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1

Fort Collins Science Center: Aquatic Systems and Technology Applications  

Science.gov (United States)

Land and water management agencies are responsible for restoring and conserving our nation's natural resources. However, they face increasing, often competing demands for those resources, which can result in alteration or loss of critical riverine, riparian, wetland, and terrestrial habitats. Land and resource managers may be in federal, state, or local government, but all have the same need for quantitative, objective, science-based information that helps them plan, manage, and conserve the natural resources within their purview. The Aquatic Systems and Technology Applications Branch (ASTA) of the Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) encompasses a wide variety of studies, investigations, and activities that are related to providing tools and capabilities for natural resource managers. ASTA's mission is to provide managers with credible science-based information on the interrelationships among the physical, chemical, aquatic, and biological natural resources in river basins for resource management decision-making. Branch goals are to: * develop and apply specific models and analysis tools for resource management issues, * identify habitat and biological linkages in river corridor environments, * design and evaluate specific water quality improvement features, * define economic measures for natural resource benefits, * investigate altered flow regime effects on native fish populations, * characterize sediment transport effects in river corridor environments, and * utilize advanced technology to evaluate landscape-scale changes in river basins.

Hamilton, Dave

2004-01-01

2

The design, construction, and monitoring of photovoltaic power system and solar thermal system on the Georgia Institute of Technology Aquatic Center. Volume 1  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This is a report on the feasibility study, design, and construction of a PV and solar thermal system for the Georgia Tech Aquatic Center. The topics of the report include a discussion of site selection and system selection, funding, design alternatives, PV module selection, final design, and project costs. Included are appendices describing the solar thermal system, the SAC entrance canopy PV mockup, and the PV feasibility study.

Long, R.C.

1996-12-31

3

Technology Information Center  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A Transportation Technology Center (TTC) has been established at Sandia to address the transportation of nuclear waste and spent fuel. The Technology Information Center (TIC) acts as TTC's clearing house for nuclear material transportation information. TIC's activities are divided into three activities: public information, policy information, and technical information. Some of the uses of TIC's activities are briefly outlined

4

ETC: Entertainment Technology Center  

Science.gov (United States)

The Entertainment Technology Center at the University of Southern California is now on the Web. The site is an information source for those interested or involved in the entertainment industry, containing at present several hollywood magazines, production house catalogues, and Hollynet, the prototype for the ETC's future commercial web site.

5

"Infotonics Technology Center"  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

During this grant period July 15, 2002 thru September 30, 2004, the Infotonics Technology Center developed the critical infrastructure and technical expertise necessary to accelerate the development of sensors, alternative lighting and power sources, and other specific subtopics of interest to Department of Energy. Infotonics fosters collaboration among industry, universities and government and operates as a national center of excellence to drive photonics and microsystems development and commercialization. A main goal of the Center is to establish a unique, world-class research and development facility. A state-of-the-art microsystems prototype and pilot fabrication facility was established to enable rapid commercialization of new products of particular interest to DOE. The Center has three primary areas of photonics and microsystems competency: device research and engineering, packaging and assembly, and prototype and pilot-scale fabrication. Center activities focused on next generation optical communication networks, advanced imaging and information sensors and systems, micro-fluidic systems, assembly and packaging technologies, and biochemical sensors. With targeted research programs guided by the wealth of expertise of Infotonics���������������������������������������������������������������¢�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� business and scientific staff, the fabrication and packaging facility supports and accelerates innovative technology development of special interest to DOE in support of its mission and strategic defense, energy, and science goals.

Fritzemeier, L., Boysel, M.B., and Smith, D.R.

2005-01-14

6

Technological innovation and developmental strategies for sustainable management of aquatic resources in developing countries.  

Science.gov (United States)

Sustainable use and allocation of aquatic resources including water resources require implementation of ecologically appropriate technologies, efficient and relevant to local needs. Despite the numerous international agreements and provisions on transfer of technology, this has not been successfully achieved in developing countries. While reviewing some challenges to technological innovations and developments (TID), this paper analyzes five TID strategic approaches centered on grassroots technology development and provision of localized capacity for sustainable aquatic resources management. Three case studies provide examples of successful implementation of these strategies. Success requires the provision of localized capacity to manage technology through knowledge empowerment in rural communities situated within a framework of clear national priorities for technology development. PMID:25201321

Agboola, Julius Ibukun

2014-12-01

7

Solar Technology Center  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

Boehm, Bob

2011-04-27

8

Aquatic system as the subject of aquatic ecology and the starting point of the water treatment technology ??????????? ??? ??????? ?????? ???????? ? ?????? ?????????? ??????? ????  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Discrete properties of substances found in the water can provide exhaustive information about the substances contained in it. However, they do not provide any information about the interaction between the substances and the water, or between themselves, or the overall properties of the aquatic system. Therefore, they cannot serve as the basis for the systemic approach to development of efficient water treatment technologies. The author's suggestion is to introduce the term "aquatic system" as a description of the properties of natural and sewerage water. An aquatic system represents a collection of interconnected substances and phenomena in the aquatic medium. Therefore, natural and sewerage water represent aquatic systems, or mixtures of substances that have different origins, that interact with one another on a non-stop basis, and that are interrelated, and that interact with the water at one and the same time. Primary features of aquatic systems are considered in the article, including genesis, stability, and localization. Secondary features of aquatic systems, including their aggregate state, their biotic state, and their chemical composition. The research of aquatic systems of natural and sewerage waters, their structure and interrelations identifies the top-priority subject of research in the aquatic ecology. Therefore, the subject matter of the aquatic ecology represents the area of research, learning and systematization of features and properties of natural and man-made aquatic systems. This area of research dives way to a new trend of the methodology of modeling and optimization of natural and sewerage water treatment technologies. Aquatic ecology is to develop the principal provisions aimed at the improvement of water treatment technologies based on the properties of aquatic systems.?????????? ?????????? ?????????????? ? ???? ??????? ????? ???? ????????????? ???????? ? ???????????? ? ??? ?????????. ?? ??? ?? ???????? ?????????????? ???? ??????? ????? ????? ? ?????, ?????????? ???????? ??????? ? ?????, ?????????????, ???????????? ??? ?????????? ??????? ? ???????? ??????????? ??????????????? ????????? ??????? ????. ??? ???????? ??????? ????????? ? ??????? ??? ?????????? ?????? ??????? «???????????». ??????????? - ??? ???????????? ???????????? ??????? ? ??????? ? ?????? ?????. ? ???????????? ? ???? ????????, ????????? ? ??????? ???? - ??? ???????????, ?????????????? ????? ????? ??????? ??????? ?????????????, ??????????? ? ?????????? ??????????????, ??????????? ???? ? ?????? ? ????? ????????????. ??????????? ???????? ???????? ??????????? ??? ??????????: ???????, ????????????, ???????????, ? ????? ??????????? - ??????-?????????? ?????????, ??????????? ????????? ? ?????????? ??????. ???????? ?????????? ????????? ? ??????? ???, ?? ????????? ? ???????????? ?????????? ???????????? ??????????? ???????????? ? ?????? ????????, ??????? ??????? ?????? ???????? - ??? ??????? ????????, ???????? ? ?????????????? ????????? ? ??????? ????????? ? ????????????? ??????????. ??? ????????? ????? ??

Alekseev Evgenij Valer'evich

2012-02-01

9

Science and Technology Centers  

Science.gov (United States)

... and Theoretical Computer Science Computer Graphics and Scientific Visualization Research on Parallel ... successful monitoring of rhythmic cab gene expression in plants using a luciferase assay. The Center ...

10

Center for Advanced Automotive Technology  

Science.gov (United States)

The Center for Advanced Automotive Technology (CAAT) is a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Advanced Technological Education (ATE) center located at Macomb Community College, and among many other efforts, houses a comprehensive, up-to-date educational resource library available to the public. This library contains resources as small as a single presentation or assignment, to complete modules and courses taught at community colleges and universities in the fields of automotive, engineering, and technology. The scope of this library includes advanced automotive technology, alternative fuels, the smart grid interface, and related industry reports.

2013-06-26

11

Performance Technologies Learning Center  

Science.gov (United States)

One hundred years ago, telephony was a bit simpler. A variety of short courses, and one could be connecting Doctor Brown to a specialist in a far away city, such as New York, Boston, or even Green Bay, if the situation demanded it. In contemporary society, those interested in a viable and productive career in telephony must stay on top of the emerging technologies in these areas on a regular basis. This website from the Performance Technologies corporation can help them do just that. The site offers a number of tutorials on a number of networking and related telecommunications technologies and programs, including the global system for mobile communication (GSM), the common channel signaling system (or "SS7"), and the voice traffic over Internet Protocol (VoIP).

2006-11-30

12

Buildings Technology Research & Integration Center  

Science.gov (United States)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Buildings Technology Center is a "research facility devoted to the development of technologies that improve the energy efficiency and environmental compatibility of residential and commercial buildings." The state-of-the-art research and development facility houses about 50 staff and 10-20 guest researchers. The website describes the center's facilities, research capabilities, and research programs. Another section describes some of the tools for buildings that the center has developed, such as a heat pump design model, building envelope web-based calculators, and a computer program designed to determine the most cost-effective retrofit measures for single-family homes. Publications on topics such as envelope systems, appliance and equipment efficiency, Desiccant-related research and other research on building design and performance are posted online. An easy-to-browse database of success stories provides specifications, rendered and line drawings, and other facts about the Center's building technologies.

13

HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) Technology Assessment Program (TAP) was developed to provide detailed, comparable data for environmental technologies and to disseminate this data to D&D professionals in a manner that will facilitate the review and selection of technologies to perform decontamination and decommissioning. The objectives for this project include the following: Determine technology needs through review of the Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) information and other applicable websites and needs databases; Perform a detailed review of industries that perform similar activities as those required in D&D operations to identify additional technologies; Define the technology assessment program for characterization and waste management problem sets; Define the data management program for characterization, dismantlement, and waste management problem sets; Evaluate baseline and innovative technologies under standard test conditions at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) and other locations and collect data in the areas of performance, cost, health and safety, operations and maintenance, and primary and secondary waste generation; Continue to locate, verify, and incorporate technology performance data from other sources into the multimedia information system; and Develop the conceptual design for a dismantlement technology decision analysis tool for dismantlement technologies.

M.A. Ebadian

1999-10-31

14

Berkeley Center for Law & Technology  

Science.gov (United States)

Established at Berkeley's Boalt Hall in 1995, the mission of the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology is "to foster beneficial and ethical advancement of technology by promoting the understanding and guiding the development of intellectual property and related fields of law and policy as they intersect with business, science and technology." First-time visitors to their homepage can make their way through some of their new publications and papers, which can include everything from work on stem cell research ethics to international copyright law. By clicking on the "Research" section, visitors can learn more about faculty research and the scholarship of those persons working closely in affiliation with the Center through research appointments.

2008-01-01

15

DEKRA technology center - competency center for the automotive industry; DEKRA Technology Center - Kompetenzzentrum fuer die Automobilindustrie  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Within the DEKRA Group, the DEKRA Automobil Test Center in Klettwitz near Dresden is part of the DEKRA Technology Center and comes under the test area of the Automobil GmbH. In tandem with the DEKRA Crash Center in Neumuenster it constitutes the Competency Center for the automotive and automotive parts supply industry. (orig.) [German] Das DEKRA Automobil Test Center in Klettwitz bei Dresden ist Teil des DEKRA Technology Center und im DEKRA Konzern in den Pruefbereich der Automobil GmbH eingegliedert. Zusammen mit der DEKRA Unfallforschung in Stuttgart und dem DEKRA Crashzentrum in Neumuenster bildet es das Kompetenzzentrum fuer die Automobil- und Zulieferindustrie. (orig.)

Loeschner, W.; Bahnert, J. [DEKRA Automobil Test Center (Germany)

2003-04-01

16

Carnegie Mellon Entertainment Technology Center  

Science.gov (United States)

The Entertainment Technology Center at Carnegie Mellon University is a unique research institution "that combines technology and fine arts to create new processes, tools, and vision for storytelling and entertainment." Most visitors to the center's homepage will be mainly interested in the diverse array of current and past projects investigated by students and faculty. The Biohazard project is developing a program used to train firefighters for a chemical terrorist attack in a shopping mall; the program simulates the mall environment and the trainees are required to virtually guide civilians outside for decontamination. Despite the lack of research papers on the site, the projects are all explained in detail and several video demonstrations are provided.

17

Maricopa Advanced Technology Education Center  

Science.gov (United States)

There is a great deal of interest in the world of educational development in the growing fields of the semiconductor business, and the Maricopa Advanced Technology Center (MATEC) has been involved in this area of research since 1994. The Center is a division of the Maricopa Community Colleges in Arizona, and they are primarily interested in assisting students and faculty who wish to keep abreast of the evolving skills needed in this area, along with developments in the electronics and automated manufacturing industries. Most visitors will want to take a look at the "Curriculum Development" area, which features samples of their work, including illustrative animations, annual reports, and information about the skill standards that inform the basis of each educational activity created at the Center. Additionally, the "Education & Career Opportunities" section contains a virtual presentation titled "Working in the Semiconductor Manufacturing Industry", which will be of use to those considering a career in this area.

18

National Training Center Fort Irwin expansion area aquatic resources survey  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Biologists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) were requested by personnel from Fort Irwin to conduct a biological reconnaissance of the Avawatz Mountains northeast of Fort Irwin, an area for proposed expansion of the Fort. Surveys of vegetation, small mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and aquatic resources were conducted during 1995 to characterize the populations and habitats present with emphasis on determining the presence of any species of special concern. This report presents a description of the sites sampled, a list of the organisms found and identified, and a discussion of relative abundance. Taxonomic identifications were done to the lowest level possible commensurate with determining the status of the taxa relative to its possible listing as a threatened, endangered, or candidate species. Consultation with taxonomic experts was undertaken for the Coleoptera ahd Hemiptera. In addition to listing the macroinvertebrates found, the authors also present a discussion related to the possible presence of any threatened or endangered species or species of concern found in Sheep Creek Springs, Tin Cabin Springs, and the Amargosa River.

Cushing, C.E.; Mueller, R.P.

1996-02-01

19

Center for Advanced Separation Technology  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2011, U.S. mining operations contributed a total of $232 billion to the nation’s GDP plus $138 billion in labor income. Of this the coal mining industry contributed a total of $97.5 billion to GDP plus $53 billion in labor income. Despite these contributions, the industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, CAST is now a five-university consortium – Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah and Montana Tech, - that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FE0000699, Center for Advanced Separation Technology. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in two broad areas: Advanced Pre-Combustion Clean Coal Technologies and Gas-Gas Separations. Distribution of funds is handled via competitive solicitation of research proposals through Site Coordinators at the five member universities. These were reviewed and the selected proposals were forwarded these to the DOE/NETL Project Officer for final review and approval. The successful projects are listed below by category, along with abstracts from their final reports.

Honaker, Rick

2013-09-30

20

HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The programming and website for the advanced Technology Information System (TIS) have been completed. Over and above the LSDDP-TIS, the new system provides information on DOE's baseline technologies, technology data contained in DOE's databases, technologies assessed at FIU-HCET Technology Assessment Program (TAP), as well as links to other selected D&D sites with valuable technology information. The new name for the website is Gateway for Environmental Technology (GET). A super-vacuum type blasting system was tested for decontamination of 12-in pipe internal surfaces. The system operates on compressed air and propels grit media at high speed at wall surfaces. It is equipped with a vacuum system for collecting grit, dust, and debris. This technology was selected for further development. The electret ion chamber (EIC) system for measurement of alpha contamination on surfaces has been calibrated and is ready for demonstration and deployment. FIU-HCET is working with representatives from Fernald, Oak Ridge, Rocky Flats, and Savannah River to procure a demonstration and deployment site. Final arrangements are ongoing for the mock-up design for the glove box and tank size reduction technology assessments, including designing of support bases for tanks, a piping support system, and a mobilization plan for glove boxes and tanks from storage site to the PermaCon.

M.A. Ebadian

1999-05-31

 
 
 
 
21

HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

FIU-HCET participated in an ICT meeting at Mound during the second week of December and presented a brief videotape of the testing of the Robotic Climber technology. During this meeting, FIU-HCET proposed the TechXtract technology for possible testing at Mound and agreed to develop a five-page proposal for review by team members. FIU-HCET provided assistance to Bartlett Inc. and General Lasertronics Corporation in developing a proposal for a Program Opportunity Notice (PON). The proposal was submitted by these companies on January 5, 1999. The search for new equipment dismantlement technologies is continuing. The following vendors have responded to requests for demonstration: LUMONICS, Laser Solutions technology; CRYO-BEAM, Cryogenic cutting technology; Waterjet Technology Association, Waterjet Cutting technology; and DIAJET, Waterjet Cutting technology. Based on the tasks done in FY98, FIU-HCET is working closely with Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to revise the plan and scope of work of the pipeline plugging project in FY99, which involves activities of lab-scale flow loop experiments and a large-scale demonstration test bed.

M.A. Ebadian

1999-01-31

22

Technology Transfer Center | Careers & Training  

Science.gov (United States)

Technology transfer is a growing field encompassing the convergence of research, innovation, and commercialization. In order to facilitate the growth of this field, several training and education opportunities are available.

23

Campus Center for Appropriate Technology  

Science.gov (United States)

This website from Humboldt State University showcases environmental technologies that contribute to a healthy environment. The purpose of this program is to demonstrate appropriate technology in a residential setting and to provide hands-on experiential learning opportunities for students and the surrounding community. The website features links to projects and environmental topics such as organic gardening, alternative building, solar power, human energy converters, and much more.

Technology, Campus C.; University, Humboldt S.

24

Science and Technology Centers (STC): Integrative Partnerships  

Science.gov (United States)

... Science and Technology Centers: Integrative Partnerships Synopsis of Program: The Science and ... 47.074 --- Biological Sciences 47.070 --- Computer and Information Science and Engineering 47.076 ...

25

Savannah River Technology Center monthly report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This document contains many small reports from personnel at the technology center under the umbrella topics of reactors, tritium, separations, environment, waste management, and general engineering. Progress and accomplishments are given.

1992-10-01

26

National Cancer Institute | Technology Transfer Center  

Science.gov (United States)

The first-of-its-kind, the Breast Cancer Startup Challenge, an international university student-based startup competition, was launched by the National Cancer Institute's Technology Transfer Center in partnership with the non-profit organizations Avon Foundation and the Center for Advancing Innovation. The primary goals of this challenge were to accelerate the process of bringing emerging technologies from the NCI Intramural Research Program to market and stimulate the creation of start-up businesses around NCI’s discoveries.

27

HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A vendor was selected for the diamond wire technology demonstration scheduled for this summer at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). A team consisting of personnel from FIU-HCET, PPPL, and AEA Technology reviewed the submitted bids. FIU-HCET will contract this vendor. At the SRS Ninth ICT teleconference, the ICT team discussed the status of the following demonstrations: LRAD; x-ray, K-edge; Strippable Coatings; Thermal Spray Vitrification; Cutting/Shearing/Dismantlement/Size Reduction; and Electrets. The LRAD demo is complete, and the x-ray/K-edge, Strippable Coatings, and Electrets demos are ongoing. The Asbestos and Thermal Spray Vitrification demos require more laboratory testing. The Cutting/Shearing/Dismantlement/Size Reduction demo is undergoing procurement. Five FIU-HCET staff members took the 1S0 14000 environmental auditor training course February 22-26, 1999, given by ASC. The test plan for the Facility Dismantlement Technology Assessment is finished and ready for internal review.

M.A. Ebadian

1999-03-30

28

Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Technologies  

Science.gov (United States)

The Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Technologies (CEERT) is a nonprofit organization of concerned scientists, environmentalists, public interest advocates and innovative technology companies. CEERT advocates sustainable electric generation policies, clean vehicles, and energy efficiency and conservation. Their web site features the latest topics surrounding sustainable energy including Harnessing CA Solar Power, Reducing Coal Demand Fuels, and Transportation Fuel.

2008-09-09

29

HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Search for decontamination technologies to be assessed at FIU-HCET continues. Bartlett Nuclear Inc. returned to FIU-HCET on February 15-19, 1999, to complete the demonstration of coating removal from concrete ceiling and aggressive contamination removal on uncoated concrete wall using their Robotic Climber. The design of test beds for large-scale technology demonstration of blockage locating and pipe unplugging has undergone major revision. The lab-scale test loop is also under modification. A new sampling system using isokinetic principles and consisting of thermistors, flow controller, and Wheatstone bridge will be installed on the flow loop. FIU-HCET International Coordinator attended the VII Steering Committee meeting in Lima, Peru, on February 11-12, 1999, and successfully introduced the Interactive Communication Website. Additional agenda items on the Website were proposed by the Steering Committee for upcoming committee meetings and working groups.

M.A.Ebadian

1999-02-28

30

NSF Announces $10-Million Center for Bioengineering Educational Technology  

Science.gov (United States)

... $10-Million Center for Bioengineering Educational Technology A five-university partnership led by ... develop bioengineering educational technologies and curricula at a new Engineering Research Center ...

31

76 FR 39811 - International Center for Technology Assessment and the Center for Food Safety; Noxious Weed...  

Science.gov (United States)

...APHIS-2011-0081] International Center for Technology Assessment and the Center for Food Safety; Noxious Weed Status of Kentucky...2002, the International Center for Technology Assessment and the Center for Food Safety (the petitioners)...

2011-07-07

32

Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

Christopher E. Hull

2006-09-30

33

CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

Christopher E. Hull

2006-05-15

34

CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

Christopher E. Hull

2005-11-04

35

Technologies for learner-centered feedback  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available As the number, type, and use of technologies to support learning increases, so do the opportunities for using these technologies for feedback. Learner-centered feedback is a core to the teaching-learning process. It is related to assessment in describing how learners perform in their learning, their gain in knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Feedback, types of feedback, guidelines for effective learner-centered feedback, and feedback’s relationship to assessment are presented. Methods of providing feedback, for example, automated, audio scribe pens, digital audio, etc., and the related technologies are described. Technologies that allow instructors to make informed decisions about the use of various methods for feedback are discussed.

Jane Costello

2013-09-01

36

Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) Center  

Science.gov (United States)

The National Center for Information and Communications Technologies, an Advanced Technology Education (ATE) resource center, aims to "contribute to scientific and technological innovation in telecommunications education" as well as to "provide appropriately skilled technicians and technologists" to information and communication technologies (ICT) businesses, industry, and users. In the "Publications" section of this site, visitors will find links to ICT textbooks and a helpful glossary of telecommunications terms. In the "Resources" section, there are a number of ICT workforce development presentations and Flash simulations on topics such as shift keying and Ethernet switching. Also in this section, there is a web tutorial on designing accessible web pages. This site has a great deal of information to assist students and technologists in telecommunications fields, as well as ready-to-use instructional materials for educators.

2007-08-20

37

St. Luke's Medical Center: technologizing health care  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The computerization of the St. Luke's Medical Center improved the hospital administration and management, particularly in nuclear medicine department. The use of computer-aided X-ray simulator machine and computerized linear accelerator machine in diagnosing and treating cancer are the most recent medical technological breakthroughs that benefited thousands of Filipino cancer patients. 4 photos

38

Center for Science & Technology Policy Research  

Science.gov (United States)

The Center for Science and Technology Policy Research (CSTPR) was created in 2001 and their goal is "to improve how science and technology policies address societal needs, through research, education and service." Part of this goal is accomplished via their well-designed site, which features policy papers, news updates, and highlights from recent conferences and seminars sponsored under their direction. Visitors can click on the "CSTPR Multimedia Gallery", found on the left hand side of the homepage, to view presentations such as "Environmental Human Rights" and "Loving Science to Death: Problems at the Intersection of Science and Policy". Moving on, visitors shouldn't miss their newsletter, "Ogmius". Each edition contains highlights of recent research, news about Center events, and policy commentary. Scholars won't want to miss the "Publications" area, which features information about recently published books by Center affiliates and listings of their work in professional journals.

39

Marshall Space Flight Center Technology Investments Overview  

Science.gov (United States)

NASA is moving forward with prioritized technology investments that will support NASA's exploration and science missions, while benefiting other Government agencies and the U.S. aerospace enterprise. center dotThe plan provides the guidance for NASA's space technology investments during the next four years, within the context of a 20-year horizon center dotThis plan will help ensure that NASA develops technologies that enable its 4 goals to: 1.Sustain and extend human activities in space, 2.Explore the structure, origin, and evolution of the solar system, and search for life past and present, 3.Expand our understanding of the Earth and the universe and have a direct and measurable impact on how we work and live, and 4.Energize domestic space enterprise and extend benefits of space for the Nation.

Tinker, Mike

2014-01-01

40

Effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil-fuel processing technologies on aquatic systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Progress is reported for the second year of this project to evaluate the effects of aqueous effluents from in-situ fossil fuel processing technologies on aquatic biota. The project objectives for Year 2 were pursued through five tasks: literature reviews on process water constituents, possible environmental impacts and potential control technologies; toxicity bioassays on the effects of coal gasification and oil shale retorting process waters and six process water constituents on aquatic biota; biodegradation studies on process water constituents; bioaccumulation factor estimation for the compounds tested in the toxicity bioassays; and recommendations on maximum exposure concentrations for process water constituents based on data from the project and from the literature. Results in each of the five areas of research are reported.

Bergman, H.L.

1978-12-01

 
 
 
 
41

RNA interference technology used for the study of aquatic virus infections.  

Science.gov (United States)

Aquaculture is one of the most important economic activities in Asia and is presently the fastest growing sector of food production in the world. Explosive increases in global fish farming have been accompanied by an increase in viral diseases. Viral infections are responsible for huge economic losses in fish farming, and control of these viral diseases in aquaculture remains a serious challenge. Recent advances in biotechnology have had a significant impact on disease reduction in aquaculture. RNAi is one of the most important technological breakthroughs in modern biology, allowing us to directly observe the effects of the loss of specific genes in living systems. RNA interference technology has emerged as a powerful tool for manipulating gene expression in the laboratory. This technology represents a new therapeutic approach for treating aquatic diseases, including viral infections. RNAi technology is based on a naturally occurring post-transcriptional gene silencing process mediated by the formation of dsRNA. RNAi has been proven widely effective for gene knockdown in mammalian cultured cells, but its utility in fish remains unexplored. This review aims to highlight the RNAi technology that has made significant contributions toward the improvement of aquatic animal health and will also summarize the current status and future strategies concerning the therapeutic applications of RNAi to combat viral disease in aquacultured organisms. PMID:24945574

Reshi, Mohammad Latif; Wu, Jen-Leih; Wang, Hao-Ven; Hong, Jiann-Ruey

2014-09-01

42

Information and consulting center in plasma technologies  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Plasma technologies are clean, non-expensive, and easy to adapt to small-scale production. They are largely used in various modern sectors of research, industry, medicine, biology and environmental protection. At the present time a pressure to transfer the knowledge from education and research sectors toward the industrial ones was established by the financing policies at national and European levels. Nevertheless, mainly in the last decade, an informational gap sets up in Romania between the suppliers of know-how in the plasma technologies and their beneficiaries. The newly appearing companies have little knowledge about the possibilities of our research and education. In turn, the research and education sectors do not know what companies are using nowadays plasma technologies, what kinds of technologies are needed and what aspects should be stressed in educational activity. The Information and Consulting Center in Plasma Technologies is an infrastructure project aiming at gathering information and expertise in plasma technologies with emphasizing on the Romanian capabilities. The information is accessible via Internet at the address http://www.alpha2.infim.ro. By accessing the center web page one enters into the main menu or it is possible to navigate by choosing key words, as for instance: objectives, plasma diagnostics, plasma technologies, which are listed in a dedicated search box. The information is organized in databases. In the database frame there are three main categories, which lead to detailed information about: - Users of plasma technologies, the technology type, the address; - Suppliers of plasma technologies, including the main research institutes with links to the relating Internet sites; - Education and training centers including the universities and their departments dedicated to plasma physics. The expertise is organized in three categories. They are instrumentation and equipment, plasma diagnostics and plasma technologies. In the instrumentation and equipment category the most important types of devices used in plasma technologies are described, as for instance, plasma sources (RF, DC, pulsed), vacuum pumps and gauges, methods and programs for computer monitoring and control of plasma systems. In the plasma diagnostics category the most used techniques of spectral and probe investigations are presented. They are not only described, but examples and programs are given, which can be used for spectra simulation (atomic and molecular), for obtaining the rotational and vibrational temperatures, for determination of the electron temperatures and densities in plasma. The main plasma technologies described in the web page are the surface modification by cold plasma, surface cleaning and ashing, plasma polymerization, plasma etching, ion plating, deposition of thin films by sputtering and evaporation, etc. Among them, the technologies developed at the National Institute of Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics are detailed: deposition of thin films by thermionic vacuum arc; deposition of thin films by sputtering; deposition of carbon based coatings by CVD RF expanding plasma; hard coatings and wear resistant surfaces by plasma nitridation and carburization. The centre web page is under completion with a discussion list allowing easy exchange of ideas, questions and answers. An active offer and service request, accomplished via electronic mail, will be set up. The Centre facilitates a permanent contact between suppliers and customers, which establishes the basis to develop as intermediary of services and products in the plasma technology field. (authors)

43

CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the seventeen subprojects awarded in the first year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices. Due to the time taken up by the solicitation/selection process, these cover the initial 6-month period of project activity only. The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 1999, U.S. mining operations produced $66.7 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $533 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, this endeavor has been expanded into a seven-university consortium--Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah, Montana Tech, New Mexico Tech and University of Nevada, Reno--that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation (2) Solid-liquid separation (3) Chemical/Biological Extraction (4) Modeling and Control, and (5) Environmental Control.

Hugh W. Rimmer

2004-05-12

44

The Center for Environmental Technology Innovative Technology Screening Process  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Center for Environmental Technology's (CET) mission is to provide a fully integrated system for accelerated evaluation, development, commercialization, and public acceptance of creative environmental solutions which match the foremost demands in today's environmentally sensitive world. In short, CET will create a means to provide quick, effective solutions for environmental needs. To meet this mission objective, CET has created a unique and innovative approach to eliminating the usual barriers in developing and testing environmental technologies. The approach paves the way for these emerging, cutting-edge technologies by coordinating environmental restoration and waste management activities of industry, universities, and the government to: efficiently and effectively transfer technology to these users, provide market-driven, cost-effective technology programs to the public and DOE, and aid in developing innovative ideas by initiating efforts between DOE facilities and private industry. The central part to this mission is selecting and evaluating specific innovative technologies for demonstration and application at United States Department of Energy (DOE) installations. The methodology and criteria used for this selection, which is called the CET Innovative Technology Screening Process, is the subject of this paper. The selection criteria used for the screening process were modeled after other DOE technology transfer programs and were further developed by CET's Technology Screening and Evaluation Board (TSEB). The process benefits both CET and the proposing vendors by providing objective selection procedures based on predefined criteria. The selection process ensures a rapid response to proposing vendors, all technologies will have the opportunity to enter the selection process, and all technologies are evaluated on the same scale and with identical criteria

45

76 FR 68220 - Navistar Truck Development and Technology Center; a Subsidiary of Navistar International...  

Science.gov (United States)

...Development and Technology Center; a Subsidiary...Navistar Truck Reliability Center, a Subsidiary...Development and Technology Center, a Subsidiary...Navistar Truck Reliability Center, a Subsidiary...Development and Technology Center, a Subsidiary...Navistar Truck Reliability Center, a...

2011-11-03

46

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... find out more information, go to the APTA Learning Center . Is there a certification program for aquatic ... aquatic PT facilities? You should consider the same type of insurance as for all clinics (liability), except ...

47

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s particulate cleanup program  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The development of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) power systems has made it possible to use coal while still protecting the environment. Such power systems significantly reduce the pollutants associated with coal-fired plants built before the 1970s. This superior environmental performance and related high system efficiency is possible, in part, because particulate gas-stream cleanup is conducted at high-temperature and high-pressure process conditions. A main objective of the Particulate Cleanup Program at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is to ensure the success of the CCT demonstration projects. METC`s Particulate Cleanup Program supports research, development, and demonstration in three areas: (1) filter-system development, (2) barrier-filter component development, and (3) ash and char characterization. The support is through contracted research, cooperative agreements, Cooperative Research And Development Agreements (CRADAs), and METC`s own in-house research. This paper describes METC`s Particulate Cleanup Program.

Dennis, R.A.

1995-12-01

48

Tiger Team Assessment, Energy Technology Engineering Center  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Office Special Projects within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) has the responsibility to conduct Tiger Team Assessments for the Secretary of Energy. This report presents the assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities under the DOE/Rockwell Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700 for the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) and of other DOE-owned buildings and facilities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) site in southeastern Ventura County, California, not covered under Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700, but constructed over the years under various other contracts between DOE and Rockwell International. ETEC is an engineering development complex operated for DOE by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. ETEC is located within SSFL on land owned by Rockwell. The balance of the SSFL complex is owned and operated by Rocketdyne, with the exception of a 42-acre parcel owned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary mission of ETEC is to provide engineering, testing, and development of components related to liquid metals technology and to conduct applied engineering development of emerging energy technologies

49

The advanced technology development center (ATDC)  

Science.gov (United States)

NASA is building the Advanced Technology Development Center (ATDC) to provide a ``national resource'' for the research, development, demonstration, testing, and qualification of Spaceport and Range Technologies. The ATDC will be located at Space Launch Complex 20 (SLC-20) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida. SLC-20 currently provides a processing and launch capability for small-scale rockets: this capability will be augmented with additional ATDC facilities to provide a comprehensive and integrated in situ environment. Examples of Spaceport Technologies that will be supported by ATDC infrastructure include densified cryogenic systems, intelligent automated umbilicals, integrated vehicle health management systems, next-generation safety systems, and advanced range systems. The ATDC can be thought of as a prototype spaceport where industry, government, and academia, in partnership, can work together to improve safety of future space initiatives. The ATDC is being deployed in five separate phases. Major ATDC facilities will include a Liquid Oxygen Area (Phase 1); a Liquid Hydrogen Area, a Liquid Nitrogen Area, and a multipurpose Launch Mount (Phase 2); ``Iron Rocket'' Test Demonstrator (Phase 3); a Processing Facility with a Checkout and Control System (Phase 4); and Future Infrastructure Developments (Phase 5). Initial ATDC development will be completed in 2006. .

Clements, Gregory R.

2002-01-01

50

78 FR 77662 - Notice of Availability (NOA) for General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center...  

Science.gov (United States)

...General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center Construction (GPW...General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center Construction (GPW...General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center Construction...

2013-12-24

51

CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2003, U.S. mining operations produced $57 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $564 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation; (2) Solid-liquid separation; (3) Chemical/Biological Extraction; (4) Modeling and Control; and (5) Environmental Control.

Christopher E. Hull

2005-01-20

52

Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2003, U.S. mining operations produced $57 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $564 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, this endeavor has been expanded into a seven-university consortium -- Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah, Montana Tech, New Mexico Tech and University of Nevada, Reno - that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation; (2) Solid-liquid separation; (3) Chemical/biological extraction; (4) Modeling and control; and (5) Environmental control. Distribution of funds is handled via competitive solicitation of research proposals through Site Coordinators at the seven member universities. These were first reviewed and ranked by a group of technical reviewers (selected primarily from industry). Based on these reviews, and an assessment of overall program requirements, the CAST Technical Committee made an initial selection/ranking of proposals and forwarded these to the DOE/NETL Project Officer for final review and approval. The successful projects are listed by category, along with brief abstracts of their aims and objectives.

Christopher Hull

2009-10-31

53

Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research; project: hazardous materials in aquatic environments; subproject: biomarkers and risk assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LA  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established in 1989 as the umbrella organization to coordinate environmental research at both universities. CBR projects funded by the DOE under the Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments grant are defining the following: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants through wetlands environments, (2) the actual and potential impact of contaminants on ecological systems and health, (3) the mechanisms and new technologies through which these impacts might be remediated, and (4) new programs aimed at educating and training environmental workers of the future. The subproject described in this report, 'Biomarkers and Risk Assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LN', is particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy's Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program aimed at solving problems related to hazard monitoring and clean-up prioritization at sites with aquatic pollution problems in the DOE complex

54

Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research; project: hazardous materials in aquatic environments; subproject: biomarkers and risk assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LA  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established in 1989 as the umbrella organization to coordinate environmental research at both universities. CBR projects funded by the DOE under the Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments grant are defining the following: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants through wetlands environments, (2) the actual and potential impact of contaminants on ecological systems and health, (3) the mechanisms and new technologies through which these impacts might be remediated, and (4) new programs aimed at educating and training environmental workers of the future. The subproject described in this report, `Biomarkers and Risk Assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LN`, is particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program aimed at solving problems related to hazard monitoring and clean-up prioritization at sites with aquatic pollution problems in the DOE complex.

Ide, C.

1996-12-31

55

Scientific Data Management Center for Enabling Technologies  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Managing scientific data has been identified by the scientific community as one of the most important emerging needs because of the sheer volume and increasing complexity of data being collected. Effectively generating, managing, and analyzing this information requires a comprehensive, end-to-end approach to data management that encompasses all of the stages from the initial data acquisition to the final analysis of the data. Fortunately, the data management problems encountered by most scientific domains are common enough to be addressed through shared technology solutions. Based on community input, we have identified three significant requirements. First, more efficient access to storage systems is needed. In particular, parallel file system and I/O system improvements are needed to write and read large volumes of data without slowing a simulation, analysis, or visualization engine. These processes are complicated by the fact that scientific data are structured differently for specific application domains, and are stored in specialized file formats. Second, scientists require technologies to facilitate better understanding of their data, in particular the ability to effectively perform complex data analysis and searches over extremely large data sets. Specialized feature discovery and statistical analysis techniques are needed before the data can be understood or visualized. Furthermore, interactive analysis requires techniques for efficiently selecting subsets of the data. Finally, generating the data, collecting and storing the results, keeping track of data provenance, data post-processing, and analysis of results is a tedious, fragmented process. Tools for automation of this process in a robust, tractable, and recoverable fashion are required to enhance scientific exploration. The SDM center was established under the SciDAC program to address these issues. The SciDAC-1 Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center succeeded in bringing an initial set of advanced data management technologies to DOE application scientists in astrophysics, climate, fusion, and biology. Equally important, it established collaborations with these scientists to better understand their science as well as their forthcoming data management and data analytics challenges. Building on our early successes, we have greatly enhanced, robustified, and deployed our technology to these communities. In some cases, we identified new needs that have been addressed in order to simplify the use of our technology by scientists. This report summarizes our work so far in SciDAC-2. Our approach is to employ an evolutionary development and deployment process: from research through prototypes to deployment and infrastructure. Accordingly, we have organized our activities in three layers that abstract the end-to-end data flow described above. We labeled the layers (from bottom to top): a) Storage Efficient Access (SEA), b) Data Mining and Analysis (DMA), c) Scientific Process Automation (SPA). The SEA layer is immediately on top of hardware, operating systems, file systems, and mass storage systems, and provides parallel data access technology, and transparent access to archival storage. The DMA layer, which builds on the functionality of the SEA layer, consists of indexing, feature identification, and parallel statistical analysis technology. The SPA layer, which is on top of the DMA layer, provides the ability to compose scientific workflows from the components in the DMA layer as well as application specific modules. NCSU work performed under this contract was primarily at the SPA layer.

