WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology aquatic center

  1. Technological Innovation and Developmental Strategies for Sustainable Management of Aquatic Resources in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agboola, Julius Ibukun

    2014-12-01

    Sustainable use and allocation of aquatic resources including water resources require implementation of ecologically appropriate technologies, efficient and relevant to local needs. Despite the numerous international agreements and provisions on transfer of technology, this has not been successfully achieved in developing countries. While reviewing some challenges to technological innovations and developments (TID), this paper analyzes five TID strategic approaches centered on grassroots technology development and provision of localized capacity for sustainable aquatic resources management. Three case studies provide examples of successful implementation of these strategies. Success requires the provision of localized capacity to manage technology through knowledge empowerment in rural communities situated within a framework of clear national priorities for technology development.

  2. Technology Information Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Transportation Technology Center (TTC) has been established at Sandia to address the transportation of nuclear waste and spent fuel. The Technology Information Center (TIC) acts as TTC's clearing house for nuclear material transportation information. TIC's activities are divided into three activities: public information, policy information, and technical information. Some of the uses of TIC's activities are briefly outlined

  3. Data Basin Aquatic Center: expanding access to aquatic conservation data, analysis tools, people and practical answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne-Gowey, J.; Strittholt, J.; Bergquist, J.; Ward, B. C.; Sheehan, T.; Comendant, T.; Bachelet, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    The world’s aquatic resources are experiencing anthropogenic pressures on an unprecedented scale and aquatic organisms are experiencing widespread population changes and ecosystem-scale habitat alterations. Climate change is likely to exacerbate these threats, in some cases reducing the range of native North American fishes by 20-100% (depending on the location of the population and the model assumptions). Scientists around the globe are generating large volumes of data that vary in quality, format, supporting documentation, and accessibility. Moreover, diverse models are being run at various temporal and spatial scales as scientists attempt to understand previous (and project future) human impacts to aquatic species and their habitats. Conservation scientists often struggle to synthesize this wealth of information for developing practical on-the-ground management strategies. As a result, the best available science is often not utilized in the decision-making and adaptive management processes. As aquatic conservation problems around the globe become more serious and the demand to solve them grows more urgent, scientists and land-use managers need a new way to bring strategic, science-based, and action-oriented approaches to aquatic conservation. The Conservation Biology Institute (CBI), with partners such as ESRI, is developing an Aquatic Center as part of a dynamic, web-based resource (Data Basin; http: databasin.org) that centralizes usable aquatic datasets and provides analytical tools to visualize, analyze, and communicate findings for practical applications. To illustrate its utility, we present example datasets of varying spatial scales and synthesize multiple studies to arrive at novel solutions to aquatic threats.

  4. ETC: Entertainment Technology Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Entertainment Technology Center at the University of Southern California is now on the Web. The site is an information source for those interested or involved in the entertainment industry, containing at present several hollywood magazines, production house catalogues, and Hollynet, the prototype for the ETC's future commercial web site.

  5. "Infotonics Technology Center"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzemeier, L., Boysel, M.B., and Smith, D.R.

    2005-01-14

    During this grant period July 15, 2002 thru September 30, 2004, the Infotonics Technology Center developed the critical infrastructure and technical expertise necessary to accelerate the development of sensors, alternative lighting and power sources, and other specific subtopics of interest to Department of Energy. Infotonics fosters collaboration among industry, universities and government and operates as a national center of excellence to drive photonics and microsystems development and commercialization. A main goal of the Center is to establish a unique, world-class research and development facility. A state-of-the-art microsystems prototype and pilot fabrication facility was established to enable rapid commercialization of new products of particular interest to DOE. The Center has three primary areas of photonics and microsystems competency: device research and engineering, packaging and assembly, and prototype and pilot-scale fabrication. Center activities focused on next generation optical communication networks, advanced imaging and information sensors and systems, micro-fluidic systems, assembly and packaging technologies, and biochemical sensors. With targeted research programs guided by the wealth of expertise of Infotonics���������������������������������������������������������������¢�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� business and scientific staff, the fabrication and packaging facility supports and accelerates innovative technology development of special interest to DOE in support of its mission and strategic defense, energy, and science goals.

  6. Solar Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Bob

    2011-04-27

    The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

  7. Center for Resourceful Building Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for Resourceful Building Technology maintains an online guide that describes building practices that are resource-efficient. Some information on the center's research projects is also available, including reports on small-diameter timber, construction and demolition waste, biobased building materials, and post-consumer glass in construction. The "Demonstration" section contains some information about demo homes constructed by the project.

  8. Buildings Technology Research & Integration Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Buildings Technology Center is a "research facility devoted to the development of technologies that improve the energy efficiency and environmental compatibility of residential and commercial buildings." The state-of-the-art research and development facility houses about 50 staff and 10-20 guest researchers. The website describes the center's facilities, research capabilities, and research programs. Another section describes some of the tools for buildings that the center has developed, such as a heat pump design model, building envelope web-based calculators, and a computer program designed to determine the most cost-effective retrofit measures for single-family homes. Publications on topics such as envelope systems, appliance and equipment efficiency, Desiccant-related research and other research on building design and performance are posted online. An easy-to-browse database of success stories provides specifications, rendered and line drawings, and other facts about the Center's building technologies.

  9. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-10-31

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) Technology Assessment Program (TAP) was developed to provide detailed, comparable data for environmental technologies and to disseminate this data to D&D professionals in a manner that will facilitate the review and selection of technologies to perform decontamination and decommissioning. The objectives for this project include the following: Determine technology needs through review of the Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) information and other applicable websites and needs databases; Perform a detailed review of industries that perform similar activities as those required in D&D operations to identify additional technologies; Define the technology assessment program for characterization and waste management problem sets; Define the data management program for characterization, dismantlement, and waste management problem sets; Evaluate baseline and innovative technologies under standard test conditions at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) and other locations and collect data in the areas of performance, cost, health and safety, operations and maintenance, and primary and secondary waste generation; Continue to locate, verify, and incorporate technology performance data from other sources into the multimedia information system; and Develop the conceptual design for a dismantlement technology decision analysis tool for dismantlement technologies.

  10. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT, SEDIMENT SAMPLING TECHNOLOGY, AQUATIC RESEARCH INSTRUMENTS, RUSSIAN PEAT BORER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Russian Peat Borer designed and fabricated by Aquatic Research Instruments was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in April and May 1999 at sites in EPA Regions 1 and 5, respectively. In additio...

  11. Berkeley Center for Law & Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Established at Berkeley's Boalt Hall in 1995, the mission of the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology is "to foster beneficial and ethical advancement of technology by promoting the understanding and guiding the development of intellectual property and related fields of law and policy as they intersect with business, science and technology." First-time visitors to their homepage can make their way through some of their new publications and papers, which can include everything from work on stem cell research ethics to international copyright law. By clicking on the "Research" section, visitors can learn more about faculty research and the scholarship of those persons working closely in affiliation with the Center through research appointments.

  12. Process Engineering Technology Center Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Martha A.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is developing as a world-class Spaceport Technology Center (STC). From a process engineering (PE) perspective, the facilities used for flight hardware processing at KSC are NASA's premier factories. The products of these factories are safe, successful shuttle and expendable vehicle launches carrying state-of-the-art payloads. PE is devoted to process design, process management, and process improvement, rather than product design. PE also emphasizes the relationships of workers with systems and processes. Thus, it is difficult to speak of having a laboratory for PE at K.S.C. because the entire facility is practically a laboratory when observed from a macro level perspective. However, it becomes necessary, at times, to show and display how K.S.C. has benefited from PE and how K.S.C. has contributed to the development of PE; hence, it has been proposed that a Process Engineering Technology Center (PETC) be developed to offer a place with a centralized focus on PE projects, and a place where K.S.C.'s PE capabilities can be showcased, and a venue where new Process Engineering technologies can be investigated and tested. Graphics for showcasing PE capabilities have been designed, and two initial test beds for PE technology research have been identified. Specifically, one test bed will look into the use of wearable computers with head mounted displays to deliver work instructions; the other test bed will look into developing simulation models that can be assembled into one to create a hierarchical model.

  13. Center for Applied Science Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Founded in 1984, the Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST) is an organization that is committed to expanding â??learning opportunities for all individuals, especially those with disabilities, through the research and development of innovative, technology-based educational resources and strategiesâ?. On their homepage, visitors can learn about their various initiatives, which include significant research projects, professional development, policy implementation, and publications. The publications area is a good place to start, and visitors can read such articles as â??Twenty online resources on reading with comprehension and engagementâ? and â??Teaching students to evaluate Internet information criticallyâ?. Visitors may also wish to examine the Teaching Every Student website that CAST has created, as it provides a detailed explanation of the teaching model that they have named â??Universal Design for Learningâ?.

  14. Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (Program website, free access)   Currently there is no database matching your keyword search, but the NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology website may be of interest. The Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology enables science and industry by providing essential measurement methods, instrumentation, and standards to support all phases of nanotechnology development, from discovery to production.

  15. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-04-30

    The final data package has been completed for the Mississippi State University, DIAL FTP Wall Depth Removal Characterization Technology. The package has been sent to DIAL for comments. Work is progressing on completing the transfer of glove boxes and tanks from Rocky Flats to FIU-HCET for the purpose of performing size reduction technology assessments. Vendors are being identified and security measures are being put in place to meet the High Risk Property criteria required by Rocky Flats. The FIU-HCET Technology Assessment Program has been included as one of 11 verification programs across the US and Canada described in the Interstate Technology Regulatory Cooperation (ITRC) document, ''Multi-state Evaluation of Elements Important to the Verification of Remediation Technologies'', dated January 1999. FIU-HCET will also participate in a panel discussion on technology verification programs at the International Environmental Technology Expo '99.

  16. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-05-31

    The programming and website for the advanced Technology Information System (TIS) have been completed. Over and above the LSDDP-TIS, the new system provides information on DOE's baseline technologies, technology data contained in DOE's databases, technologies assessed at FIU-HCET Technology Assessment Program (TAP), as well as links to other selected D&D sites with valuable technology information. The new name for the website is Gateway for Environmental Technology (GET). A super-vacuum type blasting system was tested for decontamination of 12-in pipe internal surfaces. The system operates on compressed air and propels grit media at high speed at wall surfaces. It is equipped with a vacuum system for collecting grit, dust, and debris. This technology was selected for further development. The electret ion chamber (EIC) system for measurement of alpha contamination on surfaces has been calibrated and is ready for demonstration and deployment. FIU-HCET is working with representatives from Fernald, Oak Ridge, Rocky Flats, and Savannah River to procure a demonstration and deployment site. Final arrangements are ongoing for the mock-up design for the glove box and tank size reduction technology assessments, including designing of support bases for tanks, a piping support system, and a mobilization plan for glove boxes and tanks from storage site to the PermaCon.

  17. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-01-31

    FIU-HCET participated in an ICT meeting at Mound during the second week of December and presented a brief videotape of the testing of the Robotic Climber technology. During this meeting, FIU-HCET proposed the TechXtract technology for possible testing at Mound and agreed to develop a five-page proposal for review by team members. FIU-HCET provided assistance to Bartlett Inc. and General Lasertronics Corporation in developing a proposal for a Program Opportunity Notice (PON). The proposal was submitted by these companies on January 5, 1999. The search for new equipment dismantlement technologies is continuing. The following vendors have responded to requests for demonstration: LUMONICS, Laser Solutions technology; CRYO-BEAM, Cryogenic cutting technology; Waterjet Technology Association, Waterjet Cutting technology; and DIAJET, Waterjet Cutting technology. Based on the tasks done in FY98, FIU-HCET is working closely with Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to revise the plan and scope of work of the pipeline plugging project in FY99, which involves activities of lab-scale flow loop experiments and a large-scale demonstration test bed.

  18. Campus Center for Appropriate Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campus Center for Appropriate Technology

    This website from Humboldt State University showcases environmental technologies that contribute to a healthy environment. The purpose of this program is to demonstrate appropriate technology in a residential setting and to provide hands-on experiential learning opportunities for students and the surrounding community. The website features links to projects and environmental topics such as organic gardening, alternative building, solar power, human energy converters, and much more.

  19. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-07-31

    FIU-HCET personnel visited the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) for discussions with the Principal Investigator (PI) of Laser Induced Fluorescence Imaging (LIFI) and for training in LIFI. Mr. Peter Gibbons, Tanks Retrieval Technology Integration Manager, visited FIU-HCET on July 20, 1999. Mr. Gibbons inspected the pipeline unplugging experimental facility at the HCET testing field. The detailed test bed construction, testing plan, and plugging material specifications were discussed.

  20. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-03-30

    A vendor was selected for the diamond wire technology demonstration scheduled for this summer at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). A team consisting of personnel from FIU-HCET, PPPL, and AEA Technology reviewed the submitted bids. FIU-HCET will contract this vendor. At the SRS Ninth ICT teleconference, the ICT team discussed the status of the following demonstrations: LRAD; x-ray, K-edge; Strippable Coatings; Thermal Spray Vitrification; Cutting/Shearing/Dismantlement/Size Reduction; and Electrets. The LRAD demo is complete, and the x-ray/K-edge, Strippable Coatings, and Electrets demos are ongoing. The Asbestos and Thermal Spray Vitrification demos require more laboratory testing. The Cutting/Shearing/Dismantlement/Size Reduction demo is undergoing procurement. Five FIU-HCET staff members took the 1S0 14000 environmental auditor training course February 22-26, 1999, given by ASC. The test plan for the Facility Dismantlement Technology Assessment is finished and ready for internal review.

  1. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A.Ebadian

    1999-02-28

    Search for decontamination technologies to be assessed at FIU-HCET continues. Bartlett Nuclear Inc. returned to FIU-HCET on February 15-19, 1999, to complete the demonstration of coating removal from concrete ceiling and aggressive contamination removal on uncoated concrete wall using their Robotic Climber. The design of test beds for large-scale technology demonstration of blockage locating and pipe unplugging has undergone major revision. The lab-scale test loop is also under modification. A new sampling system using isokinetic principles and consisting of thermistors, flow controller, and Wheatstone bridge will be installed on the flow loop. FIU-HCET International Coordinator attended the VII Steering Committee meeting in Lima, Peru, on February 11-12, 1999, and successfully introduced the Interactive Communication Website. Additional agenda items on the Website were proposed by the Steering Committee for upcoming committee meetings and working groups.

  2. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-06-30

    To enhance the measurement capability of EICs to alpha spectrometry, measurements at FIU-HCET were performed on different energy alpha sources, and response factors of ST electrets in 960-mL chamber were determined. Earlier, EIC was considered as only a charge-integrating device without spectrometric capability. This is a potentially significant development accomplished by FIU-HCET. It could appreciably lower the current cost of spectral characterization. FIU-HCET has been invited to participate in the Operating Engineers' National Hazmat program's assessment of the Mini Mitter, commercially known as the VitalSense{trademark} Telemetric Monitoring System. This evaluation is scheduled for early July 1999. Additional health and safety technology evaluations, in which FIU-HCET will also participate, are also scheduled for later in the summer. The Technology Information System (TIS), MISD, and DASD are now complete and accessible through the Internet website http://www.DandD.org/tis.

  3. Georgia Institute of Technology: Technology Policy and Assessment Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Policy and Assessment Center (TPAC) at Georgia Institute of Technology performs "interdisciplinary research and analysis on technology-intensive issues." Sample projects include the High Tech Indicators Survey, which is used to generate indicators of national technological competitiveness, and a study that identified eight factors affecting managerial use of technology. The findings of this latter study were used to develop an interactive evaluative instrument, available on this website, which analysts and managers can use to assess the utilization prospects of their product. The TPAC website also profiles Hot Technologies, including overviews of who is doing the research, how much research is taking place and the prospects for technologies within the topic area.

  4. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-09-30

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) demonstration of the diamond wire cutting technology on the surrogate of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), Figure 1, was performed from August 23-September 3, 1999. The plated diamond wire, Figure 2, was successful in cutting through all components of the TFTR surrogate including stainless steel, inconel and graphite. The demonstration tested three different void fill materials (mortar with sand, Rheocell-15, and foam) and three cooling systems (water, air, and liquid nitrogen). The optimum combination was determined to be the use of the low-density concrete void fill, Rheocell-15 with an average density of 52 lbs/ft{sup 3}, using a water coolant. However, the liquid nitrogen performed better than expected with only minor problems and was considered to be a successful demonstration of the Bluegrass Concrete Cutting, Inc. proprietary liquid-nitrogen coolant system. Data from the demonstration is being calculated and a summary of the technology demonstration will be included in the October monthly report. An ITSR will be written comparing the diamond wire saw to the plasma arc (baseline) technology. The MTR Chemical Protective Suit, a proprietary new suit from Kimberly Clark, was evaluated from 8/9/99 to 8/12/99 at Beaver, WV. This particular suit was tested on subjects performing three different tasks: climbing through a horizontal confined space, vertical confined space (pit), and loading and unloading material using a wheel barrow. Multiple test subjects performed each task for 20 minutes each. Performance of the innovative suit was compared to two commonly used types of protective clothing. Vital statistics, including body temperature and heart rate, were continuously monitored and recorded by an authorized physician. A summary of the demonstration will be included in the October monthly report. Along with the MTR Chemical Protective Suit, the VitalSense{trademark} Telemetric Monitoring System from Mini Mitter Co., Inc. was evaluated. A summary of the demonstration will be included in the October monthly report. A Kool-Vest from MicroClimate Systems, Inc. was evaluated during assessment at Beaver, WV from 8/16/99 to 8/17/99. The evaluation was performed in the same manner as the MTR Chemical Protective Suit described above. A summary of the demonstration will be included in the October monthly report. A brochure announcing the new Gateway to Environmental Technology (GET) website was produced by FIU-HCET and is being distributed to the D&D community by FETC-DDFA. The website provides links to the TIS and other decision support systems developed at FIU-HCET.

  5. Savannah River Technology Center monthly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    This document contains many small reports from personnel at the technology center under the umbrella topics of reactors, tritium, separations, environment, waste management, and general engineering. Progress and accomplishments are given.

  6. Center for Advanced Automotive Technology: Resource Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for Advanced Automotive Technology, a partnership between Macomb Community College, Wayne State University Division of Engineering Technology, and Regional Automotive related businesses, associations and agencies, is dedicated to education and curricular reform for the rapidly evolving advanced powertrain sector. This page provides free educational resources on alternative fuels, advanced engine technologies, energy storage and battery technologies, energy policy, smart grid interface, material lightweighting, vehicle electrification systems and technologies and related topics. Users may browse the resource by topic or search by keyword.

  7. Effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil-fuel processing technologies on aquatic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, H.L.

    1978-12-01

    Progress is reported for the second year of this project to evaluate the effects of aqueous effluents from in-situ fossil fuel processing technologies on aquatic biota. The project objectives for Year 2 were pursued through five tasks: literature reviews on process water constituents, possible environmental impacts and potential control technologies; toxicity bioassays on the effects of coal gasification and oil shale retorting process waters and six process water constituents on aquatic biota; biodegradation studies on process water constituents; bioaccumulation factor estimation for the compounds tested in the toxicity bioassays; and recommendations on maximum exposure concentrations for process water constituents based on data from the project and from the literature. Results in each of the five areas of research are reported.

  8. Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Center for Information and Communications Technologies, an Advanced Technology Education (ATE) resource center, aims to "contribute to scientific and technological innovation in telecommunications education" as well as to "provide appropriately skilled technicians and technologists" to information and communication technologies (ICT) businesses, industry, and users. In the "Publications" section of this site, visitors will find links to ICT textbooks and a helpful glossary of telecommunications terms. In the "Resources" section, there are a number of ICT workforce development presentations and Flash simulations on topics such as shift keying and Ethernet switching. Also in this section, there is a web tutorial on designing accessible web pages. This site has a great deal of information to assist students and technologists in telecommunications fields, as well as ready-to-use instructional materials for educators.

  9. Technologies for learner-centered feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Costello

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As the number, type, and use of technologies to support learning increases, so do the opportunities for using these technologies for feedback. Learner-centered feedback is a core to the teaching-learning process. It is related to assessment in describing how learners perform in their learning, their gain in knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Feedback, types of feedback, guidelines for effective learner-centered feedback, and feedback’s relationship to assessment are presented. Methods of providing feedback, for example, automated, audio scribe pens, digital audio, etc., and the related technologies are described. Technologies that allow instructors to make informed decisions about the use of various methods for feedback are discussed.

  10. Center for Innovation in Technological Education (CITE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for Information Technology Education is dedicated to providingpractical Information Technology education, which prepares people withskills to match industry needs. Their site contains resources on problem based learning, and the incorporation of "real-world, real-time" situations and case studies into the education process. This is a great resource for anyone studying Information Technology and those currently in the field, as it gives information on maximizing IT education to provide the skills necessary to the profession for the 21st century.

  11. Marshall Space Flight Center Technology Investments Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Mike

    2014-01-01

    NASA is moving forward with prioritized technology investments that will support NASA's exploration and science missions, while benefiting other Government agencies and the U.S. aerospace enterprise. center dotThe plan provides the guidance for NASA's space technology investments during the next four years, within the context of a 20-year horizon center dotThis plan will help ensure that NASA develops technologies that enable its 4 goals to: 1.Sustain and extend human activities in space, 2.Explore the structure, origin, and evolution of the solar system, and search for life past and present, 3.Expand our understanding of the Earth and the universe and have a direct and measurable impact on how we work and live, and 4.Energize domestic space enterprise and extend benefits of space for the Nation.

  12. Integrated Technology Assessment Center (ITAC) Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. L.; Neely, M. A.; Curran, F. M.; Christensen, E. R.; Escher, D.; Lovell, N.; Morris, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Integrated Technology Assessment Center (ITAC) has developed a flexible systems analysis framework to identify long-term technology needs, quantify payoffs for technology investments, and assess the progress of ASTP-sponsored technology programs in the hypersonics area. For this, ITAC has assembled an experienced team representing a broad sector of the aerospace community and developed a systematic assessment process complete with supporting tools. Concepts for transportation systems are selected based on relevance to the ASTP and integrated concept models (ICM) of these concepts are developed. Key technologies of interest are identified and projections are made of their characteristics with respect to their impacts on key aspects of the specific concepts of interest. Both the models and technology projections are then fed into the ITAC's probabilistic systems analysis framework in ModelCenter. This framework permits rapid sensitivity analysis, single point design assessment, and a full probabilistic assessment of each concept with respect to both embedded and enhancing technologies. Probabilistic outputs are weighed against metrics of interest to ASTP using a multivariate decision making process to provide inputs for technology prioritization within the ASTP. ITAC program is currently finishing the assessment of a two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO), rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) concept and a TSTO turbine-based combined cycle (TBCC) concept developed by the team with inputs from NASA. A baseline all rocket TSTO concept is also being developed for comparison. Boeing has recently submitted a performance model for their Flexible Aerospace System Solution for Tomorrow (FASST) concept and the ISAT program will provide inputs for a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) TBCC based concept in the near-term. Both of these latter concepts will be analyzed within the ITAC framework over the summer. This paper provides a status update of the ITAC program.

  13. Gulf Coast Addiction Technology Transfer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Based at the University of Texas at Austin, the Gulf Coast Addiction Technology Transfer Center (GCATTC) is one of 14 such regional university centers in the United States. The Center's work includes creating high-quality training materials for health care professionals, convening research conferences, and providing technical assistance to state agencies and providers. On the website, visitors can learn about research projects, pilot programs for transforming mental health service delivery programs, and work on the abuse of prescription drugs. The left-hand side of the page includes sections like Grant Writing, Products, and Offender Education Programs. In the Products area, visitors can look over publications and presentations by Center staff and also view a list of resources for treatment of substance use disorders.

  14. National Cancer Institute | Technology Transfer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center, the Avon Foundation and The Center for Advancing Innovation have partnered to create a “first-of-a-kind” Breast Cancer Start-up Challenge. The Challenge is a business plan and start-up challenge among multi-disciplinary university-led teams. The finalists in the best business plan phase of the challenge will launch a start-up, compete for seed funding, and negotiate a license for the invention in the final phase of the challenge.

  15. Information and consulting center in plasma technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma technologies are clean, non-expensive, and easy to adapt to small-scale production. They are largely used in various modern sectors of research, industry, medicine, biology and environmental protection. At the present time a pressure to transfer the knowledge from education and research sectors toward the industrial ones was established by the financing policies at national and European levels. Nevertheless, mainly in the last decade, an informational gap sets up in Romania between the suppliers of know-how in the plasma technologies and their beneficiaries. The newly appearing companies have little knowledge about the possibilities of our research and education. In turn, the research and education sectors do not know what companies are using nowadays plasma technologies, what kinds of technologies are needed and what aspects should be stressed in educational activity. The Information and Consulting Center in Plasma Technologies is an infrastructure project aiming at gathering information and expertise in plasma technologies with emphasizing on the Romanian capabilities. The information is accessible via Internet at the address http://www.alpha2.infim.ro. By accessing the center web page one enters into the main menu or it is possible to navigate by choosing key words, as for instance: objectives, plasma diagnostics, plasma technologies, which are listed in a dedicated search box. The information is organized in databases. In the database frame there are three es. In the database frame there are three main categories, which lead to detailed information about: - Users of plasma technologies, the technology type, the address; - Suppliers of plasma technologies, including the main research institutes with links to the relating Internet sites; - Education and training centers including the universities and their departments dedicated to plasma physics. The expertise is organized in three categories. They are instrumentation and equipment, plasma diagnostics and plasma technologies. In the instrumentation and equipment category the most important types of devices used in plasma technologies are described, as for instance, plasma sources (RF, DC, pulsed), vacuum pumps and gauges, methods and programs for computer monitoring and control of plasma systems. In the plasma diagnostics category the most used techniques of spectral and probe investigations are presented. They are not only described, but examples and programs are given, which can be used for spectra simulation (atomic and molecular), for obtaining the rotational and vibrational temperatures, for determination of the electron temperatures and densities in plasma. The main plasma technologies described in the web page are the surface modification by cold plasma, surface cleaning and ashing, plasma polymerization, plasma etching, ion plating, deposition of thin films by sputtering and evaporation, etc. Among them, the technologies developed at the National Institute of Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics are detailed: deposition of thin films by thermionic vacuum arc; deposition of thin films by sputtering; deposition of carbon based coatings by CVD RF expanding plasma; hard coatings and wear resistant surfaces by plasma nitridation and carburization. The centre web page is under completion with a discussion list allowing easy exchange of ideas, questions and answers. An active offer and service request, accomplished via electronic mail, will be set up. The Centre facilitates a permanent contact between suppliers and customers, which establishes the basis to develop as intermediary of services and products in the plasma technology field. (authors)

  16. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh W. Rimmer

    2004-05-12

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the seventeen subprojects awarded in the first year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices. Due to the time taken up by the solicitation/selection process, these cover the initial 6-month period of project activity only. The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 1999, U.S. mining operations produced $66.7 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $533 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, this endeavor has been expanded into a seven-university consortium--Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah, Montana Tech, New Mexico Tech and University of Nevada, Reno--that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation (2) Solid-liquid separation (3) Chemical/Biological Extraction (4) Modeling and Control, and (5) Environmental Control.

  17. The advanced technology development center (ATDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Gregory R.

    2002-01-01

    NASA is building the Advanced Technology Development Center (ATDC) to provide a ``national resource'' for the research, development, demonstration, testing, and qualification of Spaceport and Range Technologies. The ATDC will be located at Space Launch Complex 20 (SLC-20) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida. SLC-20 currently provides a processing and launch capability for small-scale rockets: this capability will be augmented with additional ATDC facilities to provide a comprehensive and integrated in situ environment. Examples of Spaceport Technologies that will be supported by ATDC infrastructure include densified cryogenic systems, intelligent automated umbilicals, integrated vehicle health management systems, next-generation safety systems, and advanced range systems. The ATDC can be thought of as a prototype spaceport where industry, government, and academia, in partnership, can work together to improve safety of future space initiatives. The ATDC is being deployed in five separate phases. Major ATDC facilities will include a Liquid Oxygen Area (Phase 1); a Liquid Hydrogen Area, a Liquid Nitrogen Area, and a multipurpose Launch Mount (Phase 2); ``Iron Rocket'' Test Demonstrator (Phase 3); a Processing Facility with a Checkout and Control System (Phase 4); and Future Infrastructure Developments (Phase 5). Initial ATDC development will be completed in 2006. .

  18. Tiger Team Assessment, Energy Technology Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office Special Projects within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) has the responsibility to conduct Tiger Team Assessments for the Secretary of Energy. This report presents the assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities under the DOE/Rockwell Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700 for the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) and of other DOE-owned buildings and facilities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) site in southeastern Ventura County, California, not covered under Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700, but constructed over the years under various other contracts between DOE and Rockwell International. ETEC is an engineering development complex operated for DOE by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. ETEC is located within SSFL on land owned by Rockwell. The balance of the SSFL complex is owned and operated by Rocketdyne, with the exception of a 42-acre parcel owned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary mission of ETEC is to provide engineering, testing, and development of components related to liquid metals technology and to conduct applied engineering development of emerging energy technologies

  19. Effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil fuel processing technologies on aquatic systems. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, H.L.; Anderson, A.D.

    1977-12-01

    This is the first annual report issued under a project to evaluate the effects of aqueous effluents from in-situ fossil fuel processing technologies on aquatic biota. Briefly, the goals of the project are to: evaluate the toxicity of process water effluents on aquatic biota; recommend maximum exposure concentrations for process water constituents; and assist DOE in using project data and recommendations to design control technologies and to assess environmental impacts. The project objectives for Year 1 were pursued through the following five tasks: a literature review on process water constituents; toxicity studies on the effect of process waters and six process water constituents on aquatic biota; degradation rate studies on four to six process water constituents; bioaccumulation studies on four to six process water constituents; and recommendations on maximum exposure concentrations for process water constituents based on data from the project and from the literature. Progress toward completion of these goals is presented.

  20. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher E. Hull

    2005-01-20

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2003, U.S. mining operations produced $57 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $564 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation; (2) Solid-liquid separation; (3) Chemical/Biological Extraction; (4) Modeling and Control; and (5) Environmental Control.

  1. Scientific Data Management Center for Enabling Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vouk, Mladen A.

    2013-01-15

    Managing scientific data has been identified by the scientific community as one of the most important emerging needs because of the sheer volume and increasing complexity of data being collected. Effectively generating, managing, and analyzing this information requires a comprehensive, end-to-end approach to data management that encompasses all of the stages from the initial data acquisition to the final analysis of the data. Fortunately, the data management problems encountered by most scientific domains are common enough to be addressed through shared technology solutions. Based on community input, we have identified three significant requirements. First, more efficient access to storage systems is needed. In particular, parallel file system and I/O system improvements are needed to write and read large volumes of data without slowing a simulation, analysis, or visualization engine. These processes are complicated by the fact that scientific data are structured differently for specific application domains, and are stored in specialized file formats. Second, scientists require technologies to facilitate better understanding of their data, in particular the ability to effectively perform complex data analysis and searches over extremely large data sets. Specialized feature discovery and statistical analysis techniques are needed before the data can be understood or visualized. Furthermore, interactive analysis requires techniques for efficiently selecting subsets of the data. Finally, generating the data, collecting and storing the results, keeping track of data provenance, data post-processing, and analysis of results is a tedious, fragmented process. Tools for automation of this process in a robust, tractable, and recoverable fashion are required to enhance scientific exploration. The SDM center was established under the SciDAC program to address these issues. The SciDAC-1 Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center succeeded in bringing an initial set of advanced data management technologies to DOE application scientists in astrophysics, climate, fusion, and biology. Equally important, it established collaborations with these scientists to better understand their science as well as their forthcoming data management and data analytics challenges. Building on our early successes, we have greatly enhanced, robustified, and deployed our technology to these communities. In some cases, we identified new needs that have been addressed in order to simplify the use of our technology by scientists. This report summarizes our work so far in SciDAC-2. Our approach is to employ an evolutionary development and deployment process: from research through prototypes to deployment and infrastructure. Accordingly, we have organized our activities in three layers that abstract the end-to-end data flow described above. We labeled the layers (from bottom to top): a) Storage Efficient Access (SEA), b) Data Mining and Analysis (DMA), c) Scientific Process Automation (SPA). The SEA layer is immediately on top of hardware, operating systems, file systems, and mass storage systems, and provides parallel data access technology, and transparent access to archival storage. The DMA layer, which builds on the functionality of the SEA layer, consists of indexing, feature identification, and parallel statistical analysis technology. The SPA layer, which is on top of the DMA layer, provides the ability to compose scientific workflows from the components in the DMA layer as well as application specific modules. NCSU work performed under this contract was primarily at the SPA layer.

  2. Aquatic Invasives Public Service Announcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC) presents a public service announcement on invasive aquatic species. Running time for the clip is 59 seconds. Users must download this resource for viewing, which requires a free log-in. There is no cost to download the item.

  3. Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research; project: hazardous materials in aquatic environments; subproject: biomarkers and risk assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established in 1989 as the umbrella organization to coordinate environmental research at both universities. CBR projects funded by the DOE under the Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments grant are defining the following: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants through wetlands environments, (2) the actual and potential impact of contaminants on ecological systems and health, (3) the mechanisms and new technologies through which these impacts might be remediated, and (4) new programs aimed at educating and training environmental workers of the future. The subproject described in this report, 'Biomarkers and Risk Assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LN', is particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy's Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program aimed at solving problems related to hazard monitoring and clean-up prioritization at sites with aquatic pollution problems in the DOE complex

  4. Information and Communications Technologies Center (ICT) YouTube Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page presents the YouTube channel of the National Center for Information and Communications Technologies (ICT Center). There is a growing collection of videos - focusing on information and communication technologies - on topics such as Second Life, the oscilloscope, digital media production, games and gaming, as well as a number of interviews with others in the telecommunications technology field.

  5. Program strategy document for the Nuclear Materials Transportation Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multiyear program plan is presented which describes the program of the Nuclear Materials Transportation Technology Center (TIC) at Sandia Laboratories. The work element plans, along with their corresponding work breakdown structures, are presented for TTC activities in the areas of Technology and Information Center, Systems Development, Technology, and Institutional Issues for the years from 1979 to 1985

  6. A case study of data integration for aquatic resources using semantic web technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Janice; Chkhenkeli, Nina; Govoni, David L.; Lightsom, Frances L.; Ostroff, Andrea; Schweitzer, Peter N.; Thongsavanh, Phethala; Varanka, Dalia E.; Zednik, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Use cases, information modeling, and linked data techniques are Semantic Web technologies used to develop a prototype system that integrates scientific observations from four independent USGS and cooperator data systems. The techniques were tested with a use case goal of creating a data set for use in exploring potential relationships among freshwater fish populations and environmental factors. The resulting prototype extracts data from the BioData Retrieval System, the Multistate Aquatic Resource Information System, the National Geochemical Survey, and the National Hydrography Dataset. A prototype user interface allows a scientist to select observations from these data systems and combine them into a single data set in RDF format that includes explicitly defined relationships and data definitions. The project was funded by the USGS Community for Data Integration and undertaken by the Community for Data Integration Semantic Web Working Group in order to demonstrate use of Semantic Web technologies by scientists. This allows scientists to simultaneously explore data that are available in multiple, disparate systems beyond those they traditionally have used.

  7. SDM center technologies for accelerating scientific discoveries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the increasing volume and complexity of data produced by ultra-scale simulations and high-throughput experiments, understanding the science is largely hampered by the lack of comprehensive, end-to-end data management solutions ranging from initial data acquisition to final analysis and visualization. The SciDAC-1 Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center succeeded in bringing an initial set of advanced data management technologies to DOE application scientists in astrophysics, climate, fusion, and biology. Equally important, it established collaborations with these scientists to better understand their science as well as their forthcoming data management and data analytics challenges. Our future focus is on improving the SDM framework to address the needs of ultra-scale science during SciDAC-2. Specifically, we are enhancing and extending our existing tools to allow for more interactivity and fault tolerance when managing scientists' workflows, for better parallelism and feature extraction capabilities in their data analytics operations, and for greater efficiency and functionality in users' interactions with local parallel file systems, active storage, and access to remote storage. These improvements are necessary for the scalability and complexity challenges presented by hardware and applications at ultra scale, and are complemented by continued efforts to work with application scientists in various domains

  8. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh W. Rimmer

    2003-11-15

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 1999, U.S. mining operations produced $66.7 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $533 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (a) Solid-solid separation (b) Solid-liquid separation (c) Chemical/Biological Extraction (d) Modeling and Control, and (e) Environmental Control. Distribution of funds is being handled via competitive solicitation of research proposals through Site Coordinators at the seven member universities. The first of these solicitations, referred to as the CAST II-Round 1 RFP, was issued on October 28, 2002. Thirty-eight proposals were received by the December 10, 2002 deadline for this RFP-eleven (11) Solid-Solid Separation, seven (7) Solid-Liquid Separation, ten (10) Chemical/Biological Extraction, six (6) Modeling & Control and four (4) Environmental Control. These were first reviewed and ranked by a group of technical reviewers (selected primarily from industry). Based on these reviews, and an assessment of overall program requirements, the CAST Technical Committee made an initial selection/ranking of proposals and forwarded these to the DOE/NETL Project Officer for final review and approval. This process took some 7 months to complete but 17 projects (one joint) were in place at the constituent universities (three at Virginia Tech, two at West Virginia University, three at University of Kentucky, three at University of Utah, three at Montana Tech, three at New Mexico Tech, and one at the University of Nevada, Reno) by May 17, 2003. These projects are listed by category, along with brief abstracts of their aims and objectives.

  9. Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    National consortium of educational institutions and organizations seeking to improve marine technology education. The website has an overview of marine technology with current status and future development, information on careers and educational and professional development opportunities. Some curriculum material is provided with more coming soon. Learn how to make your very own ROV. Additional information on ROV contests, workshops, and cost-associated teacher resources are available.

  10. Technology Transfer Center | Clinical Trial Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) is dedicated to reducing the burden of cancer through exploration, discovery, and the translation of novel approaches into compassionate and effective care for all cancer patients.

  11. CREST: Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology, a 501(c)(3) organization in Washington, DC, announces Solstice, a file server with state-of-the-art information on renewable energy, energy efficiency, the environment, and sustainable community development.

  12. DEVELOPING INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY MEASUREMENT INDICATORS FOR HEALTH CENTERS

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Jamaledin Tabibi; Shandiz Moslehi; Mahmood Reza Gohari; Mohamad Reza Maleki

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify a list of indicators for information and communication technology measurement of health centers. The study was conducted in three stages: first, conducting review articles of the literature to identify different indicators for information technology measurement in health centers; second, the 2 round Delphi process was used with participating eighteen experts in two; third, Analytical Hierarchy Process method was used to give weights to each indicator....

  13. A feasibility study for a manufacturing technology deployment center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-31

    The Automation & Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) and the Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to determine the feasibility of a regional industrial technology institute to be located at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Central Facility in Waxahachie, Texas. In response to this opportunity, ARRI and TEEX teamed with the DOE Kansas City Plant (managed by Allied Signal, Inc.), Los Alamos National Laboratory (managed by the University of California), Vought Aircraft Company, National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), SSC Laboratory, KPMG Peat Marwick, Dallas County Community College, Navarro Community College, Texas Department of Commerce (TDOC), Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center (TMAC), Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology, Arkansas Science and Technology Authority, Louisiana Productivity Center, and the NASA Mid-Continent Technology Transfer Center (MCTTC) to develop a series of options, perform the feasibility analysis and secure industrial reviews of the selected concepts. The final report for this study is presented in three sections: Executive Summary, Business Plan, and Technical Plan. The results from the analysis of the proposed concept support the recommendation of creating a regional technology alliance formed by the states of Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana through the conversion of the SSC Central facility into a Manufacturing Technology Deployment Center (MTDC).

  14. Computers & Technology in School Library Media Centers. Professional Growth Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Katherine Toth

    Technology is arriving in school libraries in unprecedented quantities, resulting in many changes in the school library media center. While most librarians agree that technology is wonderful, many are feeling the stress of rapid change and coping with the decisions made by educational policy makers. This looseleaf notebook, written for the novice,…

  15. Information and Communications Technologies Center: Gender Equality Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Information and Communications Technologies Center (ICT) presents this collection of links to a number of online resources related to gender equality in math, science and technology. The links include professional associations, private companies, institutes and publications. These resources would be useful for community and technical college recruitment as well as educators and counselors looking to encourage girls and women in technical fields.

  16. Center of excellence for atomically controlled fabrication technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Yuji; Saito, Akira; Arima, Kenta; Ohmi, Hiromasa

    2011-04-01

    This short review aims to show the introduction of the educational and research program of "Center of excellence of atomically controlled fabrication technology" supported ministry of education, culture, sports, science and technology--Japan. We would like to introduce research activity and a unique trait of educational system. PMID:21776631

  17. The Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center Summer Fellows Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depken, Diane E.; Zeman, Catherine L.; Lensch, Ellen Kabat; Brown, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the background, activities, and outcomes of the Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center (ATEEC) and its Summer Fellows Institutes as a model for disciplinary and cross-disciplinary infusion of environmental science and technology content, curriculum, and methods into the classroom. Presents experiences, themes, and activities…

  18. Student Technology Use in a Self-Access Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Joachim; Mynard, Jo; Rubesch, Troy

    2011-01-01

    Technology has played an increasingly vital role in self-access learning over the past twenty years or so, yet little research has been conducted into learners' actual use of the technology both for self-directed learning and as part of everyday life. This paper describes an ongoing action research project at a self-access learning center (SALC)…

  19. Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) Center Print Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    This website from the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Center provides a list of print publications from the ICT Center Delmar Learning Series, created by Delmar Learning and the ICT Center. Titles include Introduction to Telecommunications Networks, Basic Telecommunications: The Physical Layer, Fiber Optic Communications and Network Security. The listings for each book include links to information and sample chapters on Delmar Learning's website, as well as links to order the titles on Amazon.com.

  20. Unique Organizational Competencies of Brazilian Technological Innovation Centers

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Zandra, Balbinot; Julie Cristini, Dias; Rafael Borim-de-, Souza.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The general objective of this research was to identify the unique organizational competences of Brazilian Technological Innovation Centers (TICs). We developed a theoretical framework that deals with technological innovation centers and unique organizational competences. Empirical research consisted [...] of two sequential phases, the first qualitative and the second quantitative. The qualitative phase consisted of semi-structured interviews that were chosen through non- probabilistic selection criteria. The quantitative phase made use of a survey questionnaire that was mailed to individuals responsible for the TICs participating in the National Forum of Managers of Innovation and Technology Transfer and the Intellectual Property Network of the State of Minas Gerais. The unique organizational competences encountered were: intellectual property; national patenting; consulting services rendered by individual professors or researchers; identification of the areas of excellence in research of scientific and technological institutions via the number of registered patents, the number of scientific publications, declared lines of research, and the presence of related research groups.

  1. 75 FR 14128 - Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology Postdoctoral Researcher and Visiting Fellow...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ...100311136-0140-01] Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology Postdoctoral Researcher...Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (CNST) is establishing...training, and practical experience in nanoscale science and technology on-site at...

  2. User-Centered Design and Interactive Health Technologies for Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vito Dabbs, Annette; Myers, Brad A.; Mc Curry, Kenneth R.; Dunbar-jacob, Jacqueline; Hawkins, Robert P.; Begey, Alex; Dew, Mary Amanda

    2009-01-01

    Despite recommendations that patients be involved in the design and testing of health technologies, few reports describe how to involve patients in systematic and meaningful ways to ensure that applications are customized to meet their needs. User-centered design (UCD) is an approach that involves end-users throughout the development process so that technology support tasks, are easy to operate, and are of value to users. In this paper we provide an overview of UCD and use the development of ...

  3. Technology and Innovation in Manufacturing & Engineering (TIME) Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology and Innovation in Manufacturing Education (TIME), an Advanced Technological Education (ATE) resource center, has the mission to "assist regional manufacturers to meet their current and future workforce needs, and to improve the technical and workplace support skills of new and existing technicians and workers." As part of their Manufacturing Curriculum (located in the "Training" section of the site), TIME has outlined curricular goals in the areas of Processing, Electronics/Instrumentation, Fabrication, and Industrial Maintenance. Also, in the "Resources & Events" section, visitors will find a calendar of events, links to a number of related organizations and to all other ATE resource centers.

  4. Center for Technology and National Security Policy: Defense Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Horizons is a publication of the National Defense University's Center for Technology and National Security Policy. It presents "key research and analysis conducted by the center," and is available to the public on this Web site. Each issue explores a single topic in depth, such as biological weapons defense, nanotechnology, and Future Combat Systems. In addition to focusing on new technologies, Defense Horizons also considers military training techniques, global trade, the ramifications of implementing key policies, and the effectiveness of existing ones. It is a relatively new publication, and all fifteen issues can be viewed.

  5. Sustainable Technology Research and Demonstration Center for Earth Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Judy Ueda; Minoru Ueda

    2012-01-01

    This is a discussion paper that the authors presented at the International Workshop on Rammed Earth Materials and Sustainable Structures and Hakka Tulou Forum 2011: Structures of Sustainability, 28–31 October 2011, Xiamen University, China. A Sustainable Technology Research and Demonstration Center for Earth Structures is proposed to study, preserve, advance, promote, and implement rammed earth structures. The Center concept including the objectives, scope of activities and benefits...

  6. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Plasma Science & Fusion Center (PSFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considered one of the leaders in the physics and engineering aspects of magnetic confinement fusion, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Plasma Science & Fusion Center offers comprehensive information on the research being conducted at the center. Within the Physics Research section of the site, the Levitated Dipole Experiment Website provides details (including research documents) on the levitation of a half-ton superconducting ring as a means of exploring "the physics of plasma confinement in a magnetic dipole field." Other areas of research include the Alcator Project and a waves and beams division. A preprint archive, accessed by way of a link to the center's library, holds downloadable documents from 1997 to 1999.

