals in distance education. It offers learning and data accession opportunities to learners notwithstanding time and place. In academic education, it was found that one of the critical problem is the appreciate education tool for disabilities students. Students with special education have difficulties to develop cognitive abilities and acquire new knowledge. They could also need to improve their behavior, communication and relationships with their environment. The development of customizable and adaptable applications tailored to them provides many benefits as it helps mold the learning process to different cognitive, sensorial or mobility impairments. This reviewed paper defines mobile technologies universally designed devices and technology for learning, presents examples of how designed technology hardware and software applications promote increased learning to school and university settings to enhance learning outcomes of all students, including those with disabilities. The reviewed results found that application of the instrumental enrichment of mobile technologies universally designed devices and technology can have an effect in terms of anticipated effects and thus have a positive influence on both learning skills and results in school and university students with a learning disability. The students mainly appreciated the mobile devices and technology and optimistic approach to the learner and to possibilities of modification of their own learning style. The mobile device and technology provide students with options to access the content multiple times in different settings while using a variety of technology applications. The concluded results also challenged educators to rethink the nature of the disability studentsâ?? curriculum and empower them with the flexibility to serve a diverse population of learners.

  13. Variables Related to Undergraduate Students Preference for Distance Education Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Manuel C. F.; Hasit, Cindi; Pontes, Nancy M. H.; Lewis, Phillip A.; Siefring, Karen T.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify student-specific characteristics that are related to students' preference for distance education courses. Since distance education courses provide students with more convenient and flexible class schedules, they should be preferred by students who have a greater number of competing demands, such as work…

  14. Which Are the Determinants of Online Students' Efficiency in Higher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Merino, David; Serradell-Lopez, Enric; González-González, Inés

    International literature shows that the positive effect on students performance from the adoption of innovations in the technology of teaching and learning do not affect all teaching methods and learning styles equally, as it depends on university strategy and policy towards Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) adoption, students abilities, technology uses in the educational process by teachers and students, or the selection of a methodology that matches with digital uses. This paper provides empirical answers to these questions with data from online students at the Open University of Catalonia (UOC). An empirical model based on structural equations has been defined to explain complex relationships between variables. Our results show that motivation is the main variable affecting online students' performance. It appears as a latent variable influenced by students' perception of efficiency, a driver for indirect positive and significant effect on students' performance from students' ability in ICT uses.

  15. Leveraging mobile computing and communication technologies in education: : Incorporation of mobile learning into Tertiary Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Annan, Nana Kofi

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of mobile computing and communication technologies has come with it, an unprecedented transformation in digitalising every aspect of human activities. This transformation has brought about a high degree of mobility in the way knowledge is constructed, processed, stored and disseminated through the use of portable information and communication technologies (ICTs) such as smart phones, tablets, personal computers and laptop computers. These mobile devices use mobile communication infrastructure to promote the mobility affordances for human activities anywhere and anytime. Although education and technology have evolved in tandem over the past years, this dissertation recognises the lapse that there is, in not being able to effectively leverage technology to improve education delivery by most educators. The study appreciates the enormousness of mobile computing and communication technologies in contributing to the development of tertiary education delivery, and has taken keen interest to investigate how the capacities of these technologies can be leveraged and incorporated effectively into the pedagogic framework of tertiary education. The purpose is to research into how these ubiquitous ICTs can be used to facilitate teaching and learning, based on a conceptual framework, which uses mobile learning platform to supplement traditional face-to-face method of education. The study uses both qualitative and quantitative data with action research as the strategy of inquiry. The study was situated within a developing country context using Ghana as the case study. In view of this, the m-learning project of Central University College with student population of about 10,000 and teaching staff of 143 was purposefully and conveniently selected as the case study for this thesis. The analysis of the results conducted after rigorous theoretical and empirical research unveiled the following: Mobile technologies can be incorporated into tertiary education if it has a strong theoretical underpinning, which links technology and pedagogy; the technology would not work if the user’s concerns in relation to the use of the technology is not holistically resolved; mobile technologies offer tremendous opportunities for the generation, processing, storing and disseminating knowledge. These findings led to the conceptualisation of the STUMP framework as a theoretical contribution for ensuring effective leveraging and incorporation of mobile computing and communication technologies into tertiary education.