Vouk, Mladen A.

2013-01-15

56

Information and Communications Technologies Center (ICT) YouTube Channel  

Science.gov (United States)

This page presents the YouTube channel of the National Center for Information and Communications Technologies (ICT Center). There is a growing collection of videos - focusing on information and communication technologies - on topics such as Second Life, the oscilloscope, digital media production, games and gaming, as well as a number of interviews with others in the telecommunications technology field.

2008-09-08

57

Program strategy document for the Nuclear Materials Transportation Technology Center  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A multiyear program plan is presented which describes the program of the Nuclear Materials Transportation Technology Center (TIC) at Sandia Laboratories. The work element plans, along with their corresponding work breakdown structures, are presented for TTC activities in the areas of Technology and Information Center, Systems Development, Technology, and Institutional Issues for the years from 1979 to 1985

58

The information data bases at the Transportation Technology Center  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Transportation Technology Center (TTC) at Sandia National Laboratories is a component of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Waste Management Program. The center provides technical management and support for those programs related to the transportation of nuclear materials

59

Effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil fuel processing technologies on aquatic systems. Annual progress report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This is the first annual report issued under a project to evaluate the effects of aqueous effluents from in-situ fossil fuel processing technologies on aquatic biota. Briefly, the goals of the project are to: evaluate the toxicity of process water effluents on aquatic biota; recommend maximum exposure concentrations for process water constituents; and assist DOE in using project data and recommendations to design control technologies and to assess environmental impacts. The project objectives for Year 1 were pursued through the following five tasks: a literature review on process water constituents; toxicity studies on the effect of process waters and six process water constituents on aquatic biota; degradation rate studies on four to six process water constituents; bioaccumulation studies on four to six process water constituents; and recommendations on maximum exposure concentrations for process water constituents based on data from the project and from the literature. Progress toward completion of these goals is presented.

Bergman, H.L.; Anderson, A.D.

1977-12-01

60

Applied technology center business plan and market survey  

Science.gov (United States)

Business plan and market survey for the Applied Technology Center (ATC), computer technology transfer and development non-profit corporation, is presented. The mission of the ATC is to stimulate innovation in state-of-the-art and leading edge computer based technology. The ATC encourages the practical utilization of late-breaking computer technologies by firms of all variety.

Hodgin, Robert F.; Marchesini, Roberto

1990-01-01

 
 
 
 
61

Johnson Space Center Research and Technology 1997 Annual Report  

Science.gov (United States)

This report highlights key projects and technologies at Johnson Space Center for 1997. The report focuses on the commercial potential of the projects and technologies and is arranged by CorpTech Major Products Groups. Emerging technologies in these major disciplines we summarized: solar system sciences, life sciences, technology transfer, computer sciences, space technology, and human support technology. Them NASA advances have a range of potential commercial applications, from a school internet manager for networks to a liquid metal mirror for optical measurements.

1998-01-01

62

Information and Library Programs at the Technology Application Center (TAC).  

Science.gov (United States)

The Technology Application Center (TAC) at the University of New Mexico is one of six National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) regional dissemination centers originally established to disseminate NASA technology to private industry on a regional basis. A fee is charged for TAC's services so it has been market oriented and has sought to…

Burch, Eugene

63

Family Center on Technology and Disability  

Science.gov (United States)

... the need for a structured approach to technology integration, and shares some of the technology tools that ... awareness of AT devices that help individuals with disabilities participate fully in school, at home, and in ...

64

76 FR 35474 - UAW-Chrysler Technical Training Center, Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Including On...  

Science.gov (United States)

...Technical Training Center, Technology Training Joint Programs Staff...Technical Training Center, Technology Training Joint Programs Staff...such as applied industrial technology, industrial automation, industrial maintenance...

2011-06-17

65

CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 1999, U.S. mining operations produced $66.7 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $533 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (a) Solid-solid separation (b) Solid-liquid separation (c) Chemical/Biological Extraction (d) Modeling and Control, and (e) Environmental Control. Distribution of funds is being handled via competitive solicitation of research proposals through Site Coordinators at the seven member universities. The first of these solicitations, referred to as the CAST II-Round 1 RFP, was issued on October 28, 2002. Thirty-eight proposals were received by the December 10, 2002 deadline for this RFP-eleven (11) Solid-Solid Separation, seven (7) Solid-Liquid Separation, ten (10) Chemical/Biological Extraction, six (6) Modeling & Control and four (4) Environmental Control. These were first reviewed and ranked by a group of technical reviewers (selected primarily from industry). Based on these reviews, and an assessment of overall program requirements, the CAST Technical Committee made an initial selection/ranking of proposals and forwarded these to the DOE/NETL Project Officer for final review and approval. This process took some 7 months to complete but 17 projects (one joint) were in place at the constituent universities (three at Virginia Tech, two at West Virginia University, three at University of Kentucky, three at University of Utah, three at Montana Tech, three at New Mexico Tech, and one at the University of Nevada, Reno) by May 17, 2003. These projects are listed by category, along with brief abstracts of their aims and objectives.

Hugh W. Rimmer

2003-11-15

66

Radiation technologies at the Obninsk irradiating center  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Paper presents the main trends of investigations and technological efforts conducted at the chemical radiation centre of the Research Physical and Chemical Institute Obninsk branch. Reactor technologies applied here are as follows: preparation of radiopharmaceuticals, nuclear doping of semiconducting materials, radiation coloring of minerals and gems, etc. The radiation technologies of synthesis of polymer systems, solidification of polymer coatings, preparation of composite materials and modification of polymers enable to prepare materials characterized by unique operation properties. 39 refs

67

CREST: Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology  

Science.gov (United States)

The Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology, a 501(c)(3) organization in Washington, DC, announces Solstice, a file server with state-of-the-art information on renewable energy, energy efficiency, the environment, and sustainable community development.

68

Technologies and experimental approaches in the NIH Botanical Research Centers  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

There are many similarities between research on combinatorial chemistry and natural products and research on dietary supplements and botanicals in the NIH Botanical Research Centers. The technologies in the centers are similar to those used by other NIH-sponsored investigators. All centers rigorously examine the authenticity of botanical dietary supplements and determine the composition and concentrations of the phytochemicals therein, most often by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. ...

Barnes, Stephen; Birt, Diane F.; Cassileth, Barrie R.; Cefalu, William T.; Chilton, Floyd H.; Farnsworth, Norman R.; Raskin, Ilya; Breemen, Richard B.; Weaver, Connie M.

2008-01-01

69

Smart Grid Technology and Consumer Call Center Readiness  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The following reasearch project deals with utility call center readiness to address customer concerns and questions about the Smart Grid and smart meter technology. Since consumer engagement is important for the benefits of the Smart Grid to be realized, the readiness and ability of utilities to answer consumer questions is an important issue. Assessing the readiness of utility call centers to address pertinant customer concerns was accomplished by calling utility call centers with Smart Grid...

Schamber, Kelsey L.

2010-01-01

70

A feasibility study for a manufacturing technology deployment center  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Automation & Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) and the Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to determine the feasibility of a regional industrial technology institute to be located at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Central Facility in Waxahachie, Texas. In response to this opportunity, ARRI and TEEX teamed with the DOE Kansas City Plant (managed by Allied Signal, Inc.), Los Alamos National Laboratory (managed by the University of California), Vought Aircraft Company, National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), SSC Laboratory, KPMG Peat Marwick, Dallas County Community College, Navarro Community College, Texas Department of Commerce (TDOC), Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center (TMAC), Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology, Arkansas Science and Technology Authority, Louisiana Productivity Center, and the NASA Mid-Continent Technology Transfer Center (MCTTC) to develop a series of options, perform the feasibility analysis and secure industrial reviews of the selected concepts. The final report for this study is presented in three sections: Executive Summary, Business Plan, and Technical Plan. The results from the analysis of the proposed concept support the recommendation of creating a regional technology alliance formed by the states of Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana through the conversion of the SSC Central facility into a Manufacturing Technology Deployment Center (MTDC).

1994-10-31

71

The Manned Spacecraft Center and medical technology  

Science.gov (United States)

A number of medically oriented research and hardware development programs in support of manned space flights have been sponsored by NASA. Blood pressure measuring systems for use in spacecraft are considered. In some cases, complete new bioinstrumentation systems were necessary to accomplish a specific physiological study. Plans for medical research during the Skylab program are discussed along with general questions regarding space-borne health service systems and details concerning the Health Services Support Control Center.

Johnston, R. S.; Pool, S. L.

1974-01-01

72

Energy Efficient Storage Technologies for Data Centers  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

An impressive amount of work has been done to date on improving the electrical efficiency of various data center components. The data storage industry has begun to see the fruits of this effort, with increased power supply and fan efficiencies. However, storage presents other significant opportunities for energy conservation, through various types of capacity optimization, that are not captured in electrical efficiency discussions. As data storage uses on the order of 25% of IT power in an av...

Yoder, Alan G.

2010-01-01

73

NASA - Johnson Space Center: Office of Technology Transfer and Commercialization  

Science.gov (United States)

The Johnson Technology Commercialization Center (JTCC) opened in 1993 and is located close to the Johnson Space Center. The JTCC is funded by a grant from NASA and is managed by the IC2 Institute, an international research center for the study of Innovation, Creativity and Capital (ICC) at the University of Texas at Austin. Among its credits, the IC2 Institute manages the Austin Technology Incubator (ATI), a recognized resource for the development of emerging technology companies a model for JTCC. The IC2 introduced a a laboratory-to-market approach, utilized by JTCC, which takes technology output from JSC and matches it with accomplished business and financial partners in the local community. The final transfer can be the result of either of two primary methods, "Small Business Incubator Services" and technology licensing.

1997-01-01

74

Evaluating an Assistive Technology Resource Center in Taiwan  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this article is intended to present the procedure and outcomes of an evaluation of the Assistive Technology Resource Center in a city of Taiwan. The evaluation was initiated by Chiayi City Government through inviting three professionals in the field of assistive technology as evaluators. For the purpose of evaluation, the Executive…

Ho, Hua-Kuo

2010-01-01

75

Sustainable Technology Research and Demonstration Center for Earth Structures  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This is a discussion paper that the authors presented at the International Workshop on Rammed Earth Materials and Sustainable Structures and Hakka Tulou Forum 2011: Structures of Sustainability, 28–31 October 2011, Xiamen University, China. A Sustainable Technology Research and Demonstration Center for Earth Structures is proposed to study, preserve, advance, promote, and implement rammed earth structures. The Center concept including the objectives, scope of activities and benefits of the proposed center are outlined. The Center for Alternative Technology in Wales, UK has been examined as a good base model along with a few successful environmental sustainability initiatives in China. The funding options to establish the proposed center have been discussed. The breadth of activities ultimately depends on funding capability. It is believed that the proposed center development will require significant government support at the initial stage but once corporate sponsorships are in place, the proposed center will potentially become self-supporting. The strategies, for the establishment of the proposed center are also addressed.

Judy Ueda

2012-10-01

76

VDI Technology Center, Physical Technologies. Annual report 1990  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Under each field of promoted activities follows a description of joint and individual projects. Listed are activities related to superconductors and low-temperature-, thin films-, and plasma technology. In addition to more detailed project descriptions, there is a register with all project titles. (DG)

77

Savannah River Site Radiological Technology Center's Efforts Supporting Waste Minimization  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper describes the efforts of the newly formed Radiological Technology Center (RTC) at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) to support waste minimization. The formation of the RTC was based upon the highly successful ALARA Center at the DOE Hanford Site. The RTC is tasked with evaluation and dissemination of new technologies and techniques for radiological hazard reduction and waste minimization. Initial waste minimization efforts have focused on the promotion of SRS containment fabrication capabilities, new personal protective equipment and use of recyclable versus disposable materials

78

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Plasma Science & Fusion Center (PSFC)  

Science.gov (United States)

Considered one of the leaders in the physics and engineering aspects of magnetic confinement fusion, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Plasma Science & Fusion Center offers comprehensive information on the research being conducted at the center. Within the Physics Research section of the site, the Levitated Dipole Experiment Website provides details (including research documents) on the levitation of a half-ton superconducting ring as a means of exploring "the physics of plasma confinement in a magnetic dipole field." Other areas of research include the Alcator Project and a waves and beams division. A preprint archive, accessed by way of a link to the center's library, holds downloadable documents from 1997 to 1999.

79

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Swimming Pool Foundation : NSPF.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention : CDC.gov What is lifeguard lung? ... aquatic physical therapy? Trends vary depending on what part of the country/world in which one lives. ...

80

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... body mechanics and postural stabilization flexibility gait and locomotion relaxation muscle strength, power, and endurance Interventions used ... find out more information, go to the APTA Learning Center . Is there a certification program for aquatic ...

 
 
 
 
81

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... find out more information, go to the APTA Learning Center . Is there a certification program for aquatic ... Hepatitis B if they do not have any open wounds, are continent of bowel and bladder and ...

82

Centers for manufacturing technology: Industrial Advisory Committee Review  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An advisory committee, composed of senior managers form industrial- sector companies and major manufacturing trade associations and representatives from appropriate educational institutions, meets semi-annually to review and advise the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology (ORCMT) on its economic security program. Individual papers have been indexed separately for the database.

NONE

1995-10-01

83

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

1980-08-01

84

Johnson Space Center Research and Technology 1993 Annual Report  

Science.gov (United States)

Johnson Space Center research and technology accomplishments during fiscal year 1993 are described and principle researchers and technologists are identified as contacts for further information. Each of the four sections gives a summary of overall progress in a major discipline, followed by detailed, illustrated descriptions of significant tasks. The four disciplines are Life Sciences, Human Support Technology, Solar Systems Sciences, and Space Systems Technology. The report is intended for technical and management audiences throughout the NASA and worldwide aerospace community. An index lists project titles, funding codes, and principal investigators.

1993-01-01

85

National Center for Rural STEM Education Outreach -Geospatial Technology  

Science.gov (United States)

The National Center for Rural Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education Outreach brings together James Madison University's (JMU) long-standing focus on teacher education with educators in rural settings across the United States. The initial emphasis of the Center will be on helping teachers and students use geospatial technologies, such as geographic information systems (GIS), global positioning systems (GPS), and remote sensing, to help build their spatial reasoning and content knowledge in STEM areas. This collection of lessons is designed to introduce and use GIS as a tool for middle school science and mathematics. These classroom-tested activities combine fundamental content with cutting-edge technology and help students see the power of spatial thinking in analysis and decision-making.

Duke, Barbaree A.

86

Spatial Information Technology Center at Fulton-Montgomery Community College  

Science.gov (United States)

The Spatial Information Technology Center (SITC) at Fulton-Montgomery Community College (FMCC) continued to fulfill its mission and charter by successfully completing its fourth year of operations under Congressional funding and NASA sponsorship. Fourth year operations (01 Oct 03 - 30 Sep 04) have been funded and conducted utilizing an authorized Research Grant NAG 13-02053 (via a one-year no-cost extension expiring Sep 04). Drawdown and reporting of fiscal activities for SITC operations passes through the Institute for the Application of Geo-spatial Technology (IAGT) at Cayuga Community College in Auburn, New York. Fiscal activity of the Center is reported quarterly via SF 272 to IAGT, this report contains an overview and expenditures for the remaining funds of NAG 13-02053. NAG 13-02053, slated for operating costs for the fiscal year FY02-03, received a one-year no-cost extension. SITC also received permission to use remaining funds for salaries and benefits through December 31,2004. The IAGT receives no compensation for administrative costs. This report includes addendums for the NAG award as required by federal guidelines. Attached are the signed Report of New Technology/Inventions and a Final Property Report. As an academic, economic, and workforce development program, the Center has made significant strides in bringing the technology, knowledge and applications of the spatial information technology field to the region it serves. Through the mission of the Center, the region's communities have become increasingly aware of the benefits of Geospatial technology, particularly in the region s K-12 arena. SITC continues to positively affect the region's education, employment and economic development, while expanding its services and operations.

2004-01-01

87

Mid-Atlantic Technology Applications Center. Quarters 1-4  

Science.gov (United States)

Mid-atlantic Technology Application Center (MTAC) pursued a number of initiatives designed to enhance the strategic position of the Langley Research Center (LaRC) and NASA in industry. Among these was a closer association with the ISA, International Society for Measurement and Control. During 1997, MTAC placed articles regarding NASA-developed technologies in each In Tech magazine. The monthly magazine is sent to 46,000 sensors and instrumentation professionals. In addition, MTAC coordinated NASXs participation in the ISA Tech 97 Conference, securing $112,000 of free exhibit space, 1500 NASA sensors posters at no cost to NASA, and thousands of dollars of free publicity. MTAC was awarded a contract by ISA to operate its Technical Resource Center (TRC). The goal of this project is to determine what user needs are in order to identify opportunities for collaboration between NASA centers and companies. In addition, the TRC work will lay the groundwork for the Technology Development Consortium (TDC) proposed by MTAC. The purpose of the TDC is to: match current industry needs with NASA technologies available now, and to identify future needs of NASA and industry which may lead to dual use projects. The goal of these activities is twofold: to infuse NASA technologies into the sensors and instrumentation industry and to secure industry funds to support NASA technology development projects. The instrumentation and sensors industry is valued at $30 billion worldwide, with $12 billion in sales in the United States. The growth rate averages 13.5%, so that by the year 2000, the industry will produce products worth $49 billion. More than 80% of instruments, sensors and control systems are currently manufactured in the United States. NASA and the industry do not have a history of collaborative projects; MTAC's initiatives in this area are designed to foster working relationships between the two parties that will help maintain U.S. leadership in this field. Mid-atlantic Technology Applications Center (MTAC) continued to work on LaRC-SI and Thin Layer Unimorph Driver and Sensor activities. MTAC helped develop the "master license" concept and identified additional applications and potential clients. The goal of these activities was to increase the financial return to Langley Research Center, to ensure the diffusion of the technologies throughout the economy, and to attract partners for future NASA technology development efforts. In an attempt to market LaRC-SI and the Thin Layer Unimorph Driver and Sensor, MTAC developed and pioneered the use of the USRTTC Technology Commercialization Team. As a result, MTAC's sister RTTCs identified both applications and potential users for the two technologies. MTAC also benefitted from its affiliate network to locate companies throughout the region that were interested in the two technologies. MTAC is working with Allegheny Ludlum to monitor the progress of the installation and testing of ultrasonic equipment purchased as a result of Langley Research Center's assistance.

1997-01-01

88

Two Micron Laser Technology Advancements at NASA Langley Research Center  

Science.gov (United States)

An Independent Laser Review Panel set up to examine NASA s space-based lidar missions and the technology readiness of lasers appropriate for space-based lidars indicated a critical need for an integrated research and development strategy to move laser transmitter technology from low technical readiness levels to the higher levels required for space missions. Based on the review, a multiyear Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) was initiated by NASA in 2002 to develop technologies that ensure the successful development of the broad range of lidar missions envisioned by NASA. This presentation will provide an overview of the development of pulsed 2-micron solid-state laser technologies at NASA Langley Research Center for enabling space-based measurement of wind and carbon dioxide.

Singh, Upendra N.

2010-01-01

89

SciDAC visualization and analytics center for enabling technology  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) focuses on leveraging scientific visualization and analytics software technology as an enabling technology for increasing scientific productivity and insight. Advances in computational technology have resulted in an 'information big bang,' which in turn has created a significant data understanding challenge. This challenge is widely acknowledged to be one of the primary bottlenecks in contemporary science. The vision of VACET is to adapt, extend, create when necessary, and deploy visual data analysis solutions that are responsive to the needs of DOE's computational and experimental scientists. Our center is engineered to be directly responsive to those needs and to deliver solutions for use in DOE's large open computing facilities. The research and development directly target data understanding problems provided by our scientific application stakeholders. VACET draws from a diverse set of visualization technology ranging from production quality applications and application frameworks to state-of-the-art algorithms for visualization, analysis, analytics, data manipulation, and data management

90

Ion Propulsion Technology Programs at NASA Glenn Research Center  

Science.gov (United States)

As lead center for the agency in electric and ion propulsion, the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is pursuing technology development in ion propulsion for a range of mission applications. The program goal is to develop key technologies for advanced NSTAR-derivative high-power ion propulsion, lightweight low power high-performance ion propulsion, 'micro' ion propulsion, and engine and component technologies for high-power electric propulsion for very ambitious missions. Products include: (1) a 5 kW, 400 kg throughput ion thruster and power processing technology; (2) extremely-lightweight high-efficiency sub-kilowatt ion thruster and power processor; (3) a 1-25 W high-specific impulse ion engine; and (4) engine and component technologies for high-power (30 kW class) ion and Hall engines. Identified applications include outer planetary science missions such as Europa orbiter/lander, Comet Nucleus Sample Return mission, Titan Explorer, Neptune/Triton, Pluto-Kuiper Belt Objects Mission, various second generation interplanetary Micro spacecraft, and the Interstellar Probe Mission. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

Patterson, M. J.; Oleson, S. R.

2001-01-01

91

Establishment of the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This Final Technical Report covers the eight sub-projects awarded in the first year and the five projects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41091: Establishment of the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

Christopher E. Hull

2006-09-30

92

ESTABLISHMENT OF THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the eight sub-projects awarded in the first year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41091: Establishment of the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices. Due to the time taken up by the solicitation/selection process, these cover the initial 6-month period of activity only.

Hugh W. Rimmer

2003-07-01

93

Career and Technology Center Honors Julie Hartman | Poster  

Science.gov (United States)

On May 7, Julie Hartman was honored by the Frederick County Career and Technology Center (CTC) for her support of the CTC’s Biomedical Sciences Program. As an education program specialist for Outreach and Special Programs at NCI at Frederick, Hartman is responsible for NCI at Frederick’s participation in the program, which is designed to offer Frederick County high school students hands-on, practical laboratory experience beyond the typical classroom setting.

94

Technologies for the marketplace from the Centers for Disease Control  

Science.gov (United States)

The Centers for Disease Control, a Public Health Service agency, is responsible for the prevention and control of disease and injury. Programs range from surveillance and prevention of chronic and infectious diseases to occupational health and injury control. These programs have produced technologies in a variety of fields, including vaccine development, new methods of disease diagnosis, and new tools to ensure a safer work environment.

Reid-Sanden, Frances L.; Greene, R. Eric; Malvitz, Dolores M.

1991-01-01

95

Unique Organizational Competencies of Brazilian Technological Innovation Centers  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: English Abstract in english The general objective of this research was to identify the unique organizational competences of Brazilian Technological Innovation Centers (TICs). We developed a theoretical framework that deals with technological innovation centers and unique organizational competences. Empirical research consisted [...] of two sequential phases, the first qualitative and the second quantitative. The qualitative phase consisted of semi-structured interviews that were chosen through non- probabilistic selection criteria. The quantitative phase made use of a survey questionnaire that was mailed to individuals responsible for the TICs participating in the National Forum of Managers of Innovation and Technology Transfer and the Intellectual Property Network of the State of Minas Gerais. The unique organizational competences encountered were: intellectual property; national patenting; consulting services rendered by individual professors or researchers; identification of the areas of excellence in research of scientific and technological institutions via the number of registered patents, the number of scientific publications, declared lines of research, and the presence of related research groups.

Zandra, Balbinot; Julie Cristini, Dias; Rafael Borim-de-, Souza.

96

Unique Organizational Competencies of Brazilian Technological Innovation Centers  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: English Abstract in english The general objective of this research was to identify the unique organizational competences of Brazilian Technological Innovation Centers (TICs). We developed a theoretical framework that deals with technological innovation centers and unique organizational competences. Empirical research consisted [...] of two sequential phases, the first qualitative and the second quantitative. The qualitative phase consisted of semi-structured interviews that were chosen through non- probabilistic selection criteria. The quantitative phase made use of a survey questionnaire that was mailed to individuals responsible for the TICs participating in the National Forum of Managers of Innovation and Technology Transfer and the Intellectual Property Network of the State of Minas Gerais. The unique organizational competences encountered were: intellectual property; national patenting; consulting services rendered by individual professors or researchers; identification of the areas of excellence in research of scientific and technological institutions via the number of registered patents, the number of scientific publications, declared lines of research, and the presence of related research groups.

Zandra, Balbinot; Julie Cristini, Dias; Rafael Borim-de-, Souza.

2012-03-01

97

NASA Johnson Space Center SBIR STTR Program Technology Innovations  

Science.gov (United States)

The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program increases opportunities for small businesses to participate in research and development (R&D), increases employment, and improves U.S. competitiveness. Specifically the program stimulates U.S. technological innovation by using small businesses to meet federal R&D needs, increasing private-sector commercialization of innovations derived from federal R&D, and fostering and encouraging the participation of socially disadvantaged businesses. In 2000, the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program extended and strengthened the SBIR Program, increasing its emphasis on pursuing commercial applications by awarding contracts to small business concerns for cooperative R&D with a nonprofit research institution. Modeled after the SBIR Program, STTR is nevertheless a separately funded activity. Technologies that have resulted from the Johnson Space Center SBIR STTR Program include: a device for regenerating iodinated resin beds; laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis or LASIK; a miniature physiological monitoring device capable of collecting and analyzing a multitude of real-time signals to transmit medical data from remote locations to medical centers for diagnosis and intervention; a new thermal management system for fibers and fabrics giving rise to new line of garments and thermal-enhancing environments; and a highly electropositive material that attracts and retains electronegative particles in water.

Krishen, Kumar

2007-01-01

98

Information data bases at the Transportation Technology Center  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A description is presented of the Transportation Technology Center (TTC) at Sandia National Laboratories, a component of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Waste Management Program. The center provides technical management and support for those programs related to the transportation of nuclear materials. A very important support function is the ability to provide information upon request. In 1979 a special collections library was established in the TTC and work was started on several of the information data bases. Today the TTC has six information collections in computerized data bases. These are described. Persons to contact for information concerning each of the following data bases are listed. The data bases are: Nuclear Material Transportation Incidents; Radioactive Materials Packaging; Legislative and Regulatory Information System; Research in Progress; Bibliographic Collection; and Transportation Technical Environmental Information

99

Oklahoma State University proposed Advanced Technology Research Center. Environmental Assessment  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the construction and equipping of the proposed Advanced Technology Research Center (ATRC) at Oklahoma State University (OSU) in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

NONE

1995-06-01

100

The Center for Women & Information Technology: Mentoring Tool Kit  

Science.gov (United States)

This document from The Center for Women and Information Technology at the University of Maryland outlines the program's mentoring program. Content of the report includes steps to a successful mentoring program, mentor and protege roles and responsibilities and a draft of a mentoring agreement. These materials would be useful for colleges looking to set up a similar program to encourage student success and retention, and would be useful for mentoring both female and male students. This document may be downloaded in PDF file format.

2012-03-01

 
 
 
 
101

Cloud computing technologies and strategies of the ubiquitous data center  

CERN Document Server

Modern computing is no longer about devices but is all about providing services, a natural progression that both consumers and enterprises are eager to embrace. As it can deliver those services, efficiently and with quality, at compelling price levels, cloud computing is with us to stay. Ubiquitously and quite definitively, cloud computing is answering the demand for sophisticated, flexible servicesCloud Computing: Technologies and Strategies of the Ubiquitous Data Center looks at cloud computing from an IT manager's perspective. It answers basic as well as strategic questions from both a busi

Chee, Brian JS

2010-01-01

102

Early progress of the Biomedical Computing Technology Information Center (BCTIC)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Through five years of effort by the Society of Nuclear Medicine Computer Committee, the Biomedical Computing Technology Information Center (BCTIC) was established by the Division of Biomedical and Environmental Research (DBER) of the U. S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in July of 1975. BCTIC forged ahead into the tasks of designing guidelines and procedures, acquisition and packaging of computer codes, data, and interface designs; building a bibliographic data base; and maintaining a directory of the user community. Important contacts were made with societies and individuals involved in biomedical computing; and BCTIC was publicized through news releases, the BCTIC newsletter (bimonthly, since October, 1975), presentations at meetings, and personal contacts. This paper presents the response BCTIC has received in its initial months, gives a progress report on the developmental phase, and takes a look to the future of BCTIC as a national technology resource in nuclear medicine computing

103

US/China Energy and Environmental Technology Center (EETC) international business development and technology transfer  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Since January 1997, the US/China Energy and Environmental Technology Center (EETC) in Beijing has been jointly operated by Tulane University and Tsinghua University. EETC is established to encourage the adoption of technologies for energy production with improved environmental performance which are essential for supporting economic growth and managing the Global Warming and Climate Change issues. International cooperation is critical to insure the environmental and energy security on a global basis. For example, the US has acquired a great deal of useful experience in clean coal technology which has been demonstrated with major utilities in commercial operations. The adaption of, and the installation of, clean coal technology should be given high priority. Worldwide, the continuous exchange of information and technology between developed and developing nations relating to the current and future clean coal technologies is of great importance. Developed nations which possess environmental responsive technologies and financial resources should work closely with developing nations to facilitate technology transfer and trade of technologies. International cooperation will lower the cost of deploying clean coal technologies directed toward the clean production of energy. This paper presents the updated activities of EETC on facilitating technology transfer and promoting the clean use of coal to satisfy growing energy demand in China.

Hsieh, S.T. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States). US/China Inst.; Atwood, T. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Qiu Daxiong [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Zhang Guocheng [State Science and Technology Commission, Beijing (China)

1997-12-31

104

National Wind Technology Center sitewide, Golden, CO: Environmental assessment  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the nation's primary solar and renewable energy research laboratory, proposes to expand its wind technology research and development program activities at its National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Golden, Colorado. NWTC is an existing wind energy research facility operated by NREL for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Proposed activities include the construction and reuse of buildings and facilities, installation of up to 20 wind turbine test sites, improvements in infrastructure, and subsequent research activities, technology testing, and site operations. In addition to wind turbine test activities, NWTC may be used to support other NREL program activities and small-scale demonstration projects. This document assesses potential consequences to resources within the physical, biological, and human environment, including potential impacts to: air quality, geology and soils, water resources, biological resources, cultural and historic resources, socioeconomic resources, land use, visual resources, noise environment, hazardous materials and waste management, and health and safety conditions. Comment letters were received from several agencies in response to the scoping and predecisional draft reviews. The comments have been incorporated as appropriate into the document with full text of the letters contained in the Appendices. Additionally, information from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site on going sitewide assessment of potential environmental impacts has been reviewed and discussed by representatives of both parties and incorporated into the document as appropriate

105

The Savannah River Technology Center environmental monitoring field test platform  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Nearly all industrial facilities have been responsible for introducing synthetic chemicals into the environment. The Savannah River Site is no exception. Several areas at the site have been contaminated by chlorinated volatile organic chemicals. Because of the persistence and refractory nature of these contaminants, a complete clean up of the site will take many years. A major focus of the mission of the Environmental Sciences Section of the Savannah River Technology Center is to develop better, faster, and less expensive methods for characterizing, monitoring, and remediating the subsurface. These new methods can then be applied directly at the Savannah River Site and at other contaminated areas in the United States and throughout the world. The Environmental Sciences Section has hosted field testing of many different monitoring technologies over the past two years primarily as a result of the Integrated Demonstration Program sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development. This paper provides an overview of some of the technologies that have been demonstrated at the site and briefly discusses the applicability of these techniques

106

National Wind Technology Center sitewide, Golden, CO: Environmental assessment  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the nation`s primary solar and renewable energy research laboratory, proposes to expand its wind technology research and development program activities at its National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Golden, Colorado. NWTC is an existing wind energy research facility operated by NREL for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Proposed activities include the construction and reuse of buildings and facilities, installation of up to 20 wind turbine test sites, improvements in infrastructure, and subsequent research activities, technology testing, and site operations. In addition to wind turbine test activities, NWTC may be used to support other NREL program activities and small-scale demonstration projects. This document assesses potential consequences to resources within the physical, biological, and human environment, including potential impacts to: air quality, geology and soils, water resources, biological resources, cultural and historic resources, socioeconomic resources, land use, visual resources, noise environment, hazardous materials and waste management, and health and safety conditions. Comment letters were received from several agencies in response to the scoping and predecisional draft reviews. The comments have been incorporated as appropriate into the document with full text of the letters contained in the Appendices. Additionally, information from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site on going sitewide assessment of potential environmental impacts has been reviewed and discussed by representatives of both parties and incorporated into the document as appropriate.

NONE

1996-11-01

107

Technology Transfer and Knowledge Management in Technological Innovation Center: A Case Study in Brazil  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to analyze the knowledge management in the process of technology transfer in a technological innovation center, known in Brazil as NIT. The used methodology included a qualitative approach. It was a case study of a Nucleus which is in a State University located in the south of Bahia state, Brazil. The results showed that this specific Nucleus presents a fine infrastructure regarding the legal regulation, based on the Federal Law of Innovation nº 10.973 and on the State of Bahia Innovation Law. Some barriers related to knowledge management were detected preventing an effective process of technology transfer.

Luan Carlos Santos Silva

2013-05-01

108

The Picatinny Technology Transfer Innovation Center: A business incubator concept adapted to federal laboratory technology transfer  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In recent years, the US defense industrial base spawned the aerospace industry, among other successes, and served as the nation`s technology seed bed. However, as the defense industrial base shrinks and public and private resources become scarcer, the merging of the commercial and defense communities becomes necessary to maintain national technological competencies. Cooperative efforts such as technology transfer provide an attractive, cost-effective, well-leveraged alternative to independently funded research and development (R and D). The sharing of knowledge, resources, and innovation among defense contractors and other public sector firms, academia, and other organizations has become exceedingly attractive. Recent legislation involving technology transfer provides for the sharing of federal laboratory resources with the private sector. The Army Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC), Picatinny Arsenal, NJ, a designer of weapons systems, is one of the nation`s major laboratories with this requirement. To achieve its important technology transfer mission, ARDEC reviewed its capabilities, resources, intellectual property, and products with commercial potential. The purpose of the review was to develop a viable plan for effecting a technology transfer cultural change within the ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal and with the private sector. This report highlights the issues identified, discussed, and resolved prior to the transformation of a temporarily vacant federal building on the Picatinny installation into a business incubator. ARDEC`s discussions and rationale for the decisions and actions that led to the implementation of the Picatinny Technology Transfer Innovation Center are discussed.

Wittig, T. [Geo-Centers, Inc. (United States); Greenfield, J. [Armaments Research, Development and Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ (United States)

1996-10-01

109

Two new research melters at the Savannah River Technology Center  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) complex leader in the development of vitrification technology. To maintain and expand this SRTC core technology, two new melter systems are currently under construction in SRTC. This paper discusses the development of these two new systems, which will be used to support current as well as future vitrification programs in the DOE complex. The first of these is the new minimelter, which is a joule-heated glass melter intended for experimental melting studies with nonradioactive glass waste forms. Testing will include surrogates of Defense Waste processing Facility (DWPF) high-level wastes. To support the DWPF testing, the new minimelter was scaled to the DWPF melter based on melt surface area. This new minimelter will replace an existing system and provide a platform for the research and development necessary to support the SRTC vitrification core technology mission. The second new melter is the British Nuclear Fuels, Inc., research melter system (BNFL melter), which is a scaled version of the BNFL low-activity-waste (LAW) melter proposed for vitrification of LAW at Hanford. It is designed to process a relatively large amount of actual radiative Hanford tank waste and to gather data on the composition of off-gases that will be generated by the LAW melter. Both the minimelter and BNFL melter systems consist of five primary subsystems: melter vessel, off-gas treatment, feed, power supply, and instrumentation and controls. The configuration and design of these subsystems are tailored to match the current system requirements and provide the flexibility to support future DOE vitrification programs. This paper presents a detailed discussion of the unique design challenges represented by these two new melter systems

110

Methods and results of an evaluation of aquatic receptor risk at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) has historically released radionuclide chemicals of potential concern into the surrounding environment. The off-site environment was evaluated for Pu239/240 and Am241 occurrence. An evaluation of exposure and effects to the aquatic ecology within off-site areas including: Standley Lake, Great Western Reservoir, Mower Reservoir and portions of Big Dry Creek, Walnut Creek, and Woman Creek was performed for the completion of an Ecological Risk Assessment. Collocated sampling activities were performed for surface water, sediment, benthic macroinvertebrates and fish. Results of the analytical data were used to assess ongoing exposure and effects. Data collected to determine effects (chemical content of fish tissue, diversity and density of macroinvertebrate populations) provided some of the necessary information needed to evaluate risk. However, due to conditions of interfering stressor effects, a quantitative evaluation of exposure through modeling techniques was also required to assess risk attributable to chemical of potential concern (COPC) occurrence. This paper presents the methods and results of both the effects and exposure assessment techniques applicable for this site and for the determination of risk

111

Study on Problems and Countermeasures of Chinese Local University Technology Transfer Center Construction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper reveals the main problems in Chinese local university technology transfer center construction: low quality of patent, Lack of high-quality professionals, unreasonable distribution of income of scientific and technological achievements and fuzzy function of university technology transfer center. In-depth analysis, to establish a new framework of Chinese local university technology transfer and technology brokerage closed-loop control principle diagram, constructs perfect patent technology transformation cycle work mode. The study on problems and countermeasures of Chinese local university technology transfer center construction has great significance to improving the ability in Chinese local universities to serve the society.