  7. SAVANNAH RIVER TECHNOLOGY CENTER MONTHLY REPORT AUGUST 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1999-06-21

    'This monthly report summarizes Programs and Accomplishments of the Savannah River Technology Center in support of activities at the Savannah River Site. The following categories are addressed: Reactor, Tritium, Separations, Environmental, Waste Management, General, and Items of Interest.'

  8. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described

  9. Transportation Technology Center Institutional Issues Program and emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institutional Issues Program of the Transportation Technology Center (TTC) and one component of that program dealing with emergency response is discussed. The process that one state (New Mexico) used in writing an Emergency Response Plan was followed closely by a TTC contractor

  10. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... find out more information, go to the APTA Learning Center . Is there a certification program for aquatic ... Plans - http://www.osha.gov/fso/osp/index.html . This Web page provides links for the states ...

  11. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... find out more information, go to the APTA Learning Center . Is there a certification program for aquatic ... to utilize the various state/local health department services. This can be ordered directly from this website ...

  12. Two Micron Laser Technology Advancements at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    An Independent Laser Review Panel set up to examine NASA s space-based lidar missions and the technology readiness of lasers appropriate for space-based lidars indicated a critical need for an integrated research and development strategy to move laser transmitter technology from low technical readiness levels to the higher levels required for space missions. Based on the review, a multiyear Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) was initiated by NASA in 2002 to develop technologies that ensure the successful development of the broad range of lidar missions envisioned by NASA. This presentation will provide an overview of the development of pulsed 2-micron solid-state laser technologies at NASA Langley Research Center for enabling space-based measurement of wind and carbon dioxide.

  13. Center for the Advancement of Process Technology (CAPT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center for the Advancement of Process Technology (CAPT), part of the Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program, "supports the development of a highly skilled, educated and diverse process technician workforce for the chemical manufacturing, refining, oil and gas production, and pharmaceutical manufacturing industry sectors. To accomplish this, CAPT focuses on three models: one for pre-hire education in process technology (PTEC), one for new hire training, and one for incumbent training." On this page, visitors will find curriculum materials and products, professional development opportunities, and process technology career information. In the Marketing section, there are a host of publications including the CAPT newsletter, presentations, press releases, a marketing toolkit, student success stories, and other CAPT publications.

  14. SciDAC visualization and analytics center for enabling technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) focuses on leveraging scientific visualization and analytics software technology as an enabling technology for increasing scientific productivity and insight. Advances in computational technology have resulted in an 'information big bang,' which in turn has created a significant data understanding challenge. This challenge is widely acknowledged to be one of the primary bottlenecks in contemporary science. The vision of VACET is to adapt, extend, create when necessary, and deploy visual data analysis solutions that are responsive to the needs of DOE's computational and experimental scientists. Our center is engineered to be directly responsive to those needs and to deliver solutions for use in DOE's large open computing facilities. The research and development directly target data understanding problems provided by our scientific application stakeholders. VACET draws from a diverse set of visualization technology ranging from production quality applications and application frameworks to state-of-the-art algorithms for visualization, analysis, analytics, data manipulation, and data management

  15. Savannah River Technology Center. Monthly report, May 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This report covers the progress and accomplishments made at the Savannah River Technology Center for the month of May 1993. Progress is reported for projects in the following areas: reactors, tritium, separations, environmental, waste management, and general. General projects are: an eight week tutorial of the Los Alamos National Laboratory developed Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP) code; development of materials and fabrication technologies for the spallation and tritium targets for the accelerator production of tritium; and a program to develop welding methods to repair stainless steel containing helium.

  16. Center for development technology and program in technology and human affairs. [emphasizing technology-based networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, M. D.

    1974-01-01

    The role of technology in nontraditional higher education with particular emphasis on technology-based networks is analyzed nontraditional programs, institutions, and consortia are briefly reviewed. Nontraditional programs which utilize technology are studied. Technology-based networks are surveyed and analyzed with regard to kinds of students, learning locations, technology utilization, interinstitutional relationships, cost aspects, problems, and future outlook.

  17. Role of small nuclear research centers in technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Originally the task of the large nuclear research centers of the leading industrial nations was to develop complete reactor systems from basic principles to prototype power plants and to transfer the newly developed technologies to their country's industry for commercial utilization. The start of nuclear power plant construction in the smaller industrial countries offered the nuclear research centers an opportunity to utilize their accumulated experiences and to transfer them to industry, electricity suppliers, and public institutions. The developing countries must also purchase nuclear power plants and installations for the fuel cycle from leading industralized nations. The main support from smaller industrial countries in the transfer of technology lies in strengthening the staff infrastructure of developing countries and joint projects

  18. Center for Renewable Energy and Alternative Transportation Technologies (CREATT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackin, Thomas

    2012-06-30

    The Center for Renewable Energy and Alternative Transportation Technologies (CREATT) was established to advance the state of the art in knowledge and education on critical technologies that support a renewable energy future. Our research and education efforts have focused on alternative energy systems, energy storage systems, and research on battery and hybrid energy storage systems.This report details the Center's progress in the following specific areas: Development of a battery laboratory; Development of a demonstration system for compressed air energy storage; Development of electric propulsion test systems; Battery storage systems; Thermal management of battery packs; and Construction of a micro-grid to support real-world performance monitoring of a renewable energy system.

  19. ESTABLISHMENT OF THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh W. Rimmer

    2003-07-01

    Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the eight sub-projects awarded in the first year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41091: Establishment of the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices. Due to the time taken up by the solicitation/selection process, these cover the initial 6-month period of activity only.

  20. Morgantown Energy Technology Center: FY83 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-11-01

    Fiscal Year 1983 was a productive year for the Morgantown Energy Technology Center with the introduction of three new Fossil Energy program areas. This annual report includes our first efforts in these three areas, which are deep source gas (subducted hypothesis), gas hydrates, and coal-burning gas turbines. The turbine work includes both highly beneficiated coal mixtures and minimally cleaned hot or cold fuel gas. The lead mission assignments for the laboratory grew to 13 areas. The new areas added in 1982 included fuel cells and heat engines. Ongoing program areas are coal gasification, fluidized-bed combustion, gas stream cleanup, components, instrumentation and control, and unconventional gas recovery. Through the defederalization of the Laramie and Grand Forks Energy Technology Centers in mid-1983, low-rank coals, oil shale, tar sands, and underground coal gasification program areas were acquired. In addition, efforts were initiated in arctic and offshore technologies. The Advanced System for Process Engineering, or ASPEN, computer code was the most requested Department of Energy software from the National Energy Software Center. The Laboratory Overview section of this report presents foremost accomplishments by program areas during FY83. Section A enumerates major institutional accomplishments of the laboratory during the year. Subsequent sections detail major accomplishments for the 13 lead mission areas. The report contains information about the indexed items.

  1. Integrating Omic Technologies into Aquatic Ecological Risk Assessment and Environmental Monitoring: Hurdles, Achievements and Future Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: In this commentary we present the findings from an international consortium on fish toxicogenomics sponsored by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) with a remit of moving omic technologies into chemical risk assessment and environmental monitoring. Obj...

  2. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DST) test block with the Carbon Injection System. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future project work is identified. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments have required that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) assess the health risks and environmental effects associated with air toxic emissions (primarily mercury) from fossil-fuel fired utility boilers. EPRI has sponsored research on environmental mercury since 1983 to determine the factors that may influence human health, and to determine the role of electric power generating stations in contributing to those factors. Over the last four years, EPRI's Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC) has conducted EPRI and DOE sponsored testing to develop and demonstrate appropriate measurement methods and control technologies for power plant atmospheric mercury emissions. Building upon the experience and expertise of the EPRI ECTC, a test program was initiated at the Center in July to further evaluate dry sorbent-based injection technologies upstream of a cold-side ESP for mercury control, and to determine the effects of such sorbents on ESP performance. The results from this program will be compared to the results from previous DOE/EPRI demonstrations, and to other ongoing programs. The primary objectives of this test program are to: (1) Determine the levels of mercury removal achievable by dry sorbent injection upstream of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The process parameters to be investigated include sorbent residence time, sorbent type, sorbent size, sorbent loading, and flue gas temperature. (2) Determine the impact of sorbent injection on ESP performance

  3. NASA Johnson Space Center SBIR STTR Program Technology Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishen, Kumar

    2007-01-01

    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program increases opportunities for small businesses to participate in research and development (R&D), increases employment, and improves U.S. competitiveness. Specifically the program stimulates U.S. technological innovation by using small businesses to meet federal R&D needs, increasing private-sector commercialization of innovations derived from federal R&D, and fostering and encouraging the participation of socially disadvantaged businesses. In 2000, the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program extended and strengthened the SBIR Program, increasing its emphasis on pursuing commercial applications by awarding contracts to small business concerns for cooperative R&D with a nonprofit research institution. Modeled after the SBIR Program, STTR is nevertheless a separately funded activity. Technologies that have resulted from the Johnson Space Center SBIR STTR Program include: a device for regenerating iodinated resin beds; laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis or LASIK; a miniature physiological monitoring device capable of collecting and analyzing a multitude of real-time signals to transmit medical data from remote locations to medical centers for diagnosis and intervention; a new thermal management system for fibers and fabrics giving rise to new line of garments and thermal-enhancing environments; and a highly electropositive material that attracts and retains electronegative particles in water.

  4. Early progress of the Biomedical Computing Technology Information Center (BCTIC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through five years of effort by the Society of Nuclear Medicine Computer Committee, the Biomedical Computing Technology Information Center (BCTIC) was established by the Division of Biomedical and Environmental Research (DBER) of the U. S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in July of 1975. BCTIC forged ahead into the tasks of designing guidelines and procedures, acquisition and packaging of computer codes, data, and interface designs; building a bibliographic data base; and maintaining a directory of the user community. Important contacts were made with societies and individuals involved in biomedical computing; and BCTIC was publicized through news releases, the BCTIC newsletter (bimonthly, since October, 1975), presentations at meetings, and personal contacts. This paper presents the response BCTIC has received in its initial months, gives a progress report on the developmental phase, and takes a look to the future of BCTIC as a national technology resource in nuclear medicine computing

  5. National Wind Technology Center sitewide, Golden, CO: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the nation`s primary solar and renewable energy research laboratory, proposes to expand its wind technology research and development program activities at its National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Golden, Colorado. NWTC is an existing wind energy research facility operated by NREL for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Proposed activities include the construction and reuse of buildings and facilities, installation of up to 20 wind turbine test sites, improvements in infrastructure, and subsequent research activities, technology testing, and site operations. In addition to wind turbine test activities, NWTC may be used to support other NREL program activities and small-scale demonstration projects. This document assesses potential consequences to resources within the physical, biological, and human environment, including potential impacts to: air quality, geology and soils, water resources, biological resources, cultural and historic resources, socioeconomic resources, land use, visual resources, noise environment, hazardous materials and waste management, and health and safety conditions. Comment letters were received from several agencies in response to the scoping and predecisional draft reviews. The comments have been incorporated as appropriate into the document with full text of the letters contained in the Appendices. Additionally, information from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site on going sitewide assessment of potential environmental impacts has been reviewed and discussed by representatives of both parties and incorporated into the document as appropriate.

  6. The Savannah River Technology Center environmental monitoring field test platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearly all industrial facilities have been responsible for introducing synthetic chemicals into the environment. The Savannah River Site is no exception. Several areas at the site have been contaminated by chlorinated volatile organic chemicals. Because of the persistence and refractory nature of these contaminants, a complete clean up of the site will take many years. A major focus of the mission of the Environmental Sciences Section of the Savannah River Technology Center is to develop better, faster, and less expensive methods for characterizing, monitoring, and remediating the subsurface. These new methods can then be applied directly at the Savannah River Site and at other contaminated areas in the United States and throughout the world. The Environmental Sciences Section has hosted field testing of many different monitoring technologies over the past two years primarily as a result of the Integrated Demonstration Program sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development. This paper provides an overview of some of the technologies that have been demonstrated at the site and briefly discusses the applicability of these techniques

  7. Introducing Aquatic Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Kinne, Otto; Browman, Howard I.; Seaman, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The Inter-Research Science Center (IR) journalsMarine Ecology Progress Series (MEPS) and AquaticMicrobial Ecology (AME) have been receiving increasingnumbers of high-quality manuscripts that are principallybiological, rather than ecological. With regret,we have had to turn these submissions away. Also,leading limnologists have for many years suggestedthat IR should provide an outlet for top quality articleson freshwater biology and ecology. Aquatic Biology(AB) fills these gaps.

  8. Cloud computing technologies and strategies of the ubiquitous data center

    CERN Document Server

    Chee, Brian JS

    2010-01-01

    Modern computing is no longer about devices but is all about providing services, a natural progression that both consumers and enterprises are eager to embrace. As it can deliver those services, efficiently and with quality, at compelling price levels, cloud computing is with us to stay. Ubiquitously and quite definitively, cloud computing is answering the demand for sophisticated, flexible servicesCloud Computing: Technologies and Strategies of the Ubiquitous Data Center looks at cloud computing from an IT manager's perspective. It answers basic as well as strategic questions from both a busi

  9. Methods and results of an evaluation of aquatic receptor risk at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) has historically released radionuclide chemicals of potential concern into the surrounding environment. The off-site environment was evaluated for Pu239/240 and Am241 occurrence. An evaluation of exposure and effects to the aquatic ecology within off-site areas including: Standley Lake, Great Western Reservoir, Mower Reservoir and portions of Big Dry Creek, Walnut Creek, and Woman Creek was performed for the completion of an Ecological Risk Assessment. Collocated sampling activities were performed for surface water, sediment, benthic macroinvertebrates and fish. Results of the analytical data were used to assess ongoing exposure and effects. Data collected to determine effects (chemical content of fish tissue, diversity and density of macroinvertebrate populations) provided some of the necessary information needed to evaluate risk. However, due to conditions of interfering stressor effects, a quantitative evaluation of exposure through modeling techniques was also required to assess risk attributable to chemical of potential concern (COPC) occurrence. This paper presents the methods and results of both the effects and exposure assessment techniques applicable for this site and for the determination of risk

  10. Research and technology, fiscal year 1986, Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center is continuing its vigorous efforts in space-related research and technology. Extensive activities in advanced studies have led to the approval of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle as a new start. Significant progress was made in definition studies of liquid rocket engine systems for future space transportation needs and the conceptualization of advanced launch vehicles. The space systems definition studies have brought the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility and Gravity Probe-B to a high degree of maturity. Both are ready for project implementation. Also discussed include significant advances in low gravity sciences, solar terrestrial physics, high energy astrophysics, atmospheric sciences, propulsion systems, and on the critical element of the Space Shuttle Main Engine in particular. The goals of improving the productivity of high-cost repetitive operations on reusable transportation systems, and extending the useful life of such systems are examined. The research and technology highlighted provides a foundation for progress on the Hubble Space Telescope, the Space Station, all elements of the Space Transportation System, and the many other projects assigned to this Center.

  11. Systems analysis support to the waste management technology center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a systems analysis concept being developed in support of waste management planning and analysis activities for Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), sites. This integrated systems model serves as a focus for the accumulation and documentation of technical and economic information from current waste management practices, improved operations projects, remedial actions, and new system development activities. The approach is generic and could be applied to a larger group of sites. This integrated model is a source of technical support to waste management groups in the Energy Systems complex for integrated waste management planning and related technology assessment activities. This problem-solving methodology for low-level waste (LLW) management is being developed through the Waste Management Technology Center (WMTC) for the Low-Level Waste Disposal, Development, and Demonstration (LLWDDD) Program. In support of long-range planning activities, this capability will include the development of management support tools such as specialized systems models, data bases, and information systems. These management support tools will provide continuing support in the identification and definition of technical and economic uncertainties to be addressed by technology demonstration programs. Technical planning activities and current efforts in the development of this system analysis capability for the LLWDDD Program are presented in this paperProgram are presented in this paper

  12. Technology Transfer and Knowledge Management in Technological Innovation Center: A Case Study in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Luan Carlos Santos Silva; João Luiz Kovaleski; Silvia Gaia; Manon Garcia; Pedro Paulo de Andrade Júnior

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to analyze the knowledge management in the process of technology transfer in a technological innovation center, known in Brazil as NIT. The used methodology included a qualitative approach. It was a case study of a Nucleus which is in a State University located in the south of Bahia state, Brazil. The results showed that this specific Nucleus presents a fine infrastructure regarding the legal regulation, based on the Federal Law of Innovation nº 10.973 and on th...

  13. 50-years history of Nuclear Technology and Education Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the 50 years activities that Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has conducted since its first training course started at Radioisotope School of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), the predecessor of NuTEC, in 1958. NuTEC was founded in October, 2005, when JAEA was established by consolidation of JAERI and Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). This report consists of the brief summary of NuTEC's activities both before and after the consolidation, and contributed articles written by 41 people who have been involved with the NuTEC's training activities in 50 years, as lecturers, trainees, and technical or administrative staff of NuTEC. (author)

  14. Center for the Study of Regional Competitiveness in Science & Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    The Center for the Study of Regional Competitiveness in Science & Technology at Washington University in St. Louis is dedicated to exploring questions about human capital and policy environment in the region. Staff members don't limit themselves to those questions, though, and this website provides additional information about their work and research projects. First-time visitors shouldn't miss the About section for additional materials on staff missions and goals. The homepage also contains information about recent conferences, media appearances, and so on. Scholars and policy folks will want to click on the Research Tools area as well. Here they will find resources like the St. Louis Regional Database Project, which contains information about St. Louis area students, teachers, and communities. Moving on, the Reports area within the Downloads section contains recent articles produced by staff members. Titles include "Putting the 'Urban' in Mathematics Education Scholarship" and "Epidemiology and Education Research: Dialoguing about Disparities."

  15. Business of Nuclear Safety Analysis Office, Nuclear Technology Test Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Technology Test Center established the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office to execute newly the works concerning nuclear safety analysis in addition to the works related to the proving tests of nuclear machinery and equipments. The regulations for the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office concerning its organization, business and others were specially decided, and it started the business formally in August, 1980. It is a most important subject to secure the safety of nuclear facilities in nuclear fuel cycle as the premise of developing atomic energy. In Japan, the strict regulation of safety is executed by the government at each stage of the installation, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear facilities, based on the responsibility for the security of installers themselves. The Nuclear Safety Analysis Office was established as the special organ to help the safety examination related to the installation of nuclear power stations and others by the government. It improves and puts in order the safety analysis codes required for the cross checking in the safety examination, and carries out safety analysis calculation. It is operated by the cooperation of the Science and Technology Agency and the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy. The purpose of establishment, the operation and the business of the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office, the plan of improving and putting in order of analysis codes, and the state of the similar organs in foreign countries are descrilar organs in foreign countries are described. (Kako, I.)

  16. Energy from aquatic biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquatic biomass is considered as a second (or third) generation option for the production of bio fuels. The best utilization for energy purposes is not its direct combustion. Several technologies are available for the extraction of compounds that may find application for the production of gaseous fuels (biogas, dihydrogen) or liquid fuels (ethanol, bio oil, biodiesel).

  17. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) conducted December 7--11, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with PETC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at PETC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site Survey activities at PETC. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the Plan's results will be incorporated into the PETC Survey findings for inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 64 refs., 23 figs., 29 tabs.

  18. Turbine Inflow Characterization at the National Wind Technology Center: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, A.; Schreck, S.; Scott, G.; Kelley, N.; Lundquist, J.

    2012-01-01

    Utility-scale wind turbines operate in dynamic flows that can vary significantly over timescales from less than a second to several years. To better understand the inflow to utility-scale turbines, two inflow towers were installed and commissioned at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado, in 2011. These towers are 135 m tall and instrumented with a combination of sonic anemometers, cup anemometers, wind vanes, and temperature measurements to characterize the inflow wind speed and direction, turbulence, stability and thermal stratification to two utility-scale turbines. Herein, we present variations in mean and turbulent wind parameters with height, atmospheric stability, and as a function of wind direction that could be important for turbine operation as well as persistence of turbine wakes. Wind speed, turbulence intensity, and dissipation are all factors that affect turbine performance. Our results shown that these all vary with height across the rotor disk, demonstrating the importance of measuring atmospheric conditions that influence wind turbine performance at multiple heights in the rotor disk, rather than relying on extrapolation from lower levels.

  19. The Biomedical Computing Technology Information Center. An international resource for technology sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expense of developing and maintaining special software and interfaces has been prohibitive to many clinical installations desiring to perform computer-assisted studies. Also, existing developmental groups have been economically unable to adequately transfer their work to such smaller installations. In response to this need and through the efforts of the Society of Nuclear Medicine Computer Committee, the US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) has established the Biomedical Computing Technology Information Center (BCTIC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). BCTIC collects, organizes, evaluates and disseminates information on computing technology pertinent to biomedicine in general and nuclear medicine in particular, providing the needed routes of communication between installations and serving as a clearinghouse for the exchange of biomedical computing software, data and interface designs. BCTIC services are available to its sponsors and their contractors and to any individual or group willing to participate in mutual exchange. (author)

  20. Aquatic Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    The site offers information on Australia's aquatic habitats and their protection, management, and rehabilitation. Visitors will also find instructions for reporting fish kills and information on how to help protect and conserve fish habitats.

  1. Program strategy document for the nuclear materials. Transportation Technology Center (FY 80)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TTC's program is divided into four principal areas, Technology and Information Center, Systems Development, Technology, and Institutional Issues. These areas are broken into activities, elements, and subelements which are delineated in this document

  2. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reimbursement Issues FAQs General FAQs What is "aquatic physical therapy" Aquatic Physical Therapy Aquatic Physical Therapy is ... or written follow-up information required. Is aquatic physical therapy effective? While there is considerable research effectively ...

  3. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is also covered directly in the Aquatic Section's "Developing an Aquatic Physical Therapy Program." (Click here to ... starting my own aquatic physical therapy practice? The "Developing an Aquatic Physical Therapy Program" and the associated ...

  4. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reimbursement Issues FAQs General FAQs What is "aquatic physical therapy" Aquatic Physical Therapy Aquatic Physical Therapy is the ... or written follow-up information required. Is aquatic physical therapy effective? While there is considerable research effectively documenting ...

  5. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... FAQs Reimbursement Issues FAQs General FAQs What is "aquatic physical therapy" Aquatic Physical Therapy Aquatic Physical Therapy ... involvement or written follow-up information required. Is aquatic physical therapy effective? While there is considerable research ...

  6. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Componet Software (TASCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindaraju, Madhusudhan

    2010-10-31

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY 2010Report Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software: Distributed CCA State University of New York, Binghamton, NY, 13902 Summary The overall objective of Binghamton's involvement is to work on enhancements of the CCA environment, motivated by the applications and research initiatives discussed in the proposal. This year we are working on re-focusing our design and development efforts to develop proof-of-concept implementations that have the potential to significantly impact scientific components. We worked on developing parallel implementations for non-hydrostatic code and worked on a model coupling interface for biogeochemical computations coded in MATLAB. We also worked on the design and implementation modules that will be required for the emerging MapReduce model to be effective for scientific applications. Finally, we focused on optimizing the processing of scientific datasets on multi-core processors. Research Details We worked on the following research projects that we are working on applying to CCA-based scientific applications. 1. Non-Hydrostatic Hydrodynamics: Non-static hydrodynamics are significantly more accurate at modeling internal waves that may be important in lake ecosystems. Non-hydrostatic codes, however, are significantly more computationally expensive, often prohibitively so. We have worked with Chin Wu at the University of Wisconsin to parallelize non-hydrostatic code. We have obtained a speed up of about 26 times maximum. Although this is significant progress, we hope to improve the performance further, such that it becomes a practical alternative to hydrostatic codes. 2. Model-coupling for water-based ecosystems: To answer pressing questions about water resources requires that physical models (hydrodynamics) be coupled with biological and chemical models. Most hydrodynamics codes are written in Fortran, however, while most ecologists work in MATLAB. This disconnect creates a great barrier. To address this, we are working on a model coupling interface that will allow biogeochemical computations written in MATLAB to couple with Fortran codes. This will greatly improve the productivity of ecosystem scientists. 2. Low overhead and Elastic MapReduce Implementation Optimized for Memory and CPU-Intensive Applications: Since its inception, MapReduce has frequently been associated with Hadoop and large-scale datasets. Its deployment at Amazon in the cloud, and its applications at Yahoo! for large-scale distributed document indexing and database building, among other tasks, have thrust MapReduce to the forefront of the data processing application domain. The applicability of the paradigm however extends far beyond its use with data intensive applications and diskbased systems, and can also be brought to bear in processing small but CPU intensive distributed applications. MapReduce however carries its own burdens. Through experiments using Hadoop in the context of diverse applications, we uncovered latencies and delay conditions potentially inhibiting the expected performance of a parallel execution in CPU-intensive applications. Furthermore, as it currently stands, MapReduce is favored for data-centric applications, and as such tends to be solely applied to disk-based applications. The paradigm, falls short in bringing its novelty to diskless systems dedicated to in-memory applications, and compute intensive programs processing much smaller data, but requiring intensive computations. In this project, we focused both on the performance of processing large-scale hierarchical data in distributed scientific applications, as well as the processing of smaller but demanding input sizes primarily used in diskless, and memory resident I/O systems. We designed LEMO-MR [1], a Low overhead, elastic, configurable for in- memory applications, and on-demand fault tolerance, an optimized implementation of MapReduce, for both on disk and in memory applications. We conducted experiments to identify not only the necessary components of thi

  7. Nonindigenous Aquatic Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online resource center, maintained by U.S.G.S., provides information, data, links about exotic plants, invertebrates, vertebrates, diseases and parasites. Central repository contains accurate and spatially referenced biogeographic accounts of alien aquatic species. Search for species by state, drainage area, citation in texts; find fact sheets, maps showing occurrence in the U.S. Or, for each taxon, review list of exotic species, find scientific, common name, photo, status; link to facts and distribution map.

  8. Research and technology: 1994 annual report of the John F. Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, the John F. Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on its advanced technology development program. This program encompasses the efforts of the Engineering Development Directorate laboratories, most of the KSC operations contractors, academia, and selected commercial industries - all working in a team effort within their own areas of expertise. This edition of the Kennedy Space Center Research and Technology 1994 Annual Report covers efforts of all these contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program, as well as our technology transfer activities. The Technology Programs and Commercialization Office (DE-TPO), (407) 867-3017, is responsible for publication of this report and should be contacted for any desired information regarding the advanced technology program.

  9. BEHAVIOUR OF STONE FACADES IN URBAN CENTERS INNOVATIVE BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Monaco

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available An innovative technology using stone and granite as exterior sheeting of modern steel and concrete tall buildings is presented, Granites are chosen for the indubitable superior durability in any wheather and polluted atmosfere condition. But to guarantee durability stone sheets have to be mounted in such a way as to avoid any inner irregular stress. In particular stresses from deformation of the main structure must not be trasmitted to the exterior sheeting. Moreover an all-proof wheather barrier has to be incorporated in the factory builded sheeting panel. The innovative technology allowing use of granite and stone in facing of tall buildings is here presented along with two very important realisations: The North Tower in Genoa and the Canary Wharf in London.

  10. Effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil fuel processing technologies on aquatic systems. Annual progress report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, H.L.

    1980-01-04

    This is the third annual progress report for a continuing EPA-DOE jointly funded project to evaluate the effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil-fuel processing technologies on aquatic biota. The project is organized into four project tasks: (1) literature review; (2) process water screening; (3) methods development; and (4) recommendations. Our Bibliography of aquatic ecosystem effects, analytical methods and treatment technologies for organic compounds in advanced fossil-fuel processing effluents was submitted to the EPA for publication. The bibliography contains 1314 citations indexed by chemicals, keywords, taxa and authors. We estimate that the second bibliography volume will contain approximately 1500 citations and be completed in February. We compiled results from several laboratories of inorganic characterizations of 19 process waters: 55 simulated in situ oil-shale retort waters; and Hanna-3, Hanna-4B 01W and Lawrence Livermore Hoe Creek underground coal gasification condenser waters. These process waters were then compared to a published summary of the analyses from 18 simulated in situ oil-shale retort waters. We completed this year 96-h flow-through toxicity bioassays with fathead minnows and rainbow trout and 48-h flow-through bioassays with Daphnia pulicaria exposed to 5 oil-shale process waters, 1 tar-sand process water, 2 underground coal gasification condenser waters, 1 post-gasification backflood condenser water, as well as 2 bioassays with fossil-fuel process water constituents. The LC/sub 50/ toxicity values for these respective species when exposed to these waters are given in detail. (LTN)

  11. Technology for libraries and information centers: A seminar in Greece, Portugal, and Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Gladys A.

    1992-01-01

    Information technologies are evolving at a rapid pace in today's world. But the electronic technologies needed to transform today's libraries and information centers into electronic 'libraries without walls', where an end-user has instantaneous access to all the information needed from a desktop workstation, have not yet arrived. Even so, there are many technologies available today that can be applied in the library/information center environment to yield increased productivity. However, not all technologies are right for or successful in every environment. Mission, budget, infrastructure, client profiles, and staff skills are a few of the 'environmental' issues that must be considered when selecting and introducing new technologies into a particular information center. Key technologies used in libraries today are reviewed; it can be used as background for targeting technologies that could be successfully implemented in your own environment to further service goals. Before focusing on a selection of technologies, you must first focus on the strategic goal of your organization. The same technology is not right for every library/information center. An overview of technologies that are readily available and can be applied today is presented.

  12. Cryogenic rocket engine research within the national technology program Tekan at the German aerospace center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, W.O.H. [German Aerospace Center, DLR, Space Propulsion, Hardthausen a.K. (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    The paper presents the highlights and a summary report of the research activities on cryogenic propulsion at the German Aerospace Center in Lampoldshausen within the National Technology Program. The research is conducted in cooperation with European industries and research establishments. The German National Technology Programme on Cryogenic Rocket Engines TEKAN, which is presented here, is a joint DLR/Astrium GmbH project with the aim to provide key technologies for future cryogenic rocket engines. The research work at the German Aerospace Center is focused on the injector, combustor, and nozzle technology and related topics. (authors)

  13. Workshop on APEC virtual center for environmental technology exchange; APEC kankyo gijutsu koryu virtual center workshop hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    At the 'policy maker workshop of the virtual center of APEC technology exchange' held in November 1997 in Osaka, Japan, it was agreed to organize study groups to discuss the scope of information provided by the virtual center, and to make common the classification systems and retrieval functions. In addition, the necessity was confirmed on international cooperation to promote establishment of virtual centers in different countries and territories. On the first day, Professor Ueda at the Kyoto University gave the basic lecture entitled 'global environment preservation and environmental technology transfer: problems and prospects'. Mr. Dan, the workshop manager gave the basic proposal entitled 'the future directionality of environmental technology exchange inside the APEC territories by using Internet'. Based on the basic proposal made on the first day, reports and discussions were given in the following sessions, where confirmation was made on the future directions. S1: establishment of the virtual centers in other countries and territories; S2: assurance of interchangeability of classification systems and retrieval functions in providing information, and S3: presentation of examples of inter-territorial exchange and the future directionality. (NEDO)

  14. Failure analysis of ETAC [Enrichment Technology Applications Center] pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of an investigation into the failure of a graphite-epoxy composite cylinder. It investigates the quality of the as-fabricated cylinder and provides a verification of compressive material property input used in its design. The design is reevaluated in terms of the adjusted composition and material property input for its suitability for 18,000-psi pressure applications. A comparison between the composition and layup of a cylinder manufactured by Hitco is also provided, as well as the results of a pressurization test of an identical ETAC cylinder tested by the Naval Ocean Systems Center

  15. Semi-annual report of Nuclear Technology and Development Center (CDTN) - July to December 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main activities developed by the several divisions of Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) are described, including areas of reactor tecnologies, fuel cycle, materials and component, nuclear safety and tecnical substructure. (C.G.C.)

  16. Research and Technology at the John F. Kennedy Space Center 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, the John F. Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on its advanced technology development program. This program encompasses the efforts of the Engineering Development Directorate laboratories, most of the KSC operations contractors, academia, and selected commercial industries - all working in a team effort within their own areas of expertise. This edition of the Kennedy Space Center Research and Technology 1993 Annual Report covers efforts of all these contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program, as well as our technology transfer activities. Major areas of research include material science, advanced software, industrial engineering, nondestructive evaluation, life sciences, atmospheric sciences, environmental technology, robotics, and electronics and instrumentation.

  17. Charles Babbage Institute: Center for the History of Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Charles Babbage Institute (CBI), located at the University of Minnesota, emphasizes the importance "of the history of information technology and information processing and their impact on society." One of the most interesting parts of the CBI Web site is the Cray Research Virtual Museum exhibit, which showcases many of the supercomputing giant's accomplishments over the last half century. In the collections section, oral histories of many prominent computer scientists are given with complete interview transcripts. These transcripts tell the personal stories of the people who made the computer industry what it is today. There is also an interesting look at the history of computers in Hollywood, citing examples of movies that use computers as key plot elements.

  18. GRI's Gas Appliance Technology Center Activities at Battelle. Final report, 1986-1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locklin, D.W.; Weaver, B.A.; Brown, V.J.

    1993-08-01

    The Gas Research Institute established the Gas Appliance Technology Center (GATC) in 1982 to develop improved gas appliances. Between 1986 and 1992, the scope of GATC activities at Battelle included technology transfer and overall industry support, residential appliances, commercial appliances, and residential space conditioning. The following tasks are representative of the GATC activities described in the report; gas burner technology, appliance venting, emissions, water heating, range/oven technology, self-powered appliances, commercial cooktop burners, reconstituting ovens, appliance reliability improvement, combination space-heating/water-heating systems, condensing heat exchangers, corrosion testing, and space heating technology. The report includes references to available sources for further reading.

  19. Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay C. Almlie; Bruce Wood; Rich Schlupp

    2007-03-01

    In November 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), ePowerSynergies, Inc. (ePSI), and Resurfice Corporation teamed to develop, produce, and demonstrate the world's first and only fuel cell-powered ice resurfacer. The goals of this project were: {sm_bullet} To educate the public on the readiness, practicality, and safety of fuel cells powered by hydrogen fuel and {sm_bullet} To establish a commercialization pathway in an early-adopter, niche market. The vehicle was developed and produced in a short 3-month span. The vehicle made its world debut at U.S. Senator Byron Dorgan's (D-ND) 2005 Hydrogen Energy Action Summit. Subsequently, the vehicle toured North America appearing at numerous public events and conferences, receiving much attention from international media outlets.

  20. VACET: Proposed SciDAC2 Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project focuses on leveraging scientific visualization and analytics software technology as an enabling technology for increasing scientific productivity and insight. Advances in computational technology have resulted in an 'information big bang',' which in turn has created a significant data understanding challenge. This challenge is widely acknowledged to be one of the primary bottlenecks in contemporary science. The vision for our Center is to respond directly to that challenge by adapting, extending, creating when necessary and deploying visualization and data understanding technologies for our science stakeholders. Using an organizational model as a Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET), we are well positioned to be responsive to the needs of a diverse set of scientific stakeholders in a coordinated fashion using a range of visualization, mathematics, statistics, computer and computational science and data management technologies

  1. Test facilities for radioactive materials transport packages (Transportation Technology Center Inc., Pueblo, Colorado, USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transportation Technology Center, Inc. is capable of conducting tests on rail vehicle systems designed for transporting radioactive materials including low level waste debris, transuranic waste, and spent nuclear fuel and high level waste. Services include rail vehicle dynamics modelling, on-track performance testing, full scale structural fatigue testing, rail vehicle impact tests, engineering design and technology consulting, and emergency response training. (author)

  2. The Scientific Data Management Center: Available Technologies and Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoshani, Arie; Altintas, Ilkay; Chen, Jin; Chin, George; Choudhary, Alok; Crawl, Daniel; Critchlow, Terence J.; Gao, K.; Grimm, B.; Iyer, H.; Kamath, Chandrika; Khan, Ayla; Klasky, S.; Koehler, Sven; Lang, Rob; Latham, Robert J.; Li, J. W.; Liao, Wei-keng; Ligon, J.; Liu, Q.; Ludaescher, Bertram T.; Mouallem, Pierre; Nagappan, Mie; Podhorszki, Norbert; Ross, Rob; Rotem, Doron; Samatova, Nagiza F.; Silva, C.; Sim, A.; Tchoua, Roselynne; Thakur, R.; Vouk, M.; Wu, J.; Yu, Weikuan

    2011-09-30

    Managing scientific data has been identified by the scientific community as one of the most important emerging needs because of the sheer volume and increasing complexity of data being collected. Effectively generating, managing, and analyzing this information requires a comprehensive, end-to-end approach to data management that encompasses all of the stages from the initial data acquisition to the final analysis of the data. Based on community input, we have identified three significant requirements. First, more efficient access to storage systems is needed. In particular, parallel file system and I/O system improvements are needed to write and read large volumes of data without slowing a simulation. Second, scientists require technologies to facilitate better understanding of their data, in particular the ability to effectively perform complex data analysis and searches over extremely large data sets. Furthermore, exploratory analysis requires techniques for efficiently selecting subsets of the data. Third, generating the data, collecting and storing the results, keeping track of data provenance, data post-processing, and analysis of results is a tedious, fragmented process. Tools for automation of this process in a robust, tractable, and recoverable fashion are required to enhance scientific exploration.

  3. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can, if an Aquatic Section member, retrieve previous Journal of aquatic Therapy articles that may help. Lastly, ... Jean Irion wrote a nice article in the "Journal of Aquatic Physical Therapy," Volume 10 Number 1, ...

  4. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Aquatic Physical Therapy: Aquatic Physical Therapy is the scientific practice of physical therapy in an aquatic environment ... an examination and evaluation to establish a functional diagnosis, prognosis for functional recovery, and need for PT ...

  5. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This information is included in various aquatic therapy texts and is also covered directly in the Aquatic ... physical therapist? PTs/PTAs should take continuing education courses to gain knowledge in the area of aquatic ...

  6. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... aquatic physical therapy practice? The "Developing an Aquatic Physical Therapy Program" and the associated continuing education courses offered by the Section should assist you ...

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF TECHNOLOGY ON THE PERFORMANCE OF BRAZILIAN CALL CENTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Gião

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Call centers (CCs show an evolution over the course of time. There is an intensive use of technology in CCs, although not always a positive side. The article is based on a survey carried out among the 103 Brazilian companies that have come (falta algum complemento, não conseguimos entender a frase and call center services and seeks to verify the contribution of technology in four distinct dimensions: cost reduction, customer relations, communication channels and monitoring of employees. The theoretical framework is eclectic based on strategic considerations, details of the technical areas of telecommunications and information technology, marketing. It focus particularly in the area of customer relations and especially of various national and international studies that have been developed regarding service and customer satisfaction. The results show that heavy use of technology does not mean a general improvement in performance in all dimensions assessed and some dimensions choices to be made over others

  8. Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology: A Summary Report of Activities Completed at the National Center for Hydrogen Technology - Year 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Michael

    2012-05-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology? (NCHT?) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research on hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT?s inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding for hydrogen-related projects ($24 million for projects in the NCHT, which includes federal and corporate partner development funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT Program?s nine activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan that refers to realistic testing of technologies at adequate scale, process intensification, and contaminant control. A number of projects have been completed that range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in Year 6 of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  9. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels

  10. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. K. Herbst; J. A. McCray; R. J. Kirkham; J. Pao; S. H. Hinckley

    1999-09-30

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  11. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Hinckley, Steve Harold

    1999-10-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  12. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-98 Status Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels

  13. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes

  14. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Argyle, Mark Don; Lauerhass, Lance; Bendixsen, Carl Lee; Hinckley, Steve Harold

    2000-11-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

  15. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Kirkham, R.J.; Pao, J.; Argyle, M.D.; Lauerhass, L.; Bendixsen, C.L.; Hinckley, S.H.

    2000-10-31

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

  16. DISSEMINATING AGRICULTURAL INFORMATION THROUGH THE INTERNET: INDONESIAN CENTER FOR AGRICULTURAL LIBRARY AND TECHNOLOGY DISSEMINATION EXPERIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Bambang Winarko

    2011-01-01

    The Indonesian Center for Library and Technology Dissemination (ICALTD) has a duty to disseminate agricultural information to researchers, extension workers, academicians, and other general users. Previously, the dissemination was based on printed publications. However, along with the penetration and development of the internet, the method of dissemination has changed to ITC-based dissemination. CD/VCD and internet technology application plays an important role in ICALTD’s dissemination of ...

  17. Final Report for "Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svetlana Shasharina

    2010-12-01

    The goal of the Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software is to fundamentally changing the way scientific software is developed and used by bringing component-based software development technologies to high-performance scientific and engineering computing. The role of Tech-X work in TASCS project is to provide an outreach to accelerator physics and fusion applications by introducing TASCS tools into applications, testing tools in the applications and modifying the tools to be more usable.

  18. An Information Management and Technology Laboratory in an Academic Health Center Library

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Margaret G. E.; Brantz, Malcolm H.

    1984-01-01

    The aims and goals in setting up an Information Management and Technology Laboratory in the Lyman Maynard Stowe Library at the University of Connecticut Health Center are outlined. Health professionals have a chance in the Laboratory to try software and machines and acquaint themselves with some of the new technology. The Laboratory can save individual departments time, the necessity for extensive research and money and will be used to give students and staff experience in information managem...

  19. The roles and functions of a lunar base Nuclear Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the roles and functions of a special Nuclear Technology Center which is developed as an integral part of a permanent lunar base. Numerous contemporary studies clearly point out that nuclear energy technology will play a major role in any successful lunar/Mars initiative program and in the overall establishment of humanity's solar system civilization. The key role of nuclear energy in the providing power has been recognized. A Nuclear Technology Center developed as part of of a permanent lunar base can also help bring about many other nuclear technology applications, such as producing radioisotopes for self-illumination, food preservation, waste sterilization, and medical treatment; providing thermal energy for mining, materials processing and agricultural; and as a source of emergency habitat power. Designing such a center will involve the deployment, operation, servicing and waste product management and disposal of megawatt class reactor power plants. This challenge must be met with a minimum of direct human support at the facility. Furthermore, to support the timely, efficient integration of this Nuclear Technology Center in the evolving lunar base infrastructure, an analog of such a facility will be needed here on Earth. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  20. Research on the Application of Machine Vision Technology in the Logistics Center Monitoring Platform System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shushan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Object monitoring is one of the key technologies of logistics information platform system. The study introduced an application method of machine vision technology in the logistics center monitoring system, improved covariance matrix algorithm to monitor objects in the logistics center. Against the technical difficulties of objects detection, the covariance matrix algorithm was applied to monitor objects in the logistics center and against the shortcomings of covariance matrix algorithm in the process of monitoring objects, the study proposed a method of path prediction and template dynamic adjustment. Experiments show that the method can effectively monitor objects in the logistics center, the improved method can not only adapt quickly to pose and scale variations of objects, but also track accurately and continuously those temporarily occluded objects, has good robustness. The method provides a new solution of monitoring objects in the logistics system.

  1. SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, E. Wes; Johnson, Chris; Joy, Ken; Ahern, Sean; Pascucci,Valerio; Childs, Hank; Cohen, Jonathan; Duchaineau, Mark; Hamann, Bernd; Hansen, Charles; Laney, Dan; Lindstrom, Peter; Meredith, Jeremy; Ostrouchov, George; Parker, Steven; Silva, Claudio; Sanderson, Allen; Tricoche, Xavier

    2006-11-28

    The SciDAC2 Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies (VACET) began operation on 10/1/2006. This document, dated11/27/2006, is the first version of the VACET project management plan. Itwas requested by and delivered to ASCR/DOE. It outlines the Center'saccomplishments in the first six weeks of operation along with broadobjectives for the upcoming future (12-24 months).

  2. Science and Technology Centers (STC): Integrative Partnerships Program Solicitation (NSF 98-13)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The US National Science Foundation Office of Science and Technology Infrastructure has announced a new program solicitation. The STC Program "fund[s] important basic research and education activities and... encourage[s] technology transfer and innovative approaches to interdisciplinary program[s]. Science and Technology Centers build intellectual and physical infrastructure within and between disciplines, weaving together knowledge creation, knowledge integration, and knowledge transfer." NSF expects to grant eight to ten awards. Proposal information, eligibility guidelines, size and duration of the awards, and proposal deadlines are available at the site. The Integrative Partnerships site contains more information about the Program, as well as links to twenty-five existing STCs.

  3. Recent advances in Ni-H2 technology at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalezsanabria, O. D.; Britton, D. L.; Smithrick, J. J.; Reid, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has concentrated its efforts on advancing the Ni-H2 system technology for low Earth orbit applications. Component technology as well as the design principles were studied in an effort to understand the system behavior and failure mechanisms in order to increase performance and extend cycle life. The design principles were previously addressed. The component development is discussed, in particular the separator and nickel electrode and how these efforts will advance the Ni-H2 system technology.

  4. Solid and liquid radioactive waste management of the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) - NUCLEBRAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low level liquid and solid wastes are produced in several laboratories of the NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT CENTER (CDTN)-NUCLEBRAS. In the last years, the intensification of technical activities at the Center has increased the radioactive waste volumes. Therefore, the implementation of a Radioactive Waste Management Program has begun. This Program includes the systematic of activities from the waste collection to the transportation for the final disposal. The liquid and solid waste are collected separately in proper containers and stored for later treatment according to the processes available or under development at the Center. (Author)

  5. Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. Staiger

    2007-06-01

    This report provides a quantitative inventory and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. From December 1963 through May 2000, liquid radioactive wastes generated by spent nuclear fuel reprocessing were converted into a solid, granular form called calcine. This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins.