  16. Leveraging mobile computing and communication technologies in education : Incorporation of mobile learning into Tertiary Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Annan, Nana Kofi

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of mobile computing and communication technologies has come with it, an unprecedented transformation in digitalising every aspect of human activities. This transformation has brought about a high degree of mobility in the way knowledge is constructed, processed, stored and disseminated through the use of portable information and communication technologies (ICTs) such as smart phones, tablets, personal computers and laptop computers. These mobile devices use mobile communication infrastructure to promote the mobility affordances for human activities anywhere and anytime. Although education and technology have evolved in tandem over the past years, this dissertation recognises the lapse that there is, in not being able to effectively leverage technology to improve education delivery by most educators. The study appreciates the enormousness of mobile computing and communication technologies in contributing to the development of tertiary education delivery, and has taken keen interest to investigate how the capacities of these technologies can be leveraged and incorporated effectively into the pedagogic framework of tertiary education. The purpose is to research into how these ubiquitous ICTs can be used to facilitate teaching and learning, based on a conceptual framework, which uses mobile learning platform to supplement traditional face-to-face method of education. The study uses both qualitative and quantitative data with action research as the strategy of inquiry. The study was situated within a developing country context using Ghana as the case study. In view of this, the m-learning project of Central University College with student population of about 10,000 and teaching staff of 143 was purposefully and conveniently selected as the case study for this thesis. The analysis of the results conducted after rigorous theoretical and empirical research unveiled the following: Mobile technologies can be incorporated into tertiary education if it has a strong theoretical underpinning, which links technology and pedagogy; the technology would not work if the user’s concerns in relation to the use of the technology is not holistically resolved; mobile technologies offer tremendous opportunities for the generation, processing, storing and disseminating knowledge. These findings led to the conceptualisation of the STUMP framework as a theoretical contribution for ensuring effective leveraging and incorporation of mobile computing and communication technologies into tertiary education.

  17. Educational Blogging: Integrating Technology into Marketing Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Melike Demirbag; Piskin, Burak; Bol, Beste

    2010-01-01

    The major challenge of marketing education is that the discipline continually reinvents itself. Marketing approaches and practices once new rapidly become old and many texts grow outdated in a short period of time, increasing the pressure on the instructors to provide the students with the latest knowledge. The changing environment of business…

  18. The experience of education students in the Technolab. Do engineers and educationalists have to co-operate?

    OpenAIRE

    CPH Myburgh

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was firstly to explore and describe post graduate students’ experiences of Technology Education in the TechnoLab and secondly to deduct recommendations to assist and facilitate the learning process of students in the TechnoLab. The research design can be described as qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual. Twenty-eight post graduate students in Technology Education participated in a workshop at the TechnoLab for one morning session. The aim of this wo...

  19. Diesel Technology: Engines. [Teacher and Student Editions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Dave; Miller, Roger; Kellum, Mary

    Competency-based teacher and student materials on diesel engines are provided for a diesel technology curriculum. Seventeen units of instruction cover the following topics: introduction to engine principles and procedures; engine systems and components; fuel systems; engine diagnosis and maintenance. The materials are based on the…

  20. Student Misconceptions Caused by Misuse of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Calculators used widely by students, teachers, scientists, engineers and many others provide an interesting case study of a compelling technology that has helped change the way many professionals work. They not only help in enhancing problem solving skills of most individuals, but also help visualise solutions to problems in a better way. Research…

  1. Students' perceptions of 'technology-based' lecture handouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammed Nazrul; Majumder, Md Anwarul Azim; Ja'afar, Rogayah; Rahman, Sayeeda

    2005-01-01

    Lecture handouts are widely used instructional tools. Handouts supplement rather than substitute students' regular reading. It is now a common practice to supply PowerPoint handouts and publish lecture handouts on the web for students' access. A study was conducted among the first year medical students (n=142) of School of Medical Sciences (SMS), Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) in order to determine their perceptions and expectations with regards to lecture handouts provided to them. The majority of the students reported that they read the lecture handouts as a reference and found them useful as a guide for future learning. More than half (68%) of the students expressed dissatisfaction with the overall presentation format of the handouts which is mainly technology-related i.e. PowerPoint and photocopying. This study indicated that students' expectations and experiences were positive towards the use of handouts. They used handouts as a means of supplementing rather than substituting their learning. Much care is needed when educators supply computer-based handouts, as this study shows a number of limitations when students use them. Medical schools should consider publishing web-based handouts with online and other facilities to make it interesting and effective. PMID:22605944