Na Deng

2014-08-01

112

Aquatic plants  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Aquatic fl owering plants form a relatively young plant group on an evolutionary timescale. The group has developed over the past 80 million years from terrestrial fl owering plants that re-colonised the aquatic environment after 60-100 million years on land. The exchange of species between terrestrial and aquatic environments continues today and is very intensive along stream banks. In this chapter we describe the physical and chemical barriers to the exchange of plants between land and water.

Madsen, T. V.; Sand-Jensen, K.

2006-01-01

113

Intelligent Processing Equipment Developments Within the Navy's Manufacturing Technology Centers of Excellence  

Science.gov (United States)

The U.S. Navy has had an active Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) Program aimed at developing advanced production processes and equipment since the late-1960's. During the past decade, however, the resources of the MANTECH program were concentrated in Centers of Excellence. Today, the Navy sponsors four manufacturing technology Centers of Excellence: the Automated Manufacturing Research Facility (AMRF); the Electronics Manufacturing Productivity Facility (EMPF); the National Center for Excellence in Metalworking Technology (NCEMT); and the Center of Excellence for Composites Manufacturing Technology (CECMT). This paper briefly describes each of the centers and summarizes typical Intelligent Equipment Processing (IEP) projects that were undertaken.

Nanzetta, Philip

1992-01-01

114

Business of Nuclear Safety Analysis Office, Nuclear Technology Test Center  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Nuclear Technology Test Center established the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office to execute newly the works concerning nuclear safety analysis in addition to the works related to the proving tests of nuclear machinery and equipments. The regulations for the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office concerning its organization, business and others were specially decided, and it started the business formally in August, 1980. It is a most important subject to secure the safety of nuclear facilities in nuclear fuel cycle as the premise of developing atomic energy. In Japan, the strict regulation of safety is executed by the government at each stage of the installation, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear facilities, based on the responsibility for the security of installers themselves. The Nuclear Safety Analysis Office was established as the special organ to help the safety examination related to the installation of nuclear power stations and others by the government. It improves and puts in order the safety analysis codes required for the cross checking in the safety examination, and carries out safety analysis calculation. It is operated by the cooperation of the Science and Technology Agency and the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy. The purpose of establishment, the operation and the business of the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office, the plan of improving and putting in order of analysis codes, and the state of the similar organs in foreign countries are descrilar organs in foreign countries are described. (Kako, I.)

115

The Mayo Clinic Advanced Genomic Technology Center Microarray Shared Resource  

Science.gov (United States)

CF-7 The Mayo Clinic Advanced Genomic Technology Center Microarray Shared Resource provides a full range of services from RNA quality assessment to whole genome transcript measurement for researchers both inside and outside of the Mayo Health System. Created in 2000, the facility offers technical services and support for both basic and clinical research programs for more than 80 principle investigators annually. Specializing in high-density microarray and real-time PCR-based analyses, the lab provides instrumentation and technical expertise to perform genomic studies on a wide variety of different sample types, including, but not limited to, RNA samples derived from fresh frozen tissues, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, Laser Capture Microdissected cells, and cultured cell lines. Instrument platforms present in the Microarray Shared Resource include Affymetrix GeneChip™;, Illumina BeadChip™, Applied Biosystems 7900 HT Sequence Detection Systems, Fluidigm Biomark™ and Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzers. Affymetrix GeneChip™ analyses are performed routinely on all human, mouse, and rat whole transcriptome arrays, as well as Gene 1.0, Exon, Tiling, and miRNA GeneChip™ products. In addition, Illumina BeadChip™ analyses are conducted with human and mouse Whole Genome 6, HT-12, Ref8, and Whole Genome DASL assays. As genomic technologies continue to emerge and evolve, the Microarray Shared Resource also seeks to expand its capabilities to include gene expression profiling in single cells as well as mRNA and miRNA analyses using Fluidigm high throughput chips and Next Generation sequencing technologies.

Jen, J.; Kolbert, C.

2010-01-01

116

76 FR 2147 - UAW-Chrysler National Training Center Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Detroit, MI; UAW...  

Science.gov (United States)

...confirmed that the proportion of Technology Training Joint Programs Staff...such as applied industrial technology, industrial automation, industrial maintenance...National Training Center, Technology Training Joint Programs...

2011-01-12

117

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... and techniques unique to the aquatic environment. Abbreviated Definition of Aquatic Physical Therapy: Aquatic Physical Therapy is ... and integumentary (skin) diseases, disorders, or conditions. Abbreviated Definition of Aquatic Physical Therapists: Aquatic Physical Therapists are ...

118

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) conducted December 7--11, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with PETC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at PETC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site Survey activities at PETC. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the Plan's results will be incorporated into the PETC Survey findings for inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 64 refs., 23 figs., 29 tabs.

1988-09-01

119

Department of Nuclear Equipment '' High Technology Center - HITEC '' - Overview  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: Activities of the Department for Nuclear Equipment High Technology Center in 2007 were focused on the development of acceleration systems for medicine and industry. The Establishment conducted an analysis of current solutions in the field of irradiation in oncology, which resulted in preparation of preliminary goals for new designs not only connected with accelerating systems but also within the field of simulator-assisted diagnostics. The Department conducted detailed preliminary works on systems of beam collimation in accelerator and simulator, steering and management systems that make use of the latest standards and client requirements for information exchange. Special attention was paid to detection systems of high-energy photon radiation used for detecting dangerous materials at border controls as well as to sources of slow and fast neutrons and detectors of neutron radiation. A major achievement of employees of the Establishment was School of Medical Accelerators Physics that was organised in October 2007 for medical physicists and physicians. Its numerous attendance and very favourable opinions expressed by those who attended permit to acknowledge this initiative as very important and helpful, worthy of repeating in the next year. (author)

120

The nuclear technology training center of the TUEV Nord Group  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Nuclear Technology Training Center of the TUeV Nord Group is used to optimize the organization's training of staff in its nuclear fields. This is to ensure that know-how will be preserved despite the phasing-out of nuclear activities in the Federal Republic of Germany and an imminent change of generations among expert consultants. There will be a continuing need for well trained experts because decommissioning work and the residual plant life periods as calculated form electricity quotas clearly exceed the phase of the shift in generations among expert consultants. Staff from different areas of expertise are prepared for working on complex nuclear problems, one important aspect being the interaction among the areas of competence involved. The curriculum offers nuclear knowledge as well as specialized knowledge in various disciplines. Training is offered not only in the format of seminars but also on the job. After all, on-the-job training is irreplaceable as it conveys specialized knowledge important in specific jobs and subjects. (orig.)

 
 
 
 
121

Certification testing at the National Wind Technology Center  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The International Electrotechnical Commission is developing a new standard that defines power performance measurement techniques. The standard will provide the basis for international recognition of a wind turbine`s performance primarily for certification, but also for qualification for tax and investment incentives, and for contracts. According to the standard, the power performance characteristics are defined by a measured power curve and by projections of annual energy production for a range of wind conditions. The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) has adopted these power performance measurement techniques. This paper reviews the results of the NWTC`s first test conducted under the new protocol on the Atlantic Orient Corporation`s AOC 15/50 wind turbine at the NWTC. The test required collecting sufficient data to establish a statistically significant database over a range of wind speeds and conditions. From the data, the power curve was calculated. Then the results from a site calibration procedure determined the flow distortion between winds measured at the turbine location and those measured at the meteorological tower. Finally, this paper discusses the uncertainty analysis that was performed in accordance with the standard. Use of these procedures resulted in the definition of the AOC 15/50`s power curve within about 3 kW.

Huskey, A.; Link, H.

1996-11-01

122

Turbine Inflow Characterization at the National Wind Technology Center: Preprint  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Utility-scale wind turbines operate in dynamic flows that can vary significantly over timescales from less than a second to several years. To better understand the inflow to utility-scale turbines, two inflow towers were installed and commissioned at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado, in 2011. These towers are 135 m tall and instrumented with a combination of sonic anemometers, cup anemometers, wind vanes, and temperature measurements to characterize the inflow wind speed and direction, turbulence, stability and thermal stratification to two utility-scale turbines. Herein, we present variations in mean and turbulent wind parameters with height, atmospheric stability, and as a function of wind direction that could be important for turbine operation as well as persistence of turbine wakes. Wind speed, turbulence intensity, and dissipation are all factors that affect turbine performance. Our results shown that these all vary with height across the rotor disk, demonstrating the importance of measuring atmospheric conditions that influence wind turbine performance at multiple heights in the rotor disk, rather than relying on extrapolation from lower levels.

Clifton, A.; Schreck, S.; Scott, G.; Kelley, N.; Lundquist, J.

2012-01-01

123

Program strategy document for the nuclear materials. Transportation Technology Center (FY 80)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The TTC's program is divided into four principal areas, Technology and Information Center, Systems Development, Technology, and Institutional Issues. These areas are broken into activities, elements, and subelements which are delineated in this document

124

Texas Manufacturing Technology Center feasibility study for the Inland Regional Industrial Technology Institute  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This document presents the Texas Manufacturing Technology Center (TMTC) Business Plan to convert the Central Facility of the Superconducting Super Collider project to alternate uses. The plan is divided into six sections: (1) Executive Summary, (2) Market and Benefit Analysis, (3) Marketing Strategy, (4) Services, (5) Organization and Operations Overview, and (6) Financial Plan. Each area is supported by separate documents that address individual opportunities and challenges associated with transitioning the facility, and its asset base to new uses for benefit of the locality, state, region and nation

125

Energy from aquatic biomass  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Aquatic biomass is considered as a second (or third) generation option for the production of bio fuels. The best utilization for energy purposes is not its direct combustion. Several technologies are available for the extraction of compounds that may find application for the production of gaseous fuels (biogas, dihydrogen) or liquid fuels (ethanol, bio oil, biodiesel).

126

Factors Predicting the Use of Technology: Findings From the Center for Research and Education on Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE)  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The successful adoption of technology is becoming increasingly important to functional independence. The present article reports findings from the Center for Research and Education on Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE) on the use of technology among community-dwelling adults. The sample included 1,204 individuals ranging in age from 18–91 years. All participants completed a battery that included measures of demographic characteristics, self-rated health, experience with technology, a...

Czaja, Sara J.; Charness, Neil; Fisk, Arthur D.; Hertzog, Christopher; Nair, Sankaran N.; Rogers, Wendy A.; Sharit, Joseph

2006-01-01

127

Science and Technology at a High Throughput Genome Center  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The Genome Center (GC) at Washington University School of Medicine has developed a state of the art genomics facility. Our scientists work on a variety of cutting edge projects with researchers from around the world. These collaborative research projects lead to cutting edge advances in the field of genomics. The structural organization at the GC reflects these efforts and is centered around six major scientific areas: Transcriptome Sequencing, Genome Assembly, Whole Genome Sequencing, Human ...

Wilson, R.; Fulton, L.

2011-01-01

128

7. Annual seminar of the scientific initiation of the Center for Development of Nuclear Technology. Abstracts  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This seminar presents the Scientific Initiation Program developed at the CDTN - Brazilian Center for the Development of Nuclear Technology and focuses on activities of the sectors of: radiopharmaceutical production; radiation applied to health; waste management; structural integrity; environment; nanotechnology and nuclear materials; reactor technology; mineral technology; reactor and analytical techniques

129

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Reimbursement Issues FAQs General FAQs What is "aquatic physical therapy" Aquatic Physical Therapy Aquatic Physical Therapy is the ... or written follow-up information required. Is aquatic physical therapy effective? While there is considerable research effectively documenting ...

130

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Operations FAQs Reimbursement Issues FAQs General FAQs What is "aquatic physical therapy" Aquatic Physical Therapy Aquatic Physical ... insurance involvement or written follow-up information required. Is aquatic physical therapy effective? While there is considerable ...

131

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... is "aquatic physical therapy" Aquatic Physical Therapy Aquatic Physical Therapy is the evidence-based and skilled practice of physical therapy in an aquatic environment by a physical ...

132

Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Componet Software (TASCS)  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY 2010Report Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software: Distributed CCA State University of New York, Binghamton, NY, 13902 Summary The overall objective of Binghamton's involvement is to work on enhancements of the CCA environment, motivated by the applications and research initiatives discussed in the proposal. This year we are working on re-focusing our design and development efforts to develop proof-of-concept implementations that have the potential to significantly impact scientific components. We worked on developing parallel implementations for non-hydrostatic code and worked on a model coupling interface for biogeochemical computations coded in MATLAB. We also worked on the design and implementation modules that will be required for the emerging MapReduce model to be effective for scientific applications. Finally, we focused on optimizing the processing of scientific datasets on multi-core processors. Research Details We worked on the following research projects that we are working on applying to CCA-based scientific applications. 1. Non-Hydrostatic Hydrodynamics: Non-static hydrodynamics are significantly more accurate at modeling internal waves that may be important in lake ecosystems. Non-hydrostatic codes, however, are significantly more computationally expensive, often prohibitively so. We have worked with Chin Wu at the University of Wisconsin to parallelize non-hydrostatic code. We have obtained a speed up of about 26 times maximum. Although this is significant progress, we hope to improve the performance further, such that it becomes a practical alternative to hydrostatic codes. 2. Model-coupling for water-based ecosystems: To answer pressing questions about water resources requires that physical models (hydrodynamics) be coupled with biological and chemical models. Most hydrodynamics codes are written in Fortran, however, while most ecologists work in MATLAB. This disconnect creates a great barrier. To address this, we are working on a model coupling interface that will allow biogeochemical computations written in MATLAB to couple with Fortran codes. This will greatly improve the productivity of ecosystem scientists. 2. Low overhead and Elastic MapReduce Implementation Optimized for Memory and CPU-Intensive Applications: Since its inception, MapReduce has frequently been associated with Hadoop and large-scale datasets. Its deployment at Amazon in the cloud, and its applications at Yahoo! for large-scale distributed document indexing and database building, among other tasks, have thrust MapReduce to the forefront of the data processing application domain. The applicability of the paradigm however extends far beyond its use with data intensive applications and diskbased systems, and can also be brought to bear in processing small but CPU intensive distributed applications. MapReduce however carries its own burdens. Through experiments using Hadoop in the context of diverse applications, we uncovered latencies and delay conditions potentially inhibiting the expected performance of a parallel execution in CPU-intensive applications. Furthermore, as it currently stands, MapReduce is favored for data-centric applications, and as such tends to be solely applied to disk-based applications. The paradigm, falls short in bringing its novelty to diskless systems dedicated to in-memory applications, and compute intensive programs processing much smaller data, but requiring intensive computations. In this project, we focused both on the performance of processing large-scale hierarchical data in distributed scientific applications, as well as the processing of smaller but demanding input sizes primarily used in diskless, and memory resident I/O systems. We designed LEMO-MR [1], a Low overhead, elastic, configurable for in- memory applications, and on-demand fault tolerance, an optimized implementation of MapReduce, for both on disk and in memory applications. We conducted experiments to identify not only the necessary components of thi

Govindaraju, Madhusudhan

2010-10-31

133

Aquatic Sediments.  

Science.gov (United States)

Presents a literature review of aquatic sediments and its effect upon water quality, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) sediment water interchange; (2) chemical and physical characterization; and (3) heavy water in sediments. A list of 129 references is also presented. (HM)

Sanville, W. D.; And Others

1978-01-01

134

Status of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s Particulate Cleanup Program -- enabling technology for advanced coal-based power systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Advanced coal-based power systems, such as integrated gasification and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion, require particulate removal at high temperatures and high pressure under adverse chemical conditions. To facilitate the development of advanced coal-based power systems, then Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has assembled a Particulate Cleanup Program, which conducts technology demonstration projects and applied research to address the adverse filtration conditions and filter system issues, as well as the future performance demands of these systems.

Dennis, R.A.

1994-10-01

135

NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Subcommittees - Information Technology  

Science.gov (United States)

With the evolution of cutting edge biomedical technology and the resultant explosion of data in healthcare, health delivery organizations across the country have struggled with the best way to integrate old with new and utilize the data in a meaningful manner. This often requires costly investments, organizational change management and new workflows, policies and procedures to assimilate technology and impact care. This offers unique challenges to community based healthcare organizations that experience multiple barriers to acquisition and implementation.

136

Semi-annual report of Nuclear Technology and Development Center (CDTN) - July to December 1988  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The main activities developed by the several divisions of Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) are described, including areas of reactor tecnologies, fuel cycle, materials and component, nuclear safety and tecnical substructure. (C.G.C.)

137

Superfund TIO videos. Set C. Alternative Treatment Technology Information Center (ATTIC). Part 9. Audio-Visual  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The videotape covers Alternative Treatment Technology Information Center (ATTIC) computer program and ways in which OSCs and RPMs can use ATTIC in their jobs. (Access to ATTIC for hands-on practice is recommended.)

138

78 FR 65300 - Notice of Availability (NOA) for General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center...  

Science.gov (United States)

...Information Technology Center Construction (GPW/IT)--Tracy Site-- Environmental Assessment...NOA) for GPW/IT--Tracy Site-- Environmental Assessment...Joaquin, California--Tracy Site. The EA has been prepared...

2013-10-31

139

The Knowledge-Based Technology Applications Center (KBTAC) seminar series  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Neural Networks are adaptive systems that allow users to model complex systems, classify patterns, filter data or control processes with little or no a-priori knowledge. Neural networks represent a branch of artificial intelligence technology. Fuzzy logic is a generalization of formalized mathematical logic that allows representation of uncertainty by providing a smooth transition from true to false, instead of a step change. It allows for a proposition to be both true and false, to different degrees at the same time. This allows representation of approximate reasoning concepts that occur frequently in everyday experience, such as ''somewhat true,'' or ''not very hot.'' To utilize these technologies, utility personnel need to acquire knowledge and skills in a number of areas: 1. basic principles of neural networks and fuzzy logic; 2. types of neural networks and fuzzy logic systems, their applications, and requirements for use; 3. considerations for designing neural networks and fuzzy logic systems; 4. software tools available for these technologies. Off-the-shelf software is available for a variety of hardware platforms to rapidly develop, tune and test neural networks and fuzzy logic systems. Familiarity with the problem to which a neural network or fuzzy logic system is applied allows the designer to develop an appropriate design. Therefore, it is desirable to teach neural network and fuzzy logic technology to utility experts in the domain of applicationts in the domain of application

140

Managing Information Technology in Academic Medical Centers: A "Multicultural" Experience.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examines how beliefs and concerns of academic medicine's diverse professional cultures affect management of information technology. Two scenarios, one dealing with standardization of desktop personal computers and the other with publication of syllabi on an institutional intranet, form the basis for an exercise in which four prototypical members…

Friedman, Charles P.; Corn, Milton; Krumrey, Arthur; Perry, David R.; Stevens, Ronald H.

1998-01-01

 
 
 
 
141

Failure analysis of ETAC [Enrichment Technology Applications Center] pressure vessel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report presents the results of an investigation into the failure of a graphite-epoxy composite cylinder. It investigates the quality of the as-fabricated cylinder and provides a verification of compressive material property input used in its design. The design is reevaluated in terms of the adjusted composition and material property input for its suitability for 18,000-psi pressure applications. A comparison between the composition and layup of a cylinder manufactured by Hitco is also provided, as well as the results of a pressurization test of an identical ETAC cylinder tested by the Naval Ocean Systems Center

142

Surface-water quantity and quality, aquatic biology, stream geomorphology, and groundwater-flow simulation for National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania, 2002-05  

Science.gov (United States)

Base-line and long-term monitoring of water resources of the National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap in south-central Pennsylvania began in 2002. Results of continuous monitoring of streamflow and turbidity and monthly and stormflow water-quality samples from two continuous-record long-term stream sites, periodic collection of water-quality samples from five miscellaneous stream sites, and annual collection of biological data from 2002 to 2005 at 27 sites are discussed. In addition, results from a stream-geomorphic analysis and classification and a regional groundwater-flow model are included. Streamflow at the facility was above normal for the 2003 through 2005 water years and extremely high-flow events occurred in 2003 and in 2004. Water-quality samples were analyzed for nutrients, sediments, metals, major ions, pesticides, volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, and explosives. Results indicated no exceedances for any constituent (except iron) above the primary and secondary drinking-water standards or health-advisory levels set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Iron concentrations were naturally elevated in the groundwater within the watershed because of bedrock lithology. The majority of the constituents were at or below the method detection limit. Sediment loads were dominated by precipitation due to the remnants of Hurricane Ivan in September 2004. More than 60 percent of the sediment load measured during the entire study was transported past the streamgage in just 2 days during that event. Habitat and aquatic-invertebrate data were collected in the summers of 2002-05, and fish data were collected in 2004. Although 2002 was a drought year, 2003-05 were above-normal flow years. Results indicated a wide diversity in invertebrates, good numbers of taxa (distinct organisms), and on the basis of a combination of metrics, the majority of the 27 sites indicated no or slight impairment. Fish-metric data from 25 sites indicated results similar to the invertebrate data. Stream classification based on evolution of the stream channels indicates about 94 percent of the channels were considered to be in equilibrium (type B or C channels), neither aggrading nor eroding. A regional, uncalibrated groundwater-flow model indicated the surface-water and groundwater-flow divides coincided. Because of folding of rock layers, groundwater was under confined conditions and nearly all the water leaves the facility via the streams.

Langland, Michael J.; Cinotto, Peter J.; Chichester, Douglas C.; Bilger, Michael D.; Brightbill, Robin A.

2010-01-01

143

VACET: Proposed SciDAC2 Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This project focuses on leveraging scientific visualization and analytics software technology as an enabling technology for increasing scientific productivity and insight. Advances in computational technology have resulted in an 'information big bang',' which in turn has created a significant data understanding challenge. This challenge is widely acknowledged to be one of the primary bottlenecks in contemporary science. The vision for our Center is to respond directly to that challenge by adapting, extending, creating when necessary and deploying visualization and data understanding technologies for our science stakeholders. Using an organizational model as a Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET), we are well positioned to be responsive to the needs of a diverse set of scientific stakeholders in a coordinated fashion using a range of visualization, mathematics, statistics, computer and computational science and data management technologies

144

U.S. Army's Center of Excellence for Spectral Sensing Technology  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent advances in the field of spectral sensing technology have elucidated the benefits of multi-spectral and hyperspectral sensing to the Army's user community. These advancements, when properly exploited can provide the Army with additional and improved automated terrain analysis, image understanding, object detection, and material characterization capabilities. The U.S. Army, led by the Topographic Engineering Center, has established a Center of Excellence for Spectral Sensing Technology. This Center conducts Army wide collaborative research on, and development and demonstration of spectral sensing, processing and exploitation technologies. The Center's collaborative efforts integrate Army programs across multiple disciplines and form a baseline program consisting of coordinated technology thrusts. The program's applied research and demonstration components will in turn support an Army spectral Strategic Technology Objective (STO) that will ultimately support and leverage joint service efforts starting in FY00. Existing efforts span the domains of sensor hardware, data processing architectures, algorithms, and, signal processing and exploitation technologies across wide spectral regions. These thrusts in turn enable progress and performance improvement in the automated analysis, understanding, classification, discrimination, and identification of terrestrial objects, and materials. The participants draw upon common scientific processes and disciplines to attack similar problems related to different categories and domains of phenomenology. This paper describes the Center's program and objectives along with an explanation of the Army's strategy and approach in support of its program objectives.

Hamilton, Mark K.; Roper, William E.

1999-08-01

145

Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In November 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), ePowerSynergies, Inc. (ePSI), and Resurfice Corporation teamed to develop, produce, and demonstrate the world's first and only fuel cell-powered ice resurfacer. The goals of this project were: {sm_bullet} To educate the public on the readiness, practicality, and safety of fuel cells powered by hydrogen fuel and {sm_bullet} To establish a commercialization pathway in an early-adopter, niche market. The vehicle was developed and produced in a short 3-month span. The vehicle made its world debut at U.S. Senator Byron Dorgan's (D-ND) 2005 Hydrogen Energy Action Summit. Subsequently, the vehicle toured North America appearing at numerous public events and conferences, receiving much attention from international media outlets.

Jay C. Almlie; Bruce Wood; Rich Schlupp

2007-03-01

146

Department of Nuclear Equipment '' High Technology Center - HITEC '' - Overview  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: The Department of Nuclear Equipment specializes in applications of accelerator technologies in medicine and industrial radiography. It combines research and development with manufacturing activities. The year 2009 was an important and busy period for the Department. We expect to observe already its full results in the coming year. In 2009, the Department concentrated on developing technologies, solutions and elements for use in the new generation of medical accelerators. Design, manufacturing and tests of a model of a new accelerating structure were conducted. The overall mechanical and electrical design of the accelerator was reworked and partially tested. Major efforts were devoted to creating an efficient software environment for the accelerators: new concepts for the control system were developed and tested, and a recording and verification system based on the DICOM standard was completed. A new imaging system was designed and manufactured and work on the associated imaging software was initiated. Design work on a multileaf collimator, begun in 2008, was continued. In effect, an operational model of the device was manufactured which allowed a practical verification of the design ideas. A lull scale prototype is scheduled for manufacture in 2010. The 2009 edition of the HITEC School on Medical Accelerators was directed to Medical Technicians. Very positive feedback from the participants proves the correctness of that decision. The year 2009 was also impothat decision. The year 2009 was also important for the manufacturing capabilities of the Department of Nuclear Equipment: a new Precision Machining Workshop was established and equipped with modern CNC milling machines. Also, the Vacuum Technologies Laboratory significantly extended the range of its machinery. In 2009 HITEC underwent deep organizational changes. The Quality Management System that governs all aspects of the Department's activities was also substantially redesigned. In December 2009, the new System was successfully audited and the validity of its ISO 9001 and ISO 13485 certificates was extended for another 3 years. (author)

147

A User Centered Approach to Developing Emergent Technology Products  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Current participatory design methods do not allow designers to gain the insight required to develop products with emerging technologies, that is, products that do not have any precedents in the users’ knowledge base and experience. This poses challenges to the designers, as input from users cannot be used too early in the design process, given that users respond best to issues they know or can relate to. This paper presents a case study where a user-centred approach was used to determine when and how to involve users in the design of a TV-enabled mobile telephone. The aim of the study was to identify the main form factor drivers for the design of such a phone. Five possible usage scenarios were identified and five form factors were derived from testing these scenarios, which were subsequently evaluated by potential users, through highly focused feedback sessions. The paper also discusses some methodological issues related to user involvement in the implementation of emerging technologies in the consumer electronics industry.

Restrepo-Giraldo, John Dairo; McAloone, Timothy Charles

2008-01-01

148

Department of Nuclear Equipment 'High Technology Center - HITEC' - Overview  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: The main activities of the Department for Nuclear Equipment High Technology Centre in 2008 were focused on the development of specialized systems using linear accelerators for medical applications, realized within the frame of the Innovative Economy Operational Program: · Calculations, simulations and design of accelerator structures and beam shaping devices · Design of a model of carrying structures · Building stands for carrying out critical component examinations and tests A new evolutionary algorithm has been implemented in a three-dimensional treatment planning system for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning optimization. A design for a multi leaf collimator, second model, was worked out. The Department received an Award for the Polkam TBI therapeutic table in the first edition of the '' Teraz-Polska '' national contest for the best Polish innovative product. Equipment manufactured by the High Technology Centre and especially for total body irradiation techniques was presented for the first time during the Biennial Meeting of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology in Goeteborg, Sweden. The second edition of the School of Medical Accelerator Physics organized in October 2008 was well received by medical physicists and physicians. (author)

149

Technology Center for Nuclear Control 2004 Annual Report  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This research describe the activities of TCNC in KAERI, given the authority from the Government. TCNC is carrying out technical assistance to the Government after reviewing the safeguards and physical protection at the nuclear facilities, while developing the divers technologies related to the export control and nuclear material accountancy. Relating to the safeguards implementation, activities for national safeguards inspection and supporting activities for IAEA safeguards inspection are described. For this, Results of national safeguards inspection and facility status are analyzed. Besides, implementation of the Additional Protocol and IAEA's complementary access supporting activities due to the effectuation of the Additional Protocol are introduced. With regards to the nuclear control planning, technical support for the government about the North Korea nuclear issues and export control, international cooperation are delineated. Holding a non-proliferation workshop, web-site operation of TCNC and Yaksan and work for the publication of TCNC newsletter are also described as a part of nuclear control planning related work. For the safeguards technology area, operation of remote monitoring system using VPN, works for tracing nuclear activities through swipe analysis and the development and improvement of verification equipment such as OFS are presented. Businesses related to the physical protection such as supporting for establishing a plan to implement the effectuated law such as approval examination of physical protection regulations and inspection on facilities and transport protection and development of design basis threat and emergency manual for physical protection etc. are mentioned

150

Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance Provisions for the Office of Aeronautics, Exploration and Technology Centers  

Science.gov (United States)

This Handbook establishes general safety, reliability, and quality assurance (SR&QA) guidelines for use on flight and ground-based projects conducted at the Ames, Langley, and Lewis Research Centers, hereafter identified as the Office of Aeronautics, Exploration and Technology (OAET) Centers. This document is applicable to all projects and operations conducted at these Centers except for those projects covered by more restrictive provisions such as the Space Shuttle, Space Station, and unmanned spacecraft programs. This Handbook is divided into two parts. The first (Chapters 1 and 2) establishes the SR&QA guidelines applicable to the OAET Centers, and the second (Appendices A, B, C, and D) provides examples and definitions for the total SR&QA program. Each center should implement SR&QA programs using these guidelines with tailoring appropriate to the special projects conducted by each Center. This Handbook is issued in loose-leaf form and will be revised by page changes.

1991-01-01

151

Spatial interpretation of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Payload Operations Control Center using virtual reality technology  

Science.gov (United States)

In its search for higher level computer interfaces and more realistic electronic simulations for measurement and spatial analysis in human factors design, NASA at MSFC is evaluating the functionality of virtual reality (VR) technology. Virtual reality simulation generates a three dimensional environment in which the participant appears to be enveloped. It is a type of interactive simulation in which humans are not only involved, but included. Virtual reality technology is still in the experimental phase, but it appears to be the next logical step after computer aided three-dimensional animation in transferring the viewer from a passive to an active role in experiencing and evaluating an environment. There is great potential for using this new technology when designing environments for more successful interaction, both with the environment and with another participant in a remote location. At the University of North Carolina, a VR simulation of a the planned Sitterson Hall, revealed a flaw in the building's design that had not been observed during examination of the more traditional building plan simulation methods on paper and on computer aided design (CAD) work station. The virtual environment enables multiple participants in remote locations to come together and interact with one another and with the environment. Each participant is capable of seeing herself and the other participants and of interacting with them within the simulated environment.

Lindsey, Patricia F.

1993-01-01

152

Development of a compact injector and injection technology to promote the WCI center project  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This is the R and D project to promote the activities and technology developments or World Class Institute (WCI) center, 'Center for Quantum beam based Radiation Research' Main goal is the R and D of compact circular accelerator by developing the injection technology using laser-accelerated electron beam. The subject of this project includes the technology development of compact high energy injector using laser-plasma acceleration, such as, high-vacuum plasma target and the improvement of stability and quality of laser accelerated electron beam, and the injection technology of them to a circular accelerator. As a matching R and D, this project is focused on any technologies related on laser acceleration to accomplish it as an injector

153

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... can, if an Aquatic Section member, retrieve previous Journal of aquatic Therapy articles that may help. Lastly, ... Jean Irion wrote a nice article in the "Journal of Aquatic Physical Therapy," Volume 10 Number 1, ...

154

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Rules, Regulations & Operations FAQs Reimbursement Issues FAQs General FAQs What is "aquatic physical therapy" Aquatic Physical Therapy ... in which one lives. Back to Top Education FAQs Is there a certification program for aquatic physical ...

155

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... should or should not have aquatic physical therapy? Indications/contraindications? This is an area with potentially deleterious ... understanding of hydrodynamic principles and various aquatic therapy techniques. Prior to embarking on providing aquatic therapy, one ...

156

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... in various aquatic therapy texts and is also covered directly in the Aquatic Section's "Developing an Aquatic ... one who is immersed in water for prolonged periods, seem to be susceptible to. At this time, ...

157

Department of Nuclear Equipment '' High Technology Center - HITEC '' - Overview  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: The Department of Nuclear Equipment, also known under the brand '' HITEC '' plays a unique role in the Institute. It combines research and development with manufacturing activities in the area of accelerator technology applications in medicine and industrial radiography. In 2010, the Department continued intense development efforts in the framework of Project No. POIG.01.01-14-012/08-00 (known under the short name of '' Accelerators and Detectors '') funded by EU Structural Funds. As described in detail elsewhere in this Report, these efforts resulted in substantial progress in the design and manufacture of the first model of a medical multi-energy accelerator for advanced radiotherapy. This model is an important testbed for a number of technologies and solutions that will be implemented in the final accelerator. Also, design and manufacture of the elements for an intra-surgery accelerator was carried out. It is worth noting that participation in the '' Accelerators and Detectors '' Project allowed HITEC to modernize significantly its manufacturing and testing capabilities. In 2010, the new equipment was successfully implemented for use in a manufacturing regime. The year 2010 also saw the completion of two R(and)D projects co-financed by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education: · Multileaf Collimator as a Precision Device for Irradiation Field Delimiting in Medical Accelerators; · 4? Recessed Ionization Chamber with Internal Power Supply. In Chamber with Internal Power Supply. In both cases, full scale prototypes of the respective devices were manufactured. In response to market interest HITEC started in 2010 a concept study of a compact low energy industrial radiography accelerator. Subsequently, HITEC received an order to develop and manufacture such a device and the development work was started. On completion the new device will extend the range of commercially available accelerators. In parallel to the above, HITEC continued to extend its engagement in scientific collaborations. A prominent example of this activity was the manufacture of a buncher cavity for the Linac 4 accelerator which will be installed at CERN. Successful delivery of the buncher triggered interest in further and more extensive collaboration: it is planned that starting from 2011 HITEC will manufacture the accelerating cavities for Linac 4. (author)

158

Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center for Enabling Technologies  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Over the past five years, our activities have both established Kepler as a viable scientific workflow environment and demonstrated its value across multiple science applications. We have published numerous peer-reviewed papers on the technologies highlighted in this short paper and have given Kepler tutorials at SC06,SC07,SC08,and SciDAC 2007. Our outreach activities have allowed scientists to learn best practices and better utilize Kepler to address their individual workflow problems. Our contributions to advancing the state-of-the-art in scientific workflows have focused on the following areas. Progress in each of these areas is described in subsequent sections. Workflow development. The development of a deeper understanding of scientific workflows "in the wild" and of the requirements for support tools that allow easy construction of complex scientific workflows; Generic workflow components and templates. The development of generic actors (i.e.workflow components and processes) which can be broadly applied to scientific problems; Provenance collection and analysis. The design of a flexible provenance collection and analysis infrastructure within the workflow environment; and Workflow reliability and fault tolerance. The improvement of the reliability and fault-tolerance of workflow environments.

Lud?scher, Bertram; Altintas, Ilkay

2013-09-06

159

The Scientific Data Management Center: Available Technologies and Highlights  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Managing scientific data has been identified by the scientific community as one of the most important emerging needs because of the sheer volume and increasing complexity of data being collected. Effectively generating, managing, and analyzing this information requires a comprehensive, end-to-end approach to data management that encompasses all of the stages from the initial data acquisition to the final analysis of the data. Based on community input, we have identified three significant requirements. First, more efficient access to storage systems is needed. In particular, parallel file system and I/O system improvements are needed to write and read large volumes of data without slowing a simulation. Second, scientists require technologies to facilitate better understanding of their data, in particular the ability to effectively perform complex data analysis and searches over extremely large data sets. Furthermore, exploratory analysis requires techniques for efficiently selecting subsets of the data. Third, generating the data, collecting and storing the results, keeping track of data provenance, data post-processing, and analysis of results is a tedious, fragmented process. Tools for automation of this process in a robust, tractable, and recoverable fashion are required to enhance scientific exploration.

Shoshani, Arie; Altintas, Ilkay; Chen, Jin; Chin, George; Choudhary, Alok; Crawl, Daniel; Critchlow, Terence J.; Gao, K.; Grimm, B.; Iyer, H.; Kamath, Chandrika; Khan, Ayla; Klasky, S.; Koehler, Sven; Lang, Rob; Latham, Robert J.; Li, J. W.; Liao, Wei-keng; Ligon, J.; Liu, Q.; Ludaescher, Bertram T.; Mouallem, Pierre; Nagappan, Mie; Podhorszki, Norbert; Ross, Rob; Rotem, Doron; Samatova, Nagiza F.; Silva, C.; Sim, A.; Tchoua, Roselynne; Thakur, R.; Vouk, M.; Wu, J.; Yu, Weikuan

2011-09-30

160

Research on the Application of Machine Vision Technology in the Logistics Center Monitoring Platform System  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Object monitoring is one of the key technologies of logistics information platform system. The study introduced an application method of machine vision technology in the logistics center monitoring system, improved covariance matrix algorithm to monitor objects in the logistics center. Against the technical difficulties of objects detection, the covariance matrix algorithm was applied to monitor objects in the logistics center and against the shortcomings of covariance matrix algorithm in the process of monitoring objects, the study proposed a method of path prediction and template dynamic adjustment. Experiments show that the method can effectively monitor objects in the logistics center, the improved method can not only adapt quickly to pose and scale variations of objects, but also track accurately and continuously those temporarily occluded objects, has good robustness. The method provides a new solution of monitoring objects in the logistics system.

Shushan Zhang

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
161

SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnology  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The SciDAC2 Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies (VACET) began operation on 10/1/2006. This document, dated11/27/2006, is the first version of the VACET project management plan. Itwas requested by and delivered to ASCR/DOE. It outlines the Center'saccomplishments in the first six weeks of operation along with broadobjectives for the upcoming future (12-24 months).