  6. Solid State Technology Branch of NASA Lewis Research Center: Fifth Annual Digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The digest is a collection of papers written by the members of the Solid State Technology Branch of NASA Lewis Research Center from June 1992-June 1993. The papers cover a range of topics relating to superconductivity, monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC's), coplanar waveguide, and material characterization. Individual papers are abstracted separately on the data base

  7. The Research Results of Radioactive Waste Management Technology Center Year 1996/1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research results of Radioactive Waste Management Technology Center, National Atomic Energy Agency of Indonesia year 1996/1997 contain paper as form of research results on radioactive waste management related fields. There were included many aspects such as radioactive waste processing, storage, decontamination, decommissioning, safety and environmental aspects. There are 24 papers and 12 short communications indexed individually(ID)

  8. The Research Results of Radioactive Waste Management Technology Center Year 1997/1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research results of Radioactive Waste Management Technology Center, National Atomic Energy Agency of Indonesia year 1997/1998 contain paper as form of research results on radioactive waste management related fields. There were included many aspects such as radioactive waste processing, storage, decontamination, decommissioning, safety and environmental aspects. There are 26 papers indexed individually (ID)

  9. Space Science Research and Technology at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Charles L.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation will summarize the various projects and programs managed in the Space Science Programs and Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Projects in the portfolio include NASA's Chandra X-Ray telescope, Hinode solar physics satellite, various advanced space propulsion technologies, including solar sails and tethers, as well as NASA's Discovery and New Frontiers Programs.

  10. Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC) YouTube Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), located at Eastern Iowa Community College, has created a number of videos on various environmental and energy fields and educational programs. Topics range from biodiesel to wind turbines, and the collection presents a mix of videos on instructional issues as well as about ATEEC itself.

  11. User Centered Design : From understanding hearing loss and hearing technologies towards understanding interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egbert, Maria; Matthews, Ben

    2012-01-01

    The interdisciplinary approach of User Centered Design is presented here with a focus on innovation in the design and use of hearing technologies as well as on the potential of innovation in interaction. This approach is geared towards developing new products, systems, technologies and practices based on an understanding of why so few persons with hearing loss use the highly advanced hearing technologies. In integrating Conversation Analysis (“CA”), audiology and User Centered Design, three disciplines which are collaborating together for the first time, we are addressing the following questions: Who is the user? What are the interactional situations in which hearing loss and hearing aids are relevant? How can Conversation Analysis contribute to innovation? What are the challenges in such a collaboration?

  12. Radiation technology facilities operating at the italian ENEA-Casaccia research center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ENEA Casaccia Research Center, 20 km far from Rome, is the main Italian technological research Center, with more than 2000 scientists involved in several advanced research fields (materials, energy, environment, etc.). Within the frame of radiation technology, three main facilities are in service at full power at the Casaccia research Center: a 1 MW TRIGA Mark II reactor (RC-1); a 5 kW fast source reactor (TAPIRO); a 3.7 x 1015 Bq Cobalt-60 irradiation plant (CALLIOPE). Main R-D programmes carried out regard medical radioisotopes and radio trackers production, neutron radiography, neutron activation analysis, radiation damage analysis, neutron diffractometry, foodstuffs treatment, crosslinking processes, wastes (hazardous, chemical, hospital) processing. The paper provides a features description of utilized facilities and reports main present carried out projects

  13. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC): Advancing the frontiers of computational science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, J. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) provides researchers with high-performance computing tools to tackle science`s biggest and most challenging problems. Founded in 1974 by DOE/ER, the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Computer Center was the first unclassified supercomputer center and was the model for those that followed. Over the years the center`s name was changed to the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center and then to NERSC; it was relocated to LBNL. NERSC, one of the largest unclassified scientific computing resources in the world, is the principal provider of general-purpose computing services to DOE/ER programs: Magnetic Fusion Energy, High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Health and Environmental Research, and the Office of Computational and Technology Research. NERSC users are a diverse community located throughout US and in several foreign countries. This brochure describes: the NERSC advantage, its computational resources and services, future technologies, scientific resources, and computational science of scale (interdisciplinary research over a decade or longer; examples: combustion in engines, waste management chemistry, global climate change modeling).

  14. Available decontamination and decommissioning capabilities at the Savannah River Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safety Analysis and Engineering Services Group has performed a survey of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) technical capabilities, skills, and experience in Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) activities. The goal of this survey is to enhance the integration of the SRTC capabilities with the technical needs of the Environmental Restoration Department D ampersand D program and the DOE Office of Technology Development through the Integrated Demonstration Program. This survey has identified technical capabilities, skills, and experience in the following D ampersand D areas: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Material Disposal, Remote Systems, and support on Safety Technology for D ampersand D. This review demonstrates the depth and wealth of technical capability resident in the SRTC in relation to these activities, and the unique qualifications of the SRTC to supply technical support in the area of DOE facility D ampersand D. Additional details on specific technologies and applications to D ampersand D will be made available on request

  15. A project to transfer technology from NASA centers in support of industrial innovation in the midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    A technology transfer program utilizing graduate students in mechanical engineering at the University of Kansas was initiated in early 1981. The objective of the program was to encourage industrial innovation in the Midwest through improved industry/university cooperation and the utilization of NASA technology. A related and important aspect of the program was the improvement of graduate engineering education through the involvement of students in the identification and accomplishment of technological objectives in cooperation with scientists at NASA centers and engineers in industry. The pilot NASA/University Industrial Innovation Program was an outstanding success based on its ability to: attract top graduate students; secure industry support; and stimulate industry/university cooperation leading to enhanced university capability and utilization of advanced technology by industry.

  16. The Use of DOE Technologies at The World Trade Center Incident: Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, B.; Kovach, J.; Carpenter, C.; Blair, D.

    2003-02-25

    In response to the attack of the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001, the International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE) National Hazmat Program (OENHP) assembled and deployed a HAZMAT Emergency Management Team (Team) to the disaster site (Site). The response team consisted of a Certified Industrial Hygienist and a rotating team of industrial hygienists, safety professionals, and certified HAZMAT instructors. Through research funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the IUOE conducted human factors assessments on baseline and innovative technologies during real-world conditions and served as an advocate at the WTC disaster site to identify opportunities for the use and evaluation of DOE technologies. From this work, it is clear that opportunities exist for more DOE technologies to be made readily available for use in future emergencies.

  17. Available decontamination and decommissioning capabilities at the Savannah River Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polizzi, L.M.; Norkus, J.K.; Paik, I.K.; Wooten, L.A.

    1992-08-19

    The Safety Analysis and Engineering Services Group has performed a survey of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) technical capabilities, skills, and experience in Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) activities. The goal of this survey is to enhance the integration of the SRTC capabilities with the technical needs of the Environmental Restoration Department D D program and the DOE Office of Technology Development through the Integrated Demonstration Program. This survey has identified technical capabilities, skills, and experience in the following D D areas: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Material Disposal, Remote Systems, and support on Safety Technology for D D. This review demonstrates the depth and wealth of technical capability resident in the SRTC in relation to these activities, and the unique qualifications of the SRTC to supply technical support in the area of DOE facility D D. Additional details on specific technologies and applications to D D will be made available on request.

  18. Available decontamination and decommissioning capabilities at the Savannah River Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polizzi, L.M.; Norkus, J.K.; Paik, I.K.; Wooten, L.A.

    1992-08-19

    The Safety Analysis and Engineering Services Group has performed a survey of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) technical capabilities, skills, and experience in Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities. The goal of this survey is to enhance the integration of the SRTC capabilities with the technical needs of the Environmental Restoration Department D&D program and the DOE Office of Technology Development through the Integrated Demonstration Program. This survey has identified technical capabilities, skills, and experience in the following D&D areas: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Material Disposal, Remote Systems, and support on Safety Technology for D&D. This review demonstrates the depth and wealth of technical capability resident in the SRTC in relation to these activities, and the unique qualifications of the SRTC to supply technical support in the area of DOE facility D&D. Additional details on specific technologies and applications to D&D will be made available on request.

  19. The Use of DOE Technologies at The World Trade Center Incident: Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to the attack of the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001, the International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE) National Hazmat Program (OENHP) assembled and deployed a HAZMAT Emergency Management Team (Team) to the disaster site (Site). The response team consisted of a Certified Industrial Hygienist and a rotating team of industrial hygienists, safety professionals, and certified HAZMAT instructors. Through research funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the IUOE conducted human factors assessments on baseline and innovative technologies during real-world conditions and served as an advocate at the WTC disaster site to identify opportunities for the use and evaluation of DOE technologies. From this work, it is clear that opportunities exist for more DOE technologies to be made readily available for use in future emergencies

  20. The National Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlitz, Rachel J.; David, Kayla D.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) Program monitors, analyzes, and records sightings of non-native (introduced) aquatic species throughout the United States. The program is based at the USGS Southeast Ecological Science Center in Gainesville, Florida. The initiative to maintain scientific information on nationwide occurrences of non-native aquatic species began with the Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force, a group created by Congress in 1990 to address the need for this type of information by natural resource managers. Since then, the NAS program has maintained the database as a clearinghouse of information for confirmed sightings of non-native aquatic species throughout the Nation. The program also produces email alerts, maps, summary graphs, publications, and other information products to support natural resource managers.

  1. Legacy and Emergence of Spaceport Technology Development at the Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Stanley; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has a long and successful legacy in the checkout and launch of missiles and space vehicles. These operations have become significantly more complex, and their evolution has driven the need for many technology developments. Unanticipated events have also underscored the need for a local, highly responsive technology development and testing capability. This evolution is briefly described, as well as the increasing level of technology capability at KSC. The importance of these technologies in achieving past national space goals suggests that the accomplishment of low-cost and reliable access to space will depend critically upon KSC's future success in developing spaceport technologies. This paper concludes with a description KSC's current organizational approach and major thrust areas in technology development. The first phase of our historical review focuses on the development and testing of field- deployable short- and intermediate-range ballistic missiles (1953 to 1958). These vehicles are later pressed into service as space launchers. The second phase involves the development of large space lift vehicles culminating in the Saturn V launches (1959 to 1975). The third phase addresses the development and operations of the partially reusable launch vehicle, Space Shuttle (1976 to 2000). In the current era, KSC is teaming with the U.S. Air Force (AF), industry, academia, and other partners to identify and develop Spaceport and Range Technologies necessary to achieve national space goals of lower-cost and higher-reliability space flight.

  2. Research on the establishment of design requirements (TOR) for Center for Nuclear Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents four chapters related to the following topics: General explanation and description of the Center of Nuclear Science and Technology; The role of new research reactor; Economic efficiency evaluation directly of applications on research reactor and Requirements for selection of new research reactor. The functions and missions of the Center with the main laboratories and main equipments have been identified. The main equipment of the Center is research reactor with power from 10 to 20 MW. In order to satisfy long term application requirements, the design characteristics and the safety features of the new research reactor have been considered in detail. The basic content of the Terms of Reference (TOR) of the Center was prepared and submitted to counterpart for consideration. (author)

  3. Technological drivers in data centers and telecom systems: Multiscale thermal, electrical, and energy management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ? Thermal management approaches reviewed against energy usage of IT industry. ? Challenges of energy efficiency in large-scale electronic systems highlighted. ? Underlying drivers for progress at the business and technology levels identified. ? Thermal, electrical and energy management challenges discussed as drivers. ? Views of IT system operators, manufacturers and integrators represented. - Abstract: We identify technological drivers for tomorrow’s data centers and telecommunications systems, including thermal, electrical and energy management challenges, based on discussions at the 2nd Workshop on Thermal Management in Telecommunication Systems and Data Centers in Santa Clara, California, on April 25–26, 2012. The relevance of thermal management in electronic systems is reviewed against the background of the energy usage of the information technology (IT) industry, encompassing perspectives of different sectors of the industry. The underlying drivers for progress at the business and technology levels are identified. The technological challenges are reviewed in two main categories – immediate needs and future needs. Enabling cooling techniques that are currently under development are also discussed

  4. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be available in the Spring of 2014. What education requirements are needed to specialize in Aquatic PT? ... therapy, one is strongly encouraged to take continuing education classes, and if possible, to actually observe aquatic ...

  5. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... protective, or supportive devices and equipment. The unique properties of the aquatic environment enhance interventions for patients/ ... modalities, physical agents and mechanical modalities using the properties of water and techniques unique to the aquatic ...

  6. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spasticity issues What is the required level of chlorine for aquatic therapy pools? This is usually regulated ... nspf.org Can patients with HepatitisB and other water borne illnesses participate in aquatic therapy? There should ...

  7. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... topic cannot be found. What do I do if I am denied coverage for aquatic therapy? First ... website under reimbursement to assist with the process. If this particular third party payor globally denies aquatic ...

  8. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... FAQs Rules, Regulations & Operations FAQs Reimbursement Issues FAQs General FAQs What is "aquatic physical therapy" Aquatic Physical ... implementation of quality of life, fitness-related or general health-related goals; can be delivered in a ...

  9. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2. FAQ's About Aquatic PT 3. CAPTCC 4. Join Us! About Aquatic Physical Therapy This page provides ... Therapy Section, All Rights Reserved | Home | Contact Us | Join the Section! | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn

  10. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is that aquatic physical therapy requires the "skilled service" of a PT and/or PTA which may ... standards of care which impact all other treatment services. Aquatic Exercise is the utilization of water for ...

  11. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to specialize in Aquatic PT? Water safety, risk management, and an understanding of hydrodynamic principles and various ... Aquatic Physical Therapy Program", you can get the management package that INCLUDES STATE-SPECIFIC information and how ...

  12. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can someone be required to be in the water? The Aquatic Therapy and Rehab Institute (ATRI) published ... nspf.org Can patients with HepatitisB and other water borne illnesses participate in aquatic therapy? There should ...

  13. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... practice analysis currently being conducted. What are the current trends in aquatic physical therapy? Trends vary depending ... to specialize in Aquatic PT? Water safety, risk management, and an understanding of hydrodynamic principles and various ...

  14. Conceptual strategic plan for the GRI Environmental Technology Information Center. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millet, S.; Young, J.

    1993-12-01

    The report summarizes the results of a survey conducted to develop a strategic plan for the Gas Research Institute (GRI) environmental technology information center. The initial concept was that of a service to provide environmental technology information to GRI members. For the survey, an investigation of nine information services was conducted, through on-site visits and interviews. Information products and services and their combinations generally offered are discussed. Best industry practices are highlighted, and sample markets are outlined. Details on the survey are presented in appendixes.

  15. Institutional overviews. Overview of the JAEA and the Nuclear Nonproliferation Science and Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Nonproliferation Science and Technology Center (NPSTC) was formed within the new Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) to carry out safeguards and material control duties for the JAEA. Development of technologies and procedures for safeguards is an important duty. In addition, the new NPSTC will assume a 'think tank' role in support of the nonproliferation regime, help train nonproliferation experts, and cooperate with academic, government and non-governmental organizations on nonproliferation issues. This report briefly summarizes the formation of the JAEA and describes the duties and structure of the NPSTC in detail. (author)

  16. Aquatic plant communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, R.G.; Grace, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    This report evaluates the expected responses of aquatic plants to elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO/sub 2/. We include aquatic plants with emergent foliage, as well as submersed macrophytes and microscopic algae and consider both freshwater and marine plants. We review known effects of inorganic carbon on aquatic plants, project the possible effects of a doubling in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ on aquatic plants, and discuss needed research on this problem. 192 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  17. Accelerator laboratories: development centers for experimental physics and technology in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three years ago in this Nuclear Center the author and Professor Graef expounded the inception and development of experimental physics and new techniques centered about laboratories and equipped in our country with positive ion accelerators. Extracted here is the information on the laboratories that have allowed professional training as well as the furtherance of scientific productivity in each group. An additional proposal as to how the technical groups knowledgeable in advanced technology might contribute significantly to adequate preparation of youth at the intermediate level able to generate innocuous micro industries in their own neighbourhood. (Author). 5 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  18. GOES SXI Monthly Project Status Report Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center Month of October 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Mons D.

    2004-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Advanced Technology Center (LMATC) is developing three Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) instruments. Two are being built for flights on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) N and O, and one will be a flight spare. The SXI development is being managed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The SXI will image the full sun at wavelengths between approximately 6 and 60 A with a detector having 5 arcsec pixels. The launch of the first SXI will be on GOES N and the second SXI is to be launched on on GOES O or P.

  19. Technology in an outpatient chemotherapy center and advanced practice nursing: observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Carolina Robledo Osses

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Advanced practice nursing (APN requires nurses to support their knowledge and clinical experience in a nursing care model that delivers holistic and comprehensive care adjusted to the needs of each patient. Objetives. To identify the technological tools available to nurses in a chemotherapy unit, to select one of the specific technologies used and to generate a proposal that can be used in advanced practice. Methods. Data was collected using non-participant observation in an adult outpatient chemotherapy unit. Results. It was observed that nurses properly used hard technologies in their unit. In so far as hard-soft technologies, although there is a specialized knowledge in oncology, there is no theoretical framework associated to the nursing care provided. With regards to the use of soft technologies, their use seems to be related more with personal characteristics that a structured and conscious intervention. Conclusions. Technologies are tools that, coupled with nursing expertise, allow nurses to provide safe and effective care. The chemotherapy unit is a center where APN could be conducted. This study proposes enhancing patient-oriented care based on the knowledge of the discipline as expressed in three different models that are suggested, thus making it possible to state that advanced practice nursing is being provided to patients undergoing ambulatory chemotherapy.

  20. Role of Health Information Technologies in the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    OpenAIRE

    Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Gabbay, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    A national effort to reform primary care, known as the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), requires fulfillment of six standards determined by the National Committee for Quality Assurance to (1) enhance access and continuity, (2) identify and manage patient populations, (3) plan and manage care, (4) provide self-care and community support, (5) track and coordinate care, and (6) measure and improve performance. Information technologies play a vital role in the support of most, if not all, of...

  1. Tiger Team Assessment of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, [August 19--September 13, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy (DOE) Tiger Team Assessment conducted at Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, between August 19 and September 13, 1991. A team comprised of professionals from the Department, its contractors, and consultants conducted the assessment. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy the status of environment, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) programs at PETC. A management assessment was performed

  2. Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussman, Alan [University of Maryland

    2014-10-21

    This is a final technical report for the University of Maryland work in the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). The Maryland work focused on software tools for coupling parallel software components built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) APIs. Those tools are based on the Maryland InterComm software framework that has been used in multiple computational science applications to build large-scale simulations of complex physical systems that employ multiple separately developed codes.

  3. A New Concept for Medical Imaging Centered on Cellular Phone Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Granot, Yair; Ivorra, Antoni; Rubinsky, Boris

    2008-01-01

    According to World Health Organization reports, some three quarters of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In addition, in developing countries over 50% of medical equipment that is available is not being used because it is too sophisticated or in disrepair or because the health personnel are not trained to use it. The goal of this study is to introduce and demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept in medical imaging that is centered on cellular phone technology a...

  4. ALARA Center of Technology promotes good radiological work practices at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waggoner, L.O., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

    1997-10-31

    The central Radiological Control Organization, originally under the previous Management and Operations contractor (Westinghouse Hanford Company) decided that a significant improvement in ALARA implementation would result if examples of engineered controls used for radiological work were assembled in one location to provide a ``showcase`` for workers and managers. The facility would be named the ALARA Center of Technology (ACT) and would include the latest technologies used to accomplish radiological work, as well as proven techniques, tools, and equipment. A location for the Center was selected in the 200 East Area of Hanford in a central location to be easily accessible to all facilities and contractors. Since there was little money available for this project, a decision was made to contact several vendors and request loans of their tools, equipment, and materials. In return, the center would help market products on site and assist with product demonstrations when the vendors visited Hanford. Out of 28 vendors originally contacted, 16 responded with offers to loan products. This included a containment tent, several glove bags, BEPA filtered vacuum cleaners, portable ventilation systems, fixatives, temporary shielding, pumps, and several special tools. Vendors who could not provide products sent videos and brochures. Westinghouse Hanford Company began using the ACT in June 1996. Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., the present Management and Integrating Contractor for the Hanford Site, held the formal opening ceremony of the ALARA Center of Technology on October 1, 1996. The Center now has about 1200 ft{sup 2} of floor space fi Iled with tools, equipment and material used to perform radiological work.

  5. Test and Approval Center for Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies: Phase I. Initiation : Final report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Fuel cells and hydrogen technologies hold the potential for decreasing emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants, for facilitating the increased use of renewable energy sources with high efficiencies and thereby contributing to the establishment of a sustainable energy system and the mitigation of the human-caused global warming. Fuel cells (in particular solid oxide fuel cells) produce electricity and heat at higher efficiencies than conventional power plants. They emit less pollutants - for example no toxic NOx at all - than conventional plants do. Fuel cells can operate on fossil fuels (natural gas) and on alternative fuels as well. They can therefore bridge the gap between availability and efficient use of fossil fuels on the short term and establishment of an energy market based on renewables on the long term. Hydrogen is a zero carbon energy carrier that– just like electricity - can be converted to power and heat. The increased use of hydrogen will decrease oil dependency, which is foreseen to have profound economic as well as political impacts. Fuel cell and hydrogen technologies play an important role in future sustainable energy system scenarios, often in combination with other technologies where Denmark already holds strong positions today. This includes for example (1) using biomass for production of electricity, (2) storing of energy by using excess electricity from wind turbines to produce fuel by electrolysis and (3) using fuel cells for load balancing of the fluctuating wind energy. As the fuel cell and hydrogen technologies come closer to commercialization, development of testing methodology, qualified testing and demonstration become increasingly important. Danish industrial players have expressed a strong need for support in the process to push fuel cell and hydrogen technologies from the research and development stage into the commercial domain. A Center to support industry with test, development, analysis, approval, certification, consultation, and training in the areas of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies was needed. Denmark has demonstrated leading international positions in the fuel cell and hydrogen technologies. The expectations from the center were to secure a continuing strong position for Denmark in these fast developing areas in the near and far future. Furthermore, the center was considered necessary to secure that the substantial investments already spent on these technologies also lead to commercial success. The project ‘Test and Approval Center for Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies: Phase I. Initiation’ was aiming at starting with the Establishment of such a center. The following report documents the achievements within the project. This is done by compiling short reports for each milestone that illustrate the related activities. The official reports are included in this final report. Furthermore, an account for the dissemination of the project results and the Center as such is given and, finally, the final EUDP scheme for the project.

  6. Mask R&D activities at the Advanced Mask Technology Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, Markus; Peters, Jan Hendrik

    2004-08-01

    The Advanced Mask Technology Center (AMTC) in Dresden is an equally-owned joint venture of Advanced Micro Devices Inc. (AMD), DuPont Photomasks, Inc. (DPI), and Infineon Technologies AG (Infineon) founded in 2002 to create a world-leading mask R&D center for both DRAM and logic applications. The AMTC's primary focus is research and development of sub-70 nm technologies. While 193 nm lithography will be used for 65 nm design rules and is probable for 45 nm design rules, solutions for sub-45 nm design rules are still being studied. Possible solutions include 193 nm immersion, 157 nm immersion, EUV, and EPL or its variants. The AMTC is actively involved in multiple collaborative projects to develop masks for advanced lithographies. This paper presents a sampling of AMTC's development activities on both conventional and EUV masks. Intensive studies on adequate materials and their properties for the respective technology have been performed with key partners in the field. Masks have been produced and analyzed. New repair processes have been developed for the small structures of future nodes, the printing capabilities have been predicted by AIMS measurements and analyzed with printing experiments at the respective wavelengths. In this talk we will present the latest results of simulations, experiments, handling and tool qualifications performed at the AMTC or with its partners. We will especially focus on our activities for the EUV technology and will present results on material and process development as well as on simulations for soft and hard pellicle induced distortions. For the EUV technology we will present preliminary results from our etching experiment on binary masks. First results on the performance of our new nano-machining RAVE tool will be shown.

  7. Patient safety goals for the proposed Federal Health Information Technology Safety Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittig, Dean F; Classen, David C; Singh, Hardeep

    2014-10-20

    The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology is expected to oversee creation of a Health Information Technology (HIT) Safety Center. While its functions are still being defined, the center is envisioned as a public-private entity focusing on promotion of HIT related patient safety. We propose that the HIT Safety Center leverages its unique position to work with key administrative and policy stakeholders, healthcare organizations (HCOs), and HIT vendors to achieve four goals: (1) facilitate creation of a nationwide 'post-marketing' surveillance system to monitor HIT related safety events; (2) develop methods and governance structures to support investigation of major HIT related safety events; (3) create the infrastructure and methods needed to carry out random assessments of HIT related safety in complex HCOs; and (4) advocate for HIT safety with government and private entities. The convening ability of a federally supported HIT Safety Center could be critically important to our transformation to a safe and effective HIT enabled healthcare system. PMID:25332353

  8. Manpower development and international cooperation in Nuclear Technology and Education Center, JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Technology and Education Center was founded in 1958 and now has two branches, Tokyo Education Center at Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo and Tokai Education Center at Tokai, Ibaraki-ken. The objective was to educate and train nuclear engineers and scientists for implementing the nation's program of atomic energy research, development and utilization. A variety of training courses have been prepared and carried out to meet the requirements of the nuclear community. In recent years, activities of getting the public acceptance have become important for nuclear energy deployment in Japan. Many short courses have been implemented at JAERI sites and cities for providing the public including high school teachers with basic knowledge on nuclear energy. International training programs of the center were started with the cooperation of the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) in 1985 and of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in 1987. International seminars were implemented for improving nuclear safety by inviting participants from the former Soviet Union, central/east European countries and the neighboring countries of Japan under the direction of the Science and Technology Agency (STA) in 1992. STA and JAERI are starting new programs of helping Asian and Pacific countries to develop nuclear manpower. (author)

  9. Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs are supported by the technology resources of the Engineering Physics Information Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Engineering Physics Information Centers (EPIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have two activities which support NRC Programs, the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) and the Technical Data Management Center (TDMC). The older of the two, RSIC, was established in 1963 as an Information Analysis Center in the general field of radiation shielding, transport, and protection. It has multiple agency funding to acquire, evaluate, organize, and distribute information (including computing technology and numerical data) relevant to its field. The TDMC was established in 1978 to perform work for NRC in fields not related to RSIC's subject coverage and to perform tasks beyond the normal level of activity for RSIC. The two centers share administrative functions, physical premises, specialists skills, and computing resources. The NRC/ADM/TIDC monitors the cosponsorship of RSIC for coverage of agency-wide interests and plans, directs, and coordinates the work of the TDMC, including the establishment of TDMC as the agency-wide repository for packaged computer-related technical information products. The contract monitor is Myrna L. Steele

  10. Update and Expansion of the Center of Automotive Technology Excellence Under the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irick, David

    2012-08-30

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its seventh year of operation under this agreement, its thirteenth year in total. During this period the Center has involved eleven GATE Fellows and three GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center’s focus area: Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Control Systems. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $2,000,000.

  11. Advanced Technologies for Future Spacecraft Cockpits and Space-based Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Galan, Carlos; Uckun, Serdar; Gregory, William; Williams, Kerry

    2006-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is embarking on a new era of Space Exploration, aimed at sending crewed spacecraft beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO), in medium and long duration missions to the Lunar surface, Mars and beyond. The challenges of such missions are significant and will require new technologies and paradigms in vehicle design and mission operations. Current roles and responsibilities of spacecraft systems, crew and the flight control team, for example, may not be sustainable when real-time support is not assured due to distance-induced communication lags, radio blackouts, equipment failures, or other unexpected factors. Therefore, technologies and applications that enable greater Systems and Mission Management capabilities on-board the space-based system will be necessary to reduce the dependency on real-time critical Earth-based support. The focus of this paper is in such technologies that will be required to bring advance Systems and Mission Management capabilities to space-based environments where the crew will be required to manage both the systems performance and mission execution without dependence on the ground. We refer to this concept as autonomy. Environments that require high levels of autonomy include the cockpits of future spacecraft such as the Mars Exploration Vehicle, and space-based control centers such as a Lunar Base Command and Control Center. Furthermore, this paper will evaluate the requirements, available technology, and roadmap to enable full operational implementation of onboard System Health Management, Mission Planning/re-planning, Autonomous Task/Command Execution, and Human Computer Interface applications. The technology topics covered by the paper include enabling technology to perform Intelligent Caution and Warning, where the systems provides directly actionable data for human understanding and response to failures, task automation applications that automate nominal and Off-nominal task execution based on human input or integrated health state-derived conditions. Shifting from Systems to Mission Management functions, we discuss the role of automated planning applications (tactical planning) on-board, which receive data from the other cockpit automation systems and evaluate the mission plan against the dynamic systems and mission states and events, to provide the crew with capabilities that enable them to understand, change, and manage the timeline of their mission. Lastly, we discuss the role of advanced human interface technologies that organize and provide the system md mission information to the crew in ways that maximize their situational awareness and ability to provide oversight and control of aLl the automated data and functions.

  12. Aquatic arsenic: phytoremediation using floating macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Azizur; Hasegawa, H

    2011-04-01

    Phytoremediation, a plant based green technology, has received increasing attention after the discovery of hyperaccumulating plants which are able to accumulate, translocate, and concentrate high amount of certain toxic elements in their above-ground/harvestable parts. Phytoremediation includes several processes namely, phytoextraction, phytodegradation, rhizofiltration, phytostabilization and phytovolatilization. Both terrestrial and aquatic plants have been tested to remediate contaminated soils and waters, respectively. A number of aquatic plant species have been investigated for the remediation of toxic contaminants such as As, Zn, Cd, Cu, Pb, Cr, Hg, etc. Arsenic, one of the deadly toxic elements, is widely distributed in the aquatic systems as a result of mineral dissolution from volcanic or sedimentary rocks as well as from the dilution of geothermal waters. In addition, the agricultural and industrial effluent discharges are also considered for arsenic contamination in natural waters. Some aquatic plants have been reported to accumulate high level of arsenic from contaminated water. Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), duckweeds (Lemna gibba, Lemna minor, Spirodela polyrhiza), water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica), water ferns (Azolla caroliniana, Azolla filiculoides, and Azolla pinnata), water cabbage (Pistia stratiotes), hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) and watercress (Lepidium sativum) have been studied to investigate their arsenic uptake ability and mechanisms, and to evaluate their potential in phytoremediation technology. It has been suggested that the aquatic macrophytes would be potential for arsenic phytoremediation, and this paper reviews up to date knowledge on arsenic phytoremediation by common aquatic macrophytes. PMID:21435676

  13. The role of national research and development centers in the transfer of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transfer of technology between two partners - one with the experience and know-how, the other with the desire to accomplish - is often carried out in licensed contract form. When this transfer has to be extended to foreign countries, and especially to under-developed countries, the problems are more complex because of: a) a lesser understanding of the industrial context. b) difficulties in finding competent and suitable staff. c) the geographical distance. d) problems of patent rights. e) research policy. In conclusion, the transfer of nuclear technology to a developing country passes through the creation of a research center where some of the main nuclear energy problems can be explored. For maximum efficiency of this transfer, it must be organized from the very beginning, for instance, in the form of a turnkey market, which establishes a privileged and long-term relationship between the two partners

  14. Artificial pinning center technology to enhance vortex pinning in YBCO coated conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystalline defects on the nano-scale, which are called artificial pinning centers (APCs), were successfully introduced into high-temperature superconductors (HTS) by nanotechnology, in order to strongly pin the quantized vortices. The critical current densities, Jc, of the HTS films were dramatically improved by APCs. It is possible to form APCs in high-quality epitaxial films, keeping the desired dimensionality, volume fraction, spatial distribution and so on. The in-field Jc of HTS films at 77 K was improved by one order of magnitude compared with previous values using APCs. This technology can be applied to the coated conductor technology in progress, and a high Jc has already been reported. A current outline of the research is described in this review.

  15. Human-Centered Technologies and Procedures for Future Air Traffic Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip; Woods, David; McCoy, Elaine; Billings, Charles; Sarter, Nadine; Denning, Rebecca; Dekker, Sidney

    1997-01-01

    The use of various methodologies to predict the impact of future Air Traffic Management (ATM) concepts and technologies is explored. The emphasis has been on the importance of modeling coordination and cooperation among multiple agents within this system, and on understanding how the interactions among these agents will be influenced as new roles, responsibilities, procedures and technologies are introduced. To accomplish this, we have been collecting data on performance under the current air traffic management system, identifying critical problem areas and looking for examples suggestive of general approaches for solving such problems. Using the results of these field studies, we have developed a set of concrete scenarios centered around future designs, and have studied performance in these scenarios with a set of 40 controllers, dispatchers, pilots and traffic managers.

  16. Overview of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Waste Management Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of the Waste Management Technology Center is to: provide technical analyses to support the development of corporate waste management policies by Martin Marietta Energy Systems and DOE/ORO; involve the private sector in the identification and demonstration of innovative technologies; assist in obtaining regulator approval for the implementation of new waste management practices; and to assist in the deployment of new waste management systems on DOE/ORO sites. Major program responsibilities assigned to the WMTC are: development of new low-level waste disposal facilities for the Oak Ridge Reservation Low-Level Waste Disposal Development Demonstration (LLWDDD) program; and coordination of hazardous waste treatment demonstrations conducted on ORO-managed sites under DOE's National Hazardous Wastes Remedial Action Program (HAZWRAP)

  17. Managing technological challenges for advanced and evolutionary power reactors at the technical center of Framatome ANP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The merger of Framatome's and Siemens' nuclear activities has resulted in a unique center of competence for technological domains like materials technology, radiochemistry, thermal hydraulics and fluid dynamics, components and systems testing, and welding-laboratory. These basic and key-technologies are centralized in the Technical Center to contribute to utmost synergies in technology, innovation and R + D at Framatome ANP. Engineering resources and tools, as well as appropriately equipped laboratories (e. g. for radiochemistry, corrosion, mechanical testing, and metallography) and large scale test-facilities are available to cope with this mission, relevant for the planning, manufacturing and erection, in-service behavior and maintenance of nuclear power plants. Powerful are the test facilities that support the tasks of the Technical Center, like: 1) Hot cell facilities, e. g. for handling of contaminated or activated materials in the course of root-cause and failure analyses or for post-irradiation examinations of Reactor Pressure Vessel materials. 2) Valve test facilities, e. g. the world largest valve test facility (GAP) in which valves up to pipe sizes of 700 mm in diameter can be tested. 3) Multi-purpose test facilities and loops with pressure up to 330 bars (MAGALY, KOPRA and BENSON), e.g. for testing of reactor components 4) Critical heat flux test loop, KATHY, with 15 MW electrical power supply for 1:1 fuel assembly investigation (BWR and PWR). 5) Integral 4investigation (BWR and PWR). 5) Integral 4-loop test facility PKL simulating a 1300 MWe PWR (diameter scale 1:12, elevations 1:1) for design and beyond-design accident investigations. Total quality management is a matter of principle. The Technical Center is certified according to ISO 9001 and ASME; the laboratories are accredited to EN 45001 as independent testing laboratories. The presentation highlights examples for recent R and D activities for advanced and evolutionary power reactors like: core melt retention concepts, new reactor internal design testing, fuel assembly development, iodine behaviour in beyond design accidents, design of advanced digital control systems and robotics as well as outstanding examples for component and systems qualification. (authors)

  18. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Newly Generated Liquid Waste Demonstration Project Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A research, development, and demonstration project for the grouting of newly generated liquid waste (NGLW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center is considered feasible. NGLW is expected from process equipment waste, decontamination waste, analytical laboratory waste, fuel storage basin waste water, and high-level liquid waste evaporator condensate. The potential grouted waste would be classed as mixed low-level waste, stabilized and immobilized to meet RCRA LDR disposal in a grouting process in the CPP-604 facility, and then transported to the state

  19. Assessing consumer benefits of selected gas appliance technology center tasks. Topical report, April-December 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gas Appliance Technology Center (GATC) was created in 1983 to assist the gas industry in bringing about a new generation of reasonably priced, advanced gas appliances. The objective of the report is to evaluate consumer benefits of sixteen selected GATC tasks for the time period between 1983 and 1990. Tasks were selected for review based upon their degree of industry impact and how well they represented activities in the four targeted research areas of Space Conditioning, Commercial Appliances, Residential Appliances, and Codes and Standards

  20. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-01-12

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI?s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) test block with the Carbon Injection System. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future project work is identified.

  1. [Technology: training centers--a new method for learning surgery in visceral surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troidl, H

    1996-01-01

    The importance of training centers can be best described after first answering a few questions like: 1. What kind of surgery will we deal with in the future? 2. What kind of surgeon do we need for this surgery, if it is basically different? 3. How will this surgeon have to be educated/trained for this different surgery? Although I am aware of the fact, that statements about future prospects are usually doomed to fail, I maintain that endoscopic surgery will be an essential part of general surgery. If this is so, surgery will be dominated by extremely complicated technology, new techniques and new instruments. It will be a "different" surgery. It will offer more comfort at the same safety. The surgeon of the future will still need a certain personality; he will still need intuition and creativity. To survive in our society, he will have to be an organiser and even a businessman. Additionally, something new has to be added: he will have to understand modern, complicated technology and will have to use totally different instruments for curing surgical illness. This makes it clear that we will need a different education/training and may be even a different selection of surgeons. We should learn from other professions sharing common interests with surgery, for example, sports where the common interest is achieving most complicated motions and necessarily highly differentiated coordination. Common interest with airline pilots is the target of achieving absolute security. They have a highly differentiated selection and training concept. Training centers may be-under certain prerequisites-a true alternative for this necessary form of training. They must have a concept, i.e. contents and aims have to be defined, structured and oriented on the requirements of surgery for the patient. Responsibility for the concept, performance and control can only be in the hands of Surgical Societies and Universities. These prerequisites correspond most likely to training centers being established by universities and managed by them. Training centers set up by the industry contain some trouble spots, from "sponsoring" over "normal business" to "corruption". Being aware of the fact that training centers will replace traditional "surgery schools"-teaching in their current state is technology and techniques-they are a true alternative for learning/training in general surgery. PMID:9101978

  2. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clients across the age span with musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, cardiovascular/pulmonary, and integumentary diseases, disorders, or conditions. Aquatic Physical Therapy interventions are ...

  3. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... functional training, manual therapy, breathing strategies, electrotherapeutic modalities, physical agents and mechanical modalities using the properties of water and techniques unique to the aquatic ...

  4. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, 1984-1985. Report to the President

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past year, technical progress has been made in all Plasma Fusion Center (PFC) research programs. The Plasma Fusion Center is recognized as one of the leading university research laboratories in the physics and engineering aspects of magnetic confinement fusion. Its research programs have produced significant results on four fronts: (1) the basic physics of high-temperature plasmas (plasma theory, rf heating, free electron lasers, development of advanced diagnostics and small-scale experiments on the Versator tokamak and Constance mirror devices); (2) major confinement results on the Alcator C tokamak, including pioneering investigations of the stability, heating, and confinement properties of plasmas at high densities, temperatures and magnetic fields; (3) development of an innovative design for axisymmetric tandem mirrors with inboard thermal barriers, with initial operation of the TARA tandem mirror experiment beginning in 1984; and (4) a broad program of fusion technology and engineering development that addresses problems in several critical subsystem areas (e.g., magnet systems, superconducting materials development, environmental and safety studies, advanced millimeter wave source development, and system studies of fusion reactor design, operation, and technology requirements). A review of these programs is given

  5. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center 1987--1988 report to the President

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past year, technical progress has been made in all Plasma Fusion Center (PFC) research programs. The Plasma Fusion Center is recognized as one of the leading university research laboratories in the physics and engineering aspects of magnetic confinement fusion. Its research programs have produced significant results on several fronts: the basic physics of high-temperature plasmas (plasmas theory, RF heating, free electron lasers, development of advanced diagnostics, and intermediate-scale experiments on the Versator tokamak and Constance mirror devices), major confinement results on the Alcator C tokamak, including pioneering investigations of the stability, heating, and confinement properties of plasmas at high densities, temperatures and magnetic fields, experiments on the medium-scale TARA tandem mirror, including the development of novel MHD stabilization techniques in axisymmetric geometry, and a broad program of fusion technology and engineering development that addresses problems in several critical subsystem areas (e.g., magnet systems, superconducting materials development, environmental and safety studies, advanced millimeter-wave source development, and system studies of fusion reactor design, operation, and technology requirements

  6. A Measurement Management Technology for Improving Energy Efficiency in Data Centers and Telecommunication Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrik Hamann, Levente Klein

    2012-06-28

    Data center (DC) electricity use is increasing at an annual rate of over 20% and presents a concern for the Information Technology (IT) industry, governments, and the society. A large fraction of the energy use is consumed by the compressor cooling to maintain the recommended operating conditions for IT equipment. The most common way to improve the DC efficiency is achieved by optimally provisioning the cooling power to match the global heat dissipation in the DC. However, at a more granular level, the large range of heat densities of today's IT equipment makes the task of provisioning cooling power optimized to the level of individual computer room air conditioning (CRAC) units much more challenging. Distributed sensing within a DC enables the development of new strategies to improve energy efficiency, such as hot spot elimination through targeted cooling, matching power consumption at rack level with workload schedule, and minimizing power losses. The scope of Measurement and Management Technologies (MMT) is to develop a software tool and the underlying sensing technology to provide critical decision support and control for DC and telecommunication facilities (TF) operations. A key aspect of MMT technology is integration of modeling tools to understand how changes in one operational parameter affect the overall DC response. It is demonstrated that reduced ordered models for DC can generate, in less than 2 seconds computational time, a three dimensional thermal model in a 50 kft{sup 2} DC. This rapid modeling enables real time visualization of the DC conditions and enables 'what if' scenarios simulations to characterize response to 'disturbances'. One such example is thermal zone modeling that matches the cooling power to the heat generated at a local level by identifying DC zones cooled by a specific CRAC. Turning off a CRAC unit can be simulated to understand how the other CRAC utilization changes and how server temperature responds. Several new sensing technologies were added to the existing MMT platform: (1) air contamination (corrosion) sensors, (2) power monitoring, and (3) a wireless environmental sensing network. All three technologies are built on cost effective sensing solutions that increase the density of sensing points and enable high resolution mapping of DCs. The wireless sensing solution enables Air Conditioning Unit (ACU) control while the corrosion sensor enables air side economization and can quantify the risk of IT equipment failure due to air contamination. Validation data for six test sites demonstrate that leveraging MMT energy efficiency solutions combined with industry best practices results in an average of 20% reduction in cooling energy, without major infrastructure upgrades. As an illustration of the unique MMT capabilities, a data center infrastructure efficiency (DCIE) of 87% (industry best operation) was achieved. The technology is commercialized through IBM System and Technology Lab Services that offers MMT as a solution to improve DC energy efficiency. Estimation indicates that deploying MMT in existing DCs can results in an 8 billion kWh savings and projection indicates that constant adoption of MMT can results in obtainable savings of 44 billion kWh in 2035. Negotiations are under way with business partners to commercialize/license the ACU control technology and the new sensor solutions (corrosion and power sensing) to enable third party vendors and developers to leverage the energy efficiency solutions.

  7. Aquatic biology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquatic biology studies focused on studying the hydrothermal effects of Par Pond reservoir on periphyton, plankton, zooplankton, macrophytes, human pathogens, and microbial activity; the variability between the artificial streams of the Flowing Streams Laboratory and Upper Three Runs Creek; and the bacterial production of methane in Savannah River Plant aquatic systems

  8. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment, rehabilitation, prevention, health, wellness and fitness of patient/client populations in an aquatic environment with or without the ... treatment, rehabilitation, prevention, health, wellness and fitness of patient/client populations in an aquatic environment. The unique properties of ...

  9. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Jean Irion wrote a nice article in the "Journal of Aquatic Physical Therapy," Volume 10 Number 1, Spring 2002, addressing the history. The focus of research and study is the practice analysis currently being conducted. What are the current trends in aquatic physical therapy? Trends vary depending on ...

  10. The Integration of an Information Processing Center into a Modern Office/Word Processing Technology Course. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVan, Jan; Arndt, Maridene

    A report and related materials are provided from an activity to set up an operating information processing center that would do the work initiated by personnel in the district and to incorporate the center into the Modern Office/Word Processing Technology course. The report details objectives, population and sample, and conclusions and…

  11. Aquatic biodiversity and the electric utility industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmsted, Larry L.; Bolin, John W.

    1996-09-01

    Results from a 1995 survey of utility company biologists indicate that aquatic biodiversity is an emerging and poorly understood issue. As a result, there is some confusion about what aquatic biodiversity actually is, and how we can best conserve it. Only one fourth (24%) of the respondents said their company has a stated environmental policy that addresses biodiversity. Many respondents indicate that over the years they have not specifically managed for biodiversity, but have been doing that through their efforts to assure balanced indigenous populations. While regulations are still the major driver for biological work, an increasing number of companies are involved in voluntary partnerships in managing water resources. Of these voluntary partnerships, 70% have biodiversity as a goal. Biodiversity is becoming an increasingly common subject of study, and a vast majority (75%) of the respondents suggested it should be a goal for utility resource management. Conservation of aquatic biodiversity is a complex task, and to date most aquatic efforts have been directed toward fish and macroinvertebrates. Ecological research and technological development performed by the utility industry have resulted in a number of successful biopreservation and biorestoration success stories. A common theme to preserving or enhancing aquatic biodiversity is preserving aquatic habitat. Increasingly, ecosystem management is touted as the most likely approach to achieve success in preserving aquatic biodiversity. Several utilities are conducting progressive work in implementing ecosystem management. This paper presents the potential interactions between power plants and biodiversity, an overview of aquatic biodiversity preservation efforts within the electric utility industry, more detail on the results of the survey, and recent initiatives in ecosystem management.