  2. Partnership for Environmental Technology Education (PETE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Partnership for Environmental Technology Education (PETE) is a nonprofit organization that provides environmental education and training through partnerships with community and technical colleges. The PETE network includes of 400 community and technical colleges, this representing over one-third of American two-year institutions, and extends across all 50 states. These institutions team with business, industry, government and educational programs to disseminate information focusing on environmentally sound technology. The website provides literature on various partners working with PETE. Programs and resources created through these partnerships are predominately featured on the main page; these mostly contain information on educational curriculum and training for the classroom. A calendar keeps users up to date with happening within the organization.

  3. Effectiveness of Technological Design on Elementary Student Teachers' Understanding of Air Resistance, Gravity, Terminal Velocity and Acceleration: Model Parachute Race Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Mirac; Bakirci, Hasan; Artun, Huseyin; Cepni, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Educational research maintains that, teaching science through designing technology has significant educational potential. Although the literature emphasizes that making technological designs is beneficial for students, it is stressed that studies about technological design generally focus on mental structures rather than hand skills of students

  4. The Relationship between Personality Type and Learning Style: A Study of Automotive Technology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threeton, Mark D.; Walter, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to provide career and technical education (CTE) professionals with additional insight on how to better meet the individual education needs of the learner, this study (a) sought to identify the predominant personality type of postsecondary automotive technology students and (b) examined whether there was a relationship between the…

  5. Student stress and quality of education

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Letícia, Pena; Dayr, Reis.

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam um artigo exploratório sobre o stress do estudante. Após examinar a relação entre trabalho e stress, o artigo passa a analisar o modelo de McLeansobre contexto, vulnerabilidade e fatores que causam o stress. Esse modelo serve de quadro de referência para a pesquisa elaborada, t [...] endo em vista avaliar como um grupo de estudantes de administração enfrenta o stress cotidiano. O artigo também sugere medi­das para reduzir os efeitos prejudiciais do stress no estudante e na qualidade de ensino. Abstract in english Today, managers are increasingly interested in knowing how the work in organizations aftects employees' health. Less common is the interest in stress erupting in the academic community - among students, faculty and administrators. The authors present a reflection paper focused on student stress. In [...] this paper, they first examine McLean 's model of context, vulnerability and stressors. This model provides the framework for the student surveys and for the entire paper. Based on the students surveys, an assessment is made of how asma" group of students are coping with stress. The paper fina"y suggests what can be done by students, faculty, and administrators to insta" and/or improve social support systems that might reduce the harmful eftects of stress on students and thus impact the quality of education.

  6. Technology in the Teaching of Neuroscence: Enhanced Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. John D. Griffin (College of William and Mary Department of Biology)

    2003-09-01

    The primary motivation for integrating any form of education technology into a particular course or curriculum should always be to enhance student learning. However, it can be difficult to determine which technologies will be the most appropriate and effective teaching tools. Through the alignment of technology-enhanced learning experiences with a clear set of learning objectives, teaching becomes more efficient and effective and learning is truly enhanced. In this article, I describe how I have made extensive use of technology in two neuroscience courses that differ in structure and content. Course websites function as resource centers and provide a forum for student interaction. PowerPoint presentations enhance formal lectures and provide an organized outline of presented material. Some lectures are also supplemented with interactive CD-ROMs, used in the presentation of difficult physiological concepts. In addition, a computer-based physiological recording system is used in laboratory sessions, improving the hands-on experience of group learning while reinforcing the concepts of the research method. Although technology can provide powerful teaching tools, the enhancement of the learning environment is still dependent on the instructor. It is the skill and enthusiasm of the instructor that determines whether technology will be used effectively.