Bethel, E. Wes; Johnson, Chris; Joy, Ken; Ahern, Sean; Pascucci,Valerio; Childs, Hank; Cohen, Jonathan; Duchaineau, Mark; Hamann, Bernd; Hansen, Charles; Laney, Dan; Lindstrom, Peter; Meredith, Jeremy; Ostrouchov, George; Parker, Steven; Silva, Claudio; Sanderson, Allen; Tricoche, Xavier

2006-11-28

162

Technology Assessment: NREL Provides Know-How for Highly Energy-Efficient Data Centers (Fact Sheet)  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

NREL leads the effort to change how energy is used worldwide by helping identify and eliminate barriers to energy efficiency and clean energy technology deployment. The laboratory takes a portfolio approach that explores the full range of technology options for developing and implementing innovative energy performance solutions. The Research Support Facility (RSF) data center is a prime example of NREL's capabilities and expertise in energy efficiency. But, more important, its features can be replicated. NREL provides custom technical assistance and training for improved data center performance to help our customers realize cost savings.

2012-05-01

163

The roles and functions of a lunar base Nuclear Technology Center  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper describes the roles and functions of a special Nuclear Technology Center which is developed as an integral part of a permanent lunar base. Numerous contemporary studies clearly point out that nuclear energy technology will play a major role in any successful lunar/Mars initiative program and in the overall establishment of humanity's solar system civilization. The key role of nuclear energy in the providing power has been recognized. A Nuclear Technology Center developed as part of of a permanent lunar base can also help bring about many other nuclear technology applications, such as producing radioisotopes for self-illumination, food preservation, waste sterilization, and medical treatment; providing thermal energy for mining, materials processing and agricultural; and as a source of emergency habitat power. Designing such a center will involve the deployment, operation, servicing and waste product management and disposal of megawatt class reactor power plants. This challenge must be met with a minimum of direct human support at the facility. Furthermore, to support the timely, efficient integration of this Nuclear Technology Center in the evolving lunar base infrastructure, an analog of such a facility will be needed here on Earth. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

164

SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies (VACET) focuses on leveraging scientific visualization andanalytics software technology as an enabling technology for increasingscientific productivity and insight. Advances in computational technologyhave resulted in an 'information big bang,' which in turn has created asignificant data understanding challenge. This challenge is widelyacknowledged to be one of the primary bottlenecks in contemporaryscience. The vision of VACET is to adapt, extend, create when necessary,and deploy visual data analysis solutions that are responsive to theneeds of DOE'scomputational and experimental scientists. Our center isengineered to be directly responsive to those needs and to deliversolutions for use in DOE's large open computing facilities. The researchand development directly target data understanding problems provided byour scientific application stakeholders. VACET draws from a diverse setof visualization technology ranging from production quality applicationsand application frameworks to state-of-the-art algorithms forvisualization, analysis, analytics, data manipulation, and datamanagement.

Bethel, E. Wes; Johnson, Chris; Joy, Ken; Ahern, Sean; Pascucci,Valerio; Childs, Hank; Cohen, Jonathan; Duchaineau, Mark; Hamann, Bernd; Hansen, Charles; Laney, Dan; Lindstrom, Peter; Meredith, Jermey; Ostrouchov, George; Parker, Steven; Silva, Claudio; Sanderson, Allen; Tricoche, Xavier.

2007-06-30

165

Radioactivity in the Canadian aquatic environment  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Sources of radionuclides arising from natural anthropogenic processes as well as technologically enhanced natural radiation are discussed. Transport, distribution and behaviour of these radionuclides in aquatic systems are influenced by physical, chemical, biological and geological processes and conditions in freshwater and marine environments. Dosimetry of aquatic organisms, as well as various methods of measuring dose rate are presented. Effects of ionizing radiation (acute and chronic exposure) on aquatic organisms, populations and ecosystems are reviewed. This review covers the entire spectrum of the aquatic environment. Results of many studies are summarized. 300+ refs

166

An Information Management and Technology Laboratory in an Academic Health Center Library  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The aims and goals in setting up an Information Management and Technology Laboratory in the Lyman Maynard Stowe Library at the University of Connecticut Health Center are outlined. Health professionals have a chance in the Laboratory to try software and machines and acquaint themselves with some of the new technology. The Laboratory can save individual departments time, the necessity for extensive research and money and will be used to give students and staff experience in information managem...

Peterson, Margaret G. E.; Brantz, Malcolm H.

1984-01-01

167

Final Report for "Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software"  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The goal of the Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software is to fundamentally changing the way scientific software is developed and used by bringing component-based software development technologies to high-performance scientific and engineering computing. The role of Tech-X work in TASCS project is to provide an outreach to accelerator physics and fusion applications by introducing TASCS tools into applications, testing tools in the applications and modifying the tools to be more usable.

Svetlana Shasharina

2010-12-01

168

Technical Data Management Center: a focal point for meteorological and other environmental transport computing technology  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Technical Data Management Center, collecting, packaging, analyzing, and distributing information, computer technology and data which includes meteorological and other environmental transport work is located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, within the Engineering Physics Division. Major activities include maintaining a collection of computing technology and associated literature citations to provide capabilities for meteorological and environmental work. Details of the activities on behalf of TDMC's sponsoring agency, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, are described

169

Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology: A Summary Report of Activities Completed at the National Center for Hydrogen Technology - Year 6  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology? (NCHT?) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research on hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT?s inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding for hydrogen-related projects ($24 million for projects in the NCHT, which includes federal and corporate partner development funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT Program?s nine activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan that refers to realistic testing of technologies at adequate scale, process intensification, and contaminant control. A number of projects have been completed that range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in Year 6 of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

Holmes, Michael

2012-05-31

170

The development and technology transfer of software engineering technology at NASA. Johnson Space Center  

Science.gov (United States)

The United State's big space projects of the next decades, such as Space Station and the Human Exploration Initiative, will need the development of many millions of lines of mission critical software. NASA-Johnson (JSC) is identifying and developing some of the Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) technology that NASA will need to build these future software systems. The goal is to improve the quality and the productivity of large software development projects. New trends are outlined in CASE technology and how the Software Technology Branch (STB) at JSC is endeavoring to provide some of these CASE solutions for NASA is described. Key software technology components include knowledge-based systems, software reusability, user interface technology, reengineering environments, management systems for the software development process, software cost models, repository technology, and open, integrated CASE environment frameworks. The paper presents the status and long-term expectations for CASE products. The STB's Reengineering Application Project (REAP), Advanced Software Development Workstation (ASDW) project, and software development cost model (COSTMODL) project are then discussed. Some of the general difficulties of technology transfer are introduced, and a process developed by STB for CASE technology insertion is described.

Pitman, C. L.; Erb, D. M.; Izygon, M. E.; Fridge, E. M., III; Roush, G. B.; Braley, D. M.; Savely, R. T.

1992-01-01

171

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Argyle, Mark Don; Lauerhass, Lance; Bendixsen, Carl Lee; Hinckley, Steve Harold

2000-11-01

172

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-98 Status Report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Rogers, A.Z.; Simmons, R.F.; Palethrope, S.J.

1999-03-01

173

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Kirkham, R.J.; Pao, J.; Argyle, M.D.; Lauerhass, L.; Bendixsen, C.L.; Hinckley, S.H.

2000-10-31

174

Selected Topics in Overset Technology Development and Applications At NASA Ames Research Center  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper presents a general overview of overset technology development and applications at NASA Ames Research Center. The topics include: 1) Overview of overset activities at NASA Ames; 2) Recent developments in Chimera Grid Tools; 3) A general framework for multiple component dynamics; 4) A general script module for automating liquid rocket sub-systems simulations; and 5) Critical future work.

Chan, William M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

175

Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC) YouTube Channel  

Science.gov (United States)

The Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC), located at Eastern Iowa Community College, has created a number of videos on various environmental and energy fields and educational programs. Topics range from biodiesel to wind turbines, and the collection presents a mix of videos on instructional issues as well as about ATEEC itself.

2012-05-17

176

The Research Results of Radioactive Waste Management Technology Center Year 1997/1998  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The research results of Radioactive Waste Management Technology Center, National Atomic Energy Agency of Indonesia year 1997/1998 contain paper as form of research results on radioactive waste management related fields. There were included many aspects such as radioactive waste processing, storage, decontamination, decommissioning, safety and environmental aspects. There are 26 papers indexed individually (ID)

177

The Research Results of Radioactive Waste Management Technology Center Year 1996/1997  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The research results of Radioactive Waste Management Technology Center, National Atomic Energy Agency of Indonesia year 1996/1997 contain paper as form of research results on radioactive waste management related fields. There were included many aspects such as radioactive waste processing, storage, decontamination, decommissioning, safety and environmental aspects. There are 24 papers and 12 short communications indexed individually(ID)

178

Space Science Research and Technology at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center  

Science.gov (United States)

This presentation will summarize the various projects and programs managed in the Space Science Programs and Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Projects in the portfolio include NASA's Chandra X-Ray telescope, Hinode solar physics satellite, various advanced space propulsion technologies, including solar sails and tethers, as well as NASA's Discovery and New Frontiers Programs.

Johnson, Charles L.

2007-01-01

179

Radiation technology facilities operating at the italian ENEA-Casaccia research center  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The ENEA Casaccia Research Center, 20 km far from Rome, is the main Italian technological research Center, with more than 2000 scientists involved in several advanced research fields (materials, energy, environment, etc.). Within the frame of radiation technology, three main facilities are in service at full power at the Casaccia research Center: a 1 MW TRIGA Mark II reactor (RC-1); a 5 kW fast source reactor (TAPIRO); a 3.7 x 1015 Bq Cobalt-60 irradiation plant (CALLIOPE). Main R-D programmes carried out regard medical radioisotopes and radio trackers production, neutron radiography, neutron activation analysis, radiation damage analysis, neutron diffractometry, foodstuffs treatment, crosslinking processes, wastes (hazardous, chemical, hospital) processing. The paper provides a features description of utilized facilities and reports main present carried out projects

180

Research on the establishment of design requirements (TOR) for Center for Nuclear Science and Technology  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The report presents four chapters related to the following topics: General explanation and description of the Center of Nuclear Science and Technology; The role of new research reactor; Economic efficiency evaluation directly of applications on research reactor and Requirements for selection of new research reactor. The functions and missions of the Center with the main laboratories and main equipments have been identified. The main equipment of the Center is research reactor with power from 10 to 20 MW. In order to satisfy long term application requirements, the design characteristics and the safety features of the new research reactor have been considered in detail. The basic content of the Terms of Reference (TOR) of the Center was prepared and submitted to counterpart for consideration. (author)

 
 
 
 
181

DEVELOPMENT OF A NATIONAL CENTER FOR HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY: A SUMMARY REPORT OF ACTIVITIES COMPLETED AT THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY FROM 2005 TO 2010  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energyâ??s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research of hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHTâ??s inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding of hydrogen-related projects ($20 million for the NCHT project which includes federal and corporate development partner funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT projectâ??s 19 activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan. A number of projects have been completed which range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified to transportation-grade quality in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in the first 5 years of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

Michael Holmes

2011-05-31

182

Research and technology: 1986 annual report of the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center  

Science.gov (United States)

Johnson Space Center accomplishments in new and advanced concepts during 1986 are highlighted. Included are research funded by the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology; Solar System Exploration and Life Sciences research funded by the Office of Space Sciences and Applications; and Advanced Programs tasks funded by the Office of Space Flight. Summary sections describing the role of the Johnson Space Center in each program are followed by one-page descriptions of significant projects. Descriptions are suitable for external consumption, free of technical jargon, and illustrated to increase ease of comprehension.

1986-01-01

183

Research and technology: 1985 annual report of the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center  

Science.gov (United States)

Johnson Space Center accomplishments in new and advanced concepts during 1985 are highlighted. Included are research funded by the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology; Solar System Exploration and Life Sciences research funded by the Office of Space Sciences and Applications; and Advanced Programs tasks funded by the Office of Space Flight. Summary sections describing the role of the Johnson Space Center in each program are followed by one-page descriptions of significant projects. Descriptions are suitable for external consumption, free of technical jargon, and illustrated to increase ease of comprehension.

1985-01-01

184

University of California-Davis Postharvest Technology Research and Information Center:  

Science.gov (United States)

The Postharvest Technology Research and Information Center is housed in the Pomology Department at the University of California-Davis. Postharvest Center research focuses on improving the quality of horticultural crops, reducing post-harvest losses, improving marketing efficiency, and solving produce handling problems. This Publications website contains a wealth of downloadable articles organized by a wide range of crops and related issues. The numerous publication categories include: Apples, Nectarines, Lettuce, Postharvest IPM, Health Benefits, Storage, and many more. Visitors can locate articles by browsing the site index or by using a keyword search engine.

185

Waste Processing Research and Technology Development at NASA Ames Research Center  

Science.gov (United States)

The current "store and return" approach for handling waste products generated during low Earth orbit missions will not meet the requirements for future human missions identified in NASA s new Exploration vision. The objective is to develop appropriate reliable waste management systems that minimize maintenance and crew time, while maintaining crew health and safety, as well as providing protection of planetary surfaces. Solid waste management requirements for these missions include waste volume reduction, stabilization and storage, water recovery, and ultimately recovery of carbon dioxide, nutrients and other resources from a fully regenerative food production life support system. This paper identifies the key drivers for waste management technology development within NASA, and provides a roadmap for the developmental sequence and progression of technologies. Recent results of research and technology development activities at NASA Ames Research Center on candidate waste management technologies with emphasis on compaction, lyophilization, and incineration are discussed.

Fisher, John; Kliss, Mark

2004-01-01

186

A project to transfer technology from NASA centers in support of industrial innovation in the midwest  

Science.gov (United States)

A technology transfer program utilizing graduate students in mechanical engineering at the University of Kansas was initiated in early 1981. The objective of the program was to encourage industrial innovation in the Midwest through improved industry/university cooperation and the utilization of NASA technology. A related and important aspect of the program was the improvement of graduate engineering education through the involvement of students in the identification and accomplishment of technological objectives in cooperation with scientists at NASA centers and engineers in industry. The pilot NASA/University Industrial Innovation Program was an outstanding success based on its ability to: attract top graduate students; secure industry support; and stimulate industry/university cooperation leading to enhanced university capability and utilization of advanced technology by industry.

Barr, B. G.

1986-01-01

187

The Use of DOE Technologies at The World Trade Center Incident: Lessons Learned  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In response to the attack of the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001, the International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE) National Hazmat Program (OENHP) assembled and deployed a HAZMAT Emergency Management Team (Team) to the disaster site (Site). The response team consisted of a Certified Industrial Hygienist and a rotating team of industrial hygienists, safety professionals, and certified HAZMAT instructors. Through research funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the IUOE conducted human factors assessments on baseline and innovative technologies during real-world conditions and served as an advocate at the WTC disaster site to identify opportunities for the use and evaluation of DOE technologies. From this work, it is clear that opportunities exist for more DOE technologies to be made readily available for use in future emergencies.

McCabe, B.; Kovach, J.; Carpenter, C.; Blair, D.

2003-02-25

188

Available decontamination and decommissioning capabilities at the Savannah River Technology Center  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Safety Analysis and Engineering Services Group has performed a survey of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) technical capabilities, skills, and experience in Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) activities. The goal of this survey is to enhance the integration of the SRTC capabilities with the technical needs of the Environmental Restoration Department D ampersand D program and the DOE Office of Technology Development through the Integrated Demonstration Program. This survey has identified technical capabilities, skills, and experience in the following D ampersand D areas: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Material Disposal, Remote Systems, and support on Safety Technology for D ampersand D. This review demonstrates the depth and wealth of technical capability resident in the SRTC in relation to these activities, and the unique qualifications of the SRTC to supply technical support in the area of DOE facility D ampersand D. Additional details on specific technologies and applications to D ampersand D will be made available on request

189

Johnson Space Center Research and Technology Annual Report 1998-1999  

Science.gov (United States)

As the principle center for NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) leads NASA development of human spacecraft, human support systems, and human spacecraft operations. An important element in implementing this mission, JSC has focused on developing the infrastructure and partnerships that enable the technology development for future NASA programs. In our efforts to develop key technologies, we have found that collaborative relationships with private industry and academia strengthen our capabilities, infuse innovative ideas, and provide alternative applications for our development projects. The American public has entrusted NASA with the responsibility for space technology development, and JSC is committed to the transfer of the technologies that we develop to the private sector for further development and application. It is our belief that commercialization of NASA technologies benefits both American industry and NASA through technology innovation and continued partnering. To this end, we present the 1998-1999 JSC Research and Technology Report. As your guide to the current JSC technologies, this report showcases the projects in work at JSC that may be of interest to U.S. industry, academia, and other government agencies (federal, state, and local). For each project, potential alternative uses and commercial applications are described. To aid in your search, projects are arranged according to the Major Product Groups used by CorpTech to classify and index types of industry. Some projects fall into multiple categories and are placed under the predominant category, for example, an artificial intelligence project is listed under the Computer Software category, while its function is to automate a process (Automation category).

Abbey, George W. S.

2004-01-01

190

The International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) and ISTC projects related to nuclear safety. Information review  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The ISTC is an intergovernmental organization created ten years ago by Russia, USA, EU and Japan in Moscow. The Center supports numerous science and technology projects in different areas, from biotechnologies and environmental problems to all aspects of nuclear studies, including those focused on the development of effective innovative concepts and technologies in the nuclear field, in general, and for improvement of nuclear safety, in particular. The presentation addresses some technical results of the ISTC projects as well as methods and approaches employed by the ISTC to foster close international collaboration and manage projects towards fruitful results. (author)

191

Institutional overviews. Overview of the JAEA and the Nuclear Nonproliferation Science and Technology Center  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Nuclear Nonproliferation Science and Technology Center (NPSTC) was formed within the new Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) to carry out safeguards and material control duties for the JAEA. Development of technologies and procedures for safeguards is an important duty. In addition, the new NPSTC will assume a 'think tank' role in support of the nonproliferation regime, help train nonproliferation experts, and cooperate with academic, government and non-governmental organizations on nonproliferation issues. This report briefly summarizes the formation of the JAEA and describes the duties and structure of the NPSTC in detail. (author)

192

Calcine Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report documents an inventory of calcined waste produced at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center during the period from December 1963 to May 2000. The report was prepared based on calciner runs, operation of the calcined solids storage facilities, and miscellaneous operational information that establishes the range of chemical compositions of calcined waste stored at Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The report will be used to support obtaining permits for the calcined solids storage facilities, possible treatment of the calcined waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and to ship the waste to an off-site facility including a geologic repository. The information in this report was compiled from calciner operating data, waste solution analyses and volumes calcined, calciner operating schedules, calcine temperature monitoring records, and facility design of the calcined solids storage facilities. A compact disk copy of this report is provided to facilitate future data manipulations and analysis.

Staiger, Merle Daniel; M. C. Swenson

2005-01-01

193

Access to information: assessment of the use of automated interaction technologies in call centers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available With the purpose of at lowering costs and reendering the demanded information available to users with no access to the internet, service companies have adopted automated interaction technologies in their call centers, which may or may not meet the expectations of users. Based on different areas of knowledge (man-machine interaction, consumer behavior and use of IT 13 propositions are raised and a research is carried out in three parts: focus group, field study with users and interviews with experts. Eleven automated service characteristics which support the explanation for user satisfaction are listed, a preferences model is proposed and evidence in favor or against each of the 13 propositions is brought in. With balance scorecard concepts, a managerial assessment model is proposed for the use of automated call center technology. In future works, the propositions may become verifiable hypotheses through conclusive empirical research.

Fernando de Souza Meirelles

2011-01-01

194

Tiger Team Assessment of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, [August 19--September 13, 1991  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report documents the results of the Department of Energy (DOE) Tiger Team Assessment conducted at Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, between August 19 and September 13, 1991. A team comprised of professionals from the Department, its contractors, and consultants conducted the assessment. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy the status of environment, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) programs at PETC. A management assessment was performed

195

Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This is a final technical report for the University of Maryland work in the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). The Maryland work focused on software tools for coupling parallel software components built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) APIs. Those tools are based on the Maryland InterComm software framework that has been used in multiple computational science applications to build large-scale simulations of complex physical systems that employ multiple separately developed codes.

Sussman, Alan [University of Maryland

2014-10-21

196

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... vary depending on what part of the country/world in which one lives. Back to Top Education ... Aquatic Therapy and Rehab Institute (ATRI) published a document called Safety Standards for Aquatic Therapy and Rehabilitation ...

197

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... to specialize in Aquatic PT? Water safety, risk management, and an understanding of hydrodynamic principles and various ... Aquatic Physical Therapy Program", you can get the management package that INCLUDES STATE-SPECIFIC information and how ...

198

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... protective, or supportive devices and equipment. The unique properties of the aquatic environment enhance interventions for patients/ ... modalities, physical agents and mechanical modalities using the properties of water and techniques unique to the aquatic ...

199

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Here What is the history of the Aquatic PT Section? Focus of research and study in the ... education requirements are needed to specialize in Aquatic PT? Water safety, risk management, and an understanding of ...

200

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... rehabilitation, prevention, health, wellness and fitness of patient/client populations in an aquatic environment with or without ... of the aquatic environment enhance interventions for patients/clients across the age span with musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, cardiovascular/ ...

 
 
 
 
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About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... in a safe aquatic environment taking into consideration transition to land based functional activities and communication with ... to specialize in Aquatic PT? Water safety, risk management, and an understanding of hydrodynamic principles and various ...

202

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... on the topic - Click Here What is the history of the Aquatic PT Section? Focus of research ... Are aquatic PTs required to be certified in life saving? No; however, the Section recommends some type ...

203

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... PTAs should take continuing education courses to gain knowledge in the area of aquatic physical therapy; ... therapy practice? The "Developing an Aquatic Physical Therapy Program" and ...

204

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... history of the Aquatic PT Section? Focus of research and study in the Section? Jean Irion wrote a nice article in the "Journal of Aquatic Physical Therapy," Volume 10 Number 1, ...

205

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... limited to treatment, rehabilitation, prevention, health, wellness and fitness of patient/client populations in an aquatic environment ... limited to treatment, rehabilitation, prevention, health, wellness and fitness of patient/client populations in an aquatic environment. ...

206

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Aquatic Physical Therapy Aquatic Physical Therapy is the evidence-based and skilled practice of physical therapy in ... one's person medical history, the has been documented evidence regarding both respiratory and dermatological conditions that one ...

207

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... the exact risks inherent at a specific pool location. Initial information can be derived from the National ... this can also be found in the following locations: APTA's Aquatic Section's " Developing an Aquatic Physical Therapy ...

208

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... prevention, health, wellness and fitness of patient/client populations in an aquatic environment with or without the ... prevention, health, wellness and fitness of patient/client populations in an aquatic environment. The unique properties of ...

209

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... is that aquatic physical therapy requires the "skilled service" of a PT and/or PTA which may ... standards of care which impact all other treatment services. Aquatic Exercise is the utilization of water for ...

210

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... be available in the Spring of 2014. What education requirements are needed to specialize in Aquatic PT? ... therapy, one is strongly encouraged to take continuing education classes, and if possible, to actually observe aquatic ...

211

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... topic cannot be found. What do I do if I am denied coverage for aquatic therapy? First ... website under reimbursement to assist with the process. If this particular third party payor globally denies aquatic ...

212

Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs are supported by the technology resources of the Engineering Physics Information Centers  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Engineering Physics Information Centers (EPIC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have two activities which support NRC Programs, the Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) and the Technical Data Management Center (TDMC). The older of the two, RSIC, was established in 1963 as an Information Analysis Center in the general field of radiation shielding, transport, and protection. It has multiple agency funding to acquire, evaluate, organize, and distribute information (including computing technology and numerical data) relevant to its field. The TDMC was established in 1978 to perform work for NRC in fields not related to RSIC's subject coverage and to perform tasks beyond the normal level of activity for RSIC. The two centers share administrative functions, physical premises, specialists skills, and computing resources. The NRC/ADM/TIDC monitors the cosponsorship of RSIC for coverage of agency-wide interests and plans, directs, and coordinates the work of the TDMC, including the establishment of TDMC as the agency-wide repository for packaged computer-related technical information products. The contract monitor is Myrna L. Steele

213

KBTAC: EPRI's center to assist the nuclear industry to apply the knowledge-based technology  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The nuclear utility industry's complex engineering and procedure systems offer many opportunities for use of the knowledge-based technology such as expert systems and neural networks. The ability of expert systems to enhance human experts makes them an important tool in the areas of engineering, operations and maintenance. However, many current industry applications are research projects or turnkey systems supplied by vendors. These often do not impart to utility technical staff a clear understanding of the capabilities of knowledge-based systems (KBS). More importantly, simply using completed applications does not meet utilities' need to acquire the capabilities to build their own knowledge-based systems. Thus, EPRI is supporting its member utilities utilization of knowledge-based technology for power plant engineering, operations, and maintenance applications through the establishment of the Knowledge-Based Technology Application Center (KBTAC)

214

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... prevention, health, wellness and fitness of patient/client populations in an aquatic environment with or without the use of assistive, adaptive, ... prevention, health, wellness and fitness of patient/client populations in an aquatic environment. The unique properties of the aquatic environment enhance ...

215

Technology in an outpatient chemotherapy center and advanced practice nursing: observational study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background. Advanced practice nursing (APN requires nurses to support their knowledge and clinical experience in a nursing care model that delivers holistic and comprehensive care adjusted to the needs of each patient. Objetives. To identify the technological tools available to nurses in a chemotherapy unit, to select one of the specific technologies used and to generate a proposal that can be used in advanced practice. Methods. Data was collected using non-participant observation in an adult outpatient chemotherapy unit. Results. It was observed that nurses properly used hard technologies in their unit. In so far as hard-soft technologies, although there is a specialized knowledge in oncology, there is no theoretical framework associated to the nursing care provided. With regards to the use of soft technologies, their use seems to be related more with personal characteristics that a structured and conscious intervention. Conclusions. Technologies are tools that, coupled with nursing expertise, allow nurses to provide safe and effective care. The chemotherapy unit is a center where APN could be conducted. This study proposes enhancing patient-oriented care based on the knowledge of the discipline as expressed in three different models that are suggested, thus making it possible to state that advanced practice nursing is being provided to patients undergoing ambulatory chemotherapy.

María Carolina Robledo Osses

2012-12-01

216

Technology Transfer Challenges: A Case Study of User-Centered Design in NASA's Systems Engineering Culture  

Science.gov (United States)

The Upper Stage (US) section of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Ares I rocket will require internal access platforms for maintenance tasks performed by humans inside the vehicle. Tasks will occur during expensive critical path operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) including vehicle stacking and launch preparation activities. Platforms must be translated through a small human access hatch, installed in an enclosed worksite environment, support the weight of ground operators and be removed before flight - and their design must minimize additional vehicle mass at attachment points. This paper describes the application of a user-centered conceptual design process and the unique challenges encountered within NASA's systems engineering culture focused on requirements and "heritage hardware". The NASA design team at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) initiated the user-centered design process by studying heritage internal access kits and proposing new design concepts during brainstorming sessions. Simultaneously, they partnered with the Technology Transfer/Innovative Partnerships Program to research inflatable structures and dynamic scaffolding solutions that could enable ground operator access. While this creative, technology-oriented exploration was encouraged by upper management, some design stakeholders consistently opposed ideas utilizing novel, untested equipment. Subsequent collaboration with an engineering consulting firm improved the technical credibility of several options, however, there was continued resistance from team members focused on meeting system requirements with pre-certified hardware. After a six-month idea-generating phase, an intensive six-week effort produced viable design concepts that justified additional vehicle mass while optimizing the human factors of platform installation and use. Although these selected final concepts closely resemble heritage internal access platforms, challenges from the application of the user-centered process provided valuable lessons for improving future collaborative conceptual design efforts.

Quick, Jason

2009-01-01

217

The World Wide Web and Technology Transfer at NASA Langley Research Center  

Science.gov (United States)

NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) began using the World Wide Web (WWW) in the summer of 1993, becoming the first NASA installation to provide a Center-wide home page. This coincided with a reorganization of LaRC to provide a more concentrated focus on technology transfer to both aerospace and non-aerospace industry. Use of the WWW and NCSA Mosaic not only provides automated information dissemination, but also allows for the implementation, evolution and integration of many technology transfer applications. This paper describes several of these innovative applications, including the on-line presentation of the entire Technology Opportunities Showcase (TOPS), an industrial partnering showcase that exists on the Web long after the actual 3-day event ended. During its first year on the Web, LaRC also developed several WWW-based information repositories. The Langley Technical Report Server (LTRS), a technical paper delivery system with integrated searching and retrieval, has proved to be quite popular. The NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS), an outgrowth of LTRS, provides uniform access to many logically similar, yet physically distributed NASA report servers. WWW is also the foundation of the Langley Software Server (LSS), an experimental software distribution system which will distribute LaRC-developed software with the possible phase-out of NASA's COSMIC program. In addition to the more formal technology distribution projects, WWW has been successful in connecting people with technologies and people with other people. With the completion of the LaRC reorganization, the Technology Applications Group, charged with interfacing with non-aerospace companies, opened for business with a popular home page.

Nelson, Michael L.; Bianco, David J.

1994-01-01

218

United Technologies Research Center 8-kW prototype wind system. Final test report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The United Technologies Research Center 8 kW prototype wind system underwent testing at the Rocky Flats Small Wind Systems Test Center from April 1980 through August 1980. During atmospheric testing, the machine survived wind speeds of 30.8 m/s (69 mph) without incurring damage and proved it was capable of meeting the design specification for power production (8 kW at 9 m/s - 20 mph). Erratic cycling of the generator speed detector was the only operational problem encountered. Vibration tests indicated the first and second bending modes of the tower were excited during actual machine operation, but modifications were not required. Noise measurements revealed that sound pressure levels of the UTRC are within an acceptable range and should pose no barriers to machine use.

Higashi, K. K.

1981-09-01

219

The Use of Assessment Center Technology for the Prevention and Reduction of Professional Burnout  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Dynamism of professional activity, increasing workload and working time shortage, high social responsibility for results and other factors increase the probability of formation of burnout in government employees. This actualizes the search for new forms and methods of professional qualification of government employees based on an assessment of their psychological qualities. We discuss the problem of professional and personal burnout in Rosreestr employees, reveal the symptoms of this syndrome. As a tool for preventing and reducing the negative impact of professional deformation in Rosreestr workers, we propose the use of assessment center technology successfully tested in the international practice and requiring adaptation to Russian realities.

Stalnova I.A.,

2014-08-01

220

Design and Key Technology of Gardening Information Management System Based on Data Center  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available To provide scientific management basis for the garden planning, project construction, maintenance, social service, this paper prompted that the urban gardening administration sectors need to construct gardening information management system. On the basis of fully requirements analysis of gardening sectors, this paper discussed the key technology for system construction. It also proposed to flexibly and smartly build up the system by using the secondary development design environment and running environment based on data center integration development platform. This system greatly helps the daily management and plays very important role in improving urban ecological environment and investment environment.

Wen Zeng

2010-05-01

 
 
 
 
221

Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI?s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) test block with the Carbon Injection System. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future project work is identified.

None

1998-01-12

222

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Newly Generated Liquid Waste Demonstration Project Feasibility Study  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A research, development, and demonstration project for the grouting of newly generated liquid waste (NGLW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center is considered feasible. NGLW is expected from process equipment waste, decontamination waste, analytical laboratory waste, fuel storage basin waste water, and high-level liquid waste evaporator condensate. The potential grouted waste would be classed as mixed low-level waste, stabilized and immobilized to meet RCRA LDR disposal in a grouting process in the CPP-604 facility, and then transported to the state.

Herbst, A.K.

2000-02-01

223

The Integration of an Information Processing Center into a Modern Office/Word Processing Technology Course. Final Report.  

Science.gov (United States)

A report and related materials are provided from an activity to set up an operating information processing center that would do the work initiated by personnel in the district and to incorporate the center into the Modern Office/Word Processing Technology course. The report details objectives, population and sample, and conclusions and…

LeVan, Jan; Arndt, Maridene

224

Progresses on the Theoretical and Experimental Studies in Laser Technologies Research and Application Center In Kocaeli  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Laser Technologies Research and Application Center (LATARUM) was established in 2005 with interdisciplinary cooperation to obtain product based on projects, to train personnel with at highest academic level with knowledge to use latest technology. There are electro-optics, laser material processing and modelling and simulation groups working on projects. Theoretical modeling studies are performed for x-ray laser media. Ne-like nickel and iron and Ni-like tin and molybdenum x-ray laser media for different pumping laser configurations have been modeled using EHYBRID. Theoretical and experimental studies on spectrometer design for wavelength range between X-ray and IR are carried out by electro-optic group. Material processing studies using Nd-YAG laser are performed. Materials of titanium, aluminum and stainless steel have been welded in different laser pulse, power, and repetition rate conditions. Optimum parameters for these welding processes have been obtained

225

Space Solar Power Satellite Technology Development at the Glenn Research Center: An Overview  

Science.gov (United States)

NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). is participating in the Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology program (SERT) for the development of a solar power satellite concept. The aim of the program is to provide electrical power to Earth by converting the Sun's energy and beaming it to the surface. This paper will give an overall view of the technologies being pursued at GRC including thin film photovoltaics, solar dynamic power systems, space environmental effects, power management and distribution, and electric propulsion. The developmental path not only provides solutions to gigawatt sized space power systems for the future, but provides synergistic opportunities for contemporary space power architectures. More details of Space Solar Power can be found by reading the references sited in this paper and by connecting to the web site http://moonbase.msfc.nasa.gov/ and accessing the "Space Solar Power" section "Public Access" area.

Dudenhoefer, James E.; George, Patrick J.

2000-01-01

226

Progresses on the Theoretical and Experimental Studies in Laser Technologies Research and Application Center In Kocaeli  

Science.gov (United States)

Laser Technologies Research and Application Center (LATARUM) was established in 2005 with interdisciplinary cooperation to obtain product based on projects, to train personnel with at highest academic level with knowledge to use latest technology. There are electro-optics, laser material processing and modelling and simulation groups working on projects. Theoretical modeling studies are performed for x-ray laser media. Ne-like nickel and iron and Ni-like tin and molybdenum x-ray laser media for different pumping laser configurations have been modeled using EHYBRID. Theoretical and experimental studies on spectrometer design for wavelength range between X-ray and IR are carried out by electro-optic group. Material processing studies using Nd-YAG laser are performed. Materials of titanium, aluminum and stainless steel have been welded in different laser pulse, power, and repetition rate conditions. Optimum parameters for these welding processes have been obtained.

Akman, E.; Atalay, B.; Candan, L.; Canel, T.; Demir, A.; Demir, P.; Erturk, S.; Genc, B.; Kacar, E.; Kenar, N.; Koymen, E.; Mutlu, M.; Sinmazcelik, T.; Urhan, O.

2007-04-01

227

Advanced Technologies for Future Spacecraft Cockpits and Space-based Control Centers  

Science.gov (United States)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is embarking on a new era of Space Exploration, aimed at sending crewed spacecraft beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO), in medium and long duration missions to the Lunar surface, Mars and beyond. The challenges of such missions are significant and will require new technologies and paradigms in vehicle design and mission operations. Current roles and responsibilities of spacecraft systems, crew and the flight control team, for example, may not be sustainable when real-time support is not assured due to distance-induced communication lags, radio blackouts, equipment failures, or other unexpected factors. Therefore, technologies and applications that enable greater Systems and Mission Management capabilities on-board the space-based system will be necessary to reduce the dependency on real-time critical Earth-based support. The focus of this paper is in such technologies that will be required to bring advance Systems and Mission Management capabilities to space-based environments where the crew will be required to manage both the systems performance and mission execution without dependence on the ground. We refer to this concept as autonomy. Environments that require high levels of autonomy include the cockpits of future spacecraft such as the Mars Exploration Vehicle, and space-based control centers such as a Lunar Base Command and Control Center. Furthermore, this paper will evaluate the requirements, available technology, and roadmap to enable full operational implementation of onboard System Health Management, Mission Planning/re-planning, Autonomous Task/Command Execution, and Human Computer Interface applications. The technology topics covered by the paper include enabling technology to perform Intelligent Caution and Warning, where the systems provides directly actionable data for human understanding and response to failures, task automation applications that automate nominal and Off-nominal task execution based on human input or integrated health state-derived conditions. Shifting from Systems to Mission Management functions, we discuss the role of automated planning applications (tactical planning) on-board, which receive data from the other cockpit automation systems and evaluate the mission plan against the dynamic systems and mission states and events, to provide the crew with capabilities that enable them to understand, change, and manage the timeline of their mission. Lastly, we discuss the role of advanced human interface technologies that organize and provide the system md mission information to the crew in ways that maximize their situational awareness and ability to provide oversight and control of aLl the automated data and functions.

Garcia-Galan, Carlos; Uckun, Serdar; Gregory, William; Williams, Kerry

2006-01-01

228

The National Space Science and Technology Center's Education and Public Outreach Program  

Science.gov (United States)

The objective of the National Space Science and Technology Center's (NSSTC) Education and Public Outreach program (EPO) is to support K-20 education by coalescing academic, government, and business constituents awareness, implementing best business/education practices, and providing stewardship over funds and programs that promote a symbiotic relationship among these entities, specifically in the area of K-20 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education. NSSTC EPO Program's long-term objective is to showcase its effective community-based integrated stakeholder model in support of STEM education and to expand its influence across the Southeast region for scaling ultimately across the United States. The Education and Public Outreach program (EPO) is coordinated by a supporting arm of the NSSTC Administrative Council called the EPO Council (EPOC). The EPOC is funded through federal, state, and private grants, donations, and in-kind contributions. It is comprised of representatives of NSSTC Research Centers, both educators and scientists from the Alabama Space Science and Technology Alliance (SSTA) member institutions, the Alabama Space Grant Consortium and the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Education Office. Through its affiliation with MSFC and the SSTA - a consortium of Alabama's research universities that comprise the NSSTC, EPO fosters the education and development of the next generation of Alabama scientists and engineers by coordinating activities at the K-20 level in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Education, the Alabama Commission on Higher Education, and Alabama's businesses and industries. The EPO program's primary objective is to be Alabama's premiere organization in uniting academia, government, and private industry by way of providing its support to the State and Federal Departments of Education involved in systemic STEM education reform, workforce development, and innovative uses of technology. The NSSTC EPO is poised to be a leader in this field because of its direct support to agency's accountable for America's educational systems, and for its synergistic relationships across the integrated stakeholder community. This includes Alabama's NASA facility, USRA, the SSTA's seven research universities, businesses and industries, and the Alabama Math, Science and Technology Education Coalition. In addition to traditional outreach methodologies, the EPO uses the unique resources of the NSSTC to assist in dissolving the boundaries in education among academia, government, and industry and to foster a more collaborative environment in support of STEM education reform.