  12. Calcine Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. Staiger

    1999-06-01

    A potential option in the program for long-term management of high-level wastes at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, calls for retrieving calcine waste and converting it to a more stable and less dispersible form. An inventory of calcine produced during the period December 1963 to May 1999 has been prepared based on calciner run, solids storage facilities operating, and miscellaneous operational information, which gives the range of chemical compositions of calcine waste stored at INTEC. Information researched includes calciner startup data, waste solution analyses and volumes calcined, calciner operating schedules, solids storage bin capacities, calcine storage bin distributor systems, and solids storage bin design and temperature monitoring records. Unique information on calcine solids storage facilities design of potential interest to remote retrieval operators is given.

  13. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Consolidated Progress Report July 2006 - March 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernholdt, D E; McInnes, L C; Govindaraju, M; Bramley, R; Epperly, T; Kohl, J A; Nieplocha, J; Armstrong, R; Shasharina, S; Sussman, A L; Sottile, M; Damevski, K

    2009-04-14

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedented computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative high-performance scientific computing.

  14. Current Development of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion technologies at the Center for Space Nuclear Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. O' Brien; Steven K. Cook; Nathan D. Jerred; Steven D. Howe; Ronald Samborsky; Daniel Brasuell

    2012-09-01

    Nuclear power and propulsion has been considered for space applications since the 1950s. Between 1955 and 1972 the US built and tested over twenty nuclear reactors / rocket engines in the Rover/NERVA programs1. The Aerojet Corporation was the prime contractor for the NERVA program. Modern changes in environmental laws present challenges for the redevelopment of the nuclear rocket. Recent advances in fuel fabrication and testing options indicate that a nuclear rocket with a fuel composition that is significantly different from those of the NERVA project can be engineered; this may be needed to ensure public support and compliance with safety requirements. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) is pursuing a number of technologies, modeling and testing processes to further the development of safe, practical and affordable nuclear thermal propulsion systems.

  15. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center monthly report to the Steering Committee, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-02

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot FGD unit continued this month with High Velocity Scrubbing and the Tampa Electric Company (TECO) Tailored Collaboration test block. Additionally, Phase III of the Toxics Removal/Carbon Injection test block was conducted concurrently with FGD testing. At the beginning of the month, a second phase of third-party testing began for Suncor, Inc. The Suncor Gypsum Sample Collection test block (MSUN) began on June 5 on the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet FGD unit. Testing was completed on June 13. On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, testing continued this month as ammonia slip measurements were conducted under low catalyst inlet temperatures and at baseline conditions.

  16. Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. METC is currently a research and development facility, managed by DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy. Its goal is to focus energy research and development to develop engineered fossil fuel systems, that are economically viable and environmentally sound, for commercial application. There is clear evidence that, since the 1991 Tiger Team Assessment, substantial progress has been made by both FE and METC in most aspects of their ES&H program. The array of new and restructured organizations, systems, and programs at FE and METC; increased assignments of staff to support these initiatives; extensive training activities; and the maturing planning processes, all reflect a discernable, continuous improvement in the quality of the ES&H performance.

  17. Results of Occupational Monitoring Program in Technologic Navy Center in Sao Paulo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CTMSP, Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo, is a nuclear research Center located in the State of Sao Paulo. CTMSP headquarters is placed at the Campus of the University of Sao Paulo. Most of CTMSP nuclear facilities are at the Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA), located 120 km northwest from the Capital city of Sao Paulo. CTMSP has two major nuclear programs. One is the development of a PWR reactor for naval propulsion, and the other is associated with the front end fuel cycle technology comprising enrichment, conversion and reconversion. These activities require an extensive area monitoring program. This paper presents the results of this program covering the years of 2003 to 2011. The results include surface monitoring, dose rates and uranium concentrations in the air. (author)

  18. Remote Sensing Techniques for Monitoring Aquatic Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Alfonso

    Hydrilla is an important submerged aquatic vegetation because it has a large capacity to absorb pollutants and it is an indicator of the eutrophic status of a waterbody. Monitoring and restoration of submerged aquatic vegetation is key for the preservation and restoration of the Chesapeake Bay. Remote sensing techniques have been used for assessing wetlands and non-invasive aquatic species, but there is limited studies of hydrilla monitoring combined with space-borne, airborne and in-situ remote sensing measurements for detecting and mapping hydrilla infestation. The first objective of this research was to establish a database of hydrilla spectral signatures from an experimental tank and from a field setting using a handheld spectrometer. The spectral signatures collected will be used to identify the optimal spectral and spatial characteristics that are required to identify and classify the distribution of hydrilla canopies in water bodies. The second objective is to process and analyze two hyperspectral images from a space-borne (Hyperion) and airborne (AISA) sensors with ENVI for detecting and mapping the infestation of hydrilla vertillicata in a coastal estuary in Chesapeake Bay. The third objective was to validate the satellite and airborne hyperspectral images with the spectral signatures collected with the in-situ field measurements. In addition, the Hyperion and AISA imaging results were compared with ground surveys and aerial photos collected by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and the Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences for verifying the extent and the location of the hydrilla canopies. The hyperspectral analysis of both sensors provided for a dual results, one is the identification and classification of hydrilla from hyperspectral imaging sensors and secondly the identification of algae blooms in very productive waters. A hydrilla spectral signature database was established and housed in GMU's EastFIRE Lab of Environmental Science and Technology Center (ESTC) which other researches, consultants, and academia can access for future studies. The achievement of these mapping techniques will provide a more cost-effective (eventually), timely, and repeatable method for creating an accurate baseline for detecting and mapping hydrilla.

  19. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (formerly ICPP) ash reutilization study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenwalter, T.; Pettet, M.; Ochoa, R.; Jensen, S.

    1998-05-01

    Since 1984, the coal-fired plant at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC, formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) has been generating fly ash at a rate of approximately 1,000 tons per year. This ash is hydrated and placed in an ash bury pit near the coal-fired plant. The existing ash bury pit will be full in less than 1 year at its present rate of use. A conceptual design to build a new ash bury pit was completed, and the new pit is estimated to cost $1.7 million. This report evaluates ash reutilization alternatives that propose to eliminate this waste stream and save the $1.7 million required to build a new pit. The alternatives include using ash for landfill day cover, concrete admixture, flowable fill, soil stabilization, waste remediation, and carbon recovery technology. Both physical and chemical testing, under the guidance of the American Society for Testing and Materials, have been performed on ash from the existing pit and from different steps within the facility`s processes. The test results have been evaluated, compared to commercial ash, and are discussed as they relate to reutilization alternatives. This study recommends that the ash be used in flowable fill concrete for Deactivation and Demolition work at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

  20. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (formerly ICPP) ash reutilization study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1984, the coal-fired plant at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC, formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) has been generating fly ash at a rate of approximately 1,000 tons per year. This ash is hydrated and placed in an ash bury pit near the coal-fired plant. The existing ash bury pit will be full in less than 1 year at its present rate of use. A conceptual design to build a new ash bury pit was completed, and the new pit is estimated to cost $1.7 million. This report evaluates ash reutilization alternatives that propose to eliminate this waste stream and save the $1.7 million required to build a new pit. The alternatives include using ash for landfill day cover, concrete admixture, flowable fill, soil stabilization, waste remediation, and carbon recovery technology. Both physical and chemical testing, under the guidance of the American Society for Testing and Materials, have been performed on ash from the existing pit and from different steps within the facility's processes. The test results have been evaluated, compared to commercial ash, and are discussed as they relate to reutilization alternatives. This study recommends that the ash be used in flowable fill concrete for Deactivation and Demolition work at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center: 1985-1986 report to the President

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past year, technical progress has been made in all Plasma Fusion Center (PFC) research programs. Its research programs have produced significant results on four fronts: (1) the basic physics of high-temperature plasmas (plasmas theory, rf heating, free electron lasers, development of advanced diagnostics and small-scale experiments on the Versator tokamak and Constance mirror devices), (2) major confinement results on the Alcator C tokamak, including pioneering investigations of the stability, heating, and confinement properties of plasmas at high densities, temperatures and magnetic fields, (3) development of an innovative design for axisymmetric tandem mirrors with inboard thermal barriers, with encouraging results from the initial phase of operation of the TARA tandem mirror experiment, and (4) a broad program of fusion technology and engineering development that addresses problems in several critical subsystem areas (e.g., magnet systems, superconducting materials development, environmental and safety studies, advanced millimeter wave source development, and system studies of fusion reactor design, operation, and technology requirements)

  2. Dissemination of Advanced Mouse Resources and Technologies at RIKEN BioResource Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Yoshiki

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available RIKEN BioResource Center (BRC has collected, preserved, conducted quality control of, and distributed mouse resources since 2002 as the core facility of the National BioResource Project by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT, Japan. Our mouse resources include over 5,000 strains such as humanized disease models, fluorescent reporters, and knockout mice. We have developed novel mouse strains such as tissue-specific Cre-drivers and optogenetic strains that are in high demand by the research community. We have removed all our specified pathogens from the deposited mice and used our quality control tests to examine their genetic modifications and backgrounds. RIKEN BRC is a founding member of the Federation of International Mouse Resources and the Asian Mouse Mutagenesis and Resource Association, and provides mouse resources to the one-stop International Mouse Strain Resource database. RIKEN BRC also participates in the International Gene Trap Consortium, having registered 713 gene-trap clones and their sequences in a public library, and is an advisory member of the CREATE (Coordination of resources for conditional expression of mutated mouse alleles consortium which represents major European and international mouse database holders for the integration and dissemination of Cre-driver strains. RIKEN BRC provides training courses in the use of advanced technologies for the quality control and cryopreservation of mouse strains to promote the effective use of mouse resources worldwide.

  3. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion is the degradation of a material that results from its interaction with the environment. The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the United States. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that were generated by the solid rocket boosters. Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion.The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. As a result of fifty years of experience with launch and ground operations in a natural marine environment that is highly corrosive, NASAs Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC is a major source of corrosion control expertise in the launch and other environments. Throughout its history, the Laboratory has evolved from what started as an atmospheric exposure facility near NASAs launch pads into a world-wide recognized capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA and external customers.This presentation will provide a historical overview of the role of NASAs Corrosion Technology in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  4. NASA Education and Educational Technologies Exemplified by the Space Weather Action Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Norma Teresinha Oliveira; André, Claudio; Cline, Troy D.; Eastman, Timothy E.; Maher, Margaret J.; Mayo, Louis A.; Lewis, Elaine M.

    We explore here the Space Weather Action Center (SWAC) Program, as an example of NASA initiatives in education. Many human activities in space can be disrupted by space weather. The main objective of this program is to enable students to produce space weather forecasts by accessing current NASA data. Implementation of the SWAC Program requires: technological resources, online materials, and systematic work. Instructional guides, materials and methods are explained on the Space Weather Action Center Web site (http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/swac). Ultimately, students’ forecasts can be presented through a variety of accessible media including inexpensive video editing software and/or already existing school-based broadcast studios. This cross-curricular program is targeted to middle and high school and can be applied in almost all educational contexts as the number of schools with computer and internet access increases worldwide. SWAC is a pioneer initiative that contributes to fostering student interest in STEM and promotes their intellectual autonomy. Through SWAC, they get to act like real scientists by accessing, analyzing, recording, and communicating space weather forecasts in a professional approach.

  5. Molecular ecology of aquatic microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Abstracts of reports are presented from a meeting on Molecular Ecology of Aquatic Microbes. Topics included: opportunities offered to aquatic ecology by molecular biology; the role of aquatic microbes in biogeochemical cycles; characterization of the microbial community; the effect of the environment on aquatic microbes; and the targeting of specific biological processes.

  6. A proposal for improving data center management through strategic implementation of Server virtualization technology to support Malaysian Nuclear Agency's activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Management of servers in Nuclear Malaysia's data center poses a big challenge to IT Center as well as to the general management. Traditional server management techniques have been used to provide reliable and continuous support for the ever increasing services and applications demanded by researchers and the other staffs of Nuclear Malaysia. Data centers are cost centers which need logistical support such as electricity, air conditioning, room space, manpower and other resources. To save cost and comply with Green Technology while maintaining or improving the level of services, a new concept called server virtualization is proposed and a feasibility study of this technology has been initiated to explore its potential to accommodate IT centers ever demanding services while reducing the need for such logistical supports, hence adhering to the Green IT concept. Server virtualization is a new technology where a single high performance physical server can host multiple high processing services, and different types operating systems with different hardware and software requirements which are traditionally performed by multiple server machines. This paper briefly explains server virtualization concepts, tools and techniques and proposes an implementation strategy of the technology for Nuclear Malaysia's data center. (author)

  7. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the individual State Practice Acts. What kind of insurance should be considered for pools in aquatic PT facilities? You should consider the same type of insurance as for all clinics (liability), except that it ...

  8. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... different challenges with pools (i.e. potential for death due to drowning). Additionally, one may want to ... Are aquatic PTs required to be certified in life saving? No; however, the Section recommends some type ...

  9. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... engines to custom your search. Additionally, on this web page, one can, if an Aquatic Section member, ... www.osha.gov/fso/osp/index.html . This Web page provides links for the states that have ...

  10. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a problem with a patient who has Hepatitis B if they do not have any open wounds, ... Things to consider include: (a) State Practice Act (b) Liability insurance (c) Local regulations Do aquatic PT ...

  11. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTs/PTAs should take continuing education courses to gain knowledge in the area of aquatic physical therapy; ... and air chemistry, and personal medical factors). Additional sites with respect to water safety are the following: ...

  12. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Aquatic PT Section? Focus of research and study in the Section? Jean Irion wrote a nice ... addressing the history. The focus of research and study is the practice analysis currently being conducted. What ...

  13. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... designed to improve or maintain: function aerobic capacity/endurance conditioning balance, coordination and agility body mechanics and ... gait and locomotion relaxation muscle strength, power, and endurance Interventions used in Aquatic Physical Therapy include, but ...

  14. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... answers to more than 40 frequently asked questions related to Aquatic Physical Therapy. The questions are arranged ... for the implementation of quality of life, fitness-related or general health-related goals; can be delivered ...

  15. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... licensed physical therapists who perform an examination and evaluation to establish a functional diagnosis, prognosis for functional ... aquatic PT facilities? You should consider the same type of insurance as for all clinics (liability), except ...

  16. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTAs should take continuing education courses to gain knowledge in the area of aquatic physical therapy; should have an understanding of the effects of water on the human body during immersion, ...

  17. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... standards of care which impact all other treatment services. Aquatic Exercise is the utilization of water for the implementation of quality of life, fitness-related or general health-related ...

  18. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... engines to custom your search. Additionally, on this web page, one can, if an Aquatic Section member, retrieve ... www.osha.gov/fso/osp/index.html . This Web page provides links for the states that have established ...

  19. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a pool? Check with your State or Local Health Department for guidelines. Additionally, if you order "Developing an Aquatic Physical Therapy Program", you can get the management package that INCLUDES ...

  20. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What do I do if I am denied coverage for aquatic therapy? First of all, one must ... a pool? Check with your State or Local Health Department for guidelines. Additionally, if you order "Developing ...

  1. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with aquatic physical therapy; and the patient has potential to maximize functional goals/outcomes to improve quality ... here to download order form) Are there any potential risks to therapists who are involved with prolonged ...

  2. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... assistance in how to proceed. Are there particular patients that should or should not have aquatic physical ... based therapy. What is the required ratio of patients to PTs/PTAs? This is governed by the ...

  3. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to download order form) Are there any potential risks to therapists who are involved with prolonged exposure ... needed to specialize in Aquatic PT? Water safety, risk management, and an understanding of hydrodynamic principles and ...

  4. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... needed to specialize in Aquatic PT? Water safety, risk management, and an understanding of hydrodynamic principles and various ... to drowning). Additionally, one may want to engage risk management specialists to determine the exact risks inherent at ...

  5. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treat patients in their private pools in their homes? Things to consider include: (a) State Practice Act ( ... Top © Aquatic Physical Therapy Section, All Rights Reserved | Home | Contact Us | Join the Section! | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn

  6. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... focus of research and study is the practice analysis currently being conducted. What are the current trends ... needed to specialize in Aquatic PT? Water safety, risk management, and an understanding of hydrodynamic principles and ...

  7. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... physical therapist? PTs/PTAs should take continuing education courses to gain knowledge in the area of aquatic ... Physical Therapy Program" and the associated continuing education courses offered by the Section should assist you in ...

  8. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on the topic - Click Here What is the history of the Aquatic PT Section? Focus of research ... Volume 10 Number 1, Spring 2002, addressing the history. The focus of research and study is the ...

  9. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... accompanying paperwork, insurance involvement or written follow-up information required. Is aquatic physical therapy effective? While there is considerable research effectively documenting the value of water therapy in various setting and for ...

  10. Aquatic Animal Appendages - Flippers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketan Patel (California State University, Fullerton; Student, Biological Sciences)

    2007-06-18

    Several aquatic animals have appendages, such as flippers, that are used as a source of locomotion. Depending on the type of animal, flippers come in different sizes and are usually associated with the same type of bone joints.

  11. Aquatic Animal Skeleton - Ribcage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketan Patel (California State University, Fullerton; )

    2007-07-15

    The main purpose of an aquatic animal's ribcage is to protect its inner organs, such as the heart, from damage or injury. The ribcage is connected to the backbone of the animal and is made of mostly bone.

  12. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may also require a call to the insurance company. Additionally, one might refer to the APTA website ... aquatic PT facilities? You should consider the same type of insurance as for all clinics (liability), except ...

  13. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Assistants provide PT treatments in a safe aquatic environment taking into consideration transition to land based functional activities and communication with the patient-care team. What is the ...

  14. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... history of the Aquatic PT Section? Focus of research and study in the Section? Jean Irion wrote ... Spring 2002, addressing the history. The focus of research and study is the practice analysis currently being ...

  15. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rules, Regulations & Operations FAQs Where can I find information on starting my own aquatic physical therapy practice? ... Additionally, list below are several great sources of information regarding design, construction, and risk awareness for pools. ...

  16. Education, Technology, and Media: A Peak into My Summer Internship at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, James

    2004-01-01

    My name is James Moon and I am a senor at Tennessee State University where my major is Aeronautical and Industrial Technology with a concentration in industrial electronics. I am currently serving my internship in the Engineering and Technical Services Directorate at the Glenn Research Center (GRC). The Engineering and Technical Service Directorate provides the services and infrastructure for the Glenn Research Center to take research concepts to reality. They provide a full range of integrated services including engineering, advanced prototyping and testing, facility management, and information technology for NASA, industry, and academia. Engineering and Technical Services contains the core knowledge in Information Technology (IT). This includes data systems and analysis, inter and intranet based systems design and data security. Including the design and development of embedded real-time sohare applications for flight and supporting ground systems, Engineering and Technical Services provide a wide range of IT services and products specific to the Glenn Research Center research and engineering community.

  17. Aquatic Ecology Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Population studies included stock-progeny models of use in impact analyses; density-dependent function for fishing mortality; and the effect of growth curve and sampling regime on various methods for estimating aquatic insect production; a computer simulation. Studies on ecological effects included radiological and chemical effects. Ecological transport studies were conducted on transport of radionuclides and trace elements. Other activities included environmental monitoring of aquatic ecosystems, conferences, and marine studies

  18. The influence of technology on the performance of Brazilian call centers / A influência da tecnologia no desempenho dos call centers Brasileiros

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Paulo Roberto, Gião; Felipe Mendes, Borini; Moacir de Miranda, Oliveira Júnior.

    Full Text Available Os call centers (CC) têm mostrado constante evolução com o decorrer do tempo. Existe um uso intensivo de tecnologia nos CCs. No entanto, nem sempre para um lado positivo. O artigo é baseado em um survey feito com 103 empresas brasileiras que possuem ou provêm serviços de call center e procura verifi [...] car a contribuição da tecnologia sobre quatro distintas dimensões: redução de custos, relacionamento com clientes, canais de comunicação e monitoramento dos empregados. O referencial teórico utilizado é bastante eclético baseando-se em considerações estratégicas, informações das áreas técnicas de telecomunicações e tecnologia da informação, marketing em especial à área de relacionamento com clientes e, principalmente, de vários estudos nacionais e internacionais que vêm sendo desenvolvidos a respeito do atendimento e satisfação dos clientes. Os resultados mostram que o uso intenso de tecnologia não significa uma melhoria geral no desempenho de atendimento em todas as dimensões avaliadas e que escolhas precisam ser feitas por algumas dimensões em detrimento de outras. Abstract in english Call centers (CCs) show an evolution over the course of time. There is an intensive use of technology in CCs, although not always a positive side. The article is based on a survey carried out among the 103 Brazilian companies that have come (falta algum complemento, não conseguimos entender a frase) [...] and call center services and seeks to verify the contribution of technology in four distinct dimensions: cost reduction, customer relations, communication channels and monitoring of employees. The theoretical framework is eclectic based on strategic considerations, details of the technical areas of telecommunications and information technology, marketing. It focus particularly in the area of customer relations and especially of various national and international studies that have been developed regarding service and customer satisfaction. The results show that heavy use of technology does not mean a general improvement in performance in all dimensions assessed and some dimensions choices to be made over others.

  19. Annual report of Nuclear Technology and Education Center. April 1, 2008 - March 31, 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year 2008. This year is the 50th anniversary of NuTEC since the starting of the first training course in January, 1958 at the Radioisotope-School in Tokyo. On this occasion, a commemorative symposium was held and attended by around 150 participants. NuTEC flexibly designed and conducted out new training courses upon requests while conducting the annually scheduled training programs. In spite of some cancellations in an economic downturn, the number of trainees who completed the domestic training courses was 404, and that of those who completed the staff technical training courses was 862. As a result, the total number of trainees during this period grew over the previous fiscal year. 'Nuclear Training for METI Inspectors' was newly offered and also 'Qualification Course for the 3rd class radiation protection supervisor' was held at Tsuruga Technical High School. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities; cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, cooperative graduate school program with 14 graduate schools and one under-graduate school, and newly began to cooperate with Tsuyama National College of Technology. JAEA also continued cooperative activities with Nuclear HRD Program initiated by MEXT and METI implemented in 2007. The joint course has continued networking with five universities including newly two universities utilizing the Japan Nuclear Education Network (JNEN). International cooperation was also conducted as scheduled. The joint training course and the instructor training program were conducted bilaterally with Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam. JAEA exchanged a memorandum with CEA/INSTN and initiated preparatory work for on internship student from INSTN. Moreover, JAEA newly joined European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) and began to prepare for new international training courses. (author)

  20. Development of Russian's industrial and technological resources required to produce PET center equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most sensitive and promising methods of nuclear medicine. During the last 10-15 years positron-emission tomography (PET) has developed into a routine clinical diagnostics approach used in oncology, cardiology, neurology, psychiatry and pharmacokinetics applications. Present broad application of PET is associated with the use of not only very short-lived ''bio-isotopes'', but also of other, longer-lived positron emitters and generator systems. At present, PET technique is becoming increasingly important in clinical functional diagnostics. Considering the growing demand from domestic medical institutions in PET diagnostic equipment, the task of providing the national clinics with such instruments becomes not only topical, but vital. Although to present days major medical institutions in Moscow and in St. Petersburg have started procuring imported instruments for their PET, Russia's industrial and technological resources required to produce PET center equipment are already enough developed. Research and development efforts that have been underway at Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA) with participation of Central Scientific Research Roentgen-Radiological Institute (CNIRRI) and Bakulev Cardiovascular Surgery Scientific Center (BCSSC) engendered a theoretical, technical and technological foundation for design and production ofal foundation for design and production of the equipment required to implement PET technique in the Russian clinical environment. A several cyclotrons with target systems for PET-radionuclide production has been constructed and manufactured. The line of this cyclotrons including negative ion cyclotron CC-18/9 with vertical magnet and simultaneous dual beam extraction for accelerating 18 MeV protons 100 ?A extracted beam current and 9 MeV deuterons 50 ?A extracted beam current and negative ion cyclotron CC-12 with vertical magnet and simultaneous dual beam extraction for accelerating 12 MeV protons 100 ?A extracted beam current. Set of units for radiochemical laboratories of PET-centers has been manufactured and put in operation for automated radiochemical production of compounds and radiopharmaceuticals labeled by PET radionuclides. The set include modules for the synthesis of 11C-fatty acids, of 11C-methylation tracers, of 18F-FDG and 13 N-ammonium. Two types of shielding boxes for putting up radiochemical modules have been constructed and manufactured too. A full automated Rb-82 generator infusion system has been constructed. Rb-82 generator system provides bolus and continuous injections under computer control with display output of all required current information. At the 90 years last century experimental specimen of a full-body PET-scanner has been designed and manufactured in ITEP. This scanner comprises two half-rings with 9x18x30 mm bismuth germanate detectors housed in a circle of 1080 mm radius. From December 2005 design of high resolution PETscanner for animal experimental investigations was started in collaboration ITEP and NIIEFA. This scanner will comprise three rings with the arrays of LYSO detectors. The arrays has 11 x 11 elements with pixels 1.6 xl.6 x 10 mm. PET-scanner will be manufactured and put in run in 2007. What is being produced in Russia for PET-centers at present is shown. Complex of technical and clinical trials of presented above units have been done. Two cyclotrons CC18 put in operation in Turku (Finland) and CNIRRI (S.-Peterburg, Russia). Cyclotron CC-12 is under construction now. Set of radiochemical modules now put in ran at CNIRRI and BCSSC and use for clinical investigations more then one thousand of patients. Nine shielding boxes are using in PETcenter CNIRRI now. The Rb-82 generator system have passed integration engineering tests. The system operates reliably within the designed specifications. Now Rb-82 generator system under validation procedure in Miami, USA. Technical parameters and clinical result of using of

  1. Navigating through a document-centered electronic medical record: a mock-up based on WWW technology.

    OpenAIRE

    Bouaud, J.; Se?roussi, B.

    1996-01-01

    Current WWW technology facilitates the development of "hypertext" applications. A hospital-wide study of users' requirements in France led to a document-centered approach to the patient Electronic Medical Record (EMR). In order to refine such a specification, and taking advantage of WWW technology, we have developed a running mock-up of a document-based EMR from an actual paper-based patient record. Synthesis documents were added and linked to original replicated paper documents to form a hyp...

  2. Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Center: Transformational Technology Development For Environmental Remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE-EM, Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation and DOE Richland, in collaboration with the Hanford site and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, have established the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Center (DVZ-AFRC). The DVZ-AFRC leverages DOE investments in basic science from the Office of Science, applied research from DOE EM Office of Technology Innovation and Development, and site operation (e.g., site contractors [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Contractor and Washington River Protection Solutions], DOE-EM RL and ORP) in a collaborative effort to address the complex region of the deep vadose zone. Although the aim, goal, motivation, and contractual obligation of each organization is different, the integration of these activities into the framework of the DVZ-AFRC brings the resources and creativity of many to provide sites with viable alternative remedial strategies to current baseline approaches for persistent contaminants and deep vadose zone contamination. This cooperative strategy removes stove pipes, prevents duplication of efforts, maximizes resources, and facilitates development of the scientific foundation needed to make sound and defensible remedial decisions that will successfully meet the target cleanup goals for one of DOE EM's most intractable problems, in a manner that is acceptable by regulators.

  3. The Chicago Center for Green Technology: life-cycle assessment of a brownfield redevelopment project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sustainable development of brownfields reflects a fundamental, yet logical, shift in thinking and policymaking regarding pollution prevention. Life-cycle assessment (LCA) is a tool that can be used to assist in determining the conformity of brownfield development projects to the sustainability paradigm. LCA was applied to the process of a real brownfield redevelopment project, now known as the Chicago Center for Green Technology, to determine the cumulative energy required to complete the following redevelopment stages: (1) brownfield assessment and remediation, (2) building rehabilitation and site development and (3) ten years of operation. The results of the LCA have shown that operational energy is the dominant life-cycle stage after ten years of operation. The preservation and rehabilitation of the existing building, the installation of renewable energy systems (geothermal and photovoltaic) on-site and the use of more sustainable building products resulted in 72 terajoules (TJ) of avoided energy impacts, which would provide 14 years of operational energy for the site. (letter)

  4. Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staiger, M. Daniel, Swenson, Michael C.

    2011-09-01

    This comprehensive report provides definitive volume, mass, and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Calcine composition data are required for regulatory compliance (such as permitting and waste disposal), future treatment of the caline, and shipping the calcine to an off-Site-facility (such as a geologic repository). This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins. The Calcined Solids Storage Facilities (CSSFs) were designed by different architectural engineering firms and built at different times. Each CSSF has a unique design, reflecting varying design criteria and lessons learned from historical CSSF operation. The varying CSSF design will affect future calcine retrieval processes and equipment. Revision 4 of this report presents refinements and enhancements of calculations concerning the composition, volume, mass, chemical content, and radioactivity of calcined waste produced and stored within the CSSFs. The historical calcine samples are insufficient in number and scope of analysis to fully characterize the entire inventory of calcine in the CSSFs. Sample data exist for all the liquid wastes that were calcined. This report provides calcine composition data based on liquid waste sample analyses, volume of liquid waste calcined, calciner operating data, and CSSF operating data using several large Microsoft Excel (Microsoft 2003) databases and spreadsheets that are collectively called the Historical Processing Model. The calcine composition determined by this method compares favorably with historical calcine sample data.

  5. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the steering committee. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued with the Pilot High Velocity FGD (PHV) and the Trace Element Removal (TER) test blocks. In the High Velocity test block, SO{sub 2} removal and mist eliminator carryover rates were investigated while operating the absorber unit with various spray nozzle types and vertical mist eliminator sections. During the Trace Element Removal test block, the mercury measurements and control studies involving the EPA Method 29 continued with testing of several impinger capture solutions, and the use of activated carbon injection across the Pulse-Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) unit. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System was utilized this month in the TER test configuration to inject and transfer activated carbon to the PJFF bags for downstream mercury capture. Work also began in December to prepare the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Absorber system for receipt of the B and W Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX) unit to be used in the 1996 DOE/PRDA testing. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained in cold-standby this month.

  6. A randomized study of internet parent training accessed from community technology centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, A Blair; Gelatt, Vicky A; Hammond, Michael; Seeley, John R

    2015-05-01

    Behavioral parent training (BPT) has been shown to be efficacious to improve parenting skills for problematic interactions with adolescents displaying oppositional and antisocial behaviors. Some research suggests that support group curricula might be transferred to the Internet, and some studies suggest that other curriculum designs might also be effective. In this research, a BPT program for parents of at-risk adolescents was tested on the Internet in a randomized trial (N?=?307) from computer labs at six community technology centers in or near large metropolitan areas. The instructional design was based on asynchronous scenario-based e-learning, rather than a traditional parent training model where presentation of course material builds content sequentially over multiple class sessions. Pretest to 30-day follow-up analyses indicated significant treatment effects on parent-reported discipline style (Parenting Scale, Adolescent version), child behavior (Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory), and on social cognitive theory constructs of intentions and self-efficacy. The effect sizes were small to medium. These findings suggest the potential to provide effective parent training programs on the Internet. PMID:25351866

  7. Genetic evaluation of mesenchymal stem cells by G-banded karyotyping in a Cell Technology Center

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Tamara, Borgonovo; Isadora May, Vaz; Alexandra Cristina, Senegaglia; Carmen Lucia Kuniyoshi, Rebelatto; Paulo Roberto Slud, Brofman.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: To present the initial results of first three years of implementation of a genetic evaluation test for bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a Cell Technology Center. METHODS: A retrospective study was carried out of 21 candidates for cell therapy. After the isolation of bon [...] e marrow mononuclear cells by density gradient, mesenchymal stem cells were cultivated and expanded at least until the second passage. Cytogenetic analyses were performed before and after cell expansion (62 samples) using G-banded karyotyping. RESULTS: All the samples analyzed, before and after cell expansion, had normal karyotypes, showing no clonal chromosomal changes. Signs of chromosomal instability were observed in 11 out of 21 patients (52%). From a total of 910 analyzed metaphases, five chromatid gaps, six chromatid breaks and 14 tetraploid cells were detected giving as total of 25 metaphases with chromosome damage (2.75%). CONCLUSION: The absence of clonal chromosomal aberrations in our results for G-banded karyotyping shows the maintenance of chromosomal stability of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells until the second passage; however, signs of chromosomal instability such as chromatid gaps, chromosome breaks and tetraploidy indicate that the long-term cultivation of these cells can provide an intermediate step for tumorigenesis.

  8. Personnel Dose Monitoring in Nuclear Technology Center for Materials and Radiometry - BATAN Bandung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Personnel dose monitoring in Nuclear Technology Center for Materials and Radiometry (PTNBR) has been done using TLD NG-7776 dan TLD NG-0670 cards with the holder of TLD NG-7776 dan TLD NG-0670 respectively. The monitoring is subjected to all radiation worker who have been exposed to occupational dose. The aim of the monitoring is to keep the occupational dose not exceeding the dose limit established by BAPETEN. The management of personnel dose monitoring including : preparation, dosemeter distribution to radiation workers, dose evaluation and report. The personnel dose monitoring from the year of 2006 until 2008 is presented in this report. The result shows that most radiation workers in PTNBR received the occupational dose on the range of 1,1 – 2 mSv dan 2,1 – 3 mSv. In the year of 2007 the highest occupational dose of 9,52 mSv was received by Radiation Protection Officer (RPO) and one of radiation worker who work in radiation control area with contamination hazard potential received 8,16 mSv. In the reactor division with the activity during the year of 2007 is dominated by sipping test of nuclear fuel element giving the highest contribution of occupational dose of 6,44 mSv to one of the reactor operator. From the monitoring of personnel dose in the year 2006 until 2008 it is concluded that there is no worker who received the dose over the dose limit of 50 mSv. (author)

  9. Activities of JAEA in the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the Headquarter of the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) was established in Moscow, Russian Federation in 1994, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), which includes both Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and Japan has been made various, considerable contributions as well as participation in partner projects in ISTC activities. By the way, the Russian Federation Party, which is a Government Board Member of ISTC, made the statement that the Russian Federation would withdraw from ISTC until the end of 2015 in the 52th Government Board in held Moscow, 9 December 2010. This is based on the possible consequences of the Executive Order of the President of the Russian Federation dated 11 August 2010 with respect to the withdraw of the Russian Federation from ISTC. So that the Government Board has been discussing about the continuation and/or the establishment of a new organization for ISTC. In any case, the Headquarter of ISTC could stay at Moscow until the end of 2015 at latest. This time is considered as a transition period of ISTC and it is summarized that the collaborations, contributions of JAEA and outcomes from them for ISTC activities in this report. (author)

  10. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) conducted November 30 through December 4, 1987. In addition, the preliminary findings of the Laramie Project Office (LPO) Survey, which was conducted as part of the METC Survey on January 25 through 29, 1988, are presented in Appendices E and F. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with METC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at METC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities at METC. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the results will be incorporated into the METC Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Survey METC. 60 refs., 28 figs., 43 tabs.

  11. Investigation of tritium in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior, cycling and distribution of tritium in an aquatic ecosystem was studied in the field and in the laboratory from 1969 through 1971. Field studies were conducted in the Hudson River Estuary, encompassing a 30 mile region centered about the Indian Point Nuclear Plant. Samples of water, bottom sediment, rooted emergent aquatic plants, fish, and precipitation were collected over a year and a half period from more than 15 locations. Specialized equipment and systems were built to combust and freeze-dry aquatic media to remove and recover the loose water and convert the bound tritium into an aqueous form. An electrolysis system was set up to enrich the tritium concentrations in the aqueous samples to improve the analytical sensitivity. Liquid scintillation techniques were refined to measure the tritium activity in the samples. Over 300 samples were analyzed during the course of the study

  12. X-34 Technology Testbed Demonstrator delivery to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This is the X-34 Technology Testbed Demonstrator being delivered to NASA Dryden FRC. The X-34 will demonstrate key vehicle and operational technologies applicable to future low-cost resuable launch vehicles.

  13. A Focus on "Hands-On," Learner-Centered Technology at The Citadel

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRoma, Virginia; Nida, Steve

    2004-01-01

    While advances in technology have enhanced the quality and variety of visual presentations in teaching, most instructors find themselves teaching to a generation of students who are difficult to dazzle. Although the innovative use of technology in and outside of the classroom is a challenge, selecting practices that optimize technology as a tool…

  14. DOE SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D N

    2011-09-27

    The mission of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is to provide the worldwide climate-research community with access to the data, information, model codes, analysis tools, and intercomparison capabilities required to make sense of enormous climate data sets. Its specific goals are to (1) provide an easy-to-use and secure web-based data access environment for data sets; (2) add value to individual data sets by presenting them in the context of other data sets and tools for comparative analysis; (3) address the specific requirements of participating organizations with respect to bandwidth, access restrictions, and replication; (4) ensure that the data are readily accessible through the analysis and visualization tools used by the climate research community; and (5) transfer infrastructure advances to other domain areas. For the ESGF, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultra-scale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (such as the Community Earth System Model and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate, Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, etc.), and analysis and visualization tools, all serving a diverse user community. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as ANL, LANL, LBNL/NERSC, LLNL/PCMDI, NCAR, and ORNL) and at unfunded partner sites, such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate Computing Centre, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The ESGF software is distinguished from other collaborative knowledge systems in the climate community by its widespread adoption, federation capabilities, and broad developer base. It is the leading source for present climate data holdings, including the most important and largest data sets in the global-climate community, and - assuming its development continues - we expect it to be the leading source for future climate data holdings as well. Recently, ESG-CET extended its services beyond data-file access and delivery to include more detailed information products (scientific graphics, animations, etc.), secure binary data-access services (based upon the OPeNDAP protocol), and server-side analysis. The latter capabilities allow users to request data subsets transformed through commonly used analysis and intercomparison procedures. As we transition from development activities to production and operations, the ESG-CET team is tasked with making data available to all users seeking to understand, process, extract value from, visualize, and/or communicate it to others. This ongoing effort, though daunting in scope and complexity, will greatly magnify the value of numerical climate model outputs and climate observations for future national and international climate-assessment reports. The ESG-CET team also faces substantial technical challenges due to the rapidly increasing scale of climate simulation and observational data, which will grow, for example, from less than 50 terabytes for the last Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessment to multiple Petabytes for the next IPCC assessment. In a world of exponential technological change and rapidly growing sophistication in climate data analysis, an infrastructure such as ESGF must constantly evolve if it is to remain relevant and useful. Regretfully, we submit our final report at the end of project funding. To continue to serve the climate-science communit

  15. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansley, Shannon L.

    2002-02-20

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist.

  16. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansley, Shannon Leigh

    2002-02-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist.

  17. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; pery, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist

  18. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist

  19. 76 FR 8371 - Notice Correction; Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ...Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Surveys (NCI) The Federal...Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Survey (NCI)'' was submitted...which will include multiple customer satisfaction surveys over the course...

  20. Treatment of wastewater and restoration of aquatic systems through an eco-technology based constructed treatment wetlands - a successful experience in Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billore, S K; Sharma, J K; Singh, N; Ram, H

    2013-01-01

    In the last couple of decades constructed wetlands (CWs) have drawn considerable interest in Central India. CWs offer an effective means of integrating wastewater treatment and resource enhancement, often at competitive cost in comparison to conventional wastewater treatments, with additional benefits of Green Urban Landscaping and wildlife habitat. This paper describes treatment performances and the design of some Sub Surface Flow CWs (SSFCW) and Artificial Floating Islands (AFIs) in Central India. Central Indian CWs show significant pollution reduction load for total suspended solids (TSS) (62-82%), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) (40-75%), NH(4)-N (67-78%) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) (59-78%). Field scale SSFCWs installed so far in Central India are rectangular, earthen, single/multiple celled having similar depths of 0.60-0.90 m, hydraulic retention capacity 18-221 m(3) with effective size 41.8-1,050 m(2). The major components of CWs incorporate puddled bottom/side walls, sealed with impermeable low-density polyethylene, a bed of locally available river gravel planted with Phragmites karka, and an inlet distribution and outlet collection system. A new variant on CWs are AFIs working under hydroponics. The field scale experimental AFIs installed in-situ in a slowly flowing local river were composed of hollow bamboo, a bed of coconut coir, floating arrangements and Phragmites karka as nutrient stripping plant species. The AFIs polish the aquatic system by reducing 46.6% of TSS, 45-55% of NH(4)-N, 33-45% of NO(3)-N, 45-50% of TKN and 40-50% of BOD. The study established that there is a need for further research and sufficient data to assist the development of CWs by instilling confidence in policymakers, planners and in the public. PMID:24135106

  1. Master plan: Guntersville Reservoir Aquatic Plant Management. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    In 1989, Congress provided funding to start a five-year comprehensive project to manage aquatic plants in Guntersville Reservoir, to be jointly implemented by the US Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). TVA serves as the overall project coordinator and is the lead agency for this project. Known as the Joint Agency Guntersville Project (JAGP), the project will test and demonstrate innovative management technologies, and incorporate the most effective technologies into a comprehensive aquatic plant management plan for Guntersville Reservoir. The JAGP is intended to serve as a National Demonstration Project for aquatic plant management. As part of this JAGP, the Master Plan for Aquatic Plant Management for the Guntersville Reservoir Project, Alabama-Tennessee is authorized by Corps Contract Number DACW62-90-C-0067.

  2. National Center of Excellence for Energy Storage Technology 168.10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guezennec, Yann

    2011-12-31

    This report documents the performance of the Ohio State University (OSU) and Edison Welding Institute (EWI) in the period from 10/1/2010 to 12/31/2012. The objective of the project is to establish a Center of Excellence that leverages the strengths of the partners to establish a unique capability to develop and transfer energy storage industries to establish a unique capability in the development and transfer of energy storage system technology through a fundamental understanding of battery electrical and thermal performance, damage and aging mechanisms, and through the development of reliable, high-speed processes for joining substrates in battery cell, module and pack assemblies with low manufacturing variability. During this period, the OSU activity focused on procuring the equipment, materials and supplies necessary to conduct the experiments planned in the statement of project objectives. In detail, multiple laboratory setups were developed to enable for characterizing the open-circuit potential of cathode and anode materials for Li-ion batteries, perform experiments on calorimetry, and finally built multiple cell and module battery cyclers to be able to perform aging campaign on a wide variety of automotive grade battery cells and small modules. This suite of equipment feeds directly into the development, calibration of battery models ranging from first principle electrochemical models to electro-thermal equivalent circuit models suitable for use in control and xEV vehicle simulations. In addition, it allows to develop and calibrate ‘aging’ models for Li-ion batteries that enable the development of diagnostics and prognostics tools to characterize and predict battery degradation from automotive usage under a wide array of environmental and usage scenarios. The objective of the EWI work scope is to develop improved processes for making metal-tometal joints in advanced battery cells and packs. It will focus on developing generic techniques for making functional (electrically conductive and mechanically robust) metal-to-metal joints between thin substrates. Joints with multiple layers and bimetallic constituents will be investigated. During the current period of performance, EWI has defined the test matrix to evaluate the application of different welding technologies (laser welding, ultrasonic welding, resistance welding) to specific components of battery cells and modules, such as foils-to-tabs, tabs-to-tabs, and tabs-to-bus bars. The test matrix also includes a range of substrates (aluminum 1145 and 1100, copper 110 and nickel 200 as substrates). Furthermore, a set of procedures was defined to perform mechanical and electrical testing of the samples, including metallography, and non-destructive evaluations. Both on the OSU and EWI, this project enabled to leverage very significant industrial collaborations with a wide array of companies ranging from battery manufacturers and pack integrator all the ways to Tier 1 automotive suppliers and OEMs during the period of exercise of the project, and in the future for years to come.

  3. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with aquatic physical therapy; and the patient has potential to maximize functional goals/outcomes to improve quality of life and ease burden of care. the implementation of such therapy must comply with all standards of care which impact all other treatment services. ...

  4. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What is the new federal pool and safety act? The Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act was passed by Congress in 2007. It sets ... and drain covers. ( CLICK HERE TO READ THE ACT ) Back to Top © Aquatic Physical Therapy Section, All ...

  5. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... using the APTA website and going to the education tab to the research selection and following the prompts to various searches, ... Spring 2002, addressing the history. The focus of research and study is the practice analysis currently being ... Education FAQs Is there a certification program for aquatic ...

  6. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... potential to maximize functional goals/outcomes to improve quality of life and ease burden of care. the implementation of such therapy must comply with all standards of care which impact all other treatment services. Aquatic Exercise is the utilization of water for ...

  7. Aquatic Plant Management Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aims of the Aquatic Plant Management Society (APMS) "are to assist in promoting the management of nuisance aquatic plants, to provide for the scientific advancement of members of the society, to encourage scientific research, to promote university scholarship, and to extend and develop public interest in the aquatic plant science discipline." The APMS website contains information about upcoming and past Annual Meetings, Society Bylaws, APMS membership, and related job opportunities and scholarship funds when available. The site allows visitors to search past issues of the _Journal of Aquatic Management_ by author and keyword, as well as browse Tables of Content for 42 volumes from 1962 to the present. A number of articles from the Journal are available for viewing and download, as well as copies of the APMS newsletter. The site includes a brief Manuscript Preparation Guide for potential Journal contributors. The site also links to websites for eight Regional APMS Chapters located mostly in different states and regions of the United States.

  8. Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

  9. VITELLOGENESIS IN AQUATIC ANIMALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitellogenin (Vg) is the main precursor to egg yolk proteins (YPs) accumulated as nutrients for developing embryos of oviparous aquatic species. Recent gene cloning and immuno-biochemical analyses verified the presence of multiple Vgs in teleost fishes, similar to the case in chickens and Xenopus. ...