  7. Facilitating Student-Generated Content Using Web 2.0 Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunbae

    2011-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies have created a trend of user-generated content by supporting media production, collaboration, communication, and dissemination. User-generated content is translated into student-generated content (SGC) in education. SGC engages learners in an authentic project that fosters students' autonomy, creativity, and real-world…

  8. Using Text Mining to Uncover Students' Technology-Related Problems in Live Video Streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdous, M'hammed; He, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Because of their capacity to sift through large amounts of data, text mining and data mining are enabling higher education institutions to reveal valuable patterns in students' learning behaviours without having to resort to traditional survey methods. In an effort to uncover live video streaming (LVS) students' technology related-problems and to…

  9. Emerging University Student Experiences of Learning Technologies across the Asia Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, B. F. D.; Higa, C.; Ellis, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Three hundred students across eight countries and eleven higher education institutions in the Asia Pacific Region participated in two courses on climate change and disaster management that were supported by learning technologies: a satellite-enabled video-conferencing system and a learning management system. Evaluation of the student experience…

  10. Retooling Perspectives on Technology’s Role in Language Education

    OpenAIRE

    Randall Davis

    2011-01-01

    Broad assumptions are commonly made on how technology, including anything from computers, whiteboards, and iPads, can transform and revolutionize teaching, independent learning, assessment, and other educational initiatives. Furthermore, changes in school programs are at times instituted at break-neck speeds with little understanding of the effects that technology can have on the actual learning process. This "perspectives" piece calls for a need to maintain realistic expectations and to inve...

  11. Organizational Culture and Instructional Innovations in Higher Education: Perceptions and Reactions of Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang; Engels, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    This study examines teachers' and students' perceptions of the organizational culture of their universities and their views about and reactions to instructional innovations with regard to student-centred learning, collaborative learning and use of innovative educational technologies. Six Chinese universities were involved and in total…

  12. Inclusiveness of ICT in Secondary Education: Students' Appreciation of ICT Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heemskerk, Irma; Volman, Monique; Admiraal, Wilfried; ten Dam, Geert

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on students' appreciation of information and communication technology (ICT) applications in schools for general secondary education. We investigate to what extent students from different gender and ethnic backgrounds appreciate various characteristics of ICT tools. The research question is, "How are…

  13. Improving Student Engagement and Development through Assessment: Theory and Practice in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouder, Lynn, Ed.; Broughan, Christine, Ed.; Jewell, Steve, Ed.; Steventon, Graham, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    With a unique focus on the relationship between assessment and engagement this book explores what works in terms of keeping students on course to succeed. Against a backdrop of massification and the associated increase in student diversity there is an escalating requirement for personalized, technology driven learning in higher education. In…

  14. Student Outreach With Renewable Energy Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Eric B. (Technical Monitor); Buffinger, D.; Fuller, C.; Kalu, A.

    2003-01-01

    The Student Outreach with Renewable Energy Technology (SORET) program is a joint grant that involves a collaboration between three HBCU's (Central State University, Savannah State University, and Wilberforce University) and NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The overall goal of the grant is to increase the interest of minority students in the technical disciplines, to encourage participating minority students to continue their undergraduate study in these disciplines, and to promote graduate school to these students. As a part of SORET, Central State University has developed an undergraduate research associates program over the past two years. As part of this program, students are required to take special laboratory courses offered at Wilberforce University that involve the application of renewable energy systems. The course requires the students to design, construct, and install a renewable energy project. In addition to the applied renewable energy course, Central State University provided four undergraduate research associates the opportunity to participate in summer internships at Texas Southern University (Renewable Energy Environmental Protection Program) and the Cleveland African-American Museum (Renewable Energy Summer Camp for High School Students) an activity co sponsored by NASA and the Cleveland African-American Museum. Savannah State University held a high school summer program with a theme of the Direct Impact of Science on Our Every Day Lives. The purpose of the institute was to whet the interest of students in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology (SMET) by demonstrating the effectiveness of science to address real world problems. The 2001 institute involved the design and installation of a PV water pumping system at the Center for Advanced Water Technology and Energy Systems at Savannah State. Both high school students and undergraduates contributed to this project. Wilberforce University has used NASA support to provide resources for an Applied Renewable Energy Laboratory offered to both Central State and Wilberforce students. In addition, research endeavors for high school and undergraduates were funded during the summer. The research involved attempts to layer photovoltaic materials on a conducting polymer (polypyrrole) substrate. Two undergraduate students who were interested in polymer research originated this concept. Finally, the university was able to purchase a meteorological station to assist in the analysis of the solar/wind hybrid power system operating at the university.