Cox, G. N.; Denson, R. L.

2004-12-01

229

Research Center for Optical Physics: Education and Technology for the 21st Century  

Science.gov (United States)

During the past eleven years since its inception, RCOP has excelled in its two primary goals: 1) training of the scientists and engineers needed for the twenty-first century with special emphasis on underrepresented citizens and 2) research and technological development in areas of relevance to NASA. In the category of research training, as of May 2003, RCOP produced 36 Bachelors degrees, 25 Masters degrees, and 13 Doctoral degrees. Of these, all 36 Bachelors degrees, 16 of the Masters degrees and 9 of the Doctoral degrees were awarded to African Americans. Four of the Doctoral graduates and one of the Masters graduates are working at NASA Field Centers. RCOP has also provided research experiences to 130 undergraduate students and 22 high school students through a number of outreach programs held during the summer and the academic year. RCOP has also been crucial to the development of the Ph.D. program in physics at Hampton University by providing high quality research training and technical electives required for a Doctoral degree in physics. RCOP has also excelled in research and technological development. Since 1992, RCOP researchers have leveraged over 8 million dollars in additional research funding, published 152 papers in refereed journals and proceedings, and given 125 presentations at refereed international conferences in the United States and eight other countries. RCOP also developed numerous collaborations with other research centers, universities and industries. In recognition of this outstanding work, RCOP is the first research center in the United States invited to join the Joint Open Laboratory for Laser Crystals and Precise Laser Systems headed by Dr. Alexander Kaminiskii of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

2003-01-01

230

A Measurement Management Technology for Improving Energy Efficiency in Data Centers and Telecommunication Facilities  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Data center (DC) electricity use is increasing at an annual rate of over 20% and presents a concern for the Information Technology (IT) industry, governments, and the society. A large fraction of the energy use is consumed by the compressor cooling to maintain the recommended operating conditions for IT equipment. The most common way to improve the DC efficiency is achieved by optimally provisioning the cooling power to match the global heat dissipation in the DC. However, at a more granular level, the large range of heat densities of today's IT equipment makes the task of provisioning cooling power optimized to the level of individual computer room air conditioning (CRAC) units much more challenging. Distributed sensing within a DC enables the development of new strategies to improve energy efficiency, such as hot spot elimination through targeted cooling, matching power consumption at rack level with workload schedule, and minimizing power losses. The scope of Measurement and Management Technologies (MMT) is to develop a software tool and the underlying sensing technology to provide critical decision support and control for DC and telecommunication facilities (TF) operations. A key aspect of MMT technology is integration of modeling tools to understand how changes in one operational parameter affect the overall DC response. It is demonstrated that reduced ordered models for DC can generate, in less than 2 seconds computational time, a three dimensional thermal model in a 50 kft{sup 2} DC. This rapid modeling enables real time visualization of the DC conditions and enables 'what if' scenarios simulations to characterize response to 'disturbances'. One such example is thermal zone modeling that matches the cooling power to the heat generated at a local level by identifying DC zones cooled by a specific CRAC. Turning off a CRAC unit can be simulated to understand how the other CRAC utilization changes and how server temperature responds. Several new sensing technologies were added to the existing MMT platform: (1) air contamination (corrosion) sensors, (2) power monitoring, and (3) a wireless environmental sensing network. All three technologies are built on cost effective sensing solutions that increase the density of sensing points and enable high resolution mapping of DCs. The wireless sensing solution enables Air Conditioning Unit (ACU) control while the corrosion sensor enables air side economization and can quantify the risk of IT equipment failure due to air contamination. Validation data for six test sites demonstrate that leveraging MMT energy efficiency solutions combined with industry best practices results in an average of 20% reduction in cooling energy, without major infrastructure upgrades. As an illustration of the unique MMT capabilities, a data center infrastructure efficiency (DCIE) of 87% (industry best operation) was achieved. The technology is commercialized through IBM System and Technology Lab Services that offers MMT as a solution to improve DC energy efficiency. Estimation indicates that deploying MMT in existing DCs can results in an 8 billion kWh savings and projection indicates that constant adoption of MMT can results in obtainable savings of 44 billion kWh in 2035. Negotiations are under way with business partners to commercialize/license the ACU control technology and the new sensor solutions (corrosion and power sensing) to enable third party vendors and developers to leverage the energy efficiency solutions.

Hendrik Hamann, Levente Klein

2012-06-28

231

Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Beginning the fall semester of 1999, The University of Maryland, Departments of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering and the Institute for Systems Research served as a U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies. A key goal was to produce a graduate level education program that educated and prepared students to address the technical challenges of designing and developing hybrid electric vehicles, as they progressed into the workforce. A second goal was to produce research that fostered the advancement of hybrid electric vehicles, their controls, and other related automotive technologies. Participation ended at the University of Maryland after the 2004 fall semester. Four graduate courses were developed and taught during the course of this time, two of which evolved into annually-taught undergraduate courses, namely Vehicle Dynamics and Control Systems Laboratory. Five faculty members from Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and the Institute for Systems Research participated. Four Ph.D. degrees (two directly supported and two indirectly supported) and seven Master's degrees in Mechanical Engineering resulted from the research conducted. Research topics included thermoelectric waste heat recovery, fuel cell modeling, pre- and post-transmission hybrid powertrain control and integration, hybrid transmission design, H{sub 2}-doped combustion, and vehicle dynamics. Many of the participating students accepted positions in the automotive industry or government laboratories involved in automotive technology work after graduation. This report discusses the participating faculty, the courses developed and taught, research conducted, the students directly and indirectly supported, and the publication list. Based on this collection of information, the University of Maryland firmly believes that the key goal of the program was met and that the majority of the participating students are now contributing to the advancement of automotive technology in this country.

David Holloway

2005-09-30

232

Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Consolidated Progress Report July 2006 - March 2009  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A resounding success of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedented computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative high-performance scientific computing.

Bernholdt, D E; McInnes, L C; Govindaraju, M; Bramley, R; Epperly, T; Kohl, J A; Nieplocha, J; Armstrong, R; Shasharina, S; Sussman, A L; Sottile, M; Damevski, K

2009-04-14

233

Calcine Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A potential option in the program for long-term management of high-level wastes at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, calls for retrieving calcine waste and converting it to a more stable and less dispersible form. An inventory of calcine produced during the period December 1963 to May 1999 has been prepared based on calciner run, solids storage facilities operating, and miscellaneous operational information, which gives the range of chemical compositions of calcine waste stored at INTEC. Information researched includes calciner startup data, waste solution analyses and volumes calcined, calciner operating schedules, solids storage bin capacities, calcine storage bin distributor systems, and solids storage bin design and temperature monitoring records. Unique information on calcine solids storage facilities design of potential interest to remote retrieval operators is given.

M. D. Staiger

1999-06-01

234

Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center monthly report to the Steering Committee, June 1994  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot FGD unit continued this month with High Velocity Scrubbing and the Tampa Electric Company (TECO) Tailored Collaboration test block. Additionally, Phase III of the Toxics Removal/Carbon Injection test block was conducted concurrently with FGD testing. At the beginning of the month, a second phase of third-party testing began for Suncor, Inc. The Suncor Gypsum Sample Collection test block (MSUN) began on June 5 on the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet FGD unit. Testing was completed on June 13. On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, testing continued this month as ammonia slip measurements were conducted under low catalyst inlet temperatures and at baseline conditions.

NONE

1994-11-02

235

A home-centered ICT architecture for health-enabling technologies.  

Science.gov (United States)

Population ageing needs health-enabling technologies for delivering pervasive health care. Home care plays an import role in pervasive health care. In this paper, we aim to construct a home-centered health information system architecture which can efficiently manage multi sensors, actuators and decision support systems. Open Services Gateway initiative (OSGI) was used for constructing the service oriented architecture. HL 7 Arden Syntax for medical logic module (MLM) was used to describe the medical knowledge; An Arden compiler was used to interpret the MLMs. The Arden compiler was packed in an OSGI bundle. All of the knowledge bases can share the compiler within the OSGI platform. System within the OSGI-based architecture can change their behaviors during runtime. The proposed prototype architecture was deployed in a case study. PMID:20841648

Song, Bianying; Marschollek, Michael; Wolf, Klaus-Hendrik; Gietzelt, Matthias; Franken, Thomas; Haux, Reinhold

2010-01-01

236

Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC)  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. METC is currently a research and development facility, managed by DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy. Its goal is to focus energy research and development to develop engineered fossil fuel systems, that are economically viable and environmentally sound, for commercial application. There is clear evidence that, since the 1991 Tiger Team Assessment, substantial progress has been made by both FE and METC in most aspects of their ES&H program. The array of new and restructured organizations, systems, and programs at FE and METC; increased assignments of staff to support these initiatives; extensive training activities; and the maturing planning processes, all reflect a discernable, continuous improvement in the quality of the ES&H performance.

1993-08-01

237

Current Development of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion technologies at the Center for Space Nuclear Research  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Nuclear power and propulsion has been considered for space applications since the 1950s. Between 1955 and 1972 the US built and tested over twenty nuclear reactors / rocket engines in the Rover/NERVA programs1. The Aerojet Corporation was the prime contractor for the NERVA program. Modern changes in environmental laws present challenges for the redevelopment of the nuclear rocket. Recent advances in fuel fabrication and testing options indicate that a nuclear rocket with a fuel composition that is significantly different from those of the NERVA project can be engineered; this may be needed to ensure public support and compliance with safety requirements. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) is pursuing a number of technologies, modeling and testing processes to further the development of safe, practical and affordable nuclear thermal propulsion systems.

Robert C. O' Brien; Steven K. Cook; Nathan D. Jerred; Steven D. Howe; Ronald Samborsky; Daniel Brasuell

2012-09-01

238

Increasing Discoverability and Accessibility of NASA Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) Data Products with GIS Technology  

Science.gov (United States)

NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) is piloting the use of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology that can increase data discoverability and accessibility of ASDC data to the GIS user community in formats that they are more accustomed to. Utilizing the existing Enterprise License Agreement (ELA) between Esri and NASA for software will enable the ASDC to provide data in GIS formats and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) compliant services. These services will include a Web Mapping Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Processing Service (WPS). This is expected to yield a greater usage of NASA ASDC data as well as new analysis utilizing GIS tools for an increased understanding in the areas of the earth's radiation budget, clouds, aerosols, and tropospheric chemistry.

Tisdale, M.; Little, M. M.; Northup, E.

2013-12-01

239

Aquatic biology studies  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Aquatic biology studies focused on studying the hydrothermal effects of Par Pond reservoir on periphyton, plankton, zooplankton, macrophytes, human pathogens, and microbial activity; the variability between the artificial streams of the Flowing Streams Laboratory and Upper Three Runs Creek; and the bacterial production of methane in Savannah River Plant aquatic systems

240

Informal science educators network project Association of Science-Technology Centers Incorporated. Final report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Funding from the Department of Energy and the Annenberg/CPB Math and Science Project have helped the Association of Science-technology Centers Incorporated (ASTC) to establish and sustain an on-line community of informal science educators nationwide. The Project, called the Informal Science Educators Network Project (ISEN), is composed primarily of informal science educators and exhibit developers from science centers, museums, zoos, aquariums, botanical gardens, parks, and nature centers. Although museum-based professionals represent the majority of subscribers to ISEN, also involved are some classroom teachers and teacher educators from colleges and universities. Common to all ISEN participants is a commitment to school and science education reform. Specifically, funding from the Department of Energy helped to boot strap the effort, providing Barrier Reduction Vouchers to 123 educators that enabled them participate in ISEN. Among the major accomplishments of the Project are these: (1) assistance to 123 informal science educators to attend Internet training sessions held in connection with the Project and/or purchase hardware and software that linked them to the Internet; (2) Internet training for 153 informal science educators; (3) development of a listserv which currently has over 180 subscribers--an all-time high; (4) opportunity to participate in four web chats involving informal science educators with noted researchers; (5) development of two sites on the World Wide Web linking informal science educators to Internet resources; (6) creation of an on-line collection of over 40 articles related to inquiry-based teaching and science education reform. In order to continue the momentum of the Project, ASTC has requested from the Annenberg/CPB Math and Science project a no/cost extension through December 1997.

NONE

1997-05-09

 
 
 
 
241

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (formerly ICPP) ash reutilization study  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Since 1984, the coal-fired plant at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC, formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) has been generating fly ash at a rate of approximately 1,000 tons per year. This ash is hydrated and placed in an ash bury pit near the coal-fired plant. The existing ash bury pit will be full in less than 1 year at its present rate of use. A conceptual design to build a new ash bury pit was completed, and the new pit is estimated to cost $1.7 million. This report evaluates ash reutilization alternatives that propose to eliminate this waste stream and save the $1.7 million required to build a new pit. The alternatives include using ash for landfill day cover, concrete admixture, flowable fill, soil stabilization, waste remediation, and carbon recovery technology. Both physical and chemical testing, under the guidance of the American Society for Testing and Materials, have been performed on ash from the existing pit and from different steps within the facility's processes. The test results have been evaluated, compared to commercial ash, and are discussed as they relate to reutilization alternatives. This study recommends that the ash be used in flowable fill concrete for Deactivation and Demolition work at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

242

Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) proposed dual-use technology investment program in intelligent robots  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper presents an overview of the proposed Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) precompetitive, dual-use technology investment project in robotics. New robotic technology in advanced robots, which can recognize and respond to their environments and to spoken human supervision so as to perform a variety of combined mobility and manipulation tasks in various sectors, is an obejective of this work. In the U.S. economy, such robots offer the benefits of improved global competitiveness in a critical industrial sector; improved productivity by the end users of these robots; a growing robotics industry that produces jobs and profits; lower cost health care delivery with quality improvements; and, as these 'intelligent' robots become acceptable throughout society, an increase in the standard of living for everyone. In space, such robots will provide improved safety, reliability, and productivity as Space Station evolves, and will enable human space exploration (by human/robot teams). The proposed effort consists of partnerships between manufacturers, universities, and JSC to develop working production prototypes of these robots by leveraging current development by both sides. Currently targeted applications are in the manufacturing, health care, services, and construction sectors of the U.S. economy and in the inspection, servicing, maintenance, and repair aspects of space exploration. But the focus is on the generic software architecture and standardized interfaces for custom modules tailored for the various applications allowing end users to customize a robot as PC users customize PC's. Production prototypes would be completed in 5 years under this proposal.

Erikson, Jon D.

1994-01-01

243

Dissemination of Advanced Mouse Resources and Technologies at RIKEN BioResource Center  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available RIKEN BioResource Center (BRC has collected, preserved, conducted quality control of, and distributed mouse resources since 2002 as the core facility of the National BioResource Project by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT, Japan. Our mouse resources include over 5,000 strains such as humanized disease models, fluorescent reporters, and knockout mice. We have developed novel mouse strains such as tissue-specific Cre-drivers and optogenetic strains that are in high demand by the research community. We have removed all our specified pathogens from the deposited mice and used our quality control tests to examine their genetic modifications and backgrounds. RIKEN BRC is a founding member of the Federation of International Mouse Resources and the Asian Mouse Mutagenesis and Resource Association, and provides mouse resources to the one-stop International Mouse Strain Resource database. RIKEN BRC also participates in the International Gene Trap Consortium, having registered 713 gene-trap clones and their sequences in a public library, and is an advisory member of the CREATE (Coordination of resources for conditional expression of mutated mouse alleles consortium which represents major European and international mouse database holders for the integration and dissemination of Cre-driver strains. RIKEN BRC provides training courses in the use of advanced technologies for the quality control and cryopreservation of mouse strains to promote the effective use of mouse resources worldwide.

Atsushi Yoshiki

2010-12-01

244

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (formerly ICPP) ash reutilization study  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Since 1984, the coal-fired plant at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC, formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) has been generating fly ash at a rate of approximately 1,000 tons per year. This ash is hydrated and placed in an ash bury pit near the coal-fired plant. The existing ash bury pit will be full in less than 1 year at its present rate of use. A conceptual design to build a new ash bury pit was completed, and the new pit is estimated to cost $1.7 million. This report evaluates ash reutilization alternatives that propose to eliminate this waste stream and save the $1.7 million required to build a new pit. The alternatives include using ash for landfill day cover, concrete admixture, flowable fill, soil stabilization, waste remediation, and carbon recovery technology. Both physical and chemical testing, under the guidance of the American Society for Testing and Materials, have been performed on ash from the existing pit and from different steps within the facility`s processes. The test results have been evaluated, compared to commercial ash, and are discussed as they relate to reutilization alternatives. This study recommends that the ash be used in flowable fill concrete for Deactivation and Demolition work at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

Langenwalter, T.; Pettet, M.; Ochoa, R.; Jensen, S.

1998-05-01

245

Recent Stirling Conversion Technology Developments and Operational Measurements at NASA Glenn Research Center  

Science.gov (United States)

In support of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) project and other potential applications, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has initiated convertor technology development efforts in the areas of acoustic emission, electromagnetic field mitigation, thermoacoustic Stirling conversion, and multiple-cylinder alpha arrangements of Stirling machines. The acoustic emission measurement effort was developed as a health monitoring metric for several Stirling convertors undergoing life testing. While accelerometers have been used in the past to monitor dynamic signature, the acoustic sensors were chosen to monitor cycle events, such gas bearing operation. Several electromagnetic interference (EMI) experiments were performed on a pair of Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC). These tests demonstrated that a simple bucking coil was capable of reducing the alternating current (ac) magnetic field below the ASRG system specification. The thermoacoustic Stirling concept eliminates the displacer typically found in Stirling machines by making use of the pressure oscillations of a traveling acoustic wave. A 100 W-class thermoacoustic Stirling prototype manufactured by Northrop Grumman Space and Technology was received and tested. Another thermoacoustic prototype designed and fabricated by Sunpower, Inc., will be tested in the near future. A four cylinder free piston alpha prototype convertor was received from Sunpower, Inc. and has been tested at GRC. This hardware was used as a proof of concept to validate thermodynamic models and demonstrate stable operation of multiple-cylinder free-piston Stirling conversion. This paper will discuss each of these activities and the results they produced.

Oriti, Salvatore M.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

2010-01-01

246

The influence of technology on the performance of Brazilian call centers / A influência da tecnologia no desempenho dos call centers Brasileiros  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese Os call centers (CC) têm mostrado constante evolução com o decorrer do tempo. Existe um uso intensivo de tecnologia nos CCs. No entanto, nem sempre para um lado positivo. O artigo é baseado em um survey feito com 103 empresas brasileiras que possuem ou provêm serviços de call center e procura verifi [...] car a contribuição da tecnologia sobre quatro distintas dimensões: redução de custos, relacionamento com clientes, canais de comunicação e monitoramento dos empregados. O referencial teórico utilizado é bastante eclético baseando-se em considerações estratégicas, informações das áreas técnicas de telecomunicações e tecnologia da informação, marketing em especial à área de relacionamento com clientes e, principalmente, de vários estudos nacionais e internacionais que vêm sendo desenvolvidos a respeito do atendimento e satisfação dos clientes. Os resultados mostram que o uso intenso de tecnologia não significa uma melhoria geral no desempenho de atendimento em todas as dimensões avaliadas e que escolhas precisam ser feitas por algumas dimensões em detrimento de outras. Abstract in english Call centers (CCs) show an evolution over the course of time. There is an intensive use of technology in CCs, although not always a positive side. The article is based on a survey carried out among the 103 Brazilian companies that have come (falta algum complemento, não conseguimos entender a frase) [...] and call center services and seeks to verify the contribution of technology in four distinct dimensions: cost reduction, customer relations, communication channels and monitoring of employees. The theoretical framework is eclectic based on strategic considerations, details of the technical areas of telecommunications and information technology, marketing. It focus particularly in the area of customer relations and especially of various national and international studies that have been developed regarding service and customer satisfaction. The results show that heavy use of technology does not mean a general improvement in performance in all dimensions assessed and some dimensions choices to be made over others.

Paulo Roberto, Gião; Felipe Mendes, Borini; Moacir de Miranda, Oliveira Júnior.

247

Application of the Study Model of \\\\\\"Knowledge Management Infrastructure in Organizations\\\\\\" in Information Centers: The case of the Regional Information Center for Science and Technology (RICeST  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Information centers are duly obliged to move in line with their parent organizations’ goals and missions in creating knowledge. In the age of information and communication revolution, and in a knowledge-based economy, organizations that are involved in creation of knowledge have an important role in communication and diffusion of knowledge. In the mean time, libraries and information centers change from being mere depository sources to knowledge institutions. The current research aimed to study the present state of knowledge management infrastructures of the Regional Information Center for Science and Technology (RICeST as a national and regional information center. The statistic population of this study was consisted of 87 staff. Data was collected by means of questionnaires, observation and interviews. The results showed the required infrastructure for KM activities were almost there, among different aspects of which, budgeting had a better situation in the institution under study. In regards with establishment of knowledge management, RICeST was paying more attention to information and communication technology and knowledge network via applications such as the Internet and extranets. Another fact was that in the RICeST, emphasis was on learning and on human resources as the substantial sources in creation of knowledge. Among other aspects, “organizational culture” was in a lower state compared with other aspects in the RICeST.

Abdolhossein Farajpahlou

2012-02-01

248

The International Science and Technology Center: Scope of activities and scientific projects in the field of nuclear data  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The review of the ISTC (The International Science and Technology Center) Programs and activities including Science Project Program, Partner Program, Seminar Program and others is presented. Project funding by technology area, by funding Parties, by CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States) States etc. is demonstrated with emphasis on projects in the field of nuclear data. The ISTC opportunities for international cooperation in the fields of nuclear data measurements, calculation, evaluation and dissemination are discussed. (author)

249

Molecular ecology of aquatic microbes  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Abstracts of reports are presented from a meeting on Molecular Ecology of Aquatic Microbes. Topics included: opportunities offered to aquatic ecology by molecular biology; the role of aquatic microbes in biogeochemical cycles; characterization of the microbial community; the effect of the environment on aquatic microbes; and the targeting of specific biological processes.

NONE

1994-12-31

250

Systems and Cycles: Learning about Aquatic Ecosystems  

Science.gov (United States)

In this research, the authors present both the design and preliminary testing of a technology-intensive classroom intervention designed to support middle schools students' understanding of an aquatic ecosystem. The goals of their intervention are to help learners develop deep understanding of ecosystems and to use tools that make the relationships…

Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.; Jordan, Rebecca; Eberbach, Catherine; Rugaber, Spencer; Goel, Ashok

2011-01-01

251

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... for Disease Control (CDC) cdc.gov National Swimming Pool Foundation (NSPF) website: nspf.org Can patients with HepatitisB and other water borne illnesses participate in aquatic therapy? There should ...

252

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Are aquatic PTs required to be certified in life saving? No; however, the Section recommends some type of water safety training and risk management. What is the new federal ...

253

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... vary depending on what part of the country/world in which one lives. Back to Top Education ... Are aquatic PTs required to be certified in life saving? No; however, the Section recommends some type ...

254

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... article in the "Journal of Aquatic Physical Therapy," Volume 10 Number 1, Spring 2002, addressing the history. ... What is the range of pool temperatures for specific kinds of therapy and certain ailments? General guidelines ...

255

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... assistive, adaptive, orthotic, protective, or supportive devices and equipment. The unique properties of the aquatic environment enhance ... APTA website under reimbursement to assist with the process. If this particular third party payor globally denies ...

256

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... a list of operation rules for a new facility with a pool? Check with your State or ... should be considered for pools in aquatic PT facilities? You should consider the same type of insurance ...

257

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... history of the Aquatic PT Section? Focus of research and study in the Section? Jean Irion wrote ... org Where do I get a list of operation rules for a new facility with a pool? ...

258

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... aquatic physical therapy? Indications/contraindications? This is an area with potentially deleterious ramifications for both patient and therapist, so it would behoove one to become familiar with specific contraindications as well as relative contraindications. This information ...

259

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... State Practice Acts. What kind of insurance should be considered for pools in aquatic PT facilities? You ... NSPF) website: nspf.org How long should someone be/can someone be required to be in the ...

260

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... standards of care which impact all other treatment services. Aquatic Exercise is the utilization of water for the implementation of quality of life, fitness-related or general health-related ...

 
 
 
 
261

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... get a list of operation rules for a new facility with a pool? Check with your State or Local Health Department for guidelines. Additionally, if you order "Developing an Aquatic Physical Therapy Program", you can ...

262

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... APTA website under reimbursement to assist with the process. If this particular third party payor globally denies ... therapy? No; however, the Section is in the process of putting together of certificate for Aquatic physical ...

263

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... on the topic - Click Here What is the history of the Aquatic PT Section? Focus of research ... Volume 10 Number 1, Spring 2002, addressing the history. The focus of research and study is the ...

264

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... than 40 frequently asked questions related to Aquatic Physical Therapy. The questions are arranged below by category. Please click on the category and review questions and answers: General FAQs Education FAQs Rules, ...

265

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... properly maintained. Can PTs treat patients in their private pools in their homes? ... aquatic PTs required to be certified in life saving? No; however, the Section recommends some type ...

266

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... history of the Aquatic PT Section? Focus of research and study in the Section? Jean Irion wrote ... Spring 2002, addressing the history. The focus of research and study is the practice analysis currently being ...

267

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... safe aquatic environment taking into consideration transition to land based functional activities and communication with the patient- ... Acts. Supervision is not different between pool and land-based therapy. What is the required ratio of ...

268

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... PT and/or PTA which may include: the clinical reasoning and decision making skills of a PT/ ... Section has a Certificate in Aquatic Physical Therapy Clinical Competency for PTs and PTAs. To find ...

269

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... consideration transition to land based functional activities and communication with the patient-care team. What is the ... be available in the Spring of 2014. What education requirements are needed to specialize in Aquatic PT? ...

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About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... a physical therapist, or a physical therapist assistant under the supervision of a physical therapist. Aquatic Physical ... is encouraged to refer to the APTA website under research and follow the prompts to utilize various ...

271

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... include, but are not limited to, therapeutic exercise, functional training, manual therapy, breathing strategies, electrotherapeutic modalities, physical agents and mechanical modalities using the properties of water and techniques unique to the aquatic environment. Abbreviated ...

272

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... a problem with a patient who has Hepatitis B if they do not have any open wounds, ... Things to consider include: (a) State Practice Act (b) Liability insurance (c) Local regulations Do aquatic PT ...

273

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... or eliminated with aquatic physical therapy; and the patient has potential to maximize functional goals/outcomes to improve quality of life and ease burden of care. the implementation of such therapy must comply with ...

274

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... a pool? Check with your State or Local Health Department for guidelines. Additionally, if you order "Developing an Aquatic Physical Therapy Program", you can get the management package that INCLUDES STATE-SPECIFIC information and how ...

275

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... to proceed. Are there particular patients that should or should not have aquatic physical therapy? Indications/contraindications? ... working environment (e.g. poor environmental conditions and/or poor pool maintenance)? There are several means to ...

276

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... Spring 2002, addressing the history. The focus of research and study is the practice analysis ... Aquatic Therapy and Rehab Institute (ATRI) published a document called Safety Standards for ...

277

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... Rules, Regulations & Operations FAQs Where can I find information on starting my own aquatic physical therapy practice? ... Additionally, list below are several great sources of information regarding design, construction, and risk awareness for pools. ...

278

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... engines to custom your search. Additionally, on this web page, one can, if an Aquatic Section member, ... www.osha.gov/fso/osp/index.html . This Web page provides links for the states that have ...

279

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

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Full Text Available ... and while not all states have adequate swimming codes, this is an option. Per the Occupational Safety ... pools need lifeguards? This is dependent upon local codes. Are aquatic PTs required to be certified in ...

280

Annual report of Nuclear Technology and Education Center. April 1, 2008 - March 31, 2009  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year 2008. This year is the 50th anniversary of NuTEC since the starting of the first training course in January, 1958 at the Radioisotope-School in Tokyo. On this occasion, a commemorative symposium was held and attended by around 150 participants. NuTEC flexibly designed and conducted out new training courses upon requests while conducting the annually scheduled training programs. In spite of some cancellations in an economic downturn, the number of trainees who completed the domestic training courses was 404, and that of those who completed the staff technical training courses was 862. As a result, the total number of trainees during this period grew over the previous fiscal year. 'Nuclear Training for METI Inspectors' was newly offered and also 'Qualification Course for the 3rd class radiation protection supervisor' was held at Tsuruga Technical High School. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities; cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, cooperative graduate school program with 14 graduate schools and one under-graduate school, and newly began to cooperate with Tsuyama National College of Technology. JAEA also continued cooperative activities with Nuclear HRD Program initiated by MEXT and METI implemented in 2007. The joint course has continued networking with five universities including newly two universities utilizing the Japan Nuclear Education Network (JNEN). International cooperation was also conducted as scheduled. The joint training course and the instructor training program were conducted bilaterally with Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam. JAEA exchanged a memorandum with CEA/INSTN and initiated preparatory work for on internship student from INSTN. Moreover, JAEA newly joined European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) and began to prepare for new international training courses. (author)

 
 
 
 
281

Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This comprehensive report provides definitive volume, mass, and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Calcine composition data are required for regulatory compliance (such as permitting and waste disposal), future treatment of the caline, and shipping the calcine to an off-Site-facility (such as a geologic repository). This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins. The Calcined Solids Storage Facilities (CSSFs) were designed by different architectural engineering firms and built at different times. Each CSSF has a unique design, reflecting varying design criteria and lessons learned from historical CSSF operation. The varying CSSF design will affect future calcine retrieval processes and equipment. Revision 4 of this report presents refinements and enhancements of calculations concerning the composition, volume, mass, chemical content, and radioactivity of calcined waste produced and stored within the CSSFs. The historical calcine samples are insufficient in number and scope of analysis to fully characterize the entire inventory of calcine in the CSSFs. Sample data exist for all the liquid wastes that were calcined. This report provides calcine composition data based on liquid waste sample analyses, volume of liquid waste calcined, calciner operating data, and CSSF operating data using several large Microsoft Excel (Microsoft 2003) databases and spreadsheets that are collectively called the Historical Processing Model. The calcine composition determined by this method compares favorably with historical calcine sample data.

Staiger, M. Daniel, Swenson, Michael C.

2011-09-01

282

Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This comprehensive report provides definitive volume, mass, and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Calcine composition data are required for regulatory compliance (such as permitting and waste disposal), future treatment of the caline, and shipping the calcine to an off-Site-facility (such as a geologic repository). This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins. The Calcined Solids Storage Facilities (CSSFs) were designed by different architectural engineering firms and built at different times. Each CSSF has a unique design, reflecting varying design criteria and lessons learned from historical CSSF operation. The varying CSSF design will affect future calcine retrieval processes and equipment. Revision 4 of this report presents refinements and enhancements of calculations concerning the composition, volume, mass, chemical content, and radioactivity of calcined waste produced and stored within the CSSFs. The historical calcine samples are insufficient in number and scope of analysis to fully characterize the entire inventory of calcine in the CSSFs. Sample data exist for all the liquid wastes that were calcined. This report provides calcine composition data based on liquid waste sample analyses, volume of liquid waste calcined, calciner operating data, and CSSF operating data using several large Microsoft Excel (Microsoft 2003) databases and spreadsheets that are collectively called the Historical Processing Model. The calcine composition determined by this method compares favorably with historical calcine sample data.

283

Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the steering committee. Final technical report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued with the Pilot High Velocity FGD (PHV) and the Trace Element Removal (TER) test blocks. In the High Velocity test block, SO{sub 2} removal and mist eliminator carryover rates were investigated while operating the absorber unit with various spray nozzle types and vertical mist eliminator sections. During the Trace Element Removal test block, the mercury measurements and control studies involving the EPA Method 29 continued with testing of several impinger capture solutions, and the use of activated carbon injection across the Pulse-Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) unit. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System was utilized this month in the TER test configuration to inject and transfer activated carbon to the PJFF bags for downstream mercury capture. Work also began in December to prepare the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Absorber system for receipt of the B and W Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX) unit to be used in the 1996 DOE/PRDA testing. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained in cold-standby this month.

NONE

1995-12-01

284

Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Center: Transformational Technology Development For Environmental Remediation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

DOE-EM, Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation and DOE Richland, in collaboration with the Hanford site and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, have established the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Center (DVZ-AFRC). The DVZ-AFRC leverages DOE investments in basic science from the Office of Science, applied research from DOE EM Office of Technology Innovation and Development, and site operation (e.g., site contractors [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Contractor and Washington River Protection Solutions], DOE-EM RL and ORP) in a collaborative effort to address the complex region of the deep vadose zone. Although the aim, goal, motivation, and contractual obligation of each organization is different, the integration of these activities into the framework of the DVZ-AFRC brings the resources and creativity of many to provide sites with viable alternative remedial strategies to current baseline approaches for persistent contaminants and deep vadose zone contamination. This cooperative strategy removes stove pipes, prevents duplication of efforts, maximizes resources, and facilitates development of the scientific foundation needed to make sound and defensible remedial decisions that will successfully meet the target cleanup goals for one of DOE EM's most intractable problems, in a manner that is acceptable by regulators.

285

Addendum to the Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Center  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report is an addendum to the report Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, INEEL/EXT-98-00455 Rev. 1, June 2003. The original report provided a summary description of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities (CSSFs). It also contained dozens of pages of detailed data tables documenting the volume and composition (chemical content and radionuclide activity) of the calcine stored in the CSSFs and the liquid waste from which the calcine was derived. This addendum report compiles the calcine composition data from the original report. It presents the compiled data in a graphical format with units (weight percent, curies per cubic meter, and nanocuries per gram) that are commonly used in regulatory and waste acceptance criteria documents. The compiled data are easier to use and understand when comparing the composition of the calcine with potential regulatory or waste acceptance criteria. This addendum report also provides detailed explanations for the large variability in the calcine composition among the CSSFs. The calcine composition varies as a result of reprocessing different types of fuel that had different cladding materials. Different chemicals were used to dissolve the various types of fuel, extract the uranium, and calcine the resulting waste. This resulted in calcine with variable compositions. This addendum report also identifies a few trace chemicals and radionuclides for which the accuracy of the amounts estimated to be in the calcine could be improved by making adjustments to the assumptions and methods used in making the estimates.

M. D. Staiger; Michael Swenson; T. R. Thomas

2004-05-01

286

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, West Virginia  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) conducted November 30 through December 4, 1987. In addition, the preliminary findings of the Laramie Project Office (LPO) Survey, which was conducted as part of the METC Survey on January 25 through 29, 1988, are presented in Appendices E and F. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with METC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at METC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities at METC. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the results will be incorporated into the METC Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Survey METC. 60 refs., 28 figs., 43 tabs.

1988-06-01

287

Genetic evaluation of mesenchymal stem cells by G-banded karyotyping in a Cell Technology Center  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: To present the initial results of first three years of implementation of a genetic evaluation test for bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a Cell Technology Center. METHODS: A retrospective study was carried out of 21 candidates for cell therapy. After the isolation of bon [...] e marrow mononuclear cells by density gradient, mesenchymal stem cells were cultivated and expanded at least until the second passage. Cytogenetic analyses were performed before and after cell expansion (62 samples) using G-banded karyotyping. RESULTS: All the samples analyzed, before and after cell expansion, had normal karyotypes, showing no clonal chromosomal changes. Signs of chromosomal instability were observed in 11 out of 21 patients (52%). From a total of 910 analyzed metaphases, five chromatid gaps, six chromatid breaks and 14 tetraploid cells were detected giving as total of 25 metaphases with chromosome damage (2.75%). CONCLUSION: The absence of clonal chromosomal aberrations in our results for G-banded karyotyping shows the maintenance of chromosomal stability of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells until the second passage; however, signs of chromosomal instability such as chromatid gaps, chromosome breaks and tetraploidy indicate that the long-term cultivation of these cells can provide an intermediate step for tumorigenesis.

Tamara, Borgonovo; Isadora May, Vaz; Alexandra Cristina, Senegaglia; Carmen Lucia Kuniyoshi, Rebelatto; Paulo Roberto Slud, Brofman.

2014-06-01

288

Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center final monthly technical report, August 1995  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit this month involved the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and the simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). Additionally, the second phase of the 1995 Carbon Injection test block began this month with the SDA/PJFF test configuration. At the end of the LDG testing this month, a one-week baseline test was conducted to generate approximately 200 lbs. of magnesium-lime FGD solids for analysis. On the 1.0 MW Post-FGD Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, performance testing was continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and S0{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the reactor. As a result of new directions received from EPRI, this will be the last scheduled month of testing for the SCR unit in 1995. At the completion of this month, the unit will be isolated from the flue gas path and placed in a cold-standby mode for future test activities. This report describes the status of facilities and test facilities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

NONE

1995-08-01

289

Annual report of Nuclear Technology and Education Center. April 1, 2007-March 31, 2008  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year 2007. This is the third year since the inauguration of JAEA, and NuTEC now flexibly designs and carries out training courses upon request while carrying out the annually scheduled training programs. During this period, the number of trainees completing the domestic training courses was 466, and that for staff technical training was 694. Three prep-examination training courses for '1st class radiation protection supervisor', 'Nuclear fuel protection supervisor' and 'Professional engineer on nuclear and radiation' which were opened only for staff members were newly opened to the public. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities; cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, cooperative graduate school program with 14 graduate schools and 1 under-graduate school, and Nuclear HRD Program initiated by MEXT and METI implemented since 2007. Joint course has started networking 3 universities utilizing the Japan Nuclear Education Network, and trial experimental courses for students from newly participating universities were offered. International cooperation was also conducted as scheduled. Joint training course and Instructor training program were carried out bilaterally with Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam. Human Resources Development Workshop under the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia was arranged, and Asian Nuclear Training and Education Program to enhance the matching of the needs and available training program of the participating countries were discussed. (author)

290

76 FR 8371 - Notice Correction; Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer...  

Science.gov (United States)

...Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Surveys (NCI) The Federal...Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Survey (NCI)'' was submitted...which will include multiple customer satisfaction surveys over the course...

2011-02-14

291

Aquatic Plant/microbial Filters for Treating Septic Tank Effluent  

Science.gov (United States)

The use of natural biological processes for treating many types of wastewater have been developed by NASA at the John C. Stennis Space Center, NSTL, Mississippi, during the past 15 years. The simplest form of this technology involves the use of aquatic plant/marsh filters for treatment of septic tank effluent. Septic tank effluent from single home units can be treated to advanced secondary levels and beyond by using a 37.2 sq m (400 sq ft) surface area washed gravel filter. This filter is generally 0.3 m (1 ft) deep with a surface cover of approximately 0.15 m (6 in.) of gravel. The plants in this filter are usually aesthetic or ornamental such as calla lily (Zantedeschia aethiopica), canna lily (Canna flaccida), elephant ear (Colocasia esculenta), and water iris (Iris pseudacorus).

Wolverton, B. C.

1988-01-01

292

78 FR 13142 - Designation of the Center for Innovation and Technology Cooperation (CITC), Pentane Chemistry...  

Science.gov (United States)

...and Technology Cooperation (CITC), Pentane Chemistry Industries (PCI), and Hossein...and Technology Cooperation (CITC), Pentane Chemistry Industries (PCI), and Hossein...and Technology Cooperation (CITC), Pentane Chemistry Industries (PCI), and...

2013-02-26

293

Aquatic access for the disabled.  

Science.gov (United States)

Innovations in rehabilitation engineering can now provide aquatic access for the disabled. In the regional burn center, the Bodi-Gard cart shower system (Hospital Therapy Products, Inc., Wood Dale, Ill.) uses three flexible hoses to provide precise hydrotherapy and debridement. Its main mixing valve controls temperature and pressure and is easily disinfected by an in-line chamber. This shower system is complemented by the foldable Bodi-Gard mobile seat shower system (Hospital Therapy Products, Inc.). This system, which is covered by a disposable liner, surrounds the patient with eight water jets that empty into any floor drain. The Bather 2001 (Silcraft Corp., Traverse City, Mich.) is a fiberglass hydrotherapy bathtub with a unique Aqua-Seal door (Silcraft Corp.) that can be raised to provide patient access. Its unique closed-loop disinfection system prevents contamination of its internal components. The Nolan Tublift (Aquatic Access, Louisville, Ky.) is a lightweight, removable lift that uses water power to gently raise and lower its seat. It can be manually swiveled to allow access from a wheelchair. Transfer benches span the tub wall to provide access to the shower and bathtub. Although they are a less expensive alternative to the Tublift, they allow water to spill outside the tub, which may create a slippery bathroom floor. The Nolan Poolift (Guardian Products, Arleta, Calif.) is a water-powered pool lift, which automatically rotates as it descends. It is capable of lifting up to 135 kg with a home water pressure of 55 psi. In contrast, the water-powered Aquatic Access Poolift is a less expensive pool lift, which rotates manually with assistance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1618881

Walk, E E; Himel, H N; Batra, E K; Baruch, L; O'Connor, M B; Tanner, A E; Edlich, R F

1992-01-01

294

Status of teaching elementary science for English learners in science, mathematics and technology centered magnet schools  

Science.gov (United States)

According to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (2001), one in three students speaks a language other than English. Additionally, the Commission stated that a student is considered to be an English learner if the second language acquisition is English. In California more than 1.4 million English learners enter school speaking a variety of languages, and this number continues to rise. There is an imminent need to promote instructional strategies that support this group of diverse learners. Although this was not a California study, the results derived from the nationwide participants' responses provided a congruent assessment of the basic need to provide effective science teaching strategies to all English learners. The purpose of this study was to examine the status of elementary science teaching practices used with English learners in kindergarten through fifth grade in public mathematics, science, and technology-centered elementary magnet schools throughout the country. This descriptive research was designed to provide current information and to identify trends in the areas of curriculum and instruction for English learners in science themed magnet schools. This report described the status of elementary (grades K-5) school science instruction for English learners based on the responses of 116 elementary school teachers: 59 grade K-2, and 57 grade 3-5 teachers. Current research-based approaches support incorporating self-directed learning strategy, expository teaching strategy, active listening strategies, questioning strategies, wait time strategy, small group strategy, peer tutoring strategy, large group learning strategy, demonstrations strategy, formal debates strategy, review sessions strategy, mediated conversation strategy, cooperative learning strategy, and theme-based instruction into the curriculum to assist English learners in science education. Science Technology Society (STS) strategy, problem-based learning strategy, discovery learning strategy, constructivist learning strategy, learning cycle strategy, SCALE technique strategy, conceptual change strategy, inquiry-based strategy, cognitive academic language learning approach (CALLA) strategy, and learning from text strategy provide effective science teaching instruction to English learners. These science instructional strategies assist elementary science teachers by providing additional support to make science instruction more comprehensible for English learners.

Han, Alyson Kim

295

Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist

296

Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist.

Ansley, Shannon L.

2002-02-20

297

Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Waste Disposal Facility  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist.

Ansley, Shannon Leigh

2002-02-01

298

The Terascale Simulation Tools and Technologies Center Annual Report August 15, 2001-September 30, 2002  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The overall goal of the TSTT Center is to enable the scientific community to more easily use modern high-order, adaptive, parallel mesh and discretization tools. To achieve this goal, we are following three distinct but related paths. The first is to work directly with a number of lead application teams (for the most part SciDAC-funded) to use such technologies in their application domains. The second is to create new technology that eases the use of such tools, not only for our designated application partners, but across a broad range of application areas that require mesh and discretization tools for scientific simulation. The main technology thrust is not to create new tools (although some of this will occur), but to create new capabilities that will allow the use of these tools interoperably. This very profound step can be compared to the shift from hand craftmanship to manufactured products with interchangable components which revolutionized the world economy one to two centuries ago. The third component of our efforts is to embed this work in a larger framework of related activities, each seeking a similar, and profound, change in the practice of computational science. To ensure the relevance of our work to the SciDAC program goals, we originally selected six application areas, and in each, one or more application projects and teams with which to work directly. One application collaboration which targeted the development of an adaptive mesh refinement capability for the oceanographic code POP was postponed and may be dropped due to unanticipated technical obstacles in the specific goal selected. One new application involving jet breakup for spray combustion was added. The initial job of establishing good working relations, agreement on a plan of action, and obtaining initial results was accomplished in all cases. In general, our work with the applications has been more difficult than anticipated, in spite of the experience of the TSTT team members in similar application-motivated collaborations. For this reason, the routes to the goals have been modified in some cases, but good progress has been obtained for all of the targeted application teams. For example, in the case of the electromagnetic code for accelerator design, the original goal of developing more stable meshes has been enlarged to include the underlying difficulty which motivated this goal: to cure or ameliorate instabilities of the time stepping algorithm. With the fusion M3D code, we decided to work initially with a related, but smaller and more easily modified code from the same application team, for initial testing and proof of principle, as the full M3D code proved difficult to work with. In several applications (astrophysics, climate), our initial technology development goals were met, and while we await their use or evaluation, further collaborative goals will be pursued. The spray breakup problem achieved initial success and awaits adaptive TSTT technology to allow refined grid simulations for its next steps. We plan to continue the intensive effort to insert our existing advanced mesh and discretization technology into existing application codes for the coming year. Our main progress towards the development of new technology has been the definition of the low level interface to a variety of mesh generation and adaptive mesh management tools. This interface provides a common calling convention that will allow an application to call any compliant mesh tool in an interchangeable fashion. Most of the TSTT advanced meshing tools have been or will be made compliant to this interface. We have also pursued one-on-one interoperability goals with the development of interoperability between the FronTier front-tracking library and the Overture mesh library. This goal, advanced from year two to year one because of its need in one of our applications, has made good progress, and will be completed in the coming year. Finally, we mention the integration of this effort (interoperability and applications) with a larger computational science effort. The importanc

Glimm, J; Brown, D L; Freitag, L

2002-09-30

299

Coverage of Team Science by Public Information Officers: Content Analysis of Press Releases about the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Centers  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examines the content of press releases from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Centers (STCs) to determine how public information officers (PIOs) presented the outcomes of centers to journalists and the public. A total of 68 press releases were analyzed for type of news covered, visibility of centers and their…

Graube, Marita; Clark, Fiona; Illman, Deborah L.

2010-01-01

300

Aquatic food chain  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

If we accept the definition of radioecology as the study of the relations of organisms or group of organisms to their radioactive environment, the aquatic food chain constitutes just a part of the theme. It forms a more or less complicated system of transport of radionuclides in the waters, framed by the physico-chemical source terms and radiobiology at the target, including man. The term food web is also often used to emphazise the complexity of the system. The paper deals with some overall principles for the aquatic food chain relevant for radionuclides and exemplified by some results of Swedish investigations after the fallout from the Chernobyl accident. (orig.)

 
 
 
 
301

The Impact of Wireless Technology on Order Selection Audits at an Auto Parts Distribution Center  

Science.gov (United States)

Audits of store order pallets or totes performed by auditors at five distribution centers (two experimental and three comparison distribution centers) were used to check for picking accuracy prior to being loaded onto a truck for store delivery. Replacing the paper audits with wireless handheld computers that included immediate auditory and visual…

Goomas, David T.

2012-01-01

302

John C. Stennis Space Center: Partnerships for ISHM Technology Development and Applications  

Science.gov (United States)

This poster shows the partners that work with NASA's Stennis Space Center's NASA Test Operations Group in development of Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) applications for various programs. The partners are from universities, other US government agencies, private firms and other NASA Centers.

Figueroa, Jorge F.; Schmalzel, John; Turowski, Mark; Morris, John; Smith, Harvey

2008-01-01

303

Starting and Operating a Microcomputer Support Center. Reports on Computer Science and Technology.  

Science.gov (United States)

This report identifies and discusses the management issues and resources associated with establishing a microcomputer support center within an organization. A general introduction supplies a definition of a microcomputer support center and a historical perspective on data processing services. The remainder of the document is divided into two major…

Landberg, Ted; Winkler, Stanley

304

ORGANIZATION OF CONSTRUCTION SITE AND TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESSES OF STEEL AND CONCRETE CONSTRUCTIONS FOR MARIBOR CULTURAL CENTER CEUM/MAKS  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The diploma thesis is based on the organization of construction site for Maribor cultural center and is upgraded with the technological processes of steel and concrete constructions. Generally in the first part of the thesis, the reader is familiar with the facility and the detailed examination of conditions for construction. The core of the thesis represents an organization of construction site, which consists of demolition work and the technical report with temporary capacity dimensionin...

Bezjak, Goran

2012-01-01

305

Large space antenna communications systems: Integrated Langley Research Center/Jet Propulsion Laboratory technology development activities. 1: Introduction  

Science.gov (United States)

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Langley Research Center have been developing technology related to large space antennas (LSA) during the past several years. The need for a communication system research program became apparent during the recent studies for the Land Mobile Satellite System. This study indicated the need for additional research in (1) electromagnetic analysis methods, (2) design and development of multiple beam feed systems, and (3) the measurement methods for LSA reflectors.

Campbell, T. G.

1983-01-01

306

Annual report of Nuclear Technology and Education Center. April 1, 2009 - March 31, 2010  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year 2009. In this fiscal year, NuTEC flexibly designed and conducted new training courses upon requests while conducting the annually scheduled training programs, and actively enhanced the collaboration with academia and cooperation with international organizations. Probably due to the economic depression, the number of trainees who completed the national training courses in 2009 was 322, which is 20 percent less than the previous year. The number of those who completed the staff technical training courses was slightly increased to 787 in 2009. As a result, the total number of trainees during this period is about 6 percent less than the previous year. In order to correspond with the needs from outside of JAEA, five temporary courses were held upon the request from Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. 'Risk communication course' was newly offered upon the request from Nuclear Safety Commission. Furthermore, we addressed the longstanding issue to take countermeasure against the aging accommodation facility. The web site was also improved so that users can directly send the application for enrollment in the training courses through internet. These new services actually started in fiscal year 2010. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities; cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, and the cooperative graduate school program was enlarged to cooperate with totally 17 graduate schools (18 universities), one faculty of undergraduate school, and one technical college, including the newly joined 3 graduate schools (4 universities) in 2009. JAEA also continued cooperative activities with Nuclear HRD Program initiated by MEXT and METI in 2007. The joint course has continued networking with six universities including newly joined Osaka University through utilizing the remote education system, Japan Nuclear Education Network (JNEN), and special lectures, summer and winter practice were also conducted. International cooperation activities were conducted as scheduled. The joint training course and the instructor training program were conducted bilaterally with Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam. JAEA accepted master's students from INSTN as internship based on the MOU with CEA/INSTN. Moreover, JAEA co-organized the workshop with European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN), and attended IAEA international conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes held in UAE to present papers. (author)

307

Assessing controls on perched saturated zones beneath the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho  

Science.gov (United States)

Waste byproducts associated with operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) have the potential to contaminate the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer. Recharge to the ESRP aquifer is controlled largely by the alternating stratigraphy of fractured volcanic rocks and sedimentary interbeds within the overlying vadose zone and by the availability of water at the surface. Beneath the INTEC facilities, localized zones of saturation perched on the sedimentary interbeds are of particular concern because they may facilitate accelerated transport of contaminants. The sources and timing of natural and anthropogenic recharge to the perched zones are poorly understood. Simple approaches for quantitative characterization of this complex, variably saturated flow system are needed to assess potential scenarios for contaminant transport under alternative remediation strategies. During 2009-2011, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, employed data analysis and numerical simulations with a recently developed model of preferential flow to evaluate the sources and quantity of recharge to the perched zones. Piezometer, tensiometer, temperature, precipitation, and stream-discharge data were analyzed, with particular focus on the possibility of contributions to the perched zones from snowmelt and flow in the neighboring Big Lost River (BLR). Analysis of the timing and magnitude of subsurface dynamics indicate that streamflow provides local recharge to the shallow, intermediate, and deep perched saturated zones within 150 m of the BLR; at greater distances from the BLR the influence of streamflow on recharge is unclear. Perched water-level dynamics in most wells analyzed are consistent with findings from previous geochemical analyses, which suggest that a combination of annual snowmelt and anthropogenic sources (for example, leaky pipes and drainage ditches) contribute to recharge of shallow and intermediate perched zones throughout much of INTEC. The source-responsive fluxes model was parameterized to simulate recharge via preferential flow associated with intermittent episodes of streamflow in the BLR. The simulations correspond reasonably well to the observed hydrologic response within the shallow perched zone. Good model performance indicates that source-responsive flow through a limited number of connected fractures contributes substantially to the perched-zone dynamics. The agreement between simulated and observed perched-zone dynamics suggest that the source-responsive fluxes model can provide a valuable tool for quantifying rapid preferential flow processes that may result from different land management scenarios.

Mirus, Benjamin B.; Perkins, Kim S.; Nimmo, John R.

2011-01-01

308

Informing Science (IS and Science and Technology Studies (STS: The University as Decision Center (DC for Teaching Interdisciplinary Research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Students of history and philosophy of science courses at my University are either naïve robust realists or naïve relativists in relation to science and technology. The first group absorbs from culture stereotypical conceptions, such as the value-free character of the scientific method, that science and technology are impervious to history or ideology, and that science and religion are always at odds. The second believes science and technology were selected arbitrarily by ideologues to have privileged world views of reality to the detriment of other interpretations. These deterministic outlooks must be challenged to make students aware of the social importance of their future roles, be they as scientists and engineers or as science and technology policy decision makers. The University as Decision Center (DC not only reproduces the social by teaching standard solutions to well-defined problems but also provides information regarding conflict resolution and the epistemological, individual, historical, social, and political mechanisms that help create new science and technology. Interdisciplinary research prepares students for roles that require science and technology literacy, but raises methodological issues in the context of the classroom as it increases uncertainty with respect to apparently self-evident beliefs about scientific and technological practices.

Teresa Castelao-Lawless

2001-01-01

309

National Center of Excellence for Energy Storage Technology 168.10  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report documents the performance of the Ohio State University (OSU) and Edison Welding Institute (EWI) in the period from 10/1/2010 to 12/31/2012. The objective of the project is to establish a Center of Excellence that leverages the strengths of the partners to establish a unique capability to develop and transfer energy storage industries to establish a unique capability in the development and transfer of energy storage system technology through a fundamental understanding of battery electrical and thermal performance, damage and aging mechanisms, and through the development of reliable, high-speed processes for joining substrates in battery cell, module and pack assemblies with low manufacturing variability. During this period, the OSU activity focused on procuring the equipment, materials and supplies necessary to conduct the experiments planned in the statement of project objectives. In detail, multiple laboratory setups were developed to enable for characterizing the open-circuit potential of cathode and anode materials for Li-ion batteries, perform experiments on calorimetry, and finally built multiple cell and module battery cyclers to be able to perform aging campaign on a wide variety of automotive grade battery cells and small modules. This suite of equipment feeds directly into the development, calibration of battery models ranging from first principle electrochemical models to electro-thermal equivalent circuit models suitable for use in control and xEV vehicle simulations. In addition, it allows to develop and calibrate ‘aging’ models for Li-ion batteries that enable the development of diagnostics and prognostics tools to characterize and predict battery degradation from automotive usage under a wide array of environmental and usage scenarios. The objective of the EWI work scope is to develop improved processes for making metal-tometal joints in advanced battery cells and packs. It will focus on developing generic techniques for making functional (electrically conductive and mechanically robust) metal-to-metal joints between thin substrates. Joints with multiple layers and bimetallic constituents will be investigated. During the current period of performance, EWI has defined the test matrix to evaluate the application of different welding technologies (laser welding, ultrasonic welding, resistance welding) to specific components of battery cells and modules, such as foils-to-tabs, tabs-to-tabs, and tabs-to-bus bars. The test matrix also includes a range of substrates (aluminum 1145 and 1100, copper 110 and nickel 200 as substrates). Furthermore, a set of procedures was defined to perform mechanical and electrical testing of the samples, including metallography, and non-destructive evaluations. Both on the OSU and EWI, this project enabled to leverage very significant industrial collaborations with a wide array of companies ranging from battery manufacturers and pack integrator all the ways to Tier 1 automotive suppliers and OEMs during the period of exercise of the project, and in the future for years to come.

Guezennec, Yann

2011-12-31

310

Aquatic Pest Control. Manual 99.  

Science.gov (United States)

This training manual provides information needed to meet the minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the aquatic pest control category. The text discusses various water use situations; aquatic weed identification; herbicide use and effects; and aquatic insects and their control. (CS)

Missouri Univ., Columbia. Agricultural Experiment Station.

311

Treatment of wastewater and restoration of aquatic systems through an eco-technology based constructed treatment wetlands - a successful experience in Central India.  

Science.gov (United States)

In the last couple of decades constructed wetlands (CWs) have drawn considerable interest in Central India. CWs offer an effective means of integrating wastewater treatment and resource enhancement, often at competitive cost in comparison to conventional wastewater treatments, with additional benefits of Green Urban Landscaping and wildlife habitat. This paper describes treatment performances and the design of some Sub Surface Flow CWs (SSFCW) and Artificial Floating Islands (AFIs) in Central India. Central Indian CWs show significant pollution reduction load for total suspended solids (TSS) (62-82%), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) (40-75%), NH(4)-N (67-78%) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) (59-78%). Field scale SSFCWs installed so far in Central India are rectangular, earthen, single/multiple celled having similar depths of 0.60-0.90 m, hydraulic retention capacity 18-221 m(3) with effective size 41.8-1,050 m(2). The major components of CWs incorporate puddled bottom/side walls, sealed with impermeable low-density polyethylene, a bed of locally available river gravel planted with Phragmites karka, and an inlet distribution and outlet collection system. A new variant on CWs are AFIs working under hydroponics. The field scale experimental AFIs installed in-situ in a slowly flowing local river were composed of hollow bamboo, a bed of coconut coir, floating arrangements and Phragmites karka as nutrient stripping plant species. The AFIs polish the aquatic system by reducing 46.6% of TSS, 45-55% of NH(4)-N, 33-45% of NO(3)-N, 45-50% of TKN and 40-50% of BOD. The study established that there is a need for further research and sufficient data to assist the development of CWs by instilling confidence in policymakers, planners and in the public. PMID:24135106

Billore, S K; Sharma, J K; Singh, N; Ram, H

2013-01-01

312

ZOONOSIS OF AQUATICAL ORGANISMS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Aquatic organisms play a very important role in human nutrition. They also pose a real threat for human health by causing various diseases. Parasites, bacteria and viruses may either directly or indirectly be carried from aquatic organisms to humans. Disease outbreaks are influenced by many factors among which decreased immune response and feeding habits and higyene are most important. More frequent occuence of foodborne diseases has a number of reasons, including international travel and trade, microbial adaptation and changes in the food production system. Parasitic diseases occur most frequently as a result of human role in parasites life cycles. The prevalence is further increased by consuming raw fish and shellfish. The main feature of bacterial infections is facultative pathogenicity of most ethiological agents. In most cases disease occures as a result of decreased immunoreactivity. Several bacteria are, however, hightly pathogenic and capable of causing high morbidity and mortality in human. To date it has not been reported the case of human infection with viruses specific for aquatic organisms. Human infections are caused with human viruses and aquatic organisms play role only as vechicles. The greatest risk in that respect present shellfish. Fish and particularly shellfish are likely to cause food poisoning in humans. In most cases the cause are toxins of phithoplancton origins accumulating in shellfish and fish.

Božidar Kurtovi?

2001-12-01

313

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... the patient has impairments and/or disabilities which can be minimized or eliminated with aquatic physical therapy; and the patient has potential to maximize functional goals/outcomes to improve quality of life and ease burden of care. ...

314

Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones  

Science.gov (United States)

This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

2010-01-01

315

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... 40 frequently asked questions related to Aquatic Physical Therapy. The questions are arranged below by category. Please click on the category and review questions and answers: General FAQs Education FAQs Rules, Regulations & Operations FAQs Reimbursement Issues FAQs General FAQs ...

316

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... be encouraged to directly contact the Director of Research if adequate information regarding a specific topic cannot be found. What do I do if ... article that provides further background information on the topic - Click Here ... the Aquatic PT Section? Focus of research and study in the Section? Jean Irion wrote ...

317

Aquatic Microbiology Laboratory Manual.  

Science.gov (United States)

This laboratory manual presents information and techniques dealing with aquatic microbiology as it relates to environmental health science, sanitary engineering, and environmental microbiology. The contents are divided into three categories: (1) ecological and physiological considerations; (2) public health aspects; and (3)microbiology of water…

Cooper, Robert C.; And Others

318

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... research and follow the prompts to utilize various search engines to custom your search. Additionally, on this web page, one can, if ... research selection and following the prompts to various searches, directly emailing the Aquatic Section or discussion of ...

319

CHOLINESTERASE OF AQUATIC ANIMALS  

Science.gov (United States)

Due to increases organophosphate (OP) pesticide applications it has become necessary to evaluate their hazards and develop biological indicators of aquatic contamination. t has been hypothesized that suppression of ChE activity could be used as an indicator of contaminant stress ...

320

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center 1992--1993 report to the President  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report discusses research being conducted at MIT's plasma fusion center. Some of the areas covered are: plasma diagnostics; rf plasma heating; gyrotron research; treatment of solid waste by arc plasma; divertor experiments; tokamak studies; and plasma and fusion theory

 
 
 
 
321

Aquatic Ecology Section  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Population studies were concerned with predicting long-term consequences of mortality imposed on animal populations by man's activities. These studies consisted of development of a generalized life cycle model and an empirical impingement model for use in impact analysis. Chemical effects studies were conducted on chlorine minimization; fouling by the Asiatic clam; identification of halogenated organics in cooling water; and effects of halogenated organics in cooling systems on aquatic organisms. Ecological transport studies were conducted on availability of sediment-bound 137Cs and 60Co to fish; 137Cs and 60Co in White Oak Lake fish; and chromium levels in fish from a lake chronically contaminated with chromates from cooling towers. Progress is also reported on the following: effects of irradiation on thermal tolerance of mosquito fish; toxicity of nickel to the developing eggs and larvae of carp; accumulation of selected heavy metals associated with fly ash; and environmental monitoring of aquatic ecosystems

322

Aquatic pathway 2  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This third part of the investigation discusses the preliminary results of sub-investigations concerning problems of the release of radioactive substances into the environment via the water pathway. On the basis of papers on the emission into the draining ditch and the exchange processes there, investigations of a possible incorporation via different exposure pathways are reported. Special regard is paid to drinking water supply aquatic foodstuffs, the river sediment, the utilisation of the agricultural surfaces and the draining ditch including its pre-pollution. The dynamics of contamination processes is reported on with regard to the problem of accidents. The colloquium will give an outline of the progress made so far and admit participants' suggestions for further work on the sub-investigations. The following colloquia will report further findings, in particular effects on aquatic ecosystems. (orig.)

323

Scaling macroscopic aquatic locomotion  

Science.gov (United States)

Inertial aquatic swimmers that use undulatory gaits range in length L from a few millimetres to 30 metres, across a wide array of biological taxa. Using elementary hydrodynamic arguments, we uncover a unifying mechanistic principle characterizing their locomotion by deriving a scaling relation that links swimming speed U to body kinematics (tail beat amplitude A and frequency ?) and fluid properties (kinematic viscosity ?). This principle can be simply couched as the power law Re ~ Sw?, where Re = UL/? >> 1 and Sw = ?AL/?, with ? = 4/3 for laminar flows, and ? = 1 for turbulent flows. Existing data from over 1,000 measurements on fish, amphibians, larvae, reptiles, mammals and birds, as well as direct numerical simulations are consistent with our scaling. We interpret our results as the consequence of the convergence of aquatic gaits to the performance limits imposed by hydrodynamics.

Gazzola, Mattia; Argentina, Médéric; Mahadevan, L.

2014-10-01

324

4 years of successful knowledge transfer - the nuclear technology training center of the TUeV Nord Group  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In connection with the 2002 amendment to the German Atomic Energy Act, the topics of generational change and maintenance of competence grew in importance and necessitated new solution approaches. To this end, various activities were launched, with the aim of conducting conceptual analyses of these topics. Examples include the 'National Competence Network for Nuclear Technology' (Nationaler Kompetenzverbund fuer Kerntechnik), various networks established by colleges and universities, the 'Knowledge Management for the Maintenance and Transfer of Competence in Reactor Safety' (Wissensmanagement zum Kompetenzerhalt und -transfer in der Reaktorsicherheit) workshop held in 2001 in Garching near Munich (Germany) and the 'Ad-hoc Workgroup on the Maintenance of Competence' (Ad-hoc-Arbeitskreis Kompetenzerhalt) of the VdTUeV. The nuclear technology departments of the TUeV Nord Group were aware of te challenges associated with the generational change early on. By establishing the 'Nuclear Technology Training Center' (Ausbildungszentrum fuer Kerntechnik, AfK), the TUeV Nord Group intended to ensure the required knowledge transfer during the generational change as well as maintain the renowned high qualification as regards the subject of nuclear technology and thus continue to provide - in the sense of social responsibility - crucial contribution to the long-term safety of nuclear plants. Four years have passed since the training center held the first courses in the fall of 2002. Up to now, more than 350 participants have been trained in the courses conducted by the AfK. In the opinion of the TUeV Nord Group, the activities of the AfK have laid the foundation for a successful change of generations within the group's nuclear technology organizations. (orig.)

325

The Center for Business Intelligence conference on implementing clean coal technologies  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The papers presented covered: Coal and wind power plant integration (J. Ihle); a novel clean-coal approach - project coal and wind integration (J. Vaninetti); Financing prospects for clean coal technologies (J. Guildera); circulating fluidized bed combustion - commercial and economic CCT benefits (J. Duncan); understanding DOE clean coal cooperative agreements (M. Eastman); building clean coal technology under uncertainty - real options analysis case study of coal IGCC (N. Collamer); the zero emission plant (R. Wright); sustainable energy policy - the key to affordable and reliable energy (S. Yaeger); and commercialization and costs of clean coal technologies in Europe (T. Konings). The paper only consist of a printout of the overheads/viewgraphs.

NONE

2003-07-01

326

Aquatic macroinvertebrates of the lower Missouri River  

Science.gov (United States)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR), has been conducting research on the aquatic macroinvertebrates of the lower Missouri River since the mid-1990s. This research was initiated in response to the need for comprehensive characterization of biological communities inhabiting aquatic habitats in large river systems that have historically been poorly studied. The USGS Status and Trends of Biological Resources Program provided partial funding for pilot studies that began in 1993 when the CERC was part of the USFWS. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide stakeholders, scientists, management, and the general public with a basic summary of results from studies conducted by the CERC since that time period.

Poulton, Barry C.

2010-01-01

327

Technology Entrepreneurship Promoted by Universities' Incubation Centers in Taiwan: Its Successes and Challenges  

Science.gov (United States)

Since 1996, the Small and Medium Enterprise Administration (SMEA) in Taiwan has supported various institutions to establish incubation centers (ICs) for facilitating start-ups and innovation. At present, there are 79 ICs in total and 65 (or 83%) of them are established in universities/colleges. Most ICs in the universities/colleges offering…

Lee, Lung-Sheng; Lai, Chun-Chin

2005-01-01

328

Liberal Adult Education Adapts to the Technological Society: A Study of West Germany's Adult Education Centers  

Science.gov (United States)

This report, based on a 6-month field study, discusses developments now under way in West Germany's Adult Education Centers. The article employs a comparative approach that takes account of trends in Europe and North America, putting these developments into a philosophical framework. (Editor/WL)

Carlson, Robert A.

1976-01-01

329

Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Technology Control Center, report to the Steering committee. Final technical report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report describes test for air pollution control of flue gas and mercury as a result of coal combustion. The NYSEG Kintigh Station provided flue gas to the Center 100% of the time during this performance period. As the Kintigh Station operated with a variety of coals, fluctuations in the Center`s inlet SO{sub 2} concentrations were experienced. Safety training for the month was conducted by the O&M Superintendent, Maintenance Supervisor and Shift Supervisors. {open_quotes}Personal Protective Equipment{close_quotes} was the topic of the month. Inspections of the ECTC Facility and safety equipment (SCR air-packs, fire extinguishers, etc.) were completed and recorded this month. All systems were found to be in good condition. By continuing to emphasize safe work habits at the Center, we have raised the total number of days without a lost time injury to 1426 as of 4/30/96. The monthly safety meeting with the NYSEG Kintigh Station was held on April 30, 1996 with both NYSEG and ECTC representatives. The topics of discussion included an overview of NYSEG`s upcoming alternate fuel burn, an update on plant staffing changes, and a discussion of future safety training activities.

NONE

1996-04-01

330

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center 1992--1993 report to the President  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report discusses research being conducted at MIT`s plasma fusion center. Some of the areas covered are: plasma diagnostics; rf plasma heating; gyrotron research; treatment of solid waste by arc plasma; divertor experiments; tokamak studies; and plasma and fusion theory.

1993-07-01

331

Hearing Aids Communication : Integrating Social Interaction, Audiology and User Centered Design to Improve Communication with Hearing Loss and Hearing Technologies  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Globally, hearing loss is the second most frequent disability. About 80% of the persons affected by hearing loss do not use hearing aids. The goal of this edited volume is to present a theoretically founded, interdisciplinary approach geared at understanding and improving social interaction impacted by hearing loss and (non-) use of hearing technologies. The researchers report on pilot studies from Australia, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Switzerland and the USA. Using Conversation Analysis, the studies identify problems and serve as points of departure for possible solutions. Researchers and practitioners from the different disciplines (medicine, audiology, hearing rehabilitation, User Centered Design, Conversation Analysis, change business) as well as users of hearing technologies comment on this approach.

2012-01-01

332

Remediation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites — Review of Projects Supported by the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) is an intergovernmental organization founded in Moscow fifteen years ago by the European Union, Japan, Norway, the Russian Federation, Sweden and the USA. The ISTC has focused its mission on the human dimension of non-proliferation and global safety and security through international cooperation on science and technology. The ISTC has developed a broad spectrum of tools for advancing science, improving human health, stimulating economic growth, mitigating environmental damage and addressing other international global concerns. By January 2009, the centre and its partners had provided $815 million in grants, equipment, travel and training support for almost 2650 projects in diverse areas of civilian basic and applied research. These projects engaged over 71 000 scientists and engineers from 980 institutes, research centres and production facilities in collaborative work. This paper reviews the ISTC projects in the area of radioactive waste management and projects related to radioactively contaminated sites. (author)

333

Practical Education Support to Foster Engineers at Manufacturing and Engineering Design Center in Muroran Institute of Technology  

Science.gov (United States)

To foster engineers with creative power, Muroran Institute of Technology established Manufacturing and Engineering Design Center (MEDeC) that concentrates on Monozukuri. MEDeC consists of three project groups : i) Education Support Group provides educational support for practical training classes on and off campus and PDCA (plan-do-check-action) -conscious engineering design education related to Monozukuri ; ii) Fundamental Manufacturing Research Group carries out nurture research into fundamental and innovative technology of machining and manufacturing, and iii) Regional Cooperation Group coordinates the activities in cooperation with bureau, schools and industries in and around Muroran City. MEDeC has a fully integrated collection of machine tools and hand tools for manufacturing, an atelier, a tatara workplace, implements for measurement and related equipment designed for practically teaching state-of-the-practice manufacturing methods.

Kazama, Toshiharu; Hanajima, Naohiko; Shimizu, Kazumichi; Satoh, Kohki

334

Object-Oriented Technology-Based Software Library for Operations of Water Reclamation Centers  

Science.gov (United States)

SCADA systems in water reclamation centers have been constructed based on hardware and software that each manufacturer produced according to their design. Even though this approach used to be effective to realize real-time and reliable execution, it is an obstacle to cost reduction about system construction and maintenance. A promising solution to address the problem is to set specifications that can be used commonly. In terms of software, information model approach has been adopted in SCADA systems in other field, such as telecommunications and power systems. An information model is a piece of software specification that describes a physical or logical object to be monitored. In this paper, we propose information models for operations of water reclamation centers, which have not ever existed. In addition, we show the feasibility of the information model in terms of common use and processing performance.

Otani, Tetsuo; Shimada, Takehiro; Yoshida, Norio; Abe, Wataru

335

Inland Aquatic Resources and Biogeochemical Cycles  

Science.gov (United States)

The biosphere is the entire planetary system that includes, sustains and is influenced by life. The central issue of the science of the biosphere is the extent to which the Earth's surface, atmosphere and hydrosphere is the result of biological rather than abiotic processes. Space science and technology accelerates the understanding of global biological processes by providing repetive synoptic observations on large spatial scales once the relationships between the processes and the remotely sensed quantities are established. Especially promising applications of space technology are the measurement of biological productivity and portions of geochemical cycles in aquatic ecosystems and the evaluation and management of the quality of freshwater resources.

Melack, J. M.

1984-01-01

336

NCI CBIIT — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Science.gov (United States)

Bioinformatics provides researchers with the tools, information technologies, and analytical methodologies needed to manage the large volumes of data generated by today’s genomic studies, large observational studies, and networked clinical trials—and to harvest insights from the information that is collected. . . . from genomics to clinical trials, bioinformatics capacity becomes a critical asset.

337

Information Technology Cost Center Employee Perception of Their Contribution Value in a For Profit Organizational Culture  

Science.gov (United States)

A literature review revealed a lack of academic research related to cultural dynamics within organizations that influence information technology investments. The goal of this single descriptive case study of a for profit international company was to examine one area of cultural influence on investments. The aim was to gain an understanding of…

Gilstrap, Donald E.

2010-01-01

338

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - An International Center of Excellence for ''Training in and Demonstration of Waste Disposal Technologies''  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, which is managed and operated by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (USDOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and located in the State of New Mexico, presently hosts an underground research laboratory (URL) and the world's first certified and operating deep geological repository for safe disposition of long-lived radioactive materials (LLRMs). Both the URL and the repository are situated approximately 650 meters (m) below the ground surface in a 250-million-year-old, 600-m-thick, undisturbed, bedded salt formation, and they have been in operation since 1982 and 1999, respectively. Founded on long-standing CBFO collaborations with international and national radioactive waste management organizations, since 2001, WIPP serves as the Center of Excellence in Rock Salt for the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) International Network of Centers on ''Training in and Demonstration of Waste Disposal Technologies in Underground Research Facilities'' (the IAEA Network). The primary objective for the IAEA Network is to foster collaborative projects among IAEA Member States that: supplement national efforts and promote public confidence in waste disposal schemes; contribute to the resolution of key technical issues; and encourage the transfer and preservation of knowledge and technologies

339

Kazakhstan center of nuclear technology safety. Approach of work, possibilities and plans  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

NTSC was created in November, 1997 as an association of experts in all the areas of nuclear and radiation safety and radioactive materials handling The main goal of creation is investigation of safety aspects of nuclear power in the Republic of Kazakhstan, taking into account the interests of environment and human health protection in the regions of nuclear industry units allocation. The Center was created with support and special cooperation with the US, has grown and developed cooperative ties with several other countries.In the report are enumerate the main directions of NTSC activity, general directions of cooperation, current and completed activity, planing activity

340

How Do You Keep 'Em down on the Farm after They've Seen Technology? The Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture  

Science.gov (United States)

In an age dominated by technology, teachers are challenged as never before to help students understand the deep connections they share with people from earlier times and nowhere is this more dramatically revealed than in basic farm life. This article discusses the Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture and describes technology use that…

Donlevy, Jim

2004-01-01

 
 
 
 
341

Controlled release/removal technology; Seigyo hoshutsu {center_dot} jokyo gijutsu  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The controlled release is to control optimally releasing velocity of active ingredient in medication or agricultural chemicals for therapy or vermin control. The novel transdermal therapeutic system can be developed considering diapause term of medication setting type or time pharmacology by storing information of time lag for medication permeability in medication keeping layer. Furthermore by resent iontophoresis technology using electric fields for controlling drug permeability through the skin, migration volume of active ingredient to blood can be controlled pulsed shape by On- Off of electric fields. In another hand, it comes to be clarified that drugs in the body can be extracted by contrarotating operation of electrodes. From now, effective removal system of barren materials from organism or time controlling therapeutic system with feed buck function can be realized by being optimal novel technology of medical engineering therapy. (NEDO)

Tojo, K. [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Fukuoka (Japan)

2000-02-05

342

Report of the results of the fiscal 1997 regional consortium R and D project. Regional consortium field / Development of technology to treat aquatic environment by using microorganisms fixed on carbon fabrics (abbreviation: carbon/aquatic environment project) (first fiscal year); 1997 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki consortium bun`ya / tanso sen`i nansoshiki eno biseibutsu kochaku gensho wo riyoshita mizukankyo seibi gijutsu no kaihatsu (ryakusho: tanso mizu kankyo project) daiichi nendo seika hokokusho  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Out of the development of technology to arrange the aquatic environment using phenomena of microorganism fixation on carbon fiber soft textures, the paper stated the fiscal 1997 result. On carbon fibers in a state of swaying in water, microorganisms in water fix in an amazingly large quantity. A catalog was compiled of 58 kinds of carbon fabrics trially woven and knitted. When carbon fiber is used as activated sludge carrier, activity of microorganism lasts more than one year. Only a little amount of surplus sludge is generated. The fixed microorganisms are more active in case of carbon fiber than in case of nylon and polyester fibers. Fiber texture models of carbon fiber fixing activated sludge groups were proposed. By pump operation, the water flow inside/outside microorganism groups is being accelerated. Several new strains of bacillus carboniphilus were isolated/identified from soil and marsh. To grasp relationships of characteristics among three elements such as the state of aquatic environment, fiber, and microorganism group, the experiment was prepared. Preliminary work is conducted to derive a simple equation for facility design, and experimental directions to obtain design conditions were proposed. 6 refs., 166 figs., 47 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01

343

Report on enhancing young scholars in science and technology the Center for Excellence in Education  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The present stock and flow of highly talented young persons engaged in the global discovery and application of science and technology are critical to the future pace of innovation. Historically, the world`s largest reservoirs of scientists and engineers have been in the Western economies. Overtime, however, Asia has begun to build equivalent pools of scientists and engineers among their university graduates. According to 1993 data from the National Science Foundation and the UNESCO World Science Report, Germany leads all economies with a 67% ratio of science and engineering degrees to total first university degrees compared to the United States with a distant fifth place at 32% behind Italy, Mexico and Poland. If the nation is to keep its scientific and technological prowess, it must capture its very best talent in the science and technology fields. The question is then raised as to the source within the United States of the science and technology talent pool. While between 1978 and 1991 there was an overall decline in male participation in undergraduate (-9%) and graduate degrees (-12%), the number of women receiving undergraduate (+8%) and graduate degrees (+34%) rose dramatically. These numbers are encouraging for women`s participation overall, however, women earn only a small percentage of physical science and engineering degrees. Why are there so few women in mathematics, engineering, and the physical sciences? The answers are complex and begin early in a woman`s exposure to science and mathematics. This report presents results on a study of careers of alumni from the Research Science Institute. Investigations were concerned with the timing of decision processes concerned with the sciences and math and factors that influenced people to turn away from or proceed with careers in science and math.

NONE

1996-09-30

344

Hygienic aspects of new technologies using of the fuel cycle center  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim: justification of criteria for making decision on possibility of the regenerated fuel use in operating productions. Hygienic criteria have been formulated to be guided in order to make a decision on possibility and suitability to carry out planned change of technology at the enterprises of the nuclear fuel circle, its reconstruction, change the line of business, as well as usage of raw materials with worse characteristics.

Simakov ?.V.

2013-12-01

345

Hard X-ray Optics Technology Development for Astronomy at the Marshall Space Flight Center  

Science.gov (United States)

Grazing-incidence telescopes based on Wolter 1 geometry have delivered impressive advances in astrophysics at soft-x-ray wavelengths, while the hard xray region remains relatively unexplored at fine angular resolution and high sensitivities. The ability to perform ground-breaking science in the hard-x-ray energy range had been the motivation for technology developments aimed at fabricating low-cost, light-weight, high-quality x-ray mirrors. Grazing-incidence x-ray optics for high-energy astrophysical applications is being developed at MSFC using the electroform-nickel replication process.

Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian; Kilaru, Kiranmayee

2009-01-01

346

A review of recent thermophotovoltaic energy conversion technology development at NASA Lewis Research Center  

Science.gov (United States)

NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) has had an ongoing research program in TPV since the late 1980's. This effort has included both in-house research programs on critical components such as photovoltaic cells (PV) and emitter materials, as well as an active contracting effort directed toward system and component development. Of particular note is the in-house development of thin film selective emitters fabricated from rare-earth yttrium aluminum garnets (YAG). Also developed at LeRC is a Monolithic Interconnected Module (MIM) consisting of many small InGaAs cells series interconnected on a single InP substrate. An infrared reflector placed on the rear surface of the substrate returns unabsorbed photons to the emitter for recycling. The current contracted efforts include two TPV system developments by Tecogen, Inc., a solar powered TPV system development, a GaInAsSb cell development and several emitter development efforts (plasma-sprayed selective emitters, flexible SiC and a selective emitting light pipe).

Wilt, David M.; Chubb, Donald L.

1998-01-01

347

A review of recent thermophotovoltaic energy conversion technology development at NASA Lewis Research Center  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) has had an ongoing research program in TPV since the late 1980 close-quote s. This effort has included both in-house research programs on critical components such as photovoltaic cells (PV) and emitter materials, as well as an active contracting effort directed toward system and component development. Of particular note is the in-house development of thin film selective emitters fabricated from rare-earth yttrium aluminum garnets (YAG). Also developed at LeRC is a Monolithic Interconnected Module (MIM) consisting of many small InGaAs cells series interconnected on a single InP substrate. An infrared reflector placed on the rear surface of the substrate returns unabsorbed photons to the emitter for recycling. The current contracted efforts include two TPV system developments by Tecogen, Inc., a solar powered TPV system development, a GaInAsSb cell development and several emitter development efforts (plasma-sprayed selective emitters, flexible SiC and a selective emitting light pipe). copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

348

A review of recent thermophotovoltaic energy conversion technology development at NASA Lewis Research Center  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) has had an ongoing research program in TPV since the late 1980{close_quote}s. This effort has included both in-house research programs on critical components such as photovoltaic cells (PV) and emitter materials, as well as an active contracting effort directed toward system and component development. Of particular note is the in-house development of thin film selective emitters fabricated from rare-earth yttrium aluminum garnets (YAG). Also developed at LeRC is a Monolithic Interconnected Module (MIM) consisting of many small InGaAs cells series interconnected on a single InP substrate. An infrared reflector placed on the rear surface of the substrate returns unabsorbed photons to the emitter for recycling. The current contracted efforts include two TPV system developments by Tecogen, Inc., a solar powered TPV system development, a GaInAsSb cell development and several emitter development efforts (plasma-sprayed selective emitters, flexible SiC and a selective emitting light pipe). {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Wilt, D.M.; Chubb, D.L. [Photovoltaic and Space Environment Branch, NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

1998-01-01

349

A Review of Recent Thermophotovoltaic Energy Conversion Technology Development at NASA Lewis Research Center  

Science.gov (United States)

NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) has had an ongoing research program in TPV since the late 1980's. This effort has included both in-house research programs on critical components such as photovoltaic cells (PV) and emitter materials, as well as an active contracting effort directed toward system, and component development. Of particular note is the in-house development of thin film selective emitters fabricated from rare-earth yttrium aluminum garnets (YAG). Also developed at LeRC is a Monolithic Interconnect Module (MIM) consisting of many small InGaAs cells series interconnected on a single InP substrate. An infrared reflector placed on the rear surface of the substrate returns unabsorbed photons to the emitter for recycling. The current contracted efforts include two TPV system developments by Tecogen, Inc., a solar powered TPV system development, a GaInAsSb cell development and several emitter development efforts (plasma-sprayed selective emitters, flexible SiC and a selective emitting light pipe).

Wilt, David M.; Chubb, Donald L.

1998-01-01

350

Motor Control Center (MCC) based technology study for safety-related motor operated valves  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

It is necessary to monitor periodically the operability of safety-related Motor-Operated Valves (MOVs) in nuclear power plants. However, acquiring diagnostic signals for MOVs is very difficult, and doing so requires an excessive amount of time, effort, and expenditure. This paper introduces an accurate and economical method to evaluate the performance of MOVs remotely. The technique to be utilized includes electrical measurements and signal processing to estimate the motor torque and the stem thrust, which have been cited as the two most effective parameters in diagnosing MOVs by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The motor torque is calculated by using electrical signals, which can be measured in the Motor Control Center (MCC). Some advantages of using the motor torque signature over other signatures are examined. The stem thrust is calculated considering the characteristics of the MOV and the estimated motor torque. The basic principle of estimating stem thrust is explained. The developed method is implemented in diagnostic equipment, namely, the Motor Operated Valve Intelligent Diagnostic System (MOVIDS), which is used to obtain the accuracy of and to validate the applicability of the developed method in nuclear power plants. Finally, the accuracy of the developed method is presented and some examples applied to field data are discussed

351

Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center. Report to the Steering Committee, February 1996. Final technical report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Carbon Injection System and the Trace Element Removal test blocks. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued with impinger capture solutions. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (Carbon Injection System) was utilized in the TER test configuration this month. The B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit is being installed utilizing the Mini Pilot Flue Gas System. The 1.0 MW Cold- Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. Monthly inspections were conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems, and will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff.

NONE

1996-02-01

352

Proposal of an Observatory of Trends for Nanotechnology in the Context of Technology Management in an Oil and Gas R&D Center - Case: Nanotechnology  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: English Abstract in english The paper presents basic concepts on nanotechnology and the use of this in an oil and gas research and development (R&D) center, the Research and Development Center Leopoldo Américo Miguez de Mello of Petrobras (CENPES). The aim of this paper is to present a proposal of an observatory of trends in t [...] he area of nanotechnology at CENPES, to generate information, such as the state of the art technologies, technological trajectories, movements of competitors and partners, and aspects relating to regulations and incentives for decision making in the technology management process. The model consists of five steps that should occur in a continuous cycle: literature review, expert consultation, analysis of opportunities and threats, timelines or roadmaps, and monitoring. In conclusion, the proposed observatory includes a set of topics (variables), sources, techniques of competitive technical intelligence and technological foresight, systematized in order to support decision making in technology management.

Viviane, Masseran Antunes Parreiras; Adelaide Maria, de Souza Antunes; Lelia, Lowe.

2013-12-01

353

Proposal of an Observatory of Trends for Nanotechnology in the Context of Technology Management in an Oil and Gas R&D Center - Case: Nanotechnology  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: English Abstract in english The paper presents basic concepts on nanotechnology and the use of this in an oil and gas research and development (R&D) center, the Research and Development Center Leopoldo Américo Miguez de Mello of Petrobras (CENPES). The aim of this paper is to present a proposal of an observatory of trends in t [...] he area of nanotechnology at CENPES, to generate information, such as the state of the art technologies, technological trajectories, movements of competitors and partners, and aspects relating to regulations and incentives for decision making in the technology management process. The model consists of five steps that should occur in a continuous cycle: literature review, expert consultation, analysis of opportunities and threats, timelines or roadmaps, and monitoring. In conclusion, the proposed observatory includes a set of topics (variables), sources, techniques of competitive technical intelligence and technological foresight, systematized in order to support decision making in technology management.

Viviane, Masseran Antunes Parreiras; Adelaide Maria, de Souza Antunes; Lelia, Lowe.

354

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... following websites: National Swimming Pool Foundation : NSPF.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention : CDC.gov What is lifeguard lung? ... with respect to water safety are the following: Centers for Disease Control (CDC) cdc.gov National Swimming Poo l Foundation ( ...

355

The International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) and ISTC projects related to research reactors: information review  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The ISTC is an intergovernmental organization established by agreement between the Russian Federation, the European Union, Japan, and the United States. Since 1994, Finland, Sweden, Norway, Georgia, Belarus, Kazakhstan and the Kyrgyz Republic have acceded to the Agreement and Statute. At present, the Republic of Korea is finishing the process of accession to the ISTC. All work of the ISTC is aimed at the goals defined in the ISTC Agreement: To give CIS weapons scientists, particularly those who possess knowledge and skills related to weapons of mass destruction and their delivery systems, the opportunities to redirect their talents to peaceful activities; To contribute to solving national and international technical problems; To support the transition to market-based economics; To support basic and applied research; To help integrate CIS weapons scientists into the international scientific community. The projects may be funded both through governmental funds of the Funding partners of the ISTC. According to the ISTC Statute, approved by the appropriate national organizations, funds used within ISTC projects are exempt from CIS taxes. As of March 1998, more than 1500 proposals had been submitted to the Center, of which 551 were approved for funding, for a total value of approximately US$166 million. The number of scientists and engineers participating in the projects is more than 18000. There are about 20 funded and as yet nonfunded projects related to various problemsunded projects related to various problems of research reactors. Many of them address safety issues. Information review of the results and plans of both ongoing projects and as yet nonfunded proposals related to research reactors will be presented with the aim assisting international researchers to establish partnerships or collaboration with ISTC projects. The following groups of ISTC projects will be represented: 1. complex computer simulator s for research reactors; 2. reactor facility decommissioning; 3. neutron sources for medicine; 4. medical radioisotope production by research re

356

John F. Kennedy Space Center's Technology Development and Application 2006-2007 Report  

Science.gov (United States)

Topics covered include: Reversible Chemochromic Hydrogen Detectors; Determining Trajectory of Triboelectrically Charged Particles, Using Discrete Element Modeling; Using Indium Tin Oxide To Mitigate Dust on Viewing Ports; High-Performance Polyimide Powder Coatings; Controlled-Release Microcapsules for Smart Coatings for Corrosion Applications; Aerocoat 7 Replacement Coatings; Photocatalytic Coatings for Exploration and Spaceport Design; New Materials for the Repair of Polyimide Electrical Wire Insulation; Commodity-Free Calibration; Novel Ice Mitigation Methods; Crack Offset Measurement With the Projected Laser Target Device; New Materials for Structural Composites and Protective Coatings; Fire Chemistry Testing of Spray-On Foam Insulation (SOFI); Using Aerogel-Based Insulation Material To Prevent Foam Loss on the Liquid-Hydrogen Intertank; Particle Ejection and Levitation Technology (PELT); Electrostatic Characterization of Lunar Dust; Numerical Analysis of Rocket Exhaust Cratering; RESOLVE Projects: Lunar Water Resource Demonstration and Regolith Volatile Characterization; Tribocharging Lunar Soil for Electrostatic Beneficiation; Numerically Modeling the Erosion of Lunar Soil by Rocket Exhaust Plumes; Trajectory Model of Lunar Dust Particles; Using Lunar Module Shadows To Scale the Effects of Rocket Exhaust Plumes; Predicting the Acoustic Environment Induced by the Launch of the Ares I Vehicle; Measuring Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocity in a Thin Sheet of Graphite Epoxy Composite; Hail Size Distribution Mapping; Launch Pad 39 Hail Monitor Array System; Autonomous Flight Safety System - Phase III; The Photogrammetry Cube; Bird Vision System; Automating Range Surveillance Through Radio Interferometry and Field Strength Mapping Techniques; Next-Generation Telemetry Workstation; GPS Metric Tracking Unit; and Space-Based Range.

2008-01-01

357

Coal-feeder development program. Morgantown Energy Technology Center topical report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

As this development program progressed, it became obvious that none of the coal feeders could meet all of the goals demanded by the original specifications. However, all the feeders now under development may be applied to one or more advanced coal process technology system. The most common shortcoming is the condition that the feeding action be continuous. All concepts, except the kinetic-extruder, are batch or intermittent feeder systems. A desirable goal for any feeder is that the feed rate be independent of the coal characteristics, coal additives, moisture, etc. All feeders, except the kinetic-extruder, employ a positive displacement action to force a volume of coal into a high-pressure region. Although most of the remaining program goals have not yet been achieved, there appears to be no inherent conceptual flaws which are insurmountable. Thus, the effort in this program is progressing towards solutions to the critical problem of feeding coal into advanced coal process systems. In order to completely establish the need for continuing this coal feed system development program, a study of potential applications for each feeder was performed. The results of this study are shown in Figures 10-14. Each figure shows the application of a specific concept, although the actual design details will vary from facility to facility. In order to ensure that the capital costs (or first costs) for the developing coal feed systems were within goals of this program, cost data for the lockhopper and slurry-pumping systems were gathered from the available literature.

1981-09-01

358

The International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) and ISTC projects related to research reactors. Information review  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

1. ISTC - history, activities, outlook: The ISTC is an intergovernmental organization established by agreement between the Russian Federation, the European Union, Japan, and the United States. Since 1994, Finland, Sweden, Norway, Georgia, Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan and the Kyrgyz Republic have acceded to the Agreement and Statute. At present, the Republic of Korea is finishing the process of accession to the ISTC. All work of the ISTC is aimed at the goals defined in the ISTC Agreement: - To give CIS weapons scientists, particularly those who possess knowledge and skills related to weapons of mass destruction and their delivery systems, the opportunities to redirect their talents to peaceful activities; - To contribute to solving national and international technical problems; - To support the transition to market-based economies; - To support basic and applied research; - To help integrate CIS weapons scientists into the international scientific community. The projects may be funded both through governmental funds of the Funding Parties specified for the ISTC, and by organizations, nominated as Funding Partners of the ISTC. According to the ISTC Statute, approved by the appropriate national organizations, funds used within ISTC projects are exempt from CIS taxes. As of March 1998, more than 1500 proposals had been submitted to the Center, of which 541 were approved for funding, for a total value of approximately US dollars 165 million. The number of scientists and engineers participating in the projects is more than 17,000. 2. Projects Related to Research Reactors: There are about 20 funded and as yet non-funded projects related to various problems of research reactors. Many of them address safety issues. Information review of the results and plans of both ongoing projects and as yet non-funded proposals related to research reactors will be presented with the aim assisting international researchers to establish partnerships or collaboration with ISTC projects. The following groups of ISTC projects will be represented: 1. Complex Computer Simulators for Research Reactors; 2. Reactor Facility Decommissioning; 3. Neutron Sources for Medicine; 4. Medical Radioisotope Production by Research Reactors; 5. Research Reactors for Examination of Physics and Materials. (author)

359

Supporting Development for the Stirling Radioisotope Generator and Advanced Stirling Technology Development at NASA Glenn Research Center  

Science.gov (United States)

A high-efficiency, 110-We (watts electric) Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) for possible use on future NASA Space Science missions is being developed by the Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Stirling Technology Company (STC), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Potential mission use includes providing spacecraft onboard electric power for deep space missions and power for unmanned Mars rovers. GRC is conducting an in-house supporting technology project to assist in SRG110 development. One-, three-, and six-month heater head structural benchmark tests have been completed in support of a heater head life assessment. Testing is underway to evaluate the key epoxy bond of the permanent magnets to the linear alternator stator lamination stack. GRC has completed over 10,000 hours of extended duration testing of the Stirling convertors for the SRG110, and a three-year test of two Stirling convertors in a thermal vacuum environment will be starting shortly. GRC is also developing advanced technology for Stirling convertors, aimed at substantially improving the specific power and efficiency of the convertor and the overall generator. Sunpower, Inc. has begun the development of a lightweight Stirling convertor, under a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) award, that has the potential to double the system specific power to about 8 We/kg. GRC has performed random vibration testing of a lower-power version of this convertor to evaluate robustness for surviving launch vibrations. STC has also completed the initial design of a lightweight convertor. Status of the development of a multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code and high-temperature materials work on advanced superalloys, refractory metal alloys, and ceramics are also discussed.

Thieme, Lanny G.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

2005-01-01

360

The International Science and Technology Center (ISTC): Supporting of nuclear knowledge progress through ten years of international cooperation (Information review)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

owing objectives: - Give weapons experts in the CIS the opportunity to redirect their talents to peaceful activities; - Contribute to the solution of national and international science and technology problems; - Reinforce the transition to market economies; - Support basic and applied research; - Promote integration of CIS scientists into global scientific community. The ISTC solicits, approves, finances, and monitors peaceful science and technology research conducted by Russia and CIS weapons scientists; - Projects are carried out at research institutes and facilities located in Russia and other CIS countries; - In the process of project implementation, collaboration with Western scientists and science organizations is highly encouraged. ISTC Science Project Program covers: The Science Project Program is the most comprehensive non-proliferation activity conducted by the ISTC. ISTC Partner Program aims to contribute to the solution of national and international science and technology problems, and to match Russia and CIS scientific potential and expertise to the needs of the world science, industries and businesses. Presently, the ISTC Partner list includes over 180 organizations and leading industrial companies from all ISTC parties. ISTC Activities to Date include over 4300 project proposals; as of April 2004, about 2000 projects have been approved for funding; total funding exceeds US dollar 600 million; more than 600 institutions and 52,000 specialists have received grants through the ISTC. The ISTC established the Technologies Database Program to establish and expand information exchange infrastructure concerning research activities, toward promoting the expertise of CIS research institutes and cooperation between CIS and foreign technical experts. Main Topics, fit with nuclear knowledge management are related to different aspects of nuclear science, reactor physics and modelling, and Nuclear Fuel Cycle, including actinide transmutation and plutonium disposition. Indeed, the concern of the international nuclear community about keeping information and skills is reasonable, and assistance to preservation of nuclear knowledge is important and relevant task rightly undertaken under the IAEA auspices. These aspects are: Publishing of monographs (in English and in Russian) on Nuclear reactors; Materials and material science; Theory, and mathematical modeling; Lasers, plasma physics, accelerators; Measurement and record technique; - Generators; Plutonium disposition; Experimental and computer benchmarking; Severe accident analysis; Radio ecological information; Nuclear data - measurements and evaluation; Critical and other integral experiments; Nuclear power for Space exploration; Medical nuclear physics; reactor decommissioning, including nuclear submarines; radioactive waste management; NFC simulators and training centers, etc. The ISTC maintains close contact with international and national nuclear organisations, such as IAEA, OECD/NEA, International Nuclear Safety Center (Moscow), International Radiation Safety Center (Moscow), and so on. The goal of this activity is use of available information, concentrated in these institutions, for effective realisation of the projects and for incorporation of its personnel, installations and results into international programs. - Information Exchange: General information on the ISTC activity, procedures, project summaries, events is available on the ISTC web site. To get the Final reports or/and project detailed information it is necessary to contact with both project Recipient institute and the ISTC Secretariat. Conclusion: The goals of this presentation are to introduce the ISTC programmes, particularly those, related to integration and keeping of nuclear knowledge, and making it accessible to international nuclear community, and to establish partnership between project recipients, foreign organisations and the ISTC, in order to define areas and forms of possible collaboration in future

 
 
 
 
361

Alternative Evaluation Designs for Data-Centered Technology-Based Geoscience Education Projects  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper will present different strategies for how to evaluate contrasting K-12 geoscience classroom-based interventions with different goals, leveraging the first author's experiences as principal investigator of four NSF and NASA-funded geoscience education projects. Results will also be reported. Each project had its own distinctive features but all had in common the broad goal of bringing to high school classrooms uses of real place-based geospatial data to study the relationships of Earth system phenomena to climate change and sustainability. The first project's goal was to produce templates and exemplars for curriculum and assessment designs around studying contrasting geoscience topics with different data sets and forms of data representation. The project produced a near transfer performance assessment task in which students who studied climate trends in Phoenix turned their attention to climate in Chicago. The evaluation looked at the technical quality of the assessment instrument as measured by inter-rater reliability. It then analyzed the assessment results against student responses to the instructional tasks about Phoenix. The evaluation proved useful in pinpointing areas of student strength and weakness on different inquiry tasks, from simple map interpretation to analysis of contrasting claims about what the data indicate. The goal of the second project was to produce an exemplar curriculum unit that bridges Western science and traditional American Indian ecological knowledge for student learning and skill building about local environmental sustainability issues. The evaluation looked at the extent to which Western and traditional perspectives were incorporated into the design of the curriculum. The curriculum was not constructed with a separate assessment, yet evidence centered design was utilized to extrapolate from the exemplar unit templates for future instructional and assessment tasks around other places, other sustainability problems, and other repositories of traditional ecological knowledge. The goals of the two other projects, in progress, are to build forms of support and access by teachers to complex scientific geospatial data sets concerning climate change and a myriad of related Earth system phenomena for which measurements are available from different government agencies such as NASA, NCAR, and the USGS. The driving philosophy of these projects has been that teachers are more likely to use these powerful resources when provided with curricula and educative supports, yet have the option of implementing the curricula as written, adapting the curricula, or developing their own curricula provided that they on at least some of the data about the local region. These projects are being evaluated on the extent to which this model of flexible implementation is bearing fruit in teacher capacity building and student learning outcomes. Hence, teachers are being provided with a set of pre post assessment options that they can choose from, including for example selected response items on Earth system variables of their choice, map interpretation items, and open-ended constructed response items about the weather, climate, and ecosystem concepts that they select to focus on with their students. Teacher capacity building is being measured through oral and written documentation of the teachers' evolving learning about the data resources and evolving decision-making about how to use the resources.

Zalles, D. R.

2012-12-01

362

About Aquatic Physical Therapy  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... information on the following websites: National Swimming Pool Foundation : NSPF.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention : ... awareness for pools. These include: National Swimming Pool Foundation (NSPF ): nspf.org USA Swimming: usaswimming.org Where ...

363

AQUATIC ANIMALS AS INDICATORS OF ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES  

Science.gov (United States)

Aquatic animals are useful as indicators of many kinds of pollutants in the aquatic environment. The presence of pollutants in the general environments of air, land and water is reflected in their accumulations in and effects on aquatic organisms because the aquatic portion of th...

364

U.S. Army Center for Environmental Health Research  

Science.gov (United States)

Based at Fort Detrick, Maryland, the U.S. Army Center for Environmental Health Research (USACEHR) is dedicated "to improving risk assessment methods and to developing biomonitoring technologies for military environmental health hazards." The staff at USACEHR has a facility that includes advanced aquaculture facilities and laboratories specifically designed for aquatic toxicology and molecular biology. Visitors to the site can familiarize themselves with it by looking over the "USACEHR Research" section, and continue on by looking at the "News" area. One very interesting area is the "USACEHR Products" section, which profiles new devices developed here, including an aquatic biomonitor and a device to provide rapid toxicity testing for field water supplies. Scientists and engineers may wish to click on the "Research" section to learn about the thematic research areas, including reproductive health and toxicogenomics. The site is rounded out by a list of publications derived from work sponsored by USACEHR associates.

365

Human Factors Process Task Analysis Liquid Oxygen Pump Acceptance Test Procedure for the Advanced Technology Development Center  

Science.gov (United States)

A process task analysis effort was undertaken by Dynacs Inc. commencing in June 2002 under contract from NASA YA-D6. Funding was provided through NASA's Ames Research Center (ARC), Code M/HQ, and Industrial Engineering and Safety (IES). The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Engineering Development Contract (EDC) Task Order was 5SMA768. The scope of the effort was to conduct a Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) of a hazardous activity and provide recommendations to eliminate or reduce the effects of errors caused by human factors. The Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Pump Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was selected for this analysis. The HF PFMEA table (see appendix A) provides an analysis of six major categories evaluated for this study. These categories include Personnel Certification, Test Procedure Format, Test Procedure Safety Controls, Test Article Data, Instrumentation, and Voice Communication. For each specific requirement listed in appendix A, the following topics were addressed: Requirement, Potential Human Error, Performance-Shaping Factors, Potential Effects of the Error, Barriers and Controls, Risk Priority Numbers, and Recommended Actions. This report summarizes findings and gives recommendations as determined by the data contained in appendix A. It also includes a discussion of technology barriers and challenges to performing task analyses, as well as lessons learned. The HF PFMEA table in appendix A recommends the use of accepted and required safety criteria in order to reduce the risk of human error. The items with the highest risk priority numbers should receive the greatest amount of consideration. Implementation of the recommendations will result in a safer operation for all personnel.

Diorio, Kimberly A.

2002-01-01

366

Activities 2009-2011 at the Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The work of the Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center team at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, MD USA centered in the last two years on two main subjects: First, the data center completed and issued a new, significantly improved version of its principal product, the Atomic Spectra Database (ASD Version 4.0 in September 2010, with an update 4.1.0 in May 2011). These versions contain new data for a good number of additional spectra as well as new, better quality and more extensive data replacing the earlier material. They are also for the first time completely integrated with the two NIST bibliographies on atomic energy levels and spectra, and on atomic transition probabilities. The sources of the material selected in ASD for the various spectra and transitions are identified there by their numbers in the respective bibliographies, so that the original papers can be directly accessed by users if they desire more background material. Secondly, new tabulations of atomic energy levels and wavelengths were completed for hydrogen and its isotopes (H, D, T), for argon (Ar II through Ar XVIII), cesium (Cs I through Cs LV), barium (Ba III through Ba LVI) and tungsten (W III through W LXXIV). Compilations of energy levels and spectral lines are in progress on neon (Ne IV), chlorine (Cl I through Cl XVII), and nickel (Ni I through Ni VIII). Data assessments and compilations of atomic transition probabilities were completed for hydrogen and its isotopes (H,D,T), for helium(He I and He II), for lithium (Li I through Li III), beryllium (Be I through Be IV), boron (B I through B V), sulfur (S I through S XVI), cesium (Cs I through Cs LV), and barium (Ba III through Ba LVI). Additional compilations for the higher fluorine and neon ions (F V through F IX, Ne VI through Ne X), chlorine (Cl I through Cl XVII) and nickel (Ni I through Ni VIII) are in progress. As in all our earlier work, the NIST data tables are limited to reference data, i.e. data of a certain minimum quality. Only one numerical value is presented for the wavelength, transition probability, and lower and upper energy levels of a given spectral line. This value may be either from a single source, evaluated to be the most accurate one, or from an average of several sources of about equal reliability. For atomic transition probabilities, explicit accuracy ratings are given. For wavelengths and energy levels, the number of tabulated digits indicates their accuracy. (author)

367

Tilmeld - LCA-Center  

...Tilmeld - LCA-Center LCA Center - Life Cycle Assessment Nyheder Nyhedsbrev Tidligere numre Tilmeld Hvad er LCA Viden & knowhow Software/GaBi LCA-data Cases Svartjeneste Kalender Om LCA Center Søg Søg Print LCA Center FORCE Technology Hjortekærsvej 99 2800 Kgs. Lyngby Tip en ven om LCA-Center Tilmelding til LCA-nyt Navn Email www.lca-center.dk ©LCA Center tlf: +45 39 555 955 email: info@lca-center.dk LCA Center drives af IPU og FORCE Technology. ...

368

Thorium: one of the analytical techniques in neutronic activation and alpha spectrometry of the CDTN (Brazilian Nuclear Technology Development Center) in the last three decades  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

For long years, the CDTN (Brazilian Nuclear Technology Development Center ) has applied several analytical techniques in the thorium determination. This work is about the evolution of the neutronic activation in the thorium 232 analysis from the 1960's to now. The importance of the analysis request and alpha spectrometry for the thorium 228 and thorium 232 determination is emphasized. (J.A.M.M.)

369

The two axis motion simulator for the large space simulator at ESTEC (European Space Research and Technology Center)  

Science.gov (United States)

The Large Space Simulator at the European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC) has been recently equipped with a motion simulator capable of handling test items of 5 tons mass and having a volume of 7m in diameter and a length of 7m. The motion simulator has a modular set-up. It consists of a spinbox as a basic unit on which the test article is mounted and which allows continuous rotation (spin) . This spinbox can be used in two operational configurations; the spin axis is vertical to 30 degrees when mounted on a gimbalstand; and the spin axis is horizontal when mounted on a turntable-yoke combination. The turntable provides rotation within plus or minus 90 degrees. This configuration allows one to bring a test article to all possible relative positions viv-a-vis the sun vector (which is horizontal in this case). The spinbox allows fast rotation between 1 to 6 rpm or slow rotation between 1 to 25 rotations per day as well as positioning within plus or minus 0.4 degrees accuracy.

Beckel, Kurt A.; Hutchison, Joop

1988-01-01

370

Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center report to the Steering Committee. Final technical monthly report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block as the Pilot was operated at baseline, forced oxidation, and inhibited oxidation conditions. As the NYSEG Kintigh Station conducted a test bum this month with Petroleum coke/coal fuel blends, a one-week trace element characterization test was performed across the Pilot unit testing this flue gas. Additionally, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies continued this month as investigations into various activated carbons, metal amalgams, and impinger capture solutions were conducted. As a result of new directions received from EPRI, August was the last scheduled month for testing on the 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit at the ECTC. This month, the unit was isolated from the flue gas path and placed in a cold-standby mode for future test activities.

NONE

1995-09-01

371

Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center. Report to the Steering Committee, November 1995. Final technical report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Pilot High Velocity (PHV) and the Trace Element Removal (TER) test blocks. In the High Velocity test block, SO{sub 2} removal and mist eliminator carryover rates were investigated while operating the absorber unit with various spray nozzle types and vertical mist eliminator sections. During the Trace Element Removal test block, the mercury measurement studies involving the EPA Draft Method 29 continued with testing of several impinger solutions. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber system was utilized in the TER test configuration this month while the 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Absorber unit remained in a state of cold-standby. A monthly inspection was conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems in the SCR building. These inspections will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff each month.

NONE

1995-11-01

372

Aquatic Species Project report, FY 1989--1990  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the Aquatic Species Project. The four articles included are summaries of individual research projects and are entered into the EDB as such. The goal of the Aquatic Species Project is to develop the technology base for large-scale production of oil-rich microalgae. The project is also developing methods to convert the microalgal lipids into liquid fuels needed for industry and transportation. Researchers in the Aquatics Species Project focus on the use of microalgae as a feedstock for producing renewable, high-energy liquid fuels such as diesel. It is important for the United States to develop alternative renewable oil sources because 42% of the current energy market in the United States is for liquid fuels, and 38% of these fuels are imported. In 1979, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated the Aquatic Species Project as part of the overall effort in biofuels. The project began to focus exclusively on fuels from microalgae in 1982. Estimates show that the technology being developed by the project can provide as much as 7% of the total current energy demand. The program`s basic premise is that microalgae, which have been called the most productive biochemical factories in the world, can produce up to 30 times more oil per unit of growth area than land plants. Selected papers were processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Brown, L.M.; Sprague, S.

1992-01-01

373

Abstracts of the 34. aquatic toxicity workshop : navigating new waters  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This workshop provided an opportunity to discuss current research findings in the field of aquatic toxicology and the biological effect on biota. It addressed the challenges of assessing and protecting the health of aquatic ecosystems in Canada. Topics of discussion ranged from basic aquatic toxicology to applications in environmental monitoring, setting regulations and developing criteria for sediment and water quality. The sessions were entitled: acid rain; agricultural stressors; amphibian ecotoxicology; aquaculture; aquatic ecotoxicology and human health; biological test methods development and their application; effects based pesticides research; emerging technologies for tracing contaminants; endocrine disruption; environmental/climate change in aquatic toxicology; environmental effects monitoring; environmental impacts of mercury; environmental risk assessment; Gulfs of Maine and St. Lawrence/Bay of Fundy issues; Maritimes leaders in marine ecotoxicology and prevention; metal and diamond mining; microscale ecotoxicology; multiple stressors in estuaries; municipal wastewaters and water treatment; non-lethal sampling; oil and gas development and production; parasites as indicators of contamination; persistent contaminants; sediment/soil toxicology; selenium ecotoxicology; and, stable isotopes in ecotoxicology. This book featured 162 abstracts, of which 19 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database

374

Mapping, Monitoring and Modeling Submersed Aquatic Vegetation Species and Communities  

Science.gov (United States)

Aquatic macrophyte communities are critically important habitat species in aquatic systems worldwide. None are more important than those found beneath the water's surface, commonly referred to as submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV). Although vital to such systems, many native submersed plants have shown near irreversible declines in recent decades as water quality impairment, habitat destruction, and encroachment by invasive species have increased. In the past, aquatic plant science has emphasized the restoration and protection of native species and the management of invasive species. Comparatively little emphasis has been directed toward adequately mapping and monitoring these resources to track their viability over time. Modeling the potential intrusion of certain invasive plant species has also been given little attention, likely because aquatic systems in general can be difficult to assess. In recent years, scientists and resource managers alike have begun paying more attention to mapping SAV communities and to address the spread of invasive species across various regions. This research attempts to provide new, cutting-edge techniques to improve SAV mapping and monitoring efforts in coastal regions, at both community and individual species levels, while also providing insights about the establishment potential of Hydrilla verticillata, a noxious, highly invasive submersed plant. Technological advances in satellite remote sensing, interpolation and spatial analysis in geographic information systems, and state-of-the-art climate envelope modeling techniques were used to further assess the dynamic nature of SAV on various scales. This work contributes to the growing science of mapping, monitoring, and modeling of SAV

Hartis, Brett Michael

375

The Role of Community Colleges in the One-Stop Career Center System. Four Case Studies. National Coalition of Advanced Technology Centers Report Series Volume 1, Number 5.  

Science.gov (United States)

This report studies how public community colleges in different states are approaching and fitting into the one-stop career center system (OSCCS). The comparison study analyzes state and federal legislation to determine the following: OSCCS development; how OSCCs are involving public community and technical colleges; the different roles these…

Gutierrez, Michael

376

Microcystin dynamics in aquatic organisms.  

Science.gov (United States)

Eutrophication of surface water has increased significantly during the past decade, resulting in increased occurrences of toxic blooms. Cyanotoxins have become a global health threat to humans, wild animals, or domestic livestock. Hepatotoxic microcystins (MC) are the predominant cyanotoxins, which accumulate in aquatic organisms and are transferred to higher trophic levels. This is an issue of major concern in aquatic toxicology, as it involves the risk for human exposure through the consumption of contaminated fish and other aquatic organisms. The persistence and detoxification of MC in aquatic organisms are important issues for public health and fishery economics. Bioaccumulation of MC depends on the toxicity of the strains, mode of feeding, and detoxication mechanisms. Although mussels, as sessile filter feeders, seem to be organisms that ingest more MC, other molluscs like gastropods, as well as zooplankton and fish, may also retain average similar levels of toxins. Edible animals such as some species of molluscs, crustaceans, and fish present different risk because toxins accumulate in muscle at low levels. Carnivorous fish seem to accumulate high MC concentrations compared to phytophagous or omnivorous fish. This review summarizes the existing data on the distribution and dynamics of MC in contaminated aquatic organisms. PMID:19117210

Martins, José C; Vasconcelos, Vítor M

2009-01-01

377

Tritium in the aquatic environment  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Tritium is of environmental importance because it is released from nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities and because it has a half life of 12.26 y. Most of the tritium released into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment, where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered studies of algae, aquatic macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, and the food chain, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue-free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near those of the external medium. The rate at which tritium from tritiated water is incorporated into the organic matter of cells is slower than the rate of its incorporation into the tissue-free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster, and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water alone. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the ''carrier'' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher trophic levels. Radiation doses from tritium releases to large populations of humans will most likely come from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products

378

Tritium in the aquatic environment  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Tritium is of environmental importance because it is released from nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities and because it has a half life of 12.26 y. Most of the tritium released into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment, where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered studies of algae, aquatic macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, and the food chain, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue-free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near those of the external medium. The rate at which tritium from tritiated water is incorporated into the organic matter of cells is slower than the rate of its incorporation into the tissue-free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster, and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water alone. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the ''carrier'' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher trophic levels. Radiation doses from tritium releases to large populations of humans will most likely come from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products.

Blaylock, B.G.; Hoffman, F.O.; Frank, M.L.

1986-02-01

379

An aquatic ecosystem in space.  

Science.gov (United States)

The Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System (CEBAS) Mini-Module experiment was designed to study aquatic ecosystem performance within a middeck locker on the Space Shuttle. CEBAS was flown aboard STS-89 in January 1998 with a population of four pregnant Xiphophorus helleri female fish and eleven adult Biomphalaria glabrata snails in the first compartment and 200 juvenile X. helleri and 48 adult and juvenile B. glabrata in the second compartment. A plant compartment contained eleven snails and 53 g of the aquatic angiosperm Ceratophyllum demersum. During the flight, Ceratophyllum fresh weight increased from 53 g to 117 g. All adult fish and 65 juveniles survived the flight experiment and 37 adult snails and 40 newly laid snail spawn packs were recovered after the flight. Oxygen production and pH were as expected. PMID:11543037

Voeste, D; Andriske, M; Paris, F; Levine, H G; Blum, V

1999-07-01

380

NETL to establish Dynamic Simulation Research and Training Center to promote IGCC technology with CO2 cpture  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

To meet increasing demand for education and experience with commercial-scale, coal-fired, integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants with CO2 capture, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is leading a project to deploy a generic, full-scope, real-time IGCC dynamic plant simulator for use in establishing a world-class research and training center, and to promote and demonstrate IGCC technology to power industry personnel. The simulator, being built by Invensys Process Systems (IPS), will be installed at two separate sites, at NETL and West Virginia University (WVU), and will combine a process/gasification simulator with a power/combined-cycle simulator together in a single dynamic simulation framework for use in engineering research studies and training applications. The simulator, scheduled to be launched in mid-year 2010, will have the following capabilities: High-fidelity, dynamic model of process-side (gasification and gas cleaning with CO2 capture) and power-block-side (combined cycle) for a generic IGCC plant fueled by coal and/or petroleum coke. Highly flexible configuration that allows concurrent training on separate gasification and combined cycle simulators, or up to two IGCC simulators. Ability to enhance and modify the plant model to facilitate studies of changes in plant configuration, equipment, and control strategies to support future R&D efforts. Training capabilities including startup, shutdown, load following and shedding, response to fuel and ambient condition variations, control strategy analysis (turbine vs. gasifier lead, etc.), representative malfunctions/trips, alarms, scenarios, trending, snapshots, data historian, etc. To support this effort, process descriptions and control strategies were developed for key sections of the plant as part of the detailed functional specification, which is serving as the basis of the simulator development. In this paper, we highlight the contents of the detailed functional specification for the simulator. We also describe the engineering, design, and expert testing process that the simulator will undergo in order to ensure that maximum fidelity is built into the generic simulator. Future applications and training programs associated with gasification, combined cycle, and IGCC simulations are discussed, including plant operation and control demonstrations, as well as education and training services.

Provost, G.; Zitney, S.; Turton, R.; Erbes, M.; Stone, H.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Liese, E.; McClintock, M.; Quintrell, M.

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
381

The legacy of Cf-252 operations at Savannah River Technology Center: Continuous releases of radioiodine to the atmosphere  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The iodine isotopes I-132, 1-133, I-134, and I-135, which have half-lives ranging from 53 minutes to 21 hours, are measured in the atmospheric effluent from the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRS is operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The isotopes' release rates range from 10 to 300 microcuries per week compared to the rate. The resulting annual dose from all iodine isotopes is minor; it comprises 0.01 percent of the total offsite dose due to atmospheric releases from SRS in 1990. Circumstantial evidence indicates the radioiodine originates from traces of unencapsulated Cf-252. The determination that spontaneous fission of Cf-252 is the source of the radioiodine has several ramifications. Radioactive fission-product isotopes of the noble gas elements krypton and xenon must also be released. Noble gases are more volatile and mobile than iodine. Also, the released iodine isotopes decay to xenon isotopes. The noble gases decay to non-gaseous elements that are transported along with radioiodine to the terrestrial environment by deposition from the SRTC plume. Only Sr-89 is believed to accumulate sufficiently in the environment to approach detectable levels. Given similar conditions in earlier years, releases of short-lived radioiodine have occurred undetected in routine monitoring since the early 1970s. Release rates 20 years ago would have been 200 times greater than current release rates. This report documents preliminary experiments conducted by SRTC and Environmental Monitoring Section (EMS) scientists. The release process and the environmental impact of fission products from Cf-252 should be thoroughly researched

382

Long-term experimental study of the aquatic plant system for polluted river water.  

Science.gov (United States)

Water purification using artificial wetlands and aquatic macrophyte is attracting attention as a purification technology that can create rich ecosystems while imposing a minimal load on the environment. Because an aquatic plant system requires a large surface area, design specifications and maintenance methods that can obtain the optimum purification effect per unit surface area must be established. Large experimental facilities have been constructed beside a polluted river flowing into Lake Kasumigaura and have been used for a three-year experiment using several kinds of aquatic plants. This report summarizes the characteristics and the design load of the aquatic plant system based on this study and results from other aquatic plant facilities. PMID:12523757

Sato, K; Sakui, H; Sakai, Y; Tanaka, S

2002-01-01

383

THE ROLE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING OF SOCIAL EXCLUSION IN THE PROCESS OF KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY AND THE SAMPLE OF CALL CENTERS IN TURKEY  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The emerging of knowledge societies brought about a lot of transformations in societies in the last decades. At first, these effects have been appeared in the developed and then in the developing world not only urban area also rural. The diffusion of the technologies that is invented on the mentality of knowledge society, have been effecting all life and promising to have major changes by providing access the opportunities for training and education, media and social networks and remodeling the way we do business, the nature of work and economy. In this concept, the internet, as a tool of the knowledge society, has also been regarded an important instrument in developing the rural regions around the globe. By connecting different parts of the world, the internet and other tools of information technologies create new job opportunities for individuals and companies. There are many people who cannot have and reach to the good education as well as the job opportunities in the rural areas as much as there is in urban areas. Many state institutions and companies have easily been investing to the rural area because of information technologies’ low level entry costs. Especially, many of them open new call centers in the poor areas of countries. the purpose of this paper is that the role of information technologies in the rural area is going to be evaluated on the call centers sample in Turkey. First part of the study, the literature is reviewed about knowledge society and information technologies. In the second part, the benefits of information technologies for individuals who live in the rural areas and some model applications are explained. In the final part, call centers that established by state and private companies are investigated according to their employment and training effects for the poor in the rural areas.

ORHAN KOÇAK

2011-04-01

384

Water Quality and Aquatic Macroinvertebrates  

Science.gov (United States)

This website includes several resources relating to water quality and the identification of aquatic macroinvertebrates. Three lessons are avaialable both on the page and for download as pdf files. Extensions, charts for invertebrate identifications, and instructions for the use of the CBL equipment are included along with several exam[ples of environmental factors which may effect the organisms.

Cleveland, April J.; Grable, Lisa L.

2000-07-27

385

Green Technology, Cloud Computing and Data Centers: the Need for Integrated Energy Efficiency Framework and Effective Metric  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Energy efficiency (EE, energy consumption cost and environmental impact are vibrant challenges to cloud computing and data centers. Reducing energy consumption and emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2 in data centers represent open areas and driving force for future research work on green data centers. Our Literature review reveals that there are currently several energy efficiency frameworks for data centers which combine a green IT architecture with specific activities and procedures that led to decrease the impact on environment and less CO2 emissions. The current available frameworks have some pros and cons that is the reason why there is an urgent need for an integrated criterion for selecting and adopting energy efficiency framework for data centers. The required energy efficiency framework criteria should also consider the social network applications as a vital related factor in elevating energy consumption, as well as high potential for better energy efficiency in data centers. Additionally, in this paper, we highlighted the importance of the identification of efficient and effective energy efficiency metric that can be used for the measurement and determination of the value of data centers efficiency and their performance combined with sound and empirically validated integrated EE framework.

Nader Nada

2014-06-01

386

Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has continued the work of the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) Program Year 6 Task 1.12 project to expose hydrogen separation membranes to coal-derived syngas. In this follow-on project, the EERC has exposed two membranes to coal-derived syngas produced in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU). Western Research Institute (WRI), with funding from the State of Wyoming Clean Coal Technology Program and the North Dakota Industrial Commission, contracted with the EERC to conduct testing of WRI’s coal-upgrading/gasification technology for subbituminous and lignite coals in the EERC’s TRDU. This gasifier fires nominally 200–500 lb/hour of fuel and is the pilot-scale version of the full-scale gasifier currently being constructed in Kemper County, Mississippi. A slipstream of the syngas was used to demonstrate warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation using membrane technology. Two membranes were exposed to coal-derived syngas, and the impact of coal-derived impurities was evaluated. This report summarizes the performance of WRI’s patent-pending coalupgrading/ gasification technology in the EERC’s TRDU and presents the results of the warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation tests. Overall, the WRI coal-upgrading/gasification technology was shown to produce a syngas significantly lower in CO2 content and significantly higher in CO content than syngas produced from the raw fuels. Warm-gas cleanup technologies were shown to be capable of reducing sulfur in the syngas to 1 ppm. Each of the membranes tested was able to produce at least 2 lb/day of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas.

Stanislowski, Joshua; Tolbert, Scott; Curran, Tyler; Swanson, Michael

2012-04-30

387

Proposed Release Guides to Protect Aquatic Biota  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

At the request of South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and the Department of Energy (DOE), the Savannah River Laboratory was assigned the task of developing the release guides to protect aquatic biota. A review of aquatic radioecology literature by two leading experts in the field of radioecology concludes that exposure of aquatic biota at one rad per day or less will not produce detectable deleterious effects on aquatic organisms. On the basis of this report, DOE recommends the use of one rad per day as an interim dose standard to protect aquatic biota.

Marter, W.L.

2001-03-28

388

Applications of tactical mobile robot technology to urban search and rescue: lessons learned at the World Trade Center disaster  

Science.gov (United States)

In the wake of the World Trade Center tragedy on Sept. 11th 2001, robots developed for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's Tactical Mobile Robot program were used under the direction of CRASAR, the Center for Robot-Assisted Search and Rescue, to provide technical support to the relief effort. The TMR's (Tactical Mobile Robots) were used to search the disaster scene for casualties, locate victims, and assess building integrity. During the effort the Tactical Mobile Robots were presented with unprecedented obstacles and challenges. This paper serves to outline lessons learned at the WTC (World Trade Center) disaster and provide information for the development of more capable search and rescue robots.

Pratt, S. S.; Alibozek, Fred; Frost, Thomas; Norman, Christopher O.; Shein, Andrew M.; Smith, Christopher

2002-07-01

389

Test and approval center for fuel cell and hydrogen technologies: Phase I. Initiation. Final report; Test- og godkendelsescenter for braendselscelle- og brintteknologier. Fase 1. Opstart. Slutrapport  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The aim of the present project was to initialize a Test and Approval Center for Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies at the sites of the project partners Risoe DTU (Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Division), and DGC (work package 1). The project furthermore included start-up of first activities with focus on the development of accelerated life-time tests of fuel cell systems, preparations for standardization of these methods, and advising in relation to certification and approval of fuel cell systems (work package 2). The main achievements of the project were: Work package 1: 1) A large national and international network was established comprising of important commercial players, research institutions, and other test centers; 2) The test center is known in large part of the international Fuel Cell and Hydrogen community due to substantial efforts in 'marketing'; 3) New national and international projects have been successfully applied for, with significant roles of the test center, which secure the further establishment and development of the center. Work package 2: 1) Testing equipment was installed and commissioned at DTU (Risoe Campus); 2) A comprehensive survey among international players regarding activities on accelerated SOFC testing was carried out; 3) A test procedure for 'compressed' testing of SOFC in relation to {mu} CHP application was developed and used for one-cell stack and 50-cell-stack testing; 4) Guidelines for Danish authority handling were formulated. (Author)

Hagen, A. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Energy Conversion, DTU Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark)

2012-09-15

390

ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS CENTER TECHNOLOGY SPECIFIC TEST PLAN: REMOVAL OF MICROBIOLOGICL AND PARTICULATE CONTAMINANTS BY MEMBRANE FILTRATION  

Science.gov (United States)

This document is the Environmental technology Verification (ETV) Technology Specific test Plan (TSTP) for evaluation of water treatment equipment for removal of microbiological and particulate contaminants using membrane filtration. This TSTP is to be used as a guide in the dev...

391

7. Annual seminar of the scientific initiation of the Center for Development of Nuclear Technology. Abstracts; 7. Seminario anual de iniciacao cientifica do Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear. Resumos  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This seminar presents the Scientific Initiation Program developed at the CDTN - Brazilian Center for the Development of Nuclear Technology and focuses on activities of the sectors of: radiopharmaceutical production; radiation applied to health; waste management; structural integrity; environment; nanotechnology and nuclear materials; reactor technology; mineral technology; reactor and analytical techniques.

NONE

2012-07-01

392

Fish out of water: terrestrial jumping by fully aquatic fishes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Many teleosts that live at the water's edge will voluntarily strand themselves to evade predators or escape poor conditions-this behavior has been repeatedly observed in the field for killifishes (Cyprinodontiformes). Although most killifishes are considered fully aquatic and possess no obvious morphological specializations to facilitate terrestrial locomotion, individuals from several different species have been observed moving across land via a "tail flip" behavior that generates a terrestrial jump. Like aquatic fast starts, terrestrial jumps are produced by high-curvature lateral flexion of the body (stage one), followed by contralateral flexion of the posterior body (stage two). Here, terrestrial jumps and aquatic fast starts are quantified for two littoral teleosts: Gambusia affinis (a killifish, Cyprinodontiformes) and Danio rerio (a small carp, Cypriniformes) to determine if the tail flip is produced by other (non-killifish) teleosts and to test the null hypothesis that the tail flip is a fast start behavior, performed on land. Both Danio and Gambusia produce tail flip-driven terrestrial jumps, which are kinematically distinct from aquatic escapes and characterized by (1) a prolonged stage one, during which the fish bends, lifting and rolling the center of mass over the caudal peduncle, and (2) a relatively brief stage two, wherein the caudal peduncle pushes against the substrate to launch the fish into the aerial phase. The ability of these fully aquatic fishes to employ the same structure to produce distinct kinematic patterns in disparate environments suggests that a new behavior has evolved to facilitate movement on land and that anatomical novelty is not a prerequisite for effective terrestrial locomotion. PMID:21972177

Gibb, Alice C; Ashley-Ross, Miriam A; Pace, Cinnamon M; Long, John H

2011-12-01

393

Tulane/Xavier University hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, January 1--December 31, 1995  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier CBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Summaries which describe objectives, goals, and accomplishments are included on ten collaborative cluster projects, two education projects, and six initiation projects. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

NONE

1996-05-02

394

Design for aquatic monitoring programs  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

An objective of ecological aquatic monitoring at nuclear power plants has been the detection of impacts on the important fauna and flora in the vicinity of the plant site. A control-treatment pairing (CTP) design for monitoring programs is presented for impact assessment in benthic and plankton communities. A scheme for the establishment of monitoring programs using CTP designs is discussed which accounts for the influence of plant site characteristics, the quantitative objectives of the monitoring study, the expected magnitude of experimental error and the limitations of time and effort. A graphical technique is presented which can be used to incorporate these often competing constraints into the design of aquatic monitoring studies. Estimates of the experimental error computed from a posteriori applications of CTP designs to benthic and plankton communities at six nuclear power plants are presented

395

Predicting toxicity in aquatic ecosystems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Ash leachates and other utility wastes that may enter lakes or streams contain mixtures of chemicals that include several kinds of toxicants. The toxic properties of these mixtures vary with the chemical form and concentration of their constituents. EPRI is developing a general toxicity model (GTM) to simulate environmental conditions in bodies of water where toxicants are present, and to predict the effects of toxicants on aquatic life-forms and ecosystems. To date, scientists have developed analytical methods to measure ambient concentrations of the major species of trace elements (selenium, arsenic, and mercury) and a model to describe the biogeochemical role of selenium. Recent studies of selenium cycling through the aquatic food web support GTM development

396

A study on organizational culture, structure and information technology as three KM enablers: A case study in five Iranian medical and healthcare research centers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study investigates organizational structure, culture, and information technology as knowledge management (KM infrastructural capabilities, and compares their significance and status quo in five medical research centers in Tehran, Iran. Objectives of this research were pursued by employing two statistical methods, regression analysis and Friedman test. Included in the study were 135 people (researchers and support staff from five medical and healthcare research centers of Tehran. A survey questionnaire including 23 questions was utilized to examine organizational structure, culture and information technology indicators. And another 12 questions examined KM effectiveness. The Friedman test indicated that in terms of their status quo, the three studied KM enablers are at different conditions, with organizational culture having the best (mean rank=1.79 and IT the worst (mean rank=2.14 status. Moreover, it was revealed by regression analysis that organizational structure is believed to have the most significant impact (Beta= 0.397 on the effectiveness of knowledge management initiatives, while information technology gained the least perceived impact (Beta= 0.176.

Mahdi Iran-nejad-parizi

2013-01-01

397

Disbursement of $65 million to the State of Texas for construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center at the former Superconducting Super Collider Site, Waxahachie, Texas  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

As part of a settlement agreement between the US DOE and the State of Texas, DOE proposes to transfer $65 million of federal funds to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNLRC) for construction of the Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) to be located in Ellis County, Texas. The RMTC would be a state-of-the-art medical facility for proton cancer therapy, operated by the State of Texas in conjunction with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The RMTC would use the linear accelerator assets of the recently terminated DOE Superconducting Super Collider Project to accelerate protons to high energies for the treatment of cancer patients. The current design provides for treatment areas, examination rooms, support laboratories, diagnostic imaging equipment, and office space as well as the accelerators (linac and synchrotron) and beam steering and shaping components. The potential environmental consequences of the proposed action are expected to be minor

398

Disbursement of $65 million to the State of Texas for construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center at the former Superconducting Super Collider Site, Waxahachie, Texas  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

As part of a settlement agreement between the US DOE and the State of Texas, DOE proposes to transfer $65 million of federal funds to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNLRC) for construction of the Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) to be located in Ellis County, Texas. The RMTC would be a state-of-the-art medical facility for proton cancer therapy, operated by the State of Texas in conjunction with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The RMTC would use the linear accelerator assets of the recently terminated DOE Superconducting Super Collider Project to accelerate protons to high energies for the treatment of cancer patients. The current design provides for treatment areas, examination rooms, support laboratories, diagnostic imaging equipment, and office space as well as the accelerators (linac and synchrotron) and beam steering and shaping components. The potential environmental consequences of the proposed action are expected to be minor.

NONE

1995-05-01

399

Immediate Feedback on Accuracy and Performance: The Effects of Wireless Technology on Food Safety Tracking at a Distribution Center  

Science.gov (United States)

The effects of wireless ring scanners, which provided immediate auditory and visual feedback, were evaluated to increase the performance and accuracy of order selectors at a meat distribution center. The scanners not only increased performance and accuracy compared to paper pick sheets, but were also instrumental in immediate and accurate data…

Goomas, David T.

2012-01-01

400

Aquatic risk assessment of pesticides in Latin America.  

Science.gov (United States)

Latin America is anticipated to be a major growth market for agriculture and production is increasing with use of technologies such as pesticides. Reports of contamination of aquatic ecosystems by pesticides in Latin America have raised concerns about potential for adverse ecological effects. In the registration process of pesticides, all countries require significant data packages on aquatic toxicology and environmental fate. However, there are usually no specific requirements to conduct an aquatic risk assessment. To address this issue, the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry organized a workshop that brought together scientists from academia, government, and industry to review and elaborate on aquatic risk assessment frameworks that can be implemented into regulation of pesticides in Latin America. The workshop concluded that the international framework for risk assessments (protection goals, effects, and exposure assessments, risk characterization, and risk mitigation) is broadly applicable in Latin America but needs further refinement for the use in the region. Some of the challenges associated with these refinements are discussed in the article. It was recognized that there is potential for data sharing both within and outside of the region where conditions are similar. However, there is a need for research to compare local species and environmental conditions to those in other jurisdictions to be able to evaluate the applicability of data used in other countries. Development should also focus on human resources as there is a need to build local capacity and capability, and scientific collaboration and exchange between stakeholders in industry, government, and academia is also important. The meeting also emphasized that, although establishing a regionally relevant risk assessment framework is important, this also needs to be accompanied by enforcement of developed regulations and good management practices to help protect aquatic habitats. Education, training, and communication efforts are needed to achieve this. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:539-542. © 2014 SETAC. PMID:25044328

Carriquiriborde, Pedro; Mirabella, Paula; Waichman, Andrea; Solomon, Keith; Van den Brink, Paul J; Maund, Steve

2014-10-01

 
 
 
 
401

List of scientific and technological reports of the Nuclear Research Center Juelich Jan. 1985 - March 1988. 2. ed.  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This list of scientific and technological reports at first comprises some general publications such as abbreviations used in technical reports, annual report for 1984, 1985, 1986, the list of reports 1984 and 1985, surveys and inquiries on the population to the Chernobyl accident and on the scientific personnel of Juelich to the transfer of scientific knowledge to the public. - The other reports are concerned with the subjects mathematics - computer - cybernetics, general physics, atomic- and nuclear physics, solid state physics, materials, analytical chemistry, technology, reactor techniques, measuring techniques, biology, agriculture, questions of energy, medicine, environment, plasma physics and fusion reactor technology, physical chemistry, nuclear- and radiochemistry, chemical technology, electrotechniques - electronics, geosciences. Finally a register of the authors is added. (HK)

402

Phytoremediation Potential of Aquatic Macrophyte, Azolla  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Aquatic macrophytes play an important role in the structural and functional aspects of aquatic ecosystems by altering water movement regimes, providing shelter to fish and aquatic invertebrates, serving as a food source, and altering water quality by regulating oxygen balance, nutrient cycles, and accumulating heavy metals. The ability to hyperaccumulate heavy metals makes them interesting research candidates, especially for the treatment of industrial effluents and sewage waste water. The us...

Sood, Anjuli; Uniyal, Perm L.; Prasanna, Radha; Ahluwalia, Amrik S.

2012-01-01

403

Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, “Radioactive Waste Management Manual.” This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility.

Bryant, Jeffrey Whealdon; Nenni, Joseph A; Timothy S. Yoder

2003-04-01

404

Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility

405

Analytical capabilities of the new thermal neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis instrument at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A new thermal neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) instrument was designed and built to replace the original PGAA system at the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Center for Neutron Research. The new PGAA instrument was constructed to achieve a reduction of the fast neutron beam component, a reduction of background gamma-radiation (including gamma-ray lines that directly interfere with element analyses, low-energy scattered gamma rays, and Compton scattered gamma rays), improvement in element sensitivities and limits of detection (LODs), and a simplified instrument set-up procedure. (orig.)

Mackey, E.A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Analytical Chemistry Division, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Anderson, D.L. [US Food and Drug Administration, Elemental Research Branch, College Park, MD (United States)

2004-07-01

406

FY 1987 Aquatic Species Program: Annual report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The goal of the Department of Energy/Solar Energy Research Institute Aquatic Species Program is to develop the technology base to produce liquid fuels from microalagae at prices competitive with conventional alternatives. Microalgae are unusual plants that can accumulate large quantities of oil and can thrive in high-salinity water, which currently has no competing uses. The algal oils, in turn, are readily converted into gasoline and diesel fuels. The best site for successful microalgae production was determined to be the US desert Southwest, with potential applications to other warm areas. Aggressive research is needed, but the improvements required are attainable. The four prime research areas in the development of this technology are growth and production, engineering design, harvesting, and conversion. Algae are selected for three criteria: tolerance to environmental fluctuations, high growth rates, and high lipid production. From 1982 to 1986, the program collected more than 3000 strains of microalgae that are more than twice as tolerant to temperature and salinity fluctuation than the initial strains. Productivity has been increased by a factor of two in outdoor culture systems since 1982, and lipid content has also been increased from 20% of body weight in 1982 to greater than 66% of body weight in 1987. Research programs are ongoing in lipid biochemistry and genetic engineering so that ultimately strains can be modified and improved to combine their best characteristics. An outdoor test facility is being built in Roswell, New Mexico.

Johnson, D.A.; Sprague, S.

1987-09-01

407

The LISA Pathfinder Simulator for the Science and Technology Operations Center: Simulator Reuse Across the Project Life-Cycle: Practical Experiences and Lessons Learned  

Science.gov (United States)

During the operational phase of the Lisa Pathfinder (LPF) mission, the Science and Technology Operations Center (STOC) will be in charge of the operations of the LPF experiments. For the STOC to be able to perform its planning activities, an experiment simulator is required. The STOC simulator is based on the reuse of two simulators, which had originally been developed by EADS Astrium to support previous phases of the project life-cycle. This paper describes the STOC Simulator development approach, the used technologies and the high- evel design. It then focuses on the specific implications of the reuse of the existing simulators: relevant issues are highlighted, together with the adopted solutions. Finally, the paper reports the first feedback on the actual usage of the STOC Simulator and then summarizes the lessons learned.

van der Plas, P.; Leorato, C.

2010-08-01

408

National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center is Helping to Facilitate the Transition to a New Energy Future  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center (HTSC) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) uses a systems engineering and integration approach to hydrogen research and development to help the United States make the transition to a new energy future - a future built on diverse and abundant domestic renewable resources and integrated hydrogen systems. Research focuses on renewable hydrogen production, delivery, and storage; fuel cells and fuel cell manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; analysis; education; and market transformation. Hydrogen can be used in fuel cells to power vehicles and to provide electricity and heat for homes and offices. This flexibility, combined with our increasing demand for energy, opens the door for hydrogen power systems. HTSC collaborates with DOE, other government agencies, industry, communities, universities, national laboratories, and other stakeholders to promote a clean and secure energy future.

2011-01-01

409

Beaver herbivory on aquatic plants.  

Science.gov (United States)

Herbivores have strong impacts on marine and terrestrial plant communities, but their impact is less well studied in benthic freshwater systems. For example, North American beavers (Castor canadensis) eat both woody and non-woody plants and focus almost exclusively on the latter in summer months, yet their impacts on non-woody plants are generally attributed to ecosystem engineering rather than herbivory. Here, we excluded beavers from areas of two beaver wetlands for over 2 years and demonstrated that beaver herbivory reduced aquatic plant biomass by 60%, plant litter by 75%, and dramatically shifted plant species composition. The perennial forb lizard's tail (Saururus cernuus) comprised less than 5% of plant biomass in areas open to beaver grazing but greater than 50% of plant biomass in beaver exclusions. This shift was likely due to direct herbivory, as beavers preferentially consumed lizard's tail over other plants in a field feeding assay. Beaver herbivory also reduced the abundance of the invasive aquatic plant Myriophyllum aquaticum by nearly 90%, consistent with recent evidence that native generalist herbivores provide biotic resistance against exotic plant invasions. Beaver herbivory also had indirect effects on plant interactions in this community. The palatable plant lizard's tail was 3 times more frequent and 10 times more abundant inside woolgrass (Scirpus cyperinus) tussocks than in spatially paired locations lacking tussocks. When the protective foliage of the woolgrass was removed without exclusion cages, beavers consumed nearly half of the lizard's tail leaves within 2 weeks. In contrast, leaf abundance increased by 73-93% in the treatments retaining woolgrass or protected by a cage. Thus, woolgrass tussocks were as effective as cages at excluding beaver foraging and provided lizard's tail plants an associational refuge from beaver herbivory. These results suggest that beaver herbivory has strong direct and indirect impacts on populations and communities of herbaceous aquatic plants and extends the consequences of beaver activities beyond ecosystem engineering. PMID:17180372

Parker, John D; Caudill, Christopher C; Hay, Mark E

2007-04-01

410

Aquatic Organic Matter Fluorescence - from phenomenon to application  

Science.gov (United States)

The use of fluorescence to quantify and characterise aquatic organic matter in river, ocean, ground water and drinking and waste waters has come along way since its discovery as a phenomenon in the early 20th century. For example, there are over 100 papers published each year in international peer reviewed journals, an order of magnitude increase since a decade ago (see Figure taken from ISI database from 1989 to 2007 for publications in the fields of river water and waste water). Since then it has been extensively used as a research tool since the 1990's by scientists and is currently used for a wide variety of applications within a number of sectors. Universities, organisations and companies that research into aquatic organic matter have either recently readily use appropriate fluorescence based techniques and instrumentation. In industry and government, the technology is being taken up by environmental regulators and water and wastewater companies. This keynote presentation will give an overview of aquatic organic matter fluorescence from its conception as a phenomenon through to its current use in a variety of emerging applications within the sectors concerned with understanding, managing and monitoring the aquatic environment. About the Speaker Darren Reynolds pioneered the use of fluorescence spectroscopy for the analysis of wastewaters in the 1990's. He currently leads a research group within the Centre for Research in Biosciences and sits on the Scientific Advisory Board for the Institute of Bio-Sensing Technology at the University of the West of England, Bristol. He is a multidisciplinary scientist concerned with the development of technology platforms for applications in the fields of environment/agri-food and health. His current research interests include the development of optical technologies and techniques for environmental and biological sensing and bio-prospecting applications. He is currently involved in the development and use of synthetic biology (bioluminescent reporter bacteria) for the discovery and characterization of bacteriophage and to assess their potential use as a bio-control/antimicrobial in the health and agri-food sectors. Presently, he is developing, in collaboration with industrial partners, in-situ fluorescence sensors to help further understand the role of dissolved organic matter in underpinning the microbial processes in aquatic systems through time, a project funded by the Natural Environment Research Council, UK.

Reynolds, Darren

2014-05-01

411

On aquatic genotoxicity in vivo  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Freshwater molluscs inhabiting various aquatic systems of Lithuania, Spain and Switzerland were used as bioindicators of environmental genotoxicity. Cytogenetic disturbances (chromosomes set aneuploidy, polyploidy, meiotic injuries, chromosomal aberrations) were assessed in somatic and gonadal cells of bivalve (Unioand Anadonta) and gastropod (Viviparus and Theodoxus) molluscs. The environmental quality of some heavily polluted sites, as well as in drinking water, was assessed using the common and endemic molluscs. Cytogenetic damage in molluscs was also assessed in lakes affected by nuclear power plants in Lithuania (Ignalina NPP) and Switzerland (Lucens and Muehleberg NPP). (author)

412

Structures promoting research, training, and technology transfer in mobility: lessons learned from a visit to European centers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this paper is to describe the education, research, technology transfer, and cooperative models that appear to have the greatest likelihood of successfully tackling the issue of technology to improve mobility. Ideally better models in each of these areas will lead to an increased number of researchers who are more productive. There will be increased international collaboration that will allow for better research with small and/or disadvantaged populations, and the research completed will lead to changes in clinical care that positively impact individuals with impair mobility.

Boninger Michael L

2012-03-01

413

[Venomous and poisonous animals. IV. Envenomations by venomous aquatic vertebrates].  

Science.gov (United States)

Epidemiological information on marine envenomation is generally less extensive in Europe than in tropical regions where these injuries are more severe and the need for medical advice is more frequent. For these reasons use of regional Poison Control Centers in the area where the injury occurs must be encouraged. The purpose of this review is to describe envenomation by bony fish (lion fish, stone fish, and catfish), cartilaginous fish (stingrays and poisonous sharks), or other venomous aquatic vertebrates (moray-eels and marine snakes). Understanding of these envenomation syndromes is important not only in tropical areas but also in Europe where importation of dangerous species has increased in recent years. PMID:17691425

Bédry, R; De Haro, L

2007-04-01

414

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - An International Center of Excellence for ''Training in and Demonstration of Waste Disposal Technologies''  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, which is managed and operated by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (USDOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and located in the State of New Mexico, presently hosts an underground research laboratory (URL) and the world's first certified and operating deep geological repository for safe disposition of long-lived radioactive materials (LLRMs). Both the URL and the repository are situated approximately 650 meters (m) below the ground surface in a 250-million-year-old, 600-m-thick, undisturbed, bedded salt formation, and they have been in operation since 1982 and 1999, respectively. Founded on long-standing CBFO collaborations with international and national radioactive waste management organizations, since 2001, WIPP serves as the Center of Excellence in Rock Salt for the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) International Network of Centers on ''Training in and Demonstration of Waste Disposal Technologies in Underground Research Facilities'' (the IAEA Network). The primary objective for the IAEA Network is to foster collaborative projects among IAEA Member States that: supplement national efforts and promote public confidence in waste disposal schemes; contribute to the resolution of key technical issues; and encourage the transfer and preservation of knowledge and technologies.

Matthews, Mark L.; Eriksson, Leif G.

2003-02-25

415

Bilgi Teknolojisinin Yap?sal ve Yönetsel Aç?lardan Bilgi-Belge Merkezlerine Getirdi?i Yenilikler / Structural and Managerial Innovations Provided to Information and Documentation Centers by Information Technology  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This research is concerned with structural and managerial innovations in information and documentation centers brought by information technologies that have found widespread use since the 1990’s. The mentioned innovations have been examined from the aspects of information recording media, buildings, work flow, worker and manager, cooperation, standardization, services, the concept of library/information and documentation center, organizational culture, structure of management and organization, and stakeholder perspectives. The study also presents suggestions about arrangements to ensure effective use of information technologies in information and documentation centers in Turkey.

Mesut Kurulgan

2005-10-01

416

Passive electroreception in aquatic mammals.  

Science.gov (United States)

Passive electroreception is a sensory modality in many aquatic vertebrates, predominantly fishes. Using passive electroreception, the animal can detect and analyze electric fields in its environment. Most electric fields in the environment are of biogenic origin, often produced by prey items. These electric fields can be relatively strong and can be a highly valuable source of information for a predator, as underlined by the fact that electroreception has evolved multiple times independently. The only mammals that possess electroreception are the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the echidnas (Tachyglossidae) from the monotreme order, and, recently discovered, the Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis) from the cetacean order. Here we review the morphology, function and origin of the electroreceptors in the two aquatic species, the platypus and the Guiana dolphin. The morphology shows certain similarities, also similar to ampullary electroreceptors in fishes, that provide cues for the search for electroreceptors in more vertebrate and invertebrate species. The function of these organs appears to be very similar. Both species search for prey animals in low-visibility conditions or while digging in the substrate, and sensory thresholds are within one order of magnitude. The electroreceptors in both species are innervated by the trigeminal nerve. The origin of the accessory structures, however, is completely different; electroreceptors in the platypus have developed from skin glands, in the Guiana dolphin, from the vibrissal system. PMID:23187861

Czech-Damal, Nicole U; Dehnhardt, Guido; Manger, Paul; Hanke, Wolf

2013-06-01

417

International nuclear fuel cycle centers in the global infrastructure of nuclear power (Technological aspects of the problem)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In January 2006, the President of the Russian Federation put forward an initiative for the broad cooperation among nations in the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The President considers the necessity to create such a global infrastructure of nuclear power that will provide equal access to nuclear energy for all interested nations with an assured transparency through a nonproliferation regime. The key element of such an infrastructure would be creating a system of International centers to provide services for the nuclear fuel cycle under the IAEA control on the basis of nondiscrimination in allowing access to such services. (author)

418

Assitive Technology in Action  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Contact Us The Family Center on Technology and Disability Assistive Technology Works Home AT in Action Video ... com/user/FCTDvideo . Family Center on Technology and Disability (FCTD) FHI 360 1825 Connecticut Avenue, NW 7th ...

419

Involving Minority High School Students in Cutting Edge Research through C-DEBI, an NSF-National Science and Technology Center  

Science.gov (United States)

The Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations (C-DEBI) was established as a National Science and Technology Center (NTC) funded by NSF in 2009. Its mission is to explore life beneath the seafloor and make transformative discoveries that advance science, benefit society, and inspire people of all ages and origins. Thanks to the multi-institutional character of C-DEBI, the Center has not only started a collaborative framework for experimental and exploratory research, but also targets education programs at the K-12, undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral levels involving biogeochemists, microbiologists, geochemists and geologists. An example for this is the introduction of deep biosphere research into the K-12 classroom. In this context, C-DEBI has collaborated with teachers from the Animo Leadership High School in Inglewood, which is ranked 27th within California and has a total minority enrollment of 99%, to adapt Marine Biology classes and introduce latest Deep Biosphere Science discoveries. Three high school students participated in a pilot project over 6 months to gain hands-on experience in an ongoing study in a Marine Microbi