  10. ZOONOSIS OF AQUATICAL ORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božidar Kurtovi?

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic organisms play a very important role in human nutrition. They also pose a real threat for human health by causing various diseases. Parasites, bacteria and viruses may either directly or indirectly be carried from aquatic organisms to humans. Disease outbreaks are influenced by many factors among which decreased immune response and feeding habits and higyene are most important. More frequent occuence of foodborne diseases has a number of reasons, including international travel and trade, microbial adaptation and changes in the food production system. Parasitic diseases occur most frequently as a result of human role in parasites life cycles. The prevalence is further increased by consuming raw fish and shellfish. The main feature of bacterial infections is facultative pathogenicity of most ethiological agents. In most cases disease occures as a result of decreased immunoreactivity. Several bacteria are, however, hightly pathogenic and capable of causing high morbidity and mortality in human. To date it has not been reported the case of human infection with viruses specific for aquatic organisms. Human infections are caused with human viruses and aquatic organisms play role only as vechicles. The greatest risk in that respect present shellfish. Fish and particularly shellfish are likely to cause food poisoning in humans. In most cases the cause are toxins of phithoplancton origins accumulating in shellfish and fish.

  11. Assessing controls on perched saturated zones beneath the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Perkins, Kim S.; Nimmo, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Waste byproducts associated with operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) have the potential to contaminate the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer. Recharge to the ESRP aquifer is controlled largely by the alternating stratigraphy of fractured volcanic rocks and sedimentary interbeds within the overlying vadose zone and by the availability of water at the surface. Beneath the INTEC facilities, localized zones of saturation perched on the sedimentary interbeds are of particular concern because they may facilitate accelerated transport of contaminants. The sources and timing of natural and anthropogenic recharge to the perched zones are poorly understood. Simple approaches for quantitative characterization of this complex, variably saturated flow system are needed to assess potential scenarios for contaminant transport under alternative remediation strategies. During 2009-2011, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, employed data analysis and numerical simulations with a recently developed model of preferential flow to evaluate the sources and quantity of recharge to the perched zones. Piezometer, tensiometer, temperature, precipitation, and stream-discharge data were analyzed, with particular focus on the possibility of contributions to the perched zones from snowmelt and flow in the neighboring Big Lost River (BLR). Analysis of the timing and magnitude of subsurface dynamics indicate that streamflow provides local recharge to the shallow, intermediate, and deep perched saturated zones within 150 m of the BLR; at greater distances from the BLR the influence of streamflow on recharge is unclear. Perched water-level dynamics in most wells analyzed are consistent with findings from previous geochemical analyses, which suggest that a combination of annual snowmelt and anthropogenic sources (for example, leaky pipes and drainage ditches) contribute to recharge of shallow and intermediate perched zones throughout much of INTEC. The source-responsive fluxes model was parameterized to simulate recharge via preferential flow associated with intermittent episodes of streamflow in the BLR. The simulations correspond reasonably well to the observed hydrologic response within the shallow perched zone. Good model performance indicates that source-responsive flow through a limited number of connected fractures contributes substantially to the perched-zone dynamics. The agreement between simulated and observed perched-zone dynamics suggest that the source-responsive fluxes model can provide a valuable tool for quantifying rapid preferential flow processes that may result from different land management scenarios.

  12. Annual report of Nuclear Technology and Education Center. April 1, 2009 - March 31, 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year 2009. In this fiscal year, NuTEC flexibly designed and conducted new training courses upon requests while conducting the annually scheduled training programs, and actively enhanced the collaboration with academia and cooperation with international organizations. Probably due to the economic depression, the number of trainees who completed the national training courses in 2009 was 322, which is 20 percent less than the previous year. The number of those who completed the staff technical training courses was slightly increased to 787 in 2009. As a result, the total number of trainees during this period is about 6 percent less than the previous year. In order to correspond with the needs from outside of JAEA, five temporary courses were held upon the request from Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. 'Risk communication course' was newly offered upon the request from Nuclear Safety Commission. Furthermore, we addressed the longstanding issue to take countermeasure against the aging accommodation facility. The web site was also improved so that users can directly send the application for enrollment in the training courses through internet. These new services actually started in fiscal year 2010. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities; cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, and the cooperative graduate school program was enlarged to cooperate with totally 17 graduate schools (18 universities), one faculty of undergraduate school, and one technical college, including the newly joined 3 graduate schools (4 universities) in 2009. JAEA also continued cooperative activities with Nuclear HRD Program initiated by MEXT and METI in 2007. The joint course has continued networking with six universities including newly joined Osaka University through utilizing the remote education system, Japan Nuclear Education Network (JNEN), and special lectures, summer and winter practice were also conducted. International cooperation activities were conducted as scheduled. The joint training course and the instructor training program were conducted bilaterally with Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam. JAEA accepted master's students from INSTN as internship based on the MOU with CEA/INSTN. Moreover, JAEA co-organized the workshop with European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN), and attended IAEA international conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes held in UAE to present papers. (author)

  13. HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY, CENTER FOR HYDROGEN RESEARCH, AND THE HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH LABORATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danko, E

    2007-02-26

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists, and it is believed to be the largest such staff in the U.S. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. Many of SRNL's programs support dual-use applications. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation on hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including membrane filters for H2 separation, doped carbon nanotubes, storage vessel design and optimization, chemical hydrides, hydrogen compressors and hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Several of these are discussed further in Section 2, SRNL Hydrogen Research and Development.

  14. Technology Assessment: Strategic Energy Analysis Center (SEAC) 2012 Highlights (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-02-01

    This fact sheet lists key analysis products produced by NREL in 2012. Like all NREL analysis products, these aim to increase the understanding of the current and future interactions and roles of energy policies, markets, resources, technologies, environmental impacts, and infrastructure. NREL analysis, data, and tools inform decisions as energy-efficient and renewable energy technologies advance from concept to commercial application.

  15. A Learning-Center Solution for Using Technology in Elementary Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Amy C.

    2005-01-01

    The challenge for educators today is to overcome this barrage of media and technology and find innovative ways to help students learn. But, how can teachers compete for student attention when this is the challenge? How can they improve learning experiences and make them relevant to our students' lives? Integrating technology into the music…

  16. Health care needs and services for technology-dependent children in developmental centers.

    OpenAIRE

    Crain, L. S.; Mangravite, D. N.; Allport, R.; Schour, M.; Biakanja, K.

    1990-01-01

    In an attempt to document the trend toward a more seriously ill and medically needy population of children in California state developmental centers, we studied the medical status and health care needs of the pediatric and young adult population (birth to 22 years of age) residing in all acute care and skilled nursing care units in developmental centers in 1988. All children in California's state developmental centers are severely to profoundly mentally retarded and chronically disabled, and ...

  17. Early Pleistocene aquatic resource use in the Turkana Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Will; Braun, David R; Harris, Jack W K; McCoy, Jack T; Richmond, Brian G

    2014-12-01

    Evidence for the acquisition of nutritionally dense food resources by early Pleistocene hominins has implications for both hominin biology and behavior. Aquatic fauna may have comprised a source of highly nutritious resources to hominins in the Turkana Basin at ?1.95 Ma. Here we employ multiple datasets to examine the issue of aquatic resource use in the early Pleistocene. This study focuses on four components of aquatic faunal assemblages (1) taxonomic diversity, (2) skeletal element proportion, (3) bone fragmentation and (4) bone surface modification. These components are used to identify associations between early Pleistocene aquatic remains and hominin behavior at the site of FwJj20 in the Koobi Fora Fm. (Kenya). We focus on two dominant aquatic species: catfish and turtles. Further we suggest that data on aquatic resource availability as well as ethnographic examples of aquatic resource use complement our observations on the archaeological remains from FwJj20. Aquatic food items provided hominins with a valuable nutritional alternative to an exclusively terrestrial resource base. We argue that specific advantages afforded by an aquatic alternative to terrestrial resources include (1) a probable reduction in required investment of energy relative to economic return in the form of nutritionally dense food items, (2) a decrease in the technological costs of resource acquisition, and (3) a reduced level of inter-specific competition associated with carcass access and an associated reduction of predation risk relative to terrestrial sources of food. The combined evidence from FwJj20 suggests that aquatic resources may have played a substantial role in early Pleistocene diets and these resources may have been overlooked in previous interpretations of hominin behavior. PMID:24721760

  18. Database created with the operation of environmental monitoring program from the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) - Brazilian CNEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental control from the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN - Brazilian CNEN) is done through a Program of Environmental Monitoring-PMA, which has been in operation since 1985. To register all the analytic results of the several samples, samples, a database was created. In this work, this database structure as well as the information used in the evaluation of the results obtained from the operation of the above-mentioned PMA are presented. (author). 5 refs, 1 fig, 3 tabs

  19. Structural Integrity Program for the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual'. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities

  20. Structural Integrity Program for the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities

  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center, 1988--1989 report to the President

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics on fusion energy: cold fusion; alcator confinement experiments; applied plasma physics research; fusion systems; coherent electromagnetic wave generation; and fusion technology and engineering

  2. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - Site Status Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epperly, T W

    2008-12-03

    This report summarizes LLNL's progress for the period April through September of 2008 for the Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) SciDAC. The TASCS project is organized into four major thrust areas: CCA Environment (72%), Component Technology Initiatives (16%), CCA Toolkit (8%), and User and Application Outreach & Support (4%). The percentage of LLNL's effort allocation is shown in parenthesis for each thrust area. Major thrust areas are further broken down into activity areas, LLNL's effort directed to each activity is shown in Figure 1. Enhancements, Core Tools, and Usability are all part of CCA Environment, and Software Quality is part of Component Technology Initiatives. The balance of this report will cover our accomplishments in each of these activity areas.

  3. 76 FR 11498 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ...Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Surveys (NCI). Type...information on the satisfaction of TTC's external customers with TTC customer services; collect information...3) Enhance the quality, utility, and...

  4. 75 FR 80830 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Technology Transfer Center External Customer Satisfaction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ...Transfer Center External Customer Satisfaction Survey (NCI). Type...information on the satisfaction of TTC's external customers with TTC customer services; collect information...3) Enhance the quality, utility, and...

  5. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center 1992--1993 report to the President

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses research being conducted at MIT's plasma fusion center. Some of the areas covered are: plasma diagnostics; rf plasma heating; gyrotron research; treatment of solid waste by arc plasma; divertor experiments; tokamak studies; and plasma and fusion theory

  6. Organizational Factors that Influence Information Technology Diffusion in Academic Health Sciences Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Ash, Joan

    1997-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To identify the organizational factors which influence the diffusion of end user online literature searching, the computer-based patient record, and electronic mail systems in academic health sciences centers in the United States.

  7. Aquatic Ecology Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Population studies were concerned with predicting long-term consequences of mortality imposed on animal populations by man's activities. These studies consisted of development of a generalized life cycle model and an empirical impingement model for use in impact analysis. Chemical effects studies were conducted on chlorine minimization; fouling by the Asiatic clam; identification of halogenated organics in cooling water; and effects of halogenated organics in cooling systems on aquatic organisms. Ecological transport studies were conducted on availability of sediment-bound 137Cs and 60Co to fish; 137Cs and 60Co in White Oak Lake fish; and chromium levels in fish from a lake chronically contaminated with chromates from cooling towers. Progress is also reported on the following: effects of irradiation on thermal tolerance of mosquito fish; toxicity of nickel to the developing eggs and larvae of carp; accumulation of selected heavy metals associated with fly ash; and environmental monitoring of aquatic ecosystems

  8. Inland Aquatic Resources and Biogeochemical Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melack, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The biosphere is the entire planetary system that includes, sustains and is influenced by life. The central issue of the science of the biosphere is the extent to which the Earth's surface, atmosphere and hydrosphere is the result of biological rather than abiotic processes. Space science and technology accelerates the understanding of global biological processes by providing repetive synoptic observations on large spatial scales once the relationships between the processes and the remotely sensed quantities are established. Especially promising applications of space technology are the measurement of biological productivity and portions of geochemical cycles in aquatic ecosystems and the evaluation and management of the quality of freshwater resources.

  9. Coverage of Team Science by Public Information Officers: Content Analysis of Press Releases about the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graube, Marita; Clark, Fiona; Illman, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the content of press releases from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Centers (STCs) to determine how public information officers (PIOs) presented the outcomes of centers to journalists and the public. A total of 68 press releases were analyzed for type of news covered, visibility of centers and their…

  10. Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division Technical Digest: Advanced materials technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The Dahlgren Division conducts full-spectrum research, development, test and evaluation (RDT and E), and fleet support on advanced materials and materials processes for application to ordnance and weapon systems. We emphasize various core technologies such as advanced ceramics, warhead materials, electrochemistry, polymer science, acoustic materials, composites, magnetostrictive materials, semiconductor materials, thermal management materials, radiation sensor materials, energetic materials, biotechnology, surface science, and nondestructive evaluation. Spin-off technologies for dual use are also actively pursued. This issue of the Digest includes articles on engineered materials, energetic materials, and the characterization of materials.

  11. 4 years of successful knowledge transfer - the nuclear technology training center of the TUeV Nord Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In connection with the 2002 amendment to the German Atomic Energy Act, the topics of generational change and maintenance of competence grew in importance and necessitated new solution approaches. To this end, various activities were launched, with the aim of conducting conceptual analyses of these topics. Examples include the 'National Competence Network for Nuclear Technology' (Nationaler Kompetenzverbund fuer Kerntechnik), various networks established by colleges and universities, the 'Knowledge Management for the Maintenance and Transfer of Competence in Reactor Safety' (Wissensmanagement zum Kompetenzerhalt und -transfer in der Reaktorsicherheit) workshop held in 2001 in Garching near Munich (Germany) and the 'Ad-hoc Workgroup on the Maintenance of Competence' (Ad-hoc-Arbeitskreis Kompetenzerhalt) of the VdTUeV. The nuclear technology departments of the TUeV Nord Group were aware of te challenges associated with the generational change early on. By establishing the 'Nuclear Technology Training Center' (Ausbildungszentrum fuer Kerntechnik, AfK), the TUeV Nord Group intended to ensure the required knowledge transfer during the generational change as well as maintain the renowned high qualification as regards the subject of nuclear technology and thus continue to provide - in the sense of social responsibility - crucial contribution to the long-term safety of nuclear plants. Four years have passed since the training center held the first courses in the fall of 2002. ld the first courses in the fall of 2002. Up to now, more than 350 participants have been trained in the courses conducted by the AfK. In the opinion of the TUeV Nord Group, the activities of the AfK have laid the foundation for a successful change of generations within the group's nuclear technology organizations. (orig.)

  12. NCI CBIIT — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioinformatics provides researchers with the tools, information technologies, and analytical methodologies needed to manage the large volumes of data generated by today’s genomic studies, large observational studies, and networked clinical trials—and to harvest insights from the information that is collected. . . . from genomics to clinical trials, bioinformatics capacity becomes a critical asset.

  13. Information Technology Cost Center Employee Perception of Their Contribution Value in a For Profit Organizational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilstrap, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    A literature review revealed a lack of academic research related to cultural dynamics within organizations that influence information technology investments. The goal of this single descriptive case study of a for profit international company was to examine one area of cultural influence on investments. The aim was to gain an understanding of…

  14. Hot-Air Balloons: Project-Centered Study as a Bridge between Science and Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Moshe; Raz, Eli

    2000-01-01

    Describes the development of a project-based unit on hot-air balloons used with Israeli junior high school students. Concludes that students in the program gained experience with high-level scientific principles and technological processes, the project allows for a learning environment of cooperation and teamwork, and collaboration between…

  15. The Retrieval Knowledge Center Evaluation Of Low Tank Level Mixing Technologies For DOE High Level Waste Tank Retrieval 10516

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Complex has over two-hundred underground storage tanks containing over 80-million gallons of legacy waste from the production of nuclear weapons. The majority of the waste is located at four major sites across the nation and is planned for treatment over a period of almost forty years. The DOE Office of Technology Innovation and Development within the Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) sponsors technology research and development programs to support processing advancements and technology maturation designed to improve the costs and schedule for disposal of the waste and closure of the tanks. Within the waste processing focus area are numerous technical initiatives which included the development of a suite of waste removal technologies to address the need for proven equipment and techniques to remove high level radioactive wastes from the waste tanks that are now over fifty years old. In an effort to enhance the efficiency of waste retrieval operations, the DOE-EM Office of Technology Innovation and Development funded an effort to improve communications and information sharing between the DOE's major waste tank locations as it relates to retrieval. The task, dubbed the Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC) was co-lead by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with core team members representing the Oak Ridge and Idaho sites, as well as, site contractors responsible for waste s, site contractors responsible for waste tank operations. One of the greatest challenges to the processing and closure of many of the tanks is complete removal of all tank contents. Sizeable challenges exist for retrieving waste from High Level Waste (HLW) tanks; with complications that are not normally found with tank retrieval in commercial applications. Technologies currently in use for waste retrieval are generally adequate for bulk removal; however, removal of tank heels, the materials settled in the bottom of the tank, using the same technology have proven to be difficult. Through the RKC, DOE-EM funded an evaluation of adaptable commercial technologies that could assist with the removal of the tank heels. This paper will discuss the efforts and results of developing the RKC to improve communications and discussion of tank waste retrieval through a series of meetings designed to identify technical gaps in retrieval technologies at the DOE Hanford and Savannah River Sites. This paper will also describe the results of an evaluation of commercially available technologies for low level mixing as they might apply to HLW tank heel retrievals.

  16. THE RETRIEVAL KNOWLEDGE CENTER EVALUATION OF LOW TANK LEVEL MIXING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DOE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK RETRIEVAL 10516

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellinger, A.

    2009-12-08

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Complex has over two-hundred underground storage tanks containing over 80-million gallons of legacy waste from the production of nuclear weapons. The majority of the waste is located at four major sites across the nation and is planned for treatment over a period of almost forty years. The DOE Office of Technology Innovation & Development within the Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) sponsors technology research and development programs to support processing advancements and technology maturation designed to improve the costs and schedule for disposal of the waste and closure of the tanks. Within the waste processing focus area are numerous technical initiatives which included the development of a suite of waste removal technologies to address the need for proven equipment and techniques to remove high level radioactive wastes from the waste tanks that are now over fifty years old. In an effort to enhance the efficiency of waste retrieval operations, the DOE-EM Office of Technology Innovation & Development funded an effort to improve communications and information sharing between the DOE's major waste tank locations as it relates to retrieval. The task, dubbed the Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC) was co-lead by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with core team members representing the Oak Ridge and Idaho sites, as well as, site contractors responsible for waste tank operations. One of the greatest challenges to the processing and closure of many of the tanks is complete removal of all tank contents. Sizeable challenges exist for retrieving waste from High Level Waste (HLW) tanks; with complications that are not normally found with tank retrieval in commercial applications. Technologies currently in use for waste retrieval are generally adequate for bulk removal; however, removal of tank heels, the materials settled in the bottom of the tank, using the same technology have proven to be difficult. Through the RKC, DOE-EM funded an evaluation of adaptable commercial technologies that could assist with the removal of the tank heels. This paper will discuss the efforts and results of developing the RKC to improve communications and discussion of tank waste retrieval through a series of meetings designed to identify technical gaps in retrieval technologies at the DOE Hanford and Savannah River Sites. This paper will also describe the results of an evaluation of commercially available technologies for low level mixing as they might apply to HLW tank heel retrievals.

  17. Optimization of the cementation installation from the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low Level Liquid Waste generated and received at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN are being treated by chemical precipitation/filtration process, followed by comentation of the sludge. A plant was demonstrated in 1987 and it is being developed in the Center using Brazilian equipment and materials. At the end of 1994, some special equipment were installed to minimize the generation of secondary waste, to improve the efficiency and decontamination. The performed changes will be able to treat wastes from different generators, such as industries, medical clinics, hospitals, universities and other nuclear research center. (author). 11 refs, 3 figs

  18. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center 1992--1993 report to the President

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at MIT`s plasma fusion center. Some of the areas covered are: plasma diagnostics; rf plasma heating; gyrotron research; treatment of solid waste by arc plasma; divertor experiments; tokamak studies; and plasma and fusion theory.

  19. The Center for Hearing and Speech: Bilingual Support Services through Videoconferencing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Many listening and spoken language specialists find themselves serving increasing numbers of children with hearing loss who come from families whose primary language is not English. This manuscript describes a variety of methods that can meet the needs of this ever-growing population by highlighting the dual-language support program at the Center…

  20. Tool use by aquatic animals

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Janet; Patterson, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Tool-use research has focused primarily on land-based animals, with less consideration given to aquatic animals and the environmental challenges and conditions they face. Here, we review aquatic tool use and examine the contributing ecological, physiological, cognitive and social factors. Tool use among aquatic animals is rare but taxonomically diverse, occurring in fish, cephalopods, mammals, crabs, urchins and possibly gastropods. While additional research is required, the scarcity of tool ...

  1. Aquatic toxicology: fact or fiction?

    OpenAIRE

    Macek, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief history of the development of the field of aquatic toxicology is provided. In order to provide a perspective on the state-of-the-art in aquatic toxicology relative to classical toxicology, the two fields are compared from the standpoint of the type of scientist practicing each field, the respective objectives of each, the forces which drive the activity in each field, and the major advantages and disadvantages accruing to the practitioner of aquatic toxicology as a result of the diffe...

  2. Geothermal Research at the Geo-Heat Center Oregon Institute of Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, John W.

    1997-01-01

    The Geo-Heat Center was established in 1975 to provide information and technical services for geothermal energy direct-use and development--mainly utilizing low- and moderate-temperature resources (<150oC). The Center is funded by the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE). Our main functions are (1) technical assistance, (2) resource information, (3) advising and referrals, (4) speaker’s bureau, (5) tours of geothermal systems, (6) publications, (7) research, and (8) stocking a geothermal library. During 1997, the Geo-Heat Center staff provided assistance to 761 individuals, companies and municipalities--up to eight hours of technical assistance can be provided free of charge. Staff members have also participated in numerous international geothermal direct-use projects. The Center has developed a “Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook” and publishes a free “Quarterly Bulletin” on geothermal direct-use projects and research. The Geo-Heat Center also has a website (http://www.oit.edu/~geoheat). Several of these direct-use research projects are discussed in the paper, including: a) Downhole Heat Exchangers, b) A Cost Comparison of Commercial Ground- Source Heat Pump Systems, c) A Spreadsheet for Geothermal Energy Cost Evaluation, d) Utilization of Silica Waste from Geothermal Power Production, e) Fossil Fuel-Fired Peak Heating for Geothermal Greenhouses, f) Selected Cost Considerations for the Geothermal District Heating in Existing Single-Family Residential Areas, and g) Collocated Resources Inventory of Wells and Hot Springs in the Western U.S.

  3. Uncooled technology transforming the future soldier into a center for surveillance and engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Yoram; Cohen, Noam

    2009-05-01

    In this paper we are presenting the ELOP concept of the night vision for the modern soldier. According to this concept the modern soldier's missions are divided into 4 main layers - situation awareness, improved lethality capabilities, target acquisition and surveillance. Based on this concept during the last few years ELOP has developed a family of products for those needs. Those new products are mainly based on the uncooled technology (with one exception). The uncooled technology allows cost eective solution with superior performance in comparison with image intensiers systems (by means of better robustness to poor lighting conditions, better immunity to dazzling etc.). Those products include thermal monocular, driver thermal sight, thermal weapon sights and hand held thermal cameras.

  4. Nuclear Information Center: 25 years of CNEN in the support of science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 25 years of the Nuclear Information Centre of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission - CIN/CNEN, and the role played in the context of Brazilian scientific and technological development is analyzed under two points of view: as database producer and information services provider as well as generator of knowledge and technology in the field of Information Science. The pioneer role of the Centre, not only in developing software for bibliographic information handling and in building a marketing model to information services but also contributing for the growth of database usage culture in Brazil is described. Cooperation, decentralization and sharing of resources are emphasized as the main characteristics of the work developed by the CIN/CNEN staff. Finally, the international background of CIN/CNEN coordinating Latin-American Projects as well as an active member of INIS - International Nuclear Information System, IAEA and more recently as the Brazilian representative to ETDE - Energy Technology Data Exchange is shown. IEA energy database is also discussed. (author)

  5. Hearing Aids Communication : Integrating Social Interaction, Audiology and User Centered Design to Improve Communication with Hearing Loss and Hearing Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Globally, hearing loss is the second most frequent disability. About 80% of the persons affected by hearing loss do not use hearing aids. The goal of this edited volume is to present a theoretically founded, interdisciplinary approach geared at understanding and improving social interaction impacted by hearing loss and (non-) use of hearing technologies. The researchers report on pilot studies from Australia, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Switzerland and the USA. Using Conversation Analysis, the studies identify problems and serve as points of departure for possible solutions. Researchers and practitioners from the different disciplines (medicine, audiology, hearing rehabilitation, User Centered Design, Conversation Analysis, change business) as well as users of hearing technologies comment on this approach.

  6. Structural Integrity Program for the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.

    2003-05-22

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities.

  7. An Analysis of Information Technology Adoption by IRBs of Large Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Hurdle, John F

    2015-02-01

    The clinical research landscape has changed dramatically in recent years in terms of both volume and complexity. This poses new challenges for Institutional Review Boards' (IRBs) review efficiency and quality, especially at large academic medical centers. This article discusses the technical facets of IRB modernization. We analyzed the information technology used by IRBs in large academic institutions across the United States. We found that large academic medical centers have a high electronic IRB adoption rate; however, the capabilities of electronic IRB systems vary greatly. We discuss potential use-cases of a fully exploited electronic IRB system that promise to streamline the clinical research work flow. The key to that approach utilizes a structured and standardized information model for the IRB application. PMID:25742664

  8. Aquatic Ecology Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Population studies included the following: empirical transport model of the impact of entrainment on fish; impingement losses of white perch in the Hudson river; and modeling the effects of entrainment on adult fish. Progress is also reported on the following: sediment contribution to the accumulation of 60Co and 137Cs in fish; dose rate and the frequency of abnormal embryos in Gambusia; distribution and concentration of tritium in White Oak Lake; stable element concentrations in fish; toxicant formation in condenser cooling systems; and environmental monitoring of aquatic systems

  9. Recent technology advances in the NASA-Lewis Research Center Brayton program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, R.

    1972-01-01

    A review of the progress and milestones passed in the Brayton program during the past year is presented. The 2-to-15 kWe power system was successfully operated in a vacuum with a space-type radiator. Gas loop and electrical subsystem endurance tests have continued to demonstrate long-term operation with one rotating unit surpassing 10,000 hours of failure-free operation. Simplified gas-bearing designs for the rotating unit are being evaluated. Fabrication of an improved design of heat exchanger is nearing completion, and a study of more advanced heat exchanger technology is being conducted.

  10. Hard X-ray Optics Technology Development for Astronomy at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian; Kilaru, Kiranmayee

    2009-01-01

    Grazing-incidence telescopes based on Wolter 1 geometry have delivered impressive advances in astrophysics at soft-x-ray wavelengths, while the hard xray region remains relatively unexplored at fine angular resolution and high sensitivities. The ability to perform ground-breaking science in the hard-x-ray energy range had been the motivation for technology developments aimed at fabricating low-cost, light-weight, high-quality x-ray mirrors. Grazing-incidence x-ray optics for high-energy astrophysical applications is being developed at MSFC using the electroform-nickel replication process.

  11. Recent activities of the nuclear fuel technology department of Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Fuel Technology Department (NFTD) in CNRTC is a unique unit in Turkey in charge of performing all activities in nuclear fuel field. It has a pilot plant on uranium refining and conversion to UO2 since 1986. Presently, its R and D activities are focused on pellet manufacturing and characterization: UO2, ThO2and (Th,U)O2. The studies on thorium dioxide fuel include to obtain ThO2 pellets from thorium nitrate and mixed (Th,U)O2 pellets. A study on evaluation of different fuel cycle options in accordance with nuclear energy planning in Turkey is also going on. (author)

  12. Development of technologies for nuclear fusion at the Karlsruhe Research Center - Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the European Fusion Research Program the Karlsruhe Research Center is making important contributions to the fields of plasma heating, superconducting magnets, energy conversion in the blanket, the ITER fuel cycle, primary vacuum pumps for ITER, and structural materials and erosion of amor materials (the first five subjects were covered in Part I of this contribution in atw 2 (2002)). The availability of suitable structural materials for future fusion reactors decisively influences the design of nearly all in-vessel components. The long-term objective is the development of materials withstanding, for many years, the combined impacts of fusion operation, and the selection criteria this implies. The research and development effort this requires is based on international cooperation and concentration on a few promising classes of materials. The integrated first wall - blanket concepts can be subdivided into ceramic solid blankets and liquid metal blankets. They are based on the three classes of structural materials of ferritic - martensitic steel grades (RAFM) with reduced activation capacity; vanadium alloys; and SiC-SiC fiber composites. The Karlsruhe Research Center contributes significantly to the development of RAFM steel grades. The service life of carbon fiber composite (CFC), tungsten, and beryllium discussed as in-vessel armor materials for the planned ITER fusion reactor is determined by sputtering, evaporation, and macroscopic erosion. Eg, evaporation, and macroscopic erosion. Extensive research must be conducted into the technical evaluation of these materials. The Karlsruhe Research Center is engaged in a comprehensive damage analysis of the vertical target and the wall materials as a result of evaporation and macroscopic erosion. (orig.)

  13. Kazakhstan center of nuclear technology safety. Approach of work, possibilities and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NTSC was created in November, 1997 as an association of experts in all the areas of nuclear and radiation safety and radioactive materials handling The main goal of creation is investigation of safety aspects of nuclear power in the Republic of Kazakhstan, taking into account the interests of environment and human health protection in the regions of nuclear industry units allocation. The Center was created with support and special cooperation with the US, has grown and developed cooperative ties with several other countries.In the report are enumerate the main directions of NTSC activity, general directions of cooperation, current and completed activity, planing activity

  14. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - An International Center of Excellence for ''Training in and Demonstration of Waste Disposal Technologies''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, which is managed and operated by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (USDOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and located in the State of New Mexico, presently hosts an underground research laboratory (URL) and the world's first certified and operating deep geological repository for safe disposition of long-lived radioactive materials (LLRMs). Both the URL and the repository are situated approximately 650 meters (m) below the ground surface in a 250-million-year-old, 600-m-thick, undisturbed, bedded salt formation, and they have been in operation since 1982 and 1999, respectively. Founded on long-standing CBFO collaborations with international and national radioactive waste management organizations, since 2001, WIPP serves as the Center of Excellence in Rock Salt for the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) International Network of Centers on ''Training in and Demonstration of Waste Disposal Technologies in Underground Research Facilities'' (the IAEA Network). The primary objective for the IAEA Network is to foster collaborative projects among IAEA Member States that: supplement national efforts and promote public confidence in waste disposal schemes; contribute to the resolution of key technical issues; and encourage the transfer and preservation of knowledge and technologies

  15. Center Partnerships: a Vehicle for integrating MSIs into Mainstream Research and Technology Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, C. E.; Black, S. M.

    2008-05-01

    Norfolk State University, a historically black university in Norfolk, VA, has established a number of fruitful research and education partnerships with a wide range of domestic research universities over the last ten years. These partnerships have been the result of the combination of a number of well established research collaborations developed by faculty in Materials Science and Engineering and their colleagues at University of Virginia, Purdue, Cornell, Georgia Tech, and the University of Washington. In this presentation, we will describe the formation of these partnerships, including the process and challenges of their formation and the benefits to both groups that these types of relations can produce for the students, faculty, and institutions. We will use examples from our own experience both successful and unsuccessful to describe a framework under which small MSIs and Research I institutions can form mutually beneficial relations that maximize the capabilities of the participating institutions and opportunities for the students and faculty to impact the science, engineering, and technology and the culture of STEM training and practice.

  16. John F. Kennedy Space Center's Technology Development and Application 2006-2007 Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Topics covered include: Reversible Chemochromic Hydrogen Detectors; Determining Trajectory of Triboelectrically Charged Particles, Using Discrete Element Modeling; Using Indium Tin Oxide To Mitigate Dust on Viewing Ports; High-Performance Polyimide Powder Coatings; Controlled-Release Microcapsules for Smart Coatings for Corrosion Applications; Aerocoat 7 Replacement Coatings; Photocatalytic Coatings for Exploration and Spaceport Design; New Materials for the Repair of Polyimide Electrical Wire Insulation; Commodity-Free Calibration; Novel Ice Mitigation Methods; Crack Offset Measurement With the Projected Laser Target Device; New Materials for Structural Composites and Protective Coatings; Fire Chemistry Testing of Spray-On Foam Insulation (SOFI); Using Aerogel-Based Insulation Material To Prevent Foam Loss on the Liquid-Hydrogen Intertank; Particle Ejection and Levitation Technology (PELT); Electrostatic Characterization of Lunar Dust; Numerical Analysis of Rocket Exhaust Cratering; RESOLVE Projects: Lunar Water Resource Demonstration and Regolith Volatile Characterization; Tribocharging Lunar Soil for Electrostatic Beneficiation; Numerically Modeling the Erosion of Lunar Soil by Rocket Exhaust Plumes; Trajectory Model of Lunar Dust Particles; Using Lunar Module Shadows To Scale the Effects of Rocket Exhaust Plumes; Predicting the Acoustic Environment Induced by the Launch of the Ares I Vehicle; Measuring Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocity in a Thin Sheet of Graphite Epoxy Composite; Hail Size Distribution Mapping; Launch Pad 39 Hail Monitor Array System; Autonomous Flight Safety System - Phase III; The Photogrammetry Cube; Bird Vision System; Automating Range Surveillance Through Radio Interferometry and Field Strength Mapping Techniques; Next-Generation Telemetry Workstation; GPS Metric Tracking Unit; and Space-Based Range.

  17. Technology Evaluations Related to Mercury, Technetium, and Chloride in Treatment of Wastes at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. M. Barnes; D. D. Taylor; S. C. Ashworth; J. B. Bosley; D. R. Haefner

    1999-10-01

    The Idaho High-Level Waste and Facility Disposition Environmental Impact Statement defines alternative for treating and disposing of wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Development is required for several technologies under consideration for treatment of these wastes. This report contains evaluations of whether specific treatment is needed and if so, by what methods, to remove mercury, technetium, and chlorides in proposed Environmental Impact Statement treatment processes. The evaluations of mercury include a review of regulatory requirements that would apply to mercury wastes in separations processes, an evaluation of the sensitivity of mercury flowrates and concentrations to changes in separations processing schemes and conditions, test results from laboratory-scale experiments of precipitation of mercury by sulfide precipitation agents from the TRUEX carbonate wash effluent, and evaluations of methods to remove mercury from New Waste Calcining Facility liquid and gaseous streams. The evaluation of technetium relates to the need for technetium removal and alternative methods to remove technetium from streams in separations processes. The need for removal of chlorides from New Waste Calcining Facility scrub solution is also evaluated.

  18. Technology Evaluations Related to Mercury, Technetium, and Chloride in Treatment of Wastes at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho High-Level Waste and Facility Disposition Environmental Impact Statement defines alternative for treating and disposing of wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Development is required for several technologies under consideration for treatment of these wastes. This report contains evaluations of whether specific treatment is needed and if so, by what methods, to remove mercury, technetium, and chlorides in proposed Environmental Impact Statement treatment processes. The evaluations of mercury include a review of regulatory requirements that would apply to mercury wastes in separations processes, an evaluation of the sensitivity of mercury flowrates and concentrations to changes in separations processing schemes and conditions, test results from laboratory-scale experiments of precipitation of mercury by sulfide precipitation agents from the TRUEX carbonate wash effluent, and evaluations of methods to remove mercury from New Waste Calcining Facility liquid and gaseous streams. The evaluation of technetium relates to the need for technetium removal and alternative methods to remove technetium from streams in separations processes. The need for removal of chlorides from New Waste Calcining Facility scrub solution is also evaluated

  19. Motor Control Center (MCC) based technology study for safety-related motor operated valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is necessary to monitor periodically the operability of safety-related Motor-Operated Valves (MOVs) in nuclear power plants. However, acquiring diagnostic signals for MOVs is very difficult, and doing so requires an excessive amount of time, effort, and expenditure. This paper introduces an accurate and economical method to evaluate the performance of MOVs remotely. The technique to be utilized includes electrical measurements and signal processing to estimate the motor torque and the stem thrust, which have been cited as the two most effective parameters in diagnosing MOVs by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The motor torque is calculated by using electrical signals, which can be measured in the Motor Control Center (MCC). Some advantages of using the motor torque signature over other signatures are examined. The stem thrust is calculated considering the characteristics of the MOV and the estimated motor torque. The basic principle of estimating stem thrust is explained. The developed method is implemented in diagnostic equipment, namely, the Motor Operated Valve Intelligent Diagnostic System (MOVIDS), which is used to obtain the accuracy of and to validate the applicability of the developed method in nuclear power plants. Finally, the accuracy of the developed method is presented and some examples applied to field data are discussed

  20. Accuracy of patient's turnover time prediction using RFID technology in an academic ambulatory surgery center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand-Maillet, Florence; Debes, Claire; Garnier, Fanny; Dufeu, Nicolas; Sciard, Didier; Beaussier, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Patients flow in outpatient surgical unit is a major issue with regards to resource utilization, overall case load and patient satisfaction. An electronic Radio Frequency Identification Device (RFID) was used to document the overall time spent by the patients between their admission and discharge from the unit. The objective of this study was to evaluate how a RFID-based data collection system could provide an accurate prediction of the actual time for the patient to be discharged from the ambulatory surgical unit after surgery. This is an observational prospective evaluation carried out in an academic ambulatory surgery center (ASC). Data on length of stay at each step of the patient care, from admission to discharge, were recorded by a RFID device and analyzed according to the type of surgical procedure, the surgeon and the anesthetic technique. Based on these initial data (n?=?1520), patients were scheduled in a sequential manner according to the expected duration of the previous case. The primary endpoint was the difference between actual and predicted time of discharge from the unit. A total of 414 consecutive patients were prospectively evaluated. One hundred seventy four patients (42%) were discharged at the predicted time ± 30 min. Only 24% were discharged behind predicted schedule. Using an automatic record of patient's length of stay would allow an accurate prediction of the discharge time according to the type of surgery, the surgeon and the anesthetic procedure. PMID:25637542

  1. Heat pump centered integrated community energy systems: system development. Georgia Institute of Technology interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, D W; Trammel, B C; Dixit, B S; McCurry, D C; Rindt, B A

    1979-02-01

    Heat Pump Centered-Integrated Community Energy Systems (HP-ICES) show the promise of utilizing low-grade thermal energy for low-quality energy requirements such as space heating and cooling. The Heat Pump - Wastewater Heat Recovery (HP-WHR) scheme is one approach to an HP-ICES that proposes to reclaim low-grade thermal energy from a community's wastewater effluent. The concept of an HP-WHR system is developed, the potential performance and economics of such a system is evaluated and the potential for application is examined. A thermodynamic performance analysis of a hypothetical system projects an overall system coefficient of performance (C.O.P.) of from 2.181 to 2.264 for wastewater temperatures varying from 50/sup 0/F to 80/sup 0/F. Primary energy source savings from the implementation of this system is projected to be 5.014 QUADS, or the energy equivalent of 687 millions tons of coal, from 1980 to the year 2000. Economic analysis shows the HP-WHR scheme to be cost-competitive, on the basis of a net present value life cycle cost comparison, with conventional residential and light commercial HVAC systems.

  2. A Review of Recent Thermophotovoltaic Energy Conversion Technology Development at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, David M.; Chubb, Donald L.

    1998-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) has had an ongoing research program in TPV since the late 1980's. This effort has included both in-house research programs on critical components such as photovoltaic cells (PV) and emitter materials, as well as an active contracting effort directed toward system, and component development. Of particular note is the in-house development of thin film selective emitters fabricated from rare-earth yttrium aluminum garnets (YAG). Also developed at LeRC is a Monolithic Interconnect Module (MIM) consisting of many small InGaAs cells series interconnected on a single InP substrate. An infrared reflector placed on the rear surface of the substrate returns unabsorbed photons to the emitter for recycling. The current contracted efforts include two TPV system developments by Tecogen, Inc., a solar powered TPV system development, a GaInAsSb cell development and several emitter development efforts (plasma-sprayed selective emitters, flexible SiC and a selective emitting light pipe).

  3. A review of recent thermophotovoltaic energy conversion technology development at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilt, D.M.; Chubb, D.L. [Photovoltaic and Space Environment Branch, NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    1998-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) has had an ongoing research program in TPV since the late 1980{close_quote}s. This effort has included both in-house research programs on critical components such as photovoltaic cells (PV) and emitter materials, as well as an active contracting effort directed toward system and component development. Of particular note is the in-house development of thin film selective emitters fabricated from rare-earth yttrium aluminum garnets (YAG). Also developed at LeRC is a Monolithic Interconnected Module (MIM) consisting of many small InGaAs cells series interconnected on a single InP substrate. An infrared reflector placed on the rear surface of the substrate returns unabsorbed photons to the emitter for recycling. The current contracted efforts include two TPV system developments by Tecogen, Inc., a solar powered TPV system development, a GaInAsSb cell development and several emitter development efforts (plasma-sprayed selective emitters, flexible SiC and a selective emitting light pipe). {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. 75 FR 11917 - Chrysler LLC, Technology Center, Including On-Site Leased Workers from Aerotek, Ajilon, Altair...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ...Technologies, Argos ASG Renaissance, Automated Analysis...Technology Assoc. Gonzalez Design Engineering, Gtech...Ajilon, Argos, ASG Renaissance, Bartech, Group...Technologies, Argos, ASG Renaissance, Automated Analysis...Technology Assoc., Gonzalez Design Engineering,...

  5. Adding to the mix: integrating ELSI into a National Nanoscale Science and Technology Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornstad, David J; Wolfe, Amy K

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes issues associated with integrating the study of Ethical, Legal and Social Issues (ELSI) into ongoing scientific and technical research and describes an approach adopted by the authors for their own work with the center for nanophase materials sciences (CNMS) at the Oak Ridge national laboratory (ORNL). Four key questions are considered: (a) What is ELSI and how should it identify and address topics of interest for the CNMS? (b) What advantages accrue to incorporating ELSI into the CNMS? (c) How should the integration of ELSI into the CNMS take place? (d) How should one judge the effectiveness of the activity? We conclude that ELSI research is not a monolithic body of knowledge, but should be adapted to the question at hand. Our approach focuses on junctures in the R&D continuum at which key decisions occur, avoids topics of a purely ethical nature or advocacy, and seeks to gather data in ways that permit testing the validity of generalization. Integrating ELSI into the CNMS allows dealing with topics firmly grounded in science, offers concrete examples of potential downstream applications and provides access to the scientists using the CNMS and their insights and observations. As well, integration provides the opportunity for R&D managers to benefit from ELSI insights and the potential to modify R&D agendas. Successful integration is dependent on the particular ELSI question set that drives the project. In this case questions sought to identify key choices, information of value to scientists, institutional attributes, key attributes of the CNMS culture, and alternatives for communicating results. The opportunity to consult with scientists on ELSI implications is offered, but not promoted. Finally, ELSI effectiveness is judged by observing the use to which research products are put within the CNMS, ORNL, and the community of external scholars. PMID:22068631

  6. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Swimming Pool Foundation : NSPF.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention : CDC.gov What is lifeguard lung? ... water safety are the following: Centers for Disease Control (CDC) cdc.gov National Swimming Poo l Foundation ( ...

  7. The International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) and ISTC projects related to research reactors. Information review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. ISTC - history, activities, outlook: The ISTC is an intergovernmental organization established by agreement between the Russian Federation, the European Union, Japan, and the United States. Since 1994, Finland, Sweden, Norway, Georgia, Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan and the Kyrgyz Republic have acceded to the Agreement and Statute. At present, the Republic of Korea is finishing the process of accession to the ISTC. All work of the ISTC is aimed at the goals defined in the ISTC Agreement: - To give CIS weapons scientists, particularly those who possess knowledge and skills related to weapons of mass destruction and their delivery systems, the opportunities to redirect their talents to peaceful activities; - To contribute to solving national and international technical problems; - To support the transition to market-based economies; - To support basic and applied research; - To help integrate CIS weapons scientists into the international scientific community. The projects may be funded both through governmental funds of the Funding Parties specified for the ISTC, and by organizations, nominated as Funding Partners of the ISTC. According to the ISTC Statute, approved by the appropriate national organizations, funds used within ISTC projects are exempt from CIS taxes. As of March 1998, more than 1500 proposals had been submitted to the Center, of which 541 were approved for funding, for a total value of approximately US dollars 165 million. The number of scientists and engineers participating in the projects is more than 17,000. 2. Projects Related to Research Reactors: There are about 20 funded and as yet non-funded projects related to various problems of research reactors. Many of them address safety issues. Information review of the results and plans of both ongoing projects and as yet non-funded proposals related to research reactors will be presented with the aim assisting international researchers to establish partnerships or collaboration with ISTC projects. The following groups of ISTC projects will be represented: 1. Complex Computer Simulators for Research Reactors; 2. Reactor Facility Decommissioning; 3. Neutron Sources for Medicine; 4. Medical Radioisotope Production by Research Reactors; 5. Research Reactors for Examination of Physics and Materials. (author)

  8. Aquatic biochronologies and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrongiello, John R.; Thresher, Ronald E.; Smith, David C.

    2012-12-01

    Historical evidence provides essential context for models predicting the biological impacts of climate change. Such long-term data sets are relatively common for terrestrial taxa and environments, but sparse for aquatic systems. Aquatic biochronologies -- generated from information recorded in the hard parts of fish, molluscs and corals that are archived in their millions worldwide -- can provide valuable long-term ecological insights into marine and freshwater environments. These resources are, however, at present under-utilized in the measurement and prediction of ecological responses to climate change, despite their potential to provide unprecedented levels of spatial and temporal detail in aquatic environments.

  9. Management of disused sealed sources received by the Brazilian Center for Development of Nuclear Technology - CDTN, MG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing use of radioactive sources in Brazil brought as a consequence the increased number of disused sources because, after the withdrawal of the service, the sources are discarded by users of radioisotopes. These sources have been forwarded to the research institutes of the CNEN, among them CDTN - Brazilian Center for Development of Nuclear Technology -, who have received a significant amount of them, including more intense activity sources, such as from the teletherapy. For effective control of the sources, the compliance of the CNEN - Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission - and the recommendations of IAEA -International Atomic Energy Agency - implemented a management system that enables the monitoring of the entire process, from the initial contact to the delivery of supplies to its appropriate packaging. This paper describes the progress that has been made

  10. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center. Report to the Steering Committee, February 1996. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Carbon Injection System and the Trace Element Removal test blocks. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued with impinger capture solutions. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (Carbon Injection System) was utilized in the TER test configuration this month. The B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit is being installed utilizing the Mini Pilot Flue Gas System. The 1.0 MW Cold- Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. Monthly inspections were conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems, and will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff.

  11. PROBABILISTIC MONITORING FOR TRIBAL AQUATIC RESOURCE: EPA'S NATIONAL COASTAL ASSESSMENT TRIBAL TRAINING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, James, David Lawes, Vincent Cooke and Tom Heitmuller. In press. Probabilistic Monitoring for Tribal Aquatic Resources: EPA's National Coastal Assessment Tribal Training (Abstract). To be presented at the Monitoring Science and Technology Symposium, 20-24 September 2004, D...

  12. Proposal of an Observatory of Trends for Nanotechnology in the Context of Technology Management in an Oil and Gas R&D Center – Case: Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Masseran Antunes Parreiras

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents basic concepts on nanotechnology and the use of this in an oil and gas research and development (R&D center, the Research and Development Center Leopoldo Américo Miguez de Mello of Petrobras (CENPES. The aim of this paper is to present a proposal of an observatory of trends in the area of nanotechnology at CENPES, to generate information, such as the state of the art technologies, technological trajectories, movements of competitors and partners, and aspects relating to regulations and incentives for decision making in the technology management process. The model consists of five steps that should occur in a continuous cycle: literature review, expert consultation, analysis of opportunities and threats, timelines or roadmaps, and monitoring. In conclusion, the proposed observatory includes a set of topics (variables, sources, techniques of competitive technical intelligence and technological foresight, systematized in order to support decision making in technology management.

  13. Proposal of an Observatory of Trends for Nanotechnology in the Context of Technology Management in an Oil and Gas R&D Center - Case: Nanotechnology

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Viviane, Masseran Antunes Parreiras; Adelaide Maria, de Souza Antunes; Lelia, Lowe.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: English Abstract in english The paper presents basic concepts on nanotechnology and the use of this in an oil and gas research and development (R&D) center, the Research and Development Center Leopoldo Américo Miguez de Mello of Petrobras (CENPES). The aim of this paper is to present a proposal of an observatory of trends in t [...] he area of nanotechnology at CENPES, to generate information, such as the state of the art technologies, technological trajectories, movements of competitors and partners, and aspects relating to regulations and incentives for decision making in the technology management process. The model consists of five steps that should occur in a continuous cycle: literature review, expert consultation, analysis of opportunities and threats, timelines or roadmaps, and monitoring. In conclusion, the proposed observatory includes a set of topics (variables), sources, techniques of competitive technical intelligence and technological foresight, systematized in order to support decision making in technology management.

  14. Human-Centered Technologies and Procedures for Future Air Traffic Management: A Preliminary Overview of 1996 Studies and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip; McCoy, Elaine; Denning, Rebecca; Woods, David; Sarter, Nadine; Dekker, Sidney; Billings, Charles

    1996-01-01

    In this project, we have been exploring the use of a general methodology to predict the impact of future Air Traffic Management (ATM) concepts and technologies. In applying this methodology, our emphasis has been on the importance of modeling coordination and cooperation among the multiple agents within this system, and on understanding how the interactions among these agents will be influenced as new roles, responsibilities, procedures and technologies are introduced. To accomplish this, we have been collecting data on performance under the current air traffic management system, trying to identify critical problem areas and looking for exemplars suggestive of general approaches for solving such problems. Based on the results of these field studies, we have developed a set of scenarios centered around potential future system designs, and have conducted studies using these scenarios involving a total 40 controllers, dispatchers, pilots and traffic managers. The purpose of this report is to provide NASA with an early summary of the major recommendations that have resulted from our research under the AATT Program thus far. Recommendations 1-3 deal with general approaches that our findings suggest should be incorporated in future AATT Program activities, while Recommendations 4-11 identify some specific topics and technologies that merit research and development activities. Detailed technical reports containing supporting data, as well as the results of our still ongoing analyses, will be provided at a later date. The remainder of this report is organized as follows. Section 1 briefly describes the general design philosophy supported by our empirical studies. Section 2 presents the research methods we have used for identifying requirements for future system designs and for evaluating alternative design solutions. Section 3 discusses preliminary results from an initial set of investigations that we have conducted using these research methods. Section 4 then provides an overall summary. An outline of the rest of this preliminary project summary is provided on the following page.

  15. Implementing health information technology in a patient-centered manner: patient experiences with an online evidence-based lifestyle intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyden, Jennifer R; Zickmund, Susan L; Bhargava, Tina D; Bryce, Cindy L; Conroy, Molly B; Fischer, Gary S; Hess, Rachel; Simkin-Silverman, Laurey R; McTigue, Kathleen M

    2013-01-01

    The patient-centered care (PCC) model and the use of health information technology (HIT) are major initiatives for improving U.S. healthcare quality and delivery. A lack of published data on patient perceptions of Internet-based care makes patient-centered implementation of HIT challenging. To help ascertain patients' perceptions of an online intervention, patients completing a 1-year web-based lifestyle intervention were asked to complete a semistructured interview. We used qualitative methodology to determine frequency and types of interview responses. Overall satisfaction with program features was coded on a Likert-type scale. High levels of satisfaction were seen with the online lifestyle coaching (80%), self-monitoring tools (57%), and structured lesson features (54%). Moderated chat sessions and online resources were rarely used. Frequently identified helpful aspects were those that allowed for customized care and shared decision-making consistent with the tenets of PCC. Unhelpful program aspects were reported less often. Findings suggest that despite challenges for communicating effectively in an online forum, the personalized support, high-tech data management capabilities, and easily followed evidence-based curricula afforded by HIT may be a means of providing PCC and improving healthcare delivery and quality. PMID:24004039

  16. Aquatic biosystems: reactions and actions

    OpenAIRE

    Phlips Edward J; DasSarma Shiladitya

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aquatic biological systems are a critical part of the structure and function of earth's biosphere. While attention of the scientific community is often focused on the reaction of biological systems to changes in the environment, these systems also have profound effects, or actions, on the environment. Throughout the evolutionary history of earth, the rise and/or fall of different aquatic biosystems has impacted the character of the biosphere. At no time have environmental changes bee...

  17. Aquatic Species Project report, FY 1989--1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.M.; Sprague, S.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the Aquatic Species Project. The four articles included are summaries of individual research projects and are entered into the EDB as such. The goal of the Aquatic Species Project is to develop the technology base for large-scale production of oil-rich microalgae. The project is also developing methods to convert the microalgal lipids into liquid fuels needed for industry and transportation. Researchers in the Aquatics Species Project focus on the use of microalgae as a feedstock for producing renewable, high-energy liquid fuels such as diesel. It is important for the United States to develop alternative renewable oil sources because 42% of the current energy market in the United States is for liquid fuels, and 38% of these fuels are imported. In 1979, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated the Aquatic Species Project as part of the overall effort in biofuels. The project began to focus exclusively on fuels from microalgae in 1982. Estimates show that the technology being developed by the project can provide as much as 7% of the total current energy demand. The program`s basic premise is that microalgae, which have been called the most productive biochemical factories in the world, can produce up to 30 times more oil per unit of growth area than land plants. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  18. University of Florida: Aquatic and Wetland Plants and Invasive Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquatic plant enthusiasts will enjoy this image-rich website from the Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants (APIRS) at the University of Florida. The site features images of nearly 400 native and non-native plant species found in Florida. Site visitors can locate plant species by scientific name, common name, and plant type category (e.g. trees, shrubs, vines). Species pages contain several images accompanied by a brief description. Line drawings of numerous plant species are available for viewing as well. In addition, the site offers an Introduction to Native Plants, and an Introduction to Non-Native Invasive Plants.

  19. Outline in 1997 Japan compound material academic meeting technological prize winning technology. Kenchiku, doboku kozobutsu no hoshu[center dot]hokyo yo forukatousito no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iba, Yoshitomo.; Uemura, Masahiko.; Murakami, Shinkichi.; Saito, Makoto.; Kobayashi, Akira. (Nittetsu Composite Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1999-03-15

    That function declines in the sutra time target, and it is finally destroyed, or a construction structure thing bears putting off that life by managing efficient maintenance it is possible. The factor of the function decline of the structure thing, the degree of the decline, and so on are grasped quantitatively, and efficient repair reinforcement time and a method of construction are chosen, and you must carry it out for that. It is paying attention to the development of the method of construction to reinforce the maintenance repair of the construction structure thing by using the tip compound factor from such a viewpoint. In the beginning, a material cost was very expensive, and the recognition not to use it was very general in such a construction field. In such recognition, in Tonen Corp. incorporated company, it has paid attention to the use possibility in the construction field of the tip compound factor since early, research and development have been done continuously from 1980, that It succeeds in, and it is the method of construction that a repair reinforces a concrete structure thing by the tip material that the method of construction which got the technological prize of the Japan compound material academic meeting in 1997 moved carbon fiber to the center. (NEDO)

  20. Outline in 1997 Japan compound material academic meeting technological prize winning technology; Kenchiku, doboku kozobutsu no hoshu{center_dot}hokyo yo forukatousito no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iba, Yoshitomo.; Uemura, Masahiko.; Murakami, Shinkichi.; Saito, Makoto.; Kobayashi, Akira. [Nittetsu Composite Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-03-15

    That function declines in the sutra time target, and it is finally destroyed, or a construction structure thing bears putting off that life by managing efficient maintenance it is possible. The factor of the function decline of the structure thing, the degree of the decline, and so on are grasped quantitatively, and efficient repair reinforcement time and a method of construction are chosen, and you must carry it out for that. It is paying attention to the development of the method of construction to reinforce the maintenance repair of the construction structure thing by using the tip compound factor from such a viewpoint. In the beginning, a material cost was very expensive, and the recognition not to use it was very general in such a construction field. In such recognition, in Tonen Corp. incorporated company, it has paid attention to the use possibility in the construction field of the tip compound factor since early, research and development have been done continuously from 1980, that It succeeds in, and it is the method of construction that a repair reinforces a concrete structure thing by the tip material that the method of construction which got the technological prize of the Japan compound material academic meeting in 1997 moved carbon fiber to the center. (NEDO)

  1. Mapping, Monitoring and Modeling Submersed Aquatic Vegetation Species and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartis, Brett Michael

    Aquatic macrophyte communities are critically important habitat species in aquatic systems worldwide. None are more important than those found beneath the water's surface, commonly referred to as submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV). Although vital to such systems, many native submersed plants have shown near irreversible declines in recent decades as water quality impairment, habitat destruction, and encroachment by invasive species have increased. In the past, aquatic plant science has emphasized the restoration and protection of native species and the management of invasive species. Comparatively little emphasis has been directed toward adequately mapping and monitoring these resources to track their viability over time. Modeling the potential intrusion of certain invasive plant species has also been given little attention, likely because aquatic systems in general can be difficult to assess. In recent years, scientists and resource managers alike have begun paying more attention to mapping SAV communities and to address the spread of invasive species across various regions. This research attempts to provide new, cutting-edge techniques to improve SAV mapping and monitoring efforts in coastal regions, at both community and individual species levels, while also providing insights about the establishment potential of Hydrilla verticillata, a noxious, highly invasive submersed plant. Technological advances in satellite remote sensing, interpolation and spatial analysis in geographic information systems, and state-of-the-art climate envelope modeling techniques were used to further assess the dynamic nature of SAV on various scales. This work contributes to the growing science of mapping, monitoring, and modeling of SAV

  2. Abstracts of the 34. aquatic toxicity workshop : navigating new waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This workshop provided an opportunity to discuss current research findings in the field of aquatic toxicology and the biological effect on biota. It addressed the challenges of assessing and protecting the health of aquatic ecosystems in Canada. Topics of discussion ranged from basic aquatic toxicology to applications in environmental monitoring, setting regulations and developing criteria for sediment and water quality. The sessions were entitled: acid rain; agricultural stressors; amphibian ecotoxicology; aquaculture; aquatic ecotoxicology and human health; biological test methods development and their application; effects based pesticides research; emerging technologies for tracing contaminants; endocrine disruption; environmental/climate change in aquatic toxicology; environmental effects monitoring; environmental impacts of mercury; environmental risk assessment; Gulfs of Maine and St. Lawrence/Bay of Fundy issues; Maritimes leaders in marine ecotoxicology and prevention; metal and diamond mining; microscale ecotoxicology; multiple stressors in estuaries; municipal wastewaters and water treatment; non-lethal sampling; oil and gas development and production; parasites as indicators of contamination; persistent contaminants; sediment/soil toxicology; selenium ecotoxicology; and, stable isotopes in ecotoxicology. This book featured 162 abstracts, of which 19 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database

  3. Center for Neighborhood Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    An organization that is active in building coalitions among citizens, businesses, nonprofit organizations, government and other members of communities to promote sustainable development in Chicago and other cities in the United States.

  4. Savannah River Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a monthly progress report from the Savannah River Laboratory for the month of January 1993. It has sections with work in the areas of reactor safety, tritium processes and absorption, separations programs and wastes, environmental concerns and responses, waste management practices, and general concerns

  5. Human Factors Process Task Analysis Liquid Oxygen Pump Acceptance Test Procedure for the Advanced Technology Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diorio, Kimberly A.

    2002-01-01

    A process task analysis effort was undertaken by Dynacs Inc. commencing in June 2002 under contract from NASA YA-D6. Funding was provided through NASA's Ames Research Center (ARC), Code M/HQ, and Industrial Engineering and Safety (IES). The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Engineering Development Contract (EDC) Task Order was 5SMA768. The scope of the effort was to conduct a Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) of a hazardous activity and provide recommendations to eliminate or reduce the effects of errors caused by human factors. The Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Pump Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was selected for this analysis. The HF PFMEA table (see appendix A) provides an analysis of six major categories evaluated for this study. These categories include Personnel Certification, Test Procedure Format, Test Procedure Safety Controls, Test Article Data, Instrumentation, and Voice Communication. For each specific requirement listed in appendix A, the following topics were addressed: Requirement, Potential Human Error, Performance-Shaping Factors, Potential Effects of the Error, Barriers and Controls, Risk Priority Numbers, and Recommended Actions. This report summarizes findings and gives recommendations as determined by the data contained in appendix A. It also includes a discussion of technology barriers and challenges to performing task analyses, as well as lessons learned. The HF PFMEA table in appendix A recommends the use of accepted and required safety criteria in order to reduce the risk of human error. The items with the highest risk priority numbers should receive the greatest amount of consideration. Implementation of the recommendations will result in a safer operation for all personnel.

  6. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information on the following websites: National Swimming Pool Foundation : NSPF.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention : ... awareness for pools. These include: National Swimming Pool Foundation (NSPF ): nspf.org USA Swimming: usaswimming.org Where ...

  7. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may also require a call to the insurance company. Additionally, one might refer to the APTA website ... encouraged to seek information on the following websites: National Swimming Pool Foundation : NSPF.org Centers for Disease ...

  8. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to seek information on the following websites: National Swimming Pool Foundation : NSPF.org Centers for Disease Control and ... understanding of the inherent risks in and around swimming pools. Back to Top Rules, Regulations & Operations FAQs Where ...

  9. Activities 2009-2011 at the Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of the Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center team at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, MD USA centered in the last two years on two main subjects: First, the data center completed and issued a new, significantly improved version of its principal product, the Atomic Spectra Database (ASD Version 4.0 in September 2010, with an update 4.1.0 in May 2011). These versions contain new data for a good number of additional spectra as well as new, better quality and more extensive data replacing the earlier material. They are also for the first time completely integrated with the two NIST bibliographies on atomic energy levels and spectra, and on atomic transition probabilities. The sources of the material selected in ASD for the various spectra and transitions are identified there by their numbers in the respective bibliographies, so that the original papers can be directly accessed by users if they desire more background material. Secondly, new tabulations of atomic energy levels and wavelengths were completed for hydrogen and its isotopes (H, D, T), for argon (Ar II through Ar XVIII), cesium (Cs I through Cs LV), barium (Ba III through Ba LVI) and tungsten (W III through W LXXIV). Compilations of energy levels and spectral lines are in progress on neon (Ne IV), chlorine (Cl I through Cl XVII), and nickel (Ni I through Ni VIII). Data assessments and compilations of atomic transition probabilities were completed for hydrogen and its isotopes (H,D,T), for helium(He I and He II), for lithium (Li I through Li III), beryllium (Be I through Be IV), boron (B I through B V), sulfur (S I through S XVI), cesium (Cs I through Cs LV), and barium (Ba III through Ba LVI). Additional compilations for the higher fluorine and neon ions (F V through F IX, Ne VI through Ne X), chlorine (Cl I through Cl XVII) and nickel (Ni I through Ni VIII) are in progress. As in all our earlier work, the NIST data tables are limited to reference data, i.e. data of a certain minimum quality. Only one numerical value is presented for the wavelength, transition probability, and lower and upper energy levels of a given spectral line. This value may be either from a single source, evaluated to be the most accurate one, or from an average of several sources of about equal reliability. For atomic transition probabilities, explicit accuracy ratings are given. For wavelengths and energy levels, the number of tabulated digits indicates their accuracy. (author)

  10. Objetos subordinantes: la tecnología epistémica para producir centros y periferias Subordinating objects: epistemic technology to produce centers and peripheries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Rodriguez Medina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available En los estudios sociales de la ciencia y la tecnología ha aparecido abundante literatura acerca de la importancia del espacio en la producción y la circulación de conocimiento. La propia idea de circulación de conocimiento ha recibido mayor atención, especialmente por la necesidad de analizar las transformaciones que éste recibe a medida que viaja de su lugar de origen a sus múltiples destinos. El presente artículo, derivado de investigaciones cualitativas y documentales sobre trayectorias académicas e influencia teórica, introduce el concepto de "objeto subordinante" para comprender la apropiación en campos periféricos de conocimiento producido en los centros metropolitanos.In social studies on science and technology, abundant literature has emerged on the importance of space in the production and the circulation of knowledge. The very idea of the circulation of knowledge has received more attention, particularly because of the need to analyze the transformations it undergoes as it travels from its place of origin to its multiple destinations. This article, derived from qualitative research and the analysis of documents on academic trajectories and theoretical influence, introduces the concept of the "subordinating object" to understand how knowledge produced in metropolitan centers is appropriated in peripheral fields.

  11. Review of issues experienced by remote users of Databases operated by Regional Information Center Of Science and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    jafar Mehrad

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available   The wide-spread use of search engines – due to their simplicity and ease of use- has given rise to significant shift in users’ search behavior. Resolving the exiting issues and difficulties in access to library materials resulting in easier utilization of the same would impact on users increasing availing themselves to the said material. Regional Information Center on Science and Technology has attracted large number of remote users (both from Iran and the Middle-East based on numerous online databases that it operates. The present study carries out a survey in order to investigate the most common issues experienced by RICST remote users of online databases. Low connection speeds is the main difficulty experienced by such users that entails numerous problems. Slow download speeds, servers maintenance downtimes, subscription fees, unfamiliarity with RCIST databases and facilities, lack of search skills, as well as user ID and passwords were cited as issues. In spite of having user ID and passwords, these users cited benefiting from the knowledge of RCIST information specialists as the reason for coming back. User satisfaction with RCIST databases is an indicator of its positive performance with respect to such users.

  12. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center report to the Steering Committee. Final technical monthly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block as the Pilot was operated at baseline, forced oxidation, and inhibited oxidation conditions. As the NYSEG Kintigh Station conducted a test bum this month with Petroleum coke/coal fuel blends, a one-week trace element characterization test was performed across the Pilot unit testing this flue gas. Additionally, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies continued this month as investigations into various activated carbons, metal amalgams, and impinger capture solutions were conducted. As a result of new directions received from EPRI, August was the last scheduled month for testing on the 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit at the ECTC. This month, the unit was isolated from the flue gas path and placed in a cold-standby mode for future test activities.

  13. Tritium in the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Hoffman, F.O.; Frank, M.L.

    1986-02-01

    Tritium is of environmental importance because it is released from nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities and because it has a half life of 12.26 y. Most of the tritium released into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment, where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered studies of algae, aquatic macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, and the food chain, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue-free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near those of the external medium. The rate at which tritium from tritiated water is incorporated into the organic matter of cells is slower than the rate of its incorporation into the tissue-free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster, and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water alone. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the ''carrier'' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher trophic levels. Radiation doses from tritium releases to large populations of humans will most likely come from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products.

  14. Tritium in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium is of environmental importance because it is released from nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities and because it has a half life of 12.26 y. Most of the tritium released into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment, where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered studies of algae, aquatic macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, and the food chain, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue-free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near those of the external medium. The rate at which tritium from tritiated water is incorporated into the organic matter of cells is slower than the rate of its incorporation into the tissue-free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster, and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water alone. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the ''carrier'' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher trophic levels. Radiation doses from tritium releases to large populations of humans will most likely come from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products

  15. Tritium in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the tritium released from nuclear facilities into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered algae, aquatic plants, invertebrates, fish, and food chain studies, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near that of the external medium. Incorporation of tritium from triated water into the organic matter of cells is at a slower rate than incorporation into the tissue free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the 'carrier' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher tropic levels. Radiation doses to large populations of humans from tritium releases will most likely be from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products. (author)

  16. Differentiating aquatic plant communities in a eutrophic river using hyperspectral and multispectral remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Y.Q.; Yu, Q.; Zimmerman, M.J.; Flint, S.; Waldron, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the efficacy of remote sensing technology to monitor species composition, areal extent and density of aquatic plants (macrophytes and filamentous algae) in impoundments where their presence may violate water-quality standards. Multispectral satellite (IKONOS) images and more than 500 in situ hyperspectral samples were acquired to map aquatic plant distributions. By analyzing field measurements, we created a library of hyperspectral signatures for a variety of aquatic plant species, associations and densities. We also used three vegetation indices. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), near-infrared (NIR)-Green Angle Index (NGAI) and normalized water absorption depth (DH), at wavelengths 554, 680, 820 and 977 nm to differentiate among aquatic plant species composition, areal density and thickness in cases where hyperspectral analysis yielded potentially ambiguous interpretations. We compared the NDVI derived from IKONOS imagery with the in situ, hyperspectral-derived NDVI. The IKONOS-based images were also compared to data obtained through routine visual observations. Our results confirmed that aquatic species composition alters spectral signatures and affects the accuracy of remote sensing of aquatic plant density. The results also demonstrated that the NGAI has apparent advantages in estimating density over the NDVI and the DH. In the feature space of the three indices, 3D scatter plot analysis revealed that hyperspectral data can differentiate several aquatic plant associations. High-resolution multispectral imagery provided useful information to distinguish among biophysical aquatic plant characteristics. Classification analysis indicated that using satellite imagery to assess Lemna coverage yielded an overall agreement of 79% with visual observations and >90% agreement for the densest aquatic plant coverages. Interpretation of biophysical parameters derived from high-resolution satellite or airborne imagery should prove to be a valuable approach for assessing the effectiveness of management practices for controlling aquatic plant growth in inland waters, as well as for routine monitoring of aquatic plants in lakes and suitable lentic environments. ?? 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Thorium: one of the analytical techniques in neutronic activation and alpha spectrometry of the CDTN (Brazilian Nuclear Technology Development Center) in the last three decades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For long years, the CDTN (Brazilian Nuclear Technology Development Center ) has applied several analytical techniques in the thorium determination. This work is about the evolution of the neutronic activation in the thorium 232 analysis from the 1960's to now. The importance of the analysis request and alpha spectrometry for the thorium 228 and thorium 232 determination is emphasized. (J.A.M.M.)

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL AND SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION: BIOMASS CO-FIRING IN INDUSTRIAL BOILERS--MINNESOTA POWER'S RAPIDS ENERGY CENTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA operates the Environmental and Sustainable Technology Evaluation (ESTE) program to facilitate the deployment of innovative technologies through performance verification and information dissemination. This ESTE project involved evaluation of co-firing common woody bio...

  19. NETL to establish Dynamic Simulation Research and Training Center to promote IGCC technology with CO2 cpture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provost, G.; Zitney, S.; Turton, R.; Erbes, M.; Stone, H.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Liese, E.; McClintock, M.; Quintrell, M.

    2009-01-01

    To meet increasing demand for education and experience with commercial-scale, coal-fired, integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants with CO2 capture, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is leading a project to deploy a generic, full-scope, real-time IGCC dynamic plant simulator for use in establishing a world-class research and training center, and to promote and demonstrate IGCC technology to power industry personnel. The simulator, being built by Invensys Process Systems (IPS), will be installed at two separate sites, at NETL and West Virginia University (WVU), and will combine a process/gasification simulator with a power/combined-cycle simulator together in a single dynamic simulation framework for use in engineering research studies and training applications. The simulator, scheduled to be launched in mid-year 2010, will have the following capabilities: High-fidelity, dynamic model of process-side (gasification and gas cleaning with CO2 capture) and power-block-side (combined cycle) for a generic IGCC plant fueled by coal and/or petroleum coke. Highly flexible configuration that allows concurrent training on separate gasification and combined cycle simulators, or up to two IGCC simulators. Ability to enhance and modify the plant model to facilitate studies of changes in plant configuration, equipment, and control strategies to support future R&D efforts. Training capabilities including startup, shutdown, load following and shedding, response to fuel and ambient condition variations, control strategy analysis (turbine vs. gasifier lead, etc.), representative malfunctions/trips, alarms, scenarios, trending, snapshots, data historian, etc. To support this effort, process descriptions and control strategies were developed for key sections of the plant as part of the detailed functional specification, which is serving as the basis of the simulator development. In this paper, we highlight the contents of the detailed functional specification for the simulator. We also describe the engineering, design, and expert testing process that the simulator will undergo in order to ensure that maximum fidelity is built into the generic simulator. Future applications and training programs associated with gasification, combined cycle, and IGCC simulations are discussed, including plant operation and control demonstrations, as well as education and training services.

  20. About Aquatic Physical Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... water safety are the following: Centers for Disease Control (CDC) cdc.gov National Swimming Poo l Foundation (NSPF) website: nspf.org How does one go about reporting a bad working environment (e.g. poor environmental ...

  1. The legacy of Cf-252 operations at Savannah River Technology Center: Continuous releases of radioiodine to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The iodine isotopes I-132, 1-133, I-134, and I-135, which have half-lives ranging from 53 minutes to 21 hours, are measured in the atmospheric effluent from the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRS is operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The isotopes' release rates range from 10 to 300 microcuries per week compared to the rate. The resulting annual dose from all iodine isotopes is minor; it comprises 0.01 percent of the total offsite dose due to atmospheric releases from SRS in 1990. Circumstantial evidence indicates the radioiodine originates from traces of unencapsulated Cf-252. The determination that spontaneous fission of Cf-252 is the source of the radioiodine has several ramifications. Radioactive fission-product isotopes of the noble gas elements krypton and xenon must also be released. Noble gases are more volatile and mobile than iodine. Also, the released iodine isotopes decay to xenon isotopes. The noble gases decay to non-gaseous elements that are transported along with radioiodine to the terrestrial environment by deposition from the SRTC plume. Only Sr-89 is believed to accumulate sufficiently in the environment to approach detectable levels. Given similar conditions in earlier years, releases of short-lived radioiodine have occurred undetected in routine monitoring since the early 1970s. Release rates 20 years ago would have been 200 times greater than current release rates. This report documents preliminary experiments conducted by SRTC and Environmental Monitoring Section (EMS) scientists. The release process and the environmental impact of fission products from Cf-252 should be thoroughly researched

  2. Green Technology, Cloud Computing and Data Centers: the Need for Integrated Energy Efficiency Framework and Effective Metric

    OpenAIRE

    Nader Nada; Abusfian Elgelany

    2014-01-01

    Energy efficiency (EE), energy consumption cost and environmental impact are vibrant challenges to cloud computing and data centers. Reducing energy consumption and emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) in data centers represent open areas and driving force for future research work on green data centers. Our Literature review reveals that there are currently several energy efficiency frameworks for data centers which combine a green IT architecture with specific activities and procedures that led...

  3. Aquatic Plants and Lake Ecosystems.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Jan; Kv?t, Jan

    Oxford : Blackwell Science Ltd, 2003 - (O´Sullivan, P.; Reynolds, C.), s. 309-340 ISBN 0-632-04797-6 R&D Projects: GA ?R GA206/01/1113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : Aquatic macrophytes * green algae Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  4. Integration of remote sensing data and geographic information systems technology for emergency managers and their applications at the Pacific Disaster Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laben, Craig

    2002-09-01

    As new remote sensing data and geographic information system (GIS) technology becomes available, it is increasingly possible to develop and provide effective products, services, and tools to the emergency management community. GIS technology has become increasingly affordable and provides the ability to capture, organize, manipulate, display, and analyze complex collections of geographic data and information. The Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) has historically provided decision support products and services to local, state, federal, and regional emergency managers in the Pacific Region to assist in all four phases of disaster management: mitigation, preparation, response, and recovery. The PDC's current mission includes the integration of scientific knowledge, remote sensing data and tools, modeling and simulation technology, weather analysis, digital and information technology, and systems engineering processes in support of the disaster management community. Current activities and methods are presented in this paper.

  5. Sustainable exploitation and management of aquatic resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neuenfeldt, Stefan; Köster, Fritz

    2014-01-01

    DTU Aqua conducts research, provides advice,educates at university level and contributes toinnovation in sustainable exploitation andmanagement of aquatic resources. The vision of DTUAqua is to enable ecologically and economicallysustainable exploitation of aquatic resourcesapplying an integrated ecosystem approach whichutilizes synergies in natural and technical sciencedisciplines. DTU Aqua advises the Danish Ministry ofFood, Agriculture and Fisheries and other publicauthorities, the commercial fisheries, theaquaculture industry and international commissions.DTU Aqua deals with all types ofaquatic habitats – from the North Atlantic Oceanand European shelf areas to coastal areas and innerDanish waters, ecosystems in lakes and streams as well as aquaculture. European shelf seas, Danish coastalareas and freshwaters are our main working areas, but we also work on Arctic and sub-Arctic waters, inparticular in the North Atlantic surrounding Greenland, and we are involved in research activities in otherparts of theworld. DTU Aqua’s research is divided into the following fields:Oceanography and climate focuses on understanding the interplay between physical,chemical and biological conditions in the ocean and how these factors impact the living conditions formarine organisms. Population genetics aims at gaining knowledge on how to preserve and managebiodiversity sustainably. Individual biology deals with the biology of aquatic organisms and theirinteraction with other organisms and with the surrounding environment.Freshwater fisheries and ecology is devoted to looking at the behaviour of particular speciesof fish and their interaction with the environment. Coastal ecology deals with the structure and function ofthe ecosystems as a habitat for fish and shellfish as well as with coastal area management. Marineecosystems aims at understanding the mechanisms that govern the interaction between individuals,species and populations in an ecosystem enabling us to determine the stability and flexibility of theecosystem.Marine living resources looks at the sustainable utilization of fish and shellfish stocks.Ecosystem effects expands from the ecosystem approach to fisheries management to an integratedapproach where other human activities are taken into consideration. Fisheries management developsmethods, models and tools for predicting and evaluating the effects of management measures andregulations applied by the authorities in fisheries management.Fisheries technology focuses on the development of selective and low-impact fishing gearwhich can help limit unintended by-catches and minimize the impact on the marine environment.Observation Technology is concerned with research and development of systems for collecting data insupport of marine research and management. Shellfish aquaculture and fisheries focuses on production potential and resilience of coastalareas in relation to shellfish aquaculture and fisheries. Aquaculture covers a wide range of biological andtechnological aspects from fish nutrition and growth to environmental impacts of aquaculture.

  6. Proposed Release Guides to Protect Aquatic Biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marter, W.L.

    2001-03-28

    At the request of South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and the Department of Energy (DOE), the Savannah River Laboratory was assigned the task of developing the release guides to protect aquatic biota. A review of aquatic radioecology literature by two leading experts in the field of radioecology concludes that exposure of aquatic biota at one rad per day or less will not produce detectable deleterious effects on aquatic organisms. On the basis of this report, DOE recommends the use of one rad per day as an interim dose standard to protect aquatic biota.

  7. Selection of a co-operation agreement between EMOVE – Innovative Technologies and WavEC – Wave Energy Center

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Sofia Ventura

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find the best technological co-operative arrangement for two partners – EMOVE and WavEC – concerning the development of the BluSphere technology. EMOVE provided most of the information needed for the empirical study and I based my research on academic papers. From the four options of co-operation on technological development: technology license, R&D joint arrangement, sourcing agreement and joint venture, the latter seems the best option for EMOVE in the sh...

  8. Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanislowski, Joshua; Tolbert, Scott; Curran, Tyler; Swanson, Michael

    2012-04-30

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has continued the work of the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) Program Year 6 Task 1.12 project to expose hydrogen separation membranes to coal-derived syngas. In this follow-on project, the EERC has exposed two membranes to coal-derived syngas produced in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU). Western Research Institute (WRI), with funding from the State of Wyoming Clean Coal Technology Program and the North Dakota Industrial Commission, contracted with the EERC to conduct testing of WRI’s coal-upgrading/gasification technology for subbituminous and lignite coals in the EERC’s TRDU. This gasifier fires nominally 200–500 lb/hour of fuel and is the pilot-scale version of the full-scale gasifier currently being constructed in Kemper County, Mississippi. A slipstream of the syngas was used to demonstrate warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation using membrane technology. Two membranes were exposed to coal-derived syngas, and the impact of coal-derived impurities was evaluated. This report summarizes the performance of WRI’s patent-pending coalupgrading/ gasification technology in the EERC’s TRDU and presents the results of the warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation tests. Overall, the WRI coal-upgrading/gasification technology was shown to produce a syngas significantly lower in CO2 content and significantly higher in CO content than syngas produced from the raw fuels. Warm-gas cleanup technologies were shown to be capable of reducing sulfur in the syngas to 1 ppm. Each of the membranes tested was able to produce at least 2 lb/day of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas.

  9. Technologies used for radwaste removal and deposition of old radwaste repositories at the Russian Research Center Kurchatov Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The salient features of the organization and execution of the work performed to remove radioactive wastes from and rehabilitate ten old repositories located on a special site of the Institute, which were distinguished by their design and the form and composition of the wastes contained in them, are described. The old repositories were located close to a housing development, so that special attention was devoted to the choice of technologies and technical means used for the rehabilitation. The technical approach and the sequence of operations are presented, and the technology and technical means are described. The problems of providing the proper technological equipment for this work are analyzed

  10. User's guide of DETRAS system-1. Construction and usage of the reactor simulator operation system at the Nuclear Technology and Education Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DETRAS system is a PWR reactor simulator system for operation training whose distinguished feature is that it can be operated from the remote place of the simulator site. The document which is the first one of a series of three volumes of the user's guide of DERAS describes setup of the network consisting of computer related devices at the Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) of JAEA and gives explanation of startup and shutdown procedures of the simulator system. (author)

  11. Secondary Waste Considerations for Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center FY-2001 Status Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) is considering vitrification to process liquid sodium-bearing waste. Preliminary studies were completed to evaluate the potential secondary wastes from the melter off-gas clean up systems. Projected secondary wastes comprise acidic and caustic scrubber solutions, HEPA filters, activated carbon, and ion exchange media. Possible treatment methods, waste forms, and disposal sites are evaluated from radiological and mercury contamination estimates

  12. Design for aquatic monitoring programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An objective of ecological aquatic monitoring at nuclear power plants has been the detection of impacts on the important fauna and flora in the vicinity of the plant site. A control-treatment pairing (CTP) design for monitoring programs is presented for impact assessment in benthic and plankton communities. A scheme for the establishment of monitoring programs using CTP designs is discussed which accounts for the influence of plant site characteristics, the quantitative objectives of the monitoring study, the expected magnitude of experimental error and the limitations of time and effort. A graphical technique is presented which can be used to incorporate these often competing constraints into the design of aquatic monitoring studies. Estimates of the experimental error computed from a posteriori applications of CTP designs to benthic and plankton communities at six nuclear power plants are presented

  13. List of scientific and technological reports of the Nuclear Research Center Juelich Jan. 1985 - March 1988. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This list of scientific and technological reports at first comprises some general publications such as abbreviations used in technical reports, annual report for 1984, 1985, 1986, the list of reports 1984 and 1985, surveys and inquiries on the population to the Chernobyl accident and on the scientific personnel of Juelich to the transfer of scientific knowledge to the public. - The other reports are concerned with the subjects mathematics - computer - cybernetics, general physics, atomic- and nuclear physics, solid state physics, materials, analytical chemistry, technology, reactor techniques, measuring techniques, biology, agriculture, questions of energy, medicine, environment, plasma physics and fusion reactor technology, physical chemistry, nuclear- and radiochemistry, chemical technology, electrotechniques - electronics, geosciences. Finally a register of the authors is added. (HK)

  14. The Role of Information Technology in Building up Knowledge Economy Producting and using Information in Libraries and Information Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Mohssin, Dr I.; NedaL AL-Ahmad

    2005-01-01

    The study reveals the relation between information production processes and building up knowledge economy and clarifies the role of libraries and Information Technology in producing information for the purpose of using it in bulking up knowledge economy.

  15. Research and development of grid computing technology in center for computational science and e-systems of Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Center for Computational Science and E-systems of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (CCSE/JAEA) has carried out R and D of grid computing technology. Since 1995, R and D to realize computational assistance for researchers called Seamless Thinking Aid (STA) and then to share intellectual resources called Information Technology Based Laboratory (ITBL) have been conducted, leading to construct an intelligent infrastructure for the atomic energy research called Atomic Energy Grid InfraStructure (AEGIS) under the Japanese national project 'Development and Applications of Advanced High-Performance Supercomputer'. It aims to enable synchronization of three themes: 1) Computer-Aided Research and Development (CARD) to realize and environment for STA, 2) Computer-Aided Engineering (CAEN) to establish Multi Experimental Tools (MEXT), and 3) Computer Aided Science (CASC) to promote the Atomic Energy Research and Investigation (AERI). This article reviewed achievements in R and D of grid computing technology so far obtained. (T. Tanaka)

  16. Treatment of Spent Argentine Ion Exchange Resin Using Vitrification - Results of FY01 Testing at the Savannah River Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the Science and Technology Implementing Arrangement for Cooperation on Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management (JCCRM), the Department of Energy (DOE) is helping to transfer waste treatment technology to international atomic energy commissions. In 1996, as part of the JCCRM, DOE established a collaborative research agreement with Argentina's Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA). A primary mission of the CNEA is to direct waste management activities for Argentina's nuclear industry

  17. Aquatic risk assessment of pesticides in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriquiriborde, Pedro; Mirabella, Paula; Waichman, Andrea; Solomon, Keith; Van den Brink, Paul J; Maund, Steve

    2014-10-01

    Latin America is anticipated to be a major growth market for agriculture and production is increasing with use of technologies such as pesticides. Reports of contamination of aquatic ecosystems by pesticides in Latin America have raised concerns about potential for adverse ecological effects. In the registration process of pesticides, all countries require significant data packages on aquatic toxicology and environmental fate. However, there are usually no specific requirements to conduct an aquatic risk assessment. To address this issue, the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry organized a workshop that brought together scientists from academia, government, and industry to review and elaborate on aquatic risk assessment frameworks that can be implemented into regulation of pesticides in Latin America. The workshop concluded that the international framework for risk assessments (protection goals, effects, and exposure assessments, risk characterization, and risk mitigation) is broadly applicable in Latin America but needs further refinement for the use in the region. Some of the challenges associated with these refinements are discussed in the article. It was recognized that there is potential for data sharing both within and outside of the region where conditions are similar. However, there is a need for research to compare local species and environmental conditions to those in other jurisdictions to be able to evaluate the applicability of data used in other countries. Development should also focus on human resources as there is a need to build local capacity and capability, and scientific collaboration and exchange between stakeholders in industry, government, and academia is also important. The meeting also emphasized that, although establishing a regionally relevant risk assessment framework is important, this also needs to be accompanied by enforcement of developed regulations and good management practices to help protect aquatic habitats. Education, training, and communication efforts are needed to achieve this. PMID:25044328

  18. Green Technology, Cloud Computing and Data Centers: the Need for Integrated Energy Efficiency Framework and Effective Metric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Nada

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Energy efficiency (EE, energy consumption cost and environmental impact are vibrant challenges to cloud computing and data centers. Reducing energy consumption and emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2 in data centers represent open areas and driving force for future research work on green data centers. Our Literature review reveals that there are currently several energy efficiency frameworks for data centers which combine a green IT architecture with specific activities and procedures that led to decrease the impact on environment and less CO2 emissions. The current available frameworks have some pros and cons that is the reason why there is an urgent need for an integrated criterion for selecting and adopting energy efficiency framework for data centers. The required energy efficiency framework criteria should also consider the social network applications as a vital related factor in elevating energy consumption, as well as high potential for better energy efficiency in data centers. Additionally, in this paper, we highlighted the importance of the identification of efficient and effective energy efficiency metric that can be used for the measurement and determination of the value of data centers efficiency and their performance combined with sound and empirically validated integrated EE framework.

  19. Tulane/Xavier University hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, January 1--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-02

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier CBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Summaries which describe objectives, goals, and accomplishments are included on ten collaborative cluster projects, two education projects, and six initiation projects. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. FY 1987 Aquatic Species Program: Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.A.; Sprague, S.

    1987-09-01

    The goal of the Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute Aquatic Species Program is to develop the technology base to produce liquid fuels from microalagae at prices competitive with conventional alternatives. Microalgae are unusual plants that can accumulate large quantities of oil and can thrive in high-salinity water, which currently has no competing uses. The algal oils, in turn, are readily converted into gasoline and diesel fuels. The best site for successful microalgae production was determined to be the US desert Southwest, with potential applications to other warm areas. Aggressive research is needed, but the improvements required are attainable. The four prime research areas in the development of this technology are growth and production, engineering design, harvesting, and conversion. Algae are selected for three criteria: tolerance to environmental fluctuations, high growth rates, and high lipid production. From 1982 to 1986, the program collected more than 3000 strains of microalgae that are more than twice as tolerant to temperature and salinity fluctuation than the initial strains. Productivity has been increased by a factor of two in outdoor culture systems since 1982, and lipid content has also been increased from 20% of body weight in 1982 to greater than 66% of body weight in 1987. Research programs are ongoing in lipid biochemistry and genetic engineering so that ultimately strains can be modified and improved to combine their best characteristics. An outdoor test facility is being built in Roswell, New Mexico.

  1. Aquatic Models, Genomics and Chemical Risk Management§

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Keith C.; Hinton, David E.; Mattingly, Carolyn J.; Planchart, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The 5th Aquatic Animal Models for Human Disease meeting follows four previous meetings (Hinton et al., 2009; Schmale et al., 2007; Schmale, 2004; Nairn et al., 2001) in which advances in aquatic animal models for human disease research were reported, and community discussion of future direction was pursued. At this meeting, discussion at a workshop entitled Bioinformatics and Computational Biology with Web-based Resources (20 September 2010) led to an important conclusion: Aquatic model resea...

  2. Phytoremediation Potential of Aquatic Macrophyte, Azolla

    OpenAIRE

    Sood, Anjuli; Uniyal, Perm L.; Prasanna, Radha; Ahluwalia, Amrik S.

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic macrophytes play an important role in the structural and functional aspects of aquatic ecosystems by altering water movement regimes, providing shelter to fish and aquatic invertebrates, serving as a food source, and altering water quality by regulating oxygen balance, nutrient cycles, and accumulating heavy metals. The ability to hyperaccumulate heavy metals makes them interesting research candidates, especially for the treatment of industrial effluents and sewage waste water. The us...

  3. Aquatic toxicology: past, present, and prospects.

    OpenAIRE

    Pritchard, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Aquatic organisms have played important roles as early warning and monitoring systems for pollutant burdens in our environment. However, they have significant potential to do even more, just as they have in basic biology where preparations like the squid axon have been essential tools in establishing physiological and biochemical mechanisms. This review provides a brief summary of the history of aquatic toxicology, focusing on the nature of aquatic contaminants, the levels of contamination in...

  4. Information Technology in Science (ITS) Center for Teaching and Learning Environment Design Experiment Study for the Development of New Generation Leaders in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, B. E.; Schroeder, C.; Brody, S.; Cahill, T.; Kenimer, A.; Loving, C.; Schielack, J.

    2003-12-01

    The ITS Center for Teaching and Learning is a five-year NSF-funded collaborative effort to engage scientists and university and school or district-based science educators in the use of information technology to improve science teaching and learning at all levels. One assumption is that science and mathematics teaching and learning will be improved when they become more connected to the authentic science research done in field settings or laboratories. The effective use of information technology in science classrooms has been shown to help achieve this objective. As a design study that is -working toward a greater understanding of a -learning ecology", the research related to the creation and refinement of the ITS Centeres collaborative environment for professional development is contributing information about an important setting not often included in the descriptions of professional development, a setting that incorporates distributed expertise and resulting distributed growth in the various categories of participants: scientists, science graduate students, education researchers, education graduate students, and master teachers. Design-based research is an emerging paradigm for the study of learning in context through the systematic design and study of instructional strategies and tools. This presentation will discuss the results of the formative evaluation process that has moved the ITS Centeres collaborative environment for professional development through the iterative process from Phase I (the planned program designed in-house) to Phase II (the experimental program being tested in-house). In particular, we will focus on the development of the ITS Centeres Project Teams, which create learning experiences over two summers focused on the exploration of science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) topics through the use of modeling, visualization and complex data sets to explore authentic scientific questions that can be integrated within the K-16 curriculum. Ongoing formative assessment of the Cohort I project teams led to a greater emphasis on participant exploration of authentic scientific questions and tighter integration of scientific explorations and development of participant inquiry projects.

  5. Nutrients and bioactive substances in aquatic organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Symposium on Nutrients and Bioactive Substances in Aquatic Organisms, was held during 16-17 September 1993 by the Society of Fisheries Technologists (India) to review the progress of research in this area in India and elsewhere. The papers presented indicate that scientific productivity in this field is substantial and that some of the bioactive materials isolated from aquatic organisms have potential application in human health, nutrition and therapy. The symposium focussed attention on toxicants, nutrients and bioactive substances in aquatic organisms in general, and also on pollution of aquatic systems due to thermal effluents. Paper relevant to INIS database is indexed separately. (M.K.V.)

  6. The Center for Learning Technologies in Urban Schools (LeTUS) Program[R]. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "LeTUS" program is a three-year, project-based, technology-integrated middle school science curriculum for grades 6-8. The "LeTUS" program is composed of multiple units, each lasting between eight and ten weeks. Topics include global warming, water and air quality, force and motion, communicable diseases, and ecological systems. The units are…

  7. A study on organizational culture, structure and information technology as three KM enablers: A case study in five Iranian medical and healthcare research centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Iran-nejad-parizi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates organizational structure, culture, and information technology as knowledge management (KM infrastructural capabilities, and compares their significance and status quo in five medical research centers in Tehran, Iran. Objectives of this research were pursued by employing two statistical methods, regression analysis and Friedman test. Included in the study were 135 people (researchers and support staff from five medical and healthcare research centers of Tehran. A survey questionnaire including 23 questions was utilized to examine organizational structure, culture and information technology indicators. And another 12 questions examined KM effectiveness. The Friedman test indicated that in terms of their status quo, the three studied KM enablers are at different conditions, with organizational culture having the best (mean rank=1.79 and IT the worst (mean rank=2.14 status. Moreover, it was revealed by regression analysis that organizational structure is believed to have the most significant impact (Beta= 0.397 on the effectiveness of knowledge management initiatives, while information technology gained the least perceived impact (Beta= 0.176.

  8. From Ship-To-Shore In Real Time: Data Transmission, Distribution, Management, Processing, And Archiving Using Telepresence Technologies And The Inner Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, D. F.

    2012-12-01

    Most research vessels are equipped with satellite Internet services with bandwidths capable of being upgraded to support telepresence technologies and live shore-based participation. This capability can be used for real-time data transmission to shore, where it can be distributed, managed, processed, and archived. The University of Rhode Island Inner Space Center utilizes telepresence technologies and a growing network of command centers on Internet2 to participate live with a variety of research vessels and their ocean observing and sampling systems. High-bandwidth video streaming, voice-over-IP telecommunications, and real-time data feeds and file transfers enable users on shore to take part in the oceanographic expeditions as if they were present on the ship, working in the lab. Telepresence-enabled systematic ocean exploration and similar programs represent a significant and growing paradigm shift that can change the future of seagoing ocean observations using research vessels. The required platform is the ship itself, and users of the technology rely on the ship-based technical teams, but remote and distributed shore-based science users, students, educators, and the general public can now take part by being aboard virtually.

  9. Design and construction of the Scientific Technology Promotion Center and VR Techno Center building; Kagaku gijutsu shinko senta (kasho) / VR tekuno senta gochiku shisetsu no sekkei to PC koji

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umezawa, R.; Kawai, N.; Kimoto, M. [P.S. Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-31

    The Scientific Technology Promotion Center and VR Techno Center building is a facility planned to be a monument of the advanced technology industrial estate in Kagamihara City, Gifu Prefecture. The word of VR is an abbreviation of virtual reality, which is designed by activation of natural up-own and landscape of the site. This facility is composed of two parts in rough division. The south building is a one-story house arranged in 3 steps at slope of a hill, and is used for technical laboratory and so forth of private companies. Its roof is made by repeating same shapes, and is adopted by Shingle T (ST) board of the precast pre-tension system. The north building is arranged at top of the hill, and is used for public multi-purpose hall, data room, and so on. Its roof is made by adopting arched gate type rigid frame with block pressing system (post-tension system) of precast concrete. In this paper, structure planning, manufacturing and construction of the precast prestressed concrete adopted to the north and the south buildings are reported. 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Beaver herbivory on aquatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, John D; Caudill, Christopher C; Hay, Mark E

    2007-04-01

    Herbivores have strong impacts on marine and terrestrial plant communities, but their impact is less well studied in benthic freshwater systems. For example, North American beavers (Castor canadensis) eat both woody and non-woody plants and focus almost exclusively on the latter in summer months, yet their impacts on non-woody plants are generally attributed to ecosystem engineering rather than herbivory. Here, we excluded beavers from areas of two beaver wetlands for over 2 years and demonstrated that beaver herbivory reduced aquatic plant biomass by 60%, plant litter by 75%, and dramatically shifted plant species composition. The perennial forb lizard's tail (Saururus cernuus) comprised less than 5% of plant biomass in areas open to beaver grazing but greater than 50% of plant biomass in beaver exclusions. This shift was likely due to direct herbivory, as beavers preferentially consumed lizard's tail over other plants in a field feeding assay. Beaver herbivory also reduced the abundance of the invasive aquatic plant Myriophyllum aquaticum by nearly 90%, consistent with recent evidence that native generalist herbivores provide biotic resistance against exotic plant invasions. Beaver herbivory also had indirect effects on plant interactions in this community. The palatable plant lizard's tail was 3 times more frequent and 10 times more abundant inside woolgrass (Scirpus cyperinus) tussocks than in spatially paired locations lacking tussocks. When the protective foliage of the woolgrass was removed without exclusion cages, beavers consumed nearly half of the lizard's tail leaves within 2 weeks. In contrast, leaf abundance increased by 73-93% in the treatments retaining woolgrass or protected by a cage. Thus, woolgrass tussocks were as effective as cages at excluding beaver foraging and provided lizard's tail plants an associational refuge from beaver herbivory. These results suggest that beaver herbivory has strong direct and indirect impacts on populations and communities of herbaceous aquatic plants and extends the consequences of beaver activities beyond ecosystem engineering. PMID:17180372

  11. Low Cost Propulsion Technology Testing at the Stennis Space Center: Propulsion Test Article and the Horizontal Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Mark F.; King, Richard F.; Chenevert, Donald J.

    1998-01-01

    The need for low cost access to space has initiated the development of low cost liquid rocket engine and propulsion system hardware at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This hardware will be tested at the Stennis Space Center's B-2 test stand. This stand has been reactivated for the testing of the Marshall designed Fastrac engine and the Propulsion Test Article. The RP-1 and LOX engine is a turbopump fed gas generator rocket with an ablative nozzle which has a thrust of 60,000 lbf. The Propulsion Test Article (PTA) is a test bed for low cost propulsion system hardware including a composite RP-I tank, flight feedlines and pressurization system, stacked in a booster configuration. The PTA is located near the center line of the B-2 test stand, firing vertically into the water cooled flame deflector. A new second position on the B-2 test stand has been designed and built for the horizontal testing of the Fastrac engine in direct support of the X-34 launch vehicle. The design and integration of these test facilities as well as the coordination which was required between the two Centers is described and lessons learned are provided. The construction of the horizontal test position is discussed in detail. The activation of these facilities is examined and the major test milestones are described.

  12. Space Electrochemical Research and Technology Conference, 3rd, NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH, Apr. 9, 10, 1991, Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshay, Marvin

    1991-12-01

    The proceedings of NASA's third Space Electrochemical Research and Technology (SERT) conference are presented. The objective of the conference was to assess the present status and general thrust of research and development in those areas of electrochemical technology required to enable NASA missions in the next century. The conference provided a forum for the exchange of ideas and opinions of those actively involved in the field, in order to define new opportunities for the application of electrochemical processes in future NASA missions. Papers were presented in three technical areas: the electrochemical interface, the next generation in aerospace batteries and fuel cells, and electrochemistry for nonenergy storage applications. For individual titles, see N91-32550 through N91-32567.

  13. Integration Of Digital Imaging Network Technology Into The U.S. Army's Fixed Facility And Deployable Medical Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, John; Glenn, Marcus; Kerlin, Barbara; Harrington, Michael

    1988-06-01

    The MITRE Corporation is currently under contract to the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command to evaluate Digital Imaging Network Systems (DINS) technology at two university evaluation sites. Equipment developed by Philips Medical Systems will be evaluated at the University of Washington in Seattle and AT&T's CommView system will be evaluated at Georgetown University. While other papers at the 1988 PACS II conference will discuss the details of the systems being evaluated at the university sites, this paper discusses the reasons that the Army is considering the use of DINS in its fixed facilities and in deployable medical system (DEPMEDS) applications. Reasons for converting to DINS technology will be discussed and expected benefits will be presented.

  14. NREL's Wind R&D Success Stories, National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-01-01

    Wind energy research, development, and deployment have reduced the cost of large and small wind turbine technologies, increased wind energy system reliability and operability, lowered risk by validating performance and design, increased the understanding of the true impacts of wind energy on the U.S. electrical infrastructure, and expanded wind energy markets. A synopsis of research conducted on utility-scale wind turbines, small wind turbines, software, components, market development and grid integration are detailed.

  15. FirstLight: Pluggable Optical Interconnect Technologies for Polymeric Electro-Optical Printed Circuit Boards in Data Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Pitwon, R. C. A.; Wang, K.; Graham-jones, J.; Papakonstantinou, I.; Baghsiahi, H.; Offrein, B. J.; Dangel, R.; Milward, D.; Selviah, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    The protocol data rate governing data storage devices will increase to over 12 Gb/s by 2013 thereby imposing unmanageable cost and performance burdens on future digital data storage systems. The resulting performance bottleneck can be substantially reduced by conveying high-speed data optically instead of electronically. A novel active pluggable 82.5 Gb/s aggregate bit rate optical connector technology, the design and fabrication of a compact electro-optical printed circuit board to meet exac...

  16. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/16: The Potential of Technology for the Control of Small Weapons: Applications in Developing Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALTMANN, JURGEN

    2000-07-01

    For improving the control of small arms, technology provides many possibilities. Present and future technical means are described in several areas. With the help of sensors deployed on the ground or on board aircraft, larger areas can be monitored. Using tags, seals, and locks, important objects and installations can be safeguarded better. With modern data processing and communication systems, more information can be available, and it can be more speedily processed. Together with navigation and transport equipment, action can be taken faster and at greater range. Particular considerations are presented for cargo control at roads, seaports, and airports, for monitoring designated lines, and for the control of legal arms. By starting at a modest level, costs can be kept low, which would aid developing countries. From the menu of technologies available, systems need to be designed for the intended application and with an understanding of the local conditions. It is recommended that states start with short-term steps, such as acquiring more and better radio transceivers, vehicles, small aircraft, and personal computers. For the medium term, states should begin with experiments and field testing of technologies such as tags, sensors, and digital communication equipment.

  17. TRACE Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trace Center Mission Statement - To prevent the barriers and capitalize on the opportunities presented by current and emerging information and telecommunication technologies, in order to create a world that is as accessible and usable as possible for as many people as possible.

  18. Optimizing Low Temperature Diesel Combustion (LTC-D) "FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Solicitation for University Research and Graduate Automotice Technology Education (GATE) Centers of Excellence"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolf Reitz; P. Farrell; D. Foster; J. Ghandhi; C. Rutland; S. Sanders

    2009-07-31

    The engine industry is currently facing severe emissions mandates. Pollutant emissions from mobile sources are a major source of concern. For example, US EPA mandates require emissions of particulate and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from heavy-duty diesel engine exhaust to drop at least 90 percent between 1998 and 2010. Effective analysis of the combustion process is required to guide the selection of technologies for future development since exhaust after-treatment solutions are not currently available that can meet the required emission reduction goals. The goal of this project is to develop methods to optimize and control Low Temperature Combustion Diesel technologies (LTC-D) that offers the potential of nearly eliminating engine NOx and particulate emissions at reduced cost over traditional methods by controlling pollutant emissions in-cylinder. The work was divided into 5 Tasks, featuring experimental and modeling components: 1.) Fundamental understanding of LTC-D and advanced model development, 2.) Experimental investigation of LTC-D combustion control concepts, 3.) Application of detailed models for optimization of LTC-D combustion and emissions, 4.) Impact of heat transfer and spray impingement on LTC-D combustion, and 5.) Transient engine control with mixed-mode combustion. As described in the final report (December 2008), outcomes from the research included providing guidelines to the engine and energy industries for achieving optimal low temperature combustion operation through using advanced fuel injection strategies, and the potential to extend low temperature operation through manipulation of fuel characteristics. In addition, recommendations were made for improved combustion chamber geometries that are matched to injection sprays and that minimize wall fuel films. The role of fuel-air mixing, fuel characteristics, fuel spray/wall impingement and heat transfer on LTC-D engine control were revealed. Methods were proposed for transient engine operation during load and speed changes to extend LTC-D engine operating limits, power density and fuel economy. Low emissions engine design concepts were proposed and evaluated.

  19. Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility

  20. Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Jeffrey Whealdon; Nenni, Joseph A; Timothy S. Yoder

    2003-04-01

    This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual.” This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

  1. Disbursement of $65 million to the State of Texas for construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center at the former Superconducting Super Collider Site, Waxahachie, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    As part of a settlement agreement between the US DOE and the State of Texas, DOE proposes to transfer $65 million of federal funds to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNLRC) for construction of the Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) to be located in Ellis County, Texas. The RMTC would be a state-of-the-art medical facility for proton cancer therapy, operated by the State of Texas in conjunction with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The RMTC would use the linear accelerator assets of the recently terminated DOE Superconducting Super Collider Project to accelerate protons to high energies for the treatment of cancer patients. The current design provides for treatment areas, examination rooms, support laboratories, diagnostic imaging equipment, and office space as well as the accelerators (linac and synchrotron) and beam steering and shaping components. The potential environmental consequences of the proposed action are expected to be minor.

  2. Disbursement of $65 million to the State of Texas for construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center at the former Superconducting Super Collider Site, Waxahachie, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a settlement agreement between the US DOE and the State of Texas, DOE proposes to transfer $65 million of federal funds to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNLRC) for construction of the Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) to be located in Ellis County, Texas. The RMTC would be a state-of-the-art medical facility for proton cancer therapy, operated by the State of Texas in conjunction with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The RMTC would use the linear accelerator assets of the recently terminated DOE Superconducting Super Collider Project to accelerate protons to high energies for the treatment of cancer patients. The current design provides for treatment areas, examination rooms, support laboratories, diagnostic imaging equipment, and office space as well as the accelerators (linac and synchrotron) and beam steering and shaping components. The potential environmental consequences of the proposed action are expected to be minor

  3. Diversity of aquatic bacterial populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of adapting the automated Quantum II for the identification of bacterial fish pathogens. Optimal incubation conditions were determined for each of the species used, and, by using a Chi-square goodness of fit test, it was shown that isolates could be sorted into like-species groups with a Ward's hierarchical cluster analysis technique. In a second study, population profiles, growth kinetics, and transformation kinetics were evaluated for bacteria isolated from 4 aquatic environments located in the southeastern United States. Gradual long-term accumulation of organic acids in the waters of the Okefenokee Swamp, located in southeast Georgia and northeast Florida, has resulted in acidic water ranging from pH 3.5 to 4.5. A study was designed to evaluate the metabolic efficiency of surface-water gram-negative nonfermentative bacteria and ascertain whether aquatic bacterial populations exhibit adaptation to the low pH conditions. Using the computerized AMBIS the uptake and incorporation of 35S-methionine into bacterial proteins under 5 levels of pH was quantitated for each of the test organisms

  4. AQUATIC INFORMATION AND RETRIEVAL (AQUIRE) DATABASE SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The AQUlRE database system is one of the foremost international resources for finding aquatic toxicity information. Information in the system is organized around the concept of an aquatic toxicity test. A toxicity test record contains information about the chemical, species, endp...

  5. Phytoremediation potential of aquatic macrophyte, Azolla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Anjuli; Uniyal, Perm L; Prasanna, Radha; Ahluwalia, Amrik S

    2012-03-01

    Aquatic macrophytes play an important role in the structural and functional aspects of aquatic ecosystems by altering water movement regimes, providing shelter to fish and aquatic invertebrates, serving as a food source, and altering water quality by regulating oxygen balance, nutrient cycles, and accumulating heavy metals. The ability to hyperaccumulate heavy metals makes them interesting research candidates, especially for the treatment of industrial effluents and sewage waste water. The use of aquatic macrophytes, such as Azolla with hyper accumulating ability is known to be an environmentally friendly option to restore polluted aquatic resources. The present review highlights the phytoaccumulation potential of macrophytes with emphasis on utilization of Azolla as a promising candidate for phytoremediation. The impact of uptake of heavy metals on morphology and metabolic processes of Azolla has also been discussed for a better understanding and utilization of this symbiotic association in the field of phytoremediation. PMID:22396093

  6. Customer centered health care: why managed care organizations must capitalize on new technology to build brands and customer loyalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fell, D

    1998-01-01

    Now, more than ever, health care organizations are desperately trying to reach out to customers and establish stronger relationships that will generate increased loyalty and repeat business. As technology, like the Internet and related mediums, allow us to do a better job of managing information and communication, health care executives must invest the time and resources necessary to bring these new advances into the day-to-day operations of their businesses. Those that do will have a head start in building their brand and their customer loyalty. PMID:10181710

  7. technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DetlefH.Heck

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in the mammalian neocortex receive inputs from and communicate back to thousands of other neurons, creating complex spatiotemporal activity patterns. The experimental investigation of these parallel dynamic interactions has been limited due to the technical challenges of monitoring or manipulating neuronal activity at that level of complexity. Here we describe a new massively parallel photostimulation system that can be used to control action potential firing in in vitro brain slices with high spatial and temporal resolution while performing extracellular or intracellular electrophysiological measurements. The system uses Digital-Light-Processing (DLP technology to generate 2-dimensional (2D stimulus patterns with >780,000 independently controlled photostimulation sites that operate at high spatial (5.4 µm and temporal (>13kHz resolution. Light is projected through the quartz-glass bottom of the perfusion chamber providing access to a large area (2.76 x 2.07 mm2 of the slice preparation. This system has the unique capability to induce temporally precise action potential firing in large groups of neurons distributed over a wide area covering several cortical columns. Parallel photostimulation opens up new opportunities for the in vitro experimental investigation of spatiotemporal neuronal interactions at a broad range of anatomical scales.

  8. Development of aquatic animal experiment facility, Aquatic Habitat (AQH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, S.; Kono, Y.; Sakimura, T.; Nishikawa, W.; Fujimoto, N.; Murakami, K.; Nakamura, T.

    We have been performing technical studies to develop aquatic animal experiment facility, Aquatic Habitat (AQH), for both of short-term experiments in the Space Shuttle middeck and long-term experiments in the Space Station including the Centrifuge Accommodation Module (CAM). The AQH will have the capabilities to accommodate three-generations of small freshwater fish (medaka and zebrafish) and egg through metamorphosis of amphibian (African clawed frog). For these purposes, the AQH will have the following brand-new capabilities that the previous facilities have never had; 90days experiment duration, automatic feeding according to specimen types and their developmental stages, separation of generations for fish, specimen sample collection in various developmental stages, air/water interface control for amphibian, continuous monitoring of specimen behavior even in dark condition, and so on. We have already performed preliminary breeding tests for medaka and zebrafish with a breeding system prototype. Their mating behavior was performed successfully in the small closed chamber and the hatched larvae grew and started spawning on the 45-47th day after hatching. These results demonstrated that three generational breeding of medaka and zebrafish within 90days would be possible based on this breeding system prototype. Also, we have developed almost of the above new mechanisms, that is, an automatic feeding system, an egg separation mechanism for fish, an air stabilizer to control air/water interface, and a continuous specimen monitoring system through light/dark cycle. Based on these results, we have manufactured a BBM of AQH water circulation system and performed biological compatibility tests as a next step. For African clawed frog breeding, some problems have been revealed through the preliminary tests with the breeding system prototype. Currently, we are performing the investigations to resolve the problems and preparing to proceed to the next step.

  9. The potential for underground coal gasification in Indiana. Final report to the Indiana Center for Coal Technology Research (CCTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Rupp; Evgeny Shafirovich; Arvind Varma; Maria Mastalerz; Agnieszka Drobniak

    2009-03-15

    The preliminary feasability assessment analyses the potential for underground coal gasification within Indiana. A review of existing worldwide operations and geological requirements demonstrates that the application of UCG practices in Indiana has very significant potential benefits, but careful analysis of the specific geological conditions, physical and chemical properties of coals, water resources, coupled with an assessment of the state-of-the-art technologies must be conducted to identify potential UCG sites and to determine the feasibility of employing this technology in Indiana. Of particular importance is the relatively small number of active and successful operators of UCG projects around the world and that collaborations with one or two among them could be beneficial for all concerned. There are significant opportunities for economic development that will provide dividends for first movers in the Illinois basin. The report recommends nine 'promising zones' for UCG in two large coal deposits (the Springfield and Seelyville coal beds) in Knox, Gibson, Vanderburgh, Warrick and Posey counties. 69 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs., 1 app.

  10. Valuation Methodology for the Intangible Negotiation Contributions to the Projects Technology Management in a University R&D Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega–González L.R.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A valuation methodology for the intangible negotiation contributions is proposed from the negotiation circuits of the Management of Technology Development Projects (MTDP and linking model. It is based in the definition and optimization of specific criteria mathematical cost function. The application of the methodology requires the identification of a the negotiation circuits required for the project by the development team and the technology transfer and responsible linking office. To reduce the problem complexity some valuation criteria are used as the methodology fundaments. The MTDP model activities are not applied to all the organization's R&D projects, but it is clear that in all of them it is at least required one negotiation circuitto get the acceptance of the technical and economical project proposals. Finally, a function that covers the relation of the optimal probability success with respect to the percentage of those projects using negotiation at the different phases of the MTDP model is proposed. The methodology presented al lows the calculation of the negotiation contributions with respect to the whole Project value.

  11. Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe, Institute of Nuclear Waste Management Technology. Progress report on research and development activities in 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priority subjects of the Institute of Nuclear Waste Management Technology' work in 1993 were: Corrosion studies of high burnup LWR fuel in interaction with brines; retention of Pu, A Np and Tc curing corrosion of the high-level radioactive glass R7T7; formation of hydrotalcite during corrosion of the simulated inactive glass R7Z7 in brines; chemical behaviour of redox sensitive elements in aqueous chloride-containing systems in the near range of repositories; corrosion studies of waste container materials; solid-liquid equilibriums of uranium compounds in concentrated brines; thermodynamics of Np(V) in concentrated brines; quantification of radiation-chemical effects in the near range of repositories with a view to redox state change and gas formation; laser-spectroscopic speciation and thermodynamics of Cm(III) in highly concentrated brines; development of laser-spectroscopic speciation methods; radio-chemical and chemical analyses of redioactive samples; theoretical work on the development of a sorption model; studies of the compaction behaviour of filling material; thermomechanic effects of an HAW storage site on neighbouring inhomogeneities in the salt rock; optimization of vitrification technologies; structural studies of HAW model glasses. (orig./HP)

  12. The Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Activities 1999-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Wiese discussed activities and trends at the NIST Data Centers in the last two years. He reviewed priorities covered in data work and reviewed the bibliographic and numerical databases now on their website. The Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) is their main atomic physics web database and this is a reference data, e.g., the wavelength data is generally accurate to six significant figures and transition probability data is certain to with less than ±50%. Dr. Wiese also reported about recent work on the compilation and evaluation of data for wavelengths and energy levels of elements Cu, Kr and Mo (and several others), which are fusion relevant

  13. International nuclear fuel cycle centers in the global infrastructure of nuclear power (Technological aspects of the problem)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In January 2006, the President of the Russian Federation put forward an initiative for the broad cooperation among nations in the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The President considers the necessity to create such a global infrastructure of nuclear power that will provide equal access to nuclear energy for all interested nations with an assured transparency through a nonproliferation regime. The key element of such an infrastructure would be creating a system of International centers to provide services for the nuclear fuel cycle under the IAEA control on the basis of nondiscrimination in allowing access to such services. (author)

  14. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - An International Center of Excellence for ''Training in and Demonstration of Waste Disposal Technologies''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Mark L.; Eriksson, Leif G.

    2003-02-25

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, which is managed and operated by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (USDOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and located in the State of New Mexico, presently hosts an underground research laboratory (URL) and the world's first certified and operating deep geological repository for safe disposition of long-lived radioactive materials (LLRMs). Both the URL and the repository are situated approximately 650 meters (m) below the ground surface in a 250-million-year-old, 600-m-thick, undisturbed, bedded salt formation, and they have been in operation since 1982 and 1999, respectively. Founded on long-standing CBFO collaborations with international and national radioactive waste management organizations, since 2001, WIPP serves as the Center of Excellence in Rock Salt for the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) International Network of Centers on ''Training in and Demonstration of Waste Disposal Technologies in Underground Research Facilities'' (the IAEA Network). The primary objective for the IAEA Network is to foster collaborative projects among IAEA Member States that: supplement national efforts and promote public confidence in waste disposal schemes; contribute to the resolution of key technical issues; and encourage the transfer and preservation of knowledge and technologies.

  15. Overview of NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine technology activities applicable to space power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaby, Jack G.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of the development and technological activities of the free-piston Stirling engine. The engine started as a small scale fractional horsepower engine which demonstrated basic engine operating principles and the advantages of being hermetically sealed, highly efficient, and simple. It eventually developed into the free piston Stirling engine driven heat pump, and then into the SP-100 Space Reactor Power Program from which came the Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE). The SPDE successfully operated for over 300 hr and delivered 20 kW of PV power to an alternator plunger. The SPDE demonstrated that a dynamic power conversion system can, with proper design, be balanced; and the engine performed well with externally pumped hydrostatic gas bearings.

  16. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/4: Missile Control in South Asia and the Role of Cooperative Monitoring Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal, N.; Sawhney, P.

    1998-10-01

    The succession of nuclear tests by India and Pakistan in May 1998 has changed the nature of their missile rivalry, which is only one of numerous manifestations of their relationship as hardened adversaries, deeply sensitive to each other's existing and evolving defense capabilities. The political context surrounding this costly rivalry remains unmediated by arms control measures or by any nascent prospect of detente. As a parallel development, sensible voices in both countries will continue to talk of building mutual confidence through openness to avert accidents, misjudgments, and misinterpretations. To facilitate a future peace process, this paper offers possible suggestions for stabilization that could be applied to India's and Pakistan's missile situation. Appendices include descriptions of existing missile agreements that have contributed to better relations for other countries as well as a list of the cooperative monitoring technologies available to provide information useful in implementing subcontinent missile regimes.

  17. Results of 2001 Groundwater Sampling in Support of Conditional No Longer Contained-In Determination for the Snake River Plain Aquifer in the Vicinity of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of sampling five groundwater monitoring wells in the vicinity of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in 2001. Information on general sampling practices, quality assurance practices, parameter concentrations, representativeness of sampling results, and cumulative cancer risk are presented. The information is provided to support a conditional No Longer Contained-In Determination for the Snake River Plain Aquifer in the vicinity of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

  18. An assessment of technology-based service encounters & network security on the e-health care systems of medical centers in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ching

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enhancing service efficiency and quality has always been one of the most important factors to heighten competitiveness in the health care service industry. Thus, how to utilize information technology to reduce work load for staff and expeditiously improve work efficiency and healthcare service quality is presently the top priority for every healthcare institution. In this fast changing modern society, e-health care systems are currently the best possible way to achieve enhanced service efficiency and quality under the restraint of healthcare cost control. The electronic medical record system and the online appointment system are the core features in employing e-health care systems in the technology-based service encounters. Methods This study implemented the Service Encounters Evaluation Model, the European Customer Satisfaction Index, the Attribute Model and the Overall Affect Model for model inference. A total of 700 copies of questionnaires from two authoritative southern Taiwan medical centers providing the electronic medical record system and the online appointment system service were distributed, among which 590 valid copies were retrieved with a response rate of 84.3%. We then used SPSS 11.0 and the Linear Structural Relationship Model (LISREL 8.54 to analyze and evaluate the data. Results The findings are as follows: (1 Technology-based service encounters have a positive impact on service quality, but not patient satisfaction; (2 After experiencing technology-based service encounters, the cognition of the service quality has a positive effect on patient satisfaction; and (3 Network security contributes a positive moderating effect on service quality and patient satisfaction. Conclusion It revealed that the impact of electronic workflow (online appointment system service on service quality was greater than electronic facilities (electronic medical record systems in technology-based service encounters. Convenience and credibility are the most important factors of service quality in technology-based service encounters that patients demand. Due to the openness of networks, patients worry that transaction information could be intercepted; also, the credibility of the hospital involved is even a bigger concern, as patients have a strong sense of distrust. Therefore, in the operation of technology-based service encounters, along with providing network security, it is essential to build an atmosphere of psychological trust.

  19. Foam in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Katerina; Zessner, Matthias

    2011-10-01

    Foams are ubiquitous in the environment, commonly seen as discoloured patches on streams, rivers, lakes and sea water. They often are assumed to be anthropogenic in origin as they are aesthetically unpleasant, yet they frequently appear in pristine environments indicating a natural origin. In contrast to "hidden" chemical pollution, e.g. heavy metals, pesticides etc. the visibility of foam alarms the public. To derive more information on foam in freshwaters and marine ecosystems, a literature review was performed. Alongside with some basic considerations on the formation of foam, on methods to measure foam formation and on the legal aspects of foam on surface waters, the ecological importance of foam in the aquatic environment is discussed in this paper. PMID:21757217

  20. NASAs Marshall Space Flight Center Recent Studies and Technology Developments in the Area of SSA/Orbital Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegman, B.; Hovater, M.; Kos, L.

    2012-09-01

    NASA/MSFC has been investigating the various aspects of the growing orbital debris problem since early 2009. Data shows that debris ranging in size from 5 mm to 10 cm presents the greatest threat to operational spacecraft today. Therefore, MSFC has focused its efforts on small orbital debris. Using off-the-shelf analysis packages, like the ESA MASTER software, analysts at MSFC have begun to characterize the small debris environment in LEO to support several spacecraft concept studies and hardware test programs addressing the characterization, mitigation, and ultimate removal, if necessary, of small debris. The Small Orbital Debris Active Removal (SODAR) architectural study investigated the overall effectiveness of removing small orbital debris from LEO using a low power, space-based laser. The Small Orbital Debris Detection, Acquisition, and Tracking (SODDAT) conceptual technology demonstration spacecraft was developed to address the challenges of in-situ small orbital debris environment classification including debris observability and instrument requirements for small debris observation. Work is underway at MSFC in the areas of hardware and testing. By combining off the shelf digital video technology, telescope lenses, and advanced video image FPGA processing, MSFC is building a breadboard of a space based, passive orbital tracking camera that can detect and track faint objects (including small debris, satellites, rocket bodies, and NEOs) at ranges of tens to hundreds of kilometers and speeds in excess of 15 km/sec,. MSFC is also sponsoring the development of a one-of-a-kind Dynamic Star Field Simulator with a high resolution large monochrome display and a custom collimator capable of projecting realistic star images with simple orbital debris spots (down to star magnitude 11-12) into a passive orbital detection and tracking system with simulated real-time angular motions of the vehicle mounted sensor. The dynamic star field simulator can be expanded for multiple sensors (including advanced star trackers), real-time vehicle pointing inputs, and more complex orbital debris images. This system is also adaptable to other sensor optics, missions, and installed sensor testing. MSFC's Flight Robotics Laboratory is investigating various test capabilities to evaluate proximity range sensors and state estimation, and to test short range sensors and capture mechanisms for capturing tumbling non-cooperative satellites.

  1. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Recent Studies and Technology Developments in the Area of SSA/Orbital Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegmann, Bruce M.; Hovater, Mary; Kos, Larry

    2012-01-01

    NASA/MSFC has been investigating the various aspects of the growing orbital debris problem since early 2009. Data shows that debris ranging in size from 5 mm to 10 cm presents the greatest threat to operational spacecraft today. Therefore, MSFC has focused its efforts on small orbital debris. Using off-the-shelf analysis packages, like the ESA MASTER software, analysts at MSFC have begun to characterize the small debris environment in LEO to support several spacecraft concept studies and hardware test programs addressing the characterization, mitigation, and ultimate removal, if necessary, of small debris. The Small Orbital Debris Active Removal (SODAR) architectural study investigated the overall effectiveness of removing small orbital debris from LEO using a low power, space-based laser. The Small Orbital Debris Detection, Acquisition, and Tracking (SODDAT) conceptual technology demonstration spacecraft was developed to address the challenges of in-situ small orbital debris environment classification including debris observability and instrument requirements for small debris observation. Work is underway at MSFC in the areas of hardware and testing. By combining off the shelf digital video technology, telescope lenses, and advanced video image FPGA processing, MSFC is building a breadboard of a space based, passive orbital tracking camera that can detect and track faint objects (including small debris, satellites, rocket bodies, and NEOs) at ranges of tens to hundreds of kilometers and speeds in excess of 15 km/sec,. MSFC is also sponsoring the development of a one-of-a-kind Dynamic Star Field Simulator with a high resolution large monochrome display and a custom collimator capable of projecting realistic star images with simple orbital debris spots (down to star magnitude 11-12) into a passive orbital detection and tracking system with simulated real-time angular motions of the vehicle mounted sensor. The dynamic star field simulator can be expanded for multiple sensors (including advanced star trackers), real-time vehicle pointing inputs, and more complex orbital debris images. This system is also adaptable to other sensor optics, missions, and installed sensor testing.

  2. The 1988 overview of free-piston Stirling technology for space power at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaby, Jack G.

    1988-01-01

    The completion of the Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) testing is discussed, terminating with the generation of 25 kW of engine power from a dynamically-balanced opposed-piston Stirling engine at a temperature ratio of 2.0. Engine efficiency was greater than 22 percent. The SPDE recently was divided into 2 separate single cylinder engines, Space Power Research Engine (SPRE), that serves as test beds for the evaluation of key technology disciplines, which include hydrodynamic gas bearings, high efficiency linear alternators, space qualified heat pipe heat exchangers, oscillating flow code validation, and engine loss understanding. The success of the SPDE at 650 K has resulted in a more ambitious Stirling endeavor, the design, fabrication, test, and evaluation of a designed-for-space 25 kW per cylinder Stirling Space Engine (SSE) to operate at a hot metal temperature of 1050 K using superalloy materials. This design is a low temperature confirmation of the 1300 K design. It is the 1300 K free-piston Stirling power conversion system that is the ultimate goal. The first two phases of this program, the 650 K SPDE and the 1050 K SSE are emphasized.

  3. Aquatic information and retrieval (AQUIRE) database system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, R.; Niemi, G.; Pilli, A.; Veith, G.

    1991-01-01

    The AQUIRE database system is one of the foremost international resources for finding aquatic toxicity information. Information in the system is organized around the concept of an 'aquatic toxicity test.' A toxicity test record contains information about the chemical, species, endpoint, endpoint concentrations, and test conditions under which the toxicity test was conducted. For the past 10 years aquatic literature has been reviewed and entered into the system. Currently, the AQUIRE database system contains data on more than 2,400 species, 160 endpoints, 5,000 chemicals, 6,000 references, and 104,000 toxicity tests.

  4. 65 time concrete workshop and cement concrete technology convention Kansai poster session; Dai 65 kai meno konkurito kenkyukai {center{underscore}dot} semento konkurito gijutsu taikai kansai happyokai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-10

    'In the concrete workshop (chairman and Kyoto University professor emeritus and Mr. Kiyoshi Okada)' which prides oneself it on the history for 65 years since the year establishment 1933, meeting for reading research papers are held in average year August the end of month. This poster session carried out research report again on the about 15 editions which Okada chairman selected carefully from research presentation of cement technology convention which Cement Assoc. of Japan sponsors in May, and it was held in August 31st, Foundation of Osaka Sci. and Technology Center in this year. The announcement was started in the language of the opening of the Okada chairman, and it was promoted in remaining all the time sum and kana atmosphere. The announcement collected from the national is also the research selected carefully. The data got in the back is added, and the result of question and answer in technology convention the day is incorporated, and there seems to be some making advantage. The poster session closed the curtain in closing greeting by Mr. Rokusya of vice president (the Kyoto Univ. professor emeritus). Active activity such as besides this convention besides opening of the field observation is carried out, even if in this workshop, '60 annals' is arranged in advance, and even if the introduction in the long history is a citron in the different opportunity. Over the genre in which the industry-government-university of the Kansai district is wide, the member greatly contributes to the improvement in the concrete technology in the tonoko which university, cement, admixture ingredient company manage by the rotation as an executive without asking civil engineering, architecture. (translated by NEDO)

  5. Present status and problems on technology development of high level waste management being in progress at Radioisotope Center, JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies and technical developments concerning to the management of the high level waste from the nuclear fuel reprocessing are reviewed. Problems accompanying with the waste management are extracted and then subjects to be studied in future are discussed by co-operation of the study groups of Radioisotope Center, JAERI, which work at studies and technical developments on the waste management. This paper presents the results. First, studies progressing in each group at present were introduced. Then the present status of R and D concerning the disposal of the high level waste in advanced countries was investigated. Finally data and information considered necessary to make schedule of R and D were accumulated. On the base of the information obtained above, aims and subjects of R and D were discussed and following consensus of opinions was attained. The subjects should be taken up from the point of comprehensive and long term view, including the check and review of the nuclear fuel cycle at present. Risk analysis of the ultimate disposal, partitioning and transmutation are particularly important as the subjects to be studied in JAERI. (auth.)

  6. Assistive Technology Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Technology and Disability Register Login Enter your keywords About CTD Events Home CTD Learning Center CTD Library CTD Cafe ... Sheet: Assistive Technology Laws AT Fact Sheet: Assistive Technology Laws Back to Search Results There is a ...

  7. Using AquaticHealth.net to Detect Emerging Trends in Aquatic Animal Health

    OpenAIRE

    Geoff Grossel; Aidan Lyon; Allan Mooney

    2013-01-01

    AquaticHealth.net is an open-source aquatic biosecurity intelligence application. By combining automated data collection and human analysis, AquaticHealth.net provides fast and accurate disease outbreak detection and forecasts, accompanied with nuanced explanations. The system has been online and open to the public since 1 January 2010, it has over 200 registered expert users around the world, and it typically publishes about seven daily reports and two weekly disease alerts. We document the ...

  8. New thermal neutron prompt ?-ray activation analysis instrument at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, E. A.; Anderson, D. L.; Liposky, P. J.; Lindstrom, R. M.; Chen-Mayer, H.; Lamaze, G. P.

    2004-11-01

    A new thermal neutron prompt ?-ray activation analysis (PGAA) instrument was designed and built to replace the original PGAA system at the NIST Center for Neutron Research. By placing a sapphire filter in the neutron beam shutter assembly, the fast neutron fluence rate was reduced by a factor of 5 and low-energy (50-200 keV) ?-ray intensities were reduced by factors of 5-10. The thermal neutron fluence rate was reduced by only a factor of 1.13. A new external beam tube, sample chamber, beam stop, and support structure were built and a new detection system installed. The new beam tube is made of two cylindrical aluminum sections lined with a lithiated polymer. Both sections are kept under vacuum to reduce the number of neutrons scattered by air into the beam tube walls. The sample chamber is also fabricated from aluminum and lined with lithiated polymer, and may be evacuated to minimize the number of neutrons scattered and absorbed by air. The beam tube and sample chamber assembly is suspended from the aluminum support structure. The detection system consists of a 40% efficient (relative) germanium detector (resolution 2.0 at 1332.5 keV) and a bismuth germanate Compton suppressor. The detection system is shielded by lead, surrounded by borated and lithiated polyethylene, and placed on a table attached to the support structure. The new, more compact beam stop is welded to the support structure. Capture ?-ray photopeaks from H, B, C, N, Na, Al, Fe, Ge, I and Pb in the background spectrum were either of lower intensity or eliminated with the new PGAA instrument. The more efficient detection system, positioned closer to the sample, yielded element sensitivity increases of 5-50%. Limits of detection have been greatly reduced compared with those of the original instrument due to reduced Compton and scattered ?-ray backgrounds (especially in the low-energy region), increased sensitivities, and reduction of background ?-ray photopeak intensities.

  9. AQUATIC TOXICITY INFORMATION RETRIEVAL (AQUIRE) DATABASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The AQUIRE (AQUatic toxicity Information REtrieval) database was established in 1981 by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), Mid-Continent Ecology Division, Duluth, MN (MED-Duluth). Scientific papers published both nationally and internationally on the tox...

  10. Freshwater aquatic plant biomass production in Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, K.R.; Sutton, D.L.; Bowes, G.

    1983-01-01

    About 8% (1.2 million ha) of the total surface area of Florida is occupied by freshwater. Many of these water bodies are eutrophic. Nutrients present in these water bodies can be potentially used to culture aquatic plants as a possible feedstock for methane production. This paper summarizes the results of known research findings on biomass production potential of freshwater aquatic plants in Florida and identifies key research needs to improve the quality and quantity of biomass yields. Among floating aquatic plants, biomass yield potential was in the order of water-hyacinth > water lettuce > pennywort > salvinia > duckweed > azolla. Pennywort, duckweed, and azolla appear to perform well during the cooler months compared to other aquatic plants. Among emergent plants, biomass yield potential was in the order of southern wild rice > cattails > soft rush > bulrush. Cultural techniques, nutrient management, and environmental factors influencing the biomass yields were discussed. 68 references.

  11. SYNOPSIS OF HISTOTECHNIQUES FOR AQUATIC ANIMALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This synopsis provides an overview of the necropsy, fixation, trimming, and processing of tissues from aquatic organisms for examination using light microscopy. The handling of animals, their tissues, uses of knives, and processing chemicals will be covered. Understanding the his...

  12. Nitrous oxide emission by aquatic macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Poulsen, Morten

    2009-01-01

      A large variety of aquatic animals was found to emit the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide when nitrate was present in the environment. The emission was ascribed to denitrification by ingested bacteria in the anoxic animal gut, and the exceptionally high N2O-to-N2 production ratio suggested delayed induction of the last step of denitrification. Filter- and deposit-feeding animal species showed the highest rates of nitrous oxide emission and predators the lowest, probably reflecting the different amounts of denitrifying bacteria in the diet. We estimate that nitrous oxide emission by aquatic animals is quantitatively important in nitraterich aquatic environments like freshwater, coastal marine, and deep-sea ecosystems. The contribution of this source to overall nitrous oxide emission from aquatic environments might further increase because of the projected increase of nitrate availability in tropical regions and the numeric dominance of filter- and depositfeeders in eutrophic ecosystems.

  13. New thermal neutron prompt ?-ray activation analysis instrument at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new thermal neutron prompt ?-ray activation analysis (PGAA) instrument was designed and built to replace the original PGAA system at the NIST Center for Neutron Research. By placing a sapphire filter in the neutron beam shutter assembly, the fast neutron fluence rate was reduced by a factor of 5 and low-energy (50-200 keV) ?-ray intensities were reduced by factors of 5-10. The thermal neutron fluence rate was reduced by only a factor of 1.13. A new external beam tube, sample chamber, beam stop, and support structure were built and a new detection system installed. The new beam tube is made of two cylindrical aluminum sections lined with a lithiated polymer. Both sections are kept under vacuum to reduce the number of neutrons scattered by air into the beam tube walls. The sample chamber is also fabricated from aluminum and lined with lithiated polymer, and may be evacuated to minimize the number of neutrons scattered and absorbed by air. The beam tube and sample chamber assembly is suspended from the aluminum support structure. The detection system consists of a 40% efficient (relative) germanium detector (resolution 2.0 at 1332.5 keV) and a bismuth germanate Compton suppressor. The detection system is shielded by lead, surrounded by borated and lithiated polyethylene, and placed on a table attached to the support structure. The new, more compact beam stop is welded to the support structure. Capture ?-ray photopeaks from H, B, C, N, Na, Al, Fe, Ge, I and Pb in the, C, N, Na, Al, Fe, Ge, I and Pb in the background spectrum were either of lower intensity or eliminated with the new PGAA instrument. The more efficient detection system, positioned closer to the sample, yielded element sensitivity increases of 5-50%. Limits of detection have been greatly reduced compared with those of the original instrument due to reduced Compton and scattered ?-ray backgrounds (especially in the low-energy region), increased sensitivities, and reduction of background ?-ray photopeak intensities

  14. Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.; Yoder, T.S.

    2003-04-22

    This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

  15. Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Jeffrey W.

    2010-08-12

    This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual.” This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. This report is an update, and replaces the previous report by the same title issued April 2003. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

  16. Sorption of micropollutants to natural aquatic particles.

    OpenAIRE

    Koelmans, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    Sorption to natural aquatic particles plays an important role in the bioavailability and fate of micropollutants. The characteristics of sorption were investigated for hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) and heavy metals using a wide variety of natural aquatic particles. Special attention was paid to (bio)sorption to phytoplankton and detritus. The extent of sorption can be quantified by a distribution- ( K d ) or partitioncoefficient ( K p ). It was shown in this study that such coefficient...

  17. 18F-fluorocholine production at Center of Nuclear Technology Development, Brazil: synthesis and in vitro cytotoxicity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    18F-fluorocholine (18FCH) is promising biomarker for imaging of tumors using PET technology, being effective in the diagnosis of metastatic tumors and specific for the brain tumors, prostate, lung, among others. Despite already being used in some countries like France, Germany, Slovenia, Poland, Romania and Portugal, the 18FCH is not yet produced or marketed in Brazil. This work proposed the development of a new radiopharmaceutical based on choline labeled with 18F isotope for diagnostic PET imaging which is an increasing demand of the nuclear medicine national. It was also proposed the development of quality control assays in order to evaluate the radiopharmaceutical prior to its use in patients; in vitro test of toxicity in non-tumor cells (MRC-5), evaluating possible changes in cell proliferation caused by radiopharmaceutical impurities; and, to test the interaction's saturation of 18FCH with the tumor cells (PC-3 and U-87) and the competition with HC-3 and DMAE, performed to characterize the efficiency of the radiotracer uptake by tumor cells that express the choline transporter CHT. 18FCH was synthesized in two main steps, first by reaction with dibromomethane with fluoride-18, assisted by Kryptofix2.2.2, forming 18F-fluorobromomethane (18FBrCH2) and, then, the 18FBrCH2 reacted with the second precursor DMAE generating the final product, 18FCH. Synthesis duration was 45 minutes. 18FCH was obtained in 4.68 - 8.32% radiochemical yield, radiochemical purity greater than 99% and it was stable for up to 8 hours after production. The tested analytical methodologies were suitable for routine use in the quality control of 18FCH. The evaluation of the cytotoxic potential of impurities 18FCH, by clonogenic assay, showed that at the concentrations evaluated, the components do not alter the proliferative capacity of human healthy cells. The interaction of 18FCH with cell lines was saturable, with specific binding greater than 94%, attesting to the efficacy of the radiopharmaceutical. HC-3 and DMAE showed significant inhibition of uptake of the radiotracer, demonstrating that, its uptake in these cells occurs partly, by the carrier CHT. IC50 values for HC-3 were 795.9 ± 221.1; 409.3 ± 353.6 e 778.4 ± 95.3?M for PC-3, U-87 e MRC-5, respectively, and for DMAE were 11.0 ± 8.7; 4,7 ± 1.2 e 6.3 ± 2.2?M for PC-3, U-87 e MRC-5, respectively, showing to be potent inhibitors of choline uptake. All tests realized have contributed, in part, to the registration process in accordance with the norms of ANVISA. (author)

  18. Preparation, characterization, and applications of a novel solid-phase microextraction fiber by sol-gel technology on the surface of stainless steel wire for determination of poly cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aquatic environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A novel solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber was prepared using sol–gel technology. • Sol–gel coating was performed on stainless steel substrate. • The new fibers are robust and unbreakable with temperature stability. • The fibers were used for extraction of PAHs from aqueous samples. - Abstract: A novel solid-phase microextraction(SPME) fiber was prepared using sol–gel technology with ethoxylated nonylphenol as a fiber coating material. The fiber was employed to develop a headspace SPME–GC–MS method suitable for quantification of 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water samples. Surface characteristics of the fibers were inspected by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy as well as by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM measurements showed the presence of highly porous nano-sized particles in the coating. Important parameters affecting the extraction efficiency such as extraction temperature and time, desorption conditions as well as ionic strength have been evaluated and optimized. In the next step, the validation of the new method have been performed, finding it to be specific in the trace analysis of PAHs, with the limit of detection (LOD) ranging from 0.01 to 0.5 ?g L?1 and the linear range from the respective LOD to 200 ?g L?1with RSD amounting to less than 8%. The thermal stability of the fibers was investigated as well and they were found to be durable at 280 °C for 345 min. Furthermore, the proposed method was successfully applied for quantification of PAHs in real water samples

  19. Preparation, characterization, and applications of a novel solid-phase microextraction fiber by sol-gel technology on the surface of stainless steel wire for determination of poly cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aquatic environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es-haghi, Ali, E-mail: a.eshaghi@rvsri.ac.ir [Department of Physico Chemistry, Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute, PO Box 31975/148, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseininasab, Valiallah; Bagheri, Habib [Environmental and Bio-Analytical Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-9516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A novel solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber was prepared using sol–gel technology. • Sol–gel coating was performed on stainless steel substrate. • The new fibers are robust and unbreakable with temperature stability. • The fibers were used for extraction of PAHs from aqueous samples. - Abstract: A novel solid-phase microextraction(SPME) fiber was prepared using sol–gel technology with ethoxylated nonylphenol as a fiber coating material. The fiber was employed to develop a headspace SPME–GC–MS method suitable for quantification of 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water samples. Surface characteristics of the fibers were inspected by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy as well as by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM measurements showed the presence of highly porous nano-sized particles in the coating. Important parameters affecting the extraction efficiency such as extraction temperature and time, desorption conditions as well as ionic strength have been evaluated and optimized. In the next step, the validation of the new method have been performed, finding it to be specific in the trace analysis of PAHs, with the limit of detection (LOD) ranging from 0.01 to 0.5 ?g L{sup ?1} and the linear range from the respective LOD to 200 ?g L{sup ?1}with RSD amounting to less than 8%. The thermal stability of the fibers was investigated as well and they were found to be durable at 280 °C for 345 min. Furthermore, the proposed method was successfully applied for quantification of PAHs in real water samples.

  20. In situ recovery of oil from Utah tar sand: a summary of tar sand research at the Laramie Energy Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchant, L.C.; Westhoff, J.D.

    1985-10-01

    This report describes work done by the United States Department of Energy's Laramie Energy Technology Center from 1971 through 1982 to develop technology for future recovery of oil from US tar sands. Work was concentrated on major US tar sand deposits that are found in Utah. Major objectives of the program were as follows: determine the feasibility of in situ recovery methods applied to tar sand deposits; and establish a system for classifying tar sand deposits relative to those characteristics that would affect the design and operation of various in situ recovery processes. Contents of this report include: (1) characterization of Utah tar sand; (2) laboratory extraction studies relative to Utah tar sand in situ methods; (3) geological site evaluation; (4) environmental assessments and water availability; (5) reverse combustion field experiment, TS-1C; (6) a reverse combustion followed by forward combustion field experiment, TS-2C; (7) tar sand permeability enhancement studies; (8) two-well steam injection experiment; (9) in situ steam-flood experiment, TS-1S; (10) design of a tar sand field experiment for air-stream co-injection, TS-4; (11) wastewater treatment and oil analyses; (12) economic evaluation of an in situ tar sand recovery process; and (13) appendix I (extraction studies involving Utah tar sands, surface methods). 70 figs., 68 tabs.

  1. Crowdsourcing Aquatic Resource Data Collection: Exploring Effective Methods to Collect and Rectify Citizen Contributed Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, J.

    2011-12-01

    Increasing use of mobile computing and geopositioning technology has provided the environmental sciences with vast new pools of data. Prominent among the gathering methods which produce this data is "crowdsourcing", in which citizen scientists volunteer data. Environmental data collected by crowdsourcing may need to be rectified prior to use by the scientific community. Using mobile applications to educate the crowd, support for the targeted environmental data desired, coupled with thoughtful design of mobile applications can potentially aid the process of rectification. This presentation will outline the use of crowdsourced data, cohort groups and design options for mobile applications that can be used to collect aquatic resource information. If rectification challenges can be overcome, the collective power of the crowd can be harnessed to gather standards-based geographic data, information about environmental conditions, and detailed biological data about aquatic resources. Key Words: Crowdsource, Citizen Scientist, Volunteer Data, Geopositioning Aquatic Resource Geographic Data Author Jon Eric Soderberg

  2. Data management and GIS in the Center for Disaster Management and Risk Reduction Technology (CEDIM: from integrated spatial data to the mapping of risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Köhler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The project 'Risk Map Germany' of the Center for Disaster Management and Risk Reduction Technology (CEDIM aims at the examination of existing and the development of new approaches for integrated risk assessment as well as the realisation of risk analyses for selected threats and regions. Hazard, vulnerability and risk maps display the results and provide valuable information for planning, insurances, emergency management, science and the public. This article describes the development of the basic information infrastructure for CEDIM and the 'Risk Map Germany' providing components for the networking of participating institutions, for common data management, data dissemination and publication. While a web based project platform offers information and communication facilities for all the project members and also the presentation of CEDIM to the public, an integrated data base is prepared as foundation for cross-discipline but common risk assessment. It is made available by the spatial data service 'CEDIM Data Center' which allows the project members to inform themselves about the characteristics of existing data and its applicability for their specific tasks by exploring GIS functionalities. Suitable data can be downloaded and further processed in their own work environment. The components' alignment with the principles of Spatial Data Infrastructures is required to accomplish the suppositions for long-term availability and accessibility of data, information and services.

  3. Data center cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  4. Objectives and Current Status of the IAEA Network of Centers of Excellence: Training in and Demonstration of Waste Disposal Technologies in Underground Research Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, M. J.; Knapp, M. R.

    2003-02-27

    Underground Research Laboratories (URLs) to develop and demonstrate technologies for the safe geologic disposal of radioactive wastes have been established for national purposes by several Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Under the auspices of the IAEA, nationally developed URLs and associated research institutions are being offered for use by other nations. These facilities form a Network of Centers of Excellence for training in and development of waste disposal technologies. Experience gained in the operation of the facilities, and through associated experimentation and demonstrations, will be transferred to participating Member States through hands-on work at the facilities. The Network consists of Network Members and Network Participants who share co-operative activities. Network Members are owners of facilities who have offered them to be part of the Network. At this time there are eight Members consisting of six underground facilities, a laboratory, and a university. Network Participants can potentially come from any interested IAEA Member State having spent nuclear fuel for disposal, with or without an established program for geologic disposal. There are presently about 15 Network Participants. A significant Network activity beginning in 2003 will be a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on characterization and evaluation of swelling clays for use in engineered barrier systems of geologic repositories. At the end of this project, every involved Member State should be able to identify and characterize a swelling clay that is suitable for use in a geologic repository. As the Network grows, additional CRPs to be carried out in the Underground Research Facilities of the Network Members will be defined.

  5. Objectives and Current Status of the IAEA Network of Centers of Excellence: Training in and Demonstration of Waste Disposal Technologies in Underground Research Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underground Research Laboratories (URLs) to develop and demonstrate technologies for the safe geologic disposal of radioactive wastes have been established for national purposes by several Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Under the auspices of the IAEA, nationally developed URLs and associated research institutions are being offered for use by other nations. These facilities form a Network of Centers of Excellence for training in and development of waste disposal technologies. Experience gained in the operation of the facilities, and through associated experimentation and demonstrations, will be transferred to participating Member States through hands-on work at the facilities. The Network consists of Network Members and Network Participants who share co-operative activities. Network Members are owners of facilities who have offered them to be part of the Network. At this time there are eight Members consisting of six underground facilities, a laboratory, and a university. Network Participants can potentially come from any interested IAEA Member State having spent nuclear fuel for disposal, with or without an established program for geologic disposal. There are presently about 15 Network Participants. A significant Network activity beginning in 2003 will be a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on characterization and evaluation of swelling clays for use in engineered barrier systems of geologic repositories. At the end of this project, eepositories. At the end of this project, every involved Member State should be able to identify and characterize a swelling clay that is suitable for use in a geologic repository. As the Network grows, additional CRPs to be carried out in the Underground Research Facilities of the Network Members will be defined

  6. Gerald L. Epstein, PhD: director, center for science, technology, and security policy, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Interview by Madeline Drexler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Gerald L

    2009-12-01

    Over his entire career, Gerald Epstein has toiled at the nexus of science, technology, and security. From 2003 to 2009, he was Senior Fellow for Science and Security at the Center for Strategic and International Studies Homeland Security Program, where he worked on reducing biological weapons threats, improving national preparedness, and easing potential tensions between the scientific research and national security communities. Epstein came to CSIS from the Institute for Defense Analyses. From 1996 to 2001, he served in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. And from 1983 to 1989, and again from 1991 until its demise in 1995, Epstein worked at the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, where he directed a study on the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, alongside research on other global security topics. A recognized expert in biological risk reduction, Epstein was actually trained as a physicist, having received SB degrees in physics and electrical engineering from MIT, and a PhD in physics from the University of California at Berkeley. How, then, did he come to study the evolving threat from bioterrorism? "What compelled me about bioterrorism was that it was a stellar example of a topic that would lead to a train wreck between the scientific community and the security community unless they figured out how to work together," he said. "The distance between a laboratory and a very large consequence event is a lot shorter in biology than in any other field. I got into bioterrorism to help make sure that the security community doesn't get so scared of the science that it shuts it down, and that the science community isn't so oblivious of security concerns that it pays no attention to them." Epstein spoke on November 6, 2009, with contributing writer Madeline Drexler, author of Emerging Epidemics: The Menace of New Infections (Penguin, 2009), an updated version of an earlier volume. Drexler holds a visiting appointment at the Harvard School of Public Health and is a senior fellow at Brandeis University's Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism. PMID:20028243

  7. Aquatic toxicity of two Corexit dispersants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George-Ares, A; Clark, J R

    2000-04-01

    The oil spill dispersants, Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 have low to moderate toxicity to most aquatic species in laboratory tests. Toxicity estimates are significantly affected by test variables such as species, lifestage, exposure duration, and temperature. Aquatic toxicity data generated from spiked, declining exposures (107 min half-life) are more reflective of actual dispersant use conditions. Decisions to use oil spill response chemicals should not be based solely on aquatic toxicity. Factors to consider include product effectiveness, toxicity of dispersed oil, species/habitats requiring priority protection, and recovery potential of sensitive habitats and populations. An environmental risk assessment approach is recommended where dispersant toxicity data generated under environmentally relevant exposures are compared to estimated environmental concentrations of dispersants. PMID:10718584

  8. The International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) - Fifteen-Year Experience in Management of Innovative Nuclear and Other Programs (Information Review)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudowski, W.; Tocheny, L.V. [ISTC - International Science and Technology Center, Krasnoproletarskaya 32-34, PO Box 20, 127473 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    Introduction: The ISTC is a unique international organization created in Moscow in 1994 by Russia, USA, EU and Japan. Later Korea and Canada, and several CIS countries as well acceded to ISTC. The basic idea behind establishing the ISTC was to support non-proliferation of the mass destruction weapons technologies by redirecting former Soviet weapons scientists to peaceful research thus preventing the drain of dangerous knowledge and expertise from Russia and other CIS countries. Presently, the ISTC now has 40 member countries (27 from EU), representing the CIS, Europe, Asia, and North America. The Partner list includes over 200 organizations and leading industrial companies from all ISTC parties. Numerous science and technology projects were realized with the ISTC support in different areas, from bio-technologies and environmental problems to all aspects of nuclear studies, including those focused on the development of effective innovative concepts and technologies in the nuclear field, in general, and for improvement of nuclear safety, in particular. Concept: Challenge of the World Nuclear Community is to prove to Public over the World, that newly proposed nuclear concepts are safe and effective. The only acceptable method, which is trusted and accepted by Public both now and always, is basic-type and demonstration-type Experiment, in advance of computer or paper-type arguing. Important that results of these experiments are to be available for international analysis and validation. Problems are that nuclear experiments are very complex, its require special licensing, long time preparation, appealing to high-skilled personnel, purchasing by nuclear and special materials and tools, as a result - raised budgeting. In this sense the ISTC clients (first of all - nuclear and 'nuclear weapon' institutes in Russia and CIS) have all set, ready, licensed, and equipped unique nuclear installations, high-skilled personnel, good cooperation. Essential, that the ISTC projects: - Are managing internationally; - Have plans and results, available for international collaborators; - Results may be passed to international centers (OECD/NEA and/or others) for further international benchmarking. As for today - a set of demonstration and basic-type experiments, which fit closely with IAEA/ INPRO and GIF program, with EU Frame-Work programs, - had been done or under development now in the frame of ISTC projects and programs with active international collaboration. The ISTC - as a unique international tool - is ready to take part and manage further this activity. Among five thousand project proposals submitted to ISTC, there are about five hundred related to different aspects of nuclear technologies and Nuclear Fuel Cycle (NFC). Survey of the ISTC project results: The following information will be included in the review, with special attention on details of corresponding experimental programs: - Novel reactor concepts, corresponding to GIF: - Fast reactors (Sodium-, Lead-and Lead-Bismuth-cooled); - Supercritical Pressure Water aspects; - HTGR - critical modeling, engineering. - Molten salts. - Nuclear Fuel Cycle options (including Partitioning and Transmutation). - Reactor data benchmarking and verification, critical experiments. - Nuclear Power Plant life management (Reactor pressure vessel and internals control, etc.). - Nuclear data measurements. - Severe accident study (Corium modelling, Quench-effect, Chernobyl). - Sky-shine experiments. - Depleted Uranium for RAW storage. - Technical and economical analysis of NFC, including non-proliferation issues. - Novel reactor engineering systems - experimental and computer modelling (steam-generators, etc.). - Accelerator Driven Systems (experimental modeling). References: The ISTC Annual Reports - ISTC, Moscow, 1996 - 2007. Web-site: www.istcinfo.ru. (authors)

  9. Aquatic biomass as a source of fuels and chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, L.P.

    1983-09-01

    The Aquatic Species Program (ASP) addresses the development of technologies that produce and utilize plant biomass species which naturally inhabit wetlands or submerged areas. Processes being developed through this program take advantage of the rapid growth rates, high yields, and extraordinary chemical compositions inherently associated with aquatic species. Emphasis is placed on salt tolerant species for cultivation on poorly utilized, low-value lands, where conventional agriculture is not economic. Candidate species are identified from: (1) microalgae-unicellular plants that are natural factories for converting sunlight into high quality oils; (2) macroalgae-large, chemically unique plants that can be easily fermented to methane gas or alcohols; and (3) emergents-plants that grow rooted in waterways and bogs, but are partially exposed above water. Within the next five years, the conditions and resources necessary for sustained systems operations are to be defined, design parameters examined, and experimental facilities developed. Succeeding years are planned to focus on resolving major technical hurdles in systems operations, integration, and component performance. This paper updates the technical progress in this program, describes several aspects of evolving systems concepts, and attempts to provide some perspectives based on potential economics. 16 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  10. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D N; Foster, I T; Middleton, D E

    2009-10-15

    This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities). During this semi-annual reporting period, the ESG-CET team continued its efforts to complete software components needed for the ESG Gateway and Data Node. These components include: Data Versioning, Data Replication, DataMover-Lite (DML) and Bulk Data Mover (BDM), Metrics, Product Services, and Security, all joining together to form ESG-CET's first beta release. The launch of the beta release is scheduled for late October with the installation of ESG Gateways at NCAR and LLNL/PCMDI. Using the developed ESG Data Publisher, the ESG II CMIP3 (IPCC AR4) data holdings - approximately 35 TB - will be among the first datasets to be published into the new ESG enterprise system. In addition, the NCAR's ESG II data holdings will also be published into the new system - approximately 200 TB. This period also saw the testing of the ESG Data Node at various collaboration sites, including: the British Atmospheric Data Center (BADC), the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology, the University of Tokyo Center for Climate System Research, and the Australian National University. This period, a total of 14 national and international sites installed an ESG Data Node for testing. During this period, we also continued to provide production-level services to the community, providing researchers worldwide with access to CMIP3 (IPCC AR4), CCES, and CCSM, Parallel Climate Model (PCM), Parallel Ocean Program (POP), and Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP), and NARCCAP data.

  11. Observation and electronic characterization of 'new' E' center defects in technologically relevant thermal SiO2 on Si: An additional complexity in oxide charge trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, John F., Jr.; Lenahan, P. M.; Evans, H. L.; Lowry, R. K.; Morthorst, T. J.

    1994-09-01

    Using electron-spin resonance (ESR), we demonstrate that several E' variant precursors exist in a variety of technologically significant thermally grown thin SiO2 films on Si. The E' variants include two varieties with the ubiquitous E'(sub gamma) line shape (zero-crossing g = 2.0005, O3 identically equal to Si-) and a second very narrow line shape (zero-crossing g = 2.0019, structure unkown). We tentatively label the g = 2.0019 defect EP for provisional E' and distinguish the E'(sub gamma) variants E'(sub gamma(n)) (neutral) and E'(sub gamma(p)) (positive). We combine ESR, capacitance versus voltage electrical measurements, and charge injection sequences to compare the electronic properties of the defects. We find that paramagnetic EP defects are positively charged while paramagnetic E'(sub gamma) centers can be either positively charged or, under some circumstances, neutral. We find that EP precursors have a very large capture cross section for holes (sigma = 10(exp -13) sq cm) and that paramagnetic EP defects have an even larger capture cross section for electrons (sigma = 10(exp -12) sq cm). Both EP capture cross sections are an order of magnitude greater than those of the E'(sub gamma(p)) defects. We find that EP centers are distributed much more broadly throughout the oxide than either the E'(sub gamma(p)) or E'(sub gamma(n)) defects. We also find a two order of magnitude variation in EP density dependent upon processing variations. In addition, EP centers, unlike the E'(sub gamma) variations, are not stable at room temperature. With their large capture cross section for holes and even larger capture cross section for electrons, EP defects may be relevant to device reliability and charge trapping under conditions of a low, relatively pure hole fluence such as in hot hole injection in short n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors.

  12. Reconnaissance survey of site 7 of the proposed Three Rivers Regional Landfill and Technology Center, Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabak, M.A.; Beck, M.L.; Gillam, C.; Sassaman, K.E.

    1996-02-01

    This report documents the archaeological investigation of Site 7 of the proposed Three Rivers Regional Landfill and Technology Center in Aiken County on the United States Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Pedestrian and subsurface survey techniques were used to investigate the 1,403-acre project area. Survey resulted in the discovery of 23 previously unrecorded sites and 11 occurrences; six previously recorded sites were also investigated. These sites consist of six prehistoric sites, nine historic sites, and 14 sites with both prehistoric and historic components. Sites locations and project area boundaries are provided on a facsimile of a USGS 7.5 topographic map. The prehistoric components consist of very small, low-density lithic and ceramic scatters; most contain less than 10 artifacts. Six of the prehistoric components are of unknown cultural affiliation, the remaining prehistoric sites were occupied predominately in the Woodland period. The historic sites are dominated by postbellum/modem home places of tenant and yeoman farmers but four historic sites were locations of antebellum house sites (38AK136, 38AK613, 38AK660, and 38AK674). The historic sites also include an African-American school (38AK677).

  13. Office of Inspector General audit report on the U.S. Department of Energy`s funds distribution and control system at the Federal Energy Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    In Fiscal Year 1998, the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) was responsible for managing about $723 million in budgetary resources. The objective of this audit was to determine if FETC had a funds distribution and control system to ensure appropriated funds were managed in accordance with congressional intent and applicable policies and procedures. Improvements are needed in FETC`s administration of budgetary and accounting transactions. FETC did not have a comprehensive system to allocate indirect costs to funding programs and work-for-others projects. In addition, FETC did not completely adhere to Headquarters Clean Coal budget direction. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) reached its conclusions despite a scope impairment. Written documentation was not always available, and the audit team did not have ready access to key personnel who could explain certain transactions and management practices and procedures. In order to strengthen the FETC financial management system, the OIG recommended (1) the development of policies, procedures, and practices to accurately collect and allocate indirect costs and (2) improvements in internal control procedures. The OIG also recommended that the Chief Financial Officer conduct a detailed for cause review of the financial management practices at FETC and work with the Office of Field Management to develop a schedule for reviewing the financial management systems of all Departmental elements.

  14. Measurement of Sedimentary Interbed Hydraulic Properties and Their Hydrologic Influence near the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kim S.

    2003-01-01

    Disposal of wastewater to unlined infiltration ponds near the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly known as the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has resulted in the formation of perched water bodies in the unsaturated zone (Cecil and others, 1991). The unsaturated zone at INEEL comprises numerous basalt flows interbedded with thinner layers of coarse- to fine-grained sediments and perched ground-water zones exist at various depths associated with massive basalts, basalt-flow contacts, sedimentary interbeds, and sediment-basalt contacts. Perched ground water is believed to result from large infiltration events such as seasonal flow in the Big Lost River and wastewater discharge to infiltration ponds. Evidence from a large-scale tracer experiment conducted in 1999 near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), approximately 13 km from the INTEC, indicates that rapid lateral flow of perched water in the unsaturated zone may be an important factor in contaminant transport at the INEEL (Nimmo and others, 2002b). Because sedimentary interbeds, and possibly baked-zone alterations at sediment-basalt contacts (Cecil and other, 1991) play an important role in the generation of perched water it is important to assess the hydraulic properties of these units.

  15. Idaho HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tanks WM-182 and WM-183 - Rev. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Susan Kay; unknown

    2000-12-01

    This document presents the plan for the closure of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm Facility tanks WM-182 and WM-183 in accordance with Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act interim status closure requirements. Closure of these two tanks is the first in a series of closures leading to the final closure of the eleven 300,000-gal tanks in the Tank Farm Facility. As such, closure of tanks WM-182 and WM-183 will serve as a proof-of-process demonstration of the waste removal, decontamination, and sampling techniques for the closure of the remaining Tank Farm Facility tanks. Such an approach is required because of the complexity and uniqueness of the Tank Farm Facility closure. This plan describes the closure units, objectives, and compliance strategy as well as the operational history and current status of the tanks. Decontamination, closure activities, and sampling and analysis will be performed with the goal of achieving clean closure of the tanks. Coordination with other regulatory requirements, such as U.S. Department of Energy closure requirements, is also discussed.

  16. Status of the 1.76 MeV pulsed light ion beamline at the Northrop Grumman Advanced Technology and Development Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) Advanced Technology and Development Center (ATDC) beamline has recently been upgraded to provide a 1.76 MeV beam for use in the testing of various types of targets for gamma ray production. The beam is produced by an RF Driven multicusp volume ion source. After transport through a dual solenoid LEBT. the beam is captured and accelerated to 1.013 MeV by an electroformed monolithic RFQ. The DTL boosts the 1.013 MeV output of the RFQ up to 1.76 MeV. A bunching cavity and three permanent magnet quadrupoles match the RFQ output to the DTL. Downstream of the DTL an electromagnetic quadrupole HEBT transports the beam to a diagnostic station housing target testing hardware. Automatic startup and control algorithms have been developed to simplify- beamline operations. A new sequenced autostart has been developed to start up all three RF cavities and initiate amplitude, phase, and frequency control subsystems. The frequency-control system, which uses a sliding-short tuner and an I and Q tune sensor, is currently integrated into the main control system. This paper will discuss the status of the beamline with emphasis on the energy upgrade, automatic startup and control systems, and the frequency-control subsystem. (author)

  17. Bachelor - power plant technology. Breaking new ground in academic training at the PowerTech Training Center; Bachelor - Kraftwerkstechnik. Neue Wege in der akademischen Ausbildung an der Kraftwerksschule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umierski, C. [Kraftwerksschule e.V., Essen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    For the power industry, recruiting suitable young engineers is a daunting task in the face of university reforms and the decline of highly-qualified academics in engineering sciences. This means that the power industry needs to increase their involvement with universities beyond its current extent. Participation in defining the course contents and raising the educational standards are aspects that are important to future employees; the same can be said of interesting perspectives. For the power industry, imparting the required competence and key qualifications is not the only issue - securing the future employees' long-term loyalty also plays a role. Together with the University of Applied Sciences Aachen and in close co-operation with technical committees of VGB PowerTech, the PowerTech Training Center has developed a bachelor course aimed at fulfilling the power industry's future need for engineers; students can enroll for the course from the winter semester 2007/2008 onwards. The specialisation area 'power plant technology' is offered to students of mechanical engineering as well as to employees from trainee programs in the industry. (orig.)

  18. Temperature influences on growth of aquatic organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature profoundly affects the growth rates of aquatic organisms, and its control is essential for effective aquaculture. Characteristically, both low and high temperatures produce slow growth rates and inefficient food conversion, while intermediate temperature ranges provide rapid growth and efficient food conversion. Distinct, species-specific optimum temperatures and upper and lower temperatures of zero growth can often be defined. Thermal effects can be greatly modified by amounts and quality of food. These data not only provide the basis for criteria which maintain growth of wild organisms but also for effectively using waste heat to create optimal conditions of temperature and food ration for growing aquatic organisms commercially

  19. Radioactive contamination of aquatic media and organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a brief account of the radioactive wastes produced by peaceful or military uses of Atomic Industry, the author first describes a series of observations carried out 'in the field' on the extent of contamination in aquatic organisms with respect to that of the medium. The experimental studies are then analysed, with reference both to the radioisotope metabolism and to the factors and types of contamination of aquatic organisms by wastes from atomic industry. A precise experimental project is presented at the end of the paper, including almost 300 references. (author)

  20. Effects of modifications of aquatic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies under this program historically have been concerned with the effects of a variety of stress factors on aquatic populations and communities. Current research was focused principally on ionizing radiation, and includes studies on the interaction of acute radiation and temperature on fish, the in situ measurement of radiation exposure in an aquatic environment, and the uptake and retention of tritium in a simulated pond community. In response to the expanded responsibilities of the recently formed Energy Research and Development Administration in dealing with all forms of energy related problems, this program will be redirected in the coming year to nonnuclear energy research

  1. Chapter 5. Assessing the Aquatic Hazards of Veterinary Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, there has been increasing awareness of the widespread distribution of low concentrations of veterinary medicine products and other pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. While aquatic hazard for a select group of veterinary medicines has received previous s...

  2. 40 CFR 796.3100 - Aerobic aquatic biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 true Aerobic aquatic biodegradation. 796.3100 Section 796.3100...Processes § 796.3100 Aerobic aquatic biodegradation. (a) Introduction —(1) Purpose...data on the rate and extent of aerobic biodegradation that might occur when...

  3. ECOREGION: AQUATIC ECOREGIONS FOR REVA MAIA STUDY AREA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US Environmental Protection Agency Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAIA) Project has produced geographic information system (GIS) coverage of aquatic ecoregions for the MAIA study area from the US Geological Surveys Aquatic Ecoregions of the Conterminous United States. A...

  4. El impacto tecnológico sobre los procesos migratorios: los locutorios, ¿sólo espacios tecnológicos? / Technological impact on migration processes: locutorios (call centers), only technological spaces? / O impacto tecnológico sobre os processos migratorios: os locutórios, somente espaços tecnológicos?

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Anna, Vitores; María Carmen, Peñaranda; Luz María, Martínez; Juan, Muñoz-Justicia; Lupicinio, Íñiguez-Rueda.

    Full Text Available O estudo do impacto das Tecnologias da Informação e a Comunicação (TIC) na conceituação e na experiência dos processos de migração desperta um crescente interesse nas ciências sociais. Neste marco, o nosso trabalho aborda a questão do papel dos locutórios na configuração da experiência de migração. [...] O mais visível nestes espaços são as tecnologias e as relações que com essas tecnologias são estabelecidas com o local de origem. Contudo, as tecnologias que contém o locutório não fazem sentido por elas mesmas; é necessário colocá-las no seu contexto específico de uso, examinando a rede de práticas sociais em que os dispositivos são inseridos e que lhes dão significado. Nós argumentamos que a questão chave não é como as tecnologias impactam sobre a experiência da migração, senão em perguntar-se sobre as dinâmicas geradas dentro dos locutórios e pelas apropriações que os/as usuários/as fazem desses espaços e das tecnologias. Abstract in spanish El estudio del impacto de las TIC en la conceptualización y vivencia de los procesos migratorios despierta un creciente interés en las ciencias sociales. En este marco, nuestro trabajo aborda la pregunta por el papel de los locutorios en la conformación de la experiencia migratoria. Lo más visible e [...] n estos espacios son las tecnologías y las relaciones que mediante éstas se establecen con el lugar de origen. Sin embargo, las tecnologías que contiene el locutorio no tienen sentido por sí solas; es necesario ubicarlas en su contexto de uso, examinando la red de prácticas sociales en las que se insertan y que les dan sentido. Argumentamos que la clave no está en preguntarse cómo las tecnologías impactan en la experiencia migratoria, sino en preguntarse por las dinámicas que se generan en el interior los locutorios y por las apropiaciones que los/as usuarios/as hacen de estos espacios y de las tecnologías. Abstract in english The humanities and social sciences show an increasing interest in studying the impact ICT in the conceptualization and experience of migratory processes. Our work approaches this subject, asking for the role of call shops within the migratory experience. At a first glance, these spaces seem to be ch [...] aracterized by technologies that allow communication with the country of origin. Nevertheless, technologies make no sense on it own, but instead need to be placed within a specific production context, while considering the network of social practices in which they operate and through which they acquire meaning. We argue that the question is not to ask for the impact of ICT on migratory experience, but to study those dynamics generated inside call shops and the use an appropriation of technology and space made by call centers users.

  5. HAZARDOUS WASTE IDENTIFICATION RULE (HWIR) AQUATIC FOOD CHAINS MODULE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Aquatic Food Web (AqFW) module calculates chemical concentrations in aquatic organisms that are consumed by human and ecological receptors (e.g., fish filet; aquatic macrophytes). These concentrations are used as input to the human and ecological exposure modules to determine...

  6. The Effect of Aquatic Intervention on the Gross Motor Function and Aquatic Skills in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrijevic?, Lidija; Aleksandrovic?, Marko; Madic?, Dejan; Okic?ic?, Tomislav; Radovanovic?, Dragan; Daly, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of an aquatic intervention on the gross motor function and aquatic skills of children with cerebral palsy (CP). Twenty-nine children with CP, aged 5 to 14, were recruited. Fourteen children completed an aquatic intervention (EG), and 13 children served as controls (CG). Two participants dropped out due to events (illness) unrelated to the intervention. The aquatic intervention lasted 6 weeks (2 sessions per week at 55 minutes per sessi...

  7. EAWAG Forum Chriesbach - A new building for aquatic research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-02-15

    This brochure describes the 'Forum Chriesbach' - a new building for Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology EAWAG that features a facade of blue glass panels that block the sun's rays in summer and let them through in winter, a highly insulating structural cladding and a ventilation system which almost needs no heating and active cooling. A photovoltaic system, which covers one third of the building's electricity requirements, a glass-roofed atrium which brings light into the building and provides night-time cooling during summer is also described. An extensively greened roof which retains rainwater, rainwater-flushed toilets with separate collection of urine, the use of environmentally compatible materials and a staff canteen with an attractive selection of organic menus are noted. The construction of the institute is briefly documented and its energy systems are described as are the materials used in its construction.

  8. 78 FR 57921 - A.G. Volney Center, Inc. (f/k/a Buddha Steel, Inc.), China Green Material Technologies, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ...f/k/a Buddha Steel, Inc.), China Green Material Technologies, Inc., China Tractor Holdings, Inc., and...information concerning the securities of China Green Material Technologies, Inc. because it has not filed any...

  9. SEDIMENT ASSOCIATED PHOTOTOXICITY TO AQUATIC ORGANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phototoxicity is a two to greater than 1000-fold increase in chemical toxicity caused by ultraviolet radation (UV), which has been demonstrated in a broad range of marine and freshwater fish, invertebrates, and other aquatic organisms in water column exposures. Field collected s...

  10. Aquatic Animal Skeleton - Ball and Socket Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketan Patel (California State University, Fullerton; Student, Biological Sciences)

    2007-07-14

    The ball and socket joint of an aquatic animal allows the bones connected to it to move in all sorts of directions. It is usually associated with the shoulder or hip area and connect to appendages such as flippers, limbs, or tails.

  11. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    A one-stop-shop that addresses the submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) habitat requirements, current research, relationship between SAV and water quality and SAV and living resources. Site features links to aerial photography and modeled data, as well as groups who focus on restoring this integral resource. Provides lists of publications where the reader can gain a tremendous amount of information on SAV.

  12. History of transport and storage technology for natural gas in the 20 centuries. Pipeline, LNG, storage technology and international trade; 20 seiki ni okeru tennengasu yuso {center_dot} chozo gijutsu no hensen. Paipurain {center_dot} LNG {center_dot} chozo gijutsu to kokusai boeki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, A.; Koda, Y.; Nose, Y. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kikkawa, Y. [Chiyoda Corp., Kanagawa (Japan); Arata, O.; Shiobara, K. [NKK Copr., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-03-20

    Natural gas is widely lied under the ground in every place of the world. The great majority of natural gas produced in the region is used in the country, it is said that international trade of natural gas is about 20 % of commercial base production. Natural gas has been used widely in USA and Europe since early times. Especially, the utilization of natural gas has been enlarged by the development of pipeline area since the 1960s. In Japan, because it has been possible to import foreign natural gas as liquefied natural gas with the development of LNG technology, since LNG introduction from ALASKA to Japan in 19690 LNG big project has been realize one after another, and it is widely used as the material for city gas and as the fuel for electric power. And it has been increasingly demanded as a clean energy source. LNG over 50 million ton per year has been recently imported from seven countries in the world. This is about 60 % share of LNG trade in the world. In is background, recent radical advances in the development of long distance pipeline, the technology for liquefying natural gas, and LNG carrier and storage technology have made it possible to be used in the world wide. This report discribes the outview of the transition of these technologies. (author)

  13. Technology-Supported Inquiry for Learning about Aquatic Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.; Eberbach, Catherine; Jordan, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Understanding ecosystems is challenging, but important for becoming environmentally-literate citizens of today's society. People have difficulty considering how different components, mechanisms, and phenomena, both visible and invisible, are interconnected within ecosystems. This research presents both the design and initial testing of an…

  14. Modern technologies of reprocessing of thermal reactors SNF developed at the Khlopin Radium Institute for verification at the MCC experimental-demonstration center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technologies of reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of thermal reactors (TRs) developed at the Khlopin Radium Institute, namely simplified PUREX process and Fluid PUREX process, are discussed. Main operation stages of both technologies are analyzed and results of experimental laboratory verification of these technologies using real SNF are presented. (author)

  15. Developing Meaningful Measures and Guidelines for Particulates in Aquatic Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilotta, G. S.; Harrison, C.; Joyce, C.; Peacock, C.

    2010-12-01

    Managing global water resources is one of the greatest challenges of the 21st Century. It is a resource that is under growing pressure as global populations rise and the natural supply, in the form of precipitation, is becoming increasingly variable and uncertain with climate change. It is therefore essential that water resources (surface and groundwaters) are managed sustainably in terms of both their quantity and quality. One of the most common causes for the impairment of water quality in surface waters and groundwaters is the presence of particulate matter. Particulate matter, from nano-scale particles and colloids to silt-sized sediments, can have a range of detrimental effects on water resources, from aesthetic issues and higher costs of water treatment, to a decline in the fisheries resource and serious ecological degradation. However at present, there is a poor understanding of the particulate conditions that water quality managers should aim to achieve in order to support good ecological status in different environments. There is also currently a general lack of rigour and standardisation in measurements of particulate matter in aquatic ecosystems, which in turn limits our understanding of the effects of these particles, and importantly, limits our ability to guide effective remediation. This poster describes a research approach that is currently being developed in the UK to address these issues; supporting (1) the development of ecosystem-specific water quality guidelines for particulate matter, and (2) the innovation of more advanced monitoring technologies for particulate matter in aquatic environments. The research project will utilise an established network of 13 reference condition sites (i.e. sites that have minimal anthropogenic disturbance) that contain distinct aquatic communities and are located in contrasting environment types. Hydrological and biological monitoring will be carried-out concurrently with analysis of the physical and geochemical properties of the particulates in each environment. Monitoring of the dynamics of these parameters will continue for 3.5 years, providing a medium to long-term record that can be used to develop statistical models and inform both water resource policy and technological innovation.

  16. DOE SciDAC’s Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Final Report for University of Southern California Information Sciences Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chervenak, Ann Louise [University of Southern California

    2013-12-19

    The mission of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is to provide the worldwide climate-research community with access to the data, information, model codes, analysis tools, and intercomparison capabilities required to make sense of enormous climate data sets. Its specific goals are to (1) provide an easy-to-use and secure web-based data access environment for data sets; (2) add value to individual data sets by presenting them in the context of other data sets and tools for comparative analysis; (3) address the specific requirements of participating organizations with respect to bandwidth, access restrictions, and replication; (4) ensure that the data are readily accessible through the analysis and visualization tools used by the climate research community; and (5) transfer infrastructure advances to other domain areas. For the ESGF, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultra-scale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (such as the Community Earth System Model and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate, Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, etc.), and analysis and visualization tools, all serving a diverse user community. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as ANL, LANL, LBNL/NERSC, LLNL/PCMDI, NCAR, and ORNL) and at unfunded partner sites, such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate Computing Centre, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The ESGF software is distinguished from other collaborative knowledge systems in the climate community by its widespread adoption, federation capabilities, and broad developer base. It is the leading source for present climate data holdings, including the most important and largest data sets in the globalclimate community, and—assuming its development continues—we expect it to be the leading source for future climate data holdings as well. Recently, ESG-CET extended its services beyond data-file access and delivery to include more detailed information products (scientific graphics, animations, etc.), secure binary data-access services (based upon the OPeNDAP Data Access Protocol), and server-side analysis. The latter capabilities allow users to request data subsets transformed through commonly used analysis and intercomparison procedures. As we transition from development activities to production and operations, the ESG-CET team is tasked with making data available to all users seeking to understand, process, extract value from, visualize, and/or communicate it to others—this is of course if funding continues at some level. This ongoing effort, though daunting in scope and complexity, would greatly magnify the value of numerical climate model outputs and climate observations for future national and international climate-assessment reports. The ESG-CET team also faces substantial technical challenges due to the rapidly increasing scale of climate simulation and observational data, which will grow, for example, from less than 50 terabytes for the last Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessment to multiple Petabytes for the next IPCC assessment. In a world of exponential technological change and rapidly growing sophistication in climate data analysis, an infrastructure such as ESGF must constantly evolve if it is to remain relevant and useful.

  17. DIGE and iTRAQ as biomarker discovery tools in aquatic toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Martyniuk, Christopher J.; Alvarez, Sophie; Denslow, Nancy D.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular approaches in ecotoxicology have greatly enhanced mechanistic understanding of the impact of aquatic pollutants in organisms. These methods+- have included high throughput Omics technologies, including quantitative proteomics methods such as 2D differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ). These methods are becoming more widely used in ecotoxicology studies to identify and characterize protein bioindicators of adverse...

  18. Current diversity of aquatic macrophytes in nigerian freshwater ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. N. Uka

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In Nigerian inland waters, eight aquatic plants have been incriminated as weeds. From the current study, the most prevalent of these weeds are water hyacinth and cattail plants. These aquatic weeds, once it invades a water body, not only disrupts the ecology of the systems but adversely affects the sociological, cultural and economic realities of the local communities within the area, especially the artisanal fisher folks. This paper showcases aquatic weeds distribution country wide based on its hydrological areas as well as their controlling methods. These methods, when employed in aquatic weed infested water bodies, will manifestly contribute to the success of approaches geared to solving aquatic weed problems.

  19. The feasibility of automated online flow cytometry for in-situ monitoring of microbial dynamics in aquatic ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    FrederikHammes; MichaelDomenicBesmer; DavidGregoryWeissbrodt

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent staining coupled with flow cytometry (FCM) is often used for the monitoring, quantification and characterization of bacteria in engineered and environmental aquatic ecosystems including seawater, freshwater, drinking water, wastewater, and industrial bioreactors. However, infrequent grab sampling hampers accurate characterization and subsequent understanding of microbial dynamics in all of these ecosystems. A logic technological progression is high throughput and full automation o...

  20. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semiannual Progress Report October 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D N

    2011-04-02

    This report summarizes work carried out by the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) from October 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011. It discusses ESG-CET highlights for the reporting period, overall progress, period goals, and collaborations, and lists papers and presentations. To learn more about our project and to find previous reports, please visit the ESG-CET Web sites: http://esg-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ and/or https://wiki.ucar.edu/display/esgcet/Home. This report will be forwarded to managers in the Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), as well as national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., those involved in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5) for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5); the Community Earth System Model (CESM); the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES); SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science; the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP); the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)), and also to researchers working on a variety of other climate model and observation evaluation activities. The ESG-CET executive committee consists of Dean N. Williams, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ian Foster, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); and Don Middleton, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The ESG-CET team is a group of researchers and scientists with diverse domain knowledge, whose home institutions include eight laboratories and two universities: ANL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), LLNL, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NCAR, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL)/NOAA, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), and University of Southern California, Information Sciences Institute (USC/ISI). All ESG-CET work is accomplished under DOE open-source guidelines and in close collaboration with the project's stakeholders, domain researchers, and scientists. Through the ESG project, the ESG-CET team has developed and delivered a production environment for climate data from multiple climate model sources (e.g., CMIP (IPCC), CESM, ocean model data (e.g., Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (e.g., Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, Microwave Limb Sounder), and analysis and visualization tools) that serves a worldwide climate research community. Data holdings are distributed across multiple sites including LANL, LBNL, LLNL, NCAR, and ORNL as well as unfunded partners sites such as the Australian National University (ANU) National Computational Infrastructure (NCI), the British Atmospheric Data Center (BADC), the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory/NOAA, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-M), the German Climate Computing Centre (DKRZ), and NASA/JPL. As we transition from development activities to production and operations, the ESG-CET team is tasked with making data available to all users who want to understand it, process it, extract value from it, visualize it, and/or communicate it to others. This ongoing effort is extremely large and complex, but it will be incredibly valuable for building 'science gateways' to critical climate resources (such as CESM, CMIP5, ARM, NARCCAP, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), etc.) for processing the next IPCC assessment report. Continued ESG progress will result in a production-scale system that will empower scientists to attempt new and exciting data exchanges, which could ultimately lead to breakthrough climate science discoveries.