  15. Educational Encouragement, Parenting Styles, Gender and Ethnicity as Predictors of Academic Achievement among Special Education Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqeel Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current study examines the predictors’ of academic achievement: role of parenting styles, educational encouragement, gender and ethnicity among special education students. Participants of this study consisted 200 special education students (N = 105 boys and N = 95 girls age varies 14 to 19 years from one school located at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Results showed authoritative parenting styles were mostly used by the parents of their special education students. Significant relationships were existed in parenting styles, educational encouragement and academic achievement among special educational students. Educational encouragement from mother, father, sibling and friends, ethnicity and gender were found to be significant predictors for academic achievement. Findings of current research suggested parenting styles and educational encouragement contribute to special education student’s academic achievement. The results of the current study provide the insight for the educators, teachers and parents dealing with special education adolescents.

  16. ICT in the Education of Students with SEN: Perceptions of Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Jaime; Moreira, António; Almeida, Ana Margarida

    Portugal is experiencing a technological reform in education. Technological refurbishing of schools and training of students and teachers is a reality on the rise, enhanced by the implementation of the Education Technological Plan, which also aims at computer skills certification, by 2010, of 90% of teachers. In a School that must be adjusted to all pupils, Special Educational Needs cannot be neglected and the nature and constitution of its computer resources should obviate the support of these students. ICT training is essential to benefit all students from its use. In the case of SEN, this need for training is of paramount importance to establish itself as a facilitator for these students. ICT Coordinators are the visible face of ICT implementation in schools; their functions include the management of the schools computer facilities and to zeal for the ICT training of fellow teachers.

  17. The State of Educational Technology: Responses to Mitchell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostino, Andrew; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents eight responses to an article in a previous issue by Mitchell, "The Future of Educational Technology Is Past." Highlights include the theory of educational technology, the future of the field of educational technology, cybernetics, educational psychology, systems theory, the role of teachers, control systems, computer assisted…

  18. Florida Advanced Technology Education Center for Manufacturing (FLATE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Florida Advanced Technology Education Center for Manufacturing is dedicated to the creation of a manufacturing education system that offers "technical programs, curriculum development, best practice demonstrations, and student training" required to create a workforce with high performance skills to fill the needs of the ever-growing manufacturing industry. To that end, its website provides multi-media projects and activities as well asfaculty support that help develop current skills which are in demand inthe industry. These projects and activities could be used in largelecture courses or in small groups. This website would be ideal forteachers seeking to update or create from scratch manufacturing courses,and for students seek to develop a skill set that will be required of them in the job market.

  19. Climate Change Education for Engineering Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaniyala, S.; Powers, S.

    2011-12-01

    The outreach and educational component of my NSF-CAREER grant focused on the development of a new undergraduate course on climate change for engineering undergraduate students and development of project-based course modules for middle and high-school students. Engineering students have minimal formal education on climate issues, but are increasingly finding themselves in positions where they have to participate and address climate change and mitigation issues. Towards this end, we developed a new three-credit course, entitled Global Climate Change: Science, Engineering, and Policy. With a focus on engineering students, this course was structured as a highly quantitative course, taught through an inquiry-based pedagogical approach. The students used a combination of historical climate data from ground-stations and satellites and model results of future climate conditions for different scenarios to ascertain for themselves the current extent of climate change and likely future impacts. Students also combined mitigation efforts, concentrated on geoengineering and alternate energy choices, with climate modeling to determine the immediacy of such efforts. The impacts of the course on the students were assessed with a combination of quantitative and qualitative approaches that used pre-post climate literacy and engineering self-efficacy surveys as well as qualitative focus group discussions at the end of the course. I will discuss our undergraduate course development effort and the primary outcomes of the course. I will also briefly describe our k-12 outreach effort on the development of course modules for project-based learning related to air quality and atmospheric science topics.

  20. Educating personnel for nuclear technology in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic preconditions are discussed of educating personnel for nuclear power and nuclear technology in Czechoslovakia. In educating specialists, the high societal significance of nuclear power and the need to obtain qualified personnel for safeguarding safety and reliability of nuclear facilities operation should primarily be borne in mind. The system of training applies not only to operating and maintenance personnel of nuclear power plants but also to fuel and power generation, transport, engineering, building industry, health care, education and other personnel. (J.B